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Sample records for 10-5 cm2 v-1

  1. Spin-Hall-Effect-Assisted Electroresistance in Antiferromagnets via 10(5) A/cm(2) dc Current.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiahao; Wang, Yuyan; Pan, Feng; Song, Cheng

    2016-08-22

    Antiferromagnet (AFM) spintronics with reduced electrical current is greatly expected to process information with high integration and low power consumption. In Pt/FeMn and Ta/FeMn hybrids, we observe significant resistance variation (up to 7% of the total resistance) manipulated by 10(5) A/cm(2) dc current. We have excluded the contribution of isotropic structural effects, and confirmed the critical role of the spin Hall injection from Pt (or Ta) to FeMn. This electrical current-manipulated resistance (i.e. electroresistance) is proposed to be attributed to the spin-Hall-effect-induced spin-orbit torque in FeMn. Similar results have also been detected in plain IrMn films, where the charge current generates spin current via the spin Hall effect with the existence of Ir atoms. All the measurements are free from external magnetic fields and ferromagnets. Our findings present an interesting step towards high-efficiency spintronic devices.

  2. Epitaxial SrTiO3 films with electron mobilities exceeding 30,000cm2V-1s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Junwoo; Moetakef, Pouya; Jalan, Bharat; Bierwagen, Oliver; Wright, Nicholas J.; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Stemmer, Susanne

    2010-06-01

    The study of quantum phenomena in semiconductors requires epitaxial structures with exceptionally high charge-carrier mobilities. Furthermore, low-temperature mobilities are highly sensitive probes of the quality of epitaxial layers, because they are limited by impurity and defect scattering. Unlike many other complex oxides, electron-doped SrTiO3 single crystals show high (~104cm2V-1s-1) electron mobilities at low temperatures. High-mobility, epitaxial heterostructures with SrTiO3 have recently attracted attention for thermoelectric applications, field-induced superconductivity and two-dimensional (2D) interface conductivity. Epitaxial SrTiO3 thin films are often deposited by energetic techniques, such as pulsed laser deposition. Electron mobilities in such films are lower than those of single crystals. In semiconductor physics, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is widely established as the deposition method that produces the highest mobility structures. It is a low-energetic, high-purity technique that allows for low defect densities and precise control over doping concentrations and location. Here, we demonstrate controlled doping of epitaxial SrTiO3 layers grown by MBE. Electron mobilities in these films exceed those of single crystals. At low temperatures, the films show Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. These high-mobility SrTiO3 films allow for the study of the intrinsic physics of SrTiO3 and can serve as building blocks for high-mobility oxide heterostructures.

  3. High Mobility Exceeding 80 cm2 V-1 s-1 in Polycrystalline Ta-Doped SnO2 Thin Films on Glass Using Anatase TiO2 Seed Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Shoichiro; Yamada, Naoomi; Hitosugi, Taro; Hirose, Yasushi; Shimada, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2010-03-01

    High-mobility Ta-doped SnO2 (TTO) thin films were grown on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition using a seed-layer technique. The use of 10-nm-thick polycrystalline anatase TiO2 seed layers was found to lead to the preferred growth of (200)-oriented TTO films, resulting in a 30% increase in the carrier density and a more than two times increase in mobility, compared to films grown directly on the glass substrates. The highest mobility obtained was 83 cm2 V-1 s-1 with a resistivity of 2.8×10-4 Ω cm, whereas the film with the lowest resistivity of 1.8×10-4 Ω cm had a mobility of 60 cm2 V-1 s-1.

  4. Organic Power Electronics: Transistor Operation in the kA/cm(2) Regime.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Markus P; Fischer, Axel; Kaschura, Felix; Widmer, Johannes; Kheradmand-Boroujeni, Bahman; Ellinger, Frank; Leo, Karl

    2017-03-17

    In spite of interesting features as flexibility, organic thin-film transistors have commercially lagged behind due to the low mobilities of organic semiconductors associated with hopping transport. Furthermore, organic transistors usually have much larger channel lengths than their inorganic counterparts since high-resolution structuring is not available in low-cost production schemes. Here, we present an organic permeable-base transistor (OPBT) which, despite extremely simple processing without any high-resolution structuring, achieve a performance beyond what has so far been possible using organic semiconductors. With current densities above 1 kA cm(-2) and switching speeds towards 100 MHz, they open the field of organic power electronics. Finding the physical limits and an effective mobility of only 0.06 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), this OPBT device architecture has much more potential if new materials optimized for its geometry will be developed.

  5. Sayama CM2 Chondrite: Fresh but Heavily Altered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takaoka, N.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Tonui, E.; Gounelle, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ebisawa, N.; Osawa, T.; Okazaki, R.; Nagao, K.; Yoneda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Noble gas composition and mineralogy of Sayama meteorite, that fell in Japan and recently identified as a CM2 chondrite, revealed many unique features, indicating that it experienced extensive aqueous alteration under highly oxidized condition compared with typical CMs. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Organic Matter Inclusions in CM2 Chondrite Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Z.; Liebig, B.; Lee, T.

    2015-07-01

    Large (~10 μm) inclusions of pure organic carbon exist in carbonaceous chondrites. We extracted organic inclusions from Murchison, a CM2, and analyzed the sections using XANES, TEM, and nanoSIMS. The results are compared to previous results of CRs.

  7. Benchmarking and performance analysis of the CM-2. [SIMD computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David W.; Adams, George B., II

    1988-01-01

    A suite of benchmarking routines testing communication, basic arithmetic operations, and selected kernel algorithms written in LISP and PARIS was developed for the CM-2. Experiment runs are automated via a software framework that sequences individual tests, allowing for unattended overnight operation. Multiple measurements are made and treated statistically to generate well-characterized results from the noisy values given by cm:time. The results obtained provide a comparison with similar, but less extensive, testing done on a CM-1. Tests were chosen to aid the algorithmist in constructing fast, efficient, and correct code on the CM-2, as well as gain insight into what performance criteria are needed when evaluating parallel processing machines.

  8. Direct particle simulation on the Connection Machine CM-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, L.

    1992-01-01

    Particle simulation is a useful technique for analyzing low density flows. The Connection Machine CM-2 is a useful test bed for studying the fine-grain data objects decomposition and the coarse-grain domain decomposition single instruction multiple datastream (SIMD) approaches to particle simulation. Both approaches are investigated for the model problem of uniform flow through a channel and the algorithms required for the SIMD domain decomposition approach are presented. An unresolved issue with the domain decomposition approach is the effect of a poor partitioning on flows with real geometries. Initial results with the channel flow problem indicate that a poor partitioning has only a small detrimental effect on the overall performance.

  9. Presolar grains in the CM2 chondrite Sutter's Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuchao; Lin, Yangting; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Zhang, Jianchao; Hao, Jialong; Zolensky, Michael; Jenniskens, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The Sutter's Mill (SM) carbonaceous chondrite is a regolith breccia, composed predominantly of CM2 clasts with varying degrees of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. An investigation of presolar grains in four Sutter's Mill sections, SM43, SM51, SM2-4, and SM18, was carried out using NanoSIMS ion mapping technique. A total of 37 C-anomalous grains and one O-anomalous grain have been identified, indicating an abundance of 63 ppm for presolar C-anomalous grains and 2 ppm for presolar oxides. Thirty-one silicon carbide (SiC), five carbonaceous grains, and one Al-oxide (Al2O3) were confirmed based on their elemental compositions determined by C-N-Si and O-Si-Mg-Al isotopic measurements. The overall abundance of SiC grains in Sutter's Mill (55 ppm) is consistent with those in other CM chondrites. The absence of presolar silicates in Sutter's Mill suggests that they were destroyed by aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid. Furthermore, SM2-4 shows heterogeneous distributions of presolar SiC grains (12-54 ppm) in different matrix areas, indicating that the fine-grained matrix clasts come from different sources, with various thermal histories, in the solar nebula.

  10. Microbiological study of the Murchison CM2 meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2012-10-01

    In 1864, Louis Pasteur attempted to cultivate living microorganisms from pristine samples of the Orgueil CI1 carbonaceous meteorite. His results were negative and never published, but recorded it in his laboratory notebooks. At that time, only aerobic liquid or agar-based organic reach media were used, as his research on anaerobes had just started. In our laboratory the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous meteorite was selected to expand on these studies for microbiological study by cultivation on anaerobic mineral media. Since the surface could have been more easily contaminated, interior fragments of a sample of the Murchison meteorite were extracted and crushed under sterile conditions. The resulting powder was then mixed in anoxic medium and injected into Hungate tubes containing anaerobic media with various growth substrates at different pH and salinity and incubated at different temperatures. The goal of the experiments was to determine if living cells would grow from the material of freshly fractured interior fragments of the stone. If any growth occurred, work could then be carried out to assess the nature of the environmental contamination by observations of the culture growth (rates of speed and biodiversity); live/dead fluorescent staining to determine contamination level and DNA analysis to establish the microbial species present. In this paper we report the results of that study.

  11. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cracks. 59.10-5 Section 59.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... cracks are veed out so that complete penetration of the weld metal is secured. (b) Circumferential...

  12. 46 CFR 105.10-5 - Approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved. 105.10-5 Section 105.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 105.10-5 Approved. (a) The...

  13. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  14. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  15. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  16. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  17. 10 CFR 10.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions. 10.5 Section 10.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA OR NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION OR AN EMPLOYMENT CLEARANCE General Provisions § 10.5 Definitions. Access...

  18. 44 CFR 10.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Responsibilities. 10.5 Section... SECURITY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS Agency Implementing Procedures § 10.5 Responsibilities. (a... impact statements and assign lead agency responsibility when more than one FEMA office or...

  19. 43 CFR 10.5 - Consultation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consultation. 10.5 Section 10.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony...

  20. 43 CFR 10.5 - Consultation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Consultation. 10.5 Section 10.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony...

  1. 43 CFR 10.5 - Consultation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Consultation. 10.5 Section 10.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony...

  2. 43 CFR 10.5 - Consultation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Consultation. 10.5 Section 10.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony...

  3. 43 CFR 10.5 - Consultation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Consultation. 10.5 Section 10.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony...

  4. Multielectron ultrastrong laser field ionization of Arn+, Krm+ and Xel+ (n <= 9, m <= 9, l <= 12) at intensities from 1015 W cm-2 to 1018 W cm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniyappan, S.; Di Chiara, A.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Huskins, E. L.; Falkowski, A.; Pajerowski, D.; Walker, B. C.

    2006-07-01

    Ionization yields are reported for Ar, Kr and Xe in ultrastrong fields from 1015 W cm-2 to 1018 W cm-2. Non-sequential ionization (NSI) is shown to be a robust and general feature in ultrahigh field ionization. NSI yields measured are consistent with the trends predicted by a rescattering model, but as one proceeds to higher Z atoms more NSI is observed than predicted theoretically. Additional recollision mechanisms that may need to be considered in future theories of ultrastrong field-atom interactions include 'chain' NSI, NSI from excited states of the atom (e.g. Rydberg states or inner-shell holes) and the possibility of ultrastrong field enhanced recollision/impact processes.

  5. 44 CFR 10.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Responsibilities. 10.5... Responsibilities. (a) The Regional Administrators shall, for each action not categorically excluded from this... impact statements and assign lead agency responsibility when more than one FEMA office or...

  6. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... corrugated furnaces may be repaired by welding provided any one crack does not exceed 20 inches in length. (e... any direction, nor more than a total of four cracks in a drum, and further provided the welding...

  7. Compositions of Partly Altered Olivine and Replacement Serpentine in the CM2 Chondrite QUE 93005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velbel, M. A.; Tonui, E. K.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Serpentine replacing olivine in QUE 93005 has a narrow range of compositions, regardless of the reactant olivine’s composition. Homogeneity of replacement serpentines in QUE 93005 and other CM2s favors homogeneity of aqueous solutions on >cm scales.

  8. Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray CM2 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, Audrey; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Simon, Steven B.; Grossman, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    We present high-precision measurements of the Mg isotopic compositions of a suite of types I and II chondrules separated from the Murchison and Murray CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. These chondrules are olivine- and pyroxene-rich and have low 27Al/24Mg ratios (0.012-0.316). The Mg isotopic compositions of Murray chondrules are on average lighter (δ26Mg ranging from -0.95‰ to -0.15‰ relative to the DSM-3 standard) than those of Murchison (δ26Mg ranging from -1.27‰ to +0.77‰). Taken together, the CM2 chondrules exhibit a narrower range of Mg isotopic compositions than those from CV and CB chondrites studied previously. The least-altered CM2 chondrules are on average lighter (average δ26Mg = -0.39 ± 0.30‰, 2SE) than the moderately to heavily altered CM2 chondrules (average δ26Mg = -0.11 ± 0.21‰, 2SE). The compositions of CM2 chondrules are consistent with isotopic fractionation toward heavy Mg being associated with the formation of secondary silicate phases on the CM2 parent body, but were also probably affected by volatilization and recondensation processes involved in their original formation. The low-Al CM2 chondrules analyzed here do not exhibit any mass-independent variations in 26Mg from the decay of 26Al, with the exception of two chondrules that show only small variations just outside of the analytical error. In the case of the chondrule with the highest Al/Mg ratio (a type IAB chondrule from Murchison), the lack of resolvable 26Mg excess suggests that it either formed >1 Ma after calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, or that its Al-Mg isotope systematics were reset by secondary alteration processes on the CM2 chondrite parent body after the decay of 26Al.

  9. GFDL's CM2 global coupled climate models. Part I: Formulation and simulation characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delworth, T.L.; Broccoli, A.J.; Rosati, A.; Stouffer, R.J.; Balaji, V.; Beesley, J.A.; Cooke, W.F.; Dixon, K.W.; Dunne, J.; Dunne, K.A.; Durachta, J.W.; Findell, K.L.; Ginoux, P.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Gordon, C.T.; Griffies, S.M.; Gudgel, R.; Harrison, M.J.; Held, I.M.; Hemler, R.S.; Horowitz, L.W.; Klein, S.A.; Knutson, T.R.; Kushner, P.J.; Langenhorst, A.R.; Lee, H.-C.; Lin, S.-J.; Lu, J.; Malyshev, S.L.; Milly, P.C.D.; Ramaswamy, V.; Russell, J.; Schwarzkopf, M.D.; Shevliakova, E.; Sirutis, J.J.; Spelman, M.J.; Stern, W.F.; Winton, M.; Wittenberg, A.T.; Wyman, B.; Zeng, F.; Zhang, R.

    2006-01-01

    The formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled climate models developed at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) are described. The models were designed to simulate atmospheric and oceanic climate and variability from the diurnal time scale through multicentury climate change, given our computational constraints. In particular, an important goal was to use the same model for both experimental seasonal to interannual forecasting and the study of multicentury global climate change, and this goal has been achieved. Tw o versions of the coupled model are described, called CM2.0 and CM2.1. The versions differ primarily in the dynamical core used in the atmospheric component, along with the cloud tuning and some details of the land and ocean components. For both coupled models, the resolution of the land and atmospheric components is 2?? latitude ?? 2.5?? longitude; the atmospheric model has 24 vertical levels. The ocean resolution is 1?? in latitude and longitude, with meridional resolution equatorward of 30?? becoming progressively finer, such that the meridional resolution is 1/3?? at the equator. There are 50 vertical levels in the ocean, with 22 evenly spaced levels within the top 220 m. The ocean component has poles over North America and Eurasia to avoid polar filtering. Neither coupled model employs flux adjustments. The co ntrol simulations have stable, realistic climates when integrated over multiple centuries. Both models have simulations of ENSO that are substantially improved relative to previous GFDL coupled models. The CM2.0 model has been further evaluated as an ENSO forecast model and has good skill (CM2.1 has not been evaluated as an ENSO forecast model). Generally reduced temperature and salinity biases exist in CM2.1 relative to CM2.0. These reductions are associated with 1) improved simulations of surface wind stress in CM2.1 and associated changes in oceanic gyre circulations; 2) changes in cloud tuning and

  10. Aliphatic Amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aponte, Jose C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-01-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific delta13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The delta13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The delta13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10per mille, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the delta13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59per mille. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and delta13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  11. Aliphatic amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte, José C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-09-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific δ13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The δ13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The δ13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10‰, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the δ13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59‰. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and δ13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  12. The EET87513 clast N: A CM2 fragment in an HED polymict breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, P. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Reid, A. M.; Barrett, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Xenoliths of material resembling carbonaceous chondrites have been found in several HED polymict breccias. Most workers concluded that these clasts are related to CM2 meteorites on the basis of texture, bulk composition, and mineralogy. Data on clast N, a carbonaceous chondrite fragment from the howardite EET87513 large enough (approximately 4x5mm on the surface of the slab from which it was separated) to extract bulk samples for INAA and oxygen isotope analysis and to provide a thin section for electron microprobe, SEM, and TEM analysis is reported. Preliminary data for this clast were previously reported. INAA was performed at Oregon State University and bulk oxygen isotopic composition was determined at the University of Chicago. These data confirm that EET87513 clast N is a fragment of CM2 material.

  13. Relativistic Electron Accleration by a Laser of Intensity in Excess of 1020 W cm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangles, S. P. D.; Walton, B.; Wei, M. S.; Clarke, R. J.; Fritzler, S.; Gopal, A.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Krushelnick, K.; Najmudin, Z.; Dangor, A. E.

    Relativistic electrons with energies in excess of 300 MeV have been observed resulting from the interaction of a 0.3 PW laser beam focused to intensities of around 3 × 1020 W cm-2 interacting with an underdense plasma. Two dimensional particle in cell simulation of the interaction show that an interaction directly between preheated electrons and the intense laser field is responsible for the maximum acceleration.

  14. Investigation of pyridine carboxylic acids in CM2 carbonaceous chondrites: Potential precursor molecules for ancient coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-07-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  15. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  16. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We lso report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  17. Wide-Pulse Evaluation of 0.5 CM2 Silicon Carbide SGTO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    the surface of the chip. Figure 3. SGTO packaged at ARL using power package, AuSn die attach, 5-mil wire bonds, and silicone -based potting. Figure 5...WIDE-PULSE EVALUATION OF 0.5 CM2 SILICON CARBIDE SGTO Heather O’Brien, Aderinto Ogunniyi, Charles J. Scozzie U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800...3026 E. Cornwallis Rd Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA Victor Temple Silicon Power Corp., 958 Main St., Suite A Clifton Park, NY 12065 USA

  18. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pumps. 193.10-5 Section 193.10-5 Shipping COAST... EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 193.10-5 Fire pumps. (a) Vessels shall be equipped with independently driven fire pumps in accordance with Table 193.10-5(a). Table 193.10-5(a) Gross tons Over Not...

  19. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps. 193.10-5 Section 193.10-5 Shipping COAST... EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 193.10-5 Fire pumps. (a) Vessels shall be equipped with independently driven fire pumps in accordance with Table 193.10-5(a). Table 193.10-5(a) Gross tons Over Not...

  20. Methylmercury degradation by Pseudomonas putida V1.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Lucélia; Yu, Ri-Qing; Crane, Sharron; Giovanella, Patricia; Barkay, Tamar; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2016-08-01

    Environmental contamination of mercury (Hg) has caused public health concerns with focuses on the neurotoxic substance methylmercury, due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. The goals of the present study were to examine: (i) the transformation of methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate and mercuric chloride by cultures of Pseudomonas putida V1, (ii) the presence of the genes merA and merB in P. putida V1, and (iii) the degradation pathways of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Strain V1 cultures readily degraded methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercury acetate, and reduced mercuric chloride into gaseous Hg(0). However, the Hg transformation in LB broth by P. putida V1 was influenced by the type of Hg compounds. The merA gene was detected in P. putida V1, on the other hand, the merB gene was not detected. The sequencing of this gene, showed high similarity (100%) to the mercuric reductase gene of other Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, tests using radioactive (14)C-methylmercury indicated an uncommon release of (14)CO2 concomitant with the production of Hg(0). The results of the present work suggest that P. putida V1 has the potential to remove methylmercury from contaminated sites. More studies are warranted to determine the mechanism of removal of methylmercury by P. putida V1.

  1. Organic Power Electronics: Transistor Operation in the kA/cm2 Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Markus P.; Fischer, Axel; Kaschura, Felix; Widmer, Johannes; Kheradmand-Boroujeni, Bahman; Ellinger, Frank; Leo, Karl

    2017-03-01

    In spite of interesting features as flexibility, organic thin-film transistors have commercially lagged behind due to the low mobilities of organic semiconductors associated with hopping transport. Furthermore, organic transistors usually have much larger channel lengths than their inorganic counterparts since high-resolution structuring is not available in low-cost production schemes. Here, we present an organic permeable-base transistor (OPBT) which, despite extremely simple processing without any high-resolution structuring, achieve a performance beyond what has so far been possible using organic semiconductors. With current densities above 1 kA cm‑2 and switching speeds towards 100 MHz, they open the field of organic power electronics. Finding the physical limits and an effective mobility of only 0.06 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, this OPBT device architecture has much more potential if new materials optimized for its geometry will be developed.

  2. Organic Power Electronics: Transistor Operation in the kA/cm2 Regime

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Markus P.; Fischer, Axel; Kaschura, Felix; Widmer, Johannes; Kheradmand-Boroujeni, Bahman; Ellinger, Frank; Leo, Karl

    2017-01-01

    In spite of interesting features as flexibility, organic thin-film transistors have commercially lagged behind due to the low mobilities of organic semiconductors associated with hopping transport. Furthermore, organic transistors usually have much larger channel lengths than their inorganic counterparts since high-resolution structuring is not available in low-cost production schemes. Here, we present an organic permeable-base transistor (OPBT) which, despite extremely simple processing without any high-resolution structuring, achieve a performance beyond what has so far been possible using organic semiconductors. With current densities above 1 kA cm−2 and switching speeds towards 100 MHz, they open the field of organic power electronics. Finding the physical limits and an effective mobility of only 0.06 cm2 V−1 s−1, this OPBT device architecture has much more potential if new materials optimized for its geometry will be developed. PMID:28303924

  3. Compositions of Partly Altered Olivine and Replacement Serpentine in the CM2 Chondrite QUE93005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velbel, M. A.; Tonui, E. K.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Some phyllosilicates in CM carbonaceous chondrites formed by aqueous alteration of anhydrous precursor phases. Although broad trends in the compositions of hydrous phyllosilicates are recognized and believed to be related to trends in degree of aqueous alteration, details of the reactions that formed specific secondary minerals remain obscure. This paper reports compositional relationships between remnants of partially pseudomorphically (or alteromorphically) replaced silicates and their alteration products (serpentine) in the CM2 chondrite QUE93005 and compares it with previously published results for ALH81002. Reactants and products were characterized by optical petrography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy (BSEM), and electron microprobe. By focusing on serpentine formed from known reactants (olivines), and on only those instances in which some of the reactant silicate remains, direct compositional relationships between reactants and products, and the elemental mobility required by the reactions, can be established. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  4. Spectral content of buried Ag foils at 1016 W/cm2 laser illuminationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, C. M.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B. A.

    2014-11-01

    Sources of 5-12 keV thermal Heα x-rays are readily generated by laser irradiation of mid-Z foils at intensities >1014 W/cm2, and are widely used as probes for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density experiments. Higher energy 17-50 keV x-ray sources are efficiently produced from "cold" Kα emission using short pulse, petawatt lasers at intensities >1018 W/cm2 [H.-S. Park, B. R. Maddox et al., "High-resolution 17-75 keV backlighters for high energy density experiments," Phys. Plasmas 15(7), 072705 (2008); B. R. Maddox, H. S. Park, B. A. Remington et al., "Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV," Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 056709 (2011)]. However, when long pulse (>1 ns) lasers are used with Z > 30 elements, the spectrum contains contributions from both K shell transitions and from ionized atomic states. Here we show that by sandwiching a silver foil between layers of high-density carbon, the ratio of Kα:Heα in the x-ray spectrum is significant increased over directly illuminated Ag foils, with narrower lines from K-shell transitions. Additionally, the emission volume is more localized for the sandwiched target, producing a more planar x-ray sheet. This technique may be useful for generating probes requiring spectral purity and a limited spatial extent, for example, in incoherent x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  5. The amino acid composition of the Sutter's Mill CM2 carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Jenniskens, Peter; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    We determined the abundances and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids in Sutter's Mill fragment #2 (designated SM2) recovered prior to heavy rains that fell April 25-26, 2012, and two other meteorite fragments, SM12 and SM51, that were recovered postrain. We also determined the abundance, enantiomeric, and isotopic compositions of amino acids in soil from the recovery site of fragment SM51. The three meteorite stones experienced terrestrial amino acid contamination, as evidenced by the low D/L ratios of several proteinogenic amino acids. The D/L ratios were higher in SM2 than in SM12 and SM51, consistent with rain introducing additional L-amino acid contaminants to SM12 and SM51. Higher percentages of glycine, β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid were observed in free form in SM2 and SM51 compared with the soil, suggesting that these free amino acids may be indigenous. Trace levels of D+L-β-aminoisobutyric acid (β-AIB) observed in all three meteorites are not easily explained as terrestrial contamination, as β-AIB is rare on Earth and was not detected in the soil. Bulk carbon and nitrogen and isotopic ratios of the SM samples and the soil also indicate terrestrial contamination, as does compound-specific isotopic analysis of the amino acids in the soil. The amino acid abundances in SM2, the most pristine SM meteorite analyzed here, are approximately 20-fold lower than in the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite. This may be due to thermal metamorphism in the Sutter's Mill parent body at temperatures greater than observed for other aqueously altered CM2 meteorites.

  6. Organic blend semiconductors and transistors with hole mobility exceeding 10 cm2/Vs (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Alexandra F.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2015-10-01

    Plastic electronics that can be manufactured using solution-based methods are the subject of great research interest due to their potential for low-cost, large-area electronic applications. The interest in this field has led to considerable research and subsequent advances in device performance. To this end solution-processed organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) have shown impressive improvements in recent years through the increasing values of charge carrier mobility. Here we report the development of next generation organic blend materials for OTFTs with hole mobilities of 10 cm2/Vs. These high performance devices have been achieved using a novel semiconducting blend system comprising of an amorphous-like conjugated polymer and a high mobility small molecule. The combination of a highly crystalline small molecule with the polymer binder aids the formation of uniform films as well as enables an element of control over the nucleation and growth of the small molecule. The polymer binders investigated belongs to the family of indacenodithiophene-based copolymers which are renowned for their high carrier mobilities regardless of their apparent structural disorder. The addition of the polymer with carefully chosen small molecules is found to further increase the hole mobility of the resulting blend OTFT to over 10 cm2/Vs. These organic devices provide an interesting insight into this rather complex blend system, highlighting the correlation between the morphology developed following solution processing and device performance, as well as exploring the role of each of the two components in the blend in terms of their contribution to charge transport.

  7. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  8. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  9. Registration of cotton germplasm line md 10-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MD 10-5 (Reg. No. ______, PI 675077) is a noncommercial breeding line of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) released by the USDA-ARS at Stoneville, MS in 2015. MD 10-5 was selected in F4 progenies from a cross between MD 15 (PI 642769) and JJ 1145ne. MD 10-5 has a desirable combination between lint yi...

  10. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  11. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  12. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  13. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  14. 46 CFR 61.10-5 - Pressure vessels in service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vessels in service. 61.10-5 Section 61.10-5... INSPECTIONS Tests and Inspections of Pressure Vessels § 61.10-5 Pressure vessels in service. (a) Basic requirements. Each pressure vessel must be examined or tested every 5 years. The extent of the test...

  15. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  16. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  17. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-5 - Cargo-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo-TB/ALL. 30.10-5 Section 30.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5 Cargo—TB/ALL. The term cargo means combustible liquid, flammable liquid, or liquefied flammable gas...

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-5 - Cargo-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo-TB/ALL. 30.10-5 Section 30.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5 Cargo—TB/ALL. The term cargo means combustible liquid, flammable liquid, or liquefied flammable gas...

  20. 46 CFR 113.10-5 - Common return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Common return. 113.10-5 Section 113.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-5 Common return. A...

  1. 46 CFR 113.10-5 - Common return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Common return. 113.10-5 Section 113.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-5 Common return. A...

  2. 46 CFR 113.10-5 - Common return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Common return. 113.10-5 Section 113.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-5 Common return. A...

  3. 46 CFR 113.10-5 - Common return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Common return. 113.10-5 Section 113.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-5 Common return. A...

  4. 33 CFR 66.10-5-66.10-10 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 66.10-5-66.10-10 Section 66.10-5-66.10-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System §§ 66.10-5—66.10-10...

  5. 33 CFR 66.10-5-66.10-10 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 66.10-5-66.10-10 Section 66.10-5-66.10-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System §§ 66.10-5—66.10-10...

  6. 46 CFR 113.10-5 - Common return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Common return. 113.10-5 Section 113.10-5 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-5 Common return. A conductor must not be used as a common return from more than one zone....

  7. Evaporation of metals by high-density (107 A · cm-2) electrical currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhel, A. D.

    1996-09-01

    In the present work, the problem of time evolution of pressure and temperature profiles across a wire through which an electrical current with a density of the order of 107 A · cm-2 flows is solved. The correct boundary conditions for a metal surface are obtained for the case when this metal is rapidly evaporated as a result of high-power Joule heating. The pressure profile appears under these conditions due to pinch-effect and inertia of thermal expansion of the metal; the temperature profile arises because of intensive evaporation from the surface of the wire. The conditions under which a liquid metal is superheated are formulated. On the basis of the analysis of the experimental results on exploding wires, the conclusion is drawn that decay of the metastable state takes place near the binodal. It is shown that the distribution of fine dispersed vapor bubbles is strongly nonuniform across the wire and the process of expansion of the two-phase mixture is very similar to the motion of a wave.

  8. On the Behavior of Phosphorus During the Aqueous Alteration of CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Chizmadia, Lysa J.

    2005-01-01

    During the earliest period of solar system formation, water played an important role in the evolution of primitive dust, both after accretion of planetesimals and possible before accretion within the protoplanetary disk. Many chondrites show evidence of variable degrees of aqueous alteration, the CM2 chondrites being among the most studied [1]. This group of chondrites is characterized by mineral assemblages of both primary and secondary alteration phases. Hence, these meteorites retain a particularly important record of the reactions that occurred between primary high temperature nebular phases and water. Studies of these chondrites can provide information on the conditions and environments of aqueous alteration and the mobility of elements during alteration. This latter question is at the core of a debate concerning the location of aqueous alteration, i.e. whether alteration occurred predominantly within a closed system after accretion (parent body alteration) or whether some degree of alteration occurred within the solar nebula or on ephemeral protoplanetary bodies prior to accretion. At the core of the parent body alteration model is the hypothesis that elemental exchange between different components, principally chondrules and matrix, must have occurred. chondrules and matrix, must have occurred. In this study, we focus on the behavior of the minor element, phosphorus. This study was stimulated by observations of the behavior of P during the earliest stages of alteration in glassy mesostasis in type II chondrules in CR chondrites and extends the preliminary observations of on Y791198 to other CM chondrites.

  9. Murchison CM2 chondrite at nanoscale: evidence for hydrated minerals in the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, J. M.; Vila-Ruaix, A.; Alonso-Azcárate, J.; Abad, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    The most pristine chondrites are undifferentiated meteorites with highly unequilibrated mineral grains that accreted from the protoplanetary disk about 4.6 Gyrs ago. Here we focus our attention in the study of Murchison, one of the most primitive carbonaceous chondrites belonging to the CM2 group. Despite of being aqueously altered, Murchison matrix is extraordinarily complex at nanoscale, and its study can hold clues to understand the origin of the water incorporated in the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites. Murchison comes from an undifferentiated carbon-rich asteroid which formed from the accretion of solid particles formed in the outer protoplanetary disk. Their rock-forming materials felt into the plane of the system where they mixed with organics, and probably with hydrated minerals. Our UHRTEM (ultra-high resolution transmission electron microscopy) data demonstrate that Murchison fine-grained matrix consists of a complex mixture of many ingredients, including chondrule and CAI fragments, stellar grains, phyllosilicates and organic compounds. We describe here some mineral and textural features that exemplify how pristine, and diverse is Murchison matrix. Our results indicate that the study of carbonaceous chondrites at nanoscale can provide a significant progress in our understanding of the accretion of materials and the preservation of presolar grains in the outer regions of the protoplanetary disk.

  10. A minimum column density of 1 g cm(-2) for massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Mark R; McKee, Christopher F

    2008-02-28

    Massive stars are very rare, but their extreme luminosities make them both the only type of young star we can observe in distant galaxies and the dominant energy sources in the Universe today. They form rarely because efficient radiative cooling keeps most star--forming gas clouds close to isothermal as they collapse, and this favours fragmentation into stars of one solar mass or lower. Heating of a cloud by accreting low-mass stars within it can prevent fragmentation and allow formation of massive stars, but the necessary properties for a cloud to form massive stars-and therefore where massive stars form in a galaxy--have not yet been determined. Here we show that only clouds with column densities of at least 1 g cm(-2) can avoid fragmentation and form massive stars. This threshold, and the environmental variation of the stellar initial mass function that it implies, naturally explain the characteristic column densities associated with massive star clusters and the difference between the radial profiles of Halpha and ultraviolet emission in galactic disks. The existence of a threshold also implies that the initial mass function should show detectable variation with environment within the Galaxy, that the characteristic column densities of clusters containing massive stars should vary between galaxies, and that star formation rates in some galactic environments may have been systematically underestimated.

  11. N-15-Rich Organic Globules in a Cluster IDP and the Bells CM2 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2008-01-01

    Organic matter in primitive meteorites and chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) is commonly enriched in D/H and 15N/14N relative to terrestrial values [1-3]. These anomalies are ascribed to the partial preservation of presolar cold molecular cloud material [1]. Some meteorites and IDPs contain m-size inclusions with extreme H and N isotopic anomalies [2-4], possibly due to preserved pristine primordial organic grains. We recently showed that the in the Tagish Lake meteorite, the principle carriers of these anomalies are sub- m, hollow organic globules [5]. The globules likely formed by photochemical processing of organic ices in a cold molecular cloud or the outermost regions of the protosolar disk [5]. We proposed that similar materials should be common among primitive meteorites, IDPs, and comets. Similar objects have been observed in organic extracts of carbonaceous chondrites [6-8], however their N and H isotopic compositions are generally unknown. Bulk H and N isotopic compositions may indicate which meteorites best preserve interstellar organic compounds. Thus, we selected the Bells CM2 carbonaceous chondrites for study based on its large bulk 15N (+335 %) and D (+990 %) [9].

  12. A Comparison Between Silicon Carbide from Indarch (EH4) and CM2 Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, S. S.; Alexander, C. M. O'd.; Ott, U.; Zinner, E. K.; Arden, J. W.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-07-01

    A light-element stepped-combustion, noble-gas, ion-probe, and SEM study of interstellar SiC from Indarch has been undertaken in order to compare SiC isolated from enstatite chondrites with SiC from the more extensively studied CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. Eighty-five grams of Indarch were etched in HF/HCl, crushed and treated with 9MHF/1MHCl + 1M HCl, Cr(sub)2O(sub)7^2- in H(sub)2SO(sub)4, and then HClO(sub)4, leaving an acid-resistant residue equivalent to 42 ppm of the whole rock. Carbon, nitrogen, and noble-gas data were acquired by stepped combustion and pyrolysis after precombusting the samples to 600 degrees C to oxidize nanometer-sized diamond. The presence of isotopically anomalous SiC in the Indarch residue is indicated by the isotopically heavy CO2 released at high temperature during stepped combustion, with a maximum delta ^13C value of +1420 per mil (^12C/^13C = 36.2), identical to results obtained for typical CM2 samples [1]. In contrast to CM meteorites, however, the peak release of heavy carbon occurs at 1200 degrees C, some 200 degrees C higher than the peak release temperatures of Murchison and Cold Bokkeveld. A similarly high release temperature was seen in the stepped-combustion analysis of the noble gas in the Indarch residue. This suggests a morphological and/or size difference between the SiC present in the two types of meteorites. The nitrogen stepped-combustion profile of the Indarch residue is dominated by the presence of Si(sub)3N(sub)4 of unremarkable isotopic composition (delta ^15N = -56 per mil) that could not be resolved from nitrogen released from SiC. The abundance of SiC in Indarch is estimated, from the stepped combustion data, to be about 1.4 ppm (or 14 ppm SiC in the matrix, not dissimilar to values obtained for CM2 meteorites). A comparison of the noble-gas data from grain-size fractions of Murchison [2] and the bulk Indarch residue data, particularly the Ne-E/Xe-s ratio, suggests that Indarch is enriched in fine-grained Si

  13. Characterizing unforced multi-decadal variability of ENSO: a case study with the GFDL CM2.1 coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, A. R.; Battisti, D. S.; Wittenberg, A. T.; Roberts, W. H. G.; Vimont, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Large multi-decadal fluctuations of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability simulated in a 4000-year pre-industrial control run of GFDL CM2.1 have received considerable attention due to implications for constraining the causes of past and future changes in ENSO. We evaluated the mechanisms of this low-frequency ENSO modulation through analysis of the extreme epochs of CM2.1 as well as through the use of a linearized intermediate-complexity model of the tropical Pacific, which produces reasonable emulations of observed ENSO variability. We demonstrate that the low-frequency ENSO modulation can be represented by the simplest model of a linear, stationary process, even in the highly nonlinear CM2.1. These results indicate that CM2.1's ENSO modulation is driven by transient processes that operate at interannual or shorter time scales. Nonlinearities and/or multiplicative noise in CM2.1 likely exaggerate the ENSO modulation by contributing to the overly active ENSO variability. In contrast, simulations with the linear model suggest that intrinsically-generated tropical Pacific decadal mean state changes do not contribute to the extreme-ENSO epochs in CM2.1. Rather, these decadal mean state changes actually serve to damp the intrinsically-generated ENSO modulation, primarily by stabilizing the ENSO mode during strong-ENSO epochs. Like most coupled General Circulation Models, CM2.1 suffers from large biases in its ENSO simulation, including ENSO variance that is nearly twice that seen in the last 50 years of observations. We find that CM2.1's overly strong ENSO variance directly contributes to its strong multi-decadal modulation through broadening the distribution of epochal variance, which increases like the square of the long-term variance. These results suggest that the true spectrum of unforced ENSO modulation is likely substantially narrower than that in CM2.1. However, relative changes in ENSO modulation are similar between CM2.1, the linear model tuned to

  14. Fe and O EELS Studies of Ion Irradiated Murchison CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrite Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Christofferson, R.; Dukes, C. A.; Baragiola, R. A.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The physical and chemical response of hydrated carbonaceous chondrite materials to space weathering processes is poorly understood. Improving this understanding is a key part of establishing how regoliths on primitive carbonaceous asteroids respond to space weathering processes, knowledge that supports future sample return missions (Hayabusa 2 and OSIRISREx) that are targeting objects of this type. We previously reported on He+ irradiation of Murchison matrix and showed that the irradiation resulted in amorphization of the matrix phyllosilicates, loss of OH, and surface vesiculation. Here, we report electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements of the irradiated material with emphasis on the Fe and O speciation. Sample and Methods: A polished thin section of the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite was irradiated with 4 kilovolts He(+) (normal incidence) to a total dose of 1 x 10(exp 18) He(+) per square centimeter. We extracted thin sections from both irradiated and unirradiated regions in matrix using focused ion beam (FIB) techniques with electron beam deposition for the protective carbon strap to minimize surface damage artifacts from the FIB milling. The FIB sections were analyzed using a JEOL 2500SE scanning and transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with a Gatan Tridiem imaging filter. EELS spectra were collected from 50 nanometer diameter regions with an energy resolution of 0.7 electronvolts FWHM at the zero loss. EELS spectra were collected at low electron doses to minimize possible artifacts from electron-beam irradiation damage. Results and Discussion: Fe L (sub 2,3) EELS spectra from matrix phyllosilicates in CM chondrites show mixed Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) oxidation states with Fe(3+)/Sigma Fe approximately 0.5. Fe L(sub 2,3) spectra from the irradiated/ amorphized matrix phyllosilicates show higher Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratios compared to spectra obtained from pristine material at depths beyond the implantation/amorphization layer. We

  15. Impact-Induced Chondrule Deformation and Aqueous Alteration of CM2 Murchison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, R. D.; Zolensky, M.; Ketcham, R. A.; Behr, W. M.; Martinez, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Deformed chondrules in CM2 Murchison have been found to define a prominent foliation [1,2] and lineation [3] in 3D using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). It has been hypothesized that chondrules in foliated chondrites deform by "squeezing" into surrounding pore space [4,5], a process that also likely removes primary porosity [6]. However, shock stage classification based on olivine extinction in Murchison is consistently low (S1-S2) [4-5,7] implying that significant intracrystalline plastic deformation of olivine has not occurred. One objective of our study is therefore to determine the microstructural mechanisms and phases that are accommodating the impact stress and resulting in relative displacements within the chondrules. Another question regarding impact deformation in Murchison is whether it facilitated aqueous alteration as has been proposed for the CMs which generally show a positive correlation between degree of alteration and petrofabric strength [7,2]. As pointed out by [2], CM Murchison represents a unique counterpoint to this correlation: it has a strong petrofabric but a relatively low degree of aqueous alteration. However, Murchison may not represent an inconsistency to the proposed causal relationship between impact and alteration, if it can be established that the incipient aqueous alteration post-dated chondrule deformation. Methods: Two thin sections from Murchison sample USNM 5487 were cut approximately perpendicular to the foliation and parallel to lineation determined by XCT [1,3] and one section was additionally polished for EBSD. Using a combination of optical petrography, SEM, EDS, and EBSD several chondrules were characterized in detail to: determine phases, find microstructures indicative of strain, document the geometric relationships between grain-scale microstructures and the foliation and lineation direction, and look for textural relationships of alteration minerals (tochilinite and Mg-Fe serpentine) that indicate timing of their

  16. Formation of spinel-, hibonite-rich inclusions found in CM2 carbonaceous chrondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, S B; Grossman, L; Hutcheon, I D; Phinney, D L; Weber, P K; Fallon, S J

    2005-11-03

    We report petrography, mineral chemistry, bulk chemistry, and bulk isotopic compositions of a suite of 40 spinel-rich inclusions from the Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrite. Seven types of inclusions are identified based on mineralogy: spinel-hibonite-perovskite; spinel-perovskite-pyroxene; spinel-perovskite-melilite; spinel-hibonite-perovskite-melilite; spinel-hibonite; spinel-pyroxene; and spinel-melilite-anorthite. Hibonite-bearing inclusions have Ti-poor spinel compared to the hibonite-free ones, and spinel-hibonite-perovskite inclusions have the highest average bulk TiO{sub 2} contents (7.8 wt%). The bulk CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of the inclusions range from 0.005-0.21, well below the solar value of 0.79. Hibonite-, spinel-rich inclusions consist of phases that are not predicted by condensation calculations to coexist; in the equilibrium sequence, hibonite is followed by melilite, which is followed by spinel. Therefore, hibonite-melilite or melilite-spinel inclusions should be dominant instead. One explanation for the 'missing melilite' is that it condensed as expected but was lost due to evaporation of Mg and Ca during heating and melting of spherule precursors. If this theory were correct, melilite-poor spherules would have isotopically heavy Mg and Ca. Except for one inclusion with F{sub Mg} = 4.3 {+-} 2.6{per_thousand}/amu and another with isotopically light Ca (F{sub Ca} = 3.4 {+-} 2.0{per_thousand}/amu), however, all the inclusions we analyzed have normal isotopic compositions within their 2{sigma} uncertainties. Thus, we found no evidence for significant mass-dependent fractionation. Our preferred explanation for the general lack of melilite among hibonite-, spinel-bearing inclusions is kinetic inhibition of melilite condensation relative to spinel. Because of similarities between the crystal structures of hibonite and spinel, it should be easier for spinel to form from hibonite than for melilite to do so.

  17. 33 CFR 49.10-5 - Payment of moneys due.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Payment of moneys due. 49.10-5... PAYMENT OF AMOUNTS DUE MENTALLY INCOMPETENT COAST GUARD PERSONNEL Reports and Moneys § 49.10-5 Payment of moneys due. Upon the appointment of a trustee or trustees to receive moneys due an incompetent,...

  18. 33 CFR 49.10-5 - Payment of moneys due.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Payment of moneys due. 49.10-5... PAYMENT OF AMOUNTS DUE MENTALLY INCOMPETENT COAST GUARD PERSONNEL Reports and Moneys § 49.10-5 Payment of moneys due. Upon the appointment of a trustee or trustees to receive moneys due an incompetent,...

  19. 33 CFR 49.10-5 - Payment of moneys due.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of moneys due. 49.10-5... PAYMENT OF AMOUNTS DUE MENTALLY INCOMPETENT COAST GUARD PERSONNEL Reports and Moneys § 49.10-5 Payment of moneys due. Upon the appointment of a trustee or trustees to receive moneys due an incompetent,...

  20. 33 CFR 49.10-5 - Payment of moneys due.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Payment of moneys due. 49.10-5... PAYMENT OF AMOUNTS DUE MENTALLY INCOMPETENT COAST GUARD PERSONNEL Reports and Moneys § 49.10-5 Payment of moneys due. Upon the appointment of a trustee or trustees to receive moneys due an incompetent,...

  1. 33 CFR 49.10-5 - Payment of moneys due.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Payment of moneys due. 49.10-5... PAYMENT OF AMOUNTS DUE MENTALLY INCOMPETENT COAST GUARD PERSONNEL Reports and Moneys § 49.10-5 Payment of moneys due. Upon the appointment of a trustee or trustees to receive moneys due an incompetent,...

  2. 46 CFR 58.10-5 - Gasoline engine installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Internal Combustion Engine Installations § 58.10-5 Gasoline engine installations. (a) Engine design. All installations shall be of marine type engines suitable for the intended... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gasoline engine installations. 58.10-5 Section...

  3. 46 CFR 58.10-5 - Gasoline engine installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Internal Combustion Engine Installations § 58.10-5 Gasoline engine installations. (a) Engine design. All installations shall be of marine type engines suitable for the intended... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gasoline engine installations. 58.10-5 Section...

  4. 46 CFR 58.10-5 - Gasoline engine installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Internal Combustion Engine Installations § 58.10-5 Gasoline engine installations. (a) Engine design. All installations shall be of marine type engines suitable for the intended... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gasoline engine installations. 58.10-5 Section...

  5. 46 CFR 58.10-5 - Gasoline engine installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Internal Combustion Engine Installations § 58.10-5 Gasoline engine installations. (a) Engine design. All installations shall be of marine type engines suitable for the intended... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gasoline engine installations. 58.10-5 Section...

  6. 46 CFR 58.10-5 - Gasoline engine installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Internal Combustion Engine Installations § 58.10-5 Gasoline engine installations. (a) Engine design. All installations shall be of marine type engines suitable for the intended... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gasoline engine installations. 58.10-5 Section...

  7. 33 CFR 67.10-5 - Location requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Location requirements. 67.10-5 Section 67.10-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  8. 33 CFR 67.10-5 - Location requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Location requirements. 67.10-5 Section 67.10-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  9. 33 CFR 67.10-5 - Location requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location requirements. 67.10-5 Section 67.10-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  10. 33 CFR 67.10-5 - Location requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Location requirements. 67.10-5 Section 67.10-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  11. 33 CFR 67.10-5 - Location requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Location requirements. 67.10-5 Section 67.10-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES General Requirements for...

  12. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire main system, details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... equipped with independently driven fire pumps in accordance with Table 193.10-5(a). Table 193.10-5(a) Gross tons Over Not over Minimum number of pumps Hose and hydrant size, inches Nozzle orifice size, inches... together with a commercial garden hose nozzle may be used. The pump may be hand operated and the length...

  13. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire main system, details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... equipped with independently driven fire pumps in accordance with Table 193.10-5(a). Table 193.10-5(a) Gross tons Over Not over Minimum number of pumps Hose and hydrant size, inches Nozzle orifice size, inches... together with a commercial garden hose nozzle may be used. The pump may be hand operated and the length...

  14. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire main system, details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equipped with independently driven fire pumps in accordance with Table 193.10-5(a). Table 193.10-5(a) Gross tons Over Not over Minimum number of pumps Hose and hydrant size, inches Nozzle orifice size, inches... together with a commercial garden hose nozzle may be used. The pump may be hand operated and the length...

  15. 46 CFR 95.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... on an international voyage, each required fire pump, while delivering water thru the fire main system... pumps shall be fitted with a pressure gage on the discharge side of the pumps. (f) Fire pumps may be... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pumps. 95.10-5 Section 95.10-5 Shipping COAST...

  16. 46 CFR 95.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... on an international voyage, each required fire pump, while delivering water thru the fire main system... pumps shall be fitted with a pressure gage on the discharge side of the pumps. (f) Fire pumps may be... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire pumps. 95.10-5 Section 95.10-5 Shipping COAST...

  17. 46 CFR 95.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... on an international voyage, each required fire pump, while delivering water thru the fire main system... pumps shall be fitted with a pressure gage on the discharge side of the pumps. (f) Fire pumps may be... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire pumps. 95.10-5 Section 95.10-5 Shipping COAST...

  18. Nanoimprinted polymer lasers with threshold below 100 W/cm2 using mixed-order distributed feedback resonators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Tsiminis, Georgios; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Skabara, Peter J; Samuel, Ifor D W; Turnbull, Graham A

    2013-06-17

    Organic semiconductor lasers were fabricated by UV-nanoimprint lithography with thresholds as low as 57 W/cm(2) under 4 ns pulsed operation. The nanoimprinted lasers employed mixed-order distributed feedback resonators, with second-order gratings surrounded by first-order gratings, combined with a light-emitting conjugated polymer. They were pumped by InGaN LEDs to produce green-emitting lasers, with thresholds of 208 W/cm(2) (102 nJ/pulse). These hybrid lasers incorporate a scalable UV-nanoimprint lithography process, compatible with high-performance LEDs, therefore we have demonstrated a coherent, compact, low-cost light source.

  19. Successful Capture, Extraction and Identification of Hypervelocity CM2 Meteorite Fragments Shot by Light-Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snead, C.; Westphal, A. J.; Dominguez, G.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Here we report the successful capture, extraction and identification of two fragments of a CM2 meteorite (ALH83100) into lowdensity aerogel. The shot was carried out at the AVGR at NASAARC. A mixture of powdered ALH83100 and borosilicate glass microspheres was shot at 4.55.0 km/sec into 50 mg cm silicate aerogel.

  20. Comparison of visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra of CM2 carbonaceous chondrites and primitive asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, F.; Hiroi, T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Spectra of primitive asteroids (defined as C, P, and D classes and associated subclasses) were compared to the limited number of spectra of CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. An absorption feature located at 0.7 microns attributed to an Fe(+2) - Fe(+3) charge transfer absorption in iron oxides in phyllosilicates is apparent in some of the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite spectra and many of the asteroid spectra. Sawyer found a correlation between the area of the 0.7 micron feature and the mean semimajor axis of the asteroids. Spectra of a larger sample of carbonaceous chondrites, including 7 CM2 chondrites, covering a spectral interval of 0.30-2.5 microns were recently obtained using the Relab instrument at Brown University. These spectra were compared with spectrophotometric asteroid observations in a separate abstract. Those spectra of CM2 chondrites were isolated into the UV, visible and near-infrared spectral regions in order to compare them with high-quality narrowband reflectance spectra.

  1. Naval Sea Systems Command Acquisition Strategy Guide v1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Strategy Guide v1.0 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...FINAL REPORT 20 NAVSEA Acquisition Strategy Guide v1.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 3 Title Page LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES Table 1...Final Report B-1 APPENDIX C - Acquisition Strategy Suggested Routing Sequence C-1 APPENDIX D – References D-1 APPENDIX E – Acronym List

  2. TOUGH+ v1.5 Core Code

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.

    2015-08-27

    TOUGH+ v1.5 is a numerical code for the simulation of multi-phase, multi-component flow and transport of mass and heat through porous and fractured media, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. TOUGH+ is a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstations, PC, Macintosh). TOUGH+ v1.5 employs dynamic memory allocation, thus minimizing storage requirements. It has a completely modular structure, follows the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), and involves the advanced features of FORTRAN 95/2003, i.e., modules, derived data types, the use of pointers, lists and trees, data encapsulation, defined operators and assignments, operator extension and overloading, use of generic procedures, and maximum use of the powerful intrinsic vector and matrix processing operations. TOUGH+ v1.5 is the core code for its family of applications, i.e., the part of the code that is common to all its applications. It provides a description of the underlying physics and thermodynamics of non-isothermal flow, of the mathematical and numerical approaches, as well as a detailed explanation of the general (common to all applications) input requirements, options, capabilities and output specifications. The core code cannot run by itself: it needs to be coupled with the code for the specific TOUGH+ application option that describes a particular type of problem. The additional input requirements specific to a particular TOUGH+ application options and related illustrative examples can be found in the corresponding User’s Manual.

  3. TOUGH3 v1.0

    SciTech Connect

    PAU, GEORGE; JUNG, YOOJIN; FINSTERLE, STEFAN; ZHANG, YINGQI

    2016-09-14

    TOUGH3 V1.0 capabilities to simulate multi-dimensional, multi-phase, multi-component, non-isothermal flow and transport in fractured porous media, with applications geosciences and reservoir engineering and other application areas. TOUGH3 V1.0 supports a number of different combinations of fluids and components (updated equation-of-state (EOS) modules from previous versions of TOUGH, including EOS1, EOS2, EOS3, EOS4, EOS5, EOS7, EOS7R, EOS7C, EOS7CA, EOS8, EOS9, EWASG, TMVOC, ECO2N, and ECO2M). This upgrade includes (a) expanded list of updated equation-of-state (EOS) modules, (b) new hysteresis models, (c) new implementation of parallel and solver functionalities, (d) new linear solver options based on PETSc libraries, (e) new automatic build system that automatically downloads and builds third-party libraries and TOUGH3, (f) new printout in CSV format, (g) dynamic memory allocation, (h) various user features, and (i) bug fixes.

  4. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library designed using a 10 kA cm-2 niobium fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Nagasawa, Shuichi; China, Fumihiro; Ando, Takumi; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-01

    Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic is an energy-efficient superconductor logic with zero static power consumption and very small switching energy. In this paper, we report a new AQFP cell library designed using the AIST 10 kA cm-2 Nb high-speed standard process (HSTP), which is a high-critical-current-density version of the AIST 2.5 kA cm-2 Nb standard process (STP2). Since the intrinsic damping of the Josephson junction (JJ) of HSTP is relatively strong, shunt resistors for JJs were removed and the energy efficiency improved significantly. Also, excitation transformers in the new cells were redesigned so that the cells can operate in a four-phase excitation mode. We described the detail of HSTP and the AQFP cell library designed using HSTP, and showed experimental results of cell test circuits.

  5. 28 CFR 10.5 - Incorporation of papers previously filed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Incorporation of papers previously filed... CARRYING ON ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Registration Statement § 10.5 Incorporation of papers previously filed. Papers and documents already filed with the Attorney General pursuant to the said act...

  6. 28 CFR 10.5 - Incorporation of papers previously filed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Incorporation of papers previously filed... CARRYING ON ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Registration Statement § 10.5 Incorporation of papers previously filed. Papers and documents already filed with the Attorney General pursuant to the said act...

  7. 28 CFR 10.5 - Incorporation of papers previously filed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Incorporation of papers previously filed... CARRYING ON ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Registration Statement § 10.5 Incorporation of papers previously filed. Papers and documents already filed with the Attorney General pursuant to the said act...

  8. 28 CFR 10.5 - Incorporation of papers previously filed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Incorporation of papers previously filed... CARRYING ON ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Registration Statement § 10.5 Incorporation of papers previously filed. Papers and documents already filed with the Attorney General pursuant to the said act...

  9. 28 CFR 10.5 - Incorporation of papers previously filed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Incorporation of papers previously filed... CARRYING ON ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Registration Statement § 10.5 Incorporation of papers previously filed. Papers and documents already filed with the Attorney General pursuant to the said act...

  10. Polarization-entangled light pulses of 10(5) photons.

    PubMed

    Iskhakov, Timur Sh; Agafonov, Ivan N; Chekhova, Maria V; Leuchs, Gerd

    2012-10-12

    We experimentally demonstrate polarization entanglement for squeezed vacuum pulses containing more than 10(5) photons. We also study photon-number entanglement by calculating the Schmidt number and measuring its operational counterpart. Theoretically, our pulses are the more entangled the brighter they are. This promises important applications in quantum technologies, especially photonic quantum gates and quantum memories.

  11. 15 CFR 10.5 - Development of a recommended standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Development of a recommended standard... DEVELOPMENT OF VOLUNTARY PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.5 Development of a recommended standard. (a) The Standard... proposal, after consulting with the proponent group, so that these requirements are met,...

  12. RealGasBrine v1.0 option of TOUGH+ v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George

    2015-02-27

    RealGasBrine v1.0 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of gas-bearing porous and/fractured geologic media. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase ?uid and heat ?ow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. RealGasBrine v1.0 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. RealGasBrine v1.0 describes the non-isothermal two- (for pure water) or three-phase (for brine) flow of an aqueous phase and a real gas mixture in a gas-bearing medium, with a particular focus in ultra-tight (such as tight-sand and shale gas) systems. Up to 12 individual real gases can be tracked, and salt can precipitate as solid halite. The capabilities of the code include coupled flow and thermal effects, real gas behavior, Darcy and non-Darcy flow, several isotherm options of gas sorption onto the grains of the porous media, complex fracture descriptions, gas solubility into water, and geomechanical effects on flow properties. RealGasBrine v1.0 allows the study of flow and transport of fluids and heat over a wide range of time frames and spatial scales not only in gas reservoirs, but also in any problem involving the flow of gases in geologic media, including the geologic storage of greenhouse gas mixtures, the behavior of geothermal reservoirs with multi-component condensable (H2O and CO2) and non-condensable gas mixtures, the transport of water and released H2 in nuclear waste storage applications, etc.

  13. SANCscope—v.1.00

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonov, A.; Arbuzov, A.; Bardin, D.; Bondarenko, S.; Christova, P.; Kalinovskaya, L.; Nanava, G.; von Schlippe, W.

    2006-03-01

    In this article we have summarized the status of the system SANC version 1.00. We have implemented theoretical predictions for many high energy interactions of fundamental particles at the one-loop precision level for up to 4-particle processes. In the present part of our SANC description we place emphasis on an extensive discussion of an important first step of calculations of the one-loop amplitudes of 3- and 4-particle processes in QED, QCD and EW theories. Program summaryTitle of program:SANC Catalogue identifier: ADXK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXK_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Designed for: platforms on which Java and FORM3 are available Tested on: Intel-based PC's Operating systems: Linux, Windows Programming languages used: Java, FORM3, PERL, FORTRAN Memory required to execute with typical data: 10 Mb No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 658 844 No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: 1 on SANC server, 1 on SANC client Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: Automatic calculation of pseudo- and realistic observables for various processes and decays in the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions, QCD and QED at one-loop precision level. Form factors and helicity amplitudes free of UV divergences are produced. For exclusion of IR singularities the soft photon emission is included. Method of solution: Numerical computation of analytical formulae of form factors and helicity amplitudes. For simulation of two fermion radiative decays of Standard Model bosons (W,Z) and the Higgs boson a Monte Carlo technique is used. Restrictions on the complexity: In the current version of SANC there are 3 and 4 particle processes and decays available at one-loop precision level. Typical running time: The running time depends on the selected process. For instance, the symbolic calculation of form factors (with precomputed

  14. HYDRATE v1.5 OPTION OF TOUGH+ v1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George

    2015-08-27

    HYDRATE v1.5 is a numerical code that for the simulation of the behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic systems, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. It is an option of TOUGH+ v1.5 [Moridis and Pruess, 2014], a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999, 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. HYDRATE v1.5 needs the TOUGH+ v1.5 core code in order to compile and execute. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available. By solving the coupled equations of mass and heat balance, the fully operational TOUGH+HYDRATE code can model the non-isothermal gas release, phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat under conditions typical of common natural CH4-hydrate deposits (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments) in complex geological media at any scale (from laboratory to reservoir) at which Darcy’s law is valid. TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.5 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate formation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and up to four mass components, i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dissociation or formation, phase changes and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects and inhibitor-induced effects.

  15. MESHMAKER (MM) V1.5

    SciTech Connect

    MORIDIS, GEORGE

    2016-05-02

    MeshMaker v1.5 is a code that describes the system geometry and discretizes the domain in problems of flow and transport through porous and fractured media that are simulated using the TOUGH+ [Moridis and Pruess, 2014] or TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012] families of codes. It is a significantly modified and drastically enhanced version of an earlier simpler facility that was embedded in the TOUGH2 codes [Pruess et al., 1999; 2012], from which it could not be separated. The code (MeshMaker.f90) is a stand-alone product written in FORTRAN 95/2003, is written according to the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming, has a modular structure and can perform a number of mesh generation and processing operations. It can generate two-dimensional radially symmetric (r,z) meshes, and one-, two-, and three-dimensional rectilinear (Cartesian) grids in (x,y,z). The code generates the file MESH, which includes all the elements and connections that describe the discretized simulation domain and conforming to the requirements of the TOUGH+ and TOUGH2 codes. Multiple-porosity processing for simulation of flow in naturally fractured reservoirs can be invoked by means of a keyword MINC, which stands for Multiple INteracting Continua. The MINC process operates on the data of the primary (porous medium) mesh as provided on disk file MESH, and generates a secondary mesh containing fracture and matrix elements with identical data formats on file MINC.

  16. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, Yu.; Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm2, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm2), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  17. Targeting voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.7, Na V1.8, and Na V1.9 for treatment of pathological cough.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1-NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough.

  18. Advanced polymer targets for TNSA regime producing 6 MeV protons at 1016 W/cm2 laser intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.

    2017-02-01

    High intensity laser pulses, at an intensity of the order of 1016 W/cm2, are employed to irradiate in vacuum polyethylene terephthalate thin foils in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime. The plasma obtained in the forward emission is investigated using ion collectors and semiconductor detectors connected in a time-of-flight configuration, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and X-ray streak camera. The results indicate that the foil thickness of 1 micron is optimal to accelerate protons of up to 6.5 MeV. The high ion acceleration can be due to different effects such as the high absorption in the advanced semicrystalline polymer containing spherulite centers, the high resonant absorption in gold nanoparticles embedded in the polymer, the optimal thickness of the used polymer to enhance the electron density in the forward plasma, and the self-focusing effect induced by preplasma created in front of the irradiated target.

  19. Xenoliths in the CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrite LON 94101: Implications for Complex Mixing on the Asteroidal Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindgren, P.; Lee, M. R.; Sofe, M.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Xenoliths are foreign clasts that oc-cur in various classes of meteorites, e.g. [1,2,3]. A re-cent study reveals the presence of several distinct classes of xenoliths in regolith-bearing meteorites, in-cluding in over 20 different carbonaceous chondrites [4]. The most common types of xenoliths are fine-grained hydrous clasts, often referred to as C1 or CI clasts in the literature, although their mineralogy is actually more similar to hydrous micrometeorites [5,6]. Xenoliths in meteorites present an opportunity to study material not yet classified or available as separate meteorites, and can provide additional information on processes in the dynamic early history of the Solar Sys-tem. Here we have performed chemical and mineralogi-cal analyses of xenoliths in the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite LON 94101, using scanning electron micro-scopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  20. V-1 regulates capping protein activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jung, Goeh; Alexander, Christopher J; Wu, Xufeng S; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2016-10-25

    Capping Protein (CP) plays a central role in the creation of the Arp2/3-generated branched actin networks comprising lamellipodia and pseudopodia by virtue of its ability to cap the actin filament barbed end, which promotes Arp2/3-dependent filament nucleation and optimal branching. The highly conserved protein V-1/Myotrophin binds CP tightly in vitro to render it incapable of binding the barbed end. Here we addressed the physiological significance of this CP antagonist in Dictyostelium, which expresses a V-1 homolog that we show is very similar biochemically to mouse V-1. Consistent with previous studies of CP knockdown, overexpression of V-1 in Dictyostelium reduced the size of pseudopodia and the cortical content of Arp2/3 and induced the formation of filopodia. Importantly, these effects scaled positively with the degree of V-1 overexpression and were not seen with a V-1 mutant that cannot bind CP. V-1 is present in molar excess over CP, suggesting that it suppresses CP activity in the cytoplasm at steady state. Consistently, cells devoid of V-1, like cells overexpressing CP described previously, exhibited a significant decrease in cellular F-actin content. Moreover, V-1-null cells exhibited pronounced defects in macropinocytosis and chemotactic aggregation that were rescued by V-1, but not by the V-1 mutant. Together, these observations demonstrate that V-1 exerts significant influence in vivo on major actin-based processes via its ability to sequester CP. Finally, we present evidence that V-1's ability to sequester CP is regulated by phosphorylation, suggesting that cells may manipulate the level of active CP to tune their "actin phenotype."

  1. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2008-12-08

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

  2. Perovskite solar cells with 18.21% efficiency and area over 1 cm2 fabricated by heterojunction engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongzhen; Yang, Xudong; Chen, Wei; Yue, Youfeng; Cai, Molang; Xie, Fengxian; Bi, Enbing; Islam, Ashraful; Han, Liyuan

    2016-11-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are promising low-cost photovoltaic technologies with high solar-to-electric power conversion efficiency (PCE). The heterojunction structure between perovskite and charge extraction layers is crucial to the photovoltaic performance of PSCs. Here, we report efficient inverted-structured PSCs with a perovskite-fullerene graded heterojunction (GHJ), in which the electron-accepting material is distributed in the perovskite layer with a gradient. This structure can enhance the PCE as it improves the photoelectron collection and reduces recombination loss, especially for the formamidinium cation-based perovskite. The conformal fullerene coating on perovskite during the GHJ deposition achieves a full coverage with reduced layer thickness, thus minimizing the resistive loss in larger sized devices. Our strategy enables the fabrication of centimetre-scale PSCs showing high efficiency with small hysteresis and good stability. A PCE of 18.21% was certified by an independent institution for cells with an aperture area of 1.022 cm2.

  3. Clasts in the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Lonewolf Nunataks 94101: Evidence for aqueous alteration prior to complex mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Paula; Lee, Martin R.; Sofe, Mahmood R.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2013-06-01

    Clasts in the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101 have been characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis to determine their degrees of aqueous alteration, and the timing of alteration relative to incorporation of clasts into the host. The provenance of the clasts, and the mechanism by which they were incorporated and mixed with their host material are also considered. Results show that at least five distinct types of clasts occur in LON 94101, of which four have been aqueously altered to various degrees and one is largely anhydrous. The fact that they have had different alteration histories implies that the main part of aqueous activity occurred prior to the mixing and assimilation of the clasts with their host. Further, the presence of such a variety of clasts suggests complex mixing in a dynamic environment involving material from various sources. Two of the clasts, one containing approximately 46 vol% carbonate and the other featuring crystals of pyrrhotite up to approximately 1 mm in size, are examples of unusual lithologies and indicate concentration of chemical elements in discrete areas of the parent body(ies), possibly by flow of aqueous solutions.

  4. Spin-Hall-Effect-Assisted Electroresistance in Antiferromagnets via 105 A/cm2 dc Current

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiahao; Wang, Yuyan; Pan, Feng; Song, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnet (AFM) spintronics with reduced electrical current is greatly expected to process information with high integration and low power consumption. In Pt/FeMn and Ta/FeMn hybrids, we observe significant resistance variation (up to 7% of the total resistance) manipulated by 105 A/cm2 dc current. We have excluded the contribution of isotropic structural effects, and confirmed the critical role of the spin Hall injection from Pt (or Ta) to FeMn. This electrical current-manipulated resistance (i.e. electroresistance) is proposed to be attributed to the spin-Hall-effect-induced spin-orbit torque in FeMn. Similar results have also been detected in plain IrMn films, where the charge current generates spin current via the spin Hall effect with the existence of Ir atoms. All the measurements are free from external magnetic fields and ferromagnets. Our findings present an interesting step towards high-efficiency spintronic devices. PMID:27546199

  5. Improved Reproducibility for Perovskite Solar Cells with 1 cm(2) Active Area by a Modified Two-Step Process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Heping; Wu, Yiliang; Peng, Jun; Duong, The; Fu, Xiao; Barugkin, Chog; White, Thomas P; Weber, Klaus; Catchpole, Kylie R

    2017-02-22

    With rapid progress in recent years, organohalide perovskite solar cells (PSC) are promising candidates for a new generation of highly efficient thin-film photovoltaic technologies, for which up-scaling is an essential step toward commercialization. In this work, we propose a modified two-step method to deposit the CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) perovskite film that improves the uniformity, photovoltaic performance, and repeatability of large-area perovskite solar cells. This method is based on the commonly used two-step method, with one additional process involving treating the perovskite film with concentrated methylammonium iodide (MAI) solution. This additional treatment is proved to be helpful for tailoring the residual PbI2 level to an optimal range that is favorable for both optical absorption and inhibition of recombination. Scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence image analysis further reveal that, compared to the standard two-step and one-step methods, this method is very robust for achieving uniform and pinhole-free large-area films. This is validated by the photovoltaic performance of the prototype devices with an active area of 1 cm(2), where we achieved the champion efficiency of ∼14.5% and an average efficiency of ∼13.5%, with excellent reproducibility.

  6. Structural Basis for Capping Protein Sequestration by Myotrophin (V-1)*

    PubMed Central

    Zwolak, Adam; Fujiwara, Ikuko; Hammer, John A.; Tjandra, Nico

    2010-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric 62-kDa protein that binds the barbed end of the actin filament with high affinity to block further filament elongation. Myotrophin (V-1) is a 13-kDa ankyrin repeat-containing protein that binds CP tightly, sequestering it in a totally inactive complex in vitro. Here, we elucidate the molecular interaction between CP and V-1 by NMR. Specifically, chemical shift mapping and intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments reveal that the ankyrin loops of V-1, which are essential for V-1/CP interaction, bind the basic patch near the joint of the α tentacle of CP shown previously to drive most of the association of CP with and affinity for the barbed end. Consistently, site-directed mutagenesis of CP shows that V-1 and the strong electrostatic binding site for CP on the barbed end compete for this basic patch on CP. These results can explain how V-1 inactivates barbed end capping by CP and why V-1 is incapable of uncapping CP-capped actin filaments, the two signature biochemical activities of V-1. PMID:20538588

  7. Targeting the cysteine-stabilized fold of Art v 1 for immunotherapy of Artemisia pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Gadermaier, Gabriele; Jahn-Schmid, Beatrice; Vogel, Lothar; Egger, Matthias; Himly, Martin; Briza, Peter; Ebner, Christof; Vieths, Stefan; Bohle, Barbara; Ferreira, Fatima

    2010-03-01

    Plants of the genus Artemisia domestic in Northern and Central Europe, USA and parts of Asia are a major cause of allergic symptoms from late summer to autumn. Art v 1, the major mugwort pollen allergen appears as two-domain glycoprotein, consisting of an N-terminal defensin-like and a proline/hydroxyproline-rich C-terminal part. Patients sensitized to Art v 1 commonly display IgE antibodies against the cysteine-stabilized defensin fold. Site-directed mutagenesis of eight cysteines was used to disrupt disulfide bonds to generate molecules with altered IgE-binding capacity. Engineered constructs were expressed in E. coli and recombinant proteins were tested for their allergenic and T cell reactivity as well as for their physicochemical characteristics. Three cysteine variants (C22S, C47S, and C49S) exhibited extremely low IgE-binding activity in immunoblot and ELISA using sera from Art v 1-allergic patients. Mediator release assays using rat basophil leukemia cells showed that these variants displayed a 1x10(5)-fold reduced allergenic potency as compared to wild-type protein. All variants were able to activate allergen-specific T cells in PBMC, as well as Art v 1-specific T cell lines and clones. Variant C49S displayed an increased hydrophobic surface potential which correlated with an advanced activation of allergen-specific T cells. The low allergenicity and high immunogenic activity of Art v 1 variant C49S renders the molecule an attractive candidate for hypoallergen-based immunotherapy of Artemisia pollen allergy.

  8. Extended chronologies of aqueous alteration in the CM2 carbonaceous chondrites: Evidence from carbonates in Queen Alexandra Range 93005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. R.; Lindgren, P.; Sofe, M. R.; O'D Alexander, C. M.; Wang, J.

    2012-09-01

    The Antarctic CM2 carbonaceous chondrite QUE 93005 contains four compositionally distinct carbonates, namely breunnerite, calcite, dolomite and a Ca-poor dolomite. These carbonates can form monomineralic grains, or may be intergrown as bimineralic grains consisting of dolomite plus breunnerite and dolomite plus calcite, or polymineralic grains containing an intergrowth of breunnerite, Ca-poor dolomite and calcite. Carbonates in all grain types have inclusions of Fe-Ni sulphides and/or Mg-Fe phyllosilicates. In the bimineralic grains, dolomite crystallised first to be overgrown by breunnerite or partially replaced by calcite. Polymineralic grains are concentrically layered, with breunnerite crystallising first on pore margins to be later etched, then overgrown and partially replaced by Ca-poor dolomite that was itself partly dissolved prior to being overgrown by calcite. Calcite and dolomite have also cemented fractures that cross-cut the fine-grained rims to aqueously altered chondrules and were formed by expansion of the chondrules during their hydration. Overall, the sequence of mineralisation in QUE 93005 was: (1) dolomite, (2) breunnerite, (3) Ca-poor dolomite then (4) calcite. This secular change in carbonate composition and mineralogy reflects changing solution composition and probably also provenance. Mg-Fe phyllosilicates replaced dolomite, breunnerite and Ca-poor dolomite prior to calcite crystallisation, and most or all of the sulphides formed after both the phyllosilicates and calcite. Following sulphide crystallisation, the edges of carbonate grains were abraded, either by impact 'gardening' or as a consequence of fluidisation of the matrix during rapid loss of gas or vapour. Determination of the crystallisation age of dolomite via the Mn-Cr system indicates that aqueous alteration of QUE 93005 began on or before 3.93 ± 0.23 Ma after the formation of the oldest solar system solids. Overall, the water/rock ratio and fO2 during alteration of QUE 93005

  9. Changes in storm tracks and energy transports in a warmer climate simulated by the GFDL CM2.1 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yutian; Ting, Mingfang; Seager, Richard; Huang, Huei-Ping; Cane, Mark A.

    2011-07-01

    Storm tracks play a major role in regulating the precipitation and hydrological cycle in midlatitudes. The changes in the location and amplitude of the storm tracks in response to global warming will have significant impacts on the poleward transport of heat, momentum and moisture and on the hydrological cycle. Recent studies have indicated a poleward shift of the storm tracks and the midlatitude precipitation zone in the warming world that will lead to subtropical drying and higher latitude moistening. This study agrees with this key feature for not only the annual mean but also different seasons and for the zonal mean as well as horizontal structures based on the analysis of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) CM2.1 model simulations. Further analyses show that the meridional sensible and latent heat fluxes associated with the storm tracks shift poleward and intensify in both boreal summer and winter in the late twenty-first century (years 2081-2100) relative to the latter half of the twentieth century (years 1961-2000). The maximum dry Eady growth rate is examined to determine the effect of global warming on the time mean state and associated available potential energy for transient growth. The trend in maximum Eady growth rate is generally consistent with the poleward shift and intensification of the storm tracks in the middle latitudes of both hemispheres in both seasons. However, in the lower troposphere in northern winter, increased meridional eddy transfer within the storm tracks is more associated with increased eddy velocity, stronger correlation between eddy velocity and eddy moist static energy, and longer eddy length scale. The changing characteristics of baroclinic instability are, therefore, needed to explain the storm track response as climate warms. Diagnosis of the latitude-by-latitude energy budget for the current and future climate demonstrates how the coupling between radiative and surface heat fluxes and eddy heat and moisture

  10. ATP6V1G1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    ATP6V1G1 is a subunit of vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multisubunit enzyme. V-ATPase is an enzyme transporter that functions to acidify intracellular compartments in eukaryotic cells. This acidification process is necessary for such intracellular processes as protein sorting, zymogen activation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, and synaptic vesicle proton gradient generation. V-ATPase is ubiquitously expressed and is present in endomembrane organelles such as vacuoles, lysosomes, endosomes, the Golgi apparatus, chromaffin granules and coated vesicles, as well as in the plasma membrane. V-ATPase is composed of a cytosolic V1 domain and a transmembrane V0 domain. The V1 domain consists of three A, three B, and two G subunits, as well as a C, D, E, F, and H subunit. The V1 domain contains the ATP catalytic site.

  11. Ageing studies on CuInS2/In2S3 junction (2.5×2cm2) deposited using automated spray machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, M. V.; Kartha, C. Sudha; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2014-04-01

    CuInS2/In2S3 heterojunction photovoltaic device was realized in an area of 2.5 × 2 cm2 using automated spray pyrolysis machine which shows an open-circuit voltage of 432mV, short circuit current density of 6.33mA/cm2, fill factor of 34% and efficiency of 0.94%. Performance of the device was monitored up to 100 days and it was working quite well without the application of any protective coatings. The device maintains a fill factor of around 32% up to 80 days but other photovoltaic parameters had slight decrease.

  12. 46 CFR 3.10-5 - Renewal of letter of designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Renewal of letter of designation. 3.10-5 Section 3.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC DESIGNATION OF OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS Designation § 3.10-5 Renewal of letter of designation. At least 60 days prior...

  13. 46 CFR 38.10-5 - Filling and discharge pipes-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filling and discharge pipes-TB/ALL. 38.10-5 Section 38.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Piping, Valves, Fittings, and Accessory Equipment § 38.10-5 Filling and discharge pipes—TB/ALL....

  14. 46 CFR 30.10-5b - Cargo control station-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo control station-TB/ALL. 30.10-5b Section 30.10-5b Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5b Cargo control station—TB/ALL. The term cargo control station means a location that is...

  15. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  16. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  17. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  18. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  19. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard...

  20. 46 CFR 34.10-5 - Fire pumps-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps-T/ALL. 34.10-5 Section 34.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 34.10-5 Fire pumps—T/ALL. (a) Tankships shall be equipped with independently driven fire pumps...

  1. Solution-processed small molecule-polymer blend organic thin-film transistors with hole mobility greater than 5 cm2/Vs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremy; Zhang, Weimin; Sougrat, Rachid; Zhao, Kui; Li, Ruipeng; Cha, Dongkyu; Amassian, Aram; Heeney, Martin; McCulloch, Iain; Anthopoulos, Thomas D

    2012-05-08

    Using phase-separated organic semiconducting blends containing a small molecule, as the hole transporting material, and a conjugated amorphous polymer, as the binder material, we demonstrate solution-processed organic thin-film transistors with superior performance characteristics that include; hole mobility >5 cm(2) /Vs, current on/off ratio ≥10(6) and narrow transistor parameter spread. These exceptional characteristics are attributed to the electronic properties of the binder polymer and the advantageous nanomorphology of the blend film.

  2. New narrow infrared absorption features in the spectrum of Io between 3600 and 3100 cm (2.8-3.2 micrometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Salama, Farid; Goorvitch, David

    1994-01-01

    We report the discovery of a series of infrared absorption bands between 3600 and 3100/cm (2.8-3.2 micrometers) in the spectrum of Io. Individual narrow bands are detected at 3553, 3514.5, 3438, 3423, 3411.5, and 3401/cm (2.815, 2.845, 2.909, 2.921, 2.931, and 2.940 micrometers, respectively). The positions and relative strengths of these bands, and the difference of their absolute strengths between the leading and trailing faces of Io, indicate that they are due to SO2. The band at 3438/cm (2.909 micrometers) could potentially have a contribution from an additional molecular species. The existence of these bands in the spectrum of Io indicates that a substantial fraction of the SO2 on Io must reside in transparent ices having relatively large crystal sizes. The decrease in the continuum observed at the high frequency ends of the spectra is probably due to the low frequency side of the recently detected, strong 3590/cm (2.79 micrometer) feature. This band is likely due to the combination of a moderately strong SO2 band and an additional absorption from another molecular species, perhaps H2O isolated in SO2 at low concentrations. A broad (FWHM approximately = 40-60/cm), weak band is seen near 3160/cm (3.16 micrometers) and is consistent with the presence of small quantities of H2O isolated in SO2-rich ices. There is no evidence in the spectra for the presence of H2O vapor on Io. Thus, the spectra presented here neither provide unequivocal evidence for the presence of H2O on Io nor preclude it at the low concentrations suggested by past studies.

  3. Feasibility Study for Implementing Magnetic Suspension in the Glenn Research Center 225 cm2 Supersonic Wind Tunnel for Testing the Dynamic Stability of Blunt Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevier, Abigail; Davis, David O.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Barnhart, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of a magnetic suspension system in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 225 cm2 Supersonic Wind Tunnel would be a powerful test technique that could accurately determine the dynamic stability of blunt body entry vehicles with no sting interference. This paper explores initial design challenges to be evaluated before implementation, including defining the lowest possible operating dynamic pressure and corresponding model size, developing a compatible video analysis technique, and incorporating a retractable initial support sting.

  4. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Process of V1 NPP Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Matejovic, Igor; Polak, Vincent

    2007-07-01

    Through the adoption of Governmental Resolution No. 801/99 the Slovak Republic undertook a commitment to shutdown units 1 and 2 of Jaslovske Bohunice V 1 NPP (WWER 230 reactor type) in 2006 and 2008 respectively. Therefore the more intensive preparation of a decommissioning documentation has been commenced. Namely, the VI NPP Conceptual Decommissioning Plan and subsequently the Environmental Impact Assessment Report of VI NPP Decommissioning were developed. Thus, the standard environmental impact assessment process was performed and the most suitable alternative of V1 NPP decommissioning was selected as a basis for development of further decommissioning documents. The status and main results of the environmental impact assessment process and EIA report are discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  5. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain’s ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants’ left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness. PMID:27601986

  6. An uncertainty principle underlying the functional architecture of V1.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Davide; Citti, Giovanna; Sanguinetti, Gonzalo; Sarti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We present a model of the morphology of orientation maps in V1 based on the uncertainty principle of the SE(2) group. Starting from the symmetries of the cortex, suitable harmonic analysis instruments are used to obtain coherent states in the Fourier domain as minimizers of the uncertainty. Cortical activities related to orientation maps are then obtained by projection on a suitable cortical Fourier basis.

  7. 46 CFR 35.10-5 - Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL. 35.10-5 Section 35.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-5 Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning—T/ALL. The requirements for muster lists, emergency signals,...

  8. 46 CFR 35.10-5 - Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL. 35.10-5 Section 35.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-5 Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning—T/ALL. The requirements for muster lists, emergency signals,...

  9. 46 CFR 35.10-5 - Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL. 35.10-5 Section 35.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-5 Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning—T/ALL. The requirements for muster lists, emergency signals,...

  10. 46 CFR 35.10-5 - Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL. 35.10-5 Section 35.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-5 Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning—T/ALL. The requirements for muster lists, emergency signals,...

  11. 46 CFR 35.10-5 - Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning-T/ALL. 35.10-5 Section 35.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Fire and Emergency Requirements § 35.10-5 Muster lists, emergency signals, and manning—T/ALL. The requirements for muster lists, emergency signals,...

  12. 46 CFR 30.10-5a - Cargo area-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo area-TB/ALL. 30.10-5a Section 30.10-5a Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5a Cargo area—TB/ALL. The term cargo area means that part of a vessel that includes the cargo tanks...

  13. 46 CFR 30.10-5a - Cargo area-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo area-TB/ALL. 30.10-5a Section 30.10-5a Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5a Cargo area—TB/ALL. The term cargo area means that part of a vessel that includes the cargo tanks...

  14. 46 CFR 12.10-5 - Examination and demonstration of ability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examination and demonstration of ability. 12.10-5 Section 12.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN..., whether administered orally or by other means, must be conducted only in the English language and...

  15. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... transport a mobile home over water? Yes, you may transport a mobile home over water when both the points...

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-5b - Cargo control station-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo control station-TB/ALL. 30.10-5b Section 30.10-5b...-5b Cargo control station—TB/ALL. The term cargo control station means a location that is manned during cargo transfer operations for the purpose of directing or controlling the loading or unloading...

  17. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... transport a mobile home over water? Yes, you may transport a mobile home over water when both the points...

  18. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... transport a mobile home over water? Yes, you may transport a mobile home over water when both the points...

  19. Orientation Maps in V1 and Non-Euclidean Geometry.

    PubMed

    Afgoustidis, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    In the primary visual cortex, the processing of information uses the distribution of orientations in the visual input: neurons react to some orientations in the stimulus more than to others. In many species, orientation preference is mapped in a remarkable way on the cortical surface, and this organization of the neural population seems to be important for visual processing. Now, existing models for the geometry and development of orientation preference maps in higher mammals make a crucial use of symmetry considerations. In this paper, we consider probabilistic models for V1 maps from the point of view of group theory; we focus on Gaussian random fields with symmetry properties and review the probabilistic arguments that allow one to estimate pinwheel densities and predict the observed value of π. Then, in order to test the relevance of general symmetry arguments and to introduce methods which could be of use in modeling curved regions, we reconsider this model in the light of group representation theory, the canonical mathematics of symmetry. We show that through the Plancherel decomposition of the space of complex-valued maps on the Euclidean plane, each infinite-dimensional irreducible unitary representation of the special Euclidean group yields a unique V1-like map, and we use representation theory as a symmetry-based toolbox to build orientation maps adapted to the most famous non-Euclidean geometries, viz. spherical and hyperbolic geometry. We find that most of the dominant traits of V1 maps are preserved in these; we also study the link between symmetry and the statistics of singularities in orientation maps, and show what the striking quantitative characteristics observed in animals become in our curved models.

  20. MEG studies of human vision: Retinotopic organization of V1

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.; George, J.; Ranken, D.; Best, E.; Tiee, W.; Vigil, V.; Flynn, E.; Wood, C.; Supek, S.

    1993-12-31

    A primary goal of noninvasive studies of human vision is to identify and characterize multiple visual areas in the human brain analogous to those identified in studies of nonhuman primates. By combining functional MEG measurements with images of individual anatomy derived from MRI, the authors hope to determine the location and arrangement of multiple visual areas in human cortex and to probe their functional significance. The authors have identified several different visual areas thus far which appear to be topographically organized. This paper focuses on the retinotopic characterization of the primary visual area (V1) in humans.

  1. Dynamics of cell and tissue growth acquired by means of 25 mm2 to 10 cm2 lens-free imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momey, F.; Coutard, J.-G.; Bordy, T.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Dinten, J.-M.; Allier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a new methodology based on lens-free imaging to perform wound healing assay with unprecedented statistics. Our video lens-free microscopy setup is a simple optical system featuring only a CMOS sensor and a semi coherent illumination system. Yet it is a powerful means for the real-time monitoring of cultivated cells. It presents several key advantages, e.g., integration into standard incubator, compatibility with standard cell culture protocol, simplicity and ease of use. It can perform the follow-up in a large field of view (25 mm2) of several crucial parameters during the culture of cells i.e. their motility, their proliferation rate or their death. Consequently the setup can gather large statistics both in space and time. But in the case of tissue growth experiments, the field of view of 25 mm2 remains not sufficient and results can be biased depending on the position of the device with respect to the recipient of the cell culture. Hence, to conduct exhaustive wound healing assay, here we propose to enlarge the field of view up to 10 cm2 through two different approaches. The first method consists in performing a scan of the cell culture by moving the source/sensor couple and then stitch the stack of images. The second is to make an acquisition by scanning with a line scan camera. The two approaches are compared in term of resolution, complexity and acquisition time. Next we have performed acquisitions of wound healing assay (keratinocytes HaCaT) both in real-time (25 mm2) and in final point (10 cm2) to assess the combination of these two complementary modalities. In the future, we aim at combining directly super wide field of view acquisitions (>10 cm2) with real time ability inside the incubator.

  2. Absence of ocular effects after either single or repeated exposure to 10 mW/cm(2) from a 60 GHz CW source.

    PubMed

    Kues, H A; D'Anna, S A; Osiander, R; Green, W R; Monahan, J C

    1999-12-01

    This study was designed to examine ocular effects associated with exposure to millimeter waves (60 GHz). Rabbits served as the primary experimental subjects. To confirm the results of the rabbit experiments in a higher species, the second phase of the study used nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta). First, this study used time-resolved infrared radiometry to assess the field distribution patterns produced by different antennas operating at 60 GHz. These results allowed us to select an antenna that produced a uniform energy distribution and the best distance at which to expose our experimental subjects. The study then examined ocular changes after exposure at an incident power density of 10 mW/cm(2). Acute exposure of both rabbits and nonhuman primates consisted of a single 8 h exposure, and the repeated exposure protocol consisted of five separate 4 h exposures on consecutive days. One eye in each animal was exposed and the contralateral eye served as the sham-exposed control. After postexposure diagnostic examinations, animals were euthanized and the eyes were removed. Ocular tissue was examined by both light and transmission electron microscopy. Neither microscopic examinations nor the diagnostic procedures performed on the eyes of acute and repeatedly exposed rabbits found any ocular changes that could be attributed to millimeter-wave exposure at 10 mW/cm(2). Examination of the primates after comparable exposures also failed to detect any ocular changes due to exposure. On the basis of our results, we conclude that single or repeated exposure to 60 GHz CW radiation at 10 mW/cm(2) does not result in any detectable ocular damage.

  3. Laser Driven Compression Equations of State and Hugoniot Pressure Measurements in Thick Solid Metallic Targets at ˜0.17-13 TW/cm2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, John L.

    2010-10-01

    An electro-optic laser probe was developed to obtain parameters for high energy density equations of state (EoS), Hugoniot pressures (PH), and strain rates for high energy density laser irradiation intensity, I, experiments at ˜170 GW/cm2 (λ = 1064 nm) to ˜13 TW/cm2 (λ = 527 nm) on Al, Cu, Ti, Fe, Ni metal targets in a vacuum. At I ˜7 TW/cm2 front surface plasma pressures and temperatures reached 100's GPa and over two million K. Rear surface PH ranged from 7-120 GPa at average shock wave transit velocities 4.2-8.5 km/s, depending on target thickness and I. A surface plasma compression ˜100's GPa generated an impulsive radial expanding shock wave causing compression, rarefactions, and surface elastic and plastic deformations depending on I. A laser/fiber optic system measured rear surface shock wave emergence and particle velocity with ˜3 GHz resolution by monitoring light deflection from diamond polished rear surfaces of malleable metallic targets, analogous to an atomic force microscope. Target thickness, ˜0.5-2.9 mm, prevented front surface laser irradiation penetration, due to low radiation skin depth, from altering rear surface reflectivity (refractive index). At ˜10 TW electromagnetic plasma pulse noise generated from the target chamber overwhelmed detector signals. Pulse frequency analysis using Moebius loop antennae probed transient noise characteristics. Average shock (compression) and particle (rear surface displacement) velocity measurements determined rear surface PH and GPa) EoS that are compared with gas guns.

  4. 4H-SiC Power Bipolar Junction Transistor with a Very Low Specific On-resistance of 2.9 mOmega.cm2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-12

    pp1381-1382, 2004. [2] C.-F. Huang and J. A. Cooper, Jr., “High current gain 4H-SiC NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors ,” IEEE Electron Device Lett...4H-SiC Power Bipolar Junction Transistor with a Very Low Specific On-resistance of 2.9 mΩ.cm2 Jianhui Zhang, member, IEEE, Petre Alexandrov...specific on-resistance (Rsp,on) of power 4H-SiC bipolar junction transistors (BJT). A 4H-SiC BJT based on a 12 um drift-layer shows a record low

  5. Giant Field Localization in 2-D Photonic Crystal Cavities with Defect Resonances: Bringing Nonlinear Optics to the W/cm2 Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AEgis Tech,Nanogenesis Division ,410 Jan Davis Dr,Huntsville,AL,35806 8...cm2 level Nadia Mattiucci,1 Mark J. Bloemer,2 and Giuseppe D’Aguanno1,a 1AEgis Tech., Nanogenesis Division 410 Jan Davis Dr, Huntsville, AL 35806, USA...Opt. Comm. 285, 1945 (2012). 24 N. Hô, J. M. Laniel, R. Valée, and A. Villeneuve, “ Photosensitivity of As2S3 chalcogenide thin films at 1.5μm

  6. MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures with electron mobility exceeding 1 × 106 cm2/Vs

    PubMed Central

    Falson, Joseph; Kozuka, Yusuke; Uchida, Masaki; Smet, Jurgen H.; Arima, Taka-hisa; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The inherently complex chemical and crystallographic nature of oxide materials has suppressed the purities achievable in laboratory environments, obscuring the rich physical degrees of freedom these systems host. In this manuscript we provide a systematic approach to defect identification and management in oxide molecular beam epitaxy grown MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures which host two-dimensional electron systems. We achieve samples displaying electron mobilities in excess of 1 × 106 cm2/Vs. This data set for the MgZnO/ZnO system firmly establishes that the crystalline quality has become comparable to traditional semiconductor materials. PMID:27229479

  7. Generation of Black-Dominant Responses in V1 Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chun-I; Shapley, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Consistent with human perceptual data, we found many more black-dominant than white-dominant responses in layer 2/3 neurons of the macaque primary visual cortex (V1). Seeking the mechanism of this black dominance of layer 2/3 neurons, we measured the laminar pattern of population responses (multiunit activity and local field potential) and found that a small preference for black is observable in early responses in layer 4Cβ, the parvocellular-input layer, but not in the magnocellular-input layer 4Cα. Surprisingly, further analysis of the dynamics of black-white responses in layers 4Cβ and 2/3 suggested that black-dominant responses in layer 2/3 were not generated simply because of the weak black-dominant inputs from 4Cβ. Instead, our results indicated the neural circuitry in V1 is wired with a preference to strengthen black responses. We hypothesize that this selective wiring could be due to (1) feedforward connectivity from black-dominant neurons in layer 4C to cells in layer 2/3 or (2) recurrent interactions between black-dominant neurons in layer 2/3, or a combination of both. PMID:20926676

  8. Columnar organization of orientation domains in V1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedtke, Joscha; Wolf, Fred

    In the primary visual cortex (V1) of primates and carnivores, the functional architecture of basic stimulus selectivities appears similar across cortical layers (Hubel & Wiesel, 1962) justifying the use of two-dimensional cortical models and disregarding organization in the third dimension. Here we show theoretically that already small deviations from an exact columnar organization lead to non-trivial three-dimensional functional structures. We extend two-dimensional random field models (Schnabel et al., 2007) to a three-dimensional cortex by keeping a typical scale in each layer and introducing a correlation length in the third, columnar dimension. We examine in detail the three-dimensional functional architecture for different cortical geometries with different columnar correlation lengths. We find that (i) topological defect lines are generally curved and (ii) for large cortical curvatures closed loops and reconnecting topological defect lines appear. This theory extends the class of random field models by introducing a columnar dimension and provides a systematic statistical assessment of the three-dimensional functional architecture of V1 (see also (Tanaka et al., 2011)).

  9. Gain Modulation by Nicotine in Macaque V1

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Anita A.; Aoki, Chiye; Hawken, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acetylcholine is a ubiquitous cortical neuromodulator implicated in cognition. In order to understand the potential for acetylcholine to play a role in visual attention, we studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) localization and function in area V1 of the macaque. We found nAChRs presynaptically at thalamic synapses onto excitatory, but not inhibitory, neurons in the primary thalamorecipient layer 4c. Furthermore, consistent with the release enhancement suggested by this localization, we discovered that nicotine increases responsiveness and lowers contrast threshold in layer 4c neurons. We also found that nAChRs are expressed by GABAergic interneurons in V1 but rarely by pyramidal neurons, and that nicotine suppresses visual responses outside layer 4c. All sensory systems incorporate gain control mechanisms, or processes which dynamically alter input/output relationships. We demonstrate that at the site of thalamic input to visual cortex, the effect of this nAChR-mediated gain is an enhancement of the detection of visual stimuli. PMID:18031686

  10. Performance of n-in-p Pixel Detectors Irradiated at Fluences up to 5x1015 neq/cm2 for the Future ATLAS Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchiolo, A.; Gallrapp, C.; La Rosa, A.; Nisius, R.; Pernegger, H.; Richter, R. H.; Weigell, P.

    We present the results of the characterization of novel n-in-p planar pixel detectors, designed for the future upgrades of the ATLAS pixel system. N-in-p silicon devices are a promising candidate to replace the n-in-n sensors thanks to their radiation hardness and cost effectiveness, that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. The n-in-p modules presented here are composed of pixel sensors produced by CiS connected by bump-bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. The characterization of these devices has been performed with the ATLAS pixel read-out systems, TurboDAQ and USBPIX, before and after irradiation with 25 MeV protons and neutrons up to a fluence of 5x1015 neq/cm2. The charge collection measurements carried out with radioactive sources have proven the feasibility of employing this kind of detectors up to these particle fluences. The collected charge has been measured to be for any fluence in excess of twice the value of the FE-I3 threshold, tuned to 3200 e. The first results from beam test data with 120 GeV pions at the CERN-SPS are also presented, demonstrating a high tracking efficiency before irradiation and a high collected charge for a device irradiated at 1015 neq/cm2. This work has been performed within the framework of the RD50 Collaboration.

  11. 5 × 5 cm2 silicon photonic crystal slabs on glass and plastic foil exhibiting broadband absorption and high-intensity near-fields

    PubMed Central

    Becker, C.; Wyss, P.; Eisenhauer, D.; Probst, J.; Preidel, V.; Hammerschmidt, M.; Burger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline silicon photonic crystal slabs are widely used in various photonics applications. So far, the commercial success of such structures is still limited owing to the lack of cost-effective fabrication processes enabling large nanopatterned areas (≫ 1 cm2). We present a simple method for producing crystalline silicon nanohole arrays of up to 5 × 5 cm2 size with lattice pitches between 600 and 1000 nm on glass and flexible plastic substrates. Exclusively up-scalable, fast fabrication processes are applied such as nanoimprint-lithography and silicon evaporation. The broadband light trapping efficiency of the arrays is among the best values reported for large-area experimental crystalline silicon nanostructures. Further, measured photonic crystal resonance modes are in good accordance with light scattering simulations predicting strong near-field intensity enhancements greater than 500. Hence, the large-area silicon nanohole arrays might become a promising platform for ultrathin solar cells on lightweight substrates, high-sensitive optical biosensors, and nonlinear optics. PMID:25073935

  12. Tailoring gadolinium-doped ceria-based solid oxide fuel cells to achieve 2 W cm(-2) at 550 °C.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Goo; Park, Jeong Ho; Shul, Yong Gun

    2014-06-04

    Low-temperature operation is necessary for next-generation solid oxide fuel cells due to the wide variety of their applications. However, significant increases in the fuel cell losses appear in the low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells, which reduce the cell performance. To overcome this problem, here we report Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95-based low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells with nanocomposite anode functional layers, thin electrolytes and core/shell fibre-structured Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ-Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 cathodes. In particular, the report describes the use of the advanced electrospinning and Pechini process in the preparation of the core/shell-fibre-structured cathodes. The fuel cells show a very high performance of 2 W cm(-2) at 550 °C in hydrogen, and are stable for 300 h even under the high current density of 1 A cm(-2). Hence, the results suggest that stable and high-performance solid oxide fuel cells at low temperatures can be achieved by modifying the microstructures of solid oxide fuel cell components.

  13. AMINO ACID ANALYSES OF THE ANTARCTIC CM2 METEORITES ALH 83100 AND LEW 90500 USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-TIME OF FLIGHT-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Aubrey, A.; Botta, O.; Doty, J. H., III; Bada, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The investigation of organic compounds in primitive carbonaceous meteorites provides a record of the chemical processes that occurred in the early solar system. In particular, amino acids have been shown to be potential indicators in tracing the nature of carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies [ 13. The delivery of amino acids by carbonaceous chondrites to the early Earth could have been any important source of the Earth's prebiotic organic inventory [2]. Over 80 different amino acids have been detected in the Murchison CM2 meteorite, most of them completely non-existent in the terrestrial biosphere [3]. We have optimized a new liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-ToF-MS) technique coupled with OPAMAC derivatization in order to detect amino acids in meteorite extracts by UV fluorescence and exact mass simultaneously. The detection limit of the LC-ToF-MS instrument for amino acids is at least 3 orders of magnitude lower than traditional GC-MS techniques. Here we report on the first analyses of amino acids and their enantiomeric abundances in the CM2 carbonaceous meteorites ALH 83100, LEW 90500, and Murchison using this new LC-ToF-MS instrument configuration. Amino acid analyses of any kind for the CM meteorite ALH 83100 have not previously been reported.

  14. Current density and catalyst-coated membrane resistance distribution of hydro-formed metallic bipolar plate fuel cell short stack with 250 cm2 active area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, S.; Moser, M.; Hirschfeld, J. A.; Jozwiak, K.

    2016-01-01

    An automotive fuel cell with an active area of 250 cm2 is investigated in a 4-cell short stack with a current and temperature distribution device next to the bipolar plate with 560 current and 140 temperature segments. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this current scan shunt module. The applied fuel cell consists of bipolar plates constructed of 75-μm-thick, welded stainless-steel foils and a graphitic coating. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this module with a 6% deviation in in-plane conductivity. The current density distribution is evaluated up to 2.4 A cm-2. The entire cell's investigated volumetric power density is 4.7 kW l-1, and its gravimetric power density is 4.3 kW kg-1 at an average cell voltage of 0.5 V. The current density distribution is determined without influencing the operating cell. In addition, the current density distribution in the catalyst-coated membrane and its effective resistivity distribution with a finite volume discretisation of Ohm's law are evaluated. The deviation between the current density distributions in the catalyst-coated membrane and the bipolar plate is determined.

  15. Hyperfine polarization and its normal gradient coefficient of (87)Rb atoms in the vicinity (approximately 10(-5) cm) of coated and uncoated Pyrex glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, K; Wu, Z

    2003-09-12

    We have made regionally specific measurement of the hyperfine polarization of 87Rb atoms in the vicinity ( approximately 10(-5) cm) of coated and uncoated Pyrex glass surfaces. We find that the polarization near an uncoated surface decreases rapidly with decreasing distance from the surface whereas for a silicone-coated surface the polarization is independent of the distance from the surface. We have also determined the normal gradient coefficient micro (S.I) of the hyperfine polarization in uncoated cells. In a representative uncoated cell, at a Rb density 7.35 x 10(13) cm(-3) and a pump beam intensity 1.3 W/cm(2), we find micro(S.I)=24+/-7 microm(-1).

  16. 46 CFR 54.10-5 - Maximum allowable working pressure (reproduces UG-98).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Inspection, Reports, and Stamping § 54.10-5 Maximum allowable working pressure...) that are likely to occur, or the designated coincident operating temperature, excluding any...

  17. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Gaspra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 951 as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on October 29, 1991. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the target asteroid. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files gap015tn.qub, gap035tn.qub, gap036tn.qub, gap037tn.qub, and gap038tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3 TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the first Earth/Moon encounter of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  18. The Open Provenance Model core specification (v1.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, Luc; Clifford, Ben; Freire, Juliana; Futrelle, Joe; Gil, Yolanda; Groth, Paul; Kwasnikowska, Natalia; Miles, Simon; Missier, Paolo; Myers, Jim; Plale, Beth; Simmhan, Yogesh; Stephan, Eric; den Bussche, Jan Van

    2011-06-01

    The Open Provenance Model is a model of provenance that is designed to meet the following requirements: (1) To allow provenance information to be ex- changed between systems, by means of a compatibility layer based on a shared provenance model. (2) To allow developers to build and share tools that operate on such a provenance model. (3) To deFIne provenance in a precise, technology- agnostic manner. (4) To support a digital representation of provenance for any “thing, whether produced by computer systems or not. (5) To allow multiple levels of description to coexist. (6) To deFIne a core set of rules that identify the valid inferences that can be made on provenance representation. This docu- ment contains the speciFIcation of the Open Provenance Model (v1.1) resulting from a commChallenge.

  19. The oxygen isotope evolution of parent body aqueous solutions as recorded by multiple carbonate generations in the Lonewolf Nunataks 94101 CM2 carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. R.; Sofe, M. R.; Lindgren, P.; Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.

    2013-11-01

    The CM2 carbonaceous chondrite LON 94101 contains aragonite and two generations of calcite that provide snapshots of the chemical and isotopic evolution of aqueous solutions during parent body alteration. Aragonite was the first carbonate to crystallize. It is rare, heterogeneously distributed within the meteorite matrix, and its mean oxygen isotope values are δ18O 39.9 ± 0.6‰, Δ17O -0.3 ± 1.0‰ (1σ). Calcite precipitated soon afterwards, and following a fall in solution Mg/Ca ratios, to produce small equant grains with a mean oxygen isotope value of δ18O 37.5 ± 0.7‰, Δ17O 1.4 ± 1.1‰ (1σ). These grains were partially or completely replaced by serpentine and tochilinite prior to precipitation of the second generation of calcite, which occluded an open fracture to form a millimetre-sized vein, and replaced anhydrous silicates within chondrules and the matrix. The vein calcite has a mean composition of δ18O 18.4 ± 0.3‰, Δ17O -0.5 ± 0.5‰ (1σ). Petrographic and isotopic results therefore reveal two discrete episodes of mineralisation that produced calcite generations with contrasting δ18O, and mean Δ17O values. The aragonite and equant calcite crystallized over a relatively brief period early in the aqueous alteration history of the parent body, and from static fluids that were evolving chemically in response to mineral dissolution and precipitation. The second calcite generation crystallized from solutions of a lower Δ17O, and a lower δ18O and/or higher temperature. As two generations of calcite whose petrographic characteristics and oxygen isotopic compositions are similar to those in LON 94101 occur in at least one other CM2, multiphase carbonate mineralisation could be the typical outcome of the sequence of chemical reactions during parent body aqueous alteration. It is equally possible however that the second generation of calcite formed in response to an event such as impact fracturing and concomitant fluid mobilisation that affected

  20. High-Performance, Air-Stable Field-Effect Transistors Based on Heteroatom-Substituted Naphthalenediimide-Benzothiadiazole Copolymers Exhibiting Ultrahigh Electron Mobility up to 8.5 cm V(-1) s(-1).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Yin, Zhihong; Chen, Huajie; Zheng, Liping; Zhu, Chunguang; Zhang, Long; Tan, Songting; Wang, Hanlin; Guo, Yunlong; Tang, Qingxin; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-01-01

    Rational heteroatom engineering is applied to develop high-performance electron-transporting naphthalenediimide copolymers. Top-gate field-effect transistors fabricated from selenophene-containing polymers achieve an ultrahigh electron mobility of 8.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and excellent air-stability. The results demonstrate that the incorporation of selenophene heterocycles into the polymers can improve the film-forming ability, intermolecular interaction, and carrier transport significantly.

  1. Three-dimensional nanostructured bilayer solid oxide fuel cell with 1.3 W/cm(2) at 450 °C.

    PubMed

    An, Jihwan; Kim, Young-Beom; Park, Joonsuk; Gür, Turgut M; Prinz, Fritz B

    2013-09-11

    Obtaining high power density at low operating temperatures has been an ongoing challenge in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which are efficient engines to generate electrical energy from fuels. Here we report successful demonstration of a thin-film three-dimensional (3-D) SOFC architecture achieving a peak power density of 1.3 W/cm(2) obtained at 450 °C. This is made possible by nanostructuring of the ultrathin (60 nm) electrolyte interposed with a nanogranular catalytic interlayer at the cathode/electrolyte interface. We attribute the superior cell performance to significant reduction in both the ohmic and the polarization losses due to the combined effects of employing an ultrathin film electrolyte, enhancement of effective area by 3-D architecture, and superior catalytic activity by the ceria-based interlayer at the cathode. These insights will help design high-efficiency SOFCs that operate at low temperatures with power densities that are of practical significance.

  2. Compositions of Partly Altered Olivine and Replacement Serpentine in the CM2 Chondrites QUE93005 and Nogoya: Implications for Scales of Elemental Redistribution During Aqueous Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velbel, M. A.; Tonui, E. K.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Some phyllosilicates in CM carbonaceous chondrites formed by aqueous alteration of anhydrous precursor phases. Although broad trends in the compositions of hydrous phyllosilicates are recognized and believed to be related to trends in degree of aqueous alteration, details of the reactions that formed specific secondary minerals remain obscure. This paper reports compositional relationships between remnants of partially pseudomorphically replaced silicates and their alteration products (serpentine) in the CM2 chondrites QUE93005 and Nogoya and compares both with previously published results for Allan Hills 81002. By focusing on serpentine formed from known reactants (olivines), and on only those instances in which some of the reactant silicate remains, direct compositional relationships between reactants and products, and the elemental mobility required by the reactions, can be established.

  3. iGeoT v1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, Nicolas; Finsterle, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    iGeoT v1.0 automates into a stand-alone computer program the multicomponent chemical geothermometry code GeoT v2.1 and the numerical optimization engine of iTOUGH2. iGeoT allows for optimizations of GeoT runs using multiple water chemical analyses. The underlying geothermometry method is that previously developed by Reed and Spycher (1984) using the computed saturation indices of multiple minerals. GeoT automatically reconstitutes deep fluid compositions and estimates reservoir temperature from statistical evaluation of computed mineral saturation indices. The output include estimated temperatures following various statistical methods and their range of uncertainty. The computer program also outputs temperatures predicted using classical geothermometers. Input parameters include water composition and, optionally, gas composition, fraction of gas discharge, dilution/evaporation factor (in case of boiling or mixing with dilute waters), and end-member water composition (in case of mixing with other non-dilute waters). The dilution/evaporation factor, fraction of gas discharge, and concentration of various aqueous and gas species can be automatically estimated by numerical optimization. This program was designed for geothermal applications.

  4. Evaluation of recombinant monoclonal antibody SVmab1 binding to Na V1.7 target sequences and block of human Na V1.7 currents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Tseng, Mandy; Epstein, Linda F; Green, Lydia; Chan, Brian; Soriano, Brian; Lim, Desiree; Pan, Oscar; Murawsky, Christopher M; King, Chadwick T; Moyer, Bryan D

    2016-01-01

    Identification of small and large molecule pain therapeutics that target the genetically validated voltage-gated sodium channel Na V1.7 is a challenging endeavor under vigorous pursuit. The monoclonal antibody SVmab1 was recently published to bind the Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain and block human Na V1.7 sodium currents in heterologous cells. We produced purified SVmab1 protein based on publically available sequence information, and evaluated its activity in a battery of binding and functional assays. Herein, we report that our recombinant SVmAb1 does not bind peptide immunogen or purified Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain via ELISA, and does not bind Na V1.7 in live HEK293, U-2 OS, and CHO-K1 cells via FACS. Whole cell manual patch clamp electrophysiology protocols interrogating diverse Na V1.7 gating states in HEK293 cells, revealed that recombinant SVmab1 does not block Na V1.7 currents to an extent greater than observed with an isotype matched control antibody. Collectively, our results show that recombinant SVmab1 monoclonal antibody does not bind Na V1.7 target sequences or specifically inhibit Na V1.7 current.

  5. Evaluation of recombinant monoclonal antibody SVmab1 binding to Na V1.7 target sequences and block of human Na V1.7 currents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Tseng, Mandy; Epstein, Linda F.; Green, Lydia; Chan, Brian; Soriano, Brian; Lim, Desiree; Pan, Oscar; Murawsky, Christopher M.; King, Chadwick T.; Moyer, Bryan D.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of small and large molecule pain therapeutics that target the genetically validated voltage-gated sodium channel Na V1.7 is a challenging endeavor under vigorous pursuit. The monoclonal antibody SVmab1 was recently published to bind the Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain and block human Na V1.7 sodium currents in heterologous cells. We produced purified SVmab1 protein based on publically available sequence information, and evaluated its activity in a battery of binding and functional assays. Herein, we report that our recombinant SVmAb1 does not bind peptide immunogen or purified Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain via ELISA, and does not bind Na V1.7 in live HEK293, U-2 OS, and CHO-K1 cells via FACS. Whole cell manual patch clamp electrophysiology protocols interrogating diverse Na V1.7 gating states in HEK293 cells, revealed that recombinant SVmab1 does not block Na V1.7 currents to an extent greater than observed with an isotype matched control antibody. Collectively, our results show that recombinant SVmab1 monoclonal antibody does not bind Na V1.7 target sequences or specifically inhibit Na V1.7 current. PMID:27990272

  6. Modified MBE hardware and techniques and role of gallium purity for attainment of two dimensional electron gas mobility >35×106 cm2/V s in AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells grown by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Geoffrey C.; Fallahi, Saeed; Watson, John D.; Manfra, Michael J.

    2016-05-01

    We provide evidence that gallium purity is the primary impediment to attainment of ultra-high mobility in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The purity of gallium can be enhanced dramatically by in-situ high temperature outgassing within an operating MBE. Based on analysis of data from an initial growth campaign in a new MBE system and modifications employed for a 2nd growth campaign, we have produced 2DEGs with low temperature mobility μ in excess of 35×106 cm2/V s at density n=3.0×1011/cm2 and μ=18×106 cm2/V s at n=1.1×1011/cm2. Our 2nd campaign data indicate that gallium purity remains the factor currently limiting μ<40×106 cm2/V s. We describe strategies to overcome this limitation.

  7. Ion acceleration in electrostatic field of charged cavity created by ultra-short laser pulses of 1020-1021 W/cm2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Singh, P. K.; Ahmed, H.; Kakolee, K. F.; Scullion, C.; Jeong, T. W.; Hadjisolomou, P.; Alejo, A.; Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2017-01-01

    Ion acceleration resulting from the interaction of ultra-high intensity and ultra-high contrast (˜10-10) laser pulses with thin A l foil targets at 30° angle of laser incidence is studied. Proton maximum energies of 30 and 18 MeV are measured along the target normal rear and front sides, respectively, showing intensity scaling as Ib . For the target front bf r o n t= 0.5-0.6 and for the target rear br e a r= 0.7-0.8 is observed in the intensity range 1020-1021 W/cm2. The fast scaling from the target rear ˜I0.75 can be attributed enhancement of laser energy absorption as already observed at relatively low intensities. The backward acceleration of the front side protons with intensity scaling as ˜I0.5 can be attributed to the to the formation of a positively charged cavity at the target front via ponderomotive displacement of the target electrons at the interaction of relativistic intense laser pulses with a solid target. The experimental results are in a good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  8. Aging characteristics of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes at an extremely high current density of 3.5 kA cm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Pengfei; Althumali, Ahmad; Gu, Erdan; Watson, Ian M.; Dawson, Martin D.; Liu, Ran

    2016-04-01

    The aging characteristics of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes (micro-LEDs) with different sizes have been studied at an extremely high current density 3.5 kA cm-2 for emerging micro-LED applications including visible light communication (VLC), micro-LED pumped organic lasers and optogenetics. The light output power of micro-LEDs first increases and then decreases due to the competition of Mg activation in p-GaN layer and defect generation in the active region. The smaller micro-LEDs show less light output power degradation compared with larger micro-LEDs, which is attributed to the lower junction temperature of smaller micro-LEDs. It is found that the high current density without additional junction temperature cannot induce significant micro-LED degradation at room temperature but the combination of the high current density and high junction temperature leads to strong degradation. Furthermore, the cluster LEDs, composed of a micro-LED array, have been developed with both high light output power and less light output degradation for micro-LED applications in solid state lighting and VLC.

  9. First operation and performance of a 200 lt double phase LAr LEM-TPC with a 40 × 76 cm2 readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badertscher, A.; Curioni, A.; Degunda, U.; Epprecht, L.; Gendotti, A.; Horikawa, S.; Knecht, L.; Lussi, D.; Natterer, G.; Nguyen, K.; Resnati, F.; Rubbia, A.; Viant, T.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we describe the design, construction, and operation of a first large area double-phase liquid argon Large Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber (LAr LEM-TPC). The detector has a maximum drift length of 60 cm and the readout consists of a 40 × 76 cm2 LEM and 2D projective anode to multiply and collect drifting charges. Scintillation light is detected by means of cryogenic PMTs positioned below the cathode. To record both charge and light signals, we have developed a compact acquisition system, which is scalable up to ton-scale detectors with thousands of charge readout channels. The acquisition system, as well as the design and the performance of custom-made charge sensitive preamplifiers, are described. The complete experimental setup has been operated for a first time during a period of four weeks at CERN in the cryostat of the ArDM experiment, which was equipped with liquid and gas argon purification systems. The detector, exposed to cosmic rays, recorded events with a single-channel signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 30 for minimum ionising particles. Cosmic muon tracks and their δ-rays were used to assess the performance of the detector, and to estimate the liquid argon purity and the gain at different amplification fields.

  10. Nanostructured multielement (TiHfZrNbVTa)N coatings before and after implantation of N+ ions (1018 cm-2): Their structure and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Bondar, O. V.; Borba, S. O.; Abadias, G.; Konarski, P.; Plotnikov, S. V.; Beresnev, V. M.; Kassenova, L. G.; Drodziel, P.

    2016-10-01

    Multielement high entropy alloy (HEA) nitride (TiHfZrNbVTa)N coatings were deposited by vacuum arc and their structural and mechanical stability after implantation of high doses of N+ ions, 1018 cm-2, were investigated. The crystal structure and phase composition were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy, while depth-resolved nanoindentation tests were used to determine the evolution of hardness and elastic modulus along the implantation depth. XRD patterns show that coatings exhibit a main phase with fcc structure, which preferred orientation varies from (1 1 1) to (2 0 0), depending on the deposition conditions. First-principles calculations reveal that the presence of Nb atoms could favor the formation of solid solution with fcc structure in multielement HEA nitride. TEM results showed that amorphous and nanostructured phases were formed in the implanted coating sub-surface layer (∼100 nm depth). Concentration of nitrogen reached 90 at% in the near-surface layer after implantation, and decreased at higher depth. Nanohardness of the as-deposited coatings varied from 27 to 38 GPa depending on the deposition conditions. Ion implantation led to a significant decrease of the nanohardness to 12 GPa in the implanted region, while it reaches 24 GPa at larger depths. However, the H/E ratio is ⩾0.1 in the sub-surface layer due to N+ implantation, which is expected to have beneficial effect on the wear properties.

  11. Performance of a 64-channel, 3.2×3.2 cm2 SiPM tile for TOF-PET application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, Alessandro; Acerbi, Fabio; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio; Paternoster, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a new 3.2×3.2 cm2 detector tile, composed of 8×8 single SiPMs, having a regular 4 mm pitch in both the X and Y directions. The tile fill factor is 85%. We produced two versions of the tile with different SiPM technologies: RGB-HD and NUV. The first one features square micro-cells with 25 μm pitch, a PDE peaked at 550 nm and a DCR of 300 kHz/mm2, at 20 °C and at maximum detection efficiency. The second one features micro-cells with 40 μm pitch and a PDE peaked in the blue part of the spectrum. The dark count rate at 20 °C and at maximum PDE is 100 kHz/mm2. In this work, we show the energy and timing resolution measurements at 511 keV obtained coupling the two tiles to an 8×8 LYSO array with a pixel size of 4×4×22 mm3, perfectly matching the photo-detector array.

  12. Predicting the optimal process window for the coating of single-crystalline organic films with mobilities exceeding 7 cm2/Vs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janneck, Robby; Vercesi, Federico; Heremans, Paul; Genoe, Jan; Rolin, Cedric

    2016-09-01

    Organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) based on single crystalline thin films of organic semiconductors have seen considerable development in the recent years. The most successful method for the fabrication of single crystalline films are solution-based meniscus guided coating techniques such as dip-coating, solution shearing or zone casting. These upscalable methods enable rapid and efficient film formation without additional processing steps. The single-crystalline film quality is strongly dependent on solvent choice, substrate temperature and coating speed. So far, however, process optimization has been conducted by trial and error methods, involving, for example, the variation of coating speeds over several orders of magnitude. Through a systematic study of solvent phase change dynamics in the meniscus region, we develop a theoretical framework that links the optimal coating speed to the solvent choice and the substrate temperature. In this way, we can accurately predict an optimal processing window, enabling fast process optimization. Our approach is verified through systematic OTFT fabrication based on films grown with different semiconductors, solvents and substrate temperatures. The use of best predicted coating speeds delivers state of the art devices. In the case of C8BTBT, OTFTs show well-behaved characteristics with mobilities up to 7 cm2/Vs and onset voltages close to 0 V. Our approach also explains well optimal recipes published in the literature. This route considerably accelerates parameter screening for all meniscus guided coating techniques and unveils the physics of single crystalline film formation.

  13. 19 CFR 10.5 - Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's... Provisions Articles Exported and Returned § 10.5 Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's account. (a... record of cloth boards of domestic manufacture exported to be wrapped with foreign textiles shall be...

  14. 19 CFR 10.5 - Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's... Provisions Articles Exported and Returned § 10.5 Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's account. (a... record of cloth boards of domestic manufacture exported to be wrapped with foreign textiles shall be...

  15. 19 CFR 10.5 - Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's... Provisions Articles Exported and Returned § 10.5 Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's account. (a... record of cloth boards of domestic manufacture exported to be wrapped with foreign textiles shall be...

  16. 19 CFR 10.5 - Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's... Provisions Articles Exported and Returned § 10.5 Shooks and staves; cloth boards; port director's account. (a... record of cloth boards of domestic manufacture exported to be wrapped with foreign textiles shall be...

  17. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  18. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  19. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  20. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  1. 33 CFR 1.10-5 - Public availability of records and documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... written request to the Chief, Office of Information Management (CG-61), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters... of Information Management (CG-61), at the address in paragraph (a) of this section. ... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GENERAL PROVISIONS Public Availability of Information § 1.10-5...

  2. 46 CFR 31.10-5 - Inspection of new tank vessels-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... district in which the vessel is to be built; and one set shall be retained at the Marine Safety Center. If... such tank vessel is classed by the American Bureau of Shipping or other recognized classification... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inspection of new tank vessels-TB/ALL. 31.10-5...

  3. 46 CFR 31.10-5 - Inspection of new tank vessels-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... district in which the vessel is to be built; and one set shall be retained at the Marine Safety Center. If... such tank vessel is classed by the American Bureau of Shipping or other recognized classification... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inspection of new tank vessels-TB/ALL. 31.10-5...

  4. 26 CFR 1.414(v)-1 - Catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catch-up contributions. 1.414(v)-1 Section 1.414(v)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(v)-1 Catch-up...

  5. 26 CFR 1.414(v)-1 - Catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catch-up contributions. 1.414(v)-1 Section 1.414(v)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(v)-1...

  6. 26 CFR 1.414(v)-1 - Catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Catch-up contributions. 1.414(v)-1 Section 1.414(v)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(v)-1...

  7. 26 CFR 1.414(v)-1 - Catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catch-up contributions. 1.414(v)-1 Section 1.414(v)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(v)-1...

  8. 26 CFR 1.414(v)-1 - Catch-up contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catch-up contributions. 1.414(v)-1 Section 1.414(v)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(v)-1...

  9. Aqueous Alteration of Carbonaceous Chondrites: New Insights from Comparative Studies of Two Unbrecciated CM2 Chondrites, Y 791198 and ALH 81002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chizmadia, L. J.; Brearley, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are an important resource for understanding the physical and chemical conditions in the early solar system. In particular, a long-standing question concerns the role of water in the cosmochemical evolution of carbonaceous chondrites. It is well established that extensive hydration of primary nebular phases occurred in the CM and CI chondrites, but the location where this alteration occurred remains controversial. In the CM2 chondrites, hydration formed secondary phases such as serpentine, tochilinite, pentlandite, carbonate and PCP. There are several textural observations which suggest that alteration occurred before the accretion of the final CM parent asteroid, i.e. preaccretionary alteration. Conversely, there is a significant body of evidence that supports parent-body alteration. In order to test these two competing hypotheses further, we studied two CM chondrites, Y-791198 and ALH81002, two meteorites that exhibit widely differing degrees of aqueous alteration. In addition, both meteorites have primary accretionary textures, i.e. experienced minimal asteroidal brecciation. Brecciation significantly complicates the task of unraveling alteration histories, mixing components that have been altered to different degrees from different locations on the same asteroidal parent body. Alteration in Y-791198 is mostly confined to chondrule mesostases, FeNi metal and fine-grained matrix and rims. In comparison, the primary chondrule silicates in ALH81002 have undergone extensive replacement by secondary hydrous phases. This study focuses on compositional and textural relationships between chondrule mesostasis and the associated rim materials. Our hypothesis is: both these components are highly susceptible to aqueous alteration and should be sensitive recorders of the alteration process. For parent body alteration, we expect systematic coupled mineralogical and compositional changes in rims and altered mesostasis, as elemental exchange between these

  10. Investigation of rat bone fracture healing using pulsed 1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2) burst ultrasound--axial distance dependency.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chak-Hei; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Pounder, Neill M; de Ana, F Javier; Harrison, Andrew; Leung, Kwok-Sui

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of LIPUS on fracture healing when fractures were exposed to ultrasound at three axial distances: z=0 mm, 60 mm, and 130 mm. We applied LIPUS to rat fracture at these three axial distances mimicking the exposure condition of human fractures at different depths under the soft tissue. Measurement of LIPUS shows pressure variations in near field (nearby transducer); uniform profile was found beyond it (far field). We asked whether different positions of the fracture within the ultrasound field cause inconsistent biological effect during the healing process. Closed femoral fractured Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, near-field (0mm), mid-near field (60 mm) or far-field (130 mm) groups. Daily LIPUS treatment (plane, but apodized source, see details in the text; 2.2 cm in diameter; 1.5 MHz sine waves repeating at 1 kHz PRF; spatial average temporal average intensity, ISATA=30 mW/cm(2)) was given to fracture site at the three axial distances. Weekly radiographs and endpoint microCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical tests were performed. The results showed that the 130 mm group had the highest tissue mineral density; and significantly higher mechanical properties than control at week 4. The 60 mm and 0 mm groups had significantly higher (i.e. p<0.05) woven bone percentage than control group in radiological, microCT and histomorphometry measurements. In general, LIPUS at far field augmented callus mineralization and mechanical properties; while near field and mid-near field enhanced woven bone formation. Our results indicated the therapeutic effect of LIPUS is dependent on the axial distance of the ultrasound beam. Therefore, the depth of fracture under the soft tissue affects the biological effect of LIPUS. Clinicians have to be aware of the fracture depth when LIPUS is applied transcutaneously.

  11. Chloromethane Utilization Gene Cluster from Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum Strain CM2T and Development of Functional Gene Probes To Detect Halomethane-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    McAnulla, Craig; Woodall, Claire A.; McDonald, Ian R.; Studer, Alex; Vuilleumier, Stephane; Leisinger, Thomas; Murrell, J. Colin

    2001-01-01

    Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum CM2T, an aerobic methylotrophic member of the α subclass of the class proteobacteria, can grow with chloromethane as the sole carbon and energy source. H. chloromethanicum possesses an inducible enzyme system for utilization of chloromethane, in which two polypeptides (67-kDa CmuA and 35-kDa CmuB) are expressed. Previously, four genes, cmuA, cmuB, cmuC, and purU, were shown to be essential for growth of Methylobacterium chloromethanicum on chloromethane. The cmuA and cmuB genes were used as probes to identify homologs in H. chloromethanicum. A cmu gene cluster (9.5 kb) in H. chloromethanicum contained 10 open reading frames: folD (partial), pduX, orf153, orf207, orf225, cmuB, cmuC, cmuA, fmdB, and paaE (partial). CmuA from H. chloromethanicum (67 kDa) showed high identity to CmuA from M. chloromethanicum and contains an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal corrinoid-binding domain. CmuB from H. chloromethanicum is related to a family of methyl transfer proteins and to the CmuB methyltransferase from M. chloromethanicum. CmuC from H. chloromethanicum shows identity to CmuC from M. chloromethanicum and is a putative methyltransferase. folD codes for a methylene-tetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase, which may be involved in the C1 transfer pathway for carbon assimilation and CO2 production, and paaE codes for a putative redox active protein. Molecular analyses and some preliminary biochemical data indicated that the chloromethane utilization pathway in H. chloromethanicum is similar to the corrinoid-dependent methyl transfer system in M. chloromethanicum. PCR primers were developed for successful amplification of cmuA genes from newly isolated chloromethane utilizers and enrichment cultures. PMID:11133460

  12. Hydrogen and carbon isotopic ratios of polycyclic aromatic compounds in two CM2 carbonaceous chondrites and implications for prebiotic organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongsong; Aponte, José C.; Zhao, Jiaju; Tarozo, Rafael; Hallmann, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Study of meteoritic organic compounds offers a unique opportunity to understand the origins of the organic matter in the early Solar System. Meteoritic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heteropolycyclic aromatic compounds (HACs) have been studied for over fifty years, however; their hydrogen stable isotopic ratios (δD) have never been reported. Compound-specific δD measurements of PAHs and HACs are important, in part because the carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C) of various meteoritic PAHs cannot be readily distinguished from their terrestrial counterparts and it is difficult to rule out terrestrial contamination based on carbon isotopic ratios alone. In this study, we have extracted and identified more than sixty PAHs and HACs present in two CM2 carbonaceous chondrites Murchison and LON 94101. Their carbon and hydrogen stable isotopic ratios (δ13C and δD) were measured and used to discuss about their synthetic environments and formation mechanisms. The concentration of aromatic compounds is ∼30% higher in Murchison than in the Antarctic meteorite LON 94101, but both samples contained similar suites of PAHs and HACs. All PAHs and HACs found exhibited positive δD values (up to 1100‰) consistent with an extraterrestrial origin, indicating the relatively low δ13C values are indeed an inherent feature of the meteoritic aromatic compounds. The hydrogen isotopic data suggest aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites were mainly formed in the cold interstellar environments. Molecular level variations in hydrogen and carbon isotopic values offer new insights to the formation pathways for the aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.

  13. One-year Outcomes of Pachymetry and Epithelium Thicknesses after Accelerated (45 mW/cm2) Transepithelial Corneal Collagen Cross-linking for Keratoconus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Sun, Ling; Chen, Yingjun; Li, Meiyan; Tian, Mi; Zhou, Xingtao

    2016-01-01

    The thickness of corneal pachymetry and the epithelium after accelerated (45 mW/cm2) transepithelial corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) for keratoconus were assessed in this prospective case series study. Twenty-eight patients were treated for keratoconus. The mean Kmax was 56.18 ± 7.90. The thinnest point, as assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT), was 443.18 ± 39.75 μm. Accelerated transepithelial CXL was performed, and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), corneal topography, and OCT were recorded at 1 week postoperatively as well as at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. The surgery was uneventful in all eyes. Postoperative epithelial edema was observed and faded in 3 days. The postoperative Kmax was 54.56 ± 8.81, 55.78 ± 8.11, 56.37 ± 8.71, 55.80 ± 7.92, and 55.47 ± 8.24 at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months, respectively (all, P > 0.05). The thinnest postoperative corneal point, 439.04 ± 44.99 μm, was observed at 12 months (P = 0.109). The epithelial thickness decreased during the first postoperative week then showed a gradual recovery. Postoperative pachymetry thickness showed no significant changes for up to 12 months. Postoperative epithelial thickness decreased temporarily, then stabilized at month 12. Accelerated transepithelial CXL was shown to be effective and safe for the treatment of keratoconus. PMID:27597655

  14. Effect of Tube-Based X-Ray Microtomography Imaging on the Amino Acid and Amine Content of the Murchison CM2 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Friedrich, J. M.; Aponte, J. C.; Dworkin, J. P.; Ebel, D. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Hill, M.; McLain, H. L.; Towbin, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray and synchrotron X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) are increasingly being used for three dimensional reconnaissance imaging of chondrites and returned extraterrestrial material prior to detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses. Although micro-CT imaging is generally considered to be a non-destructive technique since silicate and metallic minerals in chondrites are not affected by X-ray exposures at the intensities and wavelengths typically used, there are concerns that the use of micro-CT could be detrimental to the organics in carbonaceous chondrites. We recently conducted a synchrotron micro-CT experiment on a powdered sample of the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite exposed to a monochromatic high energy (approximately 48 kiloelectronvolts) total X-ray radiation dose of approximately 1 kilogray (kGy) using the Advanced Photon Source beamline 13-BMD (13-Bending Magnet-D Beamline) at Argonne National Laboratory and found that there were no detectable changes in the amino acid abundances or enantiomeric compositions in the chondrite after exposure relative to a Murchison control sample that was not exposed. However, lower energy bremsstrahlung X-rays could interact more with amino acids and other lower molecular weight amines in meteorites. To test for this possibility, three separate micro-CT imaging experiments of the Murchison meteorite using the GE Phoenix v/tome/x s 240 kilovolt microfocus high resolution tungsten target X-ray tube instrument at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) were conducted and the amino acid abundances and enantiomeric compositions were determined. We also investigated the abundances of the C1-C5 amines in Murchison which were not analyzed in the first study.

  15. Optimal Jet Finder (v1.0 C++)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, S.; Jankowski, E.; Tkachov, F. V.

    2006-10-01

    We describe a C++ implementation of the Optimal Jet Definition for identification of jets in hadronic final states of particle collisions. We explain interface subroutines and provide a usage example. The source code is available from http://www.inr.ac.ru/~ftkachov/projects/jets/. Program summaryTitle of program: Optimal Jet Finder (v1.0 C++) Catalogue identifier: ADSB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSB_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: any computer with a standard C++ compiler Tested with:GNU gcc 3.4.2, Linux Fedora Core 3, Intel i686; Forte Developer 7 C++ 5.4, SunOS 5.9, UltraSPARC III+; Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 (compiler 13.10.3077, linker 7.10.30777, option /EHsc), Windows XP, Intel i686. Programming language used: C++ Memory required:˜1 MB (or more, depending on the settings) No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3047 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 884 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: Analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collision experiments often involves identification of hadronic jets. A large number of hadrons detected in the calorimeter is reduced to a few jets by means of a jet finding algorithm. The jets are used in further analysis which would be difficult or impossible when applied directly to the hadrons. Grigoriev et al. [D.Yu. Grigoriev, E. Jankowski, F.V. Tkachov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 061801] provide brief introduction to the subject of jet finding algorithms and a general review of the physics of jets can be found in [R. Barlow, Rep. Prog. Phys. 36 (1993) 1067]. Method of solution: The software we provide is an implementation of the so-called Optimal Jet Definition (OJD). The theory of OJD was developed in [F.V. Tkachov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 2405; Erratum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74 (1995) 2618; F.V. Tkachov, Int. J. Modern Phys

  16. Silencing of atp6v1c1 prevents breast cancer growth and bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shengmei; Zhu, Guochun; McConnell, Matthew; Deng, Lianfu; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Mengrui; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Jinshen; Qi, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Atp6v1c1, a regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex, is up-regulated in metastatic oral tumors. Despite these studies, the function of Atp6v1c1 in tumor growth and metastasis is still unknown. Atp6v1c1's expression in metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma indicates that Atp6v1c1 has an important function in cancer growth and metastasis. We hypothesized that elevated expression of Atp6v1c1 is essential to cancer growth and metastasis and that Atp6v1c1 promotes cancer growth and metastasis through activation of V-ATPase activity. To test this hypothesis, a Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown approach was used to study the function of Atp6v1c1 in mouse 4T1 mammary tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro and cancer growth and metastasis in vivo. Our data revealed that silencing of Atp6v1c1 in 4T1 cancer cells inhibited lysosomal acidification and severely impaired 4T1 cell growth, migration, and invasion through Matrigel in vitro. We also show that Atp6v1c1 knockdown with Lenti-c1s3, a lentivirus targeting Atp6v1c1 for shRNA mediated knockdown, can significantly inhibit 4T1 xenograft tumor growth, metastasis, and osteolytic lesions in vivo. Our study demonstrates that Atp6v1c1 may promote breast cancer growth and bone metastasis through regulation of lysosomal V-ATPase activity, indicating that Atp6v1c1 may be a viable target for breast cancer therapy and silencing of Atp6v1c1 may be an innovative therapeutic approach for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  17. Measurements of charm meson production in 10.5 GeV electron-positron annihilations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Edward Eric

    A study of charm meson production in e+ e- γ* --> cc¯ events at s = 10.5 GeV is presented. Included are measurements of the fragmentation distributions of D+s and D*+s , the vector to pseudoscalar production ratio for Ds, and the D*+ spin alignment. A description of the new trigger designed for the CLEO III detector is also provided.

  18. Optical characterizations and electronic devices of nearly pure (10,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Tu, Xiaomin; Welsher, Kevin; Wang, Xinran; Zheng, Ming; Dai, Hongjie

    2009-02-25

    It remains an elusive goal to achieve high-performance single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) composed of only single-chirality SWNTs. Many separation mechanisms have been devised and various degrees of separation demonstrated, yet it is still difficult to reach the goal of total fractionation of a given nanotube mixture into its single-chirality components. Chromatography has been reported to separate small SWNTs (diameter < or = 0.9 nm) according to their diameter, chirality, and length. The separation efficiency decreased with increasing tube diameter when the ssDNA sequence d(GT)(n) (n = 10-45) was used. Here we report our results on the separation of single-chirality (10,5) SWNTs (diameter = 1.03 nm) from HiPco tubes using ion-exchange chromatography. The separation efficiency was improved by using the new DNA sequence (TTTA)(3)T, which can recognize SWNTs with the specific chirality (10,5). The chirality of the separated tubes was examined by optical absorption, Raman, photoluminescence excitation/emission, and electrical transport measurements. All of the spectroscopic methods gave a single peak of (10,5) tubes. The purity was 99% according to the electrical measurement. The FETs composed of separated SWNTs in parallel gave an I(on)/I(off) ratio up to 10(6) due to the single-chirality-enriched (10,5) tubes. This is the first time that SWNT FETs with single-chirality SWNTs have been achieved. The chromatography method has the potential to separate even larger diameter semiconducting SWNTs from other starting materials to further improve the performance of the SWNT FETs.

  19. Determining temperature distribution in tissue in the focal plane of the high (>100 W/cm(2)) intensity focused ultrasound beam using phase shift of ultrasound echoes.

    PubMed

    Karwat, Piotr; Kujawska, Tamara; Lewin, Peter A; Secomski, Wojciech; Gambin, Barbara; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    In therapeutic applications of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) the guidance of the HIFU beam and especially its focal plane is of crucial importance. This guidance is needed to appropriately target the focal plane and hence the whole focal volume inside the tumor tissue prior to thermo-ablative treatment and beginning of tissue necrosis. This is currently done using Magnetic Resonance Imaging that is relatively expensive. In this study an ultrasound method, which calculates the variations of speed of sound in the locally heated tissue volume by analyzing the phase shifts of echo-signals received by an ultrasound scanner from this very volume is presented. To improve spatial resolution of B-mode imaging and minimize the uncertainty of temperature estimation the acoustic signals were transmitted and received by 8 MHz linear phased array employing Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) technique. Initially, the validity of the algorithm developed was verified experimentally in a tissue-mimicking phantom heated from 20.6 to 48.6 °C. Subsequently, the method was tested using a pork loin sample heated locally by a 2 MHz pulsed HIFU beam with focal intensity ISATA of 129 W/cm(2). The temperature calibration of 2D maps of changes in the sound velocity induced by heating was performed by comparison of the algorithm-determined changes in the sound velocity with the temperatures measured by thermocouples located in the heated tissue volume. The method developed enabled ultrasound temperature imaging of the heated tissue volume from the very inception of heating with the contrast-to-noise ratio of 3.5-12 dB in the temperature range 21-56 °C. Concurrently performed, conventional B-mode imaging revealed CNR close to zero dB until the temperature reached 50 °C causing necrosis. The data presented suggest that the proposed method could offer an alternative to MRI-guided temperature imaging for prediction of the location and extent of the thermal lesion prior to applying the

  20. Kinetic Analysis of Membrane Potential Dye Response to NaV1.7 Channel Activation Identifies Antagonists with Pharmacological Selectivity against NaV1.5.

    PubMed

    Finley, Michael; Cassaday, Jason; Kreamer, Tony; Li, Xinnian; Solly, Kelli; O'Donnell, Greg; Clements, Michelle; Converso, Antonella; Cook, Sean; Daley, Chris; Kraus, Richard; Lai, Ming-Tain; Layton, Mark; Lemaire, Wei; Staas, Donnette; Wang, Jixin

    2016-06-01

    The NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel is a highly valued target for the treatment of neuropathic pain due to its expression in pain-sensing neurons and human genetic mutations in the gene encoding NaV1.7, resulting in either loss-of-function (e.g., congenital analgesia) or gain-of-function (e.g., paroxysmal extreme pain disorder) pain phenotypes. We exploited existing technologies in a novel manner to identify selective antagonists of NaV1.7. A full-deck high-throughput screen was developed for both NaV1.7 and cardiac NaV1.5 channels using a cell-based membrane potential dye FLIPR assay. In assay development, known local anesthetic site inhibitors produced a decrease in maximal response; however, a subset of compounds exhibited a concentration-dependent delay in the onset of the response with little change in the peak of the response at any concentration. Therefore, two methods of analysis were employed for the screen: one to measure peak response and another to measure area under the curve, which would capture the delay-to-onset phenotype. Although a number of compounds were identified by a selective reduction in peak response in NaV1.7 relative to 1.5, the AUC measurement and a subsequent refinement of this measurement were able to differentiate compounds with NaV1.7 pharmacological selectivity over NaV1.5 as confirmed in electrophysiology.

  1. Visceral and somatic pain modalities reveal NaV 1.7-independent visceral nociceptive pathways.

    PubMed

    Hockley, James R F; González-Cano, Rafael; McMurray, Sheridan; Tejada-Giraldez, Miguel A; McGuire, Cian; Torres, Antonio; Wilbrey, Anna L; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Nieto, Francisco R; Pitcher, Thomas; Knowles, Charles H; Baeyens, José Manuel; Wood, John N; Winchester, Wendy J; Bulmer, David C; Cendán, Cruz Miguel; McMurray, Gordon

    2017-01-20

    Voltage-gated sodium channel NaV 1.7 is required for acute and inflammatory pain in mice and humans but its significance for visceral pain is unknown. Here we examine the role of NaV 1.7 in visceral pain processing and the development of referred hyperalgesia using a conditional nociceptor-specific NaV 1.7 knockout mouse (NaV 1.7(Nav1.8) ) and selective small-molecule NaV 1.7 antagonist PF-5198007. NaV 1.7(Nav1.8) mice showed normal nociceptive behaviours to intracolonic application of either capsaicin or mustard oil, stimuli known to evoke sustained nociceptor activity and sensitization following tissue damage, respectively. Normal responses following induction of cystitis by cyclophosphamide were also observed in both NaV 1.7(Nav1.8) and littermate controls. Loss, or blockade, of NaV 1.7 did not affect afferent responses to noxious mechanical and chemical stimuli in nerve-gut preparations in mouse, or following antagonism of NaV 1.7 in resected human appendix stimulated by noxious distending pressures. However, expression analysis of voltage-gated sodium channel α subunits revealed NaV 1.7 mRNA transcripts in nearly all retrogradely-labelled colonic neurons suggesting redundancy in function. By contrast, using comparative somatic behavioral models we identify that genetic deletion of NaV 1.7 (in NaV 1.8-expressing neurons) regulates noxious heat pain threshold and that this can be recapitulated by the selective NaV 1.7 antagonist PF-5198007. Our data demonstrates that NaV 1.7 (in NaV 1.8-expressing neurons) contributes to defined pain pathways in a modality-dependent manner, modulating somatic noxious heat pain but is not required for visceral pain processing, and advocates that pharmacological block of NaV 1.7 alone in the viscera may be insufficient in targeting chronic visceral pain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. NBC's ``10.5'' May Answer An Age-Old Seismologic Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Andrew V.

    2004-04-01

    There is a new NBC 4-hour miniseries set to air during the May sweeps period (2-3 May) titled simply enough ``10.5.'' No, this is not a sequel to ``9 and ½ weeks'', nor is it a mini-sequel to ``10''. This number instead refers to a mega-earthquake that rocks the west coast of the United States. One may think that the network writers have done their homework and have consulted a geophysicist or two regarding the realism of their program, let alone the title. This is just a short note to comment on their potential folly. I would like to clarify to the network writers, as well as to the non-seismologists in the Earth science community what exactly a magnitude 10.5 earthquake could be, and why, if such were to occur, it may be more than just a west coast problem. Alternatively, NBC may just soon answer an age-old seismologic question...

  3. Specificity of V1-V2 Orientation Networks in the Primate Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Anna W.; Ts'o, Daniel Y.

    2015-01-01

    The computation of texture and shape involves integration of features of various orientations. Orientation networks within V1 tend to involve cells which share similar orientation selectivity. However, emergent properties in V2 require the integration of multiple orientations. We now show that, unlike interactions within V1, V1-V2 orientation interactions are much less synchronized and are not necessarily orientation dependent. We find V1-V2 orientation networks are of two types: a more tightly synchronized, orientation-preserving network and a less synchronized orientation-diverse network. We suggest that such diversity of V1-V2 interactions underlies the spatial and functional integration required for computation of higher order contour and shape in V2. PMID:26314798

  4. Vasopressin receptors V1a and V2 are not osmosensors

    PubMed Central

    Lykke, Kasper; Assentoft, Mette; Fenton, Robert A; Rosenkilde, Mette M; MacAulay, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we investigated whether G protein-coupled signaling via the vasopressin receptors of the V1a and V2 subtypes (V1aR and V2R) could be obtained as a direct response to hyperosmolar challenges and/or whether hyperosmolar challenges could augment classical vasopressin-dependent V1aR signaling. The V1aR-dependent response was monitored indirectly via its effects on aquaporin 4 (AQP4) when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and V1aR and V2R function was directly monitored following heterologous expression in COS-7 cells. A tendency toward an osmotically induced, V1aR-mediated reduction in AQP4-dependent water permeability was observed, although osmotic challenges failed to mimic vasopressin-dependent V1aR-mediated internalization of AQP4. Direct monitoring of inositol phosphate (IP) production of V1aR-expressing COS-7 cells demonstrated an efficient vasopressin-dependent response that was, however, independent of hyperosmotic challenges. Similarly, the cAMP production by the V2R was unaffected by hyperosmotic challenges although, in contrast to the V1aR, the V2R displayed an ability to support alternative signaling (IP production) at higher concentration of vasopressin. V1aR and V2R respond directly to vasopressin exposure, but they do not have an ability to act as osmo- or volume sensors when exposed to an osmotic gradient in the absence or presence of vasopressin. PMID:26311834

  5. The rise and fall of Lake Bonneville between 45 and 10.5 ka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; Lund, S.P.; Smoot, J.P.; Rhode, D.E.; Spencer, R.J.; Verosub, K.L.; Louderback, L.A.; Johnson, C.A.; Rye, R.O.; Negrini, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    A sediment core taken from the western edge of the Bonneville Basin has provided high-resolution proxy records of relative lake-size change for the period 45.1-10.5 calendar ka (hereafter ka). Age control was provided by a paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV)-based age model for Blue Lake core BL04-4. Continuous records of ??18O and total inorganic carbon (TIC) generally match an earlier lake-level envelope based on outcrops and geomorphic features, but with differences in the timing of some hydrologic events/states. The Stansbury Oscillation was found to consist of two oscillations centered on 25 and 24 ka. Lake Bonneville appears to have reached its geomorphic highstand and began spilling at 18.5 ka. The fall from the highstand to the Provo level occurred at 17.0 ka and the lake intermittently overflowed at the Provo level until 15.2 ka, at which time the lake fell again, bottoming out at ~14.7 ka. The lake also fell briefly below the Provo level at ~15.9 ka. Carbonate and ??18O data indicate that between 14.7 and 13.1 ka the lake slowly rose to the Gilbert shoreline and remained at about that elevation until 11.6 ka, when it fell again. Chemical and sedimentological data indicate that a marsh formed in the Blue Lake area at 10.5 ka.Relatively dry periods in the BL04-4 records are associated with Heinrich events H1-H4, suggesting that either the warming that closely followed a Heinrich event increased the evaporation rate in the Bonneville Basin and (or) that the core of the polar jet stream (PJS) shifted north of the Bonneville Basin in response to massive losses of ice from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) during the Heinrich event. The second Stansbury Oscillation occurred during Heinrich event H2, and the Gilbert wet event occurred during the Younger Dryas cold interval. Several relatively wet events in BL04-4 occur during Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) warm events.The growth of the Bear River glacier between 32 and 17 ka paralleled changes in the values of proxy

  6. Hierarchical CRMP2 posttranslational modifications control NaV1.7 function.

    PubMed

    Dustrude, Erik T; Moutal, Aubin; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yuying; Khanna, May; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-12-27

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are crucial determinants of neuronal excitability and signaling. Trafficking of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 is dysregulated in neuropathic pain. We identify a trafficking program for NaV1.7 driven by hierarchical interactions with posttranslationally modified versions of the binding partner collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2). The binding described between CRMP2 and NaV1.7 was enhanced by conjugation of CRMP2 with small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) and further controlled by the phosphorylation status of CRMP2. We determined that CRMP2 SUMOylation is enhanced by prior phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and antagonized by Fyn phosphorylation. As a consequence of CRMP2 loss of SUMOylation and binding to NaV1.7, the channel displays decreased membrane localization and current density, and reduces neuronal excitability. Preventing CRMP2 SUMOylation with a SUMO-impaired CRMP2-K374A mutant triggered NaV1.7 internalization in a clathrin-dependent manner involving the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4) and endocytosis adaptor proteins Numb and epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 15. Collectively, our work shows that diverse modifications of CRMP2 cross-talk to control NaV1.7 activity and illustrate a general principle for regulation of NaV1.7.

  7. Multiple episodic evolution events in V1R receptor genes of East-African cichlids.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Masato; Ota, Tomoki; Hirata, Tadashi; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Satta, Yoko; Aibara, Mitsuto; Mzighani, Semvua I; Sturmbauer, Christian; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko; Okada, Norihiro

    2014-05-06

    Fish use olfaction to detect a variety of nonvolatile chemical signals, and thus, this sense is key to survival and communication. However, the contribution of the olfactory sense to social-especially reproductive-interactions in cichlids is still controversial. To obtain insights into this issue, we investigated the genes encoding V1Rs-possible candidates for reproductive pheromone receptors-among East-African cichlids. Interestingly, we found an excess of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions in four of six V1R genes in multiple cichlid lineages. First, we found that highly dimorphic V1R2 allele groups were shared among the cichlids inhabiting all East-African Great Lakes emerged through the episodic accumulation of the nonsynonymous substitutions prior to the radiation of the Lake Tanganyika species flock. We further detected such episodic events in V1R1 of the tribe Tropheini, and in V1R3 and V1R6 of the tribe Trematocarini. The excess of nonsynonymous substitutions in these examples were indicated as dN/dS > 1, which were all statistically significant by Fisher's exact test. Furthermore, we speculate that the amino acid changes in these episodic events are likely functional switch because they occurred in the putative ligand-binding pocket. Our finding of the occurrence of multiple episodic events and the unexpected gene diversity in one unique gene family is suggestive of the contribution of the V1R to the species diversification and the social interaction in cichlids.

  8. More functional V1R genes occur in nest-living and nocturnal terricolous mammals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Shi, Peng; Zhu, Zhouhai; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2010-07-12

    Size of the vomeronasal type 1 receptor (V1R) gene repertoire may be a good indicator for examining the relationship between animal genomes and their environmental niche specialization, especially the relationship between ecological factors and the molecular evolutionary history of the sensory system. Recently, Young et al. (Young JM, Massa HF, Hsu L, Trask BJ. 2009. Extreme variability among mammalian V1R gene families. Genome Res.) concluded that no single ecological factor could explain the extreme variability of the V1R gene repertoire in mammalian genomes. In contrast, we found a significant positive correlation between the size and percentage of intact V1R genes in 32 species that represent the phylogenetic diversity of terricolous mammals and two ecological factors: spatial activity and rhythm activity. Nest-living species possessed a greater number of intact V1R genes than open-living species, and nocturnal terricolous mammals tended to possess more intact V1R genes than did diurnal species. Moreover, our analysis reveals that the evolutionary mechanisms underlying these observations likely resulted from the rapid gene birth and accelerated amino acid substitutions in nest-living and nocturnal mammals, likely a functional requirement for exploiting narrow, dark environments. Taken together, these results reveal how adaptation to divergent circadian rhythms and spatial activity were manifested at the genomic scale. Size of the V1R gene family might have indicated how this gene family adapts to ecological factors.

  9. Immune recognition of novel isoforms and domains of the mugwort pollen major allergen Art v 1.

    PubMed

    Dedic, Azra; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Vogel, Lothar; Ebner, Christof; Vieths, Stefan; Ferreira, Fátima; Egger, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Allergen isoforms can differ in their IgE and T cell recognition patterns, and thus might have an impact on the selection of candidates for molecule-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The present study aimed at the identification and characterization of isoforms of Art v 1, the mugwort pollen major allergen. In addition, single Art v 1 domains were physicochemically and immunologically characterized. For this purpose, the Art v 1 cDNA was radiolabeled and used to screen a mugwort pollen cDNA library. Positive clones were sequenced and used for the production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using the pHIS-Parallel2 vector. Protein purification was performed by affinity- and ion exchange chromatography. Antibody binding to the recombinant proteins was determined by immunoblot, ELISA, cross-inhibition experiments, and mediator release assays. We could identify 7 Art v 1 isoforms differing in 1-6 amino acid residues. Interestingly, all amino acid variations were restricted to the proline domain carrying the molecule's post-translational modifications. No significant difference in IgG or IgE reactivity could be observed between Art v 1 isoforms and the defensin domain produced in E. coli. When expressed in E. coli, the proline domain was not recognized by Art v 1-specific antibodies. Our results demonstrated that the relevant IgE epitopes of Art v 1 are located on the defensin domain and suggest the involvement of carbohydrates in the allergenicity of natural Art v 1. Plant-based expression systems could help to reveal possibly different glycosylation patterns and IgE binding properties of Art v 1 isoforms. These findings have direct implications on the development of novel tools for mugwort pollen allergy diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Co-evolutionary dynamics of the bacteria Vibrio sp. CV1 and phages V1G, V1P1, and V1P2: implications for phage therapy.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Camilo; Venail, Patrick; Holguin, Angela V; Vives, Martha J

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial infections are the second largest cause of mortality in shrimp hatcheries. Among them, bacteria from the genus Vibrio constitute a major threat. As the use of antibiotics may be ineffective and banned from the food sector, alternatives are required. Historically, phage therapy, which is the use of bacteriophages, is thought to be a promising option to fight against bacterial infections. However, as for antibiotics, resistance can be rapidly developed. Since the emergence of resistance is highly undesirable, a formal characterization of the dynamics of its acquisition is mandatory. Here, we explored the co-evolutionary dynamics of resistance between the bacteria Vibrio sp. CV1 and the phages V1G, V1P1, and V1P2. Single-phage treatments as well as a cocktail composed of the three phages were considered. We found that in the presence of a single phage, bacteria rapidly evolved resistance, and the phages decreased their infectivity, suggesting that monotherapy may be an inefficient treatment to fight against Vibrio infections in shrimp hatcheries. On the contrary, the use of a phage cocktail considerably delayed the evolution of resistance and sustained phage infectivity for periods in which shrimp larvae are most susceptible to bacterial infections, suggesting the simultaneous use of multiple phages as a serious strategy for the control of vibriosis. These findings are very promising in terms of their consequences to different industrial and medical scenarios where bacterial infections are present.

  11. Sodium channel diversity in the vestibular ganglion: NaV1.5, NaV1.8, and tetrodotoxin-sensitive currents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Wooltorton, Julian R A; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Yang, Fu-Chia; Lysakowski, Anna; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2016-05-01

    Firing patterns differ between subpopulations of vestibular primary afferent neurons. The role of sodium (NaV) channels in this diversity has not been investigated because NaV currents in rodent vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) were reported to be homogeneous, with the voltage dependence and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitivity of most neuronal NaV channels. RT-PCR experiments, however, indicated expression of diverse NaV channel subunits in the vestibular ganglion, motivating a closer look. Whole cell recordings from acutely dissociated postnatal VGNs confirmed that nearly all neurons expressed NaV currents that are TTX-sensitive and have activation midpoints between -30 and -40 mV. In addition, however, many VGNs expressed one of two other NaV currents. Some VGNs had a small current with properties consistent with NaV1.5 channels: low TTX sensitivity, sensitivity to divalent cation block, and a relatively negative voltage range, and some VGNs showed NaV1.5-like immunoreactivity. Other VGNs had a current with the properties of NaV1.8 channels: high TTX resistance, slow time course, and a relatively depolarized voltage range. In two NaV1.8 reporter lines, subsets of VGNs were labeled. VGNs with NaV1.8-like TTX-resistant current also differed from other VGNs in the voltage dependence of their TTX-sensitive currents and in the voltage threshold for spiking and action potential shape. Regulated expression of NaV channels in primary afferent neurons is likely to selectively affect firing properties that contribute to the encoding of vestibular stimuli.

  12. 10.5% efficient polymer and amorphous silicon hybrid tandem photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehwan; Hong, Ziruo; Li, Gang; Song, Tze-Bin; Chey, Jay; Lee, Yun Seog; You, Jingbi; Chen, Chun-Chao; Sadana, Devendra K.; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Thin-film solar cells made with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) or organic semiconductors are considered as promising renewable energy sources due to their low manufacturing cost and light weight. However, the efficiency of single-junction a-Si:H or organic solar cells is typically <10%, insufficient for achieving grid parity. Here we demonstrate an efficient double-junction photovoltaic cell by employing an a-Si:H film as a front sub-cell and a low band gap polymer:fullerene blend film as a back cell on planar glass substrates. Monolithic integration of 6.0% efficienct a-Si:H and 7.5% efficient polymer:fullerene blend solar cells results in a power conversion efficiency of 10.5%. Such high-efficiency thin-film tandem cells can be achieved by optical management and interface engineering of fully optimized high-performance front and back cells without sacrificing photovoltaic performance in both cells.

  13. Pion interference correlations in pion-nucleus collisions at 10. 5 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.

    1983-01-01

    Inclusive reactions of pion, Ne collisions at 10.5 GeV/c have been studied. The pion intensity interference effect has been observed in identical pion (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup -/, and ..pi../sup -/, ..pi../sup -/) as well as non-identical (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup -/) pion pair correlations. A momentum dependence is observed in the interference correlation function at small momentum differences. Previously only the identical pion interference correlations have been reported. In this thesis, the non-identical pion pair correlation is also studied. The momentum dependence is also new. For (..pi../sup -/,..pi../sup +/) and (..pi../sup -/,..pi../sup -/) pairs, the enhancement is due mostly to pions with mom/sup */>600 MeV/c. However for (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup +/) pairs, the peak is due primarily to pions with mom<200 MeV/c. Using the method of Kopylov and Podgoretsky the identical pion source region is determined to be 4.1 +/- 2.3 fermis. Also the influence on the final state correlations by the Bose statistics, Coulomb, and nuclear forces is observed. The possibility of using the (..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/) pion pair correlations to examine the pions produced in the quark-gluon perturbative vacuum of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is suggested.

  14. 10.5% efficient polymer and amorphous silicon hybrid tandem photovoltaic cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehwan; Hong, Ziruo; Li, Gang; Song, Tze-bin; Chey, Jay; Lee, Yun Seog; You, Jingbi; Chen, Chun-Chao; Sadana, Devendra K; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-04

    Thin-film solar cells made with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) or organic semiconductors are considered as promising renewable energy sources due to their low manufacturing cost and light weight. However, the efficiency of single-junction a-Si:H or organic solar cells is typically <10%, insufficient for achieving grid parity. Here we demonstrate an efficient double-junction photovoltaic cell by employing an a-Si:H film as a front sub-cell and a low band gap polymer:fullerene blend film as a back cell on planar glass substrates. Monolithic integration of 6.0% efficienct a-Si:H and 7.5% efficient polymer:fullerene blend solar cells results in a power conversion efficiency of 10.5%. Such high-efficiency thin-film tandem cells can be achieved by optical management and interface engineering of fully optimized high-performance front and back cells without sacrificing photovoltaic performance in both cells.

  15. rBet v 1 immunotherapy of sensitized mice with Streptococcus thermophilus as vehicle and adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Petrarca, Claudia; Clemente, Emanuela; Toto, Valentina; Iezzi, Manuela; Rossi, Cosmo; Zanotta, Stefania; Mistrello, Gianni; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca; Arioli, Stefania; Mora, Diego; Guglielmetti, Simone; Paganelli, Roberto; Di Gioacchino, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli are able to induce upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs with Th1 cytokines production and increase in Treg activity. This could explain the observed effectiveness of the prolonged administration of lactobacilli in the prevention of allergic disorders in infants and envisage the possible use of bacteria expressing the allergen for the specific immunotherapy of allergic diseases. Hence, we evaluated Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) expressing rBet v 1 as allergen delivery tool and adjuvant factor for immunotherapy in Betv1-sensitized mice. rBet v 1 gene was introduced and expressed in ST (ST[rBet v 1]). BALB/c mice were sensitized with rBet v 1 and then treated with either ST alone, ST[rBet v 1], or the combination of ST and rBet v 1, for 20 days. After 2 aerosol challenges, Treg frequency, in vitro allergen-induced cytokines, rBet v 1-specific IgE and IgG2a, and bronchial histology were made in harvested spleen, sera, and lung. Results were compared with those obtained from not-treated/sensitized mice. ST[rBet v 1] induced immunological and histological changes typical of successful SIT: increased frequency of Tregs and expression of Foxp3; decreased allergen-specific IgE/IgG2a ratio; decrease of in vitro rBet v 1-induced IL-4 from spleen cells; increased allergen-induced IL-10 and IFN-γ; drop of bronchial eosinophilia. ST and ST+rBet v 1 combination, even though induced a slight increase in the frequency of Tregs and moderate allergen-induced IL-10, were ineffective in reducing bronchial eosinophilia, allergen induced IL-4 and rBet v 1-specific IgE/IgG2a ratio. ST[rBet v 1] has tolerogenic and Th-1 skewing properties and efficiently delivers the allergen to the gut immune-system restraining and readdressing the established specific Th2 response toward the allergen in mice. PMID:24603094

  16. Accurate prediction of V1 location from cortical folds in a surface coordinate system

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Oliver P.; Rajendran, Niranjini; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Augustinack, Jean C.; Wiggins, Graham; Wald, Lawrence L.; Rosas, H. Diana; Potthast, Andreas; Schwartz, Eric L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated substantial variability of the location of primary visual cortex (V1) in stereotaxic coordinates when linear volume-based registration is used to match volumetric image intensities (Amunts et al., 2000). However, other qualitative reports of V1 location (Smith, 1904; Stensaas et al., 1974; Rademacher et al., 1993) suggested a consistent relationship between V1 and the surrounding cortical folds. Here, the relationship between folds and the location of V1 is quantified using surface-based analysis to generate a probabilistic atlas of human V1. High-resolution (about 200 μm) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7 T of ex vivo human cerebral hemispheres allowed identification of the full area via the stria of Gennari: a myeloarchitectonic feature specific to V1. Separate, whole-brain scans were acquired using MRI at 1.5 T to allow segmentation and mesh reconstruction of the cortical gray matter. For each individual, V1 was manually identified in the high-resolution volume and projected onto the cortical surface. Surface-based intersubject registration (Fischl et al., 1999b) was performed to align the primary cortical folds of individual hemispheres to those of a reference template representing the average folding pattern. An atlas of V1 location was constructed by computing the probability of V1 inclusion for each cortical location in the template space. This probabilistic atlas of V1 exhibits low prediction error compared to previous V1 probabilistic atlases built in volumetric coordinates. The increased predictability observed under surface-based registration suggests that the location of V1 is more accurately predicted by the cortical folds than by the shape of the brain embedded in the volume of the skull. In addition, the high quality of this atlas provides direct evidence that surface-based intersubject registration methods are superior to volume-based methods at superimposing functional areas of cortex, and therefore are better

  17. Diverse Anhydrous Silicates in a Fine-Grained Rim in the Weakly Altered CM2 Chondrite Queen Elizabeth Range 97990: Evidence for the Localized Preservation of Pristine Nebular Dust in CM Chondrites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brearley, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    A fine-grained rim the QUE 97990 CM2 chondrite contains diverse submicron crystalline anhydrous silicates, including olivines, low-Ca and high Ca pyroxenes and represents a more pristine sample of nebular dust than is present in most CM chondrites.

  18. Stabilization of the Dimeric Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 1 Impacts Its Immunological Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Stefan; Ackaert, Chloé; Samonig, Martin; Asam, Claudia; Briza, Peter; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta; Cabrele, Chiara; Ferreira, Fatima; Duschl, Albert; Huber, Christian; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Many allergens share several biophysical characteristics, including the capability to undergo oligomerization. The dimerization mechanism in Bet v 1 and its allergenic properties are so far poorly understood. Here, we report crystal structures of dimeric Bet v 1, revealing a noncanonical incorporation of cysteine at position 5 instead of genetically encoded tyrosine. Cysteine polysulfide bridging stabilized different dimeric assemblies, depending on the polysulfide linker length. These dimers represent quaternary arrangements that are frequently observed in related proteins, reflecting their prevalence in unmodified Bet v 1. These conclusions were corroborated by characteristic immunologic properties of monomeric and dimeric allergen variants. Hereby, residue 5 could be identified as an allergenic hot spot in Bet v 1. The presented results refine fundamental principles in protein chemistry and emphasize the importance of protein modifications in understanding the molecular basis of allergenicity. PMID:24253036

  19. Stabilization of the dimeric birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 impacts its immunological properties.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Stefan; Ackaert, Chloé; Samonig, Martin; Asam, Claudia; Briza, Peter; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta; Cabrele, Chiara; Ferreira, Fatima; Duschl, Albert; Huber, Christian; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-01-03

    Many allergens share several biophysical characteristics, including the capability to undergo oligomerization. The dimerization mechanism in Bet v 1 and its allergenic properties are so far poorly understood. Here, we report crystal structures of dimeric Bet v 1, revealing a noncanonical incorporation of cysteine at position 5 instead of genetically encoded tyrosine. Cysteine polysulfide bridging stabilized different dimeric assemblies, depending on the polysulfide linker length. These dimers represent quaternary arrangements that are frequently observed in related proteins, reflecting their prevalence in unmodified Bet v 1. These conclusions were corroborated by characteristic immunologic properties of monomeric and dimeric allergen variants. Hereby, residue 5 could be identified as an allergenic hot spot in Bet v 1. The presented results refine fundamental principles in protein chemistry and emphasize the importance of protein modifications in understanding the molecular basis of allergenicity.

  20. Effect of 10.5 M Aqueous Urea on Helicobacter pylori Urease: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Minkara, Mona S; Weaver, Michael N; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-07-07

    The effects of a 10.5 M solution of aqueous urea on Helicobacter pylori urease were investigated over the course of a 500 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The enzyme was solvated by 25321 water molecules, and additionally, 4788 urea molecules were added to the solution. Although concentrated urea solutions are known laboratory denaturants, the protein secondary structure is retained throughout the simulation largely because of the short simulation time (urea denaturation occurs on the millisecond time scale). The relatively constant solvent accessible surface area over the last 400 ns of the simulation further confirms the overall lack of denaturation. The wide-open flap state observed previously in Klebsiella areogenes urease [Roberts, B. P., et al. (2012) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 9934] and H. pylori [Minkara, M. S., et al. (2014) J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 1852-1862] was also identified in this aqueous urea simulation. Over the course of the trajectory, we were able to observe urea molecules entering the active site in proportions related to the extent of opening of the active site-covering flap. Furthermore, urea molecules were observed to approach the pentacoordinate Ni(2+) ion in position to bind in a manner consistent with the proposed initial coordination step of the hydrolysis mechanism. We also observed a specific and unique pattern in the regions of the protein with a high root-mean-square fluctuation (rmsf). The high-rmsf regions in the β-chain form a horseshoelike arrangement surrounding the active site-covering flap on the surface of the protein. We hypothesize that the function of these regions is to both attract and shuttle urea toward the loop of the active site-covering flap before entry into the cavity. Indeed, urea is observed to interact with these regions for extended periods of simulation time before active site ingress.

  1. The relaxation of OH (v=1) and OD (v=1) by H2O and D2O at temperatures from 251 to 390 K.

    PubMed

    McCabe, D C; Rajakumar, B; Marshall, P; Smith, I W M; Ravishankara, A R

    2006-10-21

    We report rate coefficients for the relaxation of OH(v=1) and OD(v=1) by H2O and D2O as a function of temperature between 251 and 390 K. All four rate coefficients exhibit a negative dependence on temperature. In Arrhenius form, the rate coefficients for relaxation (in units of 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1) can be expressed as: for OH(v=1)+H2O between 263 and 390 K: k=(2.4+/-0.9) exp((460+/-115)/T); for OH(v=1)+D2O between 256 and 371 K: k=(0.49+/-0.16) exp((610+/-90)/T); for OD(v=1)+H2O between 251 and 371 K: k=(0.92+/-0.16) exp((485+/-48)/T); for OD(v=1)+D2O between 253 and 366 K: k=(2.57+/-0.09) exp((342+/-10)/T). Rate coefficients at (297+/-1 K) are also reported for the relaxation of OH(v=2) by D2O and the relaxation of OD(v=2) by H2O and D2O. The results are discussed in terms of a mechanism involving the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes in which intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution can occur at rates competitive with re-dissociation to the initial collision partners in their original vibrational states. New ab initio calculations on the H2O-HO system have been performed which, inter alia, yield vibrational frequencies for all four complexes: H2O-HO, D2O-HO, H2O-DO and D2O-DO. These data are then employed, adapting a formalism due to Troe (J. Troe, J. Chem. Phys., 1977, 66, 4758), in order to estimate the rates of intramolecular energy transfer from the OH (OD) vibration to other modes in the complexes in order to explain the measured relaxation rates-assuming that relaxation proceeds via the hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  2. Correlation of sensitizing capacity and T-cell recognition within the Bet v 1 family

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmüller, Claudia; Zulehner, Nora; Roulias, Anargyros; Briza, Peter; Ferreira, Fatima; Faé, Ingrid; Fischer, Gottfried F.; Bohle, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Bet v 1 is the main sensitizing allergen in birch pollen. Like many other major allergens, it contains an immunodominant T cell–activating region (Bet v 1142-156). Api g 1, the Bet v 1 homolog in celery, lacks the ability to sensitize and is devoid of major T-cell epitopes. Objective We analyzed the T-cell epitopes of Mal d 1, the nonsensitizing Bet v 1 homolog in apple, and assessed possible differences in uptake and antigen processing of Bet v 1, Api g 1, and Mal d 1. Methods For epitope mapping, Mal d 1–specific T-cell lines were stimulated with overlapping synthetic 12-mer peptides. The surface binding, internalization, and intracellular degradation of Bet v 1, Api g 1, and Mal d 1 by antigen-presenting cells were compared by using flow cytometry. All proteins were digested with endolysosomal extracts, and the resulting peptides were identified by means of mass spectrometry. The binding of Bet v 1142-156 and the homologous region in Mal d 1 by HLA class II molecules was analyzed in silico. Results Like Api g 1, Mal d 1 lacked dominant T-cell epitopes. The degree of surface binding and the kinetics of uptake and endolysosomal degradation of Bet v 1, Api g 1, and Mal d 1 were comparable. Endolysosomal degradation of Bet v 1 and Mal d 1 resulted in very similar fragments. The Bet v 1142-156 and Mal d 1141-155 regions showed no striking difference in their binding affinities to the most frequent HLA-DR alleles. Conclusion The sensitizing activity of different Bet v 1 homologs correlates with the presence of immunodominant T-cell epitopes. However, the presence of Bet v 1142-156 is not conferred by differential antigen processing. PMID:25670010

  3. Reaction and deactivation of HCl(v=1,2) by Cl, Br, and H atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, R. G.; Moore, C. Bradley

    1980-08-01

    Total decay rates for HCl(v=2, 1) were measured in the range 294-439 K for Cl, 295-390 K for Br, and at 296 K for H. HCl(v=2) was produced directly by pulsed laser excitation of the overtone. The fraction of HCl(v=2) relaxed to HCl(v=1) was determined. For HCl(v=2) + Cl, relaxation gave entirely HCl(v=1) within an experimental uncertainty of ±10%, the total relaxation rate was large, k/v¯?5 Å2, and rates varied only slightly with temperature. For Br+HCl(v=2) reaction to HBr(v=0) + Cl is exoergic by about kT. Relaxation to HCl(v=1) is the dominant process. Reaction contributes roughly 17% and 34% to the loss of HCl(v=2) at 295 and 390 K, respectively. In contrast to the result for Br and for O(reported previously), H+HCl(v=2) gives 65% H2+Cl and only 35% HCl(v=1)+H. For HCl(v=1)+H, Cl, O the vibrational excitation energy is greater than the activation energy for reaction. The relaxation rates are between 1/2 and 1/3 of the A values for the measured thermal exchange rates A exp(-ΔEact/RT). For HCl(v=1)+Br, well below threshold, the rate is some 20 times less than for HCl(v=1)+Cl. The rate for HCl(v=2)+Br, just above reaction threshold is not dramatically larger. The ratios of vibrational relaxation rates for HCl(v=2) vs HCl(v=1) are 5.0±1.3, 4.2±0.4, and 5.0±1.3 for O, Cl, and Br, respectively. Any first order linear perturbation treatment gives rates proportional to v; the data scale more closely as v2.

  4. Nasotemporal asymmetries in V1: ocular dominance columns of infant, adult, and strabismic macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tychsen, L; Burkhalter, A

    1997-11-10

    To quantify asymmetries of input from the two eyes into each cerebral hemisphere, we measured ocular dominance column (ODC) widths and areas in the striate visual cortex (area V1) of macaque monkeys. Ocular dominance stripes in layer 4C were labeled by using transneuronal transport of intraocularly injected wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) or cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry, after deafferentation of one eye or even by leaving afferent input intact. In infant monkey aged 4 and 8 weeks, ocular dominance stripes labeled by WGA-HRP appeared adultlike with smooth, sharply defined borders. In normal infant and normal adult macaque, ocular dominance stripes driven by the nasal retina (i.e., contralateral eye) were consistently wider than stripes driven by the temporal retina (i.e., ipsilateral eye). Asymmetries in the percentage of area V1 driven by nasal vs. temporal ODCs showed a similar "nasal bias": in infant macaque, approximately 58% of ODCs in V1 were driven by nasal retina, and in adult macaque approximately 57%. The asymmetries tended to be slightly smaller in opercular V1 and greater in calcarine V1. "Spontaneous" ocular dominance stripes were revealed by CO staining of V1 in a naturally strabismic monkey and in a monkey made strabismic by early postnatal alternating monocular occlusion. In these animals, ocular dominance stripes and CO blobs corresponding to the nasal retina stained more intensely for CO in both the right and left V1. ODC spacing and the nasotemporal asymmetry in ODC width and area were similar in strabismic and normal monkeys. Our results in normal monkeys extend the observations of previous investigators and verify that nasotemporal inputs to opercular and calcarine V1 are unequal, with a consistent bias favoring inputs from the nasal retina. The CO results in strabismic macaque suggest that the nasal ODC bias promotes interocular suppression when activity in neighboring ODCs is decorrelated by abnormal binocular

  5. CaV1.1: The atypical prototypical voltage-gated Ca2+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Roger A.; Beam, Kurt G.

    2012-01-01

    CaV1.1 is the prototype for the other nine known CaV channel isoforms, yet it has functional properties that make it truly atypical of this group. Specifically, CaV1.1 is expressed solely in skeletal muscle where it serves multiple purposes; it is the voltage sensor for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and it is an L-type Ca2+ channel which contributes to a form of activity-dependent Ca2+ entry that has been termed Excitation-Coupled Ca2+ Entry (ECCE). The ability of CaV1.1 to serve as voltage-sensor for EC coupling appears to be unique amongst CaV channels, whereas the physiological role of its more conventional function as a Ca2+ channel has been a matter of uncertainty for nearly 50 years. In this chapter, we discuss how CaV1.1 supports EC coupling, the possible relevance of Ca2+ entry through CaV1.1 and how alterations of CaV1.1 function can have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:22982493

  6. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E.; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca2+ channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family. PMID:27456671

  7. Color Representation Is Retinotopically Biased but Locally Intermingled in Mouse V1

    PubMed Central

    Aihara, Shuhei; Yoshida, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Ohki, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    Dichromatic vision is common in many mammals. However, color processing in the primary visual cortex (V1) of dichromatic mammals is relatively unknown compared to the trichromatic primates. In this study, we investigated the functional organization of color processing in mouse V1. The mouse retina has a graded expression pattern of two opsins along its dorsoventral axis. However, it is not clear whether and how this expression pattern is reflected in the cortical representation at local (several hundred microns) and areal (V1) level. Using in vivo two-photon calcium (Ca2+) imaging and wide-field Ca2+ imaging, we revealed that V1 neurons responded to S (UV)- and M (green)-opsin isolating stimuli with slightly biased color preference depending on retinotopic position in V1. This was consistent with the distribution of retinal opsins. At the cellular level, preferences for S- and M-opsin isolating stimuli were intermingled in a local region encompassing several hundred microns. These results suggest that functional organizations of color information are locally intermingled, but slightly biased depending on the retinotopic position in mouse V1.

  8. Ablation of TrpV1-neurons reveals their selective role in thermal pain sensation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Santosh K.; Hoon, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Here we make use of neural ablation to investigate the properties of the TrpV1-expressing neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia of mice. Resiniferotoxin (RTX), a potent TrpV1-agonist, administered either by direct injection in the ganglion or intrathecally killed approx. 70% of TrpV1-cells and resulted in modest thermal analgesia. Interestingly, after carageenan injection in the hind-paw, the analgesic effects of RTX were dramatically increased with mice now paradoxically showing far less response to heat applied at sites of inflammation. This additional carageenan and RTX-induced analgesia was transient, lasting less than 2 days, and likely resulted from deafferation of remaining TrpV1-neurons. Remarkably although RTX affected sensitivity to heat, mechanical sensitivity (both of normal and inflamed tissue) was completely unaltered by toxin-mediated silencing of the TrpV1-sensory input. Thus our data demonstrate that TrpV1-neurons are selectively tuned nociceptors that mediate responses to thermal but not mechanical pain and insinuate a labeled line model for somatosensory coding. PMID:19853036

  9. Neutronic calculation of fast reactors by the EUCLID/V1 integrated code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltashev, D. A.; Stakhanova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    This article considers neutronic calculation of a fast-neutron lead-cooled reactor BREST-OD-300 by the EUCLID/V1 integrated code. The main goal of development and application of integrated codes is a nuclear power plant safety justification. EUCLID/V1 is integrated code designed for coupled neutronics, thermomechanical and thermohydraulic fast reactor calculations under normal and abnormal operating conditions. EUCLID/V1 code is being developed in the Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The integrated code has a modular structure and consists of three main modules: thermohydraulic module HYDRA-IBRAE/LM/V1, thermomechanical module BERKUT and neutronic module DN3D. In addition, the integrated code includes databases with fuel, coolant and structural materials properties. Neutronic module DN3D provides full-scale simulation of neutronic processes in fast reactors. Heat sources distribution, control rods movement, reactivity level changes and other processes can be simulated. Neutron transport equation in multigroup diffusion approximation is solved. This paper contains some calculations implemented as a part of EUCLID/V1 code validation. A fast-neutron lead-cooled reactor BREST-OD-300 transient simulation (fuel assembly floating, decompression of passive feedback system channel) and cross-validation with MCU-FR code results are presented in this paper. The calculations demonstrate EUCLID/V1 code application for BREST-OD-300 simulating and safety justification.

  10. A Survey of Architecture and Function of the Primary Visual Cortex (V1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Jeffrey; Bharath, Anil A.; Zhaoping, Li

    2006-12-01

    The largest visual area, known as the primary visual cortex or V1, has greatly contributed to the current understanding of mammalian and human visual pathways and their role in visual perception. The initial discovery of orientation-sensitive neurons in V1, arranged according to a retinotopic mapping, suggested an analogy to its function as a low-level feature analyzer. Subsequent discoveries of phase, spatial frequency, color, ocular origin, and direction-of-motion-sensitive neurons, arranged into overlapping maps, further lent support to the view that it performs a rich decomposition, similar to signal processing transforms, of the retinal output. Like the other cortical areas, V1 has a laminar organization with specialization for input from the relayed retinal afferents, output to the higher visual areas, and the segregation of the magno (motion) and parvo (form) pathways. Spatially lateral connections that exist between neurons of similar and varying properties have also been proposed to give rise to a computation of a bottom-up saliency map in V1. We provide a review of the selectivity of neurons in V1, laminar specialization and analogies to signal processing techniques, a model of V1 saliency computation, and higher-area feedback that may mediate perception.

  11. OXYTOCIN INDUCES SOCIAL COMMUNICATION BY ACTIVATING ARGININEVASOPRESSIN V1A RECEPTORS AND NOT OXYTOCIN RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    SONG, Zhimin; MCCANN, Katharine E.; MCNEILL, John K.; LARKIN, Tony E.; HUHMAN, Kim L.; ALBERS, H. Elliott

    2014-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) and their receptors are very similar in structure. As a result, at least some of the effects of these peptides may be the result of crosstalk between their canonical receptors. The present study investigated this hypothesis by determining whether the induction of flank marking, a form of social communication in Syrian hamsters, by OT is mediated by the OT receptor or the AVP V1a receptor. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of OT or AVP induced flank marking in a dose-dependent manner although the effects of AVP were approximately 100 times greater than those of OT. Injections of highly selective V1a receptor agonists but not OT receptor agonists induced flank marking, and V1a receptor antagonists but not OT receptor antagonists significantly inhibited the ability of OT to induce flank marking. Lastly, injection of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), a peptide that stimulates OT but not AVP release, significantly increased odor-induced flank marking, and these effects were blocked by a V1a receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate that OT induces flank marking by activating AVP V1a and not OT receptors, suggesting that the V1a receptor should be considered to be an OT receptor as well as an AVP receptor. PMID:25173438

  12. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E.; Yue, David T.

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca2+ channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family.

  13. Abnormal changes in voltage-gated sodium channels Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.2, Na(V)1.3, Na(V)1.6 and in calmodulin/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, within the brains of spontaneously epileptic rats and tremor rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Feng; Lv, Xintong; Feng, Rui; Min, Dongyu; Ma, Lihua; Liu, Yajing; Zhao, Jinsheng; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Hao, Liying; Cai, Jiqun

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a crucial role in epilepsy. The expressions of different VGSCs subtypes are varied in diverse animal models of epilepsy that may reflect their multiple phenotypes or the complexity of the mechanisms of epilepsy. In a previous study, we reported that NaV1.1 and NaV1.3 were up-regulated in the hippocampus of the spontaneously epileptic rat (SER). In this study, we further analyzed both the expression and distribution of the typical VGSC subtypes NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6 in the hippocampus and in the cortex of the temporal lobe of two genetic epileptic animal models: the SER and the tremor rat (TRM). The expressions of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) were also analyzed with the purpose of assessing the effect of the CaM/CaMKII pathway in these two models of epilepsy. Increased expression of the four VGSC subtypes and CaM, accompanied by a decrease in CaMKII was observed in the hippocampus of both the SERs and the TRM rats. However, the changes observed in the expression of VGSC subtypes and CaM were decreased with an elevated CaMKII in the cortex of their temporal lobes. Double-labeled immunofluorescence data suggested that in SERs and TRM rats, the four subtypes of the VGSC proteins were present throughout the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex and these were co-localized in neurons with CaM. These data represent the first evidence of abnormal changes in expression of four VGSC subtypes (NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6) and CaM/CaMKII in the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex of SERs and TRM rats. These changes may be involved in the generation of epileptiform activity and underlie the observed seizure phenotype in these rat models of genetic epilepsy.

  14. Metal Acetylacetonate Series in Interface Engineering for Full Low-Temperature-Processed, High-Performance, and Stable Planar Perovskite Solar Cells with Conversion Efficiency over 16% on 1 cm(2) Scale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Leiming; Feng, Xiyuan; Jie, Jiansheng; He, Zhubing

    2017-02-14

    A series of metal acetylacetonates produced by a full low-temperature (below 100 °C) process are successfully employed to obtain both "multistable" and high-performance planar-inverted perovskite solar cells. All the three kinds of champion cells in small area exhibit over 18% in conversion-efficiency with negligible hysteresis, along with above 16% in conversion-efficiency for planar PSCs in an aperture area of over 1 cm(2) .

  15. Study of EWS/FLI-1 rearrangement in 18 cases of CK20+/CM2B4+ Merkel cell carcinoma using FISH and correlation to the differential diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Suarez-Peñaranda, Jose M; Alonso, Soledad

    2013-10-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) and primary cutaneous Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PCES/PNET) pose a challenging morphologic differential diagnosis. Approximately 90% of Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) have a specific translocation, t(11;22) (q24;q12). The EWS-friend leukemia integration-1 (FLI-1) fusion results in FLI-1 overexpression. EWS/FLI-1 rearrangement has been suggested as a useful tool in the diagnosis of PCES/PNET. In contrast, Merkel cell polyomavirus was found to be an infective agent related to the pathogenesis of MCC. Merkel cell polyomavirus can be immunohistochemically detected with the antibody CM2B4. To the best of our knowledge, there is no case of any cytokeratin (CK)20-/CM2B4+ PNET. The goal of our study was to investigate whether EWS/FLI-1 rearrangement was present in cases of MCC. We have studied 18 cases of MCC. To make sure that the cases investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization were genuine MCC, we considered only CK20+/CM2B4+ cases. Six cases met this criterion. EWS/FLI-1 rearrangement was not evidenced in any of the 18 cases (including the 6 "genuine" cases of MCC). Although our findings were somewhat expected, we think that they fill a gap in the literature: the confirmation that MCC is devoid of the EWS/FLI-1 rearrangement.

  16. CRMP2 protein SUMOylation modulates NaV1.7 channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Dustrude, Erik T; Wilson, Sarah M; Ju, Weina; Xiao, Yucheng; Khanna, Rajesh

    2013-08-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) trafficking is incompletely understood. Post-translational modifications of NaVs and/or auxiliary subunits and protein-protein interactions have been posited as NaV-trafficking mechanisms. Here, we tested if modification of the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) by a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) could affect NaV trafficking; CRMP2 alters the extent of NaV slow inactivation conferred by the anti-epileptic (R)-lacosamide, implying NaV-CRMP2 functional coupling. Expression of a CRMP2 SUMOylation-incompetent mutant (CRMP2-K374A) in neuronal model catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells did not alter lacosamide-induced NaV slow inactivation compared with CAD cells expressing wild type CRMP2. Like wild type CRMP2, CRMP2-K374A expressed robustly in CAD cells. Neurite outgrowth, a canonical CRMP2 function, was moderately reduced by the mutation but was still significantly higher than enhanced GFP-transfected cortical neurons. Notably, huwentoxin-IV-sensitive NaV1.7 currents, which predominate in CAD cells, were significantly reduced in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A. Increasing deSUMOylation with sentrin/SUMO-specific protease SENP1 or SENP2 in wild type CRMP2-expressing CAD cells decreased NaV1.7 currents. Consistent with a reduction in current density, biotinylation revealed a significant reduction in surface NaV1.7 levels in CAD cells expressing CRMP2-K374A; surface NaV1.7 expression was also decreased by SENP1 + SENP2 overexpression. Currents in HEK293 cells stably expressing NaV1.7 were reduced by CRMP2-K374A in a manner dependent on the E2-conjugating enzyme Ubc9. No decrement in current density was observed in HEK293 cells co-expressing CRMP2-K374A and NaV1.1 or NaV1.3. Diminution of sodium currents, largely NaV1.7, was recapitulated in sensory neurons expressing CRMP2-K374A. Our study elucidates a novel regulatory mechanism that utilizes CRMP2 SUMOylation to choreograph NaV1.7 trafficking.

  17. A single mechanism can explain the speed tuning properties of MT and V1 complex neurons.

    PubMed

    Perrone, John A

    2006-11-15

    A recent study by Priebe et al., (2006) has shown that a small proportion (27%) of primate directionally selective, complex V1 neurons are tuned for the speed of image motion. In this study, I show that the weighted intersection mechanism (WIM) model, which was previously proposed to explain speed tuning in middle temporal neurons, can also explain the tuning found in complex V1 neurons. With the addition of a contrast gain mechanism, this model is able to replicate the effects of contrast on V1 speed tuning, a phenomenon that was recently discovered by Priebe et al., (2006). The WIM model simulations also indicate that V1 neuron spatiotemporal frequency response maps may be asymmetrical in shape and hence poorly characterized by the symmetrical two-dimensional Gaussian fitting function used by Priebe et al., (2006) to classify their cells. Therefore, the actual proportion of speed tuning among directional complex V1 cells may be higher than the 27% estimate suggested by these authors.

  18. A contrast and surface code explains complex responses to black and white stimuli in V1.

    PubMed

    Zurawel, Guy; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Zweig, Shay; Shapley, Robert; Slovin, Hamutal

    2014-10-22

    We investigated the cortical mechanisms underlying the visual perception of luminance-defined surfaces and the preference for black over white stimuli in the macaque primary visual cortex, V1. We measured V1 population responses with voltage-sensitive dye imaging in fixating monkeys that were presented with white or black squares of equal contrast around a mid-gray. Regions corresponding to the squares' edges exhibited higher activity than those corresponding to the center. Responses to black were higher than to white, surprisingly to a much greater extent in the representation of the square's center. Additionally, the square-evoked activation patterns exhibited spatial modulations along the edges and corners. A model comprised of neural mechanisms that compute local contrast, local luminance temporal modulations in the black and white directions, and cortical center-surround interactions, could explain the observed population activity patterns in detail. The model captured the weaker contribution of V1 neurons that respond to positive (white) and negative (black) luminance surfaces, and the stronger contribution of V1 neurons that respond to edge contrast. Also, the model demonstrated how the response preference for black could be explained in terms of stronger surface-related activation to negative luminance modulation. The spatial modulations along the edges were accounted for by surround suppression. Overall the results reveal the relative strength of edge contrast and surface signals in the V1 response to visual objects.

  19. Functional size of human visual area V1: a neural correlate of top-down attention.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Ashika; Kolbe, Scott C; Anderson, Andrew J; Egan, Gary F; Vidyasagar, Trichur R

    2014-06-01

    Heavy demands are placed on the brain's attentional capacity when selecting a target item in a cluttered visual scene, or when reading. It is widely accepted that such attentional selection is mediated by top-down signals from higher cortical areas to early visual areas such as the primary visual cortex (V1). Further, it has also been reported that there is considerable variation in the surface area of V1. This variation may impact on either the number or specificity of attentional feedback signals and, thereby, the efficiency of attentional mechanisms. In this study, we investigated whether individual differences between humans performing attention-demanding tasks can be related to the functional area of V1. We found that those with a larger representation in V1 of the central 12° of the visual field as measured using BOLD signals from fMRI were able to perform a serial search task at a faster rate. In line with recent suggestions of the vital role of visuo-spatial attention in reading, the speed of reading showed a strong positive correlation with the speed of visual search, although it showed little correlation with the size of V1. The results support the idea that the functional size of the primary visual cortex is an important determinant of the efficiency of selective spatial attention for simple tasks, and that the attentional processing required for complex tasks like reading are to a large extent determined by other brain areas and inter-areal connections.

  20. Reactions of sulphur mustard and sarin on V 1.02 O 2.98 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mahato, T H; Prasad, G K; Singh, Beer; Srivastava, A R; Ganesan, K; Acharya, J; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2009-07-30

    Reactions of sulphur mustard and sarin were studied on the surface of V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotubes by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques. The V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotube samples were made by using hydrothermal method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetry. Later, they were exposed to sulphur mustard and sarin separately at ambient temperature (30+/-2 degrees C). The data explored the formation of sulphoxide of sulphur mustard, thiodiglycol for sulphur mustard and isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid for sarin on V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotubes illustrating the role of oxidation and hydrolysis reactions in the decontamination.

  1. Spontaneously active NaV1.5 sodium channels may underlie odor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Vincent E

    2016-08-01

    The olfactory system is remarkably sensitive to airborne odor molecules, but precisely how very low odor concentrations bordering on just a few molecules per olfactory sensory neuron can trigger graded changes in firing is not clear. This report reexamines signaling in olfactory sensory neurons in light of the recent account of NaV1.5 sodium channel-mediated spontaneous firing. Using a model of spontaneous channel activity, the study shows how even submillivolt changes in membrane potential elicited by odor are expected to cause meaningful changes in NaV1.5-dependent firing. The results suggest that the random window currents of NaV1.5 channels may underpin not only spontaneous firing in olfactory sensory neurons but the cellular response to odor as well, thereby ensuring the robustness and sensitivity of signaling that is especially important for low odor concentrations.

  2. Genetics and molecular pathophysiology of Na(v)1.7-related pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Yang, Yong; Waxman, Stephen G

    2008-01-01

    SCN9A, the gene which encodes voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7, is located on human chromosome 2 within a cluster of other members of this gene family. Na(v)1.7 is present at high levels in most peripheral nociceptive neurons in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and in sympathetic neurons. In addition to its focal tissue-specific expression, Na(v)1.7 is distinguished by its ability to amplify small depolarizations, thus acting as a threshold channel and modulating excitability. Dominantly inherited gain-of-function mutations in SCN9A have been linked to two familial painful disorders: inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). One set of mutations leads to severe episodes of pain in the feet and hands in patients with IEM, and a different set of mutations causes pain in a perirectal, periocular, and mandibular distribution in patients with PEPD. These mutations allow mutant channels to activate in response to weaker stimuli, or to remain open longer in response to stimulation. The introduction of mutant channels into DRG neurons alters electrogenesis and renders these primary sensory neurons hyperexcitable. Mutant Na(v)1.7 channels lower the threshold for single action potentials and increase the number of action potentials that neurons fire in response to suprathreshold stimuli. In contrast, recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, which cause a loss of function of Na(v)1.7 in patients, lead to indifference to pain with sparing of motor and cognitive abilities. The central role of Na(v)1.7 in these disorders, and the apparently limited consequences of loss of this channel in humans make it an attractive target for treatment of pain.

  3. Depth-dependent detection of microampere currents delivered to monkey V1

    PubMed Central

    Tehovnik, Edward J.; Slocum, Warren M.

    2011-01-01

    Monkeys can detect electrical stimulation delivered to striate cortex (area V1). We examined whether such stimulation is layer dependent. While remaining fixated on a spot of light, a rhesus monkey was required to detect a 100 ms train of electrical stimulation delivered to a site within area V1. A monkey signaled the delivery of stimulation by depressing a lever after which he was rewarded with a drop of apple juice. Control trials were interleaved during which time no stimulation was delivered and the monkey was rewarded for not depressing the lever. Biphasic pulses were delivered at 200 Hz and the current was typically at or less than 30 μA using 0.2 ms cathode-first biphasic pulses. For some experiments, the pulse duration was varied from 0.05 to 0.7 ms and anode-first pulses were used. The current threshold for detecting cathode-first pulses 50% of the time was the lowest (< 10 μA) when stimulation was delivered to the deepest layers of V1 (between 1.0 and 2.5 mm below the cortical surface). Also the shortest chronaxies (< 0.2 ms) and the shortest latencies (< 200 ms) for detecting the stimulation were observed at these depths. Finally, anode-first pulses were most effective at evoking a detection response in superficial V1 and cathode-first pulses were most effective at evoking a detection response in deep V1 (> 1.75 mm below the cortical surface). Accordingly, the deepest layers of V1 are the most sensitive for the induction of a detection response to electrical stimulation in monkeys. PMID:19519630

  4. Synonymous codon usage in TTSuV2: analysis and comparison with TTSuV1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Dai, Wei; Dai, Dingzhen

    2013-01-01

    Two species of the DNA virus Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV), TTSuV1 and TTSuV2, have become widely distributed in pig-farming countries in recent years. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of synonymous codon usage bias in 41 available TTSuV2 coding sequences (CDS), and compared the codon usage patterns of TTSuV2 and TTSuV1. TTSuV codon usage patterns were found to be phylogenetically conserved. Values for the effective number of codons (ENC) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias in both TTSuV2 and TTSuV1 was not significant, the most frequently occurring codons had an A or C at the third codon position. Correspondence analysis (COA) was performed and TTSuV2 and TTSuV1 sequences were located in different quadrants of the first two major axes. A plot of the ENC revealed that compositional constraint was the major factor determining the codon usage bias for TTSuV2. In addition, hierarchical cluster analysis of 41 TTSuV2 isolates based on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values suggested that there was no association between geographic distribution and codon bias of TTSuV2 sequences. Finally, the comparison of RSCU for TTSuV2, TTSuV1 and the corresponding host sequence indicated that the codon usage pattern of TTSuV2 was similar to that of TTSuV1. However the similarity was low for each virus and its host. These conclusions provide important insight into the synonymous codon usage pattern of TTSuV2, as well as better understangding of the molecular evolution of TTSuV2 genomes.

  5. Correlation of vision loss with tactile-evoked V1 responses in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Samantha I; Weiland, James D; Bao, Pinglei; Lopez-Jaime, Gilberto Raul; Tjan, Bosco S

    2015-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that the visual cortex of visually impaired humans is active during tactile tasks. We sought to determine if this cross-modal activation in the primary visual cortex is correlated with vision loss in individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease that progressively diminishes vision later in life. RP and sighted subjects completed three tactile tasks: a symmetry discrimination task, a Braille-dot counting task, and a sandpaper roughness discrimination task. We measured tactile-evoked blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). For each subject, we quantified the cortical extent of the tactile-evoked response by the proportion of modulated voxels within the primary visual cortex (V1) and its strength by the mean absolute modulation amplitude of the modulated voxels. We characterized vision loss in terms of visual acuity and the areal proportion of V1 that corresponds to the preserved visual field. Visual acuity and proportion of the preserved visual field both had a highly significant effect on the cortical extent of the V1 BOLD response to tactile stimulation, while visual acuity also had a significant effect on the strength of the V1 response. These effects of vision loss on cross-modal responses were reliable despite high inter-subject variability. Controlling for task-evoked responses in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) across subjects further strengthened the effects of vision loss on cross-model responses in V1. We propose that such cross-modal responses in V1 and other visual areas may be used as a cortically localized biomarker to account for individual differences in visual performance following sight recovery treatments.

  6. Figure-ground processing during fixational saccades in V1: indication for higher-order stability.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Ariel; Pesoa, Yair; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Slovin, Hamutal

    2014-02-26

    In a typical visual scene we continuously perceive a "figure" that is segregated from the surrounding "background" despite ongoing microsaccades and small saccades that are performed when attempting fixation (fixational saccades [FSs]). Previously reported neuronal correlates of figure-ground (FG) segregation in the primary visual cortex (V1) showed enhanced activity in the "figure" along with suppressed activity in the noisy "background." However, it is unknown how this FG modulation in V1 is affected by FSs. To investigate this question, we trained two monkeys to detect a contour embedded in a noisy background while simultaneously imaging V1 using voltage-sensitive dyes. During stimulus presentation, the monkeys typically performed 1-3 FSs, which displaced the contour over the retina. Using eye position and a 2D analytical model to map the stimulus onto V1, we were able to compute FG modulation before and after each FS. On the spatial cortical scale, we found that, after each FS, FG modulation follows the stimulus retinal displacement and "hops" within the V1 retinotopic map, suggesting visual instability. On the temporal scale, FG modulation is initiated in the new retinotopic position before it disappeared from the old retinotopic position. Moreover, the FG modulation developed faster after an FS, compared with after stimulus onset, which may contribute to visual stability of FG segregation, along the timeline of stimulus presentation. Therefore, despite spatial discontinuity of FG modulation in V1, the higher-order stability of FG modulation along time may enable our stable and continuous perception.

  7. 76 FR 20835 - Amendment of VOR Federal Airways V-1, V-7, V-11 and V-20; Kona, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of VOR Federal Airways V-1, V-7, V-11 and V-20; Kona, HI AGENCY: Federal... delays the effective date for the amendment of four VOR Federal airways in the vicinity of Kona, HI; V-1...), amends VOR Federal Airways V-1, V-7 V-11 and V-20; Kona, HI. These VHF Omnidirectional Range...

  8. Operating principles of rotary molecular motors: differences between F1 and V1 motors.

    PubMed

    Yamato, Ichiro; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Murata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Among the many types of bioenergy-transducing machineries, F- and V-ATPases are unique bio- and nano-molecular rotary motors. The rotational catalysis of F1-ATPase has been investigated in detail, and molecular mechanisms have been proposed based on the crystal structures of the complex and on extensive single-molecule rotational observations. Recently, we obtained crystal structures of bacterial V1-ATPase (A3B3 and A3B3DF complexes) in the presence and absence of nucleotides. Based on these new structures, we present a novel model for the rotational catalysis mechanism of V1-ATPase, which is different from that of F1-ATPases.

  9. Antagonism of 4-substituted 1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylates toward voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels Ca V 1.3 and Ca V 1.2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Chien; Cao, Song; Kang, Soosung; Kai, Li; Tian, Xinyong; Pandey, Prativa; Dunne, Sara Fernandez; Luan, Chi-Hao; Surmeier, D James; Silverman, Richard B

    2010-05-01

    L-type Ca(2+) channels in mammalian brain neurons have either a Ca(V)1.2 or Ca(V)1.3 pore-forming subunit. Recently, it was shown that Ca(V)1.3 Ca(2+) channels underlie autonomous pacemaking in adult dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and this reliance renders them sensitive to toxins used to create animal models of Parkinson's disease. Antagonism of these channels with the dihydropyridine antihypertensive drug isradipine diminishes the reliance on Ca(2+) and the sensitivity of these neurons to toxins, pointing to a potential neuroprotective strategy. However, for neuroprotection without an antihypertensive side effect, selective Ca(V)1.3 channel antagonists are required. In an attempt to identify potent and selective antagonists of Ca(V)1.3 channels, 124 dihydropyridines (4-substituted-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylic diesters) were synthesized. The antagonism of heterologously expressed Ca(V)1.2 and Ca(V)1.3 channels was then tested using electrophysiological approaches and the FLIPR Calcium 4 assay. Despite the large diversity in substitution on the dihydropyridine scaffold, the most Ca(V)1.3 selectivity was only about twofold. These results support a highly similar dihydropyridine binding site at both Ca(V)1.2 and Ca(V)1.3 channels and suggests that other classes of compounds need to be identified for Ca(V)1.3 selectivity.

  10. Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), Investment & Planing Version 3.10.5.m

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-01

    Version 3.10.5 is a multi-year Decision Support tool for Distributed Generation (DG). DER-CAM was initially created as an exclusively economic energy model, able to find the cost minimizing combination and operation profile of a set of DER technologies that meet heat and electric loads of a single building or microgrid for a typical test year. Now, version 3.10.5.m solves for a multiple-year horizon the technology choice question, the appropriate capacity for each selected technology as well as the operational and investment schedule. Optimized investment decisions are based on techno-economic criteria, along with site information such as energy loads, economic forecast, and technology characterization. Version 3.10.5 contains: 1. a PV and battery degradation model and 2. variable performance for technologies. Efficiency, investment costs, etc. can vary over time and model technology breakthroughs and advancements.

  11. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectra and cross-sections for volatile organic compounds at 10.5 eV.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Nozomu; Tonokura, Kenichi

    2007-08-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (VUV-SPI-TOFMS) has been applied to the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including aromatic, chlorinated, and oxygenated compounds. Photoionization mass spectra of 23 VOCs were measured using SPI-TOFMS at 10.5 eV (118 nm). The limits of detection of VOCs using SPI-TOFMS at 10.5 eV were estimated to be a few ppbv. The mass spectra of 20 VOCs exhibit only the parent ion and its isotopes' signals. The ionization processes of the VOCs were discussed on the basis of the reaction enthalpies predicted by the quantum chemical calculations. Absolute photoionization cross-sections for 23 VOCs, including 12 newly measured VOCs, at 10.5 eV were determined in comparison to the reported absolute photoionization cross-section of NO.

  12. Ghrelin increases growth hormone production and functional expression of NaV1.1 and Na V1.2 channels in pituitary somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Méndez, Adasue; Domínguez, Belisario; Rodríguez-Andrade, Araceli; Barrientos-Morales, Manuel; Cervantes-Acosta, Patricia; Hernández-Beltrán, Antonio; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    A variety of ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane of somatotropes within the anterior pituitary gland. Modification of these channels is linked to intracellular Ca2+ levels and therefore to hormone secretion. Previous investigations have shown that the gut-derived orexigenic peptide hormone ghrelin and synthetic GH-releasing peptides (GHRPs) stimulate release of growth hormone (GH) and increase the number of functional voltage-gated Ca2+ and Na+ channels in the membrane of clonal GC somatotropes. Here, we reveal that chronic treatment with ghrelin and its synthetic analog GHRP-6 also increases GH release from bovine pituitary somatotropes in culture, and that this action is associated with a significant increase in Na+ macroscopic current. Consistent with this, Na+ current blockade with tetrodotoxin (TTX) abolished the ghrelin- and GHRP-6-induced increase in GH release. Furthermore, semi-quantitative and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed an upregulation in the transcript levels of GH, as well as of NaV1.1 and NaV1.2, two isoforms of TTX-sensitive Na+ channels expressed in somatotropes, after treatment with ghrelin or GHRP-6. These findings improve our knowledge on (i) the cellular mechanisms involved in the control of GH secretion, (ii) the molecular diversity of Na+ channels in pituitary somatotropes, and (iii) the regulation of GH and Na+ channel gene expression by ghrelin and GHRPs.

  13. The vasopressin-induced excitation of hypoglossal and facial motoneurons in young rats is mediated by V1a but not V1b receptors, and is independent of intracellular calcium signalling.

    PubMed

    Reymond-Marron, I; Tribollet, E; Raggenbass, M

    2006-09-01

    As a hormone, vasopressin binds to three distinct receptors: V1a and V1b receptors, which induce phospholipase-Cbeta (PLCbeta) activation and Ca2+ mobilization; and V2 receptors, which are coupled to adenylyl cyclase. V1a and V1b receptors are also present in neurons. In particular, hypoglossal (XII) and facial (VII) motoneurons are excited following vasopressin-V1a receptor binding. The aim of the present study was double: (i) to determine whether V1b receptors contribute to the excitatory effect of vasopressin in XII and VII motoneurons; and (ii) to establish whether the action of vasopressin on motoneurons is mediated by Ca2+ signalling. Patch-clamp recordings were performed in brainstem slices of young rats. Vasopressin depolarized the membrane or generated an inward current. By contrast, [1-deamino-4-cyclohexylalanine] arginine vasopressin (d[Cha4]AVP), a V1b agonist, had no effect. The action of vasopressin was suppressed by Phaa-D-Tyr(Et)-Phe-Gln-Asn-Lys-Pro-Arg-NH2, a V1a antagonist, but not by SSR149415, a V1b antagonist. Thus, the vasopressin-induced excitation of brainstem motoneurons was exclusively mediated by V1a receptors. Light microscopic autoradiography failed to detect V1b binding sites in the facial nucleus. In motoneurons loaded with GTP-gamma-S, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, the effect of vasopressin was suppressed, indicating that neuronal V1a receptors are G-protein-coupled. Intracellular Ca2+ chelation suppressed a Ca2+-activated potassium current, but did not affect the vasopressin-evoked current. H7 and GF109203, inhibitors of protein kinase C, were without effect on the vasopressin-induced excitation. U73122 and D609, PLCbeta inhibitors, were also without effect. Thus, excitation of brainstem motoneurons by V1a receptor activation is probably mediated by a second messenger distinct from that associated with peripheral V1a receptors.

  14. SSE-GIS v1.03 Web Mapping Application Now Available

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-07

    SSE-GIS v1.03 Web Mapping Application Now Available Wednesday, July 6, 2016 ... you haven’t already noticed the link to the new SSE-GIS web application on the SSE homepage entitled “GIS Web Mapping Applications and Services”, we invite you to visit the site. ...

  15. Ligand Recognition of the Major Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 1 is Isoform Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Seutter von Loetzen, Christian; Jacob, Thessa; Hartl-Spiegelhauer, Olivia; Vogel, Lothar; Schiller, Dirk; Spörlein-Güttler, Cornelia; Schobert, Rainer; Vieths, Stefan; Hartl, Maximilian Johannes; Rösch, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Each spring millions of patients suffer from allergies when birch pollen is released into the air. In most cases, the major pollen allergen Bet v 1 is the elicitor of the allergy symptoms. Bet v 1 comes in a variety of isoforms that share virtually identical conformations, but their relative concentrations are plant-specific. Glycosylated flavonoids, such as quercetin-3-O-sophoroside, are the physiological ligands of Bet v 1, and here we found that three isoforms differing in their allergenic potential also show an individual, highly specific binding behaviour for the different ligands. This specificity is driven by the sugar moieties of the ligands rather than the flavonols. While the influence of the ligands on the allergenicity of the Bet v 1 isoforms may be limited, the isoform and ligand mixtures add up to a complex and thus individual fingerprint of the pollen. We suggest that this mixture is not only acting as an effective chemical sunscreen for pollen DNA, but may also play an important role in recognition processes during pollination. PMID:26042900

  16. The orientation selectivity of color-responsive neurons in macaque V1.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth N; Hawken, Michael J; Shapley, Robert

    2008-08-06

    Form has a strong influence on color perception. We investigated the neural basis of the form-color link in macaque primary visual cortex (V1) by studying orientation selectivity of single V1 cells for pure color patterns. Neurons that responded to color were classified, based on cone inputs and spatial selectivity, into chromatically single-opponent and double-opponent groups. Single-opponent cells responded well to color but weakly to luminance contrast; they were not orientation selective for color patterns. Most double-opponent cells were orientation selective to pure color stimuli as well as to achromatic patterns. We also found non-opponent cells that responded weakly or not at all to pure color; most were orientation selective for luminance patterns. Double-opponent and non-opponent cells' orientation selectivities were not contrast invariant; selectivity usually increased with contrast. Double-opponent cells were approximately equally orientation selective for luminance and equiluminant color stimuli when stimuli were matched in average cone contrast. V1 double-opponent cells could be the neural basis of the influence of form on color perception. The combined activities of single- and double-opponent cells in V1 are needed for the full repertoire of color perception.

  17. Decavanadate Toxicology and Pharmacological Activities: V10 or V1, Both or None?

    PubMed

    Aureliano, M

    2016-01-01

    This review covers recent advances in the understanding of decavanadate toxicology and pharmacological applications. Toxicological in vivo studies point out that V10 induces several changes in several oxidative stress parameters, different from the ones observed for vanadate (V1). In in vitro studies with mitochondria, a particularly potent V10 effect, in comparison with V1, was observed in the mitochondrial depolarization (IC50 = 40 nM) and oxygen consumption (99 nM). It is suggested that mitochondrial membrane depolarization is a key event in decavanadate induction of necrotic cardiomyocytes death. Furthermore, only decavanadate species and not V1 potently inhibited myosin ATPase activity stimulated by actin (IC50 = 0.75 μM) whereas exhibiting lower inhibition activities for Ca(2+)-ATPase activity (15 μM) and actin polymerization (17 μM). Because both calcium pump and actin decavanadate interactions lead to its stabilization, it is likely that V10 interacts at specific locations with these proteins that protect against hydrolysis but, on the other hand, it may induce V10 reduction to oxidovanadium(IV). Putting it all together, it is suggested that the pharmacological applications of V10 species and compounds whose mechanism of action is still to be clarified might involve besides V10 and V1 also vanadium(IV) species.

  18. A visual motion sensor based on the properties of V1 and MT neurons.

    PubMed

    Perrone, John A

    2004-01-01

    The motion response properties of neurons increase in complexity as one moves from primary visual cortex (V1), up to higher cortical areas such as the middle temporal (MT) and the medial superior temporal area (MST). Many of the features of V1 neurons can now be replicated using computational models based on spatiotemporal filters. However until recently, relatively little was known about how the motion analysing properties of MT neurons could originate from the V1 neurons that provide their inputs. This has constrained the development of models of the MT-MST stages which have been linked to higher level motion processing tasks such as self-motion perception and depth estimation. I describe the construction of a motion sensor built up in stages from two spatiotemporal filters with properties based on V1 neurons. The resulting composite sensor is shown to have spatiotemporal frequency response profiles, speed and direction tuning responses that are comparable to MT neurons. The sensor is designed to work with digital images and can therefore be used as a realistic front-end to models of MT and MST neuron processing; it can be probed with the same two-dimensional motion stimuli used to test the neurons and has the potential to act as a building block for more complex models of motion processing.

  19. A new allergen from ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) with homology to art v 1 from mugwort.

    PubMed

    Léonard, Renaud; Wopfner, Nicole; Pabst, Martin; Stadlmann, Johannes; Petersen, Bent O; Duus, Jens Ø; Himly, Martin; Radauer, Christian; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Ferreira, Fatima; Altmann, Friedrich

    2010-08-27

    Art v 1, the major pollen allergen of the composite plant mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) has been identified recently as a thionin-like protein with a bulky arabinogalactan-protein moiety. A close relative of mugwort, ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is an important allergen source in North America, and, since 1990, ragweed has become a growing health concern in Europe as well. Weed pollen-sensitized patients demonstrated IgE reactivity to a ragweed pollen protein of apparently 29-31 kDa. This reaction could be inhibited by the mugwort allergen Art v 1. The purified ragweed pollen protein consisted of a 57-amino acid-long defensin-like domain with high homology to Art v 1 and a C-terminal proline-rich domain. This part contained hydroxyproline-linked arabinogalactan chains with one galactose and 5 to 20 and more alpha-arabinofuranosyl residues with some beta-arabinoses in terminal positions as revealed by high field NMR. The ragweed protein contained only small amounts of the single hydroxyproline-linked beta-arabinosyl residues, which form an important IgE binding determinant in Art v 1. cDNA clones for this protein were obtained from ragweed flowers. Immunological characterization revealed that the recombinant ragweed protein reacted with >30% of the weed pollen allergic patients. Therefore, this protein from ragweed pollen constitutes a novel important ragweed allergen and has been designated Amb a 4.

  20. Robust Supersolidity in the V1- V2 Extended Bose-Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Nicole; Pixley, Jedediah

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by ultra-cold atomic gases with long-range interactions in an optical lattice we study the effects of the next-nearest neighbor interaction on the extended Bose-Hubbard model on a square lattice. Using the variational Gutzwiller approach with a four-site unit cell we determine the ground state phase diagrams as a function of the model parameters. We focus on the interplay of each interaction between the nearest neighbor (V1) , the next-nearest neighbor (V2) , and the onsite repulsion (U). We find various super-solid phases that can be described by one of the ordering wave-vectors (π, 0), (0, π) , and (π, π) . In the limits V1, V2 V1, V2 >U we find phases reminiscent of the limit V2 = 0 but with a richer super solid structure. For V1

  1. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  2. Decavanadate Toxicology and Pharmacological Activities: V10 or V1, Both or None?

    PubMed Central

    Aureliano, M.

    2016-01-01

    This review covers recent advances in the understanding of decavanadate toxicology and pharmacological applications. Toxicological in vivo studies point out that V10 induces several changes in several oxidative stress parameters, different from the ones observed for vanadate (V1). In in vitro studies with mitochondria, a particularly potent V10 effect, in comparison with V1, was observed in the mitochondrial depolarization (IC50 = 40 nM) and oxygen consumption (99 nM). It is suggested that mitochondrial membrane depolarization is a key event in decavanadate induction of necrotic cardiomyocytes death. Furthermore, only decavanadate species and not V1 potently inhibited myosin ATPase activity stimulated by actin (IC50 = 0.75 μM) whereas exhibiting lower inhibition activities for Ca2+-ATPase activity (15 μM) and actin polymerization (17 μM). Because both calcium pump and actin decavanadate interactions lead to its stabilization, it is likely that V10 interacts at specific locations with these proteins that protect against hydrolysis but, on the other hand, it may induce V10 reduction to oxidovanadium(IV). Putting it all together, it is suggested that the pharmacological applications of V10 species and compounds whose mechanism of action is still to be clarified might involve besides V10 and V1 also vanadium(IV) species. PMID:26904166

  3. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  4. Developing iCare v.1.0: an academic electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tami H; Li, Xueping; Indranoi, Chayawat; Bell, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    An electronic health record application, iCare v.1.0, was developed and tested that allows data input and retrieval while tracking student performance over time. The development and usability testing of iCare v.1.0 followed a rapid prototyping software development and testing model. Once the functionality was tested by engineers, the usability and feasibility testing began with a convenience sample of focus group members including undergraduate and graduate students and faculty. Three focus groups were created, and four subjects participated in each focus group (n = 12). Nielsen's usability heuristics and methods of evaluation were used to evaluate data captured from each focus group. Overall, users wanted a full-featured electronic health record with features that coached or guided users. The earliest versions of iCare v.1.0 did not provide help features and prompts to guide students but were later added. Future versions will incorporate a full-featured help section. The interface and design of iCare v.1.0 are similar to professional electronic health record applications. As a result of this usability study, future versions of iCare will include more robust help features along with advanced reporting and elements specific to specialty populations such as pediatrics and mental health services.

  5. NaV1.5 and interacting proteins in human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Ludovic; Shy, Diana; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of: Noorman M, Hakim S, Kessler E et al. Remodeling of the cardiac sodium channel, connexin43, and plakoglobin at the intercalated disk in patients with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Heart Rhythm 10(3), 412-419 (2013). Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a heart muscle disease characterized by a progressive replacement of the ventricular myocardium with adipose and fibrous tissue. This disease is often associated with mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins in the majority of patients. Based on results obtained from recent experimental models, a disturbed distribution of gap junction proteins and cardiac sodium channels may also be observed in AC phenotypes, secondary to desmosomal dysfunction. The study from Noorman et al. examined heart sections from patients diagnosed with AC and performed immunohistochemical analyses of N-cadherin, PKP2, PKG, Cx43 and the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5. Altered expression/distribution of Cx43, PKG and NaV1.5 was found in most cases of patients with AC. The altered expression and/or distribution of NaV1.5 channels in AC hearts may play a mechanistic role in the arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death in AC patients. Thus, NaV1.5 should be considered as a supplemental element in the evaluation of risk stratification and management strategies. However, additional experiments are required to clearly understand the mechanisms leading to AC phenotypes.

  6. Regulation of the NaV1.5 cytoplasmic domain by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Boto, Agedi; Kuhns, Victoria Halperin; Bianchet, Mario A; Farinelli, Federica; Aripirala, Srinivas; Yoder, Jesse; Jakoncic, Jean; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2014-11-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) underlie the rapid upstroke of action potentials in excitable tissues. Binding of channel-interactive proteins is essential for controlling fast and long-term inactivation. In the structure of the complex of the carboxy-terminal portion of Na(v)1.5 (CTNa(v)1.5) with calmodulin (CaM)-Mg(2+) reported here, both CaM lobes interact with the CTNa(v)1.5. On the basis of the differences between this structure and that of an inactivated complex, we propose that the structure reported here represents a non-inactivated state of the CTNa(v), that is, the state that is poised for activation. Electrophysiological characterization of mutants further supports the importance of the interactions identified in the structure. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that CaM binds to CTNa(v)1.5 with high affinity. The results of this study provide unique insights into the physiological activation and the pathophysiology of Na(v) channels.

  7. Tracing path-guided apparent motion in human primary visual cortex V1

    PubMed Central

    Akselrod, Michel; Herzog, Michael H.; Öğmen, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Vision is a constructive process. For example, a square, flashed at two distinct locations one after the other, appears to move smoothly between the two locations rather than as two separate flashes (apparent motion). Apparent motion is usually perceived along the shortest path between locations. Previous studies have shown that retinotopic activity in V1 correlates well with the subjective filling-in in apparent motion. If V1 activity truly reflects illusory motion, it should flexibly reflect filling-in of any path, subjectively perceived. Here, we used a path-guided apparent motion paradigm in which a faint cue, presented in addition to the squares, leads to a curved illusory motion path. We found retinotopic activity in V1 to reflect the illusory filling-in of the curved path, similarly to filling-in with linear, shortest paths. Moreover, our results show that activity along the linear path was less selective to stimulus conditions than the activity along the curved path. This finding may be interpreted as V1 activity representing a small subset of infinitely many possible solutions to ambiguous stimuli, whilst giving more weight to the shortest path/energy solution. PMID:25317907

  8. Fully Enzymatic Membraneless Glucose|Oxygen Fuel Cell That Provides 0.275 mA cm(-2) in 5 mM Glucose, Operates in Human Physiological Solutions, and Powers Transmission of Sensing Data.

    PubMed

    Ó Conghaile, Peter; Falk, Magnus; MacAodha, Domhnall; Yakovleva, Maria E; Gonaus, Christoph; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Gorton, Lo; Shleev, Sergey; Leech, Dónal

    2016-02-16

    Coimmobilization of pyranose dehydrogenase as an enzyme catalyst, osmium redox polymers [Os(4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine)2(poly(vinylimidazole))10Cl](+) or [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)2(poly(vinylimidazole))10Cl](+) as mediators, and carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds in films on graphite electrodes provides enzyme electrodes for glucose oxidation. The recombinant enzyme and a deglycosylated form, both expressed in Pichia pastoris, are investigated and compared as biocatalysts for glucose oxidation using flow injection amperometry and voltammetry. In the presence of 5 mM glucose in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (50 mM phosphate buffer solution, pH 7.4, with 150 mM NaCl), higher glucose oxidation current densities, 0.41 mA cm(-2), are obtained from enzyme electrodes containing the deglycosylated form of the enzyme. The optimized glucose-oxidizing anode, prepared using deglycosylated enzyme coimmobilized with [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)2(poly(vinylimidazole))10Cl](+) and carbon nanotubes, was coupled with an oxygen-reducing bilirubin oxidase on gold nanoparticle dispersed on gold electrode as a biocathode to provide a membraneless fully enzymatic fuel cell. A maximum power density of 275 μW cm(-2) is obtained in 5 mM glucose in PBS, the highest to date under these conditions, providing sufficient power to enable wireless transmission of a signal to a data logger. When tested in whole human blood and unstimulated human saliva maximum power densities of 73 and 6 μW cm(-2) are obtained for the same fuel cell configuration, respectively.

  9. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.

    SciTech Connect

    Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30

    This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

  10. Chromatic detection from cone photoreceptors to V1 neurons to behavior in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Charles A.; Angueyra, Juan M.; Lindbloom-Brown, Zachary; Rieke, Fred; Horwitz, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatic sensitivity cannot exceed limits set by noise in the cone photoreceptors. To determine how close neurophysiological and psychophysical chromatic sensitivity come to these limits, we developed a parameter-free model of stimulus encoding in the cone outer segments, and we compared the sensitivity of the model to the psychophysical sensitivity of monkeys performing a detection task and to the sensitivity of individual V1 neurons. Modeled cones had a temporal impulse response and a noise power spectrum that were derived from in vitro recordings of macaque cones, and V1 recordings were made during performance of the detection task. The sensitivity of the simulated cone mosaic, the V1 neurons, and the monkeys were tightly yoked for low-spatiotemporal-frequency isoluminant modulations, indicating high-fidelity signal transmission for this class of stimuli. Under the conditions of our experiments and the assumptions for our model, the signal-to-noise ratio for these stimuli dropped by a factor of ∼3 between the cones and perception. Populations of weakly correlated V1 neurons narrowly exceeded the monkeys' chromatic sensitivity but fell well short of the cones' chromatic sensitivity, suggesting that most of the behavior-limiting noise lies between the cone outer segments and the output of V1. The sensitivity gap between the cones and behavior for achromatic stimuli was larger than for chromatic stimuli, indicating greater postreceptoral noise. The cone mosaic model provides a means to compare visual sensitivity across disparate stimuli and to identify sources of noise that limit visual sensitivity. PMID:26523737

  11. Chromatic detection from cone photoreceptors to V1 neurons to behavior in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hass, Charles A; Angueyra, Juan M; Lindbloom-Brown, Zachary; Rieke, Fred; Horwitz, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    Chromatic sensitivity cannot exceed limits set by noise in the cone photoreceptors. To determine how close neurophysiological and psychophysical chromatic sensitivity come to these limits, we developed a parameter-free model of stimulus encoding in the cone outer segments, and we compared the sensitivity of the model to the psychophysical sensitivity of monkeys performing a detection task and to the sensitivity of individual V1 neurons. Modeled cones had a temporal impulse response and a noise power spectrum that were derived from in vitro recordings of macaque cones, and V1 recordings were made during performance of the detection task. The sensitivity of the simulated cone mosaic, the V1 neurons, and the monkeys were tightly yoked for low-spatiotemporal-frequency isoluminant modulations, indicating high-fidelity signal transmission for this class of stimuli. Under the conditions of our experiments and the assumptions for our model, the signal-to-noise ratio for these stimuli dropped by a factor of ∼3 between the cones and perception. Populations of weakly correlated V1 neurons narrowly exceeded the monkeys' chromatic sensitivity but fell well short of the cones' chromatic sensitivity, suggesting that most of the behavior-limiting noise lies between the cone outer segments and the output of V1. The sensitivity gap between the cones and behavior for achromatic stimuli was larger than for chromatic stimuli, indicating greater postreceptoral noise. The cone mosaic model provides a means to compare visual sensitivity across disparate stimuli and to identify sources of noise that limit visual sensitivity.

  12. Single-Trial Analysis of V1 Responses Suggests Two Transmission States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. S.; Knuth, K. H.; Truccolo, W. A.; Mehta, A. D.; McGinnis, T.; OConnell, N.; Ding, M.; Bressler, S. L.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory processing in the visual, auditory, and somatosensory systems is often studied by recording electrical activity in response to a stimulus of interest. Typically, multiple trial responses to the stimulus are averaged to isolate the stereotypic response from noise. However, averaging ignores dynamic variability in the neuronal response, which is potentially critical to understanding stimulus-processing schemes. Thus, we developed the multiple component, Event-Related Potential (mcERP) model. This model asserts that multiple components, defined as stereotypic waveforms, comprise the stimulus-evoked response and that these components may vary in amplitude and latency from trial to trial. Application of this model to data recorded simultaneously from all six laminae of V1 in an awake, behaving monkey performing a visual discrimination yielded three components. The first component localized to granular V1, the second was located in supragranular V1, and the final component displayed a multi-laminar distribution. These modeling results, which take into account single-trial response dynamics, illustrated that the initial activation of VI occurs in the granular layer followed by activation in the supragranular layers. This finding is expected because the average response in those layers demonstrates the same progression and because anatomical evidence suggests that the feedforward input in V1 enters the granular layer and progresses to supragranular layers. In addition to these findings, the granular component of the model displayed several interesting trial-to-trial characteristics including (1) a bimodal latency distribution, (2) a latency-related variation in response amplitude, (3) a latency correlation with the supragranular component, and (4) an amplitude and latency association with the multi-laminar component. Direct analyses of the single-trial data were consistent with these model predictions. These findings suggest that V1 has at least 2 transmission

  13. Fine Mapping of Virescent Leaf Gene v-1 in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Miao, Han; Zhang, Shengping; Wang, Min; Wang, Ye; Weng, Yiqun; Gu, Xingfang

    2016-09-22

    Leaf color mutants are common in higher plants that can be used as markers in crop breeding or as an important tool in understanding regulatory mechanisms in chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In virescent leaf mutants, young leaves are yellow in color, which gradually return to normal green when the seedlings grow large. In the present study, we conducted phenotypic characterization and genetic mapping of the cucumber virescent leaf mutant 9110Gt conferred by the v-1 locus. Total chlorophyll and carotenoid content in 9110Gt was reduced by 44% and 21%, respectively, as compared with its wild type parental line 9110G. Electron microscopic investigation revealed fewer chloroplasts per cell and thylakoids per chloroplast in 9110Gt than in 9110G. Fine genetic mapping allowed for the assignment of the v-1 locus to a 50.4 kb genomic DNA region in chromosome 6 with two flanking markers that were 0.14 and 0.16 cM away from v-1, respectively. Multiple lines of evidence supported CsaCNGCs as the only candidate gene for the v-1 locus, which encoded a cyclic-nucleotide-gated ion channel protein. A single nucleotide change in the promoter region of v-1 seemed to be associated with the virescent color change in 9110Gt. Real-time PCR revealed significantly lower expression of CsaCNGCs in the true leaves of 9110Gt than in 9110G. This was the first report that connected the CsaCNGCs gene to virescent leaf color change, which provided a useful tool to establish linkages among virescent leaf color change, chloroplast development, chlorophyll biosynthesis, and the functions of the CsaCNGCs gene.

  14. Fine Mapping of Virescent Leaf Gene v-1 in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Han; Zhang, Shengping; Wang, Min; Wang, Ye; Weng, Yiqun; Gu, Xingfang

    2016-01-01

    Leaf color mutants are common in higher plants that can be used as markers in crop breeding or as an important tool in understanding regulatory mechanisms in chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In virescent leaf mutants, young leaves are yellow in color, which gradually return to normal green when the seedlings grow large. In the present study, we conducted phenotypic characterization and genetic mapping of the cucumber virescent leaf mutant 9110Gt conferred by the v-1 locus. Total chlorophyll and carotenoid content in 9110Gt was reduced by 44% and 21%, respectively, as compared with its wild type parental line 9110G. Electron microscopic investigation revealed fewer chloroplasts per cell and thylakoids per chloroplast in 9110Gt than in 9110G. Fine genetic mapping allowed for the assignment of the v-1 locus to a 50.4 kb genomic DNA region in chromosome 6 with two flanking markers that were 0.14 and 0.16 cM away from v-1, respectively. Multiple lines of evidence supported CsaCNGCs as the only candidate gene for the v-1 locus, which encoded a cyclic-nucleotide-gated ion channel protein. A single nucleotide change in the promoter region of v-1 seemed to be associated with the virescent color change in 9110Gt. Real-time PCR revealed significantly lower expression of CsaCNGCs in the true leaves of 9110Gt than in 9110G. This was the first report that connected the CsaCNGCs gene to virescent leaf color change, which provided a useful tool to establish linkages among virescent leaf color change, chloroplast development, chlorophyll biosynthesis, and the functions of the CsaCNGCs gene. PMID:27669214

  15. Low level laser therapy (AlGaInP) applied at 5J/cm2 reduces the proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in infected wounds and intact skin of rats*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniela Conceição Gomes Gonçalves e; Plapler, Helio; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Silva, Silvio Romero Gonçalves e; de Sá, Maria da Conceição Aquino; Silva, Benedito Sávio Lima e

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laser therapy is a low cost, non-invasive procedure with good healing results. Doubts exist as to whether laser therapy action on microorganisms can justify research aimed at investigating its possible effects on bacteria-infected wounds. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of low intensity laser on the rate of bacterial contamination in infected wounds in the skin of rats. METHODS An experimental study using 56 male Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into eight groups of seven each. Those in the "infected" groups were infected by Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in the dorsal region. Red laser diode (AlGaInP) 658nm, 5J/cm2 was used to treat the animals in the "treated" groups in scan for 3 consecutive days. Samples were drawn before inoculating bacteria and following laser treatment. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Wilcoxon (paired data) method with a significance level of p <0.05. RESULTS The statistical analysis of median values showed that the groups submitted to laser treatment had low bacterial proliferation. CONCLUSION The laser (AlGaInP), with a dose of 5J/cm2 in both intact skin and in wounds of rats infected with Staphylococcus aureus MRSA, is shown to reduce bacterial proliferation. PMID:23539003

  16. Comparison of the pharmacological properties of rat Na(V)1.8 with rat Na(V)1.2a and human Na(V)1.5 voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes using a membrane potential sensitive dye and FLIPR.

    PubMed

    Vickery, R G; Amagasu, S M; Chang, R; Mai, N; Kaufman, E; Martin, J; Hembrador, J; O'Keefe, M D; Gee, C; Marquess, D; Smith, J A M

    2004-01-01

    A novel, membrane potential sensitive dye and a fluorescence imaging plate reader (FLIPR) have been used to characterize the pharmacological properties of rat Na(v)1.8 voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) in parallel with rat Na(v)1.2a and human Na(v)1.5 VGSC subtypes, respectively. The sensitivity of recombinant Na(v)1.2a-CHO, Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA, and Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells to VGSC activators was subtype dependent. Veratridine evoked depolarization of Na(v)1.2a-CHO and Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA cells with pEC(50) values of 4.78 +/- 0.13 and 4.84 +/- 0.12, respectively (n = 3), but had negligible effect on Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells (pEC(50) < 4.5). Type I pyrethroids were without significant effect at all subtypes. In contrast, the type II pyrethroids deltamethrin and fenvalerate evoked direct depolarization of Na(v)1.8-F-11 and Na(v)1.5-293-EBNA cells. Deltamethrin potentiated the veratridine-evoked response in Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells by > or =20-fold, in contrast to a v)1.2a, and Na(v)1.5 cells. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) inhibited VGSC activator-evoked depolarization of Na(v)1.8-F-11 cells with a biphasic concentration-response curve. The calculated pIC(50) values were 8.05 +/- 0.25 (n = 4) and 4.32 +/- 0.21 (n = 4), corresponding to TTX inhibition of endogenous TTX-sensitive (TTX-S), and recombinant Na(v)1.8 TTX-resistant (TTX-R) VGSCs, respectively. With the exception of TTX, the potencies of a number of ion channel blockers for the Na(v)1.8, Na(v)1.2a, and Na(v)1.5 VGSC subtypes were similar. In summary, these high-throughput FLIPR assays represent a valuable tool for the determination of the relative potencies of compounds at different VGSC subtypes and may prove useful for the identification of novel subtype-selective inhibitors.

  17. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  18. Bistable Gestalts reduce activity in the whole of V1, not just the retinotopically predicted parts.

    PubMed

    de-Wit, Lee H; Kubilius, Jonas; Wagemans, Johan; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2012-10-22

    Activity in the primary visual cortex reduces when certain stimuli can be perceptually organized as a unified Gestalt. This reduction could offer important insights into the nature of feedback computations within the human visual system; however, the properties of this response reduction have not yet been investigated in detail. Here we replicate this reduced V1 response, but find that the modulation in V1 (and V2) to the perceived organization of the input is not specific to the retinotopic location at which the sensory input from that stimulus is represented. Instead, we find a response modulation that is equally evident across the primary visual cortex. Thus in contradiction to some models of hierarchical predictive coding, the perception of an organized Gestalt causes a broad feedback effect that does not act specifically on the part of the retinotopic map representing the sensory input.

  19. Explosive Model Tarantula V1/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17: #2

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2009-05-01

    Tarantula V1 is a kinetic package for reactive flow codes that seeks to describe initiation, failure, dead zones and detonation simultaneously. The most important parameter is P1, the pressure between the initiation and failure regions. Both dead zone formation and failure can be largely controlled with this knob. However, V1 does failure with low settings and dead zones with higher settings, so that it cannot fulfill its purpose in the current format. To this end, V2 is under test. The derivation of the initiation threshold P0 is discussed. The derivation of the initiation pressure-tau curve as an output of Tarantula shows that the initiation package is sound. A desensitization package is also considered.

  20. No gain, no pain: NaV1.7 as an analgesic target.

    PubMed

    King, Glenn F; Vetter, Irina

    2014-09-17

    Chronic pain is one of the most complex and difficult to manage clinical problems, with the therapeutic utility of current-generation analgesics restricted by problems such as dose-limiting side effects, tolerance, and the potential for addiction. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 plays a key role in setting the threshold for action potential generation in primary sensory neurons, and humans that lack this channel are completely insensitive to pain. In this Viewpoint, we examine the potential of NaV1.7 as an analgesic target a well as the challenges involved in developing therapeutically useful subtype-selective inhibitors of this ion channel.

  1. Dependence of V2 illusory contour response on V1 cell properties and topographic organization.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Amelia; Buia, Calin; Tiesinga, Paul

    2014-06-01

    An illusory contour is an image that is perceived as a contour in the absence of typical contour characteristics, such as a change in luminance or chromaticity across the stimulus. In cats and primates, cells that respond to illusory contours are sparse in cortical area V1, but are found in greater numbers in cortical area V2. We propose a model capable of illusory contour detection that is based on a realistic topographic organization of V1 cells, which reproduces the responses of individual cell types measured experimentally. The model allows us to explain several experimentally observed properties of V2 cells including variability in orientation tuning and inducer spacing preference. As a practical application, the model can be used to estimate the relationship between the severity of a cortical injury in the primary visual cortex and the deterioration of V2 cell responses to real and illusory contours.

  2. Na(v)1.7 and Na(v)1.3 are the only tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels expressed by the adult guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sage, D; Salin, P; Alcaraz, G; Castets, F; Giraud, P; Crest, M; Mazet, B; Clerc, N

    2007-10-01

    The types of sodium channels that are expressed by neurons shape the rising phase of action potentials and influence patterns of action potential discharge. With regard to the enteric nervous system (ENS), there is uncertainty about which channels are expressed, and in particular it is unknown whether Na(v)1.7 is present. We designed specific probes for the guinea pig Na(v)1.7 alpha subunit as well as for the other tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive alpha subunits (Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, and Na(v)1.6) in order to perform in situ hybridization (ISH) histochemistry on guinea pig myenteric ganglia. We established that only Na(v)1.7 mRNA and Na(v)1.3 mRNA are expressed in these ganglia. The ISH signal for Na(v)1.7 transcripts was found in seemingly all the myenteric neurons. The expression of the Na(v)1.3 alpha subunit was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in a large proportion (62%) of the myenteric neuron population. This population included enteric sensory neurons. Na(v)1.6 immunoreactivity, absent from myenteric neurons, was detected in glial cells only when a high anti-Na(v)1.6 antibody concentration was used. This suggests that the Na(v)1.6 alpha subunit and mRNA are present only at low levels, which is consistent with the fact that no Na(v)1.6 mRNA could be detected in the ENS by ISH. The fact that adult myenteric neurons are endowed with only two TTX-sensitive alpha subunits, namely, Na(v)1.3 and Na(v)1.7, emphasizes the singularity of the ENS. Both these subunits, known to have slow-inactivation kinetics, are well adapted for generating action potentials from slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials, a mode of synaptic transmission that applies to all ENS neuron types.

  3. Evaluation of the Early Access STR Kit v1 on the Ion Torrent PGM™ platform.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Zhou, Yishu; Liu, Feng; Yu, Jiao; Song, He; Shen, Hongying; Zhao, Bin; Jia, Fei; Hou, Guangwei; Jiang, Xianhua

    2016-07-01

    The Early Access STR Kit v1 is designed to detect 25-plex loci with next generation sequencing (NGS) technology on the Ion Torrent PGM™ platform, including 16 of 20 expanded Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) core loci (CSF1PO, D1S1656, D2S1338, D2S441, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, D13S317, D16S539, D19S433, D21S11, TH01, TPOX and vWA), 8 non-CODIS core loci (D1S1677, D2S1776, D4S2408, D5S2500.AC008791, D6S1043, D6S474, D9S2157 and D14S1434) and Amelogenin. In this study, we compared the Early Access STR Kit v1 with the Ion Torrent™ HID STR 10-plex to find out its improvements and explored an appropriate analytical threshold to enhance the performance. In addition, seven experiments were conducted to evaluate the Early Access STR Kit v1 such as studies of repeatability, concordance, sensitivity, mixtures, degraded samples, case-type samples and pedigrees. Other than a little discordance (0.95%) with CE-STR results observed at D21S11, NGS-STR results correctly reflected the sample being tested. Repeatable results were obtained from both initial PCRs and emPCRs aside from a few variations of allele coverage. Full profiles could be obtained from 100pg input DNA and >48.84% profiles from 10pg input DNA. Mixtures were easily detected at 9:1 and 1:9 ratios. This system could be adapted to case-type samples and degraded samples. As a whole, the Early Access STR Kit v1 is a robust, reliable and reproducible assay for NGS-STR typing and a potential tool for human identification.

  4. Neural activities in V1 create the bottom-up saliency map of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Xilin; Wang, Yizhou; Zhou, Tiangang; Fang, Fang

    2016-06-01

    A saliency map is the bottom-up contribution to the deployment of exogenous attention. It, as well as its underlying neural mechanism, is hard to identify because of the influence of top-down signals. A recent study showed that neural activities in V1 could create a bottom-up saliency map (Zhang et al. in Neuron 73(1):183-192, 2012). In this paper, we tested whether their conclusion can generalize to complex natural scenes. In order to avoid top-down influences, each image was presented with a low contrast for only 50 ms and was followed by a high contrast mask, which rendered the whole image invisible to participants (confirmed by a forced-choice test). The Posner cueing paradigm was adopted to measure the spatial cueing effect (i.e., saliency) by an orientation discrimination task. A positive cueing effect was found, and the magnitude of the cueing effect was consistent with the saliency prediction of a computational saliency model. In a following fMRI experiment, we used the same masked natural scenes as stimuli and measured BOLD signals responding to the predicted salient region (relative to the background). We found that the BOLD signal in V1, but not in other cortical areas, could well predict the cueing effect. These results suggest that the bottom-up saliency map of natural scenes could be created in V1, providing further evidence for the V1 saliency theory (Li in Trends Cogn Sci 6(1):9-16, 2002).

  5. Poblano v1.0 : a Matlab toolbox for gradient-based optimization.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-03-01

    We present Poblano v1.0, a Matlab toolbox for solving gradient-based unconstrained optimization problems. Poblano implements three optimization methods (nonlinear conjugate gradients, limited-memory BFGS, and truncated Newton) that require only first order derivative information. In this paper, we describe the Poblano methods, provide numerous examples on how to use Poblano, and present results of Poblano used in solving problems from a standard test collection of unconstrained optimization problems.

  6. CMMI(Registered) for Acquisition, Version 1.3. CMMI-ACQ, V1.3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    So Norimatsu, Norimatsu Process Engineering Lab, Inc. Mary Lynn Penn, Lockheed Martin Corporation David (Mike) Phillips , Software Engineering...CMMI ® for Acquisition, Version 1.3 CMMI-ACQ, V1.3 CMMI Product Team Improving processes for acquiring better products and services...November 2010 TECHNICAL REPORT CMU/SEI-2010-TR-032 ESC-TR-2010-032 Software Engineering Process Management Program Unlimited distribution

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation reveals attentional feedback to area V1 during serial visual search.

    PubMed

    Dugué, Laura; Marque, Philippe; VanRullen, Rufin

    2011-01-01

    Visual search tasks have been used to understand how, where and when attention influences visual processing. Current theories suggest the involvement of a high-level "saliency map" that selects a candidate location to focus attentional resources. For a parallel (or "pop-out") task, the first chosen location is systematically the target, but for a serial (or "difficult") task, the system may cycle on a few distractors before finally focusing on the target. This implies that attentional effects upon early visual areas, involving feedback from higher areas, should be visible at longer latencies during serial search. A previous study from Juan & Walsh (2003) had used Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) to support this conclusion; however, only a few post-stimulus delays were compared, and no control TMS location was used. Here we applied TMS double-pulses (sub-threshold) to induce a transient inhibition of area V1 at every post-stimulus delay between 100 ms and 500 ms (50 ms steps). The search array was presented either at the location affected by the TMS pulses (previously identified by applying several pulses at supra-threshold intensity to induce phosphene perception), or in the opposite hemifield, which served as a retinotopically-defined control location. Two search tasks were used: a parallel (+ among Ls) and a serial one (T among Ls). TMS specifically impaired the serial, but not the parallel search. We highlight an involvement of V1 in serial search 300 ms after the onset; conversely, V1 did not contribute to parallel search at delays beyond 100 ms. This study supports the idea that serial search differs from parallel search by the presence of additional cycles of a select-and-focus iterative loop between V1 and higher-level areas.

  8. Arginine Vasopressin V1a Receptor Antagonist Impairs Maternal Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nephew, Benjamin C.; Bridges, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Primiparous female rats rapidly respond to foster pups following an extended separation from pups after an initial maternal experience. This consolidation of maternal behavior has been referred to as maternal memory. The neurochemical regulation of maternal memory is not clearly understood. One neuropeptide that may mediate maternal memory is arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide which is modulated around the time of parturition and has an established role in learning and memory processes. Thus, the present studies examine the possible involvement of AVP in the establishment of maternal memory in female rats. Pregnant rats were implanted with chronic cannulae connected to subcutaneous osmotic minipumps filled with a V1a receptor antagonist [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP, 0.1–12.5 ng/hr] or saline vehicle which were chronically infused either into the lateral ventricles or bilaterally into the medial amygdala beginning on day 18 of gestation. Both the osmotic pumps and the newborn pups were removed 24 hours following parturition. The effects of the V1a antagonist treatments on social recognition and maternal behavior were measured following parturition and maternal memory was assessed following a ten day separation from pups. Whereas none of the AVP treatments affected the initial establishment of maternal behavior postpartum, maternal memory was impaired in rats infused into the amygdala with the AVP antagonist (1.25 and 12.5 ng/hr). Social recognition was not impaired by intracerebroventricular infusion of either the 0.1 or 1.0 ng/hr dose of the V1a antagonist. The present results suggest a role for medial amygdaloid V1a receptors in the establishment of maternal memory. PMID:18620713

  9. Purification and characterization of the V1 vasopressin receptor from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, J.B.; Dickey, B.F.; Attisano, C.; Fine, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    The rat liver V1 vasopressin receptor was purified approximately 21,000-fold from rat liver microsomes. The receptor was solubilized from membranes using the zwitterionic detergent CHAPS (3-((3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate). Since the V1 receptor loses its ability to bind ligand when solubilized, the authors devised a liposome reconstitution system to assay vasopressin binding activity during purification. The purified receptor exhibits a K/sub d/ of 6 nm, when, prior to solubilization, the membranes were exposed to 1 m vasopressin. This resulted in the association of a pertussis-toxin insensitive guanine-nucleotide binding protein with the receptor during most of the purification procedure. The authors are further characterizing the V1-associated G-proteins. In the absence of this association, the receptor has a K/sub d/ of 30 nM. Crosslinking of SVI-vasopressin to a partially purified preparation of receptor demonstrated that the receptor had a molecular weight of approximately 68,000 under reducing conditions, and 58,000 under non-reducing conditions. The purification procedure may prove useful in purifying a number of small peptide hormone receptors (e.g., bradykinin, angiotensin II) and perhaps their associated G-proteins as well.

  10. Contribution of lateral interactions in V1 to organization of response properties.

    PubMed

    Wright, J J; Alexander, D M; Bourke, P D

    2006-09-01

    We propose a model of self-organization of synaptic connections in V1, emphasizing lateral interactions. Subject to Hebbian learning with decay, evolution of synaptic strengths proceeds to a stable state in which all synapses are either saturated, or have minimum pre/post-synaptic coincidence. The most stable configuration gives rise to anatomically realistic "local maps", each of macro-columnar size, and each organized as Mobius projections of retinotopic space. A tiling of V1, constructed of approximately mirror-image reflections of each local map by its neighbors is formed, accounting for orientation-preference singularities, linear zones, and saddle points-with each map linked by connections between sites of common orientation preference. Ocular dominance columns are partly explained as a special case of the same process. The occurrence of direction preference fractures always in odd numbers around singularities is a specific feature explained by the Mobius configuration of the local map. Effects of stimulus velocity, orientation relative to direction of motion, and extension, upon orientation preference, which are not accounted for by spatial filtering, are explained by interactions between the classic receptive field and global V1.

  11. Phosphate solubilizing ability of Emericella nidulans strain V1 isolated from vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Satya Sunder; Barman, Soma; Ghosh, Ranjan; Duary, Raj Kumar; Goswami, Linee; Mandal, Narayan C

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorus is one of the key factors that regulate soil fertility. Its deficiencies in soil are largely replenished by chemical fertilizers. The present study was aimed to isolate efficient phosphate solubilizing fungal strains from Eisenia fetida vermicompost. Out of total 30 fungal strains the most efficient phosphate solubilizing one was Emericella (Aspergillus) nidulans V1 (MTCC 11044), identified by custom sequencing of beta-tubulin gene and BLAST analysis. This strain solubilized 13 to 36% phosphate from four different rock phosphates. After three days of incubation of isolated culture with black Mussorie phosphate rock, the highest percentage of phosphate solubilization was 35.5 +/- 1.01 with a pH drop of 4.2 +/- 0.09. Kinetics of solubilization and acid production showed a linear relationship until day five of incubation. Interestingly, from zero to tenth day of incubation, solubility of soil phosphate increased gradually from 4.31 +/- 1.57 to 13.65 +/- 1.82 (mg kg(-1)) recording a maximum of 21.23 +/- 0.54 on day 45 in respect of the V1 isolate. Further, enhanced phosphorus uptake by Phaseolus plants with significant pod yield due to soil inoculation of Emericella nidulans V1 (MTCC 11044), demonstrated its prospect as an effective biofertilizer for plant growth.

  12. Cholinergic suppression of visual responses in primate V1 is mediated by GABAergic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Disney, Anita A; Aoki, Chiye; Hawken, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has been implicated in selective attention. To understand the local circuit action of ACh, we iontophoresed cholinergic agonists into the primate primary visual cortex (V1) while presenting optimal visual stimuli. Consistent with our previous anatomical studies showing that GABAergic neurons in V1 express ACh receptors to a greater extent than do excitatory neurons, we observed suppressed visual responses in 36% of recorded neurons outside V1's primary thalamorecipient layer (4c). This suppression is blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine. Within layer 4c, ACh release produces a response gain enhancement (Disney AA, Aoki C, Hawken MJ. Neuron 56: 701-713, 2007); elsewhere, ACh suppresses response gain by strengthening inhibition. Our finding contrasts with the observation that the dominant mechanism of suppression in the neocortex of rats is reduced glutamate release. We propose that in primates, distinct cholinergic receptor subtypes are recruited on specific cell types and in specific lamina to yield opposing modulatory effects that together increase neurons' responsiveness to optimal stimuli without changing tuning width.

  13. Single mode operation with mid-IR hollow fibers in the range 5.1-10.5 µm.

    PubMed

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Kriesel, Jason M; Tittel, Frank K; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-12

    Single mode beam delivery in the mid-infrared spectral range 5.1-10.5 μm employing flexible hollow glass waveguides of 15 cm and 50 cm lengths, with metallic/dielectric internal layers and a bore diameter of 200 μm were demonstrated. Three quantum cascade lasers were coupled with the hollow core fibers. For a fiber length of 15 cm, we measured losses down to 1.55 dB at 5.4 μm and 0.9 dB at 10.5 μm. The influence of the launch conditions in the fiber on the propagation losses and on the beam profile at the waveguide exit was analyzed. At 10.5 µm laser wavelength we found near perfect agreement between measured and theoretical losses, while at ~5 µm and ~6 µm wavelengths the losses were higher than expected. This discrepancy can be explained considering an additional scattering loss effect, which scales as 1/λ(2) and is due to surface roughness of the metallic layer used to form the high-reflective internal layer structure of the hollow core waveguide.

  14. Neurohypophysial hormone regulation of Cl- secretion: physiological evidence for V1-type receptors in sea bass gill respiratory cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Guibbolini, M E; Avella, M

    2003-01-01

    Neurohypophysial hormone receptors were studied in primary cultures of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) gill respiratory-like cells grown on permeable supports. This preparation was previously shown to provide a functional model for investigating the hormonal regulation of Cl- secretion. Under control conditions, the cultured monolayered epithelium had a short-circuit current (ISC) of 3.5+/-1.1 micro A x cm(-2). This current had previously been identified as an active Cl- secretion. The addition of increasing concentrations of the fish neurohypophysial hormones, arginine vasotocin (AVT) or isotocin (IT), elicited a concentration-dependent stimulation of the ISC. Maximal increases of 60.9+/-12.1% and 117.7+/-28.0% above the basal ISC value were obtained for 10(-7) M AVT and IT respectively. Half-maximal effects were obtained for 3.1 x 10(-9) M AVT and for 1.4 x 10(-9) M IT. Mucosal application of 1.0 mM diphenylalamine-2-carboxylic acid (a specific blocker of Cl- channels) after serosal addition of 5 x 10(-8) M AVT or IT inhibited not only the basal but also the stimulated current, revealing a correlation with a hormone-dependent Cl- transport. Specific V1 or V2 receptor analogues of vasopressin (mammalian hormone) were used to characterize the type of neurohypophysial hormone receptors pharmacologically. While the V1 agonist [Phe2,Orn8]-oxytocin stimulated the basal Cl- secretion with a similar profile to that of AVT or IT, the V2 agonist [Deamino1,Val4,d -Arg8]-vasopressin had no effect. The V1 antagonist [d(CH2)5 1,O-Me-Tyr2,Arg8]-vasopressin used at a concentration of 5 x 10(-7) M totally reversed the 10-8 M AVT-stimulated Cl- secretion, whereas the V2 antagonist [d(CH2)5 1,d -Ile2,Ile4,Arg8,Ala9]-vasopressin used at the same concentration had no significant effect. In contrast, similar experiments carried out in the presence of 10(-8) M IT showed that both antagonists significantly reduced the IT-stimulated Cl- secretion, with the efficiency of the V1 receptor

  15. Analyse et modelisation spectrale de l'etoile LBV NGC 2363-V1 en eruption majeure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Veronique

    Les étoiles massives sont importantes pour plusieurs aspects de l'astrophysique moderne. Leur bonne compréhension est donc cruciale, en particulier celle de leurs mécanismes d'évolution. Les étoiles LBVs constituent une phase de transition rapide entre les étoiles massives qui quittent la séquence principale et les étoiles Wolf-Rayet, des astres évolués ayant perdu la majorité de leur enveloppe d'hydrogène. Les LBVs subissent des épisodes d'éruptions géantes, lors desquels elles peuvent perdre plusieurs masses solaires, contribuant ainsi à l'expulsion de leur enveloppe d'hydrogène. Les mécanismes qui mènent à ce genre d'éruptions majeures sont encore mal compris car ce phénomène est très rare et on ne possède pratiquement pas d'observations spectrales d'une étoile, LBV durant une éruption géante. NGC236-V1, découverte en 1996, est la première LBV en éruption majeure assez proche pour permettre des observations du grande qualité. Le but du présent projet est d'analyser les variations spectroscopiques de V1 observées avec le spectrographe STIS du télescope spatial Hubble afin d'en déterminer les paramètres physiques (température, luminosité, taux de perte de masse, etc.) à l'aide du code de transfert radiatif CMFGEN. Ainsi, nous montrons que les propriétés physiques de V1 et leur évolution sont exceptionnelles. De 1997 à 2004, la température de V1 (à une profondeur optique t ~ 10) est passée de 14500 à 21500K et le taux de perte de masse a diminué de 4.6 × 10 -4 à 1.5 × 10 -4 [Special characters omitted.] /an. V1 se situe parmi les étoiles les plus lumineuses connues. En 2001, sa luminosité atteignait 5 × 10 6 [Special characters omitted.] .

  16. Control of Neurotransmission by NaV1.7 in Human, Guinea Pig, and Mouse Airway Parasympathetic Nerves.

    PubMed

    Kocmalova, Michaela; Kollarik, Marian; Canning, Brendan J; Ru, Fei; Adam Herbstsomer, R; Meeker, Sonya; Fonquerna, Silvia; Aparici, Monica; Miralpeix, Montserrat; Chi, Xian Xuan; Li, Baolin; Wilenkin, Ben; McDermott, Jeff; Nisenbaum, Eric; Krajewski, Jeffrey L; Undem, Bradley J

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) that control neurotransmission in the parasympathetic nervous system. We evaluated the expression of the α subunits of each of the nine NaVs in human, guinea pig, and mouse airway parasympathetic ganglia. We combined this information with a pharmacological analysis of selective NaV blockers on parasympathetic contractions of isolated airway smooth muscle. As would be expected from previous studies, tetrodotoxin potently blocked the parasympathetic responses in the airways of each species. Gene expression analysis showed that that NaV 1.7 was virtually the only tetrodotoxin-sensitive NaV1 gene expressed in guinea pig and human airway parasympathetic ganglia, where mouse ganglia expressed NaV1.1, 1.3, and 1.7. Using selective pharmacological blockers supported the gene expression results, showing that blocking NaV1.7 alone can abolish the responses in guinea pig and human bronchi, but not in mouse airways. To block the responses in mouse airways requires that NaV1.7 along with NaV1.1 and/or NaV1.3 is blocked. These results may suggest novel indications for NaV1.7-blocking drugs, in which there is an overactive parasympathetic drive, such as in asthma. The data also raise the potential concern of antiparasympathetic side effects for systemic NaV1.7 blockers.

  17. Mapping of dihydropyridine binding residues in a less sensitive invertebrate L-type calcium channel (LCa v 1).

    PubMed

    Senatore, Adriano; Boone, Adrienne; Lam, Stanley; Dawson, Taylor F; Zhorov, Boris; Spafford, J David

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate L-type calcium channel, LCa(v) 1, isolated from the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis is nearly indistinguishable from mammalian Ca(v) 1.2 (α1C) calcium channel in biophysical characteristics observed in vitro. These L-type channels are likely constrained within a narrow range of biophysical parameters to perform similar functions in the snail and mammalian cardiovascular systems. What distinguishes snail and mammalian L-type channels is a difference in dihydropyridine sensitivity: 100 nM isradipine exhibits a significant block of mammalian Ca(v) 1.2 currents without effect on snail LCa(v)1 currents. The native snail channel serves as a valuable surrogate for validating key residue differences identified from previous experimental and molecular modeling work. As predicted, three residue changes in LCa(v)1 (N_3o18, F_3i10, and I_4i12) replaced with DHP-sensing residues in respective positions of Ca(v) 1.2, (Q_3o18, Y_3i10, and M_4i12) raises the potency of isradipine block of LCa(v)1 channels to that of mammalian Ca(v) 1.2. Interestingly, the single N_3o18_Q mutation in LCa(v) 1 channels lowers DHP sensitivity even further and the triple mutation bearing enhanced isradipine sensitivity, still retains a reduced potency of agonist, (S)-Bay K8644.

  18. Phase-matched four-wave mixing of sub-100-TW/ cm2 femtosecond laser pulses in isolated air-guided modes of a hollow photonic-crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Konorov, S O; Serebryannikov, E E; Akimov, D A; Ivanov, A A; Alfimov, M V; Zheltikov, A M

    2004-12-01

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers are shown to allow propagation and nonlinear-optical frequency conversion of high-intensity ultrashort laser pulses in the regime of isolated guided modes confined in the hollow gas-filled fiber core. With a specially designed dispersion of such modes, the 3omega=2omega+2omega-omega four-wave mixing of fundamental (omega) and second-harmonic (2omega) sub-100- TW/ cm(2) femtosecond pulses of a Cr:forsterite laser can be phase matched in a hollow photonic-crystal fiber within a spectral band of more than 10 nm, resulting in the efficient generation of femtosecond pulses in a well-resolved higher-order air-guided mode of 417-nm radiation.

  19. Prenatal and postnatal manganese teeth levels and neurodevelopment at 7, 9, and 10.5 years in the CHAMACOS cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Ana M.; Arora, Manish; Harley, Kim G.; Kogut, Katherine; Parra, Kimberly; Hernández-Bonilla, David; Gunier, Robert B.; Bradman, Asa; Smith, Donald R.; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous cross-sectional studies of school-age children have observed that exposure to manganese (Mn) adversely affects neurodevelopment. However, few prospective studies have looked at the effects of both prenatal and postnatal Mn exposure on child neurodevelopment. Methods We measured Mn levels in prenatal and early postnatal dentine of shed teeth and examined their association with behavior, cognition, memory, and motor functioning in 248 children aged 7, 9, and/or 10.5 years living near agricultural fields treated with Mn-containing fungicides in California. We used generalized linear models and generalized additive models to test for linear and nonlinear associations, and generalized estimating equation models to assess longitudinal effects. Results We observed that higher prenatal and early postnatal Mn levels in dentine of deciduous teeth were adversely associated with behavioral outcomes, namely internalizing, externalizing, and hyperactivity problems, in boys and girls at 7 and 10.5 years. In contrast, higher Mn levels in prenatal and postnatal dentine were associated with better memory abilities at ages 9 and 10.5, and better cognitive and motor outcomes at ages 7 and 10.5 years, among boys only. Higher prenatal dentine Mn levels were also associated with poorer visuospatial memory outcomes at 9 years and worse cognitive scores at 7 and 10.5 years in children with higher prenatal lead levels (≥0.8 μg/dL). All these associations were linear and were consistent with findings from longitudinal analyses. Conclusions We observed that higher prenatal and early postnatal Mn levels measured in dentine of deciduous teeth, a novel biomarker that provides reliable information on the developmental timing of exposures to Mn, were associated with poorer behavioral outcomes in school-age boys and girls and better motor function, memory, and/or cognitive abilities in school-age boys. Additional research is needed to understand the inconsistencies in the

  20. Critical role of alkyl chain branching of organic semiconductors in enabling solution-processed N-channel organic thin-film transistors with mobility of up to 3.50 cm² V(-1) s(-1).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Hu, Yunbin; Schuettfort, Torben; Di, Chong-an; Gao, Xike; McNeill, Christopher R; Thomsen, Lars; Mannsfeld, Stefan C B; Yuan, Wei; Sirringhaus, Henning; Zhu, Daoben

    2013-02-13

    Substituted side chains are fundamental units in solution processable organic semiconductors in order to achieve a balance of close intermolecular stacking, high crystallinity, and good compatibility with different wet techniques. Based on four air-stable solution-processed naphthalene diimides fused with 2-(1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene)malononitrile groups (NDI-DTYM2) that bear branched alkyl chains with varied side-chain length and different branching position, we have carried out systematic studies on the relationship between film microstructure and charge transport in their organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs). In particular synchrotron measurements (grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure) are combined with device optimization studies to probe the interplay between molecular structure, molecular packing, and OTFT mobility. It is found that the side-chain length has a moderate influence on thin-film microstructure but leads to only limited changes in OTFT performance. In contrast, the position of branching point results in subtle, yet critical changes in molecular packing and leads to dramatic differences in electron mobility ranging from ~0.001 to >3.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Incorporating a NDI-DTYM2 core with three-branched N-alkyl substituents of C(11,6) results in a dense in-plane molecular packing with an unit cell area of 127 Å(2), larger domain sizes of up to 1000 × 3000 nm(2), and an electron mobility of up to 3.50 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), which is an unprecedented value for ambient stable n-channel solution-processed OTFTs reported to date. These results demonstrate that variation of the alkyl chain branching point is a powerful strategy for tuning of molecular packing to enable high charge transport mobilities.

  1. Temperature-Dependent Vibrational Relaxation of NO(v=1) by O Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, E. S.; Castle, K. J.; Dodd, J. A.

    2001-12-01

    For altitudes above about 80 km, oxygen molecules are increasingly dissociated by solar VUV absorption, and O atoms, together with O2 and N2, become a principal constituent of the atmosphere. Collisions of O with ground vibrational state NO efficiently excite NO(v=1), cooling the upper atmosphere by converting a portion of the ambient kinetic energy into 5.3-μ m IR emission which escapes into space. In recent years our group has worked to better characterize the vibrational energy transfer (VET) efficiencies for the NO(v)-O system. In our experiments vibrational relaxation rates are measured; they can be related to the corresponding uppumping rates through detailed balance. The experiment employs a cw microwave source to form O atoms, combined with photolysis of a trace amount of added NO2 to produce vibrationally excited NO. A double-jacketed quartz injector allows the introduction of O and NO2 into the reaction volume while minimizing wall-induced recombination and thermal decomposition, respectively. Oxygen atoms are detected through two-photon laser-induced fluorescence, cross-calibrated against a normalized O-atom signal resulting from photolysis of a known concentration of NO2. The experiment has been used to perform updated 295 K measurements for NO(v=1,2)-O relaxation, and 295-825 K measurements for NO(v=1)-O relaxation. A modest temperature dependence is observed. The variable temperature measurements provide key information for the accurate modeling of the lower thermospheric energy budget and IR radiant intensities. We also present associated quasiclassical trajectory calculations and TIME-GCM predictions of atmospheric temperature and density.

  2. Outbursting Comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami): A Miniature Comet Holmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Jewitt, David; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Usui, Fumihiko; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ohta, Kouji; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo; Watanabe, Jun-ichi

    2014-05-01

    The short-period comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami, hereafter "V1") was discovered visually by two amateur astronomers. The appearance of the comet was peculiar, consisting of an envelope, a spherical coma near the nucleus and a tail extending in the anti-solar direction. We investigated the brightness and the morphological development of the comet by taking optical images with ground-based telescopes. Our observations show that V1 experienced a large-scale explosion between UT 2010 October 31 and November 3. The color of the comet was consistent with the Sun (g' - R C = 0.61 ± 0.20, R C - I C = 0.20 ± 0.20, and B - R C = 0.93 ± 0.25), suggesting that dust particles were responsible for the brightening. We used a dynamical model to understand the peculiar morphology, and found that the envelope consisted of small grains (0.3-1 μm) expanding at a maximum speed of 500 ± 40 m s-1, while the tail and coma were composed of a wider range of dust particle sizes (0.4-570 μm) and expansion speeds 7-390 m s-1. The total mass of ejecta is ~5 × 108 kg and kinetic energy ~5 × 1012 J. These values are much smaller than in the historic outburst of 17P/Holmes in 2007, but the energy per unit mass (1 × 104 J kg-1) is comparable. The energy per unit mass is about 10% of the energy released during the crystallization of amorphous water ice suggesting that crystallization of buried amorphous ice can supply the mass and energy of the outburst ejecta.

  3. Cortical plasticity following stripe rearing in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica: neural response properties of V1.

    PubMed

    Dooley, James C; Donaldson, Michaela S; Krubitzer, Leah A

    2017-02-01

    The functional organization of the primary visual area (V1) and the importance of sensory experience in its normal development have been well documented in eutherian mammals. However, very few studies have investigated the response properties of V1 neurons in another large class of mammals, or whether sensory experience plays a role in shaping their response properties. Thus we reared opossums (Monodelphis domestica) in normal and vertically striped cages until they reached adulthood. They were then anesthetized using urethane, and electrophysiological techniques were used to examine neuronal responses to different orientations, spatial and temporal frequencies, and contrast levels. For normal opossums, we observed responses to the temporal and spatial characteristics of the stimulus to be similar to those described in small, nocturnal, eutherian mammals such as rats and mice; neurons in V1 responded maximally to stimuli at 0.09 cycles per degree and 2.12 cycles per second. Unlike other eutherians, but similar to other marsupials investigated, only 40% of the neurons were orientation selective. In stripe-reared animals, neurons were significantly more likely to respond to vertical stimuli at a wider range of spatial frequencies, and were more sensitive to gratings at lower contrast values compared with normal animals. These results are the first to demonstrate experience-dependent plasticity in the visual system of a marsupial species. Thus the ability of cortical neurons to alter their properties based on the dynamics of the visual environment predates the emergence of eutherian mammals and was likely present in our earliest mammalian ancestors.

  4. Outbursting comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami): A miniature comet Holmes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Jewitt, David; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Usui, Fumihiko; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ohta, Kouji; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2014-05-20

    The short-period comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami, hereafter {sup V}1{sup )} was discovered visually by two amateur astronomers. The appearance of the comet was peculiar, consisting of an envelope, a spherical coma near the nucleus and a tail extending in the anti-solar direction. We investigated the brightness and the morphological development of the comet by taking optical images with ground-based telescopes. Our observations show that V1 experienced a large-scale explosion between UT 2010 October 31 and November 3. The color of the comet was consistent with the Sun (g' – R {sub C} = 0.61 ± 0.20, R {sub C} – I {sub C} = 0.20 ± 0.20, and B – R {sub C} = 0.93 ± 0.25), suggesting that dust particles were responsible for the brightening. We used a dynamical model to understand the peculiar morphology, and found that the envelope consisted of small grains (0.3-1 μm) expanding at a maximum speed of 500 ± 40 m s{sup –1}, while the tail and coma were composed of a wider range of dust particle sizes (0.4-570 μm) and expansion speeds 7-390 m s{sup –1}. The total mass of ejecta is ∼5 × 10{sup 8} kg and kinetic energy ∼5 × 10{sup 12} J. These values are much smaller than in the historic outburst of 17P/Holmes in 2007, but the energy per unit mass (1 × 10{sup 4} J kg{sup –1}) is comparable. The energy per unit mass is about 10% of the energy released during the crystallization of amorphous water ice suggesting that crystallization of buried amorphous ice can supply the mass and energy of the outburst ejecta.

  5. Disambiguating the roles of area V1 and the lateral occipital complex (LOC) in contour integration

    PubMed Central

    Shpaner, Marina; Molholm, Sophie; Forde, Emma-Jane; Foxe, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Contour integration, the linking of collinear but disconnected visual elements across space, is an essential facet of object and scene perception. Here, we set out to arbitrate between two previously advanced mechanisms of contour integration: serial facilitative interactions between collinear cells in the primary visual cortex (V1) versus pooling of inputs in higher-order visual areas. To this end, we used high-density electrophysiological recordings to assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of brain activity in response to Gabor contours embedded in Gabor noise (so-called “pathfinder displays”) versus control stimuli. Special care was taken to elicit and detect early activity stemming from the primary visual cortex, as indexed by the C1 component of the visual evoked potential. Arguing against a purely early V1 account, there was no evidence for contour-related modulations within the C1 timeframe (50-100 msecs). Rather, the earliest effects were observed within the timeframe of the N1 component (160-200 msecs) and inverse source analysis pointed to principle generators in the lateral occipital complex (LOC) within the ventral visual stream. Source anlaysis also suggested that it was only during this relatively late processing period that contextual effects emerged in hierarchically early visual regions (i.e. V1/V2), consistent with a more distributed process involving recurrent feedback/feedforward interactions between LOC and early visual sensory regions. The distribution of effects uncovered here is consistent with pooling of information in higher order cortical areas as the initial step in contour integration, and that this pooling occurs relatively late in processing rather than during the initial sensory-processing period. PMID:23201366

  6. V1 mechanisms and some figure-ground and border effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoping

    2003-01-01

    V1 neurons have been observed to respond more strongly to figure than background regions. Within a figure region, the responses are usually stronger near figure boundaries (the border effect), than further inside the boundaries. Sometimes the medial axes of the figures (e.g., the vertical midline of a vertical figure strip) induce secondary, intermediate, response peaks (the medial axis effect). Related is the physiologically elusive "cross-orientation facilitation", the observation that a cell's response to a grating patch can be facilitated by an orthogonally oriented grating in the surround. Higher center feedbacks have been suggested to cause these figure-ground effects. It has been shown, using a V1 model, that the causes could be intra-cortical interactions within V1 that serve pre-attentive visual segmentation, particularly, object boundary detection. Furthermore, whereas the border effect is robust, the figure-ground effects in the interior of a figure, in particular, the medial axis effect, are by-products of the border effect and are predicted to diminish to zero for larger figures. This model prediction (of the figure size dependence) was subsequently confirmed physiologically, and supported by findings that the response modulations by texture surround do not depend on feedbacks from V2. In addition, the model explains the "cross-orientation facilitation" as caused by a dis-inhibition, to the cell responding to the center of the central grating, by the background grating. Furthermore, the elusiveness of this phenomena was accounted for by the insight that it depends critically on the size of the figure grating. The model is applied to understand some figure-ground effects and segmentation in psychophysics: in particular, that contrast discrimination threshold is lower within and at the center of a closed contour than that in the background, and that a very briefly presented vernier target can perceptually shine through a subsequently presented large

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence of little cherry virus 1 (LChV-1) infecting sweet cherry in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little cherry virus 1 (LChV-1), associated with little cherry disease (LCD), has a significant impact on fruit quality of infected sweet cherry trees. We report the full genome sequence of an isolate of LChV-1 from China, detected by small RNA deep sequencing and amplified by overlapping RT-PCR. The...

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M30 V1-V3 variable light curves (Rosino, 1949)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosino, L.

    2013-05-01

    Time-series photographic photometry for the variable stars V1-V3 in M30. We add the light curve of V1 from Rosini, 1961, Contr. Asiago-Padova, 117, "Osservazioni di due variabili peculiari e d'una variabile tipo RR Lyrae in ammassi stellari" (4 data files).

  9. Dissociation between Neural Signatures of Stimulus and Choice in Population Activity of Human V1 during Perceptual Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph

    2014-01-01

    Primary visual cortex (V1) forms the initial cortical representation of objects and events in our visual environment, and it distributes information about that representation to higher cortical areas within the visual hierarchy. Decades of work have established tight linkages between neural activity occurring in V1 and features comprising the retinal image, but it remains debatable how that activity relates to perceptual decisions. An actively debated question is the extent to which V1 responses determine, on a trial-by-trial basis, perceptual choices made by observers. By inspecting the population activity of V1 from human observers engaged in a difficult visual discrimination task, we tested one essential prediction of the deterministic view: choice-related activity, if it exists in V1, and stimulus-related activity should occur in the same neural ensemble of neurons at the same time. Our findings do not support this prediction: while cortical activity signifying the variability in choice behavior was indeed found in V1, that activity was dissociated from activity representing stimulus differences relevant to the task, being advanced in time and carried by a different neural ensemble. The spatiotemporal dynamics of population responses suggest that short-term priors, perhaps formed in higher cortical areas involved in perceptual inference, act to modulate V1 activity prior to stimulus onset without modifying subsequent activity that actually represents stimulus features within V1. PMID:24523561

  10. Maps of cone opsin input to mouse V1 and higher visual areas.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Issac; Coello-Reyes, Gabriela; Ko, Hee-Kyoung; Nauhaus, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Studies in the mouse retina have characterized the spatial distribution of an anisotropic ganglion cell and photoreceptor mosaic, which provides a solid foundation to study how the cortex pools from afferent parallel color channels. In particular, the mouse's retinal mosaic exhibits a gradient of wavelength sensitivity along its dorsoventral axis. Cones at the ventral extreme mainly express S opsin, which is sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. Then, moving toward the retina's dorsal extreme, there is a transition to M-opsin dominance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the retina's opsin gradient is recapitulated in cortical visual areas as a functional map of wavelength sensitivity. We first identified visual areas in each mouse by mapping retinotopy with intrinsic signal imaging (ISI). Next, we measured ISI responses to stimuli along different directions of the S- and M-color plane to quantify the magnitude of S and M input to each location of the retinotopic maps in five visual cortical areas (V1, AL, LM, PM, and RL). The results illustrate a significant change in the S:M-opsin input ratio along the axis of vertical retinotopy that is consistent with the gradient along the dorsoventral axis of the retina. In particular, V1 populations encoding the upper visual field responded to S-opsin contrast with 6.1-fold greater amplitude than to M-opsin contrast. V1 neurons encoding lower fields responded with 4.6-fold greater amplitude to M- than S-opsin contrast. The maps in V1 and higher visual areas (HVAs) underscore the significance of a wavelength sensitivity gradient for guiding the mouse's behavior.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Two elements of this study are particularly novel. For one, it is the first to quantify cone inputs to mouse visual cortex; we have measured cone input in five visual areas. Next, it is the first study to identify a feature map in the mouse visual cortex that is based on well-characterized anisotropy of cones in the retina; we have identified

  11. Open Radio Communications Architecture Core Framework V1.1.0 Volume 1 Software Users Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    a red light beneath the device’s volume control. Make sure the red light is lit below the microphone volume control prior to running the SoundDemo. If...KDevelop 2.1.5 "* Compiler - gcc 3.2.2 "* make 3.79.1 "* ACE v5.4 / TAO v1.4 "* XML Parser - Apache Xerces v2.5.0 "* Net/File Browser - Konqueror...manual for the following information: a. Procedures for turning on power and making adjustments. b. Dimensions and capabilities of the visual display

  12. Geologic Map of the V-1 Snegurochka Planitia Quadrangle: Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Debra M.

    2008-01-01

    Geologic mapping of Snegurochka Planitia (V-1) reveals a complex stratigraphy of tectonic and volcanic features that can provide insight into the geologic history of Venus and Archean Earth [1,2] including 1) crustal thickening environments and processes, 2) the nature of diapirism, 3) the nature and origin of deformation belts, and 4) the origin and context of regional plains-forming volcanism. This abstract presents our progress in mapping the spatial and stratigraphic relationships of these features in the region surrounding the north pole of Venus.

  13. Diffusion of high magnetic field in (V 1- xCr x) 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudasov, Yu. B.; Makarov, I. V.; Pavlov, V. N.

    2001-01-01

    The penetration of a high magnetic field into a substance that undergoes a metal-insulator phase transition of the first order under Joule heating is discussed. This phenomenon can be used in high-current opening switches. (V 1- xCr x) 2O 3 is taken as a model substance. An analytical treatment of stationary diffusion as well as a numerical analysis are presented. The development of thermomagnetic instabilities of the metal-insulator phase boundary is investigated. It is shown that a switching time of order of few microseconds can be achieved.

  14. Apparatus to measure the vapor pressure of slowly decomposing compounds from 1 Pa to 10(5) Pa.

    PubMed

    Berg, Robert F

    2015-11-01

    This article describes an apparatus and method for measuring vapor pressures in the range from 1 Pa to 10(5) Pa. Its three distinctive elements are : (1) the static pressure measurements were made with only a small temperature difference between the vapor and the condensed phase, (2) the sample was degassed in situ, and (3) the temperature range extended up to 200 °C. The apparatus was designed to measure metal-organic precursors, which often are toxic, pyrophoric, or unstable. Vapor pressures are presented for naphthalene, ferrocene, diethyl phthalate, and TEMAH (tetrakisethylmethylaminohafnium). Also presented are data for the temperature-dependent decomposition rate of TEMAH.

  15. Enhanced low-temperature CO oxidation on a stepped platinum surface for oxygen pressures above 10(-5) Torr.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Henry D; Burnett, Daniel J; Gabelnick, Aaron M; Fischer, Daniel A; Gland, John L

    2005-11-24

    The rate of CO oxidation has been characterized on the stepped Pt(411) surface for oxygen pressures up to 0.002 Torr, over the 100-1000 K temperature range. CO oxidation was characterized using both temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) and in situ soft X-ray fluorescence yield near-edge spectroscopy (FYNES). New understanding of the important role surface defects play in accelerating CO oxidation for oxygen pressure above 10(-5) Torr is presented in this paper for the first time. For saturated monolayers of CO, the oxidation rate increases and the activation energy decreases significantly for oxygen pressures above 10(-5) Torr. This enhanced CO oxidation rate is caused by a change in the rate-limiting step to a surface reaction limited process above 10(-5) Torr oxygen from a CO desorption limited process at lower oxygen pressure. For example, in oxygen pressures above 0.002 Torr, CO(2) formation begins at 275 K even for the CO saturated monolayer, which is well below the 350 K onset temperature for CO desorption. Isothermal kinetic measurements in flowing oxygen for this stepped surface indicate that activation energies and preexponential factors depend strongly on oxygen pressure, a factor that has not previously been considered critical for CO oxidation on platinum. As oxygen pressure is increased from 10(-6) to 0.002 Torr, the oxidation activation energies for the saturated CO monolayer decrease from 24.1 to 13.5 kcal/mol for reaction over the 0.95-0.90 ML CO coverage range. This dramatic decrease in activation energy is associated with a simple increase in oxygen pressure from 10(-5) to 10(-3) Torr. Activation energies as low as 7.8 kcal/mol were observed for oxidation of an initially saturated CO layer reacting over the 0.4-0.25 ML coverage range in oxygen pressure of 0.002 Torr. These dramatic changes in reaction mechanism with oxygen pressure for stepped surfaces are consistent with mechanistic models involving transient low activation energy

  16. Identification of a uniquely expanded V1R (ORA) gene family in the Japanese grenadier anchovy (Coilia nasus).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guoli; Tang, Wenqiao; Wang, Liangjiang; Wang, Cong; Wang, Xiaomei

    A number of studies have suggested that olfaction plays an important role in fish migration. Fish use several distinct families of olfactory receptors to detect environmental odorants, including MORs (main olfactory receptors), V1Rs (vomeronasal type-1 receptors), V2Rs (vomeronasal type-2 receptors), TAARs (trace amine-associated receptors), and FPRs (formyl peptide receptors). The V1Rs have been reported to detect pheromones, and a pheromone hypothesis for the spawning migration of anadromous fish has been proposed. Examining whether Coilia nasus relies on V1R-mediated olfaction for spawning migration is important for understanding the molecular basis of spawning migration behavior. Here, we explored the V1R gene family in anadromous C. nasus. Six V1R genes previously reported in other teleost fish were successfully identified. Interestingly, we detected the largest V1R repertoire in teleost fish from C. nasus and identified a species-specific expansion event of V1R3 gene that has previously been detected as single-copy genes in other teleost fish. The V1R loci were found to be populated with repetitive sequences, especially in the expanded V1R3 genes. Additionally, the divergence of V1R3 genetic structures in different populations of C. nasus indicates the copy number variation (CNV) in V1R3 gene among individuals of C. nasus. Most of the putative C. nasus V1R genes were expressed primarily in the olfactory epithelium, consistent with the role of the gene products as functional olfactory receptors. Significant differences in the expression levels of V1R genes were detected between the anadromous and non-anadromous C. nasus. This study represents a first step in the elucidation of the olfactory communication system of C. nasus at the molecular level. Our results indicate that some V1R genes may be involved in the spawning migration of C. nasus, and the study provides new insights into the spawning migration and genome evolution of C. nasus.

  17. Replacement of olivine by serpentine in the Queen Alexandra Range 93005 carbonaceous chondrite (CM2): Reactant-product compositional relations, and isovolumetric constraints on reaction stoichiometry and elemental mobility during aqueous alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velbel, Michael A.; Tonui, Eric K.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Isovolumetric replacement of euhedral and anhedral olivine by serpentine produced both centripetal and meshwork textures in the CM2 chondrites ALH 81002 and Nogoya. The compositions of these textural varieties of serpentine are uniform within narrow limits within each previously studied meteorite, independent of the composition of olivine being replaced, and different between the two meteorites. In QUE 93005 (CM2), coarse olivines of widely varying compositions (Fo<76-99) are replaced in a texturally similar manner by compositionally uniform serpentine (Mg0.73±0.05Fe0.27±0.05)3Si2O5(OH)4. The narrow compositional range of serpentine replacing coarse olivine indicates that the aqueous solution from which the serpentine formed was compositionally uniform on scales at least as large as the meteorite (∼2.5 cm in longest dimension). Isovolumetric textures and compositional observations constrain elemental redistribution from coarse olivine to serpentine and to surrounding phases during serpentinization. Regardless of olivine's composition, isovolumetric replacement of coarse olivines by serpentine of the observed composition released more Mg and Si from olivine than was required to form the serpentine. Excess Mg and Si released by olivine destruction and not retained in serpentine were exported from the replaced volume. Olivines with different Fa/Fo proportions contributed different amounts of Fe and Mg to the serpentine. Ferroan olivines released more Fe than required to form the serpentines replacing them, so some of the Fe released from ferroan olivine was exported from the replaced volumes. Forsteritic olivines released less Fe than required to form the serpentines replacing them, so some Fe was imported into the replaced volumes augmenting the small amount of Fe released from forsteritic olivine. In QUE 93005 Fo83.8 is the threshold composition between Fe-exporting and Fe-importing behavior in individual olivine-serpentine pairs, which released exactly the

  18. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  19. Genetic engineering of trimers of hypoallergenic fragments of the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, for allergy vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vrtala, Susanne; Fohr, Monika; Campana, Raffaela; Baumgartner, Christian; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2011-03-03

    An immunotherapy trial performed in allergic patients with hypoallergenic recombinant fragments, comprising aa 1-74 and 75-160 of the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, has indicated that the induction of allergen-specific IgG responses may be an important mechanism of this treatment. To investigate whether the immunogenicity of the rBet v 1 fragments can be increased, recombinant trimers of the fragments were produced. For this purpose, DNA trimers of rBet v 1 aa 1-74 as well as of rBet v 1 aa 75-160 were subcloned into expression plasmid pET 17b, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The fragments as well as the fragment trimers showed a reduced IgE-binding capacity and allergenic activity compared to rBet v 1 wildtype when tested in allergic patients. Both rBet v 1 aa 75-160 monomer and trimer induced high titers of allergen-specific IgG1 Abs in mice. Interestingly, rBet v 1 aa 1-74 trimer induced a much higher IgG(1) response to rBet v 1 than rBet v 1 aa 1-74 monomer. Consequently, IgG Abs induced with the rBet v 1 aa 1-74 trimer inhibited birch pollen allergic patients' IgE-binding 10-fold more efficiently than IgG Abs induced with the monomer. Our data show that the immunogenicity of allergy vaccines can be increased by oligomerization.

  20. Calcium CaV1 channel subtype mRNA expression in Parkinson's disease examined by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael J; Gentleman, Steve M; Dexter, David T

    2015-03-01

    The factors which make some neurons vulnerable to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease while others remain resistant are not fully understood. Studies in animal models of Parkinson's disease suggest that preferential use of CaV1.3 subtypes by neurons may contribute to the neurodegenerative process by increasing mitochondrial oxidant stress. This study quantified the level of mRNA for the CaV1 subtypes found in the brain by in situ hybridization using CaV1 subtype-specific [(35)S]-radiolabelled oligonucleotide probes. In normal brain, the greatest amount of messenger RNA (mRNA) for each CaV1 subtype was found in the midbrain (substantia nigra), with a moderate level in the pons (locus coeruleus) and lower quantities in cerebral cortex (cingulate and primary motor). In Parkinson's disease, the level of CaV1 subtype mRNA was maintained in the midbrain and pons, despite cell loss in these areas. In cingulate cortex, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA increased in cases with late-stage Parkinson's disease. In primary motor cortex, the level of CaV1.2 mRNA increased in late-stage Parkinson's disease. The level of CaV1.3 mRNA increased in primary motor cortex of cases with early-stage Parkinson's disease and normalized to near the control level in cases from late-stage Parkinson's disease. The finding of elevated CaV1 subtype expression in cortical brain regions supports the view that disturbed calcium homeostasis is a feature of Parkinson's disease throughout brain and not only a compensatory consequence to the neurodegenerative process in areas of cell loss.

  1. Probing rotational relaxation in HBr (v=1) using double resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Antonov, Ivan O; Heaven, Michael C

    2009-02-21

    Rotational energy transfer in HBr(v=1)+HBr collisions has been investigated using an optical pump-probe double resonance technique at ambient temperature. Rotationally state selective excitation of v=1 for rotational levels in the range J=0-9 was achieved by stimulated Raman pumping, and the evolution of population was monitored using (2+1) resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of the g (3) summation (-)-X (1) summation (+)(0-1) band. Collision-induced population transfer events with DeltaJ

  2. Looming sensitive cortical regions without V1 input: evidence from a patient with bilateral cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Legrand, Lore B; Zhan, Minye; Tamietto, Marco; de Gelder, Beatrice; Pegna, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Fast and automatic behavioral responses are required to avoid collision with an approaching stimulus. Accordingly, looming stimuli have been found to be highly salient and efficient attractors of attention due to the implication of potential collision and potential threat. Here, we address the question of whether looming motion is processed in the absence of any functional primary visual cortex and consequently without awareness. For this, we investigated a patient (TN) suffering from complete, bilateral damage to his primary visual cortex. Using an fMRI paradigm, we measured TN's brain activation during the presentation of looming, receding, rotating, and static point lights, of which he was unaware. When contrasted with other conditions, looming was found to produce bilateral activation of the middle temporal areas, as well as the superior temporal sulcus and inferior parietal lobe (IPL). The latter are generally thought to be involved in multisensory processing of motion in extrapersonal space, as well as attentional capture and saliency. No activity was found close to the lesioned V1 area. This demonstrates that looming motion is processed in the absence of awareness through direct subcortical projections to areas involved in multisensory processing of motion and saliency that bypass V1.

  3. Reaction dynamics and mechanism of the Cl + HD(v = 1) reaction: a quantum mechanical study.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, L; Aldegunde, J; Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J

    2013-08-15

    Time-independent quantum mechanical calculations have been performed in order to characterize the dynamics and stereodynamics of Cl + HD reactive collisions. Calculations have been carried out at two different total energy values and for various initial states using the adiabatic potential energy surface by Bian and Werner [J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 220]. Special attention has been paid to the reaction with HD(v = 1) for which integral and differential cross-sections have been calculated and the effect of vibrational vs translational energy on the reactivity has been examined. In addition, the reactant polarization parameters and polarization-dependent differential cross-sections have been determined. From these results, the spatial preferences of the reaction and the extent of the control of the cross sections achievable through a suitable preparation of the reactants have been also studied. The directional requirements are tighter for the HCl channel than for the DCl one. Formation of the products takes place preferentially when the rotational angular momentum of the HD molecule is perpendicular to the reactants approach direction. Cross-sections and polarization moments computed from the scattering calculations have been compared with experimental results by Kandel et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 670] for the reaction with HD(v = 1) produced by stimulated Raman pumping. The agreement so obtained is good, and it improves the accordance found in previous calculations with other methodologies and potential energy surfaces.

  4. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Particle-bound Bet v 1 Allergen in PM10

    PubMed Central

    Süring, Katrin; Bach, Sabine; Höflich, Conny; Straff, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a method widely used to quantify suspended solids such as cells or bacteria in a size range from 0.5 to several tens of micrometers in diameter. In addition to a characterization of forward and sideward scatter properties, it enables the use of fluorescent labeled markers like antibodies to detect respective structures. Using indirect antibody staining, flow cytometry is employed here to quantify birch pollen allergen (precisely Bet v 1)-loaded particles of 0.5 to 10 µm in diameter in inhalable particulate matter (PM10, particle size ≤10 µm in diameter). PM10 particles may act as carriers of adsorbed allergens possibly transporting them to the lower respiratory tract, where they could trigger allergic reactions. So far the allergen content of PM10 has been studied by means of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and scanning electron microscopy. ELISA measures the dissolved and not the particle-bound allergen. Compared to scanning electron microscopy, which can visualize allergen-loaded particles, flow cytometry may additionally quantify them. As allergen content of ambient air can deviate from birch pollen count, allergic symptoms might perhaps correlate better with allergen exposure than with pollen count. In conjunction with clinical data, the presented method offers the opportunity to test in future experiments whether allergic reactions to birch pollen antigens are associated with the Bet v 1 allergen content of PM10 particles >0.5 µm. PMID:27911374

  5. Patients with oral allergic syndrome to apple have intense proliferative response to BET V 1.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, G; Fenoglio, G; Kalli, F; De Amici, M; Leonardi, S; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Salpietro, C; La Rosa, M; Caimmi, S; Marseglia, G L

    2012-01-01

    Patients with pollen allergy may frequently present an additional food-related allergy (Oral Allergic Syndrome, OAS), as consequence of cross-reactivity between pollen allergens (mainly birch, hazelnut, alder, mugwort) and vegetable allergens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on Bet v 1-induced T cell proliferation exerted by the presence of OAS in birch patients. Fourteen allergic patients were evaluated (6 males, mean age 35.8 years). All of them were monosensitized to birch and suffered from allergic rhinitis: 4 had also OAS to apple. Proliferation of peripheral mononuclear cells was evaluated using Bet v 1 and non-specific stimuli. OAS had higher proliferation than non-OAS patients. In addition, there were significant relationships between immunological and clinical parameters in OAS patients. This study evidences that OAS characterizes a more severe form of birch allergy: as OAS patients had higher SI, circulating eosinophils, and IgE levels. Thus, this study confirms the previous report and underlines the relevance of measuring recombinant birch allergen as higher values may suggest a reliable prediction of OAS.

  6. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Schramm, Chaim A; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L; Bhiman, Jinal N; DeKosky, Brandon J; Ernandes, Michael J; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kim, Helen J; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P; Altae-Tran, Han R; Bailer, Robert T; Crooks, Ema T; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J; Hoi, Kam H; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K; Longo, Nancy S; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O'Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S; Rudicell, Rebecca S; Schmidt, Stephen D; Sheward, Daniel J; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C; Binley, James M; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A; Moore, John P; Ward, Andrew B; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R

    2014-05-01

    Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from donor CAP256 (from the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA)); each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulphated, anionic antigen-binding loop (complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30-38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth and potency occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation. These data provide important insights relevant to HIV-1 vaccine development.

  7. Looming sensitive cortical regions without V1 input: evidence from a patient with bilateral cortical blindness

    PubMed Central

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Legrand, Lore B.; Zhan, Minye; Tamietto, Marco; de Gelder, Beatrice; Pegna, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Fast and automatic behavioral responses are required to avoid collision with an approaching stimulus. Accordingly, looming stimuli have been found to be highly salient and efficient attractors of attention due to the implication of potential collision and potential threat. Here, we address the question of whether looming motion is processed in the absence of any functional primary visual cortex and consequently without awareness. For this, we investigated a patient (TN) suffering from complete, bilateral damage to his primary visual cortex. Using an fMRI paradigm, we measured TN's brain activation during the presentation of looming, receding, rotating, and static point lights, of which he was unaware. When contrasted with other conditions, looming was found to produce bilateral activation of the middle temporal areas, as well as the superior temporal sulcus and inferior parietal lobe (IPL). The latter are generally thought to be involved in multisensory processing of motion in extrapersonal space, as well as attentional capture and saliency. No activity was found close to the lesioned V1 area. This demonstrates that looming motion is processed in the absence of awareness through direct subcortical projections to areas involved in multisensory processing of motion and saliency that bypass V1. PMID:26557059

  8. Vasopressin eliminates the expression of familiar odor bias in neonatal female mice through V1aR

    PubMed Central

    Hammock, Elizabeth A.D.; Law, Caitlin S.; Levitt, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Summary V1aR has a well established role in the neural regulation of adult mammalian social behavior. The role of V1aR in developmentally emerging social behavior is less well understood. We mapped V1aR at post-natal day 8 (P8) and demonstrate developmentally-specific expression in the neocortex and hippocampus. We tested the ability of male and female C57BL/6J mice to show orienting bias to a familiar odor at this age. We demonstrate that females, but not males, show an orienting bias for odors previously paired with the mother, which is eliminated by V1aR signaling. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and the vasopressin V1a receptor (V1aR) acting within the forebrain are involved in social behavior in adult animals. Much less is known about the function of V1aR in neurobehavioral development. In the present study, at post-natal day 8 (P8) in neonatal C57BL/6J mice, we map V1aR and use an olfactory exposure paradigm to assess a role for V1aR on olfactory preferences. In addition to V1aR in the lateral septum and ventral tegmental area, we observe V1aR in the neocortex and hippocampus, not typically observed in adult mice, implicating a developmental sensitive period for V1aR to modulate these brain areas in an experience-dependent manner. Males and females were tested on P8 for orienting preferences after exposure to a non-social odor, presented either when the mother was in the home cage (contingent) or when the mother had been removed from the home cage (not contingent). Wild-type female mice show a selective orienting bias toward the exposed odor, but only in the contingent condition. Males did not show orienting bias after either training condition. Female Avpr1a-/- mice showed strong familiar odor bias, regardless of the training condition. This finding led us to test the ability of AVP to diminish odor bias in females. Central application of AVP eliminated odor bias in Avpr1a+/+, but not Avpr1a-/- female mice. Together, these data indicate that AVP acting at V1a

  9. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 of the NPL, United Kingdom and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Duane, S.; Bass, G. A.; Manning, J. W.; Shipley, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) from 23 September to 7 October 2014. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 for three radiation qualities at the NPL. The results, reported as ratios of the NPL and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 1.0000(62) at 6 MV, 0.9999(70) at 10 MV and 0.9993(80) at 25 MV. This result is the seventh in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 of the NMIJ, Japan and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Shimizu, M.; Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Tanaka, T.; Kurosawa, T.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) from 9 to 23 April 2015. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 for three radiation qualities at the NMIJ. The results, reported as ratios of the NMIJ and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 0.9966 (47) at 6 MV, 0.9965 (60) at 10 MV and 0.9953 (50) at 15 MV. This result is the eighth in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. Enhanced therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of betamethasone upon topical administration with low frequency, low intensity (20 kHz, 100 mW/cm2) ultrasound exposure on carrageenan-induced arthritis in mice model

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gadi; Natsheh, Hiba; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Touitou, Elka; Lerman, Melissa A.; Lazarovici, Philip; Lewin, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether low frequency, low intensity (LFLI, 20 kHz, <100 mW/cm2, spatial-peak, temporal-peak) ultrasound (US), delivered by a light-weight (<100g), tether-free, fully wearable, battery powered applicator is capable of reducing inflammation in a mouse model of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). The therapeutic, acute, anti-inflammatory effect was estimated by the relative swelling induced in mice hind limb paws. In an independent, indirect approach, the inflammation was bio-imaged by measuring glycolytic activity with near infrared labeled 2-deoxy-glucose (2DG). The outcome of the experiments indicated that the combination of US exposure with topical application of 0.1% w/w betamethasone gel, exhibited statistically significant (p<0.05) enhanced anti-inflammatory properties in comparison with the drug or US treatment alone. The present study underscores the potential benefits of LFLI US assisted drug delivery. However, the proof of concept presented indicates the need for additional experiments to systematically evaluate and optimize the potential of, and the conditions for, safe, LFLI ultrasound promoted non-invasive drug delivery. PMID:26003010

  12. Vortex pinning properties in Co-doped BaFe2As2 thin films with a high critical current density over 2 MA cm-2 at 9 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Pusheng; Xu, Zhongtang; Wang, Dongliang; Zhang, Ming; Li, Jianqi; Ma, Yanwei

    2017-02-01

    Similar to other high-temperature superconductors, the pinning centers largely determine the critical current density (J c) in Co-doped BaFe2As2 (Ba122:Co). Therefore, understanding the vortex pinning mechanism of high-J c Ba122:Co thin films is important for the applications of Ba122:Co. Herein we report the pinning of the naturally grown defects in Ba122:Co thin films with a high critical current density. The transport J c of thin films is up to 2.6 MA cm-2 in 9 T at 4.2 K, which is the highest value in iron-based superconductors. Microstructure investigations reveal a high density of ab-planar defects (stacking faults) and localized vertical defects present in the sample. The Dew-Hughes mode analyses prove that pinning centers by surface defects and by point defects are responsible for H//ab and H//c, respectively. Therefore, the high J c in strong magnetic field for both H//ab and H//c are related to surface and point defects which act as the pinning centers in Ba122:Co films.

  13. Integrate-and-fire vs Poisson models of LGN input to V1 cortex: noisier inputs reduce orientation selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Chun; Xing, Dajun; Shapley, Robert

    2012-12-01

    One of the reasons the visual cortex has attracted the interest of computational neuroscience is that it has well-defined inputs. The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus is the source of visual signals to the primary visual cortex (V1). Most large-scale cortical network models approximate the spike trains of LGN neurons as simple Poisson point processes. However, many studies have shown that neurons in the early visual pathway are capable of spiking with high temporal precision and their discharges are not Poisson-like. To gain an understanding of how response variability in the LGN influences the behavior of V1, we study response properties of model V1 neurons that receive purely feedforward inputs from LGN cells modeled either as noisy leaky integrate-and-fire (NLIF) neurons or as inhomogeneous Poisson processes. We first demonstrate that the NLIF model is capable of reproducing many experimentally observed statistical properties of LGN neurons. Then we show that a V1 model in which the LGN input to a V1 neuron is modeled as a group of NLIF neurons produces higher orientation selectivity than the one with Poisson LGN input. The second result implies that statistical characteristics of LGN spike trains are important for V1's function. We conclude that physiologically motivated models of V1 need to include more realistic LGN spike trains that are less noisy than inhomogeneous Poisson processes.

  14. Integrate-and-fire vs Poisson models of LGN input to V1 cortex: noisier inputs reduce orientation selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Chun; Xing, Dajun; Shapley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    One of the reasons the visual cortex has attracted the interest of computational neuroscience is that it has well-defined inputs. The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus is the source of visual signals to the primary visual cortex (V1). Most large-scale cortical network models approximate the spike trains of LGN neurons as simple Poisson point processes. However, many studies have shown that neurons in the early visual pathway are capable of spiking with high temporal precision and their discharges are not Poisson-like. To gain an understanding of how response variability in the LGN influences the behavior of V1, we study response properties of model V1 neurons that receive purely feedforward inputs from LGN cells modeled either as noisy leaky integrate-and-fire (NLIF) neurons or as inhomogeneous Poisson processes. We first demonstrate that the NLIF model is capable of reproducing many experimentally observed statistical properties of LGN neurons. Then we show that a V1 model in which the LGN input to a V1 neuron is modeled as a group of NLIF neurons produces higher orientation selectivity than the one with Poisson LGN input. The second result implies that statistical characteristics of LGN spike trains are important for V1's function. We conclude that physiologically motivated models of V1 need to include more realistic LGN spike trains that are less noisy than inhomogeneous Poisson processes. PMID:22684587

  15. Locomotion Enhances Neural Encoding of Visual Stimuli in Mouse V1.

    PubMed

    Dadarlat, Maria C; Stryker, Michael P

    2017-04-05

    Neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1) are selective for particular properties of visual stimuli. Locomotion causes a change in cortical state that leaves their selectivity unchanged but strengthens their responses. Both locomotion and the change in cortical state are thought to be initiated by projections from the mesencephalic locomotor region, the latter through a disinhibitory circuit in V1. By recording simultaneously from a large number of single neurons in alert mice viewing moving gratings, we investigated the relationship between locomotion and the information contained within the neural population. We found that locomotion improved encoding of visual stimuli in V1 by two mechanisms. First, locomotion-induced increases in firing rates enhanced the mutual information between visual stimuli and single neuron responses over a fixed window of time. Second, stimulus discriminability was improved, even for fixed population firing rates, because of a decrease in noise correlations across the population. These two mechanisms contributed differently to improvements in discriminability across cortical layers, with changes in firing rates most important in the upper layers and changes in noise correlations most important in layer V. Together, these changes resulted in a threefold to fivefold reduction in the time needed to precisely encode grating direction and orientation. These results support the hypothesis that cortical state shifts during locomotion to accommodate an increased load on the visual system when mice are moving.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This paper contains three novel findings about the representation of information in neurons within the primary visual cortex of the mouse. First, we show that locomotion reduces by at least a factor of 3 the time needed for information to accumulate in the visual cortex that allows the distinction of different visual stimuli. Second, we show that the effect of locomotion is to increase information in cells of all

  16. Contribution of electromechanical coupling between KV and CaV1.2 channels to coronary dysfunction in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Zachary C.; Dick, Gregory M.; O’Leary, Heather A.; Bender, Shawn B.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Moberly, Steven P.; Owen, Meredith Kohr; Miller, Steven J.; Obukhov, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that diminished functional expression of voltage-dependent K+ (KV) channels impairs control of coronary blood flow in obesity/metabolic syndrome. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that KV channels are electromechanically coupled to CaV1.2 channels and that coronary microvascular dysfunction in obesity is related to subsequent increases in CaV1.2 channel activity. Initial studies revealed that inhibition of KV channels with 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 0.3 mM) increased intracellular [Ca2+], contracted isolated coronary arterioles and decreased coronary reactive hyperemia. These effects were reversed by blockade of CaV1.2 channels. Further studies in chronically instrumented Ossabaw swine showed that inhibition of CaV1.2 channels with nifedipine (10 μg/kg, iv) had no effect on coronary blood flow at rest or during exercise in lean swine. However, inhibition of CaV1.2 channels significantly increased coronary blood flow, conductance, and the balance between coronary flow and metabolism in obese swine (P < 0.05). These changes were associated with a ~50 % increase in inward CaV1.2 current and elevations in expression of the pore-forming subunit (α1c) of CaV1.2 channels in coronary smooth muscle cells from obese swine. Taken together, these findings indicate that electromechanical coupling between KV and CaV1.2 channels is involved in the regulation of coronary vasomotor tone and that increases in CaV1.2 channel activity contribute to coronary microvascular dysfunction in the setting of obesity. PMID:23856709

  17. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic detection of ethylene using a 10.5 μm quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Li, Zhili; Ren, Wei

    2016-02-22

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor has been developed for the sensitive detection of ethylene (C2H4) at 10.5 µm using a continuous-wave distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser. At this long-wavelength infrared, the key acoustic elements of quartz tuning fork and micro-resonators were optimized to improve the detection signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of >4. The sensor calibration demonstrated an excellent linear response (R2>0.999) to C2H4 concentration at the selected operating pressure of 500 and 760 Torr. With a minimum detection limit of 50 parts per billion (ppb) achieved at an averaging time of 70 s, the sensor has been deployed for measuring the C2H4 efflux during the respiration of biological samples in an agronomic environment.

  18. Monitoring stress related velocity variation in concrete with a 2 x 10(-5) relative resolution using diffuse ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Larose, Eric; Hall, Stephen

    2009-04-01

    Ultrasonic waves propagating in solids have stress-dependent velocities. The relation between stress (or strain) and velocity forms the basis of non-linear acoustics. In homogeneous solids, conventional time-of-flight techniques have measured this dependence with spectacular precision. In heterogeneous media such as concrete, the direct (ballistic) wave around 500 kHz is strongly attenuated and conventional techniques are less efficient. In this manuscript, the effect of weak stress changes on the late arrivals constituting the acoustic diffuse coda is tracked. A resolution of 2 x 10(-5) in relative velocity change is attained which corresponds to a sensitivity to stress change of better than 50 kPa. Therefore, the technique described here provides an original way to measure the non-linear parameter with stress variations on the order of tens of kPa.

  19. Design note of an air-cooled 2 ft x 2 ft x 10. 5 ft long muon spoiler

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A.; Pathiyil, J.

    1988-01-06

    This note describes the construction of a muon spoiler (magnetized steel assembly) with a cross section of 2 ft by 2 ft and a length of 10.5 ft. Two such spoilers are operated in series at an average field of about 15 kGauss, from one 100 ADC, 40 V power supply. The purpose of the spoilers is to prevent muons from easily escaping beyond the muon laboratory experimental area by bending them down so that they have to pass through more earth. The spoilers reduce the muon dose rate beyond the experimental area by about a factor of 15 to 20. These types of spoilers are not precision devices. They were inexpensive to build from scrap materials using rough flame cutting methods. It took about 14 days to fabricate them.

  20. TASP0434299: A Novel Pyridopyrimidin-4-One Derivative as a Radioligand for Vasopressin V1B Receptor.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kazumi; Yoshinaga, Mitsukane; Uematsu, Yoshikatsu; Nagai, Yuji; Miyakoshi, Naoki; Shimoda, Yoko; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Minamimoto, Takafumi; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Higuchi, Makoto; Ohtake, Norikazu; Suhara, Tetsuya; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2016-06-01

    A novel pyridopyrimidin-4-one derivative, N-tert-butyl-2-[2-(3-methoxyphenyl)-6-[3-(morpholin-4-yl)propoxy]-4-oxopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-3(4H)-yl]acetamide (TASP0434299), was characterized as a radioligand candidate for arginine vasopressin 1B (V1B) receptor. TASP0434299 exhibited high binding affinities for human and rat V1B receptors with IC50 values of 0.526 and 0.641 nM, respectively, and potent antagonistic activity at the human V1B receptor with an IC50 value of 0.639 nM without apparent binding affinities for other molecules at 1 μM. [(3)H]TASP0434299 bound to membranes expressing the human V1B receptor as well as those prepared from the rat anterior pituitary in a saturable manner. The binding of [(3)H]TASP0434299 to the membranes was dose-dependently displaced by several ligands for the V1B receptor. In addition, the intravenous administration of [(3)H]TASP0434299 to rats produced a saturable radioactive accumulation in the anterior pituitary where the V1B receptor is enriched, and it was dose-dependently blocked by the oral administration of 2-[2-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)-6-[3-(morpholin-4-yl)propoxy]-4-oxopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-3(4H)-yl]-N-isopropylacetamide hydrochloride, a V1B receptor antagonist, indicating that [(3)H]TASP0434299 can be used as an in vivo radiotracer to measure the occupancy of the V1B receptor. Finally, the intravenous administration of [(11)C]TASP0434299 provided positron emission tomographic images of the V1B receptor in the pituitary in an anesthetized monkey, and the signal was blocked by pretreatment with an excess of unlabeled TASP0434299. These results indicate that radiolabeled TASP0434299 is the first radioligand to be capable of quantifying the V1B receptor selectively in both in vitro and in vivo studies and will provide a clinical biomarker for determining the occupancy of the V1B receptor during drug development or for monitoring the levels of the V1B receptor in diseased conditions.

  1. Sulfonamides as Selective NaV1.7 Inhibitors: Optimizing Potency and Pharmacokinetics to Enable in Vivo Target Engagement.

    PubMed

    Marx, Isaac E; Dineen, Thomas A; Able, Jessica; Bode, Christiane; Bregman, Howard; Chu-Moyer, Margaret; DiMauro, Erin F; Du, Bingfan; Foti, Robert S; Fremeau, Robert T; Gao, Hua; Gunaydin, Hakan; Hall, Brian E; Huang, Liyue; Kornecook, Thomas; Kreiman, Charles R; La, Daniel S; Ligutti, Joseph; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Liu, Dong; McDermott, Jeff S; Moyer, Bryan D; Peterson, Emily A; Roberts, Jonathan T; Rose, Paul; Wang, Jean; Youngblood, Beth D; Yu, Violeta; Weiss, Matthew M

    2016-12-08

    Human genetic evidence has identified the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as an attractive target for the treatment of pain. We initially identified naphthalene sulfonamide 3 as a potent and selective inhibitor of NaV1.7. Optimization to reduce biliary clearance by balancing hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity (Log D) while maintaining NaV1.7 potency led to the identification of quinazoline 16 (AM-2099). Compound 16 demonstrated a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in rat and dog and demonstrated dose-dependent reduction of histamine-induced scratching bouts in a mouse behavioral model following oral dosing.

  2. Collisional vibrational energy transfer of OH (A 2Sigma + , v'=1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Leah R.; Crosley, David R.

    1996-05-01

    Vibrational energy transfer (VET) and quenching of the v'=1 level of A 2Σ+ OH have been studied using laser-induced fluorescence in a discharge flow cell at room temperature. VET cross sections (Å2) are N2, 30.1±2.8; O2, 2.8±0.3; Ar, 0.56±0.05; H2O, 8.6±0.6. The rotational energy distribution in v'=0 following the VET event was determined for nine colliders. It is nonthermal, generally populating high rotational levels. There are three broad categories of colliders that cause varying degrees of vibrational to rotational energy transfer; H2, D2, and CH4 show the least; N2, CO2, CF4, and N2O more; and O2 and Ar the most, with about one-third of the vibrational energy appearing as OH rotation.

  3. ESMO - Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale V.1.0 questions and answers

    PubMed Central

    Cherny, N I; Sullivan, R; Dafni, U; Kerst, J M; Sobrero, A; Zielinski, C; Piccart, M J; Bogaerts, J; Tabernero, J; Latino, N J; de Vries, E G E

    2016-01-01

    The ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS) is a standardised, generic, validated tool to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anticancer therapies. The ESMO-MCBS is intended to both assist oncologists in explaining the likely benefits of a particular treatment to their patients as well as to aid public health decision makers' prioritise therapies for reimbursement. From its inception the ESMO-MCBS Working Group has invited questions and critiques to promote understanding and to address misunderstandings regarding the nuanced use of the scale, and to identify shortcomings in the scale to be addressed in future planned revisions and updates. The ESMO-MCBS V.1.0 has attracted many questions regarding its development, structure and potential applications. These questions, together with responses from the ESMO-MCBS Working Group, have been edited and collated, and are herein presented as a supplementary resource. PMID:27900206

  4. Radiation hardness studies of AMS HV-CMOS 350 nm prototype chip HVStripV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanisauskas, K.; Affolder, A.; Arndt, K.; Bates, R.; Benoit, M.; Di Bello, F.; Blue, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Buckland, M.; Buttar, C.; Caragiulo, P.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Dragone, A.; Ehrler, F.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Grabas, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grillo, A.; Hiti, B.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Huffman, B. T.; John, J.; Kenney, C.; Kramberger, J.; Liang, Z.; Mandic, I.; Maneuski, D.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; MacMahon, S.; Meng, L.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Nickerson, R.; Peric, I.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Seidel, S.; Seiden, A.; Shipsey, I.; Song, W.; Staniztki, M.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Turchetta, R.; Vigani, L.; Volk, J.; Wang, R.; Warren, M.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Xiu, Q.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, H.

    2017-02-01

    CMOS active pixel sensors are being investigated for their potential use in the ATLAS inner tracker upgrade at the HL-LHC. The new inner tracker will have to handle a significant increase in luminosity while maintaining a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and pulse shaping times. This paper focuses on the prototype chip "HVStripV1" (manufactured in the AMS HV-CMOS 350nm process) characterization before and after irradiation up to fluence levels expected for the strip region in the HL-LHC environment. The results indicate an increase of depletion region after irradiation for the same bias voltage by a factor of ≈2.4 and ≈2.8 for two active pixels on the test chip. There was also a notable increase in noise levels from 85 e‑ to 386 e‑ and from 75 e‑ to 277 e‑ for the corresponding pixels.

  5. Contrast Adaptation Contributes to Contrast-Invariance of Orientation Tuning of Primate V1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Lionel G.; Barone, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies in rodents and carnivores have shown that orientation tuning width of single neurons does not change when stimulus contrast is modified. However, in these studies, stimuli were presented for a relatively long duration (e. g., 4 seconds), making it possible that contrast adaptation contributed to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Our first purpose was to determine, in marmoset area V1, whether orientation tuning is still contrast-invariant with the stimulation duration is comparable to that of a visual fixation. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed extracellular recordings and examined orientation tuning of single-units using static sine-wave gratings that were flashed for 200 msec. Sixteen orientations and three contrast levels, representing low, medium and high values in the range of effective contrasts for each neuron, were randomly intermixed. Contrast adaptation being a slow phenomenon, cells did not have enough time to adapt to each contrast individually. With this stimulation protocol, we found that the tuning width obtained at intermediate contrast was reduced to 89% (median), and that at low contrast to 76%, of that obtained at high contrast. Therefore, when probed with briefly flashed stimuli, orientation tuning is not contrast-invariant in marmoset V1. Our second purpose was to determine whether contrast adaptation contributes to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Stationary gratings were presented, as previously, for 200 msec with randomly varying orientations, but the contrast was kept constant within stimulation blocks lasting >20 sec, allowing for adaptation to the single contrast in use. In these conditions, tuning widths obtained at low contrast were still significantly less than at high contrast (median 85%). However, tuning widths obtained with medium and high contrast stimuli no longer differed significantly. Conclusions/Significance Orientation tuning does not appear to be contrast-invariant when

  6. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    SciTech Connect

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  7. Defect structure of epitaxial CrxV1-x thin films on MgO(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Bowden, Mark E.; Wang, Chongmin; Shutthanandan, V.; Manandhar, Sandeep; van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Epitaxial thin films of CrxV1-x over the entire composition range were deposited on MgO(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The films exhibited the expected 45° in-plane rotation with no evidence of phase segregation or spinodal decomposition. Pure Cr, with the largest lattice mismatch to MgO, exhibited full relaxation and cubic lattice parameters. As the lattice mismatch decreased with alloy composition, residual epitaxial strain was observed. For 0.2 ≤ x ≤ 0.4 the films were coherently strained to the substrate with associated tetragonal distortion; near the lattice-matched composition of x = 0.33, the films exhibited strain-free pseudomorphic matching to MgO. Unusually, films on the Cr-rich side of the lattice-matched composition exhibited more in-plane compression than expected from the bulk lattice parameters; this result was confirmed with both x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling measurements. Although thermal expansion mismatch in the heterostructure may play a role, the dominant mechanism for this phenomenon is still unknown. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was utilized to characterize the misfit dislocation network present at the film/MgO interface. Dislocations were found to be present with a non-uniform distribution, which is attributed to the Volmer-Weber growth mode of the films. The CrxV1-x / MgO(001) system can serve as a model system to study both the fundamentals of defect formation in bcc films and the interplay between nanoscale defects such as dislocations and radiation damage.

  8. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause–effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy. PMID:27608006

  9. Roles of Voltage-Gated Tetrodotoxin-Sensitive Sodium Channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Quanmin; Liu, Xinming; Liu, Shiguang

    2016-09-05

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common chronic medical problem worldwide; one of its complications is painful peripheral neuropathy, which can substantially erode quality of life and increase the cost of management. Despite its clinical importance, the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is complex and incompletely understood. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) link many physiological processes to electrical activity by controlling action potentials in all types of excitable cells. Two isoforms of VGSCs, NaV1.3 and NaV1.7, which are encoded by the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 3 and 9 (Scn3A and Scn9A) genes, respectively, have been identified in both peripheral nociceptive neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and pancreatic islet cells. Recent advances in our understanding of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 lead to the rational doubt about the cause-effect relation between diabetes and painful neuropathy. In this review, we summarize the roles of NaV1.3 and NaV1.7 in islet cells and DRG neurons, discuss the link between DM and painful neuropathy, and present a model, which may provide a starting point for further studies aimed at identifying the mechanisms underlying diabetes and painful neuropathy.

  10. U.S. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095: Response to CO2 Fertilization and Hadley Climate Model (HadCM2) Projections of Greenhouse-Forced Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect

    NJ Rosenberg; RC Izaurralde: RA Brown

    1999-11-19

    Research activities underway to evaluate potential consequences of climate change and variability on the agriculture, water resources, and other U.S. sectors were mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990. These activities are being carried out in a public-private partnership under the guidance of the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been using integrated assessment methodologies to appraise the possible impacts of global warming and climatic variability on the behavior of managed and natural systems. This interim PNNL report contributes to the U.S. National Assessment process with an analysis of the modeled impacts of climatic changes projected by the Hadley/UKMO (HadCM2) general circulation model on agricultural productivity and selected environmental variables. The construction of climatic data for the simulation runs followed general guidelines established by the U.S. National Assessment Synthesis Team. The baseline climate data were obtained from national records for the period 1961 - 1990. The scenario runs for two future periods (2025 - 2030 and 2090 - 2099) were extracted from results of a HadCM2 run distributed at a half-degree spatial resolution. The Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator (EPIC) was used to simulate the behavior of 204 "representative farms" (i.e., soil-climate-management combinations) under baseline climate, the two future periods and their combinations with two levels of atmospheric C02 concentrations (365 and 560 ppm). Analysis of simulation results identified areas in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California that would experience large temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in parts of Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas will experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the north eastern quarter of the country. These uniform precipitation

  11. Low-voltage back-gated atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based graphene-striped channel transistor with high-κ dielectric showing room-temperature mobility > 11,000 cm(2)/V·s.

    PubMed

    Smith, Casey; Qaisi, Ramy; Liu, Zhihong; Yu, Qingkai; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-07-23

    Utilization of graphene may help realize innovative low-power replacements for III-V materials based high electron mobility transistors while extending operational frequencies closer to the THz regime for superior wireless communications, imaging, and other novel applications. Device architectures explored to date suffer a fundamental performance roadblock due to lack of compatible deposition techniques for nanometer-scale dielectrics required to efficiently modulate graphene transconductance (gm) while maintaining low gate capacitance-voltage product (CgsVgs). Here we show integration of a scaled (10 nm) high-κ gate dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) with an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD)-derived graphene channel composed of multiple 0.25 μm stripes to repeatedly realize room-temperature mobility of 11,000 cm(2)/V·s or higher. This high performance is attributed to the APCVD graphene growth quality, excellent interfacial properties of the gate dielectric, conductivity enhancement in the graphene stripes due to low tox/Wgraphene ratio, and scaled high-κ dielectric gate modulation of carrier density allowing full actuation of the device with only ±1 V applied bias. The superior drive current and conductance at Vdd = 1 V compared to other top-gated devices requiring undesirable seed (such as aluminum and poly vinyl alcohol)-assisted dielectric deposition, bottom gate devices requiring excessive gate voltage for actuation, or monolithic (nonstriped) channels suggest that this facile transistor structure provides critical insight toward future device design and process integration to maximize CVD-based graphene transistor performance.

  12. Molecular epidemiological analyses of Cryptosporidium parvum virus 1 (CSpV1), a symbiotic virus of Cryptosporidium parvum, in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Fumi; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Aita, Junya; Yaita, Seiko; Kinami, Aiko; Fujimoto, Katsuhisa; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Murakami, Shin; Horimoto, Taisuke; Kato, Kentaro

    2016-01-04

    We show that Cryptosporidium parvum virus 1 (CSpV1), a member of the family Partitiviridae, genus Cryspovirus that can infect Cryptosporidium parvum, is a new candidate for high-resolution tool for tracing C. parvum. CSpV1 was detected in all C. parvum-positive samples tested. Phylogenetic analysis of dsRNA1 sequence from CSpV1 can distinguish infected areas of C. parvum on the national level. Sequences detected in samples from Iwate prefecture and other islands (Tanegashima, and Okinawa) belonged to a single clade. This system can differentiate the samples from Hokkaido and south part of Japan as well as from other countries. Samples from Iwate, Tanegashima, and Okinawa belonged to a single subclade, respectively. Therefore, the CSpV1 dsRNA sequences reflect the regional distribution of their host and have potential as a high-resolution tool to trace C. parvum IIaA15G2R1 subtype.

  13. Crystal structures of the ATP-binding and ADP-release dwells of the V1 rotary motor

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kano; Mizutani, Kenji; Maruyama, Shintaro; Shimono, Kazumi; Imai, Fabiana L.; Muneyuki, Eiro; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamato, Ichiro; Murata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    V1-ATPases are highly conserved ATP-driven rotary molecular motors found in various membrane systems. We recently reported the crystal structures for the Enterococcus hirae A3B3DF (V1) complex, corresponding to the catalytic dwell state waiting for ATP hydrolysis. Here we present the crystal structures for two other dwell states obtained by soaking nucleotide-free V1 crystals in ADP. In the presence of 20 μM ADP, two ADP molecules bind to two of three binding sites and cooperatively induce conformational changes of the third site to an ATP-binding mode, corresponding to the ATP-binding dwell. In the presence of 2 mM ADP, all nucleotide-binding sites are occupied by ADP to induce conformational changes corresponding to the ADP-release dwell. Based on these and previous findings, we propose a V1-ATPase rotational mechanism model. PMID:27807367

  14. Multinational Experiment 7. Outcome 4: Methodology to Understand Inter-Domain Dependencies and Vulnerabilities Guide v. 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    Motion Video FoN Freedom of Navigation GBS Global Broadcast Service GPS Global Positioning System UNCLASSIFIED Outcome 4 Guide V1.0 Page 8...System UFO UHF Follow-On UHF Ultra-high Frequency WGS Wideband Global SATCOM UNCLASSIFIED Outcome 4 Guide V1.0 Page 10 of 87 UNCLASSIFIED...dissemination of all ISR-collected data (SAR, Imagery, Full Motion Video ) and would thereby degrade dynamic targeting as well as situational

  15. Prognostic significance and function of the vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit V1E1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Son, Sung Wook; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Moon, Eun-Yi; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Pyo, Suhkneung; Um, Sung Hee

    2016-08-02

    Vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a hetero-multimeric ATP-driven proton pump has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mTOR-induced amino acid sensing for cell growth. Although dysregulated activity of cell growth regulators is often associated with cancer, the prognostic significance and metabolic roles of V-ATPase in esophageal cancer progression remain unclear. Here, we show that high levels of V-ATPase subunit V1E1 (V-ATPase V1E1) were significantly associated with shortened disease-free survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Multivariate analysis identified the V-ATPase V1E1 as an independent adverse prognostic factor (hazard ratio;1.748, P = 0.018). In addition, depletion of V-ATPase V1E1 resulted in reduced cell motility, decreased glucose uptake, diminished levels of lactate, and decreased ATP production, as well as inhibition of glycolytic enzyme expression in TE8 esophageal cancer cells. Consistent with these results, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) showed a high frequency of copy number alterations of the V-ATPase V1E1 gene, and identified a correlation between levels of V-ATPase V1E1 mRNA and Pyruvate Kinase M2 (PKM2) in ESCC. High expression levels of both V-ATPase V1E1 and phosphorylated PKM2 (p-PKM2), a key player in cancer metabolism, were associated with poorer prognosis in ESCC. Collectively, our findings suggest that expression of the V-ATPase V1E1 has prognostic significance in ESCC, and is closely linked to migration, invasion, and aerobic glycolysis in esophageal cancer cells.

  16. Questioning the Specificity of ASRS-v1.1 to Accurately Detect ADHD in Substance Abusing Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiasson, Jean-Pierre; Stavro, Katherine; Rizkallah, Elie; Lapierre, Luc; Dussault, Maxime; Legault, Louis; Potvin, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the specificity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) in detecting ADHD among individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs). Method: A chart review of 183 SUD patients was conducted. Patients were screened for ADHD with the ASRS-v1.1 and were later assessed by a psychiatrist specialized in ADHD. Results: Among SUD…

  17. Prognostic significance and function of the vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit V1E1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Pyo, Suhkneung; Um, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a hetero-multimeric ATP-driven proton pump has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mTOR-induced amino acid sensing for cell growth. Although dysregulated activity of cell growth regulators is often associated with cancer, the prognostic significance and metabolic roles of V-ATPase in esophageal cancer progression remain unclear. Here, we show that high levels of V-ATPase subunit V1E1 (V-ATPase V1E1) were significantly associated with shortened disease-free survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Multivariate analysis identified the V-ATPase V1E1 as an independent adverse prognostic factor (hazard ratio;1.748, P = 0.018). In addition, depletion of V-ATPase V1E1 resulted in reduced cell motility, decreased glucose uptake, diminished levels of lactate, and decreased ATP production, as well as inhibition of glycolytic enzyme expression in TE8 esophageal cancer cells. Consistent with these results, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) showed a high frequency of copy number alterations of the V-ATPase V1E1 gene, and identified a correlation between levels of V-ATPase V1E1 mRNA and Pyruvate Kinase M2 (PKM2) in ESCC. High expression levels of both V-ATPase V1E1 and phosphorylated PKM2 (p-PKM2), a key player in cancer metabolism, were associated with poorer prognosis in ESCC. Collectively, our findings suggest that expression of the V-ATPase V1E1 has prognostic significance in ESCC, and is closely linked to migration, invasion, and aerobic glycolysis in esophageal cancer cells. PMID:27384996

  18. Regulation of the cardiac Na+ channel NaV1.5 by post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Marionneau, Céline; Abriel, Hugues

    2015-05-01

    The cardiac voltage-gated Na(+) channel, Na(V)1.5, is responsible for the upstroke of the action potential in cardiomyocytes and for efficient propagation of the electrical impulse in the myocardium. Even subtle alterations of Na(V)1.5 function, as caused by mutations in its gene SCN5A, may lead to many different arrhythmic phenotypes in carrier patients. In addition, acquired malfunctions of Na(V)1.5 that are secondary to cardiac disorders such as heart failure and cardiomyopathies, may also play significant roles in arrhythmogenesis. While it is clear that the regulation of Na(V)1.5 protein expression and function tightly depends on genetic mechanisms, recent studies have demonstrated that Na(V)1.5 is the target of various post-translational modifications that are pivotal not only in physiological conditions, but also in disease. In this review, we examine the recent literature demonstrating glycosylation, phosphorylation by Protein Kinases A and C, Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase II, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Serum- and Glucocorticoid-inducible Kinases, Fyn and Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase, methylation, acetylation, redox modifications, and ubiquitylation of Na(V)1.5. Modern and sensitive mass spectrometry approaches, applied directly to channel proteins that were purified from native cardiac tissues, have enabled the determination of the precise location of post-translational modification sites, thus providing essential information for understanding the mechanistic details of these regulations. The current challenge is first, to understand the roles of these modifications on the expression and the function of Na(V)1.5, and second, to further identify other chemical modifications. It is postulated that the diversity of phenotypes observed with Na(V)1.5-dependent disorders may partially arise from the complex post-translational modifications of channel protein components.

  19. NaV1.5 sodium channel window currents contribute to spontaneous firing in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Christopher T; Hansen, Anne; Dupuis, Nicholas D; Shultz, Nicole; Levinson, Simon R; Finger, Thomas E; Dionne, Vincent E

    2014-09-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) fire spontaneously as well as in response to odor; both forms of firing are physiologically important. We studied voltage-gated Na(+) channels in OSNs to assess their role in spontaneous activity. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings from OSNs demonstrated both tetrodotoxin-sensitive and tetrodotoxin-resistant components of Na(+) current. RT-PCR showed mRNAs for five of the nine different Na(+) channel α-subunits in olfactory tissue; only one was tetrodotoxin resistant, the so-called cardiac subtype NaV1.5. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that NaV1.5 is present in the apical knob of OSN dendrites but not in the axon. The NaV1.5 channels in OSNs exhibited two important features: 1) a half-inactivation potential near -100 mV, well below the resting potential, and 2) a window current centered near the resting potential. The negative half-inactivation potential renders most NaV1.5 channels in OSNs inactivated at the resting potential, while the window current indicates that the minor fraction of noninactivated NaV1.5 channels have a small probability of opening spontaneously at the resting potential. When the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels were blocked by nanomolar tetrodotoxin at the resting potential, spontaneous firing was suppressed as expected. Furthermore, selectively blocking NaV1.5 channels with Zn(2+) in the absence of tetrodotoxin also suppressed spontaneous firing, indicating that NaV1.5 channels are required for spontaneous activity despite resting inactivation. We propose that window currents produced by noninactivated NaV1.5 channels are one source of the generator potentials that trigger spontaneous firing, while the upstroke and propagation of action potentials in OSNs are borne by the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channel subtypes.

  20. Deletion of the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 but not CaV1.2 Results in a Diminished sAHP in Mouse CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamelli, Amy E.; McKinney, Brandon C.; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Trains of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons are followed by a prolonged calcium-dependent post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that serves to limit further firing to a sustained depolarizing input. A reduction in the AHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning and increases in the AHP are correlated with age-related cognitive impairment. The AHP develops primarily as the result of activation of outward calcium-activated potassium currents; however the precise source of calcium for activation of the AHP remains unclear. There is substantial experimental evidence suggesting that calcium influx via voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (L-VGCCs) contributes to the generation of the AHP. Two L-VGCC subtypes are predominately expressed in the hippocampus, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, however it is not known which L-VGCC subtype is involved in generation of the AHP. This ambiguity is due in large part to the fact that at present there are no subunit-specific agonists or antagonists. Therefore, using mice in which the gene encoding CaV1.2 or CaV1.3 was deleted, we sought to determine the impact of alterations in levels of these two L-VCGG subtypes on neuronal excitability. No differences in any AHP measure were seen between neurons from CaV1.2 knockout mice and controls. However, the total area of the AHP was significantly smaller in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to neurons from wildtype controls. A significant reduction in the amplitude of the AHP was also seen at the 1 sec time point in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to those from controls. Reductions in both the area and 1 sec amplitude suggest the involvement of calcium influx via CaV1.3 in the slow AHP (sAHP). Thus, the results of our study demonstrate that deletion of CaV1.3, but not CaV1.2, significantly impacts the generation of the sAHP. PMID:20014384

  1. Ca2+ entry into neurons is facilitated by cooperative gating of clustered CaV1.3 channels

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Claudia M; Dixon, Rose E; Tajada, Sendoa; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Santana, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels regulate excitability in many neurons. As is the case for all voltage-gated channels, it is widely assumed that individual CaV1.3 channels behave independently with respect to voltage-activation, open probability, and facilitation. Here, we report the results of super-resolution imaging, optogenetic, and electrophysiological measurements that refute this long-held view. We found that the short channel isoform (CaV1.3S), but not the long (CaV1.3L), associates in functional clusters of two or more channels that open cooperatively, facilitating Ca2+ influx. CaV1.3S channels are coupled via a C-terminus-to-C-terminus interaction that requires binding of the incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and subsequent binding of CaM to the pre-IQ domain of the channels. Physically-coupled channels facilitate Ca2+ currents as a consequence of their higher open probabilities, leading to increased firing rates in rat hippocampal neurons. We propose that cooperative gating of CaV1.3S channels represents a mechanism for the regulation of Ca2+ signaling and electrical activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15744.001 PMID:27187148

  2. Turkey Astrovirus Type 1 (TAstV-1) and Chicken Astrovirus (CAstV) Detection in Brazilian Chicken Flocks.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Luis Luna; Beserra, Laila A R; Soares, Rodrigo M; Gregori, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Astrovirus is a common cause of enteritis in humans and domestic animals. Here we report the detection of turkey astrovirus type 1 (TAstV-1) and chicken astrovirus (CAstV) in avian farms. Sixty fecal sample pools (five or six birds of the same flock), from chickens without apparent clinical symptoms of enteric disease from farms located in six Brazilian states, were screened by an ORF1b PCR, followed by nucleotide sequencing of amplified products and phylogenetic analysis. Six samples tested positive for TAstV-1 and two for CAstV. One positive sample of each detected virus (TAstV-1 and CAstV) had the complete ORF2 sequenced. Data for the ORF2 sequence indicate that Brazilian TAstV-1 was divergent from TAstV-1 (United States), previously described infecting turkeys, and Brazilian CAstV clustered together with the U.K. group, subgroup B-II, associated with enteritis and growth retardation in chicks. This study provides updated information about CAstV and the first report of detection of TAstV-1 in Brazilian chickens, supporting the diagnostic of enteritis and epidemiologic surveillance in poultry health.

  3. What does Neural Plasticity Tell us about Role of Primary Visual Cortex (V1) in Visual Awareness?

    PubMed Central

    Silvanto, Juha; Rees, Geraint

    2010-01-01

    The complete loss of visual awareness resulting from a lesion to the primary visual cortex (V1) suggests that this region is indispensable for conscious visual perception. There are however a number cases of conscious perception in the absence of V1 which appear to challenge this conclusion. These include reports of patients with bilateral V1 lesions sustained at an early age whose conscious vision has spontaneously recovered, as well as stroke patients who have recovered some conscious vision with the help of rehabilitation programs. In addition, the phenomenon of hemianopic completion and percepts induced by brain stimulation suggest that V1 may not be necessary for conscious perception in all circumstances. Furthermore, that the visual abilities in the cat are associated with the recovery of normal extrastriate tuning properties rather than emulation of V1 functions suggests that there is nothing unique about the functional properties of this region in visual awareness. Rather, the dramatic effect of a V1 lesion on visual awareness may be due to its role in providing the majority of extrastriate visual input, the loss of which abolishes normal neural responsiveness throughout the visual cortex. PMID:21713187

  4. Pharmacological characterisation of the highly NaV1.7 selective spider venom peptide Pn3a

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R.; Dekan, Zoltan; Wingerd, Joshua S.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Munasinghe, Nehan R.; Bhola, Rebecca F.; Imlach, Wendy L.; Herzig, Volker; Armstrong, David A.; Rosengren, K. Johan; Bosmans, Frank; Waxman, Stephen G.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Escoubas, Pierre; Minett, Michael S.; Christie, Macdonald J.; King, Glenn F.; Alewood, Paul F.; Lewis, Richard J.; Wood, John N.; Vetter, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Human genetic studies have implicated the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. A novel peptide, μ-theraphotoxin-Pn3a, isolated from venom of the tarantula Pamphobeteus nigricolor, potently inhibits NaV1.7 (IC50 0.9 nM) with at least 40–1000-fold selectivity over all other NaV subtypes. Despite on-target activity in small-diameter dorsal root ganglia, spinal slices, and in a mouse model of pain induced by NaV1.7 activation, Pn3a alone displayed no analgesic activity in formalin-, carrageenan- or FCA-induced pain in rodents when administered systemically. A broad lack of analgesic activity was also found for the selective NaV1.7 inhibitors PF-04856264 and phlotoxin 1. However, when administered with subtherapeutic doses of opioids or the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan, these subtype-selective NaV1.7 inhibitors produced profound analgesia. Our results suggest that in these inflammatory models, acute administration of peripherally restricted NaV1.7 inhibitors can only produce analgesia when administered in combination with an opioid. PMID:28106092

  5. Structures of HIV-1-Env V1V2 with broadly neutralizing antibodies reveal commonalities that enable vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jason; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Max M.; Davenport, Thaddeus M.; Guttman, Miklos; Bailer, Robert T.; Chambers, Michael; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Jarosinski, Marissa C.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Lemmin, Thomas M.; Leung, Sherman; Louder, Mark K.; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Narpala, Sandeep; Pancera, Marie; Stuckey, Jonathan; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Mullikin, James C.; Baxa, Ulrich; Georgiou, George; McDermott, Adrian B.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Haynes, Barton F.; Moore, Penny L.; Morris, Lynn; Lee, Kelly K.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1-Env V1V2 arise in multiple donors. However, atomic-level interactions had only been determined with antibodies from a single donor, making commonalities in recognition uncertain. Here we report the co-crystal structure of V1V2 with antibody CH03 from a second donor and model Env interactions of antibody CAP256-VRC26 from a third. These V1V2-directed bNAbs utilized strand-strand interactions between a protruding antibody loop and a V1V2 strand, but differed in their N-glycan recognition. Ontogeny analysis indicated protruding loops to develop early, with glycan interactions maturing over time. Altogether, the multidonor information suggested V1V2-directed bNAbs to form an ‘extended class’, for which we engineered ontogeny-specific antigens: Env trimers with chimeric V1V2s that interacted with inferred ancestor and intermediate antibodies. The ontogeny-based design of vaccine antigens described here may provide a general means for eliciting antibodies of a desired class. PMID:26689967

  6. ATP6V1H Deficiency Impairs Bone Development through Activation of MMP9 and MMP13.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihan; Huang, Haigen; Zhao, Gexin; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Vega, Hugo; Huang, Yan; Sood, Raman; Bishop, Kevin; Maduro, Valerie; Accardi, John; Toro, Camilo; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Lyons, Karen; Gahl, William A; Duan, Xiaohong; Malicdan, May Christine V; Lin, Shuo

    2017-02-01

    ATP6V1H is a component of a large protein complex with vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) activity. We identified two generations of individuals in which short stature and osteoporosis co-segregated with a mutation in ATP6V1H. Since V-ATPases are highly conserved between human and zebrafish, we generated loss-of-function mutants in atp6v1h in zebrafish through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout. Homozygous mutant atp6v1h zebrafish exhibited a severe reduction in the number of mature calcified bone cells and a dramatic increase in the expression of mmp9 and mmp13. Heterozygous adults showed curved vertebra that lack calcified centrum structure and reduced bone mass and density. Treatment of mutant embryos with small molecule inhibitors of MMP9 and MMP13 significantly restored bone mass in the atp6v1h mutants. These studies have uncovered a new, ATP6V1H-mediated pathway that regulates bone formation, and defines a new mechanism of disease that leads to bone loss. We propose that MMP9/MMP13 could be therapeutic targets for patients with this rare genetic disease.

  7. Characterizing the V1 layer in the Venus ionosphere using VeRa observations from Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girazian, Z.; Withers, P.; Fallows, K.; Tarrh, A.; Paetzold, M.; Tellmann, S.; Haesler, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Venus Radio Science Experiment (VeRa) on the Venus Express spacecraft sounds the Venus atmosphere during Earth occultations to obtain vertical profiles of electron density in the ionosphere. The resultant profiles reveal the vertical structure of the Venus ionosphere from the topside down to below the lower layers (< 115 km). On the dayside, the dominant plasma layer is the V2 layer at ~142 km, which is produced primarily by photoionization of CO2. Embedded on the bottomside of the V2 layer is the less prominent, and much less studied, V1 layer at ~127 km. The V1 layer is also produced by photoionization of CO2, but secondary ionization due to energetic photoelectrons is much more important. Here we investigate properties of the V1 layer using VeRa profiles from 2006 to 2012 during which the Sun went from the deep solar minimum of Solar Cycle 23 to the rising solar activity levels of Solar Cycle 24. We investigate how the peak electron density and peak altitude of the V1 layer depend on solar zenith angle. We also characterize the shapes of the V1 layer and show how they are related to the solar activity level. Solar spectra from the Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) spacecraft are used to characterize the shapes of the V1 layer with solar activity.

  8. Design, synthesis and pharmacological characterization of fluorescent peptides for imaging human V1b vasopressin or oxytocin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corbani, Maithé; Trueba, Miguel; Stoev, Stoytcho; Murat, Brigitte; Mion, Julie; Boulay, Véra; Guillon, Gilles; Manning, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Among the four known vasopressin and oxytocin receptors, the specific localization of the V1b isoform is poorly described due to the lack of selective pharmacological tools. In an attempt to address this need, we decided to design, synthesize and characterize fluorescent selective V1b analogues. Starting with the selective V1b agonist, [deamino-Cys1, Leu4, Lys8]vasopressin (d[Leu4,Lys8]VP) synthesized earlier, we added blue, green or red fluorophores to the lysine residue at position 8, either directly or by the use of linkers of different lengths. Among the nine analogues synthesized, two exhibited very promising properties. These are d[Leu4, Lys (Alexa 647)8]VP (3) and d[Leu4, Lys (11-aminoundecanoyl-Alexa 647)8]VP (9). They remained full V1b agonists with nanomolar affinity and specifically decorated the plasma membrane of CHO cells stably transfected with the human V1b receptor. These new selective fluorescent peptides will allow the cellular localisation of V1b or OT receptor isoforms in native tissues. PMID:21428295

  9. A Possible Role for End-Stopped V1 Neurons in the Perception of Motion: A Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Zarei Eskikand, Parvin; Kameneva, Tatiana; Ibbotson, Michael R.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Grayden, David B.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model of the early stages of processing in the visual cortex, in particular V1 and MT, to investigate the potential role of end-stopped V1 neurons in solving the aperture problem. A hierarchical network is used in which the incoming motion signals provided by complex V1 neurons and end-stopped V1 neurons proceed to MT neurons at the next stage. MT neurons are categorized into two types based on their function: integration and segmentation. The role of integration neurons is to propagate unambiguous motion signals arriving from those V1 neurons that emphasize object terminators (e.g. corners). Segmentation neurons detect the discontinuities in the input stimulus to control the activity of integration neurons. Although the activity of the complex V1 neurons at the terminators of the object accurately represents the direction of the motion, their level of activity is less than the activity of the neurons along the edges. Therefore, a model incorporating end-stopped neurons is essential to suppress ambiguous motion signals along the edges of the stimulus. It is shown that the unambiguous motion signals at terminators propagate over the rest of the object to achieve an accurate representation of motion. PMID:27741307

  10. Pharmacological characterisation of the highly NaV1.7 selective spider venom peptide Pn3a.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Dekan, Zoltan; Wingerd, Joshua S; Smith, Jennifer J; Munasinghe, Nehan R; Bhola, Rebecca F; Imlach, Wendy L; Herzig, Volker; Armstrong, David A; Rosengren, K Johan; Bosmans, Frank; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Escoubas, Pierre; Minett, Michael S; Christie, Macdonald J; King, Glenn F; Alewood, Paul F; Lewis, Richard J; Wood, John N; Vetter, Irina

    2017-01-20

    Human genetic studies have implicated the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. A novel peptide, μ-theraphotoxin-Pn3a, isolated from venom of the tarantula Pamphobeteus nigricolor, potently inhibits NaV1.7 (IC50 0.9 nM) with at least 40-1000-fold selectivity over all other NaV subtypes. Despite on-target activity in small-diameter dorsal root ganglia, spinal slices, and in a mouse model of pain induced by NaV1.7 activation, Pn3a alone displayed no analgesic activity in formalin-, carrageenan- or FCA-induced pain in rodents when administered systemically. A broad lack of analgesic activity was also found for the selective NaV1.7 inhibitors PF-04856264 and phlotoxin 1. However, when administered with subtherapeutic doses of opioids or the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan, these subtype-selective NaV1.7 inhibitors produced profound analgesia. Our results suggest that in these inflammatory models, acute administration of peripherally restricted NaV1.7 inhibitors can only produce analgesia when administered in combination with an opioid.

  11. ATP6V1H Deficiency Impairs Bone Development through Activation of MMP9 and MMP13

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gexin; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Huang, Yan; Bishop, Kevin; Maduro, Valerie; Accardi, John; Toro, Camilo; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; Duan, Xiaohong; Malicdan, May Christine V.; Lin, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    ATP6V1H is a component of a large protein complex with vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) activity. We identified two generations of individuals in which short stature and osteoporosis co-segregated with a mutation in ATP6V1H. Since V-ATPases are highly conserved between human and zebrafish, we generated loss-of-function mutants in atp6v1h in zebrafish through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout. Homozygous mutant atp6v1h zebrafish exhibited a severe reduction in the number of mature calcified bone cells and a dramatic increase in the expression of mmp9 and mmp13. Heterozygous adults showed curved vertebra that lack calcified centrum structure and reduced bone mass and density. Treatment of mutant embryos with small molecule inhibitors of MMP9 and MMP13 significantly restored bone mass in the atp6v1h mutants. These studies have uncovered a new, ATP6V1H-mediated pathway that regulates bone formation, and defines a new mechanism of disease that leads to bone loss. We propose that MMP9/MMP13 could be therapeutic targets for patients with this rare genetic disease. PMID:28158191

  12. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 V1/V2 domain with broadly neutralizing antibody PG9

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Pancera, Marie; Carrico, Chris; Gorman, Jason; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Khayat, Reza; Louder, Robert; Pejchal, Robert; Sastry, Mallika; Dai, Kaifan; O’Dell, Sijy; Patel, Nikita; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Diwanji, Devan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Kwon, Young Do; Lee, Doyung; Louder, Mark K.; Moquin, Stephanie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Walker, Laura M.; Phogat, Sanjay; Wyatt, Richard; Orwenyo, Jared; Wang, Lai-Xi; Arthos, James; Bewley, Carole A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Schief, William R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2012-12-13

    Variable regions 1 and 2 (V1/V2) of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope glycoprotein are critical for viral evasion of antibody neutralization, and are themselves protected by extraordinary sequence diversity and N-linked glycosylation. Human antibodies such as PG9 nonetheless engage V1/V2 and neutralize 80% of HIV-1 isolates. Here we report the structure of V1/V2 in complex with PG9. V1/V2 forms a four-stranded {beta}-sheet domain, in which sequence diversity and glycosylation are largely segregated to strand-connecting loops. PG9 recognition involves electrostatic, sequence-independent and glycan interactions: the latter account for over half the interactive surface but are of sufficiently weak affinity to avoid autoreactivity. The structures of V1/V2-directed antibodies CH04 and PGT145 indicate that they share a common mode of glycan penetration by extended anionic loops. In addition to structurally defining V1/V2, the results thus identify a paradigm of antibody recognition for highly glycosylated antigens, which - with PG9 - involves a site of vulnerability comprising just two glycans and a strand.

  13. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 V1/V2 domain with broadly neutralizing antibody PG9.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Jason S; Pancera, Marie; Carrico, Chris; Gorman, Jason; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Khayat, Reza; Louder, Robert; Pejchal, Robert; Sastry, Mallika; Dai, Kaifan; O'Dell, Sijy; Patel, Nikita; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Diwanji, Devan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Kwon, Young Do; Lee, Doyung; Louder, Mark K; Moquin, Stephanie; Schmidt, Stephen D; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A; Kapiga, Saidi H; Sam, Noel E; Haynes, Barton F; Burton, Dennis R; Koff, Wayne C; Walker, Laura M; Phogat, Sanjay; Wyatt, Richard; Orwenyo, Jared; Wang, Lai-Xi; Arthos, James; Bewley, Carole A; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J; Schief, William R; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A; Kwong, Peter D

    2011-11-23

    Variable regions 1 and 2 (V1/V2) of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope glycoprotein are critical for viral evasion of antibody neutralization, and are themselves protected by extraordinary sequence diversity and N-linked glycosylation. Human antibodies such as PG9 nonetheless engage V1/V2 and neutralize 80% of HIV-1 isolates. Here we report the structure of V1/V2 in complex with PG9. V1/V2 forms a four-stranded β-sheet domain, in which sequence diversity and glycosylation are largely segregated to strand-connecting loops. PG9 recognition involves electrostatic, sequence-independent and glycan interactions: the latter account for over half the interactive surface but are of sufficiently weak affinity to avoid autoreactivity. The structures of V1/V2-directed antibodies CH04 and PGT145 indicate that they share a common mode of glycan penetration by extended anionic loops. In addition to structurally defining V1/V2, the results thus identify a paradigm of antibody recognition for highly glycosylated antigens, which-with PG9-involves a site of vulnerability comprising just two glycans and a strand.

  14. BADGER v1.0: A Fortran equation of state library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltemes, T. A.; Moses, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The BADGER equation of state library was developed to enable inertial confinement fusion plasma codes to more accurately model plasmas in the high-density, low-temperature regime. The code had the capability to calculate 1- and 2-T plasmas using the Thomas-Fermi model and an individual electron accounting model. Ion equation of state data can be calculated using an ideal gas model or via a quotidian equation of state with scaled binding energies. Electron equation of state data can be calculated via the ideal gas model or with an adaptation of the screened hydrogenic model with ℓ-splitting. The ionization and equation of state calculations can be done in local thermodynamic equilibrium or in a non-LTE mode using a variant of the Busquet equivalent temperature method. The code was written as a stand-alone Fortran library for ease of implementation by external codes. EOS results for aluminum are presented that show good agreement with the SESAME library and ionization calculations show good agreement with the FLYCHK code. Program summaryProgram title: BADGERLIB v1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEND_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEND_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 41 480 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 904 451 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: 32- or 64-bit PC, or Mac. Operating system: Windows, Linux, MacOS X. RAM: 249.496 kB plus 195.630 kB per isotope record in memory Classification: 19.1, 19.7. Nature of problem: Equation of State (EOS) calculations are necessary for the accurate simulation of high energy density plasmas. Historically, most EOS codes used in these simulations have relied on an ideal gas model. This model is inadequate for low

  15. IBCSO v1 - The first release of the International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, H. W.; Arndt, J.

    2012-12-01

    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) is an expert group of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) since the XXVIII SCAR Conference held on 30th July 2004 in Bremen Germany and a regional mapping project of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Ocean (GEBCO) operated under the joint auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) (of UNESCO) and the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO). The objective of IBCSO was to produce the first seamless bathymetric grid for the area south of latitude 60° S surrounding Antarctica. The IBCSO is going to be highly beneficial many scientific investigations. These include (a) interpretation of seabed geology, (b) the building of habitat models and maps, and (c) mapping and tracing of deep ocean current pathways. In addition the IBCSO is going to serve as an indispensable database for new nautical Charts in the Southern Ocean to improve the safety of navigation in Antarctic waters. After the inaugural meeting in 2004, the Editorial Board was then established at the 1st IBCSO Meeting at Santa Barbara in 2007 including representatives from several SCAR member countries. Since then, plenty of institutions holding bathymetric data in the Southern Ocean have been asked for a contribution to the IBCSO dataset. After the time consuming gathering, compilation and analyses of bathymetric data, finally the first version of the IBCSO is close to be released. Besides the grid an adjacent map has been developed, which is also going to be released in the near future. It is proposed to give an overview in what has been done in the IBCSO project in the last years for the creation of IBCSO v1. This will include acknowledgements to the data contributors and a short explanation of the working steps data acquisition, homogenization, cleaning and gridding. Previews of the new grid are going to demonstrate the improvement that has been achieved by IBCSO v1 compared to other bathymetric

  16. Thermal emission spectra of Mars (5.4-10.5 microns) - Evidence for sulfates, carbonates, and hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Roush, Ted; Witteborn, Fred; Bregman, Jesse; Wooden, Diane; Stoker, Carol; Toon, Owen B.

    1990-01-01

    Spectra of the Martian thermal emission in the 5.4-10.5 micron region are reported. Emission features at 7.8 and 9.7 microns are attributed to surface silicates, and an emission feature at 6.1 micron is attributed to a molecular water component of the surface material. An absorption band at 8.7 micron and a possible one at 9.8 microns is attributed to sulfate or bisulfate anions probably located at a distorted crystalline site, and an absorption band at 6.7 microns is attributed to carbonate or bicarbonate anions located in a distorted crystalline site. Spectral simulations indicate that the sulfate- and carbonate-bearing minerals are contained in the same particles of airborne dust as the dominant silicate minerals, that the dust optical depth is about 0.6 at a reference wavelength of 0.3 micron over the area of the observed spots, and that sulfates and carbonates constitute 10-15 percent and 1-3 percent by volume of the airborne dust, respectively.

  17. A trapped-ion-based quantum byte with 10(-5) next-neighbour cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Piltz, C; Sriarunothai, T; Varón, A F; Wunderlich, C

    2014-08-19

    The addressing of a particular qubit within a quantum register is a key pre-requisite for scalable quantum computing. In general, executing a quantum gate with a single qubit, or a subset of qubits, affects the quantum states of all other qubits. This reduced fidelity of the whole-quantum register could prevent the application of quantum error correction protocols and thus preclude scalability. Here we demonstrate addressing of individual qubits within a quantum byte (eight qubits) and measure the error induced in all non-addressed qubits (cross-talk) associated with the application of single-qubit gates. The quantum byte is implemented using microwave-driven hyperfine qubits of (171)Yb(+) ions confined in a Paul trap augmented with a magnetic gradient field. The measured cross-talk is on the order of 10(-5) and therefore below the threshold commonly agreed sufficient to efficiently realize fault-tolerant quantum computing. Hence, our results demonstrate how this threshold can be overcome with respect to cross-talk.

  18. Thermal emission spectra of Mars (5.4-10.5 microns) - Evidence for sulfates, carbonates, and hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, James B.; Roush, Ted; Witteborn, Fred; Bregman, Jesse; Wooden, Diane; Stoker, Carol; Toon, Owen B.

    1990-08-01

    Spectra of the Martian thermal emission in the 5.4-10.5 micron region are reported. Emission features at 7.8 and 9.7 microns are attributed to surface silicates, and an emission feature at 6.1 micron is attributed to a molecular water component of the surface material. An absorption band at 8.7 micron and a possible one at 9.8 microns is attributed to sulfate or bisulfate anions probably located at a distorted crystalline site, and an absorption band at 6.7 microns is attributed to carbonate or bicarbonate anions located in a distorted crystalline site. Spectral simulations indicate that the sulfate- and carbonate-bearing minerals are contained in the same particles of airborne dust as the dominant silicate minerals, that the dust optical depth is about 0.6 at a reference wavelength of 0.3 micron over the area of the observed spots, and that sulfates and carbonates constitute 10-15 percent and 1-3 percent by volume of the airborne dust, respectively.

  19. Molecular analysis of Arthrobacter myovirus vB_ArtM-ArV1: we blame it on the tail.

    PubMed

    Kaliniene, Laura; Šimoliūnas, Eugenijus; Truncaitė, Lidija; Zajančkauskaitė, Aurelija; Nainys, Juozas; Kaupinis, Algirdas; Valius, Mindaugas; Meškys, Rolandas

    2017-01-25

    This is the first report on a myophage that infects Arthrobacter A novel virus vB_ArtM-ArV1 (ArV1) was isolated from soil using Arthrobacter sp. 68b strain for phage propagation. Transmission electron microscopy showed its resemblance to members of the family Myoviridae: ArV1 has an isometric head (∼74 nm in diameter) and a contractile non-flexible tail (∼192 nm). Phylogenetic and comparative sequence analyses, however, revealed that ArV1 has more genes in common with phages from the family Siphoviridae than it does with any myovirus characterized to date. The genome of ArV1 is a linear, circularly permuted, double-stranded DNA molecule (71,200 bp) with a GC content of 61.6 %. The genome codes for 101 ORFs, yet contains no tRNA genes. More than 50% of ArV1 genes encode unique proteins that either have no reliable identity to database entries, or have homologues only in Arthrobacter phages, both sipho- and myoviruses. Using bioinformatics approaches, 13 ArV1 structural genes were identified, including those coding for head, tail, tail fiber, and baseplate proteins. A further 6 ArV1 ORFs were annotated as putative structural proteins based on the results of proteomic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on the alignment of four conserved virion proteins revealed that Arthrobacter myophages form a discreet clade that seems to occupy a somewhat intermediate position between myo- and siphoviruses. Thus, the data presented here will help to advance our understanding of genetic diversity and evolution of phages that constitute the order Caudovirales IMPORTANCE: Bacteriophages, which likely have originated in the early Precambrian Era, represent the most numerous population on the planet. Approximately 95% of known phages are tailed viruses that comprise three families: Podoviridae (short tail), Siphoviridae (long noncontractile tail), and Myoviridae (contractile tail). Based on the current hypothesis, myophages, which may have evolved from siphophages, are thought to

  20. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by hydrogen peroxide transcriptionally inhibits NaV1.5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Huo, Rong; Cai, Benzhi; Lu, Yan; Ye, Bo; Li, Xiang; Li, Faqian; Xu, Haodong

    2016-07-01

    Oxidants and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling have been shown to decrease cardiac Na(+) channel activity by suppressing NaV1.5 expression. Our aims are to determine if hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), one oxidant of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and promotes β-catenin nuclear activity, leading to suppression of NaV1.5 expression and if this suppression requires the interaction of β-catenin with its nuclear partner, TCF4 (also called TCF7L2) to decrease SCN5a promoter activity. The results demonstrated that H2O2 increased β-catenin, but not TCF4 nuclear localization determined by immunofluorescence without affecting total β-catenin protein level. Furthermore, H2O2 exerted a dose- and time-dependent suppressive effect on NaV1.5 expression. RT-PCR and/or Western blot analyses revealed that overexpressing active form of β-catenin or stabilizing β-catenin by GSK-3β inhibitors, LiCl and Bio, suppressed NaV1.5 expression in HL-1 cells. In contrast, destabilization of β-catenin by a constitutively active GSK-3β mutant (S9A) upregulated NaV1.5 expression. Whole-cell recording showed that LiCl significantly inhibited Na(+) channel activity in these cells. Using immunoprecipitation (IP), we showed that β-catenin interacted with TCF4 indicating that β-catenin as a co-transfactor, regulates NaV1.5 expression through TCF4. Analyses of the SCN5a promoter sequences among different species by using VISTA tools indicated that SCN5a promoter harbors TCF4 binding sites. Chromatin IP assays demonstrated that both β-catenin and TCF4 were recruited in the SCN5a promoter, and regulated its activity. Luciferase promoter assays exhibited that β-catenin inhibited the SCN5a promoter activity at a dose-dependent manner and this inhibition required TCF4. Small interfering (Si) RNA targeting β-catenin significantly increased SCN5a promoter activity, leading to enhanced NaV1.5 expression. As expected, β-catenin SiRNA prevents H2O2 suppressive effects

  1. Role of extracellular Ca2+ in gating of CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Olga; Isaev, Dmytro; Shirokov, Roman

    2005-01-01

    We examined changes in ionic and gating currents in CaV1.2 channels when extracellular Ca2+ was reduced from 10 mm to 0.1 μm. Saturating gating currents decreased by two-thirds (KD≈ 40 μm) and ionic currents increased 5-fold (KD≈ 0.5 μm) due to increasing Na+ conductance. A biphasic time dependence for the activation of ionic currents was observed at low [Ca2+], which appeared to reflect the rapid activation of channels that were not blocked by Ca2+ and a slower reversal of Ca2+ blockade of the remaining channels. Removal of Ca2+ following inactivation of Ca2+ currents showed that Na+ currents were not affected by Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Ca2+-dependent inactivation also induced a negative shift of the reversal potential for ionic currents suggesting that inactivation alters channel selectivity. Our findings suggest that activation of Ca2+ conductance and Ca2+-dependent inactivation depend on extracellular Ca2+ and are linked to changes in selectivity. PMID:15845581

  2. Identification of novel NaV1.7 antagonists using high throughput screening platforms.

    PubMed

    Klement, Goran; Babich, Olga; Larsson, Olof; Lund, Per-Eric; Malmberg, Asa; Sandberg, Lars; Sands, Zara A; Dabrowski, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Congenital Insensitivity to Pain (CIP) is a loss of function mutation resulting in a truncated NaV1.7 protein, suggesting a pivotal role in pain signaling and rendering it an important pharmaceutical target for multiple pain conditions. The structural homology in the NaV-channel family makes it challenging to design effective analgesic compounds without inducing for example cardiotoxicity or seizure liabilities. An additional approach to structural isoform selectivity is to identify compounds with use- or state-dependent profiles, i.e. inhibition efficacy based on the gating of the ion channel. In general nerve cells in damaged or inflamed tissue are more depolarized and electrically active compared to healthy nerve cells in for instance the heart. This observation has led to the design of two types of screening protocols emulating the voltage condition of peripheral neurons or cardiac tissue. The two voltage protocols have been developed to identify both use- and state-dependent antagonists. In this paper we describe an attempt to merge the two different protocols into one to increase screening efficacy, while retaining relevant state- and use-dependent pharmacology. The new protocol is constructed of two stimulation pulses and a slow voltage ramp for simultaneous assessment of resting and state-dependent block. By comparing all protocols we show that the new protocol indeed filter compounds for state-dependence and increase the prediction power of selecting use-dependent compounds.

  3. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Ida and Dactyl V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 243 Ida and a spectrum of the asteroid satellite Dactyl (Ida I) as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on August 28, 1993. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the 243 Ida system. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files idu002tn.qub, idu005tn.qub, idu006tn.qub, idu007tn.qub, idu019tn.qub, idu020tn.qub, idu022tn.qub, idu028tn.qub, idu032tn.qub, idu033tn.qub, and idu035tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3-TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the Jovian tour of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance and incidence/flux measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  4. Dynamics of relaxation and fragmentation in size-selected icosahedral Arn[NO-(v = 1)] clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, H. K.

    2011-03-01

    We study the vibrational relaxation and solvation dynamics in size-selected icosahedral Arn(NO-) at 300 K, where NO-(X3Σ-) is in v = 1 and n = 1-12, using a classical dynamics method and an interaction model consisting of detailed host-guest and host-host interactions. Two relaxation time scales are found: (i) the short-time (<200 ps), in which rate is nearly independent of cluster size, and (ii) the ns scale, in which a slow energy transfer process occurs between NO- vibration and argon modes at a rate (˜108 s-1) decreasing slightly from n = 12 to 6 and rapidly from n = 5 to 1 (˜106 s-1). In Ar12(NO-), less than one-quarter of the host atoms sampled evaporate, nearly 60% of evaporation occurring within 200 ps caused by rapid energy transfer from NO- at short time. The fraction of evaporation decreases nearly exponentially with increasing evaporation time, but ˜16% of evaporation still occurs on a time scale longer than 1 ns. Evaporation from one hemisphere of Ar12(NO-) dominates the rest. Final cluster sizes commonly produced from the fragmentation of Ar12(NO-) are n = 6-11 (evaporation of 6-1 atoms) and n = 12 (no evaporation).

  5. Slow Feature Analysis on Retinal Waves Leads to V1 Complex Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dähne, Sven; Wilbert, Niko; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2014-01-01

    The developing visual system of many mammalian species is partially structured and organized even before the onset of vision. Spontaneous neural activity, which spreads in waves across the retina, has been suggested to play a major role in these prenatal structuring processes. Recently, it has been shown that when employing an efficient coding strategy, such as sparse coding, these retinal activity patterns lead to basis functions that resemble optimal stimuli of simple cells in primary visual cortex (V1). Here we present the results of applying a coding strategy that optimizes for temporal slowness, namely Slow Feature Analysis (SFA), to a biologically plausible model of retinal waves. Previously, SFA has been successfully applied to model parts of the visual system, most notably in reproducing a rich set of complex-cell features by training SFA with quasi-natural image sequences. In the present work, we obtain SFA units that share a number of properties with cortical complex-cells by training on simulated retinal waves. The emergence of two distinct properties of the SFA units (phase invariance and orientation tuning) is thoroughly investigated via control experiments and mathematical analysis of the input-output functions found by SFA. The results support the idea that retinal waves share relevant temporal and spatial properties with natural visual input. Hence, retinal waves seem suitable training stimuli to learn invariances and thereby shape the developing early visual system such that it is best prepared for coding input from the natural world. PMID:24810948

  6. Two phases of V1 activity for visual recognition of natural images.

    PubMed

    Camprodon, Joan A; Zohary, Ehud; Brodbeck, Verena; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-06-01

    Present theories of visual recognition emphasize the role of interactive processing across populations of neurons within a given network, but the nature of these interactions remains unresolved. In particular, data describing the sufficiency of feedforward algorithms for conscious vision and studies revealing the functional relevance of feedback connections to the striate cortex seem to offer contradictory accounts of visual information processing. TMS is a good method to experimentally address this issue, given its excellent temporal resolution and its capacity to establish causal relations between brain function and behavior. We studied 20 healthy volunteers in a visual recognition task. Subjects were briefly presented with images of animals (birds or mammals) in natural scenes and were asked to indicate the animal category. MRI-guided stereotaxic single TMS pulses were used to transiently disrupt striate cortex function at different times after image onset (SOA). Visual recognition was significantly impaired when TMS was applied over the occipital pole at SOAs of 100 and 220 msec. The first interval has consistently been described in previous TMS studies and is explained as the interruption of the feedforward volley of activity. Given the late latency and discrete nature of the second peak, we hypothesize that it represents the disruption of a feedback projection to V1, probably from other areas in the visual network. These results provide causal evidence for the necessity of recurrent interactive processing, through feedforward and feedback connections, in visual recognition of natural complex images.

  7. Oxidation characteristics of Ti-25Al-10Nb-3V-1Mo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, T. A.; Clark, R. K.; Wiedemann, K. E.; Sankaran, S. N.

    1992-01-01

    Static oxidation kinetics of the super-alpha 2 titanium-aluminide alloy Ti-25Al-10Nb-3V-1Mo (at. percent) were investigated in air over the temperature range of 650 to 1000 C using thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidation kinetics were complex at all exposure temperatures and displayed up to three distinct oxidation rates. Breakaway oxidation occurred after long exposure times at high temperatures. Oxidation products were determined using X-ray diffraction techniques, electron microprobe analysis, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Oxide scale morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces and cross sections of oxidized specimens. The oxides during the parabolic stages were compact and multilayered, consisting primarily of TiO2 doped with Nb, a top layer of Al2O3, and a thin bottom layer of TiN. The transition between the second and third parabolic stage was found to be linked to the formation of a TiAl layer at the oxide-metal interface. Porosity was formed during the third stage, causing degradation of the oxide and the beginning of breakaway oxidation.

  8. Oxidation characteristics of Ti-25Al-10Nb-3V-1Mo intermetallic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Terryl A.; Clark, Ronald K.; Sankaran, Sankara N.; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    1990-01-01

    Static oxidation kinetics of the super-alpha 2 titanium-aluminide alloy Ti-25Al-10Nb-3V-1Mo (at. percent) were investigated in air over the temperature range of 650 to 1000 C using thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidation kinetics were complex at all exposure temperatures and displayed up to three distinct oxidation rates. Breakaway oxidation occurred after long exposure times at high temperatures. Oxidation products were determined using x ray diffraction techniques, electron microprobe analysis, and energy dispersive x ray analysis. Oxide scale morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces and cross sections of oxidized specimens. The oxides during the parabolic stages were compact and multilayered, consisting primarily of TiO2 doped with Nb, a top layer of Al2O3, and a thin bottom layer of TiN. The transition between the second and third parabolic stage was found to be linked to the formation of a TiAl layer at the oxide-metal interface. Porosity was formed during the third stage, causing degradation of the oxide and the beginning of breakaway oxidation.

  9. An outline of functional self-organization in V1: synchrony, STLR and Hebb rules.

    PubMed

    Wright, J J; Bourke, P D

    2008-06-01

    A model of self-organization of synapses in the striate cortex is described, and its functional implications discussed. Principal assumptions are: (a) covariance of cell firing declines with distance in cortex, (b) covariance of stimulus characteristics declines with distance in the visual field, and (c) metabolic rates are approximately uniform in all small axonal segments. Under these constraints, Hebbian learning implies a maximally stable synaptic configuration corresponding to anatomically and physiologically realistic ''local maps'', each of macro-columnar size, and each organized as Möbius projections of a "global map" of retinotopic form. Convergence to the maximally stable configuration is facilitated by the spatio-temporal learning rule. A tiling of V1, constructed of approximately mirror-image reflections of each local map by its neighbors, is formed. The model supplements standard concepts of feed-forward visual processing by introducing a new basis for contextual modulation and neural network identifications of visual signals, as perturbation of the synaptic configuration by rapid stimulus transients. On a long time-scale, synaptic development could overwrite the Möbius configuration, while LTP and LTD could mediate synaptic gain on intermediate time-scales.

  10. NMR Structure of Francisella tularensis Virulence Determinant Reveals Structural Homology to Bet v1 Allergen Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zook, James; Mo, Gina; Sisco, Nicholas J; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Hansen, Debra T; Baravati, Bobby; Cherry, Brian R; Sykes, Kathryn; Wachter, Rebekka; Van Horn, Wade D; Fromme, Petra

    2015-06-02

    Tularemia is a potentially fatal bacterial infection caused by Francisella tularensis, and is endemic to North America and many parts of northern Europe and Asia. The outer membrane lipoprotein, Flpp3, has been identified as a virulence determinant as well as a potential subunit template for vaccine development. Here we present the first structure for the soluble domain of Flpp3 from the highly infectious Type A SCHU S4 strain, derived through high-resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; the first structure of a lipoprotein from the genus Francisella. The Flpp3 structure demonstrates a globular protein with an electrostatically polarized surface containing an internal cavity-a putative binding site based on the structurally homologous Bet v1 protein family of allergens. NMR-based relaxation studies suggest loop regions that potentially modulate access to the internal cavity. The Flpp3 structure may add to the understanding of F. tularensis virulence and contribute to the development of effective vaccines.

  11. Suppression of PPARβ, and DHA treatment, inhibit NaV1.5 and NHE-1 pro-invasive activities.

    PubMed

    Wannous, Ramez; Bon, Emeline; Gillet, Ludovic; Chamouton, Julie; Weber, Günther; Brisson, Lucie; Goré, Jacques; Bougnoux, Philippe; Besson, Pierre; Roger, Sébastien; Chevalier, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β (PPARβ) and NaV1.5 voltage-gated sodium channels have independently been shown to regulate human breast cancer cell invasiveness. The n-3 polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), a natural ligand of PPAR, is effective in increasing survival and chemotherapy efficacy in breast cancer patient with metastasis. DHA reduces breast cancer cell invasiveness and it also inhibits PPARβ expression. We have shown previously that NaV1.5 promotes MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells invasiveness by potentiating the activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger type 1 (NHE-1), the major regulator of H(+) efflux in these cells. We report here that DHA inhibited NaV1.5 current and NHE-1 activity in human breast cancer cells, and in turn reduced NaV1.5-dependent cancer cell invasiveness. For the first time, we show that antagonizing PPARβ, or inhibiting its expression, reduced NaV1.5 mRNA and protein expression and NaV1.5 current, as well as NHE-1 activity and cell invasiveness. Consistent with these results, the DHA-induced reduction of both NaV1.5 expression and NHE-1 activity was abolished in cancer cells knocked-down for the expression of PPARβ (shPPARβ). This demonstrates a direct link between the inhibition of PPARβ expression and the inhibition of Nav1.5/NHE-1 activities and breast cancer cell invasiveness. This study provides new mechanistic data advocating for the use of natural fatty acids such as DHA to block the development of breast cancer metastases.

  12. Extrasolar Giant Magnetospheric Response to Steady-state Stellar Wind Pressure at 10, 5, 1, and 0.2 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Matt A.; Harnett, Erika M.; Winglee, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional, multifluid simulation of a giant planet’s magnetospheric interaction with steady-state stellar wind from a Sun-like star was performed for four different orbital semimajor axes—10, 5, 1, and 0.2 au. We simulate the effect of the increasing, steady-state stellar wind pressure related to the planetary orbital semimajor axis on the global magnetospheric dynamics for a Saturn-like planet, including an Enceladus-like plasma torus. Mass-loss processes are shown to vary with orbital distance, with the centrifugal interchange instability displayed only in the 10 and 5 au cases, which reach a state of mass-loss equilibrium more slowly than the 1 or 0.2 au cases. The compression of the magnetosphere in the 1 and 0.2 au cases contributes to the quenching of the interchange process by increasing the ratio of total plasma thermal energy to corotational energy. The strength of field-aligned currents, associated with auroral radio emissions, is shown to increase in magnitude and latitudinal coverage with a corresponding shift equatorward from increased dynamic ram pressure experienced in the hotter orbits. Similar to observed hot Jovian planets, the warm exo-Saturn simulated in the current work shows enhanced ion density in the magnetosheath and magnetopause regions, as well as the plasma torus, which could contribute to altered transit signals, suggesting that for planets in warmer (>0.1 au) orbits, planetary magnetic field strengths and possibly exomoons—via the plasma torus—could be observable with future missions.

  13. Extrasolar giant magnetospheric response to steady-state stellar wind pressure at 10, 5, 1, and 0.2 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Matt; Harnett, Erika; Winglee, Robert

    2016-10-01

    A three-dimensional, multifluid simulation of a giant planet's magnetospheric interaction with steady-state stellar wind from a Sun-like star was performed for four different orbital semi-major axes - 10, 5, 1 and 0.2 AU. We simulate the effect of the increasing, steady-state stellar wind pressure related to the planetary orbital semi-major axis on the global magnetospheric dynamics for a Saturn-like planet, including an Enceladus-like plasma torus. Mass loss processes are shown to vary with orbital distance, with the centrifugal interchange instability displayed only in the 10 AU and 5 AU cases which reach a state of mass loss equilibrium more slowly than the 1 AU or 0.2 AU cases. The compression of the magnetosphere in the 1 AU and 0.2 AU cases contributes to the quenching of the interchange process by increasing the ratio of total plasma thermal energy to corotational energy. The strength of field-aligned currents (FAC), associated with auroral radio emissions, are shown to increase in magnitude and latitudinal coverage with a corresponding shift equatorward from increased dynamic ram pressure experienced in the hotter orbits. Similar to observed hot Jovian planets, the warm exo-Saturn simulated in the current work shows enhanced ion density in the magnetosheath and magnetopause regions, as well as the plasma torus which could contribute to altered transit signals, suggesting that for planets in warmer (> 0.1 AU) orbits, planetary magnetic field strengths and possibly exomoons - via the plasma torus - could be observable with future missions.

  14. High-pressure synthesis, structure, and photoluminescence of a new KSbO3-type bismuth germanate Bi3Ge3O10.5.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinguang; Rettie, Alexander J E; Suchomel, Matthew R; Zhou, Haidong; Yan, Jiaqiang; Song, Jie; Marshall, Luke G; Larregola, Sebastian A; Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B

    2013-02-18

    A new Bi(3)Ge(3)O(10.5) compound has been synthesized under high pressure, P = 7 GPa, and 700 °C. Instead of the pyrochlore that is normally stabilized under high pressure, the Bi(3)Ge(3)O(10.5) crystallizes in a KSbO(3)-ype crystal structure. The crystal structure has been refined by the Rietveld method from synchrotron X-ray diffraction data. Moreover, we have also characterized the Bi(3)Ge(3)O(10.5) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and specific heat.

  15. Cold-aggravated pain in humans caused by a hyperactive NaV1.9 channel mutant

    PubMed Central

    Leipold, Enrico; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Frick, Miya; Gong, Ping; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Voigt, Martin; Katona, Istvan; Oliver Goral, R.; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Weis, Joachim; Hübner, Christian A.; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Kurth, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the human SCN11A-encoded voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.9 cause severe pain disorders ranging from neuropathic pain to congenital pain insensitivity. However, the entire spectrum of the NaV1.9 diseases has yet to be defined. Applying whole-exome sequencing we here identify a missense change (p.V1184A) in NaV1.9, which leads to cold-aggravated peripheral pain in humans. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that p.V1184A shifts the voltage dependence of channel opening to hyperpolarized potentials thereby conferring gain-of-function characteristics to NaV1.9. Mutated channels diminish the resting membrane potential of mouse primary sensory neurons and cause cold-resistant hyperexcitability of nociceptors, suggesting a mechanistic basis for the temperature dependence of the pain phenotype. On the basis of direct comparison of the mutations linked to either cold-aggravated pain or pain insensitivity, we propose a model in which the physiological consequence of a mutation, that is, augmented versus absent pain, is critically dependent on the type of NaV1.9 hyperactivity. PMID:26645915

  16. Distribution, prevalence, and genetic analysis of Panulirus argus virus 1 (PaV1) from the Caribbean Sea.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jessica; Behringer, Donald; Shields, Jeffrey D; Baeza, Antonio; Aguilar-Perera, Alfonso; Bush, Phillippe G; Dromer, Clement; Herrera-Moreno, Alejandro; Gittens, Lester; Matthews, Thomas R; McCord, Michael R; Schärer, Michelle T; Reynal, Lionel; Truelove, Nathanial; Butler, Mark J

    2013-05-27

    The pathogenic virus Panulirus argus virus 1 (PaV1) was first discovered in Caribbean spiny lobsters Panulirus argus from the Florida Keys (USA) in 1999 and has since been reported in Belize, Mexico, and Cuba; its distribution in the wider Caribbean is unknown. We collected tissue samples from adult spiny lobsters from 30 locations in 14 countries bordering the Caribbean Sea and used molecular diagnostics to assay for the presence of PaV1. PaV1 occurred primarily in the northern areas of the Caribbean, where its prevalence was highest. The virus was not found in lobsters from the southeastern Caribbean, and its prevalence was lowest in the southwestern Caribbean. DNA sequence analysis was performed on a fragment of the viral DNA to examine the genetic diversity of PaV1 on a Caribbean-wide scale. Sequence variation in the viral DNA fragment was high, with 61 unique alleles identified from 9 areas. The sharing of viral alleles in lobsters from distant locations supports the hypothesis of a strong genetic connectivity among lobsters within the Caribbean, and further supports the hypothesis that postlarvae infected with PaV1 may serve to disperse the virus over long distances.

  17. MAC-v1: A new global aerosol climatology for climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Stefan; O'Donnel, Declan; Stier, Philip; Kloster, Silvia; Zhang, Kai; Schmidt, Hauke; Rast, Sebastian; Giorgetta, Marco; Eck, Tom F.; Stevens, Bjorn

    2013-12-01

    The Max-Planck-Institute Aerosol Climatology version 1 (MAC-v1) is introduced. It describes the optical properties of tropospheric aerosols on monthly timescales and with global coverage at a spatial resolution of 1° in latitude and longitude. By providing aerosol radiative properties for any wavelength of the solar (or shortwave) and of the terrestrial (or longwave) radiation spectrum, as needed in radiative transfer applications, this MAC-v1 data set lends itself to simplified and computationally efficient representations of tropospheric aerosol in climate studies. Estimates of aerosol radiative properties are provided for both total and anthropogenic aerosol in annual time steps from preindustrial times (i.e., starting with year 1860) well into the future (until the year 2100). Central to the aerosol climatology is the merging of monthly statistics of aerosol optical properties for current (year 2000) conditions. Hereby locally sparse but trusted high-quality data by ground-based sun-photometer networks are merged onto complete background maps defined by central data from global modeling with complex aerosol modules. This merging yields 0.13 for the global annual midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD), with 0.07 attributed to aerosol sizes larger than 1 µm in diameter and 0.06 of attributed to aerosol sizes smaller than 1 µm in diameter. Hereby larger particles are less absorbing with a single scattering albedo (SSA) of 0.98 compared to 0.93 for smaller sizes. Simulation results of a global model are applied to prescribe the vertical distribution and to estimate anthropogenic contributions to the smaller size AOD as a function of time, with a 0.037 value for current conditions. In a demonstration application, the associated aerosol direct radiative effects are determined. For current conditions, total aerosol is estimated to reduce the combined shortwave and longwave net-flux balance at the top of the atmosphere by about -1.6 W/m2 from which -0.5 W/m2 (with

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hubble Source Catalog (V1 and V2) (Whitmore+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, B. C.; Allam, S. S.; Budavari, T.; Casertano, S.; Downes, R. A.; Donaldson, T.; Fall, S. M.; Lubow, S. H.; Quick, L.; Strolger, L.-G.; Wallace, G.; White, R. L.

    2016-10-01

    The HSC v1 contains members of the WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS and WFC3/IR Source Extractor source lists from HLA version DR8 (data release 8). The crossmatching process involves adjusting the relative astrometry of overlapping images so as to minimize positional offsets between closely aligned sources in different images. After correction, the astrometric residuals of crossmatched sources are significantly reduced, to typically less than 10mas. The relative astrometry is supported by using Pan-STARRS, SDSS, and 2MASS as the astrometric backbone for initial corrections. In addition, the catalog includes source nondetections. The crossmatching algorithms and the properties of the initial (Beta 0.1) catalog are described in Budavari & Lubow (2012ApJ...761..188B). The HSC v2 contains members of the WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS and WFC3/IR Source Extractor source lists from HLA version DR9.1 (data release 9.1). The crossmatching process involves adjusting the relative astrometry of overlapping images so as to minimize positional offsets between closely aligned sources in different images. After correction, the astrometric residuals of crossmatched sources are significantly reduced, to typically less than 10mas. The relative astrometry is supported by using Pan-STARRS, SDSS, and 2MASS as the astrometric backbone for initial corrections. In addition, the catalog includes source nondetections. The crossmatching algorithms and the properties of the initial (Beta 0.1) catalog are described in Budavari & Lubow (2012ApJ...761..188B). Hubble Source Catalog Acknowledgement: Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESAC/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA). (2 data files).

  19. Population activity statistics dissect subthreshold and spiking variability in V1.

    PubMed

    Bányai, Mihály; Koman, Zsombor; Orbán, Gergő

    2017-03-15

    Response variability, as measured by fluctuating responses upon repeated performance of trials, is a major component of neural responses, and its characterization is key to interpret high dimensional population recordings. Response variability and covariability display predictable changes upon changes in stimulus and cognitive or behavioral state, providing an opportunity to test the predictive power of models of neural variability. Still, there is little agreement on which model to use as a building block for population-level analyses, and models of variability are often treated as a subject of choice. We investigate two competing models, the Doubly Stochastic Poisson (DSP) model assuming stochasticity at spike generation, and the Rectified Gaussian (RG) model tracing variability back to membrane potential variance, to analyze stimulus-dependent modulation of both single-neuron and pairwise response statistics. Using a pair of model neurons, we demonstrate that the two models predict similar single-cell statistics. However, DSP and RG models have contradicting predictions on the joint statistics of spiking responses. In order to test the models against data, we build a population model to simulate stimulus change-related modulations in pairwise response statistics. We use single-unit data from the primary visual cortex (V1) of monkeys to show that while model predictions for variance are qualitatively similar to experimental data, only the RG model's predictions are compatible with joint statistics. These results suggest that models using Poisson-like variability might fail to capture important properties of response statistics. We argue that membrane potential-level modelling of stochasticity provides an efficient strategy to model correlations.

  20. Primate area V1: Largest response gain for receptive fields in the straight-ahead direction

    PubMed Central

    Przybyszewski, Andrzej W.; Kagan, Igor; Snodderly, D. Max

    2014-01-01

    Although neuronal responses in behaving monkeys are typically studied while the monkey fixates straight ahead, it is known that eye position modulates responses of visual neurons. The modulation has been found to enhance neuronal responses when the receptive field is placed in the straight-ahead position for neurons receiving input from the peripheral, but not the central retina [1]. We studied the effect of eye position on the responses of V1 complex cells receiving input from the central retina (1.1–5.7° eccentricity) while minimizing the effect of fixational eye movements. Contrast response functions were obtained separately with drifting light and dark bars. Data were fit with the Naka-Rushton equation: r(c)=Rmax∗cn/(cn+c50n)+s, where r(c) is mean spike rate at contrast c, Rmax the maximum response, c50 the contrast that elicits half of Rmax and s the spontaneous activity. Contrast sensitivity as measured by c50 was not affected by eye position. For dark bars there was a statistically significant decline in the normalized Rmax with increasing deviation from straight-ahead. Data for bright bars showed a similar trend with a less rapid decline. Our results indicate neurons representing the central retina show a bias for the straight-ahead position resulting from modulation of the response gain without an accompanying modulation of contrast sensitivity. The modulation is especially obvious for dark stimuli, which might be useful for directing attention to hazardous situations such as dark holes, or shadows concealing important objects (Supplement 1: Video Abstract, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/WNR/A295). PMID:25055141

  1. Transgenic rice seeds accumulating recombinant hypoallergenic birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 generate giant protein bodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Kawakatsu, Taiji; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-06-01

    A versatile hypoallergenic allergen derivative against multiple allergens is an ideal tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Such a tolerogen should exhibit high efficacy, without side effects, when administered at high doses and should be applicable to several allergens. Tree pollen chimera 7 (TPC7), a hypoallergenic Bet v 1 tolerogen against birch pollen allergy, was previously selected by DNA shuffling of 14 types of Fagales tree pollen allergens. In this study, transgenic rice seed accumulating TPC7 was generated as an oral vaccine against birch pollen allergy by expressing this protein as a secretory protein using the N-terminal signal peptide and the C-terminal KDEL tag under the control of an endosperm-specific glutelin promoter. The highest level of TPC7 accumulation was approximately 207 µg grain(-1). Recombinant TPC7 is a glycoprotein with high mannose-type N-glycan, but without β1,2-xylose or α1,3-fucose, suggesting that TPC7 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). TPC7 is deposited as a novel, giant spherical ER-derived protein body, >20 µm in diameter, which is referred to as the TPC7 body. Removal of the KDEL retention signal or mutation of a cysteine residue resulted in an alteration of TPC7 body morphology, and deletion of the signal peptide prevented the accumulation of TPC7 in rice seeds. Therefore, the novel TPC7 bodies may have formed aggregates within the ER lumen, primarily due to the intrinsic physicochemical properties of the protein.

  2. Subunit Interactions at the V1-Vo Interface in Yeast Vacuolar ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Oot, Rebecca A.; Wilkens, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) is regulated by a reversible dissociation mechanism that involves breaking and reforming of protein-protein interactions at the interface of the V1-ATPase and Vo-proton channel domains. We found previously that the head domain of the single copy C subunit (Chead) binds one subunit EG heterodimer with high affinity (Oot, R.A. and Wilkens, S. (2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285, 24654–24664). Here we generated a water-soluble construct of the N-terminal domain of the Vo “a” subunit composed of amino acid residues 104–372 (aNT(104–372)). Analytical gel filtration chromatography and sedimentation velocity analysis revealed that aNT(104–372) undergoes reversible dimerization in a concentration-dependent manner. A low-resolution molecular envelope was calculated for the aNT(104–372) dimer using small angle x-ray scattering data. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed that aNT(104–372) binds the Cfoot and EG heterodimer with dissociation constants of 22 and 33 μm, respectively. We speculate that the spatial closeness of the aNT, Cfoot, and EG binding sites in the intact V-ATPase results in a high-avidity interaction that is able to resist the torque of rotational catalysis, and that reversible enzyme dissociation is initiated by breaking either the aNT(104–372)-Cfoot or aNT(104–372)-EG interaction by an as-yet unknown signaling mechanism. PMID:22367203

  3. Long-distance feedback projections to area V1: implications for multisensory integration, spatial awareness, and visual consciousness.

    PubMed

    Clavagnier, Simon; Falchier, Arnaud; Kennedy, Henry

    2004-06-01

    It is generally agreed that information flow through the cortex is constrained by a hierarchical architecture. Recent experimental evidence suggests that projections descending the hierarchy and targeting the primary visual cortex (area V1) may play an essential role in perceptual processes. We have, therefore, reexamined feedback projections to area V1, using retrograde tracer injections in this area In addition to well-known areas, quantification of labeling in higher cortical areas reveals a number of hitherto unknown long-distance feedback connections originating from auditory (A1), multisensory (STP) cortices, but also from a perirhinal area (36). These feedback projections from advanced cortical stations, a global feature shared by areas that belong to the ventral visual stream, could play an important role in early multisensory integration and spatial awareness and could provide the physical substrate for the involvement of area V1 in visual consciousness.

  4. A sodium channel knockin mutant (NaV1.4-R669H) mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Burns, Dennis K.; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F.; Struyk, Arie F.; Cannon, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an ion channelopathy of skeletal muscle characterized by attacks of muscle weakness associated with low serum K+. HypoPP results from a transient failure of muscle fiber excitability. Mutations in the genes encoding a calcium channel (CaV1.1) and a sodium channel (NaV1.4) have been identified in HypoPP families. Mutations of NaV1.4 give rise to a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders, with gain-of-function defects causing myotonia or hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. To address the question of specificity for the allele encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant as a cause of HypoPP and to produce a model system in which to characterize functional defects of the mutant channel and susceptibility to paralysis, we generated knockin mice carrying the ortholog of the gene encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant (referred to herein as R669H mice). Homozygous R669H mice had a robust HypoPP phenotype, with transient loss of muscle excitability and weakness in low-K+ challenge, insensitivity to high-K+ challenge, dominant inheritance, and absence of myotonia. Recovery was sensitive to the Na+/K+-ATPase pump inhibitor ouabain. Affected fibers had an anomalous inward current at hyperpolarized potentials, consistent with the proposal that a leaky gating pore in R669H channels triggers attacks, whereas a reduction in the amplitude of action potentials implies additional loss-of-function changes for the mutant NaV1.4 channels. PMID:21881211

  5. Memory-guided drawing training increases Granger causal influences from the perirhinal cortex to V1 in the blind.

    PubMed

    Cacciamani, Laura; Likova, Lora T

    2017-03-24

    The perirhinal cortex (PRC) is a medial temporal lobe structure that has been implicated in not only visual memory in the sighted, but also tactile memory in the blind (Cacciamani & Likova, 2016). It has been proposed that, in the blind, the PRC may contribute to modulation of tactile memory responses that emerge in low-level "visual" area V1 as a result of training-induced cortical reorganization (Likova, 2012; 2015). While some studies in the sighted have indicated that the PRC is indeed structurally and functionally connected to the visual cortex (Clavagnier, Falchier, & Kennedy, 2004; Peterson, Cacciamani, Barense, & Scalf, 2012), the PRC's direct modulation of V1 is unknown-particularly in those who lack the visual input that typically stimulates this region. In the present study, we tested Likova's PRC modulation hypothesis; specifically, we used fMRI to assess the PRC's Granger causal influence on V1 activation in the blind during a tactile memory task. To do so, we trained congenital and acquired blind participants on a unique memory-guided drawing technique previously shown to result in V1 reorganization towards tactile memory representations (Likova, 2012). The tasks (20s each) included: tactile exploration of raised line drawings of faces and objects, tactile memory retrieval via drawing, and a scribble motor/memory control. FMRI before and after a week of the Cognitive-Kinesthetic training on these tasks revealed a significant increase in PRC-to-V1 Granger causality from pre- to post-training during the memory drawing task, but not during the motor/memory control. This increase in causal connectivity indicates that the training strengthened the top-down modulation of visual cortex from the PRC. This is the first study to demonstrate enhanced directed functional connectivity from the PRC to the visual cortex in the blind, implicating the PRC as a potential source of the reorganization towards tactile representations that occurs in V1 in the blind brain

  6. Stabilized HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimers lacking the V1V2 domain, obtained by virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Bontjer, Ilja; Melchers, Mark; Eggink, Dirk; David, Kathryn; Moore, John P; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-11-19

    The envelope glycoproteins (Env) are the focus of HIV-1 vaccine development strategies based on the induction of humoral immunity, but the mechanisms the virus has evolved to limit the induction and binding of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) constitute substantial obstacles. Conserved neutralization epitopes are shielded by variable regions and carbohydrates, so one strategy to increase their exposure and, it is hoped, their immunogenicity is to delete the overlying variable loops. However, deleting the variable regions from Env trimers can be problematic, because hydrophobic patches that are normally solvent-inaccessible now become exposed, causing protein misfolding or aggregation, for example. Here, we describe the construction and characterization of recombinant gp140 trimers lacking variable domains 1 and 2 (ΔV1V2). The design of the trimers was guided by HIV-1 evolution studies that identified compensatory changes in V1V2-deleted but functional Env proteins (Bontjer, I., Land, A., Eggink, D., Verkade, E., Tuin, K., Baldwin, C., Pollakis, G., Paxton, W. A., Braakman, I., Berkhout, B., and Sanders, R. W. (2009) J. Virol. 83, 368-383). We now show that specific compensatory changes improved the function of ΔV1V2 Env proteins and hence HIV-1 replication. The changes acted by reducing the exposure of a hydrophobic surface either by replacing a hydrophobic residue with a hydrophilic one or by covering the surface with a glycan. The compensatory changes allowed the efficient expression of well folded, soluble gp140 trimers derived from various HIV-1 isolates. The evolved ΔV1V2 Env viruses were extremely sensitive to NAbs, indicating that neutralization epitopes are well exposed, which was confirmed by studies of NAb binding to the soluble ΔV1V2 gp140 trimers. These evolved ΔV1V2 trimers could be useful reagents for immunogenicity and structural studies.

  7. Stabilized HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers Lacking the V1V2 Domain, Obtained by Virus Evolution*

    PubMed Central

    Bontjer, Ilja; Melchers, Mark; Eggink, Dirk; David, Kathryn; Moore, John P.; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoproteins (Env) are the focus of HIV-1 vaccine development strategies based on the induction of humoral immunity, but the mechanisms the virus has evolved to limit the induction and binding of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) constitute substantial obstacles. Conserved neutralization epitopes are shielded by variable regions and carbohydrates, so one strategy to increase their exposure and, it is hoped, their immunogenicity is to delete the overlying variable loops. However, deleting the variable regions from Env trimers can be problematic, because hydrophobic patches that are normally solvent-inaccessible now become exposed, causing protein misfolding or aggregation, for example. Here, we describe the construction and characterization of recombinant gp140 trimers lacking variable domains 1 and 2 (ΔV1V2). The design of the trimers was guided by HIV-1 evolution studies that identified compensatory changes in V1V2-deleted but functional Env proteins (Bontjer, I., Land, A., Eggink, D., Verkade, E., Tuin, K., Baldwin, C., Pollakis, G., Paxton, W. A., Braakman, I., Berkhout, B., and Sanders, R. W. (2009) J. Virol. 83, 368–383). We now show that specific compensatory changes improved the function of ΔV1V2 Env proteins and hence HIV-1 replication. The changes acted by reducing the exposure of a hydrophobic surface either by replacing a hydrophobic residue with a hydrophilic one or by covering the surface with a glycan. The compensatory changes allowed the efficient expression of well folded, soluble gp140 trimers derived from various HIV-1 isolates. The evolved ΔV1V2 Env viruses were extremely sensitive to NAbs, indicating that neutralization epitopes are well exposed, which was confirmed by studies of NAb binding to the soluble ΔV1V2 gp140 trimers. These evolved ΔV1V2 trimers could be useful reagents for immunogenicity and structural studies. PMID:20826824

  8. Evidence that vasopressin V1b receptors mediate the transition to excessive drinking in ethanol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Scott; Guerrero, Miguel; Ghoneim, Ola M; Roberts, Edward; Koob, George F

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism is a devastating condition that represents a progression from initial alcohol use to dependence. Although most individuals are capable of consuming alcohol in a limited fashion, the development of alcohol dependence in a subset of individuals is often associated with negative emotional states (including anxiety and depression). Since the alleviation of this negative motivational state via excessive alcohol consumption often becomes a central goal of alcoholics, the transition from initial use to dependence is postulated to be associated with a transition from positive to negative reinforcement mechanisms. Vasopressin is a neuropeptide known to potentiate the effects of CRF on the HPA axis, and emerging evidence also suggests a role for centrally located vasopressin acting on V(1b) receptors in the regulation of stress- and anxiety-like behaviors in rodents. The present study determined state-dependent alterations in vasopressin/V(1b) R signaling in an animal model of ethanol dependence. The V(1b) R antagonist SSR149415 dose-dependently reduced excessive levels of ethanol self-administration observed in dependent animals without affecting the limited levels of ethanol drinking in non-dependent animals. Ethanol self-administration reduced V(1b) receptor levels in the basolateral amygdala of non-dependent animals, a neuroadaptation that could theoretically facilitate the positive reinforcing effects of alcohol. In contrast, V(1b) R levels were seemingly restored in ethanol-dependent rats, a switch that may in part underlie a transition from positive to negative reinforcement mechanisms with dependence. Together, our data suggest a key role for vasopressin/V(1b) R signaling in the transition to ethanol dependence.

  9. Cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 distribution in myocytes via interacting proteins: the multiple pool model.

    PubMed

    Shy, Diana; Gillet, Ludovic; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac sodium current (INa) is responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac cells, thus allowing for their contraction. It is also involved in regulating the duration of the cardiac action potential (AP) and propagation of the impulse throughout the myocardium. Cardiac INa is generated by the voltage-gated Na(+) channel, NaV1.5, a 2016-residue protein which forms the pore of the channel. Over the past years, hundreds of mutations in SCN5A, the human gene coding for NaV1.5, have been linked to many cardiac electrical disorders, including the congenital and acquired long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, conduction slowing, sick sinus syndrome, atrial fibrillation, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Similar to many membrane proteins, NaV1.5 has been found to be regulated by several interacting proteins. In some cases, these different proteins, which reside in distinct membrane compartments (i.e. lateral membrane vs. intercalated disks), have been shown to interact with the same regulatory domain of NaV1.5, thus suggesting that several pools of NaV1.5 channels may co-exist in cardiac cells. The aim of this review article is to summarize the recent works that demonstrate its interaction with regulatory proteins and illustrate the model that the sodium channel NaV1.5 resides in distinct and different pools in cardiac cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction.

  10. Genetic diversity of the highly variable V1 region interferes with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 envelope functionality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The HIV envelope (Env) promotes viral entry in the host cell. During this process, Env undergoes several conformational changes to ensure its function. At the same time, the gp120 component of Env is the protein of the virus presenting the largest genetic diversity. Understanding how the virus maintains the balance between the competing requirements for maintenance of functionality and antigenic variation of this protein is central for the comprehension of its strategies of evolution and can highlight vulnerable aspects of its replication cycle. We focused on the variable domains V1 and V2 of the HIV-1 gp120 that are involved in conformational changes and are critical for viral escape from antibody neutralization. Results Despite the extensive sequence diversity found in the epidemic for these regions and their location on the external face of the protein, we observed that replacing V1V2 of one primary isolate with that of another severely interferes with Env functionality in more than half of the cases studied. Similar results were obtained for intra- and intersubtype chimeras. These observations are indicative of an interference of genetic diversity in these regions with Env functionality. Therefore, despite the extensive sequence diversity that characterizes these regions in the epidemic, our results show that functional constraints seem to limit their genetic variation. Defects in the V1V2 chimeras were not relieved by the insertion of the V3 region from the same isolate, suggesting that the decrease in functionality is not due to perturbation of potential coevolution networks between V1V2 and V3. Within the V1V2 domain, the sequence of the hypervariable loop of the V1 domain seems to be crucial for the functionality of the protein. Conclusions Besides the well-documented role of V1V2 in the interplay with the immune response, this work shows that V1 is also involved in the selection of functional envelopes. By documenting a compromise between the

  11. Similar molecular determinants on Rem mediate two distinct modes of inhibition of CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Puckerin, Akil A.; Chang, Donald D.; Subramanyam, Prakash; Colecraft, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rad/Rem/Rem2/Gem (RGK) proteins are Ras-like GTPases that potently inhibit all high-voltage-gated calcium (CaV1/CaV2) channels and are, thus, well-positioned to tune diverse physiological processes. Understanding how RGK proteins inhibit CaV channels is important for perspectives on their (patho)physiological roles and could advance their development and use as genetically-encoded CaV channel blockers. We previously reported that Rem can block surface CaV1.2 channels in 2 independent ways that engage distinct components of the channel complex: (1) by binding auxiliary β subunits (β-binding-dependent inhibition, or BBD); and (2) by binding the pore-forming α1C subunit N-terminus (α1C-binding-dependent inhibition, or ABD). By contrast, Gem uses only the BBD mechanism to block CaV1.2. Rem molecular determinants required for BBD CaV1.2 inhibition are the distal C-terminus and the guanine nucleotide binding G-domain which interact with the plasma membrane and CaVβ, respectively. However, Rem determinants for ABD CaV1.2 inhibition are unknown. Here, combining fluorescence resonance energy transfer, electrophysiology, systematic truncations, and Rem/Gem chimeras we found that the same Rem distal C-terminus and G-domain also mediate ABD CaV1.2 inhibition, but with different interaction partners. Rem distal C-terminus interacts with α1C N-terminus to anchor the G-domain which likely interacts with an as-yet-unidentified site. In contrast to some previous studies, neither the C-terminus of Rem nor Gem was sufficient to inhibit CaV1/CaV2 channels. The results reveal that similar molecular determinants on Rem are repurposed to initiate 2 independent mechanisms of CaV1.2 inhibition. PMID:27115600

  12. Persistent modification of Na{sub v}1.9 following chronic exposure to insecticides and pyridostigmine bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, Thomas J. Cooper, Brian Y.

    2014-06-15

    Many veterans of the 1991 Gulf War (GW) returned from that conflict with a widespread chronic pain affecting deep tissues. Recently, we have shown that a 60 day exposure to the insecticides permethrin, chlorpyrifos, and pyridostigmine bromide (NTPB) had little influence on nociceptor action potential forming Na{sub v}1.8, but increased K{sub v}7 mediated inhibitory currents 8 weeks after treatment. Using the same exposure regimen, we used whole cell patch methods to examine whether the influences of NTPB could be observed on Na{sub v}1.9 expressed in muscle and vascular nociceptors. During a 60 day exposure to NTPB, rats exhibited lowered muscle pain thresholds and increased rest periods, but these measures subsequently returned to normal levels. Eight and 12 weeks after treatments ceased, DRG neurons were excised from the sensory ganglia. Whole cell patch studies revealed little change in voltage dependent activation and deactivation of Na{sub v}1.9, but significant increases in the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 were observed 8 weeks after exposure. Cellular studies, at the 8 week delay, revealed that NTPB also significantly prolonged action potential duration and afterhyperpolarization (22 °C). Acute application of permethrin (10 μM) also increased the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 in skin, muscle and vascular nociceptors. In conclusion, chronic exposure to Gulf War agents produced long term changes in the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 expressed in muscle and vascular nociceptors. The reported increases in K{sub v}7 amplitude may have been an adaptive response to increased Na{sub v}1.9, and effectively suppressed behavioral pain measures in the post treatment period. Factors that alter the balance between Na{sub v}1.9 and K{sub v}7 could release spontaneous discharge and produce chronic deep tissue pain. - Highlights: • Rats were treated 60 days with permethrin, chlorpyrifos and pyridostigmine bromide. • 8 weeks after treatments, Nav1.9 activation and deactivation were

  13. Developmental expression of Ca(v)1.3 (alpha1d) calcium channels in the mouse inner ear.

    PubMed

    Hafidi, A; Dulon, D

    2004-06-21

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for neurotransmission at the level of inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs). These channels open when mechanical stimulation depolarises the hair cell membrane and the resulting calcium influx triggers neurotransmitter release. Voltage-gated calcium channels expressed in hair cells are known to be of the L-type with a predominance of the Ca(v)1.3 subunit. The present study describes the developmental expression of the Ca(v)1.3 protein in the cochlea and the vestibular system using immunohistochemical technique. In the adult organ of Corti (OC), Ca(v)1.3 was localized in both sensory and non-sensory cells with a more intense expression in IHCs and Deiters cells when compared to OHCs. In both hair cell types, immunoreactivity was observed in the apical pole, basolateral membrane and at the basal pole (synaptic zone). Similar results were obtained in the vestibular organs. During development, Ca(v)1.3 immunoreactivity was observed in the cochlea as early as embryonic day 15, with expression increasing at birth. At these early stages of cochlear development, Ca(v)1.3 was expressed in all cell types surrounding the scala media. In the OC, the labeling was observed in IHCs, OHCs and supporting cells. The Ca(v)1.3 expression reached an adult-like pattern by the end of the second postnatal week. The present findings suggested that, in addition to their implication in hair cells synaptic transmission, Ca(v)1.3 calcium channels also play an important role in vesicle recycling and transport, as suggested by their extrasynaptic location at the apical pole of the hair cells. The Ca(v)1.3 channels in Deiters cells could participate in active calcium-induced changes in micromechanics of these supporting cells. An early expression during development suggested that these calcium channels are in addition important in the development of the cochlear and vestibular sensory epithelium.

  14. Astronomical component estimation (ACE v.1) by time-variant sinusoidal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnesael, Matthias; Zivanovic, Miroslav; De Vleeschouwer, David; Claeys, Philippe; Schoukens, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Accurately deciphering periodic variations in paleoclimate proxy signals is essential for cyclostratigraphy. Classical spectral analysis often relies on methods based on (fast) Fourier transformation. This technique has no unique solution separating variations in amplitude and frequency. This characteristic can make it difficult to correctly interpret a proxy's power spectrum or to accurately evaluate simultaneous changes in amplitude and frequency in evolutionary analyses. This drawback is circumvented by using a polynomial approach to estimate instantaneous amplitude and frequency in orbital components. This approach was proven useful to characterize audio signals (music and speech), which are non-stationary in nature. Paleoclimate proxy signals and audio signals share similar dynamics; the only difference is the frequency relationship between the different components. A harmonic-frequency relationship exists in audio signals, whereas this relation is non-harmonic in paleoclimate signals. However, this difference is irrelevant for the problem of separating simultaneous changes in amplitude and frequency. Using an approach with overlapping analysis frames, the model (Astronomical Component Estimation, version 1: ACE v.1) captures time variations of an orbital component by modulating a stationary sinusoid centered at its mean frequency, with a single polynomial. Hence, the parameters that determine the model are the mean frequency of the orbital component and the polynomial coefficients. The first parameter depends on geologic interpretations, whereas the latter are estimated by means of linear least-squares. As output, the model provides the orbital component waveform, either in the depth or time domain. Uncertainty analyses of the model estimates are performed using Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, it allows for a unique decomposition of the signal into its instantaneous amplitude and frequency. Frequency modulation patterns reconstruct changes in

  15. Sequence-conserved and antibody-accessible sites in the V1V2 domain of HIV-1 gp120 envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Shmelkov, Evgeny; Grigoryan, Arsen; Krachmarov, Chavdar; Abagyan, Ruben; Cardozo, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    The immune-correlates analysis of the RV144 trial suggested that epitopes targeted by protective antibodies (Abs) reside in the V1V2 domain of gp120. We mapped V1V2 positional sequence variation onto the conserved V1V2 structural fold and showed that while most of the solvent-accessible V1V2 amino acids vary between strains, there are two accessible molecular surface regions that are conserved and also naturally antigenic. These sites may contain epitopes targeted by broadly cross-reactive anti-V1V2 antibodies.

  16. Preliminary Results of the Ground/Orbiter Lasercomm Demonstration Experiment between Table Mountain and teh ETS-V1 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Lesh, J. R.; Araki, K.; Arimoto, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The Ground/Orbiter Lasercomm Demonstration (GOLD) is an optical communications demonstration between the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite (ETS-V1) and an optical ground transmitting and receiving station at the Table Mountain FAcility in Wrightwood California. Laser transmissions to the satellite are performed approximately four hours every third night when the satellite is at apogee above Table Mountain.

  17. A monoclonal antibody that targets a NaV1.7 channel voltage sensor for pain and itch relief

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Park, Chul-Kyu; Chen, Gang; Han, Qingjian; Xie, Rou-Gang; Liu, Tong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels control the upstroke of the action potentials in excitable cells. Multiple studies have shown distinct roles of NaV channel subtypes in human physiology and diseases, but subtype-specific therapeutics are lacking and the current efforts have been limited to small molecules. Here we present a monoclonal antibody that targets the voltage-sensor paddle of NaV1.7, the subtype critical for pain sensation. This antibody not only inhibits NaV1.7 with high selectivity but also effectively suppresses inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Interestingly, the antibody inhibits acute and chronic itch, despite well-documented differences in pain and itch modulation. Using this antibody, we discovered that NaV1.7 plays a key role in spinal cord nociceptive and pruriceptive synaptic transmission. Our studies reveal that NaV1.7 is a target for itch management and the antibody has therapeutic potential for suppressing pain and itch. Our antibody strategy may have broad applications for voltage-gated cation channels. PMID:24856969

  18. A monoclonal antibody that targets a NaV1.7 channel voltage sensor for pain and itch relief.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Park, Chul-Kyu; Chen, Gang; Han, Qingjian; Xie, Rou-Gang; Liu, Tong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2014-06-05

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels control the upstroke of the action potentials in excitable cells. Multiple studies have shown distinct roles of NaV channel subtypes in human physiology and diseases, but subtype-specific therapeutics are lacking and the current efforts have been limited to small molecules. Here, we present a monoclonal antibody that targets the voltage-sensor paddle of NaV1.7, the subtype critical for pain sensation. This antibody not only inhibits NaV1.7 with high selectivity, but also effectively suppresses inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice. Interestingly, the antibody inhibits acute and chronic itch despite well-documented differences in pain and itch modulation. Using this antibody, we discovered that NaV1.7 plays a key role in spinal cord nociceptive and pruriceptive synaptic transmission. Our studies reveal that NaV1.7 is a target for itch management, and the antibody has therapeutic potential for suppressing pain and itch. Our antibody strategy may have broad applications for voltage-gated cation channels.

  19. Functional Characterization of the Extra-Classical Receptive Field in Macaque V1: Contrast, Orientation, and Temporal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Christopher A.; Joshi, Siddhartha; Xing, Dajun; Shapley, Robert M.; Hawken, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex, V1, very often have extra-classical receptive fields (eCRFs). The eCRF is defined as the region of visual space where stimuli cannot elicit a spiking response but can modulate the response of a stimulus in the classical receptive field (CRF). We investigated the dependence of the eCRF on stimulus contrast and orientation in macaque V1 cells for which the laminar location was determined. The eCRF was more sensitive to contrast than the CRF across the whole population of V1 cells with the greatest contrast differential in layer 2/3. We confirmed that many V1 cells experience stronger suppression for collinear than orthogonal stimuli in the eCRF. Laminar analysis revealed that the predominant bias for collinear suppression was found in layers 2/3 and 4b. The laminar pattern of contrast and orientation dependence suggests that eCRF suppression may derive from different neural circuits in different layers, and may be comprised of two distinct components: orientation-tuned and untuned suppression. On average tuned suppression was delayed by about 25 milliseconds compared to the onset of untuned suppression. Therefore, response modulation by the eCRF develops dynamically and rapidly in time. PMID:23554504

  20. V1 and v2b interneurons secure the alternating flexor-extensor motor activity mice require for limbed locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingming; Lanuza, Guillermo M; Britz, Olivier; Wang, Zhi; Siembab, Valerie C; Zhang, Ying; Velasquez, Tomoko; Alvarez, Francisco J; Frank, Eric; Goulding, Martyn

    2014-04-02

    Reciprocal activation of flexor and extensor muscles constitutes the fundamental mechanism that tetrapod vertebrates use for locomotion and limb-driven reflex behaviors. This aspect of motor coordination is controlled by inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord; however, the identity of the spinal interneurons that serve this function is not known. Here, we show that the production of an alternating flexor-extensor motor rhythm depends on the composite activities of two classes of ventrally located inhibitory neurons, V1 and V2b interneurons (INs). Abrogating V1 and V2b IN-derived neurotransmission in the isolated spinal cord results in a synchronous pattern of L2 flexor-related and L5 extensor-related locomotor activity. Mice lacking V1 and V2b inhibition are unable to articulate their limb joints and display marked deficits in limb-driven reflex movements. Taken together, these findings identify V1- and V2b-derived neurons as the core interneuronal components of the limb central pattern generator (CPG) that coordinate flexor-extensor motor activity.

  1. Activity of NaV1.2 promotes neurodegeneration in an animal model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Walid; Engeland, Birgit; Liu, Yuanyuan; Lerche, Holger; Friese, Manuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Counteracting the progressive neurological disability caused by neuronal and axonal loss is the major unmet clinical need in multiple sclerosis therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying irreversible neuroaxonal degeneration in multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are not well understood. A long-standing hypothesis holds that the distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels along demyelinated axons contributes to neurodegeneration by increasing neuroaxonal sodium influx and energy demand during CNS inflammation. Here, we tested this hypothesis in vivo by inserting a human gain-of-function mutation in the mouse NaV1.2-encoding gene Scn2a that is known to increase NaV1.2-mediated persistent sodium currents. In mutant mice, CNS inflammation during EAE leads to elevated neuroaxonal degeneration and increased disability and lethality compared with wild-type littermate controls. Importantly, immune cell infiltrates were not different between mutant EAE mice and wild-type EAE mice. Thus, this study shows that increased neuronal NaV1.2 activity exacerbates inflammation-induced neurodegeneration irrespective of immune cell alterations and identifies NaV1.2 as a promising neuroprotective drug target in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27882351

  2. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed.

  3. Graded Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This ‘functional coupling’ facilitates Ca2+ influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca2+/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca2+]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for ‘molecular memory’. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca2+-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca2+ signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05608.001 PMID:25714924

  4. SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels mediates the early response to acute hypoxia in central neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D; Marks, Jeremy D; Goldstein, Steve AN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism for the earliest response of central neurons to hypoxia—an increase in voltage-gated sodium current (INa)—has been unknown. Here, we show that hypoxia activates the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) pathway in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) and that SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels increases INa. The time-course for SUMOylation of single NaV1.2 channels at the cell surface and changes in INa coincide, and both are prevented by mutation of NaV1.2-Lys38 or application of a deSUMOylating enzyme. Within 40 s, hypoxia-induced linkage of SUMO1 to the channels is complete, shifting the voltage-dependence of channel activation so that depolarizing steps evoke larger sodium currents. Given the recognized role of INa in hypoxic brain damage, the SUMO pathway and NaV1.2 are identified as potential targets for neuroprotective interventions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20054.001 PMID:28029095

  5. Occupational rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma caused by chicory and oral allergy syndrome associated with bet v 1-related protein.

    PubMed

    Pirson, F; Detry, B; Pilette, C

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a patient working in a factory producing inulin from chicory who developed rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma to the dust of dry chicory roots and oral allergy syndrome to raw fruits and vegetables. Nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness was diagnosed. A provocation test with dry chicory induced acute rhinoconjunctivitis and an immediate asthmatic response with no further clinical symptoms. Skin prick test results were positive to birch pollen and fresh/dry chicory, and negative for inulin. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E was > 100 kU(A)/L for rBet v 1. Specific IgE were detected by immunoblotting chicory extract with the patient's serum, but not with a control serum. The main immunoreactive band corresponded to a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 17 kDa, like Bet v 1, and this immunoreactivity was effectively inhibited by preincubating serum with purified Bet v 1. This case documents occupational rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma due to IgE sensitization to inhaled chicory allergens, including one identified for the first time as a 17-kD Bet v 1 homologous protein, with secondary oral allergy syndrome to related foods.

  6. Release of Bet v 1 from birch pollen from 5 European countries. Results from the HIALINE study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buters, Jeroen T. M.; Thibaudon, Michel; Smith, Matt; Kennedy, Roy; Rantio-Lehtimäki, Auli; Albertini, Roberto; Reese, Gerald; Weber, Bernhard; Galan, Carmen; Brandao, Rui; Antunes, Celia M.; Jäger, Siegfried; Berger, Uwe; Celenk, Sevcan; Grewling, Łukasz; Jackowiak, Bogdan; Sauliene, Ingrida; Weichenmeier, Ingrid; Pusch, Gudrun; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Behrendt, Heidrun; Prank, Marje; Sofiev, Mikhail; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Hialine Working Group

    2012-08-01

    Exposure to allergens is pivotal in determining sensitization and allergic symptoms in individuals. Pollen grain counts in ambient air have traditionally been assessed to estimate airborne allergen exposure. However, the exact allergen content of ambient air is unknown. We therefore monitored atmospheric concentrations of birch pollen grains and the matched major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 simultaneously across Europe within the EU-funded project HIALINE (Health Impacts of Airborne Allergen Information Network). Pollen count was assessed with Hirst type pollen traps at 10 l min-1 at sites in France, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and Finland. Allergen concentrations in ambient air were sampled at 800 l min-1 with a Chemvol® high-volume cascade impactor equipped with stages PM > 10 μm, 10 μm > PM > 2.5 μm, and in Germany also 2.5 μm > PM > 0.12 μm. The major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 was determined with an allergen specific ELISA. Bet v 1 isoform patterns were analyzed by 2D-SDS-PAGE blots and mass spectrometric identification. Basophil activation was tested in an FcɛR1-humanized rat basophil cell line passively sensitized with serum of a birch pollen symptomatic patient. Compared to 10 previous years, 2009 was a representative birch pollen season for all stations. About 90% of the allergen was found in the PM > 10 μm fraction at all stations. Bet v 1 isoforms pattern did not vary substantially neither during ripening of pollen nor between different geographical locations. The average European allergen release from birch pollen was 3.2 pg Bet v 1/pollen and did not vary much between the European countries. However, in all countries a >10-fold difference in daily allergen release per pollen was measured which could be explained by long-range transport of pollen with a deviating allergen release. Basophil activation by ambient air extracts correlated better with airborne allergen than with pollen concentration. Although Bet v 1 is a mixture of different

  7. Release of Bet v 1 from birch pollen from 5 European countries. Results from the HIALINE study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The HIALINE working Group; Buters, Jeroen T. M.; Thibaudon, Michel; Smith, Matt; Kennedy, Roy; Rantio-Lehtimäki, Auli; Albertini, Roberto; Reese, Gerald; Weber, Bernhard; Galan, Carmen; Brandao, Rui; Antunes, Celia M.; Jäger, Siegfried; Berger, Uwe; Celenk, Sevcan; Grewling, Łukasz; Jackowiak, Bogdan; Sauliene, Ingrida; Weichenmeier, Ingrid; Pusch, Gudrun; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Behrendt, Heidrun; Prank, Marje; Sofiev, Mikhail; Cecchi, Lorenzo

    2012-08-01

    Exposure to allergens is pivotal in determining sensitization and allergic symptoms in individuals. Pollen grain counts in ambient air have traditionally been assessed to estimate airborne allergen exposure. However, the exact allergen content of ambient air is unknown. We therefore monitored atmospheric concentrations of birch pollen grains and the matched major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 simultaneously across Europe within the EU-funded project HIALINE (Health Impacts of Airborne Allergen Information Network).Pollen count was assessed with Hirst type pollen traps at 10 l min-1 at sites in France, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and Finland. Allergen concentrations in ambient air were sampled at 800 l min-1 with a Chemvol® high-volume cascade impactor equipped with stages PM > 10 μm, 10 μm > PM > 2.5 μm, and in Germany also 2.5 μm > PM > 0.12 μm. The major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 was determined with an allergen specific ELISA. Bet v 1 isoform patterns were analyzed by 2D-SDS-PAGE blots and mass spectrometric identification. Basophil activation was tested in an FcɛR1-humanized rat basophil cell line passively sensitized with serum of a birch pollen symptomatic patient.Compared to 10 previous years, 2009 was a representative birch pollen season for all stations. About 90% of the allergen was found in the PM > 10 μm fraction at all stations. Bet v 1 isoforms pattern did not vary substantially neither during ripening of pollen nor between different geographical locations. The average European allergen release from birch pollen was 3.2 pg Bet v 1/pollen and did not vary much between the European countries. However, in all countries a >10-fold difference in daily allergen release per pollen was measured which could be explained by long-range transport of pollen with a deviating allergen release. Basophil activation by ambient air extracts correlated better with airborne allergen than with pollen concentration.Although Bet v 1 is a mixture of different

  8. Overexpression of NaV 1.6 channels is associated with the invasion capacity of human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Plata, Everardo; Ortiz, Cindy S; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Medina-Martinez, Ingrid; Alfaro, Ana; Berumen, Jaime; Rivera, Manuel; Gomora, Juan C

    2012-05-01

    Functional activity of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) has been associated to the invasion and metastasis behaviors of prostate, breast and some other types of cancer. We previously reported the functional expression of VGSC in primary cultures and biopsies derived from cervical cancer (CaC). Here, we investigate the relative expression levels of VGSC subunits and its possible role in CaC. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that mRNA levels of Na(V) 1.6 α-subunit in CaC samples were ∼40-fold higher than in noncancerous cervical (NCC) biopsies. A Na(V) 1.7 α-subunit variant also showed increased mRNA levels in CaC (∼20-fold). All four Na(V) β subunits were also detected in CaC samples, being Na(V) β1 the most abundant. Proteins of Na(V) 1.6 and Na(V) 1.7 α-subunits were immunolocalized in both NCC and CaC biopsies and in CaC primary cultures as well; however, although in NCC sections proteins were mainly relegated to the plasma membrane, in CaC biopsies and primary cultures the respective signal was stronger and widely distributed in both cytoplasm and plasma membrane. Functional activity of Na(V) 1.6 channels in the plasma membrane of CaC cells was confirmed by whole-cell patch-clamp experiments using Cn2, a Na(V) 1.6-specific toxin, which blocked ∼30% of the total sodium current. Blocking of sodium channels VGSC with tetrodotoxin and Cn2 did not affect proliferation neither migration, but reduced by ∼20% the invasiveness of CaC primary culture cells in vitro assays. We conclude that Na(V) 1.6 is upregulated in CaC and could serve as a novel molecular marker for the metastatic behavior of this carcinoma.

  9. Time-Dependent Effects of Arginine-Vasopressin V1 Receptor Inhibition on Secondary Brain Damage after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Sandro M; Trabold, Raimund; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2017-04-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) V1 receptors are known to mediate brain edema formation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). So far, however, AVP V1 receptors were only inhibited by genetic deletion or prior to trauma. Therefore, the current study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of AVP V1 receptor antagonization after TBI. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 7 per group) were subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), and 500 ng of a selective peptide V1 receptor antagonist (V1880) were applied by intracerebroventricular injection 5 min, and 1, 3, and 6 h thereafter. After 24 h, brain water content (BWC), intracranial pressure (ICP), and secondary contusion expansion volume were assessed. Neurological function was assessed daily for 7 days after trauma. Inhibition of AVP V1 receptors within 1 h after TBI significantly reduced BWC from 81.6 ± 0.7 to 80.6 ± 0.7% (mean ± SD; p < 0.05). Reduction of brain edema resulted in a significant decrease in ICP from 25.9 ± 1.8 mm Hg to 21.0 ± 1.5 mm Hg (p < 0.05) and a reduction in contusion volume (26.1 ± 2.5 mm(3) vs. 30.1 ± 2.0 mm(3) in controls; p < 0.05). This reduction of brain injury resulted in a significantly improved neurological function 7 days after trauma. Treatments initiated 6 h after TBI had no effect. The results of the current study demonstrate that inhibition of AVP V1 receptors improve outcome after experimental TBI when given within a clinically relevant time window. Therefore, AVP V1 receptors may represent a therapeutic target with clinical potential.

  10. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Martin; Leipolcf, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 µM) or low-intensity blue-light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8−/−), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and at higher concentrations progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure. PMID:26383867

  11. A Novel NaV1.5 Voltage Sensor Mutation Associated with Severe Atrial and Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Gang; Zhu, Wandi; Kanter, Ronald J.; Silva, Jonathan R.; Honeywell, Christina; Gow, Robert M.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited autosomal dominant mutations in cardiac sodium channels (NaV1.5) cause various arrhythmias, such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome. Although dozens of mutations throughout the protein have been reported, there are few reported mutations within a voltage sensor S4 transmembrane segment and few that are homozygous. Here we report analysis of a novel lidocaine-sensitive recessive mutation, p.R1309H, in the NaV1.5 DIII/S4 voltage sensor in a patient with a complex arrhythmia syndrome. Methods and Results We expressed the wild type or mutant NaV1.5 heterologously for analysis with the patch-clamp and voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) techniques. p.R1309H depolarized the voltage-dependence of activation, hyperpolarized the voltage-dependence of inactivation, and slowed recovery from inactivation, thereby reducing the channel availability at physiologic membrane potentials. Additionally, p.R1309H increased the “late” Na+ current. The location of the mutation in DIIIS4 prompted testing for a gating pore current. We observed an inward current at hyperpolarizing voltages that likely exacerbates the loss-of-function defects at resting membrane potentials. Lidocaine reduced the gating pore current. Conclusions The p.R1309H homozygous NaV1.5 mutation conferred both gain-of-function and loss-of-function effects on NaV1.5 channel activity. Reduction of a mutation-induced gating pore current by lidocaine suggested a therapeutic mechanism. PMID:26801742

  12. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    PubMed Central

    Di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liutkeviciute, Zita; Keov, Peter; Eder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan; Marek, Ales; Elbert, Tomas; Alewood, Paul F.; Gloriam, David E.; Gruber, Christian W.

    2017-01-01

    Characterisation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) relies on the availability of a toolbox of ligands that selectively modulate different functional states of the receptors. To uncover such molecules, we explored a unique strategy for ligand discovery that takes advantage of the evolutionary conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin/vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold binding selectivity for the human V1aR over the other three subtypes, OTR, V1bR and V2R. The Arg8/D-Arg8 ligand-pair was further investigated to gain novel insights into the oxytocin/vasopressin peptide-receptor interaction, which led to the identification of key residues of the receptors that are important for ligand functionality and selectivity. These observations could play an important role for development of oxytocin/vasopressin receptor modulators that would enable clear distinction of the physiological and pathological responses of the individual receptor subtypes. PMID:28145450

  13. Capping protein regulatory cycle driven by CARMIL and V-1 may promote actin network assembly at protruding edges.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-13

    Although capping protein (CP) terminates actin filament elongation, it promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly and accelerates actin-based motility both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, capping protein Arp2/3 myosin I linker (CARMIL) antagonizes CP by reducing its affinity for the barbed end and by uncapping CP-capped filaments, whereas the protein V-1/myotrophin sequesters CP in an inactive complex. Previous work showed that CARMIL can readily retrieve CP from the CP:V-1 complex, thereby converting inactive CP into a version with moderate affinity for the barbed end. Here we further clarify the mechanism of this exchange reaction, and we demonstrate that the CP:CARMIL complex created by complex exchange slows the rate of barbed-end elongation by rapidly associating with, and dissociating from, the barbed end. Importantly, the cellular concentrations of V-1 and CP determined here argue that most CP is sequestered by V-1 at steady state in vivo. Finally, we show that CARMIL is recruited to the plasma membrane and only at cell edges undergoing active protrusion. Assuming that CARMIL is active only at this location, our data argue that a large pool of freely diffusing, inactive CP (CP:V-1) feeds, via CARMIL-driven complex exchange, the formation of weak-capping complexes (CP:CARMIL) at the plasma membrane of protruding edges. In vivo, therefore, CARMIL should promote Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly at the leading edge by promoting barbed-end capping there.

  14. Capping protein regulatory cycle driven by CARMIL and V-1 may promote actin network assembly at protruding edges

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hammer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Although capping protein (CP) terminates actin filament elongation, it promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly and accelerates actin-based motility both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, capping protein Arp2/3 myosin I linker (CARMIL) antagonizes CP by reducing its affinity for the barbed end and by uncapping CP-capped filaments, whereas the protein V-1/myotrophin sequesters CP in an inactive complex. Previous work showed that CARMIL can readily retrieve CP from the CP:V-1 complex, thereby converting inactive CP into a version with moderate affinity for the barbed end. Here we further clarify the mechanism of this exchange reaction, and we demonstrate that the CP:CARMIL complex created by complex exchange slows the rate of barbed-end elongation by rapidly associating with, and dissociating from, the barbed end. Importantly, the cellular concentrations of V-1 and CP determined here argue that most CP is sequestered by V-1 at steady state in vivo. Finally, we show that CARMIL is recruited to the plasma membrane and only at cell edges undergoing active protrusion. Assuming that CARMIL is active only at this location, our data argue that a large pool of freely diffusing, inactive CP (CP:V-1) feeds, via CARMIL-driven complex exchange, the formation of weak-capping complexes (CP:CARMIL) at the plasma membrane of protruding edges. In vivo, therefore, CARMIL should promote Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly at the leading edge by promoting barbed-end capping there. PMID:24778263

  15. Paucity of horizontal connections for binocular vision in V1 of naturally strabismic macaques: Cytochrome oxidase compartment specificity.

    PubMed

    Tychsen, Lawrence; Wong, Agnes Ming-Fong; Burkhalter, Andreas

    2004-06-21

    To describe the structural basis for lack of binocular fusion in strabismic primates, we investigated intrinsic horizontal connections within striate cortex (area V1) of normal and strabismic, adult macaque monkeys. The strabismic animals had early-onset natural esotropia (the visual axes deviated nasally), normal visual acuity in each eye, and the constellation of ocular motor deficits that typify human infantile strabismus. Horizontal patchy connections and synaptic boutons were labeled by injections of the neuronal tracer biotinylated dextran amine. Ocular dominance columns (ODCs), and blob vs. interblob compartments, were revealed by using cytochrome oxidase (CO). In layers 2/3 and 4B of the strabismic monkeys, patchy projections and boutons terminated much more frequently in same-eye (73%) as opposed to opposite-eye (27%) ODCs (normal monkeys 58% and 42%, respectively). The deficiency of binocular connections in the strabismic cortex was evident qualitatively as a "skip" pattern, in which every other row of ODCs had labeled patches. Analysis of V1 in normal monkeys revealed that the deficits in strabismic V1 were due mainly to a loss of binocular connections between neurons in CO-interblob compartments. In both normal and strabismic monkeys: (1) CO-blob compartment neurons showed a more pronounced bias for monocular connectivity, and (2) commitment of connections to the same CO-compartment as the injection site (blob-to-blob, or interblob-to-interblob) was moderately strong (64%) but far from absolute. These findings help elucidate the relative roles of visual experience vs. innate mechanisms in the development of axonal connections between ocular dominance domains and compartments within macaque V1. They also provide the first detailed description of the V1 maldevelopments associated with unrepaired natural, infantile-onset strabismus in primates.

  16. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liutkeviciute, Zita; Keov, Peter; Eder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan; Marek, Ales; Elbert, Tomas; Alewood, Paul F.; Gloriam, David E.; Gruber, Christian W.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) relies on the availability of a toolbox of ligands that selectively modulate different functional states of the receptors. To uncover such molecules, we explored a unique strategy for ligand discovery that takes advantage of the evolutionary conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin/vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold binding selectivity for the human V1aR over the other three subtypes, OTR, V1bR and V2R. The Arg8/D-Arg8 ligand-pair was further investigated to gain novel insights into the oxytocin/vasopressin peptide-receptor interaction, which led to the identification of key residues of the receptors that are important for ligand functionality and selectivity. These observations could play an important role for development of oxytocin/vasopressin receptor modulators that would enable clear distinction of the physiological and pathological responses of the individual receptor subtypes.

  17. Theoretical analysis of the quantum contributions to the reactions H/sub 2/(v=1)+H. -->. H + H/sub 2/(v'=0,1) and H/sub 2/(v=1) + D. -->. H + HD(v'=0,1)

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.B.; Hayes, E.F.

    1983-03-31

    Detailed quantum-dynamical calculations on the Siegbahn-Liu-Truhlar-Horowitz (SLTH) surface reported for a rotating linear model (RLM) approximation with and without corrections for bending zero-point energy. These dynamical results predict that there are substantial prethreshold quantum contributions to state-selected cross sections and rate constants for both of the title reactions. However, the mechanisms for these prethreshold quantum effects are not the same. For H/sub 2/(v=1)+H, a threshold resonance is responsible for the large prethreshold quantum contribution: 65% of the total rate of 300K. For H/sub 2/(v=1)+D, tunneling is found to be large, leading to a 66% prethreshold quantum contribution at 300K. These large quantum corrections are not large enough to provide an explanation for the previously identified discrepancy between the experimental and classical theoretical rate constants for these reactions.

  18. 9 kV, 1 cm x 1 cm SiC Super GTO Technology Development For Pulse Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    capacitor C1, and inductor, L1. C1 consists of 60 Electronics Power Ring polypropylene capacitors . L1 is a single turn inductor providing a total circuit...Characteristics The schematic circuit diagram for turn measurements is shown in Figure 9 with a load resistor of 10 Ω and a capacitor of 3 µF...PiN diode, D1, with snubber capacitor and resistor, a CREE 6 kV, 0.25 cm 2 SiC PiN antiparallel diode, a series resonant circuit composed of

  19. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer.

  20. Sulfonamides as Selective NaV1.7 Inhibitors: Optimizing Potency and Pharmacokinetics While Mitigating Metabolic Liabilities.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Matthew M; Dineen, Thomas A; Marx, Isaac E; Altmann, Steven; Boezio, Alessandro A; Bregman, Howard; Chu-Moyer, Margaret Y; DiMauro, Erin F; Feric Bojic, Elma; Foti, Robert S; Gao, Hua; Graceffa, Russell F; Gunaydin, Hakan; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Huang, Hongbing; Huang, Liyue; Jarosh, Michael; Kornecook, Thomas; Kreiman, Charles R; Ligutti, Joseph; La, Daniel S; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Liu, Dong; Moyer, Bryan D; Nguyen, Hanh Nho; Peterson, Emily A; Rose, Paul E; Taborn, Kristin; Youngblood, Beth D; Yu, Violeta L; Fremeau, Robert T

    2017-03-13

    Several reports have recently emerged regarding the identification of heteroarylsulfonamides as NaV1.7 inhibitors that demonstrate high levels of selectivity over other NaV isoforms. The optimization of a series of internal NaV1.7 leads that address a number of metabolic liabilities including bioactivation, PXR activation, as well as CYP3A4 induction and inhibition led to the identification of potent and selective inhibitors that demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic profiles and were devoid of the aforementioned liabilities. Key to achieving this within a series prone to transporter-mediated clearance was the identification of a small range of optimal cLogD values and the discovery of subtle PXR SAR that was not lipophilicity-dependent. This enabled the identification of compound 20 which was advanced into a target engagement pharmacodynamic model where it exhibited robust reversal of histamine-induced scratching bouts in mice.

  1. DCPT v1.0 - New particle tracker for modeling transport in dual-continuum - User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Liu, Hui Hai; Cushey, Mark; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2001-04-01

    DCPT (Dual-Continuum Particle Tracker) V1.0 is a new software for simulating solute transport in the subsurface. It is based on the random-walk method for modeling transport processes such as advection, dispersion/diffusion, linear sorption, radioactive decay, and fracture-matrix mass exchange (in fractured porous media). The user shall provide flow-field and other parameters in the form of input files. In Comparison to several analytical and numerical solutions for a number of test cases, DCPT shows excellent performance in both accuracy and efficiency. This report serves as a user's manual of DCPT V1.0. It includes theoretical basis, numerical methods, software structure, input/output description, and examples.

  2. Morphological Substrates for Parallel Streams of Corticogeniculate Feedback Originating in Both V1 and V2 of the Macaque Monkey.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Farran; Kiley, Caitlin W; Callaway, Edward M; Usrey, W Martin

    2016-04-20

    Corticothalamic circuits are essential for reciprocal information exchange between the thalamus and cerebral cortex. Nevertheless, the role of corticothalamic circuits in sensory processing remains a mystery. In the visual system, afferents from retina to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and from LGN to primary visual cortex (V1) are organized into functionally distinct parallel processing streams. Physiological evidence suggests corticogeniculate feedback may be organized into parallel streams; however, little is known about the diversity of corticogeniculate neurons, their local computations, or the structure-function relationship among corticogeniculate neurons. We used a virus-mediated approach to label and reconstruct the complete dendritic and local axonal arbors of identified corticogeniculate neurons in the macaque monkey. Our results reveal morphological substrates for parallel streams of corticogeniculate feedback based on distinct classes of neurons in V1 and V2. These results support the hypothesis that distinct populations of feedback neurons provide independent and unique information to the LGN.

  3. Treatment of Na(v)1.7-mediated pain in inherited erythromelalgia using a novel sodium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Yigal Paul; Price, Nicola; Namdari, Rostam; Cohen, Charles Jay; Lamers, Mieke H; Winters, Conrad; Price, James; Young, Clint E; Verschoof, Henry; Sherrington, Robin; Pimstone, Simon Neil; Hayden, Michael Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN9A gene leading to deficiency of its protein product, Na(v)1.7, cause congenital indifference to pain (CIP). CIP is characterized by the absence of the ability to sense pain associated with noxious stimuli. In contrast, the opposite phenotype to CIP, inherited erythromelalgia (IEM), is a disorder of spontaneous pain caused by missense mutations resulting in gain-of-function in Na(v)1.7 that promote neuronal hyperexcitability. The primary aim of this study was to demonstrate that Na(v)1.7 antagonism could alleviate the pain of IEM, thereby demonstrating the utility of this opposite phenotype model as a tool for rapid proof-of-concept for novel analgesics. An exploratory, randomized, double-blind, 2-period crossover study was conducted in 4 SCN9A mutation-proven IEM patients. In each treatment period (2days), separated by a 2-day washout period, patients were orally administered XEN402 (400mg twice daily) or matching placebo. In 3 patients, pain was induced by heat or exercise during each treatment arm. A fourth patient, in constant severe pain, required no induction. Patient-reported outcomes of pain intensity and/or relief were recorded, and the time taken to induce pain was measured. The ability to induce pain in IEM patients was significantly attenuated by XEN402 compared with placebo. XEN402 increased the time to maximal pain induction and significantly reduced the amount of pain (42% less) after induction (P=.014). This pilot study showed that XEN402 blocks Na(v)1.7-mediated pain associated with IEM, thereby demonstrating target engagement in humans and underscoring the use of rare genetic disorders with mutant target channels as a novel approach to rapid proof-of-concept.

  4. Diagnostical mistakes in ablation procedures associated with a high placement of the leads V1-V3.

    PubMed

    Longo, Damián; Poliserpi, Claudio; Toscano Quilon, Francisco; Díaz Uberti, Pedro; López, Carlos; García-Niebla, Javier; Ramella, Irma

    2017-02-20

    The misplacement of electrodes for surface electrocardiogram (ECG) recording that we use daily as a reference for mapping precise locations in invasive procedures may, besides inducing diagnostical mistakes, greatly increase the duration of the procedure and making more feasible the incidence of complications, especially in ablation of arrhythmic substrates of ventricular outflow tracts such as premature ventricular contractions (PVC's) and accessory pathways, if the right precordial electrodes (V1-V3) are higher positioned.

  5. An internally consistent dataset of δ13C-DIC in the North Atlantic Ocean - NAC13v1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Meike; Andersen, Nils; Erlenkeuser, Helmut; Humphreys, Matthew P.; Tanhua, Toste; Körtzinger, Arne

    2016-10-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) can be used to quantify fluxes within the carbon system. For example, knowing the δ13C signature of the inorganic carbon pool can help in describing the amount of anthropogenic carbon in the water column. The measurements can also be used for evaluating modeled carbon fluxes, for making basin-wide estimates of anthropogenic carbon, and for studying seasonal and interannual variability or decadal trends in interior ocean biogeochemistry. For all these purposes, it is not only important to have a sufficient amount of data, but these data must also be internally consistent and of high quality. In this study, we present a δ13C-DIC dataset for the North Atlantic which has undergone secondary quality control. The data originate from oceanographic research cruises between 1981 and 2014. During a primary quality control step based on simple range tests, obviously bad data were flagged. In a second quality control step, biases between measurements from different cruises were quantified through a crossover analysis using nearby data of the respective cruises, and values of biased cruises were adjusted in the data product. The crossover analysis was possible for 24 of the 32 cruises in our dataset, and adjustments were applied to 11 cruises. The internal accuracy of this dataset is 0.017 ‰. The dataset is available via the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at v1.html" target="_blank">http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/ndp_096/NAC13v1.html, v1" target="_blank">doi:10.3334/CDIAC/OTG.NAC13v1.

  6. Contrast-Dependence of Surround Suppression in Macaque V1: Experimental Testing of a Recurrent Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, Lars; Ichida, Jennifer M.; Shushruth, S.; Mangapathy, Pradeep; Angelucci, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal responses in primary visual cortex (V1) to optimally oriented high-contrast stimuli in the receptive field (RF) center are suppressed by stimuli in the RF surround, but can be facilitated when the RF center is stimulated at low contrast. The neural circuits and mechanisms for surround modulation are still unknown. We previously proposed that topdown feedback connections mediate suppression from the “far” surround, while “near” surround suppression is mediated primarily by horizontal connections. We implemented this idea in a recurrent network model of V1. A model assumption needed to account for the contrast-dependent sign of surround modulation is a response asymmetry between excitation and inhibition; accordingly, inhibition, but not excitation, is silent for weak visual inputs to the RF center, and surround stimulation can evoke facilitation. A prediction stemming from this same assumption is that surround suppression is weaker for low than for high contrast stimuli in the RF center. Previous studies are inconsistent with this prediction. Using single unit recordings in macaque V1, we confirm this model's prediction. Model simulations demonstrate that our results can be reconciled with those from previous studies. We also performed a systematic comparison of the experimentally-measured surround suppression strength with predictions of the model operated in different parameter regimes. We find that the original model, with strong horizontal and no feedback excitation of local inhibitory neurons, can only partially account quantitatively for the experimentally-measured suppression. Strong direct feedback excitation of V1 inhibitory neurons is necessary to account for the experimentally-measured surround suppression strength. PMID:20079853

  7. The impact of nitration on the structure and immunogenicity of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101.

    PubMed

    Ackaert, Chloé; Kofler, Stefan; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta; Zulehner, Nora; Asam, Claudia; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Fuchs, Julian E; Briza, Peter; Liedl, Klaus R; Bohle, Barbara; Ferreira, Fátima; Brandstetter, Hans; Oostingh, Gertie J; Duschl, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Allergy prevalence has increased in industrialized countries. One contributing factor could be pollution, which can cause nitration of allergens exogenously (in the air) or endogenously (in inflamed lung tissue). We investigated the impact of nitration on both the structural and immunological behavior of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101 to determine whether nitration might be a factor in the increased incidence of allergy. Bet v 1.0101 was nitrated with tetranitromethane. Immune effects were assessed by measuring the proliferation of specific T-cell lines (TCLs) upon stimulation with different concentrations of nitrated and unmodified allergen, and by measurement of cytokine release of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and primary DCs (primDCs) stimulated with nitrated versus unmodified allergen. HPLC-MS, crystallography, gel electrophoresis, amino acid analysis, size exclusion chromatography and molecular dynamics simulation were performed to characterize structural changes after nitration of the allergen. The proliferation of specific TCLs was higher upon stimulation with the nitrated allergen in comparison to the unmodified allergen. An important structural consequence of nitration was oligomerization. Moreover, analysis of the crystal structure of nitrated Bet v 1.0101 showed that amino acid residue Y83, located in the hydrophobic cavity, was nitrated to 100%. Both moDCs and primDCs showed decreased production of TH1-priming cytokines, thus favoring a TH2 response. These results implicate that nitration of Bet v 1.0101 might be a contributing factor to the observed increase in birch pollen allergy, and emphasize the importance of protein modifications in understanding the molecular basis of allergenicity.

  8. Down-regulation of an ankyrin repeat-containing protein, V-1, during skeletal muscle differentiation and its re-expression in the regenerative process of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yuko; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Yamakuni, Tohru; Ishida, Yukisato; Kato, Chieko; Ogashiwa, Masayo; Kobayashi, Masumi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Nonaka, Ikuya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Song, Si Young

    2003-01-01

    Using Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical methods, we examined the expression of V-1, a member of the ankyrin repeat-containing protein family, during differentiation and regeneration of skeletal muscle. The expression of V-1 was high in cultured myoblasts and decreased during their differentiation into myotubes, while high expression was maintained when muscle differentiation was inhibited by treatment with basic fibroblast growth factor. Down-regulation of V-1 also occurred during in vivo muscle differentiation from embryonic to postnatal stages, reaching an undetectable level in mature skeletal muscle. In contrast, strong V-1 immunoreactivity was detected again in myoblasts and regenerating muscle fibers with a small diameter, which were observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its animal model, mdx mouse. Thus, it seems that V-1 is a good marker for early stage of muscle regeneration and changes of its expression suggest that V-1 plays a role in prenatal muscle differentiation and postnatal muscle regeneration.

  9. Early Posttransplant Isolated v1 Lesion Does Not Need to Be Treated and Does Not Lead to Increased Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Thajudeen, Bijin; Sussman, Amy; Madhrira, Machaiah; Bracamonte, Erika; Popovtzer, Mordecai; Kadambi, Pradeep V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute vascular rejection (AVR) is characterized by intimal arteritis in addition to tubulitis and interstitial inflammation. It is associated with a poorer prognosis compared to tubulointerstitial rejection (AIR) and AVR is associated with a higher rate of graft loss than AIR. The prognosis and treatment of arteritis without tubulitis and interstitial inflammation (isolated v1 lesion) are still controversial. We report a case of a patient who had a biopsy of the kidney allograft for evaluation of slow graft function. The biopsy revealed an isolated v1 lesion. However, we chose not to augment immunosuppression. The patient's kidney allograft function improved over time with close monitoring. Repeat biopsy a year later showed no evidence of endothelialitis and relatively unchanged fibrosis and no other abnormalities. Although it is suggested that most cases of isolated v1 lesions will respond to corticosteroids or T cell depleting therapies, some cases will improve with conservative management. Further studies are needed to determine which cases could be managed conservatively. PMID:27293950

  10. Role of versican V0/V1 and CD44 in the regulation of human melanoma cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Daniel; Miquel-Serra, Laia; Docampo, Maria José; Marco-Ramell, Anna; Bassols, Anna

    2011-02-01

    Versican is a hyaluronan-binding, large extracellular matrix chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan whose expression is increased in malignant melanoma. Binding to hyaluronan allows versican to indirectly interact with the hyaluronan cell surface receptor CD44. The aim of this work was to study the effect of silencing the large versican isoforms (V0 and V1) and CD44 in the SK-mel-131 human melanoma cell line. Versican V0/V1 or CD44 silencing caused a decrease in cell proliferation and migration, both in wound healing assays and in Transwell chambers. Versican V0/V1 silencing also caused an increased adhesion to type I collagen, laminin and fibronectin. These results support the proposed role of versican as a proliferative, anti-adhesive and pro-migratory molecule. On the other hand, CD44 silencing caused a decrease in cell adhesion to vitronectin, fibronectin and hyaluronan. CD44 silencing inhibited the binding of a FITC-hyaluronan complex to the cell surface and its internalization into the cytoplasm. Our results indicate that both versican and CD44 play an important role regulating the behavior of malignant melanoma cells.

  11. A single structurally conserved SUMOylation site in CRMP2 controls NaV1.7 function.

    PubMed

    Dustrude, Erik Thomas; Perez-Miller, Samantha; François-Moutal, Liberty; Moutal, Aubin; Khanna, May; Khanna, Rajesh

    2017-02-28

    The neuronal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) undergoes several posttranslational modifications that codify its functions. Most recently, CRMP2 SUMOylation (addition of small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO)) was identified as a key regulatory step within a modification program that codes for CRMP2 interaction with, and trafficking of, voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7. In this addendum, we illustrate the utility of combining sequence alignment within protein families with structural analysis to identify, from a number of putative SUMOylation sites, those that are most likely to be biologically relevant. Co-opting this principle to CRMP2, we demonstrate that, of three sites predicted to be SUMOylated in CRMP2, only the lysine 374 site is a SUMOylation client. A reduction in NaV1.7 currents was the corollary of the loss of CRMP2 SUMOylation at this site. A 1.78-Å-resolution crystal structure of mouse CRMP2 was solved using X-ray crystallography, revealing lysine 374 as buried within the CRMP2 tetramer interface but exposed in the monomer. Since CRMP2 SUMOylation is dependent on phosphorylation, we postulate that this state forces CRMP2 towards a monomer, exposing the SUMO site and consequently, resulting in constitutive regulation of NaV1.7.

  12. Parallel processing of face and house stimuli by V1 and specialized visual areas: a magnetoencephalographic (MEG) study

    PubMed Central

    Shigihara, Yoshihito; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    We used easily distinguishable stimuli of faces and houses constituted from straight lines, with the aim of learning whether they activate V1 on the one hand, and the specialized areas that are critical for the processing of faces and houses on the other, with similar latencies. Eighteen subjects took part in the experiment, which used magnetoencephalography (MEG) coupled to analytical methods to detect the time course of the earliest responses which these stimuli provoke in these cortical areas. Both categories of stimuli activated V1 and areas of the visual cortex outside it at around 40 ms after stimulus onset, and the amplitude elicited by face stimuli was significantly larger than that elicited by house stimuli. These results suggest that “low-level” and “high-level” features of form stimuli are processed in parallel by V1 and visual areas outside it. Taken together with our previous results on the processing of simple geometric forms (Shgihara and Zeki, 2013; Shigihara and Zeki, 2014), the present ones reinforce the conclusion that parallel processing is an important component in the strategy used by the brain to process and construct forms. PMID:25426050

  13. Characterization of 2 genetic variants of Na(v) 1.5-arginine 689 found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Jousset, Florian; Kucera, Jan P; Shestak, Anna; Makarov, Leonid M; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-09-01

    Hundreds of genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene coding for the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Na(v) 1.5, have been described in patients with cardiac channelopathies as well as in individuals from control cohorts. The aim of this study was to characterize the biophysical properties of 2 naturally occurring Na(v) 1.5 variants, p.R689H and p.R689C, found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and in control individuals. In addition, this study was motivated by the finding of the variant p.R689H in a family with sudden cardiac death (SCD) in children. When expressed in HEK293 cells, most of the sodium current (I(Na)) biophysical properties of both variants were indistinguishable from the wild-type (WT) channels. In both cases, however, an ∼2-fold increase of the tetrodotoxin-sensitive late I(Na) was observed. Action potential simulations and reconstruction of pseudo-ECGs demonstrated that such a subtle increase in the late I(Na) may prolong the QT interval in a nonlinear fashion. In conclusion, despite the fact that the causality link between p.R689H and the phenotype of the studied family cannot be demonstrated, this study supports the notion that subtle alterations of Na(v) 1.5 variants may increase the risk for cardiac arrhythmias.

  14. Uncovering the Spatial Profile of Contour Integration from Fixational Saccades: Evidence for Widespread Processing in V1.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Ariel; Oz, Roy; Slovin, Hamutal

    2016-10-05

    During contour integration, neuronal populations in the primary visual cortex (V1) enhance their responses to the contour while suppressing their responses to the noisy background. However, the spatial extent and profile of these responses are not fully understood. To investigate this question, 2 monkeys were trained on a contour detection task while we measured population responses in V1 using voltage-sensitive dyes. During stimulus presentation the animals made few fixational saccades, and we used their changing gaze position to image and analyze neuronal responses from large part of the stimulus, encoding multiple contour/background elements. We found that contour enhancement was present over the entire contour-mapped areas. The background suppression increased with distance from the contour, extending into background-mapped areas remotely located from the contour. The spatial profile of enhancement and suppression fitted well with a Gaussian model. These results imply that the divergent cortical responses to contour integration are modulated independently and extend over large areas in V1.

  15. Callosally projecting neurons in the macaque monkey V1/V2 border are enriched in nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Ungerleider, L. G.; Adams, M. M.; Webster, M. J.; Gattass, R.; Blumberg, D. M.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies combined with retrograde tracing in macaque monkeys have demonstrated that corticocortical projections can be differentiated by their content of neurofilament protein. The present study analyzed the distribution of nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein in callosally projecting neurons located at the V1/V2 border. All of the retrogradely labeled neurons were located in layer III at the V1/V2 border and at an immediately adjacent zone of area V2. A quantitative analysis showed that the vast majority (almost 95%) of these interhemispheric projection neurons contain neurofilament protein immunoreactivity. This observation differs from data obtained in other sets of callosal connections, including homotypical interhemispheric projections in the prefrontal, temporal, and parietal association cortices, that were found to contain uniformly low proportions of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons. Comparably, highly variable proportions of neurofilament protein-containing neurons have been reported in intrahemispheric corticocortical pathways, including feedforward and feedback visual connections. These results indicate that neurofilament protein is a prominent neurochemical feature that identifies a particular population of interhemispheric projection neurons at the V1/V2 border and suggest that this biochemical attribute may be critical for the function of this subset of callosal neurons.

  16. Identification of an axonal determinant in the C-terminus of the sodium channel Na(v)1.2.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J J; Fernandes, F; Giraud, P; Mouret, I; Pasqualini, E; Fache, M P; Jullien, F; Dargent, B

    2001-11-01

    To obtain a better understanding of how hippocampal neurons selectively target proteins to axons, we assessed whether any of the large cytoplasmic regions of neuronal sodium channel Na(v)1.2 contain sufficient information for axonal compartmentalization. We show that addition of the cytoplasmic C-terminal region of Na(v)1.2 restricted the distribution of a dendritic-axonal reporter protein to axons. The analysis of mutants revealed that a critical segment of nine amino acids encompassing a di-leucine-based motif mediates axonal compartmentalization of chimera. In addition, the Na(v)1.2 C-terminus is recognized by the clathrin endocytic pathway both in non-neuronal cells and the somatodendritic domain of hippocampal neurons. The mutation of the di-leucine motif located within the nine amino acid sequence to alanines resulted in the loss of chimera compartmentalization in axons and of internalization. These data suggest that selective elimination by endocytosis in dendrites may account for the compartmentalized distribution of some proteins in axons.

  17. STAC3 stably interacts through its C1 domain with CaV1.1 in skeletal muscle triads

    PubMed Central

    Campiglio, Marta; Flucher, Bernhard E.

    2017-01-01

    The adaptor protein STAC3 is essential for skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and a mutation in the STAC3 gene has been linked to a severe muscle disease, Native American myopathy (NAM). However the function of STAC3, its interaction partner, and the mode of interaction within the EC-coupling complex remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that STAC3 forms a stable interaction with the voltage-sensor of EC-coupling, CaV1.1, and that this interaction depends on a hitherto unidentified protein-protein binding pocket in the C1 domain of STAC3. While the NAM mutation does not affect the stability of the STAC3-CaV1.1 interaction, mutation of two crucial residues in the C1 binding pocket increases the turnover of STAC3 in skeletal muscle triads. Thus, the C1 domain of STAC3 is responsible for its stable incorporation into the CaV1.1 complex, whereas the SH3 domain containing the NAM mutation site may be involved in low-affinity functional interactions in EC-coupling. PMID:28112192

  18. Spatial and temporal characteristics of V1 microstimulation during chronic implantation of a microelectrode array in a behaving macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. S.; Parker, R. A.; House, P. A.; Bagley, E.; Wendelken, S.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2012-12-01

    Objective. It has been hypothesized that a vision prosthesis capable of evoking useful visual percepts can be based upon electrically stimulating the primary visual cortex (V1) of a blind human subject via penetrating microelectrode arrays. As a continuation of earlier work, we examined several spatial and temporal characteristics of V1 microstimulation. Approach. An array of 100 penetrating microelectrodes was chronically implanted in V1 of a behaving macaque monkey. Microstimulation thresholds were measured using a two-alternative forced choice detection task. Relative locations of electrically-evoked percepts were measured using a memory saccade-to-target task. Main results. The principal finding was that two years after implantation we were able to evoke behavioural responses to electric stimulation across the spatial extent of the array using groups of contiguous electrodes. Consistent responses to stimulation were evoked at an average threshold current per electrode of 204 ± 49 µA (mean ± std) for groups of four electrodes and 91 ± 25 µA for groups of nine electrodes. Saccades to electrically-evoked percepts using groups of nine electrodes showed that the animal could discriminate spatially distinct percepts with groups having an average separation of 1.6 ± 0.3 mm (mean ± std) in cortex and 1.0° ± 0.2° in visual space. Significance. These results demonstrate chronic perceptual functionality and provide evidence for the feasibility of a cortically-based vision prosthesis for the blind using penetrating microelectrodes.

  19. Analgesic Effects of GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 in a Mouse Model of NaV1.7-Mediated Pain.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Wingerd, Joshua S; Winter, Zoltan; Durek, Thomas; Dekan, Zoltan; Sousa, Silmara R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Hoffmann, Tali; Weidner, Christian; Nassar, Mohammed A; Alewood, Paul F; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2016-03-17

    Loss-of-function mutations of Na(V)1.7 lead to congenital insensitivity to pain, a rare condition resulting in individuals who are otherwise normal except for the inability to sense pain, making pharmacological inhibition of Na(V)1.7 a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain. We characterized a novel mouse model of Na(V)1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of the scorpion toxin OD1, which is suitable for rapid in vivo profiling of Na(V)1.7 inhibitors. Intraplantar injection of OD1 caused spontaneous pain behaviors, which were reversed by co-injection with Na(V)1.7 inhibitors and significantly reduced in Na(V)1.7(-/-) mice. To validate the use of the model for profiling Na(V)1.7 inhibitors, we determined the Na(V) selectivity and tested the efficacy of the reported Na(V)1.7 inhibitors GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 (raxatrigine). GpTx-1 selectively inhibited Na(V)1.7 and was effective when co-administered with OD1, but lacked efficacy when delivered systemically. PF-04856264 state-dependently and selectively inhibited Na(V)1.7 and significantly reduced OD1-induced spontaneous pain when delivered locally and systemically. CNV1014802 state-dependently, but non-selectively, inhibited Na(V) channels and was only effective in the OD1 model when delivered systemically. Our novel model of Na(V)1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of OD1 is thus suitable for the rapid in vivo characterization of the analgesic efficacy of Na(V)1.7 inhibitors.

  20. Analgesic Effects of GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 in a Mouse Model of NaV1.7-Mediated Pain

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R.; Wingerd, Joshua S.; Winter, Zoltan; Durek, Thomas; Dekan, Zoltan; Sousa, Silmara R.; Zimmermann, Katharina; Hoffmann, Tali; Weidner, Christian; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Alewood, Paul F.; Lewis, Richard J.; Vetter, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of NaV1.7 lead to congenital insensitivity to pain, a rare condition resulting in individuals who are otherwise normal except for the inability to sense pain, making pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.7 a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain. We characterized a novel mouse model of NaV1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of the scorpion toxin OD1, which is suitable for rapid in vivo profiling of NaV1.7 inhibitors. Intraplantar injection of OD1 caused spontaneous pain behaviors, which were reversed by co-injection with NaV1.7 inhibitors and significantly reduced in NaV1.7−/− mice. To validate the use of the model for profiling NaV1.7 inhibitors, we determined the NaV selectivity and tested the efficacy of the reported NaV1.7 inhibitors GpTx-1, PF-04856264 and CNV1014802 (raxatrigine). GpTx-1 selectively inhibited NaV1.7 and was effective when co-administered with OD1, but lacked efficacy when delivered systemically. PF-04856264 state-dependently and selectively inhibited NaV1.7 and significantly reduced OD1-induced spontaneous pain when delivered locally and systemically. CNV1014802 state-dependently, but non-selectively, inhibited NaV channels and was only effective in the OD1 model when delivered systemically. Our novel model of NaV1.7-mediated pain based on intraplantar injection of OD1 is thus suitable for the rapid in vivo characterization of the analgesic efficacy of NaV1.7 inhibitors. PMID:26999206

  1. The voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ (CaV1.2) channel C-terminus fragment is a bi-modal vasodilator.

    PubMed

    Bannister, John P; Leo, Marie Dennis; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Nair, Anitha; Evanson, Kirk W; Pachuau, Judith; Gabrick, Kyle S; Boop, Frederick A; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2013-06-15

    Voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.2) are the primary Ca(2+) entry pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (myocytes). CaV1.2 channels control systemic blood pressure and organ blood flow and are pathologically altered in vascular diseases, which modifies vessel contractility. The CaV1.2 distal C-terminus is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage, which yields a truncated CaV1.2 subunit and a cleaved C-terminal fragment (CCt). Previous studies in cardiac myocytes and neurons have identified CCt as both a transcription factor and CaV1.2 channel inhibitor, with different signalling mechanisms proposed to underlie some of these effects. CCt existence and physiological functions in arterial myocytes are unclear, but important to study given the functional significance of CaV1.2 channels. Here, we show that CCt exists in myocytes of both rat and human resistance-size cerebral arteries, where it locates to both the nucleus and plasma membrane. Recombinant CCt expression in arterial myocytes inhibited CaV1.2 transcription and reduced CaV1.2 protein. CCt induced a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of both CaV1.2 current activation and inactivation, and reduced non-inactivating current in myocytes. Recombinant truncated CCt lacking a putative nuclear localization sequence (92CCt) did not locate to the nucleus and had no effect on arterial CaV1.2 transcription or protein. However, 92CCt shifted the voltage dependence of CaV1.2 activation and inactivation similarly to CCt. CCt and 92CCt both inhibited pressure- and depolarization-induced vasoconstriction, although CCt was a far more effective vasodilator. These data demonstrate that endogenous CCt exists and reduces both CaV1.2 channel expression and voltage sensitivity in arterial myocytes. Thus, CCt is a bi-modal vasodilator.

  2. Synthesis of CeFe10.5Mo1.5 with ThMn12-type structure by melt spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C; Tessema, M; Meyer, MS; Pinkerton, FE

    2013-06-01

    Rare earth compounds RFe12_xMx with tetragonal ThMn12-type structure are of great research interest for potential applications as permanent magnets. These materials are known to serve as the precursors for nitriding and hydriding processes which in certain conditions can dramatically increase the Curie temperature, spontaneous magnetization, and affect the magnetic anisotropy. In this paper, we report the phase study of CeFe10.5Mo1.5 samples melt spun at various surface wheel speeds vs between 5 m/s and 60 m/s. The results from quantitative Rietveld analysis indicate that the as-spun ribbons are a mixture of primary CeFe10.5Mo1.5 phase with impurity phases such as Ce2Fe17, Fe-Mo alloy and CeFe2. When the wheel speed vs is below 25 m/s, CeFe10.5Mo1.5 phase accounts for greater than 85 wt% in the as-spun ribbons, while the Fe-Mo alloy is the only detectable impurity phase. Above v(s)=25 m/s, as the wheel speed increases, CeFe10.5Mo1.5 phase decreases monotonically to about 60 wt% at v(s)=6O m/s while the amounts of impurity phases increase. Thermogravimetric measurement indicates that the Curie temperature T-c. corresponding to CeFe10.5Mo1.5 phase is 341 K. As a result, the best performing sample melt spun at v(s),=15 m/s only exhibits an energy product BHmax=0.121 MGOe at room temperature. Although such a number is modest for a permanent magnet, further nitriding is expected to greatly enhance the Curie temperature, and hence the magnetic performance. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 10/20, 10/10, and 10/5 systems revisited: their validity as relative head-surface-based positioning systems.

    PubMed

    Jurcak, Valer; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Dan, Ippeita

    2007-02-15

    With the advent of multi-channel EEG hardware systems and the concurrent development of topographic and tomographic signal source localization methods, the international 10/20 system, a standard system for electrode positioning with 21 electrodes, was extended to higher density electrode settings such as 10/10 and 10/5 systems, allowing more than 300 electrode positions. However, their effectiveness as relative head-surface-based positioning systems has not been examined. We previously developed a virtual 10/20 measurement algorithm that can analyze any structural MR head and brain image. Extending this method to the virtual 10/10 and 10/5 measurement algorithms, we analyzed the MR images of 17 healthy subjects. The acquired scalp positions of the 10/10 and 10/5 systems were normalized to the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) stereotactic coordinates and their spatial variability was assessed. We described and examined the effects of spatial variability due to the selection of positioning systems and landmark placement strategies. As long as a detailed rule for a particular system was provided, it yielded precise landmark positions on the scalp. Moreover, we evaluated the effective spatial resolution of 329 scalp landmark positions of the 10/5 system for multi-subject studies. As long as a detailed rule for landmark setting was provided, 241 scalp positions could be set effectively when there was no overlapping of two neighboring positions. Importantly, 10/10 positions could be well separated on a scalp without overlapping. This study presents a referential framework for establishing the effective spatial resolutions of 10/20, 10/10, and 10/5 systems as relative head-surface-based positioning systems.

  4. Sequence-specific 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments of Art v 1: a proline-rich allergen of Artemisia vulgaris pollen.

    PubMed

    Razzera, Guilherme; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Almeida, Marcius S; Ferreira, Fatima; Almeida, Fabio C L; Valente, Ana Paula

    2009-06-01

    Art v 1 is the major allergen of Artemisia vulgaris. The IgE raised against Art v 1 not only can cross-react with other proteins from the Asteraceae family members but also with components of various forms of food. Art v 1 is an important target for immunotherapy strategies, including vaccination with hypoallergenic derivatives or chimeras. We report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of the recombinant Art v 1 and identification of secondary structures based on (13)C chemical shifts.

  5. Simultaneous VLBA polarimetric observations of the v = {1,2} J = 1-0 and v = 1, J = 2-1 SiO maser emission towards VY CMa II: component-level polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Kemball, A.; Jonas, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a component-level comparison of the polarized v = 1 J = 1-0, v = 2 J = 1-0 and v = 1 J = 2-1 SiO maser emission towards the supergiant star VY CMa at milliarcsecond-scale, as observed using the Very Long Baseline Array at λ = 7 and 3 mm. An earlier paper considered overall maser morphology and constraints on SiO maser excitation and pumping derived from these data. The goal of the current paper is to use the measured polarization properties of individual co-spatial components detected across multiple transitions to provide constraints on several competing theories for the transport of polarized maser emission. This approach minimizes the significant effects of spatial blending. We present several diagnostic tests designed to distinguish key features of competing theoretical models for maser polarization. The number of coincident features is limited by sensitivity however, particularly in the v = 1 J = 2-1 transition at 86 GHz, and deeper observations are needed. Preliminary conclusions based on the current data provide some support for: (i) spin-independent solutions for linear polarization; (ii) the influence of geometry on the distribution of fractional linear polarization with intensity; and, (iii) π/2 rotations in linear polarization position angle arising from transitions across the Van Vleck angle (sin 2θ = 2/3) between the maser line of sight and magnetic field. There is weaker evidence for several enumerated non-Zeeman explanations for circular polarization. The expected 2:1 ratio in circular polarization between J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 predicted by standard Zeeman theory cannot unfortunately be tested conclusively due to insufficient coincident components.

  6. Identification of similarity of skeletal structures in the range 10-5 cm - 1023 cm and the probable role of skeletal assemblies of carbon nanotube-like dust in the large-scale structure of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V. A.

    The role of the dust in astrophysics is analyzed from viewpoint of the hypothesis [1] (and respective proof-of-concept studies [2]) for the self-assembling of a fractal dust in laboratory electric discharges. The presence of skeletal structures of the same distinctive topology (namely, tubules and cartwheels, and their simple combinations) in the range 10-5cm - 1023cm, and a trend toward self-similarity (i.e. assembling of bigger structures from similar smaller ones), are found [3]. These evidences come from the electron micrography of dust deposits in tokamak (10-6cm - 10-3cm) [4], the images of plasma taken in laboratory electric discharges -- tokamaks, Z-pinches, plasma focus and vacuum spark (10-2cm - 10 cm) [2], hail particles (1cm - 10cm), the images of tornado (103cm - 105cm) and of a wide class of objects in space (1011cm - 1023 cm), including the solar coronal mass ejection, supernova remnants, and some galaxies [3]. The similarity of, and a trend toward self-similarity in, these skeletal structures (especially, cartwheels as the structures of essentially non-hydrodynamic nature) suggest all them to possess, similarly to skeletons in the particles of dust and hail, a fractal condensed matter of particular topology of the fractal. Specifically, this matter may be assembled from nanotubular blocks in a way similar to that in the skeletons found [4] in the submicron dust particles. An analysis of the redshift surveys of galaxies and quasars suggests the possibility to draw the above similarity up to 1026cm. This hints at the presence of a baryonic cold dark skeleton (BCDS) of the Universe [5]. The hypothesis of BCDS is shown to have no conflict with major cosmological facts (Hubble expansion and cosmic microwave background's isotropy). REFERENCES: [1] Fusion Energy 1998 (IAEA, Vienna, 1999), Vol. 3, p. 1131. [2] Advances in Plasma Phys. Research, Vol. 2 (Ed. F. Gerard, Nova Science Publishers, New York, 2002), pp. 1-22. [3] Phys. Lett. A 306, 175 (2002). [4

  7. A Novel CaV1.2 N Terminus Expressed in Smooth Muscle Cells of Resistance Size Arteries Modifies Channel Regulation by Auxiliary Subunits*S

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jianxi; Asuncion-Chin, Maria; Blaskova, Eva; Bannister, John P.; Dopico, Alejandro M.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ (CaV1.2) channels are the principal Ca2+ entry pathway in arterial myocytes. CaV1.2 channels regulate multiple vascular functions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, including hypertension. However, the molecular identity of CaV1.2 channels expressed in myocytes of myogenic arteries that regulate vascular pressure and blood flow is unknown. Here, we cloned CaV1.2 subunits from resistance size cerebral arteries and demonstrate that myocytes contain a novel, cysteine rich N terminus that is derived from exon 1 (termed “exon 1c”), which is located within CACNA1C, the CaV1.2 gene. Quantitative PCR revealed that exon 1c was predominant in arterial myocytes, but rare in cardiac myocytes, where exon 1a prevailed. When co-expressed with α2δ subunits, CaV1.2 channels containing the novel exon 1c-derived N terminus exhibited: 1) smaller whole cell current density, 2) more negative voltages of half activation (V1/2,act) and half-inactivation (V1/2,inact), and 3) reduced plasma membrane insertion, when compared with channels containing exon 1b. β1b and β2a subunits caused negative shifts in the V1/2,act and V1/2,inact of exon 1b-containing CaV1.2α1/α2δ currents that were larger than those in exon 1c-containing CaV1.2α1/α2δ currents. In contrast, β3 similarly shifted V1/2,act and V1/2,inact of currents generated by exon 1b- and exon 1c-containing channels. β subunits isoform-dependent differences in current inactivation rates were also detected between N-terminal variants. Data indicate that through novel alternative splicing at exon 1, the CaV1.2 N terminus modifies regulation by auxiliary subunits. The novel exon 1c should generate distinct voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry in arterial myocytes, resulting in tissue-specific Ca2+ signaling. PMID:17699517

  8. Animation of natural scene by virtual eye-movements evokes high precision and low noise in V1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Baudot, Pierre; Levy, Manuel; Marre, Olivier; Monier, Cyril; Pananceau, Marc; Frégnac, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic noise is thought to be a limiting factor for computational efficiency in the brain. In visual cortex (V1), ongoing activity is present in vivo, and spiking responses to simple stimuli are highly unreliable across trials. Stimulus statistics used to plot receptive fields, however, are quite different from those experienced during natural visuomotor exploration. We recorded V1 neurons intracellularly in the anaesthetized and paralyzed cat and compared their spiking and synaptic responses to full field natural images animated by simulated eye-movements to those evoked by simpler (grating) or higher dimensionality statistics (dense noise). In most cells, natural scene animation was the only condition where high temporal precision (in the 10-20 ms range) was maintained during sparse and reliable activity. At the subthreshold level, irregular but highly reproducible membrane potential dynamics were observed, even during long (several 100 ms) "spike-less" periods. We showed that both the spatial structure of natural scenes and the temporal dynamics of eye-movements increase the signal-to-noise ratio by a non-linear amplification of the signal combined with a reduction of the subthreshold contextual noise. These data support the view that the sparsening and the time precision of the neural code in V1 may depend primarily on three factors: (1) broadband input spectrum: the bandwidth must be rich enough for recruiting optimally the diversity of spatial and time constants during recurrent processing; (2) tight temporal interplay of excitation and inhibition: conductance measurements demonstrate that natural scene statistics narrow selectively the duration of the spiking opportunity window during which the balance between excitation and inhibition changes transiently and reversibly; (3) signal energy in the lower frequency band: a minimal level of power is needed below 10 Hz to reach consistently the spiking threshold, a situation rarely reached with visual dense

  9. CO(v=1) population lifetimes of metal-carbonyl cluster compounds in dilute CHCl3 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilweil, E. J.; Cavanagh, R. R.; Stephenson, J. C.

    1988-07-01

    Tunable infrared picosecond pulses in the 5 μ region have been used for time-resolved pump-probe measurements of the population relaxation lifetime (T1) of CO(v=1) stretching vibrations in a series of metal-carbonyl cluster compounds in room temperature chloroform solution. T1 was the same for symmetric (ν=2084 cm-1, 90±10 ps) and antisymmetric (2014 cm-1, 87±10 ps) modes of the dicarbonyl Rh(CO)2(C5H7O2); T1 was the same for the B1 (2092 cm-1, 710±130 ps) and B2 (2036 cm-1, 750±90 ps) modes of Rh2(CO)4Cl2. Similarly long T1 times were found for Rh4(CO)12 (2075 cm-1, 610±65 ps) and Rh6(CO)16 (2077 cm-1, 700±100 ps). The molecule Co4(CO)12 has also been compared to the corresponding rhodium analog and it exhibits an initially fast relaxation of 47±5 ps followed by a slower 396±70 ps decay. The transient response of the more complex systems to the single frequency experiment is found to be sensitive to frequency and can exhibit bleaching, absorption, and a combination of these effects. Such behavior is attributed to overlap of the IR pulse with v=1 to v=2 and higher transitions in the M4(CO)12 (M=Rh or Co) and Rh6(CO)16 molecules. The long CO(v=1) T1 values for the metal cluster molecules suggest relaxation via multiquantum transfer of vibrational energy to adjacent M-C stretch and M-C-O bend vibrations; energy transfer to vibrational or electronic states of the central metal core seems unimportant in determining T1 for these systems.

  10. A Global Orientation Map in the Primary Visual Cortex (V1): Could a Self Organizing Model Reveal Its Hidden Bias?

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Ryan T.; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa

    2017-01-01

    A remarkable accomplishment of self organizing models is their ability to simulate the development of feature maps in the cortex. Additionally, these models have been trained to tease out the differential causes of multiple feature maps, mapped on to the same output space. Recently, a Laterally Interconnected Synergetically Self Organizing Map (LISSOM) model has been used to simulate the mapping of eccentricity and meridional angle onto orthogonal axes in the primary visual cortex (V1). This model is further probed to simulate the development of the radial bias in V1, using a training set that consists of both radial (rectangular bars of random size and orientation) as well as non-radial stimuli. The radial bias describes the preference of the visual system toward orientations that match the angular position (meridional angle) of that orientation with respect to the point of fixation. Recent fMRI results have shown that there exists a coarse scale orientation map in V1, which resembles the meridional angle map, thereby providing a plausible neural basis for the radial bias. The LISSOM model, trained for the development of the retinotopic map, on probing for orientation preference, exhibits a coarse scale orientation map, consistent with these experimental results, quantified using the circular cross correlation (rc). The rc between the orientation map developed on probing with a thin annular ring containing sinusoidal gratings with a spatial frequency of 0.5 cycles per degree (cpd) and the corresponding meridional map for the same annular ring, has a value of 0.8894. The results also suggest that the radial bias goes beyond the current understanding of a node to node correlation between the two maps. PMID:28111542

  11. A Global Orientation Map in the Primary Visual Cortex (V1): Could a Self Organizing Model Reveal Its Hidden Bias?

    PubMed

    Philips, Ryan T; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable accomplishment of self organizing models is their ability to simulate the development of feature maps in the cortex. Additionally, these models have been trained to tease out the differential causes of multiple feature maps, mapped on to the same output space. Recently, a Laterally Interconnected Synergetically Self Organizing Map (LISSOM) model has been used to simulate the mapping of eccentricity and meridional angle onto orthogonal axes in the primary visual cortex (V1). This model is further probed to simulate the development of the radial bias in V1, using a training set that consists of both radial (rectangular bars of random size and orientation) as well as non-radial stimuli. The radial bias describes the preference of the visual system toward orientations that match the angular position (meridional angle) of that orientation with respect to the point of fixation. Recent fMRI results have shown that there exists a coarse scale orientation map in V1, which resembles the meridional angle map, thereby providing a plausible neural basis for the radial bias. The LISSOM model, trained for the development of the retinotopic map, on probing for orientation preference, exhibits a coarse scale orientation map, consistent with these experimental results, quantified using the circular cross correlation (rc ). The rc between the orientation map developed on probing with a thin annular ring containing sinusoidal gratings with a spatial frequency of 0.5 cycles per degree (cpd) and the corresponding meridional map for the same annular ring, has a value of 0.8894. The results also suggest that the radial bias goes beyond the current understanding of a node to node correlation between the two maps.

  12. Differential contributions of vasopressin V1A and oxytocin receptors in the amygdala to pain-related behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cragg, Bryce; Ji, Guangchen

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplastic changes in the amygdala account for emotional-affective aspects of pain and involve neuropeptides such as calcitonin gene-related peptide and corticotropin-releasing factor. Another neuropeptide system, central arginine vasopressin, has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, but its role in pain-related emotional expression and neuroplasticity remains to be determined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginine vasopressin in the amygdala contributes to pain-related emotional-affective responses, using stereotaxic applications of arginine vasopressin and antagonists for G-protein coupled vasopressin V1A and oxytocin receptors in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. In normal animals, arginine vasopressin increased audible and ultrasonic vocalizations and anxiety-like behavior (decreased open-arm preference in the elevated plus maze). The facilitatory effects were blocked by a selective V1A antagonist (SR 49059, Relcovaptan) but not by an oxytocin receptor antagonist (L-371,257). L-371,257 had some facilitatory effects on vocalizations. Arginine vasopressin had no effect in arthritic rats (kaolin/carrageenan knee joint pain model). SR 49059 inhibited vocalizations and anxiety-like behavior (elevated plus maze) in arthritic, but not normal, rats and conveyed anxiolytic properties to arginine vasopressin. Arginine vasopressin, SR 49059, and L-371,257 had no significant effects on spinal reflexes. We interpret the data to suggest that arginine vasopressin through V1A in the amygdala contributes to emotional-affective aspects of pain (arthritis model), whereas oxytocin receptors may mediate some inhibitory effects of the vasopressin system. PMID:27837170

  13. Deposition of calcium phosphate coatings using condensed phosphates (P2O7(4-) and P3O10(5-)) as phosphate source through induction heating.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Hou, Saisai; Zhang, Mingjie; Yang, Mengmeng; Deng, Linhong; Xiong, Xinbo; Ni, Xinye

    2016-12-01

    In present work condensed phosphates (P2O7(4-) and P3O10(5-)) were used as phosphate source in induction heating to deposit calcium phosphate coatings. The phase, morphology, and composition of different phosphate-related coatings were characterized and compared using XRD, FTIR, and SEM analyses. Results showed that P2O7(4-)formed calcium pyrophosphate hydrate coatings with interconnected cuboid-like particles. The as-deposited calcium tripolyphosphate hydrate coating with P3O10(5-) was mainly composed of flower-like particles assembled by plate-like crystals. The bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were also studied. Moreover, the feasibility of using hybrid phosphate sources for preparing and depositing coatings onto magnesium alloy was investigated.

  14. RNA versus DNA (NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 versus Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test v1.5) for early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Kébé, K; Ndiaye, O; Ndiaye, H Diop; Mengue, P Mbakob; Guindo, P M M; Diallo, S; Léye, N; Gueye, S B; Diallo, A Gaye; Kane, C Touré; Mboup, S

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance of the NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 platform (bioMérieux, France) to the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test v1.5 (Roche Molecular Systems, Switzerland) in detecting HIV-1 infection in infants using venipuncture-derived whole blood in tubes and dried blood spots. A total of 149 dried blood spots and 43 EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood samples were collected throughout Dakar and other areas in Senegal from infants and children aged 3 weeks to 24 months who were born to HIV-1-infected mothers. Samples were tested using the NucliSENS and Amplicor technologies. The NucliSENS and Amplicor results were 100% concordant using either EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood or dried blood spots. Compared to Amplicor, the sensitivity and specificity of the NucliSENS test were 100%. The NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 RNA assay performed as well as the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test in detecting HIV-1 infection in infants. In addition, this platform can give an indication of the viral load baseline. The NucliSENS EasyQ platform is a good alternative for early infant diagnosis of HIV-1 infection.

  15. Independent variation and positive selection in env V1 and V2 domains within maternal-infant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, S L; Sleasman, J W; She, J X; Barrie, K A; Pomeroy, S M; Barrett, D J; Goodenow, M M

    1993-01-01

    Multiple targets for immune recognition and cellular tropism are localized to the V1 and V2 hypervariable regions in the amino portion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120env. We have assessed genetic diversity in env V1 and V2 hypervariable domains in vivo within epidemiologically related strains of HIV-1. Our strategy was to analyze longitudinal samples from two seropositive mothers and multiple children infected by perinatal transmission. Although the V1 and V2 domains are closely linked in the HIV-1 genome, nucleotide sequences in V1 and in V2 evolved independently in maternal-infant viruses in vivo. A high proportion of the nucleotide substitutions would introduce amino acid diversity in V1 and in V2. A significant excess of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions was identified in HIV-1 env V1 and V2 peptides in the mothers and in two older children but was not generally apparent in HIV-1 sequences in infants. An excess of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions indicated that there is positive selection for independent genetic variation in the V1 and V2 domains in vivo. It is likely that there are host responses to complex determinants in the V1 or V2 hypervariable domain of HIV-1 gp120. PMID:8510212

  16. Deficiency of ATP6V1H Causes Bone Loss by Inhibiting Bone Resorption and Bone Formation through the TGF-β1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaohong; Liu, Jin; Zheng, Xueni; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yanli; Hao, Ying; Yang, Tielin; Deng, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar-type H +-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a highly conserved, ancient enzyme that couples the energy of ATP hydrolysis to proton transport across vesicular and plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells. Previously reported mutations of various V-ATPase subunits are associated with increased bone density. We now show that haploinsufficiency for the H subunit of the V1 domain (ATP6V1H) is associated with osteoporosis in humans and mice. A genome-wide SNP array analysis of 1625 Han Chinese found that 4 of 15 tag SNPs (26.7%) within ATP6V1H were significantly associated with low spine bone mineral density. Atp6v1h+/- knockout mice generated by the CRISPR/Cas9 technique had decreased bone remodeling and a net bone matrix loss. Atp6v1h+/- osteoclasts showed impaired bone formation and increased bone resorption. The increased intracellular pH of Atp6v1h+/- osteoclasts downregulated TGF-β1 activation, thereby reducing induction of osteoblast formation but the bone mineralization was not altered. However, bone formation was reduced more than bone resorption. Our data provide evidence that partial loss of ATP6V1H function results in osteoporosis/osteopenia. We propose that defective osteoclast formation triggers impaired bone formation by altering bone remodeling. In the future, ATP6V1H might, therefore, serve as a target for the therapy of osteoporosis. PMID:27924156

  17. Genome Sequence of a Cynomolgus Macaque Adenovirus (CynAdV-1) Isolate from a Primate Colony in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Shuping; Cheng, Zetao; Bofill-Mas, Silvia; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Girones, Rosina; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-11-03

    The genome sequence of a simian adenovirus from a cynomolgus macaque, denoted CynAdV-1, is presented here. Phylogenetic analysis supports CynAdV-1 in an independent clade, comprising a new simian adenovirus (SAdV) species. These genome data are critical for understanding the evolution and relationships of primate adenoviruses, including zoonosis and emergent human pathogens.

  18. The LBB methodology application results performed on the safety related piping of NPP V-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice

    SciTech Connect

    Kupca, L.; Beno, P.

    1997-04-01

    A broad overview of the leak before break (LBB) application to the Slovakian V-1 nuclear power plant is presented in the paper. LBB was applied to the primary cooling circuit and surge lines of both WWER 440 type units, and also used to assess the integrity of safety related piping in the feed water and main steam systems. Experiments and calculations performed included analyses of stresses, material mechanical properties, corrosion, fatigue damage, stability of heavy component supports, water hammer, and leak rates. A list of analysis results and recommendations are included in the paper.

  19. FBG_SiMul V1.0: Fibre Bragg grating signal simulation tool for finite element method models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, G.; McGugan, M.; Mikkelsen, L. P.

    FBG_SiMul V1.0 is a tool to study and design the implementation of fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors solutions in any arbitrary loaded structure or application. The software removes the need for a fibre optic expert user and makes the sensor response of a structural health monitoring solution using FBG sensors more simple and fast. The software uses a modified T-Matrix method to simulate the FBG reflected spectrum based on the stress and strain from a finite element method model. The article describes the theory and algorithm implementation, followed by an empirical validation.

  20. Enhancement of the Two-Dimensional Conduction Electron Zeeman Energy Near v=1 by Optical Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.R.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Vitkalov, S.A.

    1998-11-06

    Enhancement of the Zeeman energy of 2D conduction electrons near v = 1 by optical dynamic nuclear polarization (lINP), as observed by the Overhauser shift of the transport detected electron spin resonance, is measured quantitatively for the first time in GaAs/AIGaAs mukiquantum wells. The NMR signal enhancement is obtained under similar conditions in the same sample, allowing the hyperke coupling constant of 3.7T between between the nuclei and 2D conduction electrons to be measured for the first time. The potential to suppress the Zeeman energy by optical DNP is discussed in the context of its potential influence on Skyrmion formation.