Science.gov

Sample records for 10-6 m2 s-1

  1. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activates mTORC1 by Phosphorylating AKT1S1.

    PubMed

    He, Chang-Liang; Bian, Yang-Yang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ze-Xian; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Yao, Cui-Fang; Lin, Yan; Zou, Han-Fa; Luo, Fang-Xiu; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Ye, Ming-Liang; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that requires hormonal and nutrient signals for its activation, is constitutively activated. We found that overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activates mTORC1 signaling through phosphorylating mTORC1 inhibitor AKT1 substrate 1 (AKT1S1). An unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomic survey identified 974 PKM2 substrates, including serine202 and serine203 (S202/203) of AKT1S1, in the proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Phosphorylation of S202/203 of AKT1S1 by PKM2 released AKT1S1 from raptor and facilitated its binding to 14-3-3, resulted in hormonal- and nutrient-signals independent activation of mTORC1 signaling and led accelerated oncogenic growth and autophagy inhibition in cancer cells. Decreasing S202/203 phosphorylation by TEPP-46 treatment reversed these effects. In RCCs and breast cancers, PKM2 overexpression was correlated with elevated S202/203 phosphorylation, activated mTORC1 and inhibited autophagy. Our results provided the first phosphorylome of PKM2 and revealed a constitutive mTORC1 activating mechanism in cancer cells. PMID:26876154

  2. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activates mTORC1 by Phosphorylating AKT1S1

    PubMed Central

    He, Chang-Liang; Bian, Yang-Yang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ze-Xian; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Yao, Cui-Fang; Lin, Yan; Zou, Han-Fa; Luo, Fang-Xiu; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Ye, Ming-Liang; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that requires hormonal and nutrient signals for its activation, is constitutively activated. We found that overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activates mTORC1 signaling through phosphorylating mTORC1 inhibitor AKT1 substrate 1 (AKT1S1). An unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomic survey identified 974 PKM2 substrates, including serine202 and serine203 (S202/203) of AKT1S1, in the proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Phosphorylation of S202/203 of AKT1S1 by PKM2 released AKT1S1 from raptor and facilitated its binding to 14-3-3, resulted in hormonal- and nutrient-signals independent activation of mTORC1 signaling and led accelerated oncogenic growth and autophagy inhibition in cancer cells. Decreasing S202/203 phosphorylation by TEPP-46 treatment reversed these effects. In RCCs and breast cancers, PKM2 overexpression was correlated with elevated S202/203 phosphorylation, activated mTORC1 and inhibited autophagy. Our results provided the first phosphorylome of PKM2 and revealed a constitutive mTORC1 activating mechanism in cancer cells. PMID:26876154

  3. High Frequency of vacA s1m2 Genotypes Among Helicobacter pylori Isolates From Patients With Gastroduodenal Disorders in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pajavand, Hamid; Alvandi, Amirhooshang; Mohajeri, Parviz; Bakhtyari, Somaye; Bashiri, Homayoon; Kalali, Behnam; Gerhard, Markus; Najafi, Farid; Abiri, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection and related diseases outcome are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial, host and environmental factors. Several distinct virulence factors of H. pylori have been shown to be associated with different clinical outcomes. Here we focused on vacA and cagA genotypes of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric disorder. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of two toxins and genotypes of VacA toxin in patients referred to a central hospital in the west of Iran (Imam Reza hospital, Kermanshah) during 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: Samples were collected from patients infected with H. pylori. Gastric biopsy specimens from the stomach antrum and corpus were cultured. PCR analysis was performed for genotyping H. pylori vacA and cagA genes. Results: Helicobacter pylori was isolated from 48% (96/200) of patients with gastroduodenal disorders. In 81/96 (84%) cases, the cagA gene was present. Among different genotypes of vacA, two s1m2 and s2m2 genotypes were dominant with frequency of 39.5% and 50%, respectively. The frequency of the s1m1 genotype was 7.2% (7/96), which is much lower than elsewhere. H. pylori isolates with positive results for cagA gene and vacA s1m2 genotypes showed statistically significant correlation with peptic ulcer (s1m2 13/34 [38.2%] P = 0.003). However, isolates of H. pylori infection with cagA gene and vacA s2m2 genotypes were significantly associated with development of gastritis (s2m2 41/42 [97.6%] P = 0.000). Conclusions: About 90% of H. pylori strains potentially contained vacA s2m2 and s1m2 genotypes. Infection with H. pylori strain containing the cagA gene or the vacA s1m1 and s1m2 genotypes was associated with increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). PMID:26862378

  4. The diffusion of cesium in the graphitic matrix A3-3 under irradiation by a fast neutron flux of 2 × 10 17 m -2 s -1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensel, W.; Hoinkis, E.

    1995-09-01

    The 137Cs core release rate of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) is effected by the interactions of cesium with the graphitic material used as a matrix for the coated fuel particles. The migration of 137Cs in the graphitic matrix A3-3 at a fast neutron flux of 2 × 10 17 m -2 s -1 was studied in short-term experiments using the thin-film technique. The penetration profiles did not satisfy Fick's second law. The diffusion/trapping/re-emission model was applied to determine the diffusion coefficient D and the trapping coefficient μ for four profiles produced at 1088 and 1166 K. D, μ and the reemission coefficient b at 1293 K were determined for two profiles. Compared to laboratory conditions no effect of the fast neutron irradiation on the 137Cs migration in matrix A3-3 was observed.

  5. Expansion and Evolution of a Virulent, Extensively Drug-Resistant (Polymyxin B-Resistant), QnrS1-, CTX-M-2-, and KPC-2-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST11 International High-Risk Clone

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Lúcia; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Martinez, Roberto; Darini, Ana Lúcia Costa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the early expansion, evolution, and characterization of a multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clone that was isolated with increasing frequency from inpatients in a tertiary-care university hospital in Brazil. Seven carbapenem- and quinolone-resistant and polymyxin B-susceptible or -resistant K. pneumoniae isolates isolated between December 2012 and February 2013 were investigated. Beta-lactamase- and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR)-encoding genes and the genetic environment were investigated using PCR, sequencing, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Clonal relatedness was established using XbaI–pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and phylogenetic group characterization. Plasmid analyses included PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT) and hybridization of the S1-PFGE product, plasmid MLST, and conjugation experiments. Virulence potential was assessed by PCR by searching for 10 virulence factor-encoding genes (ureA, fimH, kfuBC, uge, wabG, magA, mrkD, allS, rmpA, and cf29a) and by phenotypic tests to analyze the hypermucoviscous phenotype. The genetic context of a multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant K. pneumoniae ST11-KpI clone harboring IncFIIk-Tn4401a-blaKPC-2, qnrS1, and blaCTX-M-2 was found. Moreover, three isolates displayed high resistance to polymyxin B (MICs = 32, 32, and 128 mg/liter) as well as mucous and hypermucoviscous phenotypes. These bacteria also harbored ureA, fimH, uge, wabG, and mrkD, which code for virulence factors associated with binding, biofilm formation, and the ability to colonize and escape from phagocytosis. Our study describes the association of important coresistance and virulence factors in the K. pneumoniae ST11 international high-risk clone, which makes this pathogen successful at infections and points to the quick expansion and evolution of this multiresistant and virulent clone, leading to a pandrug-resistant phenotype and

  6. Expansion and evolution of a virulent, extensively drug-resistant (polymyxin B-resistant), QnrS1-, CTX-M-2-, and KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST11 international high-risk clone.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leonardo Neves; Vitali, Lúcia; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Martinez, Roberto; Darini, Ana Lúcia Costa

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we report the early expansion, evolution, and characterization of a multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clone that was isolated with increasing frequency from inpatients in a tertiary-care university hospital in Brazil. Seven carbapenem- and quinolone-resistant and polymyxin B-susceptible or -resistant K. pneumoniae isolates isolated between December 2012 and February 2013 were investigated. Beta-lactamase- and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR)-encoding genes and the genetic environment were investigated using PCR, sequencing, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Clonal relatedness was established using XbaI-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and phylogenetic group characterization. Plasmid analyses included PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT) and hybridization of the S1-PFGE product, plasmid MLST, and conjugation experiments. Virulence potential was assessed by PCR by searching for 10 virulence factor-encoding genes (ureA, fimH, kfuBC, uge, wabG, magA, mrkD, allS, rmpA, and cf29a) and by phenotypic tests to analyze the hypermucoviscous phenotype. The genetic context of a multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant K. pneumoniae ST11-KpI clone harboring IncFIIk-Tn4401a-blaKPC-2, qnrS1, and blaCTX-M-2 was found. Moreover, three isolates displayed high resistance to polymyxin B (MICs = 32, 32, and 128 mg/liter) as well as mucous and hypermucoviscous phenotypes. These bacteria also harbored ureA, fimH, uge, wabG, and mrkD, which code for virulence factors associated with binding, biofilm formation, and the ability to colonize and escape from phagocytosis. Our study describes the association of important coresistance and virulence factors in the K. pneumoniae ST11 international high-risk clone, which makes this pathogen successful at infections and points to the quick expansion and evolution of this multiresistant and virulent clone, leading to a pandrug-resistant phenotype and

  7. 27 CFR 10.6 - Administrative provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative provisions. 10.6 Section 10.6 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS COMMERCIAL BRIBERY Scope of Regulations § 10.6 Administrative provisions. (a) General. The Act makes applicable...

  8. 43 CFR 10.6 - Custody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Custody. 10.6 Section 10.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony From Federal or Tribal Lands § 10.6 Custody. (a)...

  9. Fractional M2-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharony, Ofer; Bergman, Oren; Jafferis, Daniel Louis

    2008-11-01

    We consider two generalizations of the Script N = 6 superconformal Chern-Simons-matter theories with gauge group U(N) × U(N). The first generalization is to Script N = 6 superconformal U(M) × U(N) theories, and the second to Script N = 5 superconformal O(2M) × USp(2N) and O(2M+1) × USp(2N) theories. These theories are conjectured to describe M2-branes probing C4/Zk in the unitary case, and C4/{\\widehat{D}}k in the orthogonal/symplectic case, together with a discrete flux, which can be interpreted as |M-N| fractional M2-branes localized at the orbifold singularity. The classical theories with these gauge groups have been constructed before; in this paper we focus on some quantum aspects of these theories, and on a detailed description of their M theory and type IIA string theory duals.

  10. 32 CFR 10.6 - Non-creation of right.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Non-creation of right. 10.6 Section 10.6 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS MILITARY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS § 10.6 Non-creation of right. Neither this part nor any Military...

  11. 32 CFR 10.6 - Non-creation of right.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Non-creation of right. 10.6 Section 10.6 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS MILITARY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS § 10.6 Non-creation of right. Neither this part nor any Military...

  12. 32 CFR 10.6 - Non-creation of right.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Non-creation of right. 10.6 Section 10.6 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS MILITARY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS § 10.6 Non-creation of right. Neither this part nor any Military...

  13. 46 CFR 188.10-6 - Captain of the Port.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Captain of the Port. 188.10-6 Section 188.10-6 Shipping... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-6 Captain of the Port. This term means an... activities within his assigned area. In addition, the District Commander shall be the Captain of the...

  14. 32 CFR 10.6 - Non-creation of right.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Non-creation of right. 10.6 Section 10.6 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS MILITARY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS § 10.6 Non-creation of right. Neither this part nor any Military...

  15. 32 CFR 10.6 - Non-creation of right.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Non-creation of right. 10.6 Section 10.6 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS MILITARY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS § 10.6 Non-creation of right. Neither this part nor any Military...

  16. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a... recall service. Upon reversion of the annuitant to retired status, any pension payable to a former...

  17. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a... recall service. Upon reversion of the annuitant to retired status, any pension payable to a former...

  18. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a... recall service. Upon reversion of the annuitant to retired status, any pension payable to a former...

  19. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a... recall service. Upon reversion of the annuitant to retired status, any pension payable to a former...

  20. 22 CFR 19.10-6 - Benefits for recall service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Benefits for recall service. 19.10-6 Section 19... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.10-6 Benefits for recall service. (a... recall service. Upon reversion of the annuitant to retired status, any pension payable to a former...

  1. High sensitivity infrared 10.6 micrometer heterodyne receiver development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented for a study on the design of an infrared 10.6-micrometer quantum-noise-limited optical receiver subsystem. Performance measurements of the HgCdTe photomixer preamplifier combination were carried out for photomixer temperatures up to 152 K and a photomixer frequency response of up to 420 MHz was obtained. Results of temperature and bias cycling of HgCdTe photomixers are reported. Design considerations for an operational 10.6 micrometer heterodyne receiver are presented. These consist of design data on required laser LO illumination, heat load levels for photomixer cooler, photomixer uniformity and the effects of photomixer impedance match on receiver sensitivity. Analysis and measurements of 10.6 micrometer heterodyne detection in an extrinsic photoconductive (p-type) HgCdTe photomixer are also presented.

  2. M2-F1 cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This photo shows the cockpit configuration of the M2-F1 wingless lifting body. With a top speed of about 120 knots, the M2-F1 had a simple instrument panel. Besides the panel itself, the ribs of the wooden shell (left) and the control stick (center) are also visible. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47

  3. Draft genome sequence of Phomopsis longicolla MSPL 10-6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis longicolla T.W. Hobbs is the primary cause of Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. We report the de novo assembled draft genome sequence of P. longicolla isolate MSPL10-6 with a 54.8-fold depth of coverage. The resulting draft genome was estimated to be approximately 64 Mb in size with an over...

  4. Experiment definition phase shuttle laboratory LDRL-10.6 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This report for the Experiment Definition Phase of the Shuttle Laboratory LDRL 10.6 Micrometer Experiment covers period 27 June through 26 September 1975. Activities during the fifth quarter included: (1) reevaluation of system obscuration ratio with a subsequent reduction of this ratio from 0.417 to 0.362, (2) completion of detail drawings for the 6X pre-expander, (3) completion of detail drawings for the nine mirrors that comprise pointing and tracking optomechanical subsystem, (4) continuation of detailing of mechanical portions of CMSS and modifications to accommodate new obscuration ratio, (5) qualitative operation of the optomechanical subsystem of the 10.6 um receiver achieved under experiment measurement task; receiver fully integrated and operation demonstrated over a 10 km experimental link, and (6) data collection task initiated to begin preparation of link analysis volumes.

  5. Observations of nine supernova remnants at 10.6 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Kundu, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity contour and polarization observation maps of nine supernova remnants at a microwave frequency are presented and discussed. The data provided are the highest-frequency (10.6 GHz) measurements to date for several of these sources and should therefore be useful in determining their spectra. Polarization ranges from 2 or 3% to as high as 40-50%. Integrated fluxes for the sources vary from about 3 to more than 25.

  6. Modeling multiple M2-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Bagger, Jonathan; Lambert, Neil

    2007-02-15

    We investigate the worldvolume theory that describes N coincident M2-branes ending on an M5-brane. We argue that the fields that describe the transverse spacetime coordinates take values in a nonassociative algebra. We postulate a set of supersymmetry transformations and find that they close into a novel gauge symmetry. We propose a three-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric action to describe the truncation of the full theory to the scalar and spinor fields, and show how a Basu-Harvey fuzzy funnel arises as the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield solution to this theory.

  7. Experiment definition phase shuttle laboratory: LDRL-10.6 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of the space shuttle laboratory laser data relay link. The system transmittance of various surfaces was considered in order to examine the coating tradeoffs for the beryllium mirrors. The results of six coating combinations considered are summarized. It is recommended that silver coatings be used throughout the system. Design of the pre-expander and a preliminary alignment procedure implemented to align all optical elements to the reference mechanical axis (the rotational axis of the outer gimbal bearing located between the two Gregorian telescopes) are included. The local oscillator subsystem, consisting of the laser, Stark cell, Stark cell electronics, power supply, starting circuit, and conditioning optics were completed and installed in the optimechanical subsystem and operation against a 10.6 micrometer source was attempted. Preliminary measurements of the HgCdTe mixer showed that this critical element was inoperative and in subsequent tests the receiver front end electronics had also failed. Possible reasons for these failures and corrective action and steps to prevent future recurrence are discussed.

  8. Magellan/M2FS Spectroscopy of Tucana 2 and Grus 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Koposov, Sergey; Belokurov, Vasily; Jethwa, Prashin; Nidever, David L.; Bonnivard, Vincent; Bailey, John I., III; Bell, Eric F.; Loebman, Sarah R.

    2016-03-01

    We present results from spectroscopic observations with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) of 147 stellar targets along the line of sight to the newly discovered “ultrafaint” stellar systems Tucana 2 (Tuc 2) and Grus 1 (Gru 1). Based on simultaneous estimates of line of sight velocity and stellar-atmospheric parameters, we identify 8 and 7 stars as probable members of Tuc 2 and and Gru 1, respectively. Our sample for Tuc 2 is sufficient to resolve an internal velocity dispersion of {8.6}-2.7+4.4 km s-1 about a mean of -{129.1}-3.5+3.5 km s-1 (solar rest frame), and to estimate a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -{2.23}-0.12+0.18. These results place Tuc 2 on chemodynamical scaling relations followed by dwarf galaxies, suggesting a dominant dark matter component with dynamical mass {2.7}-1.3+3.1× {10}6 {M}⊙ enclosed within the central ˜160 pc, and dynamical mass-to-light ratio {1913}-950+2234 {M}⊙ /{L}V,⊙ . For Gru 1 we estimate a mean velocity of -{140.5}-1.6+2.4 km s-1 and a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -{1.42}-0.42+0.55 but our sample does not resolve Gru 1's velocity dispersion. The radial coordinates of Tuc 2 and Gru 1 in Galactic phase space suggest that their orbits are among the most energetic within a distance of ≲ 300 {{kpc}}. Moreover, their proximity to each other in this space arises naturally if both objects are trailing the Large Magellanic Cloud. This paper presents data gathered with the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  9. Present and Future of M2M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Satoru; Watanabe, Takashi

    In recent years, the rapid progress in the development of hardware and software technologies enables tiny and low cost information devices hereinafter referred to as Machine to be widely available. M2M (Machine to Machine) has been of much attention where many tiny machines are connected to each other through networks with minimal human intervention to provide smooth and intelligent management. M2M is a promising core technology providing timely, flexible, efficient and comprehensive service at low cost. M2M has wide variety of applications including energy management system, environmental monitoring system, intelligent transport system, industrial automation system and other applications. M2M consists of terminals and networks that connect them. In this paper, we mainly focus on M2M networking and mention the future direction of the technology.

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-6 - Cargo handling room-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo handling room-TB/ALL. 30.10-6 Section 30.10-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-6 Cargo handling room—TB/ALL. The term cargo handling room means any enclosed space where cargo is...

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-6 - Cargo handling room-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo handling room-TB/ALL. 30.10-6 Section 30.10-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-6 Cargo handling room—TB/ALL. The term cargo handling room means any enclosed space where cargo is...

  12. Serum Stability and Affinity Optimization of an M2 Macrophage-Targeting Peptide (M2pep).

    PubMed

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Gustafson, Heather H; Pineda, Julio M; Kacherovsky, Nataly A; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major stromal component of the tumor microenvironment in several cancers. TAMs are a potential target for adjuvant cancer therapies due to their established roles in promoting proliferation of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We previously discovered an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) which was successfully used to target and deliver a pro-apoptotic KLA peptide to M2-like TAMs in a CT-26 colon carcinoma model. However, the effectiveness of in vivo TAM-targeting using M2pep is limited by its poor serum stability and low binding affinity. In this study, we synthesized M2pep derivatives with the goals of increasing serum stability and binding affinity. Serum stability evaluation of M2pepBiotin confirmed its rapid degradation attributed to exolytic cleavage from the N-terminus and endolytic cleavages at the W10/W11 and S16/K17 sites. N-terminal acetylation of M2pepBiotin protected the peptide against the exolytic degradation while W10w and K(17,18,19)k substitutions were able to effectively protect endolytic degradation at their respective cleavage sites. However, no tested amino acid changes at the W10 position resulted in both protease resistance at that site and retention of binding activity. Therefore, cyclization of M2pep was investigated. Cyclized M2pep better resisted serum degradation without compromising binding activity to M2 macrophages. During the serum stability optimization process, we also discovered that K9R and W10Y substitutions significantly enhanced binding affinity of M2pep. In an in vitro binding study of different M2pep analogs pre-incubated in mouse serum, cyclic M2pep with K9R and W10Y modifications (cyclic M2pep(RY)) retained the highest binding activity to M2 macrophages over time due to its improved serum stability. Finally, we evaluated the in vivo accumulation of sulfo-Cy5-labeled M2pep and cyclic M2pep(RY) in both the CT-26 and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. Cyclic M2pep

  13. Serum Stability and Affinity Optimization of an M2 Macrophage-Targeting Peptide (M2pep)

    PubMed Central

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Gustafson, Heather H.; Pineda, Julio M.; Kacherovsky, Nataly A.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major stromal component of the tumor microenvironment in several cancers. TAMs are a potential target for adjuvant cancer therapies due to their established roles in promoting proliferation of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We previously discovered an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) which was successfully used to target and deliver a pro-apoptotic KLA peptide to M2-like TAMs in a CT-26 colon carcinoma model. However, the effectiveness of in vivo TAM-targeting using M2pep is limited by its poor serum stability and low binding affinity. In this study, we synthesized M2pep derivatives with the goals of increasing serum stability and binding affinity. Serum stability evaluation of M2pepBiotin confirmed its rapid degradation attributed to exolytic cleavage from the N-terminus and endolytic cleavages at the W10/W11 and S16/K17 sites. N-terminal acetylation of M2pepBiotin protected the peptide against the exolytic degradation while W10w and K(17,18,19)k substitutions were able to effectively protect endolytic degradation at their respective cleavage sites. However, no tested amino acid changes at the W10 position resulted in both protease resistance at that site and retention of binding activity. Therefore, cyclization of M2pep was investigated. Cyclized M2pep better resisted serum degradation without compromising binding activity to M2 macrophages. During the serum stability optimization process, we also discovered that K9R and W10Y substitutions significantly enhanced binding affinity of M2pep. In an in vitro binding study of different M2pep analogs pre-incubated in mouse serum, cyclic M2pep with K9R and W10Y modifications (cyclic M2pep(RY)) retained the highest binding activity to M2 macrophages over time due to its improved serum stability. Finally, we evaluated the in vivo accumulation of sulfo-Cy5-labeled M2pep and cyclic M2pep(RY) in both the CT-26 and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. Cyclic M2pep

  14. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow, high above Rogers Dry Lake near the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. R. Dale Reed effectively advocated the project with the support of NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Together, they gained the support of Flight Research Center Director Paul Bikle. After a six-month feasibility study, Bikle gave approval in the fall of 1962 for the M2-F1 to be built. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and Langley research centers--the M2-F2 and the HL

  15. M2-F1 In Tow Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 lifting body is seen here under tow at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 feet where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began.

  16. M2-F1 simulator cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This early simulator of the M2-F1 lifting body was used for pilot training, to test landing techniques before the first ground tow attempts, and to test new control configurations after the first tow attempts and wind-tunnel tests. The M2-F1 simulator was limited in some ways by its analog simulator. It had only limited visual display for the pilot, as well. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne

  17. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  18. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  19. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow by an unseen C-47 at the NASA Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The low-cost vehicle was the first piloted lifting body to be test flown. The lifting-body concept originated in the mid-1950s at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Mountain View California. By February 1962, a series of possible shapes had been developed, and R. Dale Reed was working to gain support for a research vehicle. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at

  20. 20 CFR 10.6 - What special statutory definitions apply to dependents and survivors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What special statutory definitions apply to dependents and survivors? 10.6 Section 10.6 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  1. 20 CFR 10.6 - What special statutory definitions apply to dependents and survivors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true What special statutory definitions apply to dependents and survivors? 10.6 Section 10.6 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  2. What is $$\\Delta m^2_{ee}$$ ?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parke, Stephen

    2016-03-09

    Here, the current short baseline reactor experiments, Daya Bay and RENO (Double Chooz) have measured (or are capable of measuring) an effective Δm2 associated with the atmospheric oscillation scale of 0.5 km/MeV in electron antineutrino disappearance. In this paper, I compare and contrast the different definitions of such an effective Δm2 and argue that the simple, L/E independent definition given by Δmee2≡cos2θ12Δm312+sin2θ12Δm322, i.e. “the νe weighted average of Δm312 and Δm322,” is superior to all other definitions and is useful for both short baseline experiments mentioned above and for the future medium baseline experiments JUNO and RENO-50.

  3. M2-F1 in Tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 lifting body is seen here being towed behind a C-47 at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric re-entry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle.

  4. Newly Installed S-1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three sessions of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Its primary mission was to install the Starboard (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts. This is a view of the newly installed S1 Truss as photographed during the mission's first scheduled EVA. The Station's Canadarm2 is in the foreground. Visible are astronauts Piers J. Sellers (lower left) and David A. Wolf (upper right), both STS-112 mission specialists.

  5. M2-F1 in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This 25-second clip shows Milt Thompson being towed in the M2-F1 behind a C-47 aircraft. The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the Space Shuttles, the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator for the next century's Reusable Launch Vehicle, and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, California, in the mid-1950's, the M2-F1 was built in 1962-63 over a four-month period for a cost of only about $30,000, plus an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed by a souped-up Pontiac convertible until it was airborne. Later a C-47 took over the towing duties. Flown by such famous research pilots as Milt Thompson, Bruce Peterson, Chuck Yeager, and Bill Dana, the lightweight flying bathtub demonstrated that a wingless vehicle shaped for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere from space could be flown and landed safely. Flown from 1963 to 1966, the lightweight M2-F1 paved the way for the heavyweight M2-F2, M2-F3, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B lifting bodies that flew under rocket power after launch from a B-52 mothership. The heavyweights flew from 1966 to 1975, demonstrating the viability and versatility of the wingless configuration and the ability of a vehicle with low lift-over-drag characteristics to fly to high altitudes and then to land precisely with their rocket

  6. Pyruvate kinase M2 at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Reprogrammed metabolism is a key feature of cancer cells. The pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) isoform, which is commonly upregulated in many human cancers, has been recently shown to play a crucial role in metabolism reprogramming, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. In this Cell Science at a glance article and accompanying poster, we provide a brief overview of recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the regulation of PKM2 expression, enzymatic activity, metabolic functions and subcellular location. We highlight the instrumental role of the non-metabolic functions of PKM2 in tumorigenesis and evaluate the potential to target PKM2 for cancer treatment. PMID:25770102

  7. [Stable and efficient expression of hepatitis B virus S antigen and preS1 epitope fusion protein (S/preS1) in CHO cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenxi; Li, Shichong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Miao; Ye, Lingling; Wu, Yanzhuo; Xu, Mingbo; Chen, Zhaolie

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrying preS sequences could be an ideal candidate for a new hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine with higher efficacy. Here we report the success in achieving efficient and stable expression of hepatitis B virus S antigen and preS1 epitope fusion protein (S/preS1) in CHO cells. The HMRCHEF53u/Neo-S/preS1 expression vector carrying S/preS1 gene was constructed and transfected into CHO-S cells. A stable and high-expression CHO cell line, named 10G6, was selected by ELISA and limiting dilution analysis. Western blotting analysis showed S/preS1 expressed from 10G6 cells possessed both S and preS1 antigenicity. 10G6 cells displayed characters of favorable growth and stable S/preS1 expression in repeated batch cultures as evaluated by viable cell density, viability and S/preS1 concentration. And cultivation of 10G6 cells in fed-batch mode resulted in S/preS1 production at 17-20 mg/L with viable cell density at 7 x 10(6)-10 x 10(6) cells/mL. PMID:24660628

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-6a - Category A machinery space-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Category A machinery space-TB/ALL. 30.10-6a Section 30... Definitions § 30.10-6a Category A machinery space—TB/ALL. The term Category A machinery space means any space and trunks and ducts to such a space that contains: (a) Internal combustion machinery used for...

  9. 46 CFR 30.10-6a - Category A machinery space-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Category A machinery space-TB/ALL. 30.10-6a Section 30... Definitions § 30.10-6a Category A machinery space—TB/ALL. The term Category A machinery space means any space and trunks and ducts to such a space that contains: (a) Internal combustion machinery used for...

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-6a - Category A machinery space-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Category A machinery space-TB/ALL. 30.10-6a Section 30... Definitions § 30.10-6a Category A machinery space—TB/ALL. The term Category A machinery space means any space and trunks and ducts to such a space that contains: (a) Internal combustion machinery used for...

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-6a - Category A machinery space-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Category A machinery space-TB/ALL. 30.10-6a Section 30... Definitions § 30.10-6a Category A machinery space—TB/ALL. The term Category A machinery space means any space and trunks and ducts to such a space that contains: (a) Internal combustion machinery used for...

  12. 46 CFR 30.10-6a - Category A machinery space-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Category A machinery space-TB/ALL. 30.10-6a Section 30... Definitions § 30.10-6a Category A machinery space—TB/ALL. The term Category A machinery space means any space and trunks and ducts to such a space that contains: (a) Internal combustion machinery used for...

  13. Exoplanets in the M2K Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyajian, Tabetha; Fischer, Debra; Gaidos, Eric; Giguere, Matt

    2013-07-01

    Late type stars are ideal targets for the detection of low-mass planets residing in habitable zones. In such systems, not only is the stellar noise a minimum, but the lower stellar mass affords larger reflex velocities and the lower stellar luminosity moves the habitable zone inward. The M2K program is a high precision Doppler survey monitoring a couple hundred late-type stars over the past few years in search for such important exoplanetary systems. We present updated orbits of known exoplanet systems and newly detected exoplanet systems that have resulted from this program. We also advertise the Planethunters.org "Guest Scientist" program as well as our survey to measure stellar diameters and temperatures with long baseline optical interferometry.

  14. LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Balin, Yu S; Bairashin, G S; Kokhanenko, G P; Penner, I E; Samoilova, S V

    2011-10-31

    The scanning LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar, which is aimed at probing atmosphere at wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm, is described. The backscattered light is received simultaneously in two regimes: analogue and photon-counting. Along with the signals of elastic light scattering at the initial wavelengths, a 607-nm Raman signal from molecular nitrogen is also recorded. It is shown that the height range of atmosphere probing can be expanded from the near-Earth layer to stratosphere using two (near- and far-field) receiving telescopes, and analogue and photon-counting lidar signals can be combined into one signal. Examples of natural measurements of aerosol stratification in atmosphere along vertical and horizontal paths during the expeditions to the Gobi Desert (Mongolia) and Lake Baikal areas are presented.

  15. Experiment definition phase shuttle laboratory LDRL-10.6 experiment. [applying optical communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The 10.6 microns laser data relay link (LDRL 10.6) program was directed to applying optical communications to NASA's wideband data transmission requirements through the 1980's. The LDRL consists of a transmitter on one or more low earth orbit satellites with an elliptical orbit satellite receivers. Topics discussed include: update of the LDRL design control table to detail the transmitter optical chain losses and to incorporate the change to a reflective beam pre-expander; continued examination of the link establishment sequence, including its dependence upon spacecraft stability; design of the transmitter pointing and tracking control system; and finalization of the transmitter brassboard optical and mechanical design.

  16. Optical response at 10.6 microns in tungsten silicide Schottky barrier diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Boyd, Joseph T.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1987-01-01

    Optical response to radiation at a wavelength of 10.6 microns in tungsten silicide-silicon Schottky barrier diodes has been observed. Incident photons excite electrons by means of junction plasmon assisted inelastic electron tunneling. At 78 K, a peak in the second derivative of current versus junction bias voltage was observed at a voltage corresponding to the energy of photons having a wavelength of 10.6 microns. This peak increased with increasing incident laser power, saturating at the highest laser powers investigated.

  17. Routine testing of diamond-turned optics using a 10.6 micron interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    A 10.6-micron laser unequal-path interferometer for the testing of diamond-turned optics has been designed and built; the device eliminates difficulties associated with surface defects. Zinc selenide optics are used throughout to facilitate alignment in the visible and permit expansion to near IR wavelengths. The output is displayed on a TV monitor through the use of a pyroelectric vidicon. Examples are presented which clearly demonstrate the reduced effect of the diamond-turning surface defects at 10.6 microns, resulting in a more realistic view of the wavefront.

  18. 15 CFR 10.6 - Procedures for acceptance of a recommended standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Acceptance of not less than 60 percent by the producer segment, the distributor segment, and the user and... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for acceptance of a... PROCEDURES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF VOLUNTARY PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.6 Procedures for acceptance of...

  19. 15 CFR 10.6 - Procedures for acceptance of a recommended standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Acceptance of not less than 60 percent by the producer segment, the distributor segment, and the user and... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for acceptance of a... PROCEDURES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF VOLUNTARY PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.6 Procedures for acceptance of...

  20. Absorption coefficient at 10.6 microm in CdTe modulator crystals.

    PubMed

    Tucker, A W; Birnbaum, M; Montes, H; Fincher, C L

    1982-08-15

    The bulk and surface absorption coefficients of CdTe modulator crystals at 10.6 microm were compared with those of single-crystal KC1 and NaCl which served to calibrate the laser calorimeter. High-resistivity (>10(7) ohm/cm) CdTe crystals exhibited a bulk absorption coefficient of 0.0014 cm(-1). PMID:20396150

  1. Fourier transform infrared double-flash experiments resolve bacteriorhodopsin's M1 to M2 transition.

    PubMed Central

    Hessling, B; Herbst, J; Rammelsberg, R; Gerwert, K

    1997-01-01

    The orientation of the central proton-binding site, the protonated Schiff base, away from the proton release side to the proton uptake side is crucial for the directionality of the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. It has been proposed that this movement, called the reprotonation switch, takes place in the M1 to M2 transition. To resolve the molecular events in this M1 to M2 transition, we performed double-flash experiments. In these experiments a first pulse initiates the photocycle and a second pulse selectively drives bR molecules in the M intermediate back into the BR ground state. For short delay times between initiating and resetting pulses, most of the M molecules being reset are in the M1 intermediate, and for longer delay times most of the reset M molecules are in the M2 intermediate. The BR-M1 and BR-M2 difference spectra are monitored with nanosecond step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Because the Schiff base reprotonation rate is kM1 = 0.8 x 10(7) s(-1) in the light-induced M1 back-reaction and kM2 = 0.36 x 10(7) s(-1) in the M2 back-reaction, the two different M intermediates represent two different proton accessibility configurations of the Schiff base. The results show only a minute movement of one or two peptide bonds in the M1 to M2 transition that changes the interaction of the Schiff base with Y185. This backbone movement is distinct from the larger one in the subsequent M to N transition. No evidence of a chromophore isomerization is seen in the M1 to M2 transition. Furthermore, the results show time-resolved reprotonation of the Schiff base from D85 in the M photo-back-reaction, instead of from D96, as in the conventional cycle. Images Scheme 2 PMID:9336202

  2. Atmospheric backscatter vertical profiles at 9.2 and 10.6 microns - A comparative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reports a series of atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements at two widely spaced CO2 laser wavelengths: 9.25 and 10.6 microns. Comparisons are made between backscatter coefficient profiles at these two wavelengths up to 20-km altitude. Measurements such as those reported here can be used to assess the feasibility of coherent CO2 lidar for wind measurements, and they also provide a partial test of backscatter model predictions.

  3. Coupling characteristics of thin-film metal-oxide-metal diodes at 10.6 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Gustafson, T. K.; Izawa, T.

    1975-01-01

    Direct detection experiments have demonstrated the coherent coupling of 10.6 micrometer radiation into photolithographically fabricated metal-oxide-metal tunnel junctions. A CO2 laser beam mechanically chopped at 1 KHz was focused at a variable angle of incidence with a power density of about 10 W/sq cm at the diodes. Diodes in which the junction resistance was much greater than the lead resistance displayed angular characteristics dominated by coherent antenna coupling.

  4. Radiation effects on beta 10.6 of pure and europium doped KCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, H. H.; Maisel, J. E.; Hartford, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Changes in the optical absorption coefficient as a result of X-ray and electron bombardment of pure KCl (monocrystalline and polycrystalline), and divalent europium doped polycrystalline KCl were determined. The optical absorption coefficients were measured by a constant heat flow calorimetric method. Both 300 KV X-irradiation and 2 MeV electron irradiation produced significant increases in beta 10.6, measured at room temperature. The X-irradiation of pure moncrystalline KCl increased beta 10.6 by 0.005/cm for a 113 MR dose. For an equivalent dose, 2 MeV electrons were found less efficient in changing beta 10.6. However, electron irradiation of pure and Eu-doped polycrystalline KCl produced marked increases in adsorption. Beta increased to over 0.25/cm in Eu-doped material for a 30 x 10 to the 14th power electrons/sq cm dose, a factor of 20 increase over unirradiated material. Moreover, bleaching the electron irradiated doped KCl with 649 m light produced and additional factor of 1.5 increase. These findings will be discussed in light of known defect-center properties in KCl.

  5. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema

    INL

    2009-09-01

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  6. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-2 - ACP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(m)-2(b)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (E... determined under § 1.401(m)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). If... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false ACP test. 1.401(m)-2 Section 1.401(m)-2...

  7. Subwavelength transmission grating retarders for use at 10.6 μm.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, D L; Glytsis, E N; Gaylord, T K

    1996-11-01

    Designs are given for gallium-arsenide subwavelength grating retarders operating at 10.6 μm. A design procedure is detailed that takes into account the reflections at all surfaces and that uses numerical optimization to improve the transmittance of the retarders to nearly 100%. It is shown that the homogeneous uniaxial layer model for subwavelength gratings can be used to provide starting points for the Nelder-Mead simplex optimization, obviating the need for stochastic optimization techniques such as simulated annealing. An analysis of the designs with respect to wavelength, angle of incidence, and fabrication tolerances indicates that such grating retarders will perform favorably compared with commercial alternatives. PMID:21127640

  8. Predicted performance of a 10.6 micron pulsed coherent laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical predictions are made for the S/N ratio effects of atmospheric turbulence, target features, and receiver configuration on the performance of a 10.6-micron pulsed coherent laser radar. The predictions obtained are compared with experimental data for two target types: terrain consisting of soil and trees, and a silage tower. It is predicted that the terrain target should be detectable with a 50-mm aperture at ranges of up to 2.5 km for 50 percent of the time; this performance has been achieved in practice.

  9. Nitrogen hydrides in interstellar gas. Herschel/HIFI observations towards G10.6-0.4 (W31C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, C. M.; Black, J. H.; Cernicharo, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Hassel, G. E.; Herbst, E.; Gerin, M.; de Luca, M.; Bell, T. A.; Coutens, A.; Falgarone, E.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Gupta, H.; Kaźmierczak, M.; Lis, D. C.; Mookerjea, B.; Neufeld, D. A.; Pearson, J.; Phillips, T. G.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Stutzki, J.; Vastel, C.; Yu, S.; Boulanger, F.; Dartois, E.; Encrenaz, P.; Geballe, T. R.; Giesen, T.; Godard, B.; Gry, C.; Hennebelle, P.; Hily-Blant, P.; Joblin, C.; Kołos, R.; Krełowski, J.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Menten, K.; Monje, R.; Perault, M.; Plume, R.; Salez, M.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmidt, M.; Teyssier, D.; Péron, I.; Cais, P.; Gaufre, P.; Cros, A.; Ravera, L.; Morris, P.; Lord, S.; Planesas, P.

    2010-10-01

    The HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory has been used to observe interstellar nitrogen hydrides along the sight-line towards G10.6-0.4 in order to improve our understanding of the interstellar chemistry of nitrogen. We report observations of absorption in NH N = 1 ≤ftarrow 0, J = 2 ≤ftarrow 1 and ortho-NH2 11,1 ≥ts 00,0. We also observed ortho-NH3 10 ≥ts00, and 20 ≥ts 10, para-NH3 21 ≥ts 11, and searched unsuccessfully for NH+. All detections show emission and absorption associated directly with the hot-core source itself as well as absorption by foreground material over a wide range of velocities. All spectra show similar, non-saturated, absorption features, which we attribute to diffuse molecular gas. Total column densities over the velocity range 11-54 km s-1 are estimated. The similar profiles suggest fairly uniform abundances relative to hydrogen, approximately 6 × 10-9, 3 × 10-9, and 3 × 10-9 for NH, NH2, and NH3, respectively. These abundances are discussed with reference to models of gas-phase and surface chemistry. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Figures A.1 and A.2 (page 6) are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. CYP2S1: A short review

    SciTech Connect

    Saarikoski, Sirkku T. . E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P.; Hankinson, Oliver; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2005-09-01

    A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

  11. CYP2S1: a short review.

    PubMed

    Saarikoski, Sirkku T; Rivera, Steven P; Hankinson, Oliver; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2005-09-01

    A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation. PMID:16054184

  12. Frequency modulation and demodulation of a 10.6-micron CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Frequency modulation and demodulation in optical communication is done using the 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam as a carrier. A Ge-LiNbO3 acousto-optic device and W-Ni point-contact diode are used as a modulator and a detector, respectively. The frequency of the carrier shifts by f sub zero by driving the modulator with the signal of f sub zero. By using the nonreflected laser beam as a local oscillator, the beat note when the transducer was driven by the signal from the sweep signal generator is obtained at the receiving station. Present experimental observations have demonstrated this, using the subcarrier of 38 MHz and the signal of 1 MHz as the driving frequencies of the modulator.

  13. 10.6% Certified Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Solvent-Polarity-Engineered Halide Passivation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xinzheng; Voznyy, Oleksandr; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Liu, Mengxia; Xu, Jixian; Proppe, Andrew H; Walters, Grant; Fan, Fengjia; Tan, Hairen; Liu, Min; Yang, Zhenyu; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-07-13

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells are solution-processed photovoltaics with broad spectral absorption tunability. Major advances in their efficiency have been made via improved CQD surface passivation and device architectures with enhanced charge carrier collection. Herein, we demonstrate a new strategy to improve further the passivation of CQDs starting from the solution phase. A cosolvent system is employed to tune the solvent polarity in order to achieve the solvation of methylammonium iodide (MAI) and the dispersion of hydrophobic PbS CQDs simultaneously in a homogeneous phase, otherwise not achieved in a single solvent. This process enables MAI to access the CQDs to confer improved passivation. This, in turn, allows for efficient charge extraction from a thicker photoactive layer device, leading to a certified solar cell power conversion efficiency of 10.6%, a new certified record in CQD photovoltaics. PMID:27351104

  14. Physics design for the ATA tapered wiggler 10. 6. mu. FEL amplifier experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1985-10-01

    We are presently designing and constructing a high-gain, tapered wiggler 10.6 ..mu.. FEL amplifier to operate with the 50 MeV ATA e-beam. The initial experiments will be done with a constant period (lambda /SUB w/ =8 cm), 5 m-long linear wiggler. For an input laser power of 800 MW and electron beam brightness of 2.10/sup 5/ A/(rad-cm)/sup 2/, we hope to achieve a trapped particle fraction about0.5 and an energy extraction efficiency of about2% with a about10% taper in the wiggler magnetic field. This taper corresponds to decelerating the trapped particle approximately two full ponderomotive well (i.e. bucket) heights. In this talk, we discuss the physics motivations behind our tapered wiggler design and initial experimental diagnostics.

  15. Draft genome sequence of Phomopsis longicolla isolate MSPL 10-6

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuxian; Darwish, Omar; Alkharouf, Nadim; Matthews, Benjamin; Ji, Pingsheng; Domier, Leslie L.; Zhang, Ning; Bluhm, Burton H.

    2014-01-01

    Phomopsis longicolla is the primary cause of Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. This disease severely affects soybean seed quality by reducing seed viability and oil content, altering seed composition, and increasing frequencies of moldy and/or split beans. It is one of the most economically important soybean diseases. Here, we report the de novo assembled draft genome sequence of the P. longicolla isolate MSPL10-6, which was isolated from field-grown soybean seed in Mississippi, USA. This study represents the first reported genome sequence of a seedborne fungal pathogen in the Diaporthe–Phomopsis complex. The P. longicolla genome sequence will enable research into the genetic basis of fungal infection of soybean seed and provide information for the study of soybean–fungal interactions. The genome sequence will also be valuable for molecular genetic marker development, manipulation of pathogenicity-related genes and development of new control strategies for this pathogen. PMID:26484148

  16. Draft genome sequence of Phomopsis longicolla isolate MSPL 10-6.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuxian; Darwish, Omar; Alkharouf, Nadim; Matthews, Benjamin; Ji, Pingsheng; Domier, Leslie L; Zhang, Ning; Bluhm, Burton H

    2015-03-01

    Phomopsis longicolla is the primary cause of Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. This disease severely affects soybean seed quality by reducing seed viability and oil content, altering seed composition, and increasing frequencies of moldy and/or split beans. It is one of the most economically important soybean diseases. Here, we report the de novo assembled draft genome sequence of the P. longicolla isolate MSPL10-6, which was isolated from field-grown soybean seed in Mississippi, USA. This study represents the first reported genome sequence of a seedborne fungal pathogen in the Diaporthe-Phomopsis complex. The P. longicolla genome sequence will enable research into the genetic basis of fungal infection of soybean seed and provide information for the study of soybean-fungal interactions. The genome sequence will also be valuable for molecular genetic marker development, manipulation of pathogenicity-related genes and development of new control strategies for this pathogen. PMID:26484148

  17. Safety assessment for the S-1 Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R. Jr.; Stencel, J.R.

    1984-02-01

    The S-1 machine is part of the Magnetic Fusion Program. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. S-1 is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power.

  18. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-2 - ACP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(m)-2(b)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (E... determined under § 1.401(m)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1)....

  19. Comet C/2012 S1 (Ison)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granslo, B. H.; Nakano, S.

    2013-12-01

    16.88 16 11 31.6 +19 45 05 0.07+ 0.14+ 15.5 Unsuccessful visual searches for the comet, with estimated limiting magnitudes: Dec. 4.26 UT, [8.0 (B. H. Granslo, Roverkollen, Oslo, Norway, 0.08-m refractor; altitude 5 degrees in twilight); Dec. 8.8, [10.6 (Akie Hashimoto, Chichibu, Saitama-ken, Japan, 25x150 binoculars; communicated by S. Nakano, Sumoto, Japan).

  20. Development of ferromagnetic spinels for optical isolation at 10. 6. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Teegarden, K.J.

    1980-05-01

    Vacuum hot pressing was used to fabricate CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/, CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/ and (1-x) CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/.x CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/ discs with diameters of 1.25 cm from fine powders and small single crystals to relative densities as high as 99.6%. Optical attenuation coefficients of approx. 1.0 cm/sup -1/ at 10.6 m were obtained for CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/, and values of 12.1 cm/sup -1/ and 14.9 cm/sup -1/ for the selenide and sulfur-selenide mixture. Two-and-three-phonon absorption bands were found to limit the transmission of CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/ at lambda > 10 ..mu..m. Extrinsic absorption mechanisms caused the higher attenuation coefficients in CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/ and the mixture. The main extrinsic mechanisms at long wavelengths were free carrier absorption (in CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/) and an impurity absorption band at 16.3 ..mu..m due to Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. At short wavelengths the attenuation coefficient was dominated by scattering from pores and second phases. Free carrier absorption was found to be induced by free selenium present in the starting powders. Suppression of this absorption was achieved by optimizing the hot-pressing procedure in order to remove free selenium. The presence of pores was attributed to incomplete densification arising from the presence of second phases (CdSe and Cr/sub 2/Se/sub 3/) and the absence of plastic deformation as a densification mechanism. Laser damage thresholds of 250 MWcm/sup -2/ and 100 MWcm/sup -2/ were measured at 10.6 ..mu..m for CdCr/sub 2/S/sub 4/ and CdCr/sub 2/Se/sub 4/, respectively.

  1. Microsecond enamel ablation with 10.6μm CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, W. S.; McDonald, A.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Lasers have been previously been used for dental applications, however there remain issues with thermally-induced cracking. In this paper we investigate the impact of pulse length on CO2 laser ablation of human dental enamel. Experiments were carried in vitro on molar teeth without any modification to the enamel surface, such as grinding or polishing. In addition to varying the pulse length, we also varied pulse energy and focal position, to determine the most efficient ablation of dental hard tissue and more importantly to minimize or eradicate cracking. The maximum temperature rise during the multi pulse ablation process was monitored using a set of thermocouples embedded into the pulpal chamber. The application of a laser device in dental surgery allows removal of tissue with higher precision, which results in minimal loss of healthy dental tissue. In this study we use an RF discharge excited CO2 laser operating at 10.6μm. The wavelength of 10.6 μm overlaps with a phosphate band (PO3-4) absorption in dental hard tissue hence the CO2 laser radiation has been selected as a potential source for modification of the tissue. This research describes an in-depth analysis of single pulse laser ablation. To determine the parameters that are best suited for the ablation of hard dental tissue without thermal cracking, a range of pulse lengths (10-200 μs), and fluences (0-100 J/cm2) are tested. In addition, different laser focusing approaches are investigated to select the most beneficial way of delivering laser radiation to the surface (divergent/convergent beam). To ensure that these processes do not increase the temperature above the critical threshold and cause the necrosis of the tissue a set of thermocouples was placed into the pulpal chambers. Intermittent laser radiation was investigated with and without application of a water spray to cool down the ablation site and the adjacent area. Results show that the temperature can be kept below the critical threshold

  2. Cryogenic BRDF measurements at 10.6 micrometers and 0.63 micrometers on contaminated mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiber, B. L.; Bryson, R. J.; Bertrand, W. T.; Wood, B. E.

    1995-02-01

    Effects of contaminants on optical surface are concern for space-based systems. Many systems contain cryogenic optical systems that operate at temperatures where gases condense. This study presents experimental results of the effects of condensed gases and spacecraft contaminants on highly polished (superpolished) mirror surfaces cooled, under vacuum to temperatures near 16 K and 70 K. After condensing contaminants on the mirror, the change in the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) was obtained at wavelengths of 10.6 and 0.6328 um for various contaminant thicknesses up to 15 um. For a mirror surface of 16 K, BRDF changes for the following contaminant films were obtained: air, N2, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, and Ar. For a mirror surface near 70 K, the BRDF changes from condensed films of the following outgassing effluents were measured: RS12M polycyanate, Nusil CV2500 silicone, Solithane 113/Cl 13-300 urethane, RTVS60 silicone, and 1120. In addition, using measured optical properties and the thin-film interference theory-based computer program CALCRT, the spectral reflectance of an 80 K aluminum mirror was calculated for H2O, CO and RTV560. This report was sponsored by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) through Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) and by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Space Environmental Effects Program.

  3. A single-stage GM-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 10.6 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Z. H.; Dong, W. Q.; Qiu, L. M.; Zhang, X. B.; Sun, H.; He, Y. L.; Radebaugh, R.

    2009-05-01

    In order to explore the lowest attainable refrigeration temperature and improve cooling performance at temperatures around 20 K for a single-stage G-M type pulse tube cryocooler (PTC), numerical and experimental studies were performed. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) numerical model known as REGEN was applied to the simulation of a G-M type PTC for the first time. Based on the calculation results, a single-stage G-M type PTC was designed, fabricated and tested. The performance improvement of the regenerator in the temperature range of 10-80 K was investigated. The calculations predicted a lowest temperature of 10 K. A lowest temperature of 10.6 K was achieved experimentally with an input power of 7.5 kW, which is the lowest temperature ever achieved by a single-stage PTC. Further more, the cryocooler can provide a cooling power of 20 W at 20.6 K and 39.5 W at 30 K, respectively.

  4. Genome-wide functional annotation of Phomopsis longicolla isolate MSPL 10-6.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Omar; Li, Shuxian; Matthews, Benjamin; Alkharouf, Nadim

    2016-06-01

    Phomopsis seed decay of soybean is caused primarily by the seed-borne fungal pathogen Phomopsis longicolla (syn. Diaporthe longicolla). This disease severely decreases soybean seed quality, reduces seedling vigor and stand establishment, and suppresses yield. It is one of the most economically important soybean diseases. In this study we annotated the entire genome of P. longicolla isolate MSPL 10-6, which was isolated from field-grown soybean seed in Mississippi, USA. This study represents the first reported genome-wide functional annotation of a seed borne fungal pathogen in the Diaporthe-Phomopsis complex. The P. longicolla genome annotation will enable research into the genetic basis of fungal infection of soybean seed and provide information for the study of soybean-fungal interactions. The genome annotation will also be a valuable resource for the research and agricultural communities. It will aid in the development of new control strategies for this pathogen. The annotations can be found from: http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/phomopsis_longicolla/download.html. NCBI accession number is: AYRD00000000. PMID:27222801

  5. A polymer tandem solar cell with 10.6% power conversion efficiency

    PubMed Central

    You, Jingbi; Dou, Letian; Yoshimura, Ken; Kato, Takehito; Ohya, Kenichiro; Moriarty, Tom; Emery, Keith; Chen, Chun-Chao; Gao, Jing; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    An effective way to improve polymer solar cell efficiency is to use a tandem structure, as a broader part of the spectrum of solar radiation is used and the thermalization loss of photon energy is minimized. In the past, the lack of high-performance low-bandgap polymers was the major limiting factor for achieving high-performance tandem solar cell. Here we report the development of a high-performance low bandgap polymer (bandgap <1.4 eV), poly[2,7-(5,5-bis-(3,7-dimethyloctyl)-5H-dithieno[3,2-b:2′,3′-d]pyran)-alt-4,7-(5,6-difluoro-2,1,3-benzothia diazole)] with a bandgap of 1.38 eV, high mobility, deep highest occupied molecular orbital. As a result, a single-junction device shows high external quantum efficiency of >60% and spectral response that extends to 900 nm, with a power conversion efficiency of 7.9%. The polymer enables a solution processed tandem solar cell with certified 10.6% power conversion efficiency under standard reporting conditions (25 °C, 1,000 Wm−2, IEC 60904-3 global), which is the first certified polymer solar cell efficiency over 10%. PMID:23385590

  6. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

  7. A Study of the DsJ(2317) and DsJ(2460) Mesons in Inclusive ccbar Production near sqrt(s) = 10.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-19

    A study of the D*{sub sJ}(2317){sup +} and D{sub sJ}(2460){sup +} mesons in inclusive c{bar c} production is presented using 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR experiment near {radical}s = 10.6 GeV. Final states consisting of a D{sub s}{sup +} meson along with one or more {pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup {+-}}, or {gamma} particles are considered. Estimates of the mass and limits on the width are provided for both mesons and for the D{sub s1}(2536){sup +} meson. A search is also performed for neutral and doubly-charged partners of the D*{sub sJ}(2317){sup +} meson.

  8. Theoretical Assessment of 178m2Hf De-Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, E P; Chen, M; Descalle, M A; Escher, J E; Loshak, A; Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Pruet, J; Thompson, I J; Wang, T F

    2008-10-06

    This document contains a comprehensive literature review in support of the theoretical assessment of the {sup 178m2}Hf de-excitation, as well as a rigorous description of controlled energy release from an isomeric nuclear state.

  9. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27094081

  10. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27094081

  11. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles. PMID:25985102

  12. The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

  13. M2 polarization enhances silica nanoparticle uptake by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoppstädter, Jessica; Seif, Michelle; Dembek, Anna; Cavelius, Christian; Huwer, Hanno; Kraegeloh, Annette; Kiemer, Alexandra K

    2015-01-01

    While silica nanoparticles have enabled numerous industrial and medical applications, their toxicological safety requires further evaluation. Macrophages are the major cell population responsible for nanoparticle clearance in vivo. The prevailing macrophage phenotype largely depends on the local immune status of the host. Whereas M1-polarized macrophages are considered as pro-inflammatory macrophages involved in host defense, M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties, but also promote tumor growth. We employed different models of M1 and M2 polarization: granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon (IFN)-γ was used to generate primary human M1 cells and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)/interleukin (IL)-10 to differentiate M2 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were polarized towards an M1 type by LPS/IFN-γ and towards M2 by IL-10. Uptake of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (Ø26 and 41 nm) and microparticles (Ø1.75 μm) was quantified. At the concentration used (50 μg/ml), silica nanoparticles did not influence cell viability as assessed by MTT assay. Nanoparticle uptake was enhanced in M2-polarized primary human MDM compared with M1 cells, as shown by flow cytometric and microscopic approaches. In contrast, the uptake of microparticles did not differ between M1 and M2 phenotypes. M2 polarization was also associated with increased nanoparticle uptake in the macrophage-like THP-1 cell line. In accordance, in vivo polarized M2-like primary human tumor-associated macrophages obtained from lung tumors took up more nanoparticles than M1-like alveolar macrophages isolated from the surrounding lung tissue. In summary, our data indicate that the M2 polarization of macrophages promotes nanoparticle internalization. Therefore, the phenotypical differences between macrophage subsets should be taken into consideration in future investigations on nanosafety, but

  14. M2 polarization enhances silica nanoparticle uptake by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hoppstädter, Jessica; Seif, Michelle; Dembek, Anna; Cavelius, Christian; Huwer, Hanno; Kraegeloh, Annette; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2015-01-01

    While silica nanoparticles have enabled numerous industrial and medical applications, their toxicological safety requires further evaluation. Macrophages are the major cell population responsible for nanoparticle clearance in vivo. The prevailing macrophage phenotype largely depends on the local immune status of the host. Whereas M1-polarized macrophages are considered as pro-inflammatory macrophages involved in host defense, M2 macrophages exhibit anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties, but also promote tumor growth. We employed different models of M1 and M2 polarization: granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon (IFN)-γ was used to generate primary human M1 cells and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)/interleukin (IL)-10 to differentiate M2 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were polarized towards an M1 type by LPS/IFN-γ and towards M2 by IL-10. Uptake of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (Ø26 and 41 nm) and microparticles (Ø1.75 μm) was quantified. At the concentration used (50 μg/ml), silica nanoparticles did not influence cell viability as assessed by MTT assay. Nanoparticle uptake was enhanced in M2-polarized primary human MDM compared with M1 cells, as shown by flow cytometric and microscopic approaches. In contrast, the uptake of microparticles did not differ between M1 and M2 phenotypes. M2 polarization was also associated with increased nanoparticle uptake in the macrophage-like THP-1 cell line. In accordance, in vivo polarized M2-like primary human tumor-associated macrophages obtained from lung tumors took up more nanoparticles than M1-like alveolar macrophages isolated from the surrounding lung tissue. In summary, our data indicate that the M2 polarization of macrophages promotes nanoparticle internalization. Therefore, the phenotypical differences between macrophage subsets should be taken into consideration in future investigations on nanosafety, but

  15. Phase I study of postoperative radiotherapy concurrent with S-1 in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Meng; Peng, Xing-chen; Bi, Feng; Wang, Xin; Li, Qiu; Xu, Feng; Li, Zhi-ping; Shen, Ya-li; Liu, Ji-yan; Zhao, Ya-qing; Cao, Dan; Gou, Hong-feng; Yang, Yu; Chen, Ye; Yi, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil is the standard care for gastric cancer patients after curative surgery. The previous studies revealed that the subgroup of patients with high recurrence risk would benefit most from adjuvant CRT. S-1, a novel oral fluorouracil, has showed very effective in metastatic gastric cancer and became the standard option for gastric cancer with D2 dissection. The safety and dosage of S-1 combined with postoperative radiotherapy have not yet been evaluated. This study is to determine the maximum tolerate dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of S-1 given concurrently with postoperative high-dose radiotherapy in gastric cancer. Patients with more advanced stage (pT4 and/or pN+) after R0 resection were recruited. Eligible patients received one cycle standard SOX (S-1 plus oxaliplatin) chemotherapy, then S-1 monotherapy with concurrent radiotherapy for 6 weeks, followed by additional three cycles of SOX. During the concurrent CRT, S-1 was administered on every radiotherapy treatment day according to a predefined dose-escalation schedule. Radiotherapy (3D-RT or IMRT) was given to a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. DLT was defined as grade 3 or 4 hematologic and non-hematologic toxicity. From March 2011 to October 2012, 21 patients were enrolled at five dose levels: 40 (n = 3), 50 (n = 3), 60 (n = 6), 70 (n = 6) and 80 mg/m(2)/day (n = 3). D2-dissection was performed in 18 patients (85.7 %) and 15 patients (71.4 %) had stage III disease. The most common dose-related toxicity was anorexia, nausea and vomiting, fatigue and leucopenia. DLT was occurred in one patient at 60 mg/m(2)/day (grade 3 fatigue), one patient at 70 mg/m(2)/day (grade 3 vomiting and anorexia), two patients at 80 mg/m(2)/day (one with grade 3 vomiting and anorexia; another with grade 3 febrile leucopenia). Four patients did not complete CRT as planned. Overall, this phase I study demonstrated that postoperative CRT with daily S-1

  16. Anatomy of a Discovery: M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles Dudley

    2015-01-01

    M1 and M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo. The unique ability of macrophages to make these polar opposite type of responses provides primary host protection and maintains tissue homeostasis throughout the animal kingdom. In humans and other higher animals, M1 and M2-type macrophage responses also initiate and direct T cells/adaptive immunity to provide additional protection such as Th1 (cytotoxic) or Th2 (antibody-mediated) type responses. Hence, macrophages were renamed M1 and M2 to indicate the central role of macrophages/innate immunity in immune systems. These findings indicate that the long held notion that adaptive immunity controls innate immunity was backward: a sea change in understanding how immune responses occur. The clinical impact of M1/kill and M2/repair responses is immense playing pivotal roles in curing (or causing) many diseases including infections, cancer, autoimmunity, and atherosclerosis. How M1/M2 came to be is an interesting story that, like life, involved Direction, Determination, Discouragement, and Discovery. PMID:25999950

  17. M2-F1 in flight on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here under tow at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The wingless, lifting-body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Flight Research Center management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The M2-F1 project had limited goals. They were to show that a piloted lifting body could be built, that it could not only fly but be controlled in flight, and that it could make a successful landing. While the M2-F1 did prove the concept, with a wooden fuselage and fixed landing gear, it was far from an operational spacecraft. The next step in the lifting-body development was to build a heavyweight, rocket-powered vehicle that was more like an operational lifting body, albeit one without the thermal protection system that would be needed for reentry into the atmosphere from space at near-orbital speeds. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind a NASA C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to

  18. Operational guidance for using DOT-6M/2R packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.; Hummer, J.H.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a new US Department of Energy (DOE), Transportation Management Division task to create a US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 6M/2R packaging configuration user`s guide. The need for a user`s guide was identified because the DOT-6M/2R packaging configuration is widely used by DOE site contractors, and DOE receives many questions about the approved packaging configurations. Currently, two DOE organizations have the authority to approve new DOT-6M/2R configurations. For Defense Programs, the Transportation and Packaging Safety Division (EH-332) administers the program. For Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, the Transportation Management Division (EM-261) administers the program.

  19. Polarized M2 macrophages in dogs with visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pamela Rodrigues Reina; Fernando, Filipe Santos; Montassier, Hélio José; André, Marcos Rogério; de Oliveira Vasconcelos, Rosemeri

    2016-08-15

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the skin (nasal surface and ear regions), lymph nodes (popliteal and pre-scapular), spleen and liver of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis (VL), in order to investigate the relationship between the parasite load measured as DNA copy number of Alpha gene of DNA polymerase of Leishmania infantum by quantitative PCR and the number of M2 macrophages by immunohistochemistry. A set of 29 naturally infected dogs from an endemic area for VL were sampled and another set of six dogs negative for VL and from a non-endemic area were analyzed as the control group (C). The spleen presented the highest number of Leishmania DNA copies, with significant differences between the groups G1 and G2 (with and without skin lesions, respectively). The M2 phenotype immunostaining predominated among the macrophages in granulomas and inflammatory infiltrates of samples from the skin, lymph nodes and spleens examined. The presence of M2 macrophages in dogs from infected group differed significantly from the control group, in all organs analyzed, excepted liver. The highest proportion of M2 macrophages coincided with the highest parasitism loads found in more susceptible organs of VL dogs, even in the skin, considered a more resistant organ, while the liver showed low parasitism load and low immunostaining for M2 macrophages with no significant differences between infected and negative groups. It was concluded that the predominance of M2 phenotype in VL dogs favored the multiplication of Leishmania infantum in organs of dogs that are more susceptible to Leishmania infection, as skin, lymph nodes and spleen. PMID:27514887

  20. M2-F1 on lakebed with pilot Milt Thompson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    NASA Flight Research Pilot Milt Thompson, shown here on the lakebed with the M2-F1 lifting body, was an early backer of R. Dale Reed's lifting-body proposal. He urged Flight Research Center director Paul Bikle to approve the M2-F1's construction. Thompson also made the first glide flights in both the M2-F1 and its successor, the heavyweight M2-F2. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved

  1. M2-F1 ejection seat test at South Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 was fitted with an ejection seat before the airtow flights began. The project selected the seat used in the T-37 as modified by the Weber Company to use a rocket rather than a ballistic charge for ejection. To test the ejection seat, the Flight Research Center's Dick Klein constructed a plywood mockup of the M2-F1's top deck and canopy. On the first firings, the test was unsuccessful, but on the final test the dummy in the seat landed safely. The M2-F1 ejection seat was later used in the two Lunar Landing Research Vehicles and the three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles. Three of them crashed, but in each case the pilot ejected from the vehicle successfully. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with

  2. Genome Characteristics of a Novel Type I Methanotroph (Sn10-6) Isolated from a Flooded Indian Rice Field.

    PubMed

    Rahalkar, Monali C; Pandit, Pranitha S; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Pore, Soham; Arora, Preeti; Kapse, Neelam

    2016-04-01

    Flooded rice fields are important sources of atmospheric methane. Aerobic methanotrophs living in the vicinity of rice roots oxidize methane and act as environmental filters. Here, we present genome characteristics of a gammaproteobacterial methanotroph, isolate Sn10-6, which was isolated from a rice rhizosphere of a flooded field in India. Sn10-6 has been identified as a member of a putative novel genus and species within the family Methylococcaceae (Type I methanotrophs). The draft genome of Sn10-6 showed pathways for the following: methane oxidation, formaldehyde assimilation (RuMP), nitrogen fixation, conversion of nitrite to nitrous oxide, and other interesting genes including the ones responsible for survival in the rhizosphere environment. The majority of genes found in this genome were most similar to Methylovulum miyakonese which is a forest isolate. This draft genome provided insight into the physiology, ecology, and phylogeny of this gammaproteobacterial methanotroph. PMID:26547566

  3. M2e-Based Universal Influenza A Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lei; Cho, Ki Joon; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The successful isolation of a human influenza virus in 1933 was soon followed by the first attempts to develop an influenza vaccine. Nowadays, vaccination is still the most effective method to prevent human influenza disease. However, licensed influenza vaccines offer protection against antigenically matching viruses, and the composition of these vaccines needs to be updated nearly every year. Vaccines that target conserved epitopes of influenza viruses would in principle not require such updating and would probably have a considerable positive impact on global human health in case of a pandemic outbreak. The extracellular domain of Matrix 2 (M2e) protein is an evolutionarily conserved region in influenza A viruses and a promising epitope for designing a universal influenza vaccine. Here we review the seminal and recent studies that focused on M2e as a vaccine antigen. We address the mechanism of action and the clinical development of M2e-vaccines. Finally, we try to foresee how M2e-based vaccines could be implemented clinically in the future. PMID:26344949

  4. M2-F1 in hangar with Pontiac tow vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here in a hangar with its hotrod Pontiac convertible tow vehicle at the Flight Research Center (later the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. The car was a 1963 Pontiac Catalina convertible, fitted with a 421-cubic-inch tripower engine like those being run at the Daytona 500 auto race. The vehicle also had a four-speed transmission and a heavy-duty suspension and cooling system. A roll bar was also added and the passenger seat turned around so an observer could watch the M2-F1 while it was being towed. The rear seat was removed and a second, side-facing seat installed. The lifting-body team used the Pontiac for all the ground-tow flights over the next three years. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey

  5. Perivascular M2 Macrophages Stimulate Tumor Relapse after Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Russell; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Rowan, Charlotte; Muthana, Munitta; Keklikoglou, Ioanna; Olson, Oakley C.; Tazzyman, Simon; Danson, Sarah; Addison, Christina; Clemons, Mark; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Joyce, Johanna A.; De Palma, Michele; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Lewis, Claire E.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor relapse after chemotherapy-induced regression is a major clinical problem, because it often involves inoperable metastatic disease. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are known to limit the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy in preclinical models of cancer. Here, we report that an alternatively activated (M2) subpopulation of TAMs (MRC1+TIE2HiCXCR4Hi) accumulate around blood vessels in tumors after chemotherapy, where they promote tumor revascularization and relapse, in part, via VEGF-A release. A similar perivascular, M2-related TAM subset was present in human breast carcinomas and bone metastases after chemotherapy. Although a small proportion of M2 TAMs were also present in hypoxic tumor areas, when we genetically ablated their ability to respond to hypoxia via hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2, tumor relapse was unaffected. TAMs were the predominant cells expressing immunoreactive CXCR4 in chemotherapy-treated mouse tumors, with the highest levels expressed by MRC1+ TAMs clustering around the tumor vasculature. Furthermore, the primary CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12, was upregulated in these perivascular sites after chemotherapy, where it was selectively chemotactic for MRC1+ TAMs. Interestingly, HMOX-1, a marker of oxidative stress, was also upregulated in perivascular areas after chemotherapy. This enzyme generates carbon monoxide from the breakdown of heme, a gas known to upregulate CXCL12. Finally, pharmacologic blockade of CXCR4 selectively reduced M2-related TAMs after chemotherapy, especially those in direct contact with blood vessels, thereby reducing tumor revascularization and regrowth. Our studies rationalize a strategy to leverage chemotherapeutic efficacy by selectively targeting this perivascular, relapse-promoting M2-related TAM cell population. PMID:26269531

  6. Internal steel structure of M2-F1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The internal steel structure for the M2-F1 was built at the Flight Research Center (predecessor of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) in a section of the calibration hangar dubbed 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' Visible are the stick, rudder pedals, and ejection seat. The external wooden shell was attached to the steel structure. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly

  7. M2-F2 flight preparation and launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This movie clip runs about 27 seconds and shows the cockpit canopy close-out by the ground crew, the aircraft hanging from the NB-52B wing pylon, and the M2-F2 being dropped away from the mothership. A fleet of lifting bodies flown at the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC), Edwards, California, from 1963 to l975 demonstrated the ability of pilots to maneuver (in the atmosphere) and safely land a wingless vehicle. These lifting bodies were basically designed so they could fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an aircraft at a pre-determined site. They served as precursors of today's Space Shuttle, the X-33, and the X-38, providing technical and operational engineering data that shaped all three space vehicles. (In 1976 NASA renamed the FRC as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) in honor of Hugh L. Dryden.) In 1962, FRC Director Paul Bikle approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1. Built by Gus Briegleb, a sailplane builder from El Mirage, California, it featured a plywood shell, placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at the FRC. Construction was completed in 1963. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA Ames Research Center and NASA and Langley Research Center -- the M2-F2 and the HL-10, both built by the Northrop Corporation, Los Angeles, California. The 'M' refers to 'manned' and 'F' refers to 'flight' version. 'HL' comes from 'horizontal landing' and '10' is for the tenth lifting body model to be investigated by Langley. The first flight of the M2-F2 -- which looked much like the M2-F1 -- occurred on July 12, 1966. Thompson was the pilot. By then, the same B-52 used to air launch the famed X-15 rocket research aircraft had been modified to also carry the lifting bodies into the air and Thompson was

  8. Tyrosine 129 of the Murine Gammaherpesvirus M2 Protein Is Critical for M2 Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S.; O’Flaherty, Brigid M.; Speck, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    A common strategy shared by all known gammaherpesviruses is their ability to establish a latent infection in lymphocytes – predominantly in B cells. In immunocompromised patients, such as transplant recipients or AIDS patients, gammaherpesvirus infections can lead to the development of lymphoproliferative disease and lymphoid malignancies. The human gamma-herpesviruses, EBV and KSHV, encode proteins that are capable of modulating the host immune signaling machinery, thereby subverting host immune responses. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection of laboratory strains of mice has proven to be useful small-animal model that shares important pathogenic strategies with the human gamma-herpesviruses. The MHV68 M2 protein is known to manipulate B cell signaling and, dependent on route and dose of virus inoculation, plays a role in both the establishment of latency and virus reactivation. M2 contains two tyrosines that are targets for phosphorylation, and have been shown to interact with the B cell signaling machinery. Here we describe in vitro and in vivo studies of M2 mutants which reveals that while both tyrosines Y120 and Y129 are required for M2 induction of IL-10 expression from primary murine B cells in vitro, only Y129 is critical for reactivation from latency and plasma cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:25122496

  9. Physics design for the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) tapered wiggler 10. 6. mu. FEL (Free-Electron Laser) amplifier experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1985-05-09

    The design and construction of a high-gain, tapered wiggler 10.6 ..mu.. Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier to operate with the 50 MeV e-beam is underway. This report discussed the FEL simulation and the physics motivations behind the tapered wiggler design and initial experimental diagnostics.

  10. Wideband long-pulse operation of an efficient electro-optic modulator at 10.6 microm.

    PubMed

    Harris, N W; Grimm, J G; Eng, R S

    1990-10-15

    High conversion efficiency over a wide microwave band has been achieved in a high-power CdTe single-sideband electro-optic modulator working at 10.6 microm by dividing the modulator into two sections and driving each separately. PMID:19771027

  11. IUE observations of the 'Butterfly' Nebula M2-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    IUE observations of the peculiar 'Butterfy' nebula M2-9 indicate that it is not a normal planetary nebula. The ultraviolet spectrum is characterized by few emission lines and a weak continuum. Mg II 2800 A is the strongest emission line present and may be indicative of a binary nucleus. Lines of N v, Q I, N III, N IV, Si III, and C III are seen, but C IV and O III are conspicuous by their absence. T(e) = 10,250 + or - 400 K was determined for the core. Nitrogen in the core is found to be overabundant by about a factor of 5 over the solar value. M2-9 may be an object in the early stages of becoming a planetary nebula.

  12. M2 world ocean tide from tide gauge measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, O.; Mazzega, P. )

    1991-06-01

    An empirical model of the M2 oceanic tide has been computed form the harmonic constants of a subset of deep sea and coastal tide gauge measurements. The optimal interpolation of these data based on inverse theory' uses a priori covariance functions deduced from a global hydrodynamical model. The inverse solution, produced with its associated error maps and samples of error spectra, is surprisingly good when compared to in situ data and to a hydrodynamical model.

  13. M2 World Ocean tide from tide gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, O.; Mazzega, P.

    An empirical model of the M2 oceanic tide has been computed from the harmonic constants of a subset of deep sea and coastal tide gauge measurements. The optimal interpolation of these data based on “inverse theory” uses a priori covariance functions deduced from a global hydrodynamical model. The inverse solution, produced with its associated error maps and samples of error spectra, is surprisingly good when compared to in situ data and to a hydrodynamical model.

  14. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-2 - ACP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... satisfy the ACP test, but not in excess of 100%. In this case, an increase in the match rate from 50% to... under the ACP test only to the extent they do not exceed 25.00% of compensation. In this case, all of... determined under § 1.401(m)-2(b)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1)....

  15. Photoinducing the hidden M2 phase in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walko, D. A.; Smith, R. K.; Wen, Haidan; Dichiara, A. D.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahensh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    We used time-resolved x-ray diffraction to study photoinduced structural phase transitions in a 170-nm-thick VO2 film grown on sapphire (1,0,-1,0). Heating the unstrained film from room temperature induces the well-known phase transition from the monoclinic (M1) phase directly to the high-temperature tetragonal rutile (R) phase. In contrast, upon ultrafast optical excitation, the phase transition depends strongly on the laser intensity. At low fluences, the film is partially transformed into the monoclinic M2 phase, a phase which generally is observed only in doped or strained materials. Above a threshold at higher fluences, a small portion of the film is transformed into the M2 phase, decaying on a time scale of a few nanoseconds, while the majority of the film is transformed into the R phase which can persist for tens of nanoseconds. We further discuss the effects of laser wavelength on the efficiency of producing the M2 phase. Work at the Advanced Photon Source supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. State-of-the-art Model M-2 Maintenance System

    SciTech Connect

    Herndon, J.N.; Martin, H.L.; Satterlee, P.E. Jr.; Jelatis, D.G.; Jennrich, C.E.

    1984-04-01

    The Model M-2 Maintenance System is part of an ongoing program within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to improve remote manipulation technology for future nuclear fuel reprocessing and other remote applications. Techniques, equipment, and guidelines which can improve the efficiency of remote maintenance are being developed. The Model M-2 Maintenance System, installed in the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) Facility at ORNL, provides a complete, integrated remote maintenance system for the demonstration and development of remote maintenance techniques. The system comprises a pair of force-reflecting servomanipulator arms, television viewing, lighting, and auxiliary lifting capabilities, thereby allowing manlike maintenance operations to be executed remotely within the remote cell mockup area in the IET. The Model M-2 Maintenance System incorporates an upgraded version of the proven Central Research Laboratories' Model M servomanipulator. Included are state-of-the-art brushless dc servomotors for improved performance, remotely removable wrist assemblies, geared azimuth drive, and a distributed microprocessor-based digital control system. 5 references, 8 figures.

  17. M2-F1 under tow across lakebed by car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This 20-second clip shows the M2-F1 being towed by the Pontiac across Rogers Dry Lakebed. The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the Space Shuttles, the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator for the next century's Reusable Launch Vehicle, and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, California, in the mid-1950's, the M2-F1 was built in 1962-63 over a four-month period for a cost of only about $30,000, plus an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed by a souped-up Pontiac convertible until it was airborne. Later a C-47 took over the towing duties. Flown by such famous research pilots as Milt Thompson, Bruce Peterson, Chuck Yeager, and Bill Dana, the lightweight flying bathtub demonstrated that a wingless vehicle shaped for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere from space could be flown and landed safely. Flown from 1963 to 1966, the lightweight M2-F1 paved the way for the heavyweight M2-F2, M2`F3, HL-10, X-24A, and X-24B lifting bodies that flew under rocket power after launch from a B-52 mothership. The heavyweights flew from 1966 to 1975, demonstrating the viability and versatility of the wingless configuration and the ability of a vehicle with low lift-over-drag characteristics to fly to high altitudes and then to land precisely with their

  18. Phase 1 study on S-1 and oxaliplatin therapy as an adjuvant after hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Michiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Oba, Masaru; Saiura, Akio; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Shinozaki, Eiji; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-08-01

    of Background Data The effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer has been confirmed in various studies. However, no adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastasis (CLM) classified to stage IV has been established. Objectives We conducted a phase 1 study of S-1 and oxaliplatin to determine the recommended dose (RD) in patients with CLM as adjuvant therapy in two institutes. Methods S-1 and oxaliplatin were administered from day 1 to day 14 of a 3-week cycle as a 2-h infusion every 3 weeks, respectively. The initial doses of S-1 and oxaliplatin were fixed to 80 mg/m(2) and 100 mg/m(2), respectively (level 1). We scheduled in the protocol a dose change of S-1 and oxaliplatin to level 2 (S-1: 80 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 130 mg/m(2)) or level 0 (S-1: 65 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 100 mg/m(2)) depending on the incidence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at level 1 in six patients. Results Because DLT occurred in one among the initial six patients at level 1, the doses were increased to level 2 in the next six patients. At level 2, grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia occurred in one (16.7 %) and two (33.3 %) patients, respectively, in the absence of non-hematological event. Because no DLT occurred at level 2, we suggest that the RD can be set to the level 2 dose. The median number of cycles delivered at RD was 8. The mean relative dose intensity of S-1 and oxaliplatin at RD was 0.90 and 0.63, respectively. Conclusion In a patient undergoing hepatectomy for CLM, 80 mg/m(2) of S-1 and 130 mg/m(2) of oxaliplatin are recommended as adjuvant therapy. A further study is required to confirm the efficacy and safety of this regimen on a larger scale. PMID:27155613

  19. SDiff gauge theory and the M2 condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandos, Igor A.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2009-02-01

    We develop a general formalism for the construction, in D-dimensional Minkowski space, of gauge theories for which the gauge group is the infinite-dimensional group SDiffn of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms of some closed n-dimensional manifold. We then focus on the D = 3 SDiff3 superconformal gauge theory describing a condensate of M2-branes; in particular, we derive its Script N = 8 superfield equations from a pure-spinor superspace action, and we describe its relationship to the D = 3 SDiff2 super-Yang-Mills theory describing a condensate of D2-branes.

  20. A 10.6mm3 Fully-Integrated, Wireless Sensor Node with 8GHz UWB Transmitter

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeongseok; Kim, Gyouho; Lee, Yoonmyung; Foo, Zhiyoong; Sylvester, Dennis; Blaauw, David; Wentzloff, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a complete, autonomous, wireless temperature sensor, fully encapsulated in a 10.6mm3 volume. The sensor includes solar energy harvesting with an integrated 2 μAh battery, optical receiver for programming, microcontroller and memory, 8GHz UWB transmitter, and miniaturized custom antennas with a wireless range of 7 meters. Full, stand-alone operation was demonstrated for the first time for a system of this size and functionality. PMID:26855848

  1. M2K Planet Search: Spectroscopic Screening and Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Gaidos, E.; Fischer, D.; Lepine, S.

    2010-10-01

    The M2K project is a search for planets orbiting nearby early M and late K dwarf drawn from the SUPERBLINK catalog. M and K dwarfs are highly attractive targets for finding low-mass and habitable planets because (1) close-in planets are more likely to orbit within their habitable zone, (2) planets orbiting them induce a larger Doppler signal and have deeper transits than similar planets around F, G, and early K type stars, (3) planet formation models predict they hold an abundance of super-Earth sized planets, and (4) they represent the vast majority of the stars close enough for direct imaging techniques. In spite of this, only 10% of late K and early M dwarfs are being monitored by current Doppler surveys. As part of the M2K project we have obtained low-resolution spectra for more than 2000 of our sample of 10,000 M and K dwarfs. We vet our sample by screening these stars for high metallicity and low chromospheric activity. We search for transits on targets showing high RMS Doppler signal and photometry candidates provided by SuperWASP project. By using "snapshot” photometry have been able to achieve sub-millimag photometry on numerous transit targets in the same night. With further follow-up observations we will be able to detect planets smaller than 10 Earth masses.

  2. MULTIWAVELENGTH PHOTOMETRY IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M2

    SciTech Connect

    Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F.R.; Beccari, G.; Schiavon, R.; Rood, R.T.

    2009-06-15

    We present a multiwavelength photometric analysis of the globular cluster M2. The data set has been obtained by combining high-resolution (Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 and ACS) and wide-field (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) space observations and ground-based (MEGACAM-CFHT, EMMI-NTT) images. The photometric sample covers the entire cluster extension from the very central regions up to the tidal radius and beyond. It allows an accurate determination of the cluster center of gravity and other structural parameters derived from the star count density profile. Moreover, we study the Blue Straggler Star (BSS) population and its radial distribution. A total of 123 BSSs have been selected, and their radial distribution has been found to be bimodal (highly peaked in the center, decreasing at intermediate radii, and rising outward), as already found in a number of other clusters. The radial position of the minimum of the BSS distribution is consistent with the radius of avoidance caused by the dynamical friction of massive (1.2 M {sub sun}) objects over the cluster age. We also searched for gradients in the red giant branch (RGB) and the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) populations. At the 2{sigma} level, we found an overabundance of AGB stars within the core radius and confirmed the result of Sohn et al. that the central region of M2 is bluer than the outer part. We show that the latter is due to a deficit of very luminous RGB stars in the central region.

  3. KIT oncogene inhibition drives intratumoral macrophage M2 polarization.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, Michael J; Zeng, Shan; Kim, Teresa S; Sorenson, Eric C; Ocuin, Lee M; Balachandran, Vinod P; Seifert, Adrian M; Greer, Jonathan B; Popow, Rachel; Crawley, Megan H; Cohen, Noah A; Green, Benjamin L; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2013-12-16

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major component of the cancer microenvironment. Modulation of TAMs is under intense investigation because they are thought to be nearly always of the M2 subtype, which supports tumor growth. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common human sarcoma and typically results from an activating mutation in the KIT oncogene. Using a spontaneous mouse model of GIST and 57 freshly procured human GISTs, we discovered that TAMs displayed an M1-like phenotype and function at baseline. In both mice and humans, the KIT oncoprotein inhibitor imatinib polarized TAMs to become M2-like, a process which involved TAM interaction with apoptotic tumor cells leading to the induction of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factors. In human GISTs that eventually developed resistance to imatinib, TAMs reverted to an M1-like phenotype and had a similar gene expression profile as TAMs from untreated human GISTs. Therefore, TAM polarization depends on tumor cell oncogene activity and has important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies in human cancers. PMID:24323358

  4. The iron dispersion of the globular cluster M2, revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardo, C.; Mucciarelli, A.; Bastian, N.

    2016-03-01

    M2 has been claimed to possess three distinct stellar components that are enhanced in iron relative to each other. We use equivalent width measurements from 14 red giant branch stars from which Yong et al. detect a ˜0.8 dex wide, trimodal iron distribution to redetermine the metallicity of the cluster. In contrast to Yong et al., which derive atmospheric parameters following only the classical spectroscopic approach, we perform the chemical analysis using three different methods to constrain effective temperatures and surface gravities. When atmospheric parameters are derived spectroscopically, we measure a trimodal metallicity distribution, that well resembles that by Yong et al. We find that the metallicity distribution from Fe II lines strongly differs from the distribution obtained from Fe I features when photometric gravities are adopted. The Fe I distribution mimics the metallicity distribution obtained using spectroscopic parameters, while the Fe II shows the presence of only two stellar groups with metallicity [Fe/H] ≃ -1.5 and -1.1 dex, which are internally homogeneous in iron. This finding, when coupled with the high-resolution photometric evidence, demonstrates that M2 is composed by a dominant population (˜99 per cent) homogeneous in iron and a minority component (˜1 per cent) enriched in iron with respect to the main cluster population.

  5. Marginal fluctuations as instantons on M2/D2-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghdi, M.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce some (anti-) M/D-branes through turning on the corresponding field strengths of the 11- and 10-dimensional supergravity theories over spaces, where we use and for the internal spaces. Indeed, when we add M2/D2-branes on the same directions with the near horizon branes of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena model, all symmetries and supersymmetries are preserved trivially. In this case, we obtain a localized object just in the horizon. This normalizable bulk massless scalar mode is a singlet of and , and it agrees with a marginal boundary operator of the conformal dimension of . However, after performing a special conformal transformation, we see that the solution is localized in the Euclideanized space and is attributable to the included anti-M2/D2-branes, which are also necessary to ensure that there is no back-reaction. The resultant theory now breaks all supersymmetries to , while the other symmetries are so preserved. The dual boundary operator is then set up from the skew-whiffing of the representations and for the supercharges and scalars, respectively, while the fermions remain fixed in of the original theory. Besides, we also address another alternate bulk to boundary matching procedure through turning on one of the gauge fields of the full gauge group along the same lines with a similar situation to the one faced in the AdS/CFT correspondence. The latter approach covers the difficulty already faced with in the bulk-boundary matching procedure for as well.

  6. The iron dispersion of the globular cluster M2, revised

    PubMed Central

    Lardo, C.; Mucciarelli, A.; Bastian, N.

    2016-01-01

    M2 has been claimed to possess three distinct stellar components that are enhanced in iron relative to each other. We use equivalent width measurements from 14 red giant branch stars from which Yong et al. detect a ∼0.8 dex wide, trimodal iron distribution to redetermine the metallicity of the cluster. In contrast to Yong et al., which derive atmospheric parameters following only the classical spectroscopic approach, we perform the chemical analysis using three different methods to constrain effective temperatures and surface gravities. When atmospheric parameters are derived spectroscopically, we measure a trimodal metallicity distribution, that well resembles that by Yong et al. We find that the metallicity distribution from Fe ii lines strongly differs from the distribution obtained from Fe i features when photometric gravities are adopted. The Fe i distribution mimics the metallicity distribution obtained using spectroscopic parameters, while the Fe ii shows the presence of only two stellar groups with metallicity [Fe/H] ≃ −1.5 and −1.1 dex, which are internally homogeneous in iron. This finding, when coupled with the high-resolution photometric evidence, demonstrates that M2 is composed by a dominant population (∼99 per cent) homogeneous in iron and a minority component (∼1 per cent) enriched in iron with respect to the main cluster population. PMID:27274701

  7. Growth of rhodococcus S1 on anthracene.

    PubMed

    Tongpim, S; Pickard, M A

    1996-03-01

    Three slow-growing bacteria were isolated from a mixed culture enriched for growth on anthracene, using creosote-contaminated soil as the inoculum. Organisms were shown to use anthracene by the production of a clear zone around the colony after a mineral salts agar plate was sprayed with anthracene. All three bacteria were nonmotile, nonsporulating, gram-positive rods and stained acid-fast. Physiological and biochemical tests, GC content, and cell wall lipid patterns of whole cell methanolysates indicated that they belonged to the Nocardia-Mycobacterium-Rhodococcus group. On the basis of these characteristics and pyrolysis gas chromatography, they were assigned to the genus Rhodococcus. Growth of the isolates was slow on crystalline anthracene, giving a doubling time of 1.5-3 days, and they grew mainly on the crystal surface. When anthracene was supplied by precipitation from a solvent, doubling time was reduced to 1 day. All three isolates mineralized anthracene but not phenanthrene or naphthalene, nor could they grow on naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene, fluoranthene, acenaphthene, pyrene, chrysene, or naphthacene as sole carbon source. One isolate, Rhodococcus S1, was able to use 2-methylanthracene or 2-chloroanthracene as carbon source but not 1- or 9-substituted analogs. These results suggest that the initial enzyme attacking anthracene in these isolates has a narrow substrate specificity. PMID:8868237

  8. Fast, Low-ionization Emission Regions of the Planetary Nebula M2-42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danehkar, A.; Parker, Q. A.; Steffen, W.

    2016-02-01

    Spatially resolved observations of the planetary nebula M2-42 (PN G008.2-04.8) obtained with the Wide Field Spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope have revealed the remarkable features of bipolar collimated jets emerging from its main structure. Velocity-resolved channel maps derived from the [N ii] λ6584 emission line disentangle different morphological components of the nebula. This information is used to develop a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic model, which consists of an equatorial dense torus and a pair of asymmetric bipolar outflows. The expansion velocity of about 20 km s-1 is measured from the spectrum integrated over the main shell. However, the deprojected velocities of the jets are found to be in the range of 80-160 km s-1 with respect to the nebular center. It is found that the mean density of the collimated outflows, 595 ± 125 cm-3, is five times lower than that of the main shell, 3150 cm-3, whereas their singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur abundances are about three times higher than those determined from the dense shell. The results indicate that the features of the collimated jets are typical of fast, low-ionization emission regions.

  9. Polarimetry of R Aqr and PN M2-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Silvana G.; Sabin, Laurence; Ramírez Vélez; , Julio; Hiriart, David

    2014-08-01

    The bipolar or more complex morphology observed in planetary nebulae have been explained by two principal hypothesis: by the existence of a companion and an accreting disk or by the effects of magnetic field, (or a combination of both). Symbiotics are binary systems and some of them show morphologies similar to those observed on planetary nebulae. This fact could support the binary hypothesis for PNe. We have therefore performed polarimetric observations of symbiotic systems and some planetary nebulae in order, first to detect linear polarisation with POLIMA at the San Pedro Mártir observatory, and ultimately to prove the existence and physical properties of those disks. We present here the first results of a project dedicated to the analysis of the polarisation observed in evolved objects starting with the PN M2-9 and R Aqr.

  10. Parkin Regulates the Activity of Pyruvate Kinase M2*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Li, Fanzhou; Han, Haichao; Chen, Yue; Mao, Zebin; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhao, Yingming; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei; Zhao, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is mutated in most cases of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson disease. It was discovered that Parkin is also mutated in glioblastoma and other human malignancies and that it inhibits tumor cell growth. Here, we identified pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a unique substrate for parkin through biochemical purification. We found that parkin interacts with PKM2 both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction dramatically increases during glucose starvation. Ubiquitylation of PKM2 by parkin does not affect its stability but decreases its enzymatic activity. Parkin regulates the glycolysis pathway and affects the cell metabolism. Our studies revealed the novel important roles of parkin in tumor cell metabolism and provided new insight for therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:26975375

  11. Parkin Regulates the Activity of Pyruvate Kinase M2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Li, Fanzhou; Han, Haichao; Chen, Yue; Mao, Zebin; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhao, Yingming; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei; Zhao, Wenhui

    2016-05-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is mutated in most cases of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson disease. It was discovered that Parkin is also mutated in glioblastoma and other human malignancies and that it inhibits tumor cell growth. Here, we identified pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a unique substrate for parkin through biochemical purification. We found that parkin interacts with PKM2 both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction dramatically increases during glucose starvation. Ubiquitylation of PKM2 by parkin does not affect its stability but decreases its enzymatic activity. Parkin regulates the glycolysis pathway and affects the cell metabolism. Our studies revealed the novel important roles of parkin in tumor cell metabolism and provided new insight for therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:26975375

  12. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry with microbolometer arrays at 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenrijt, Jean-Francois; Georges, Marc P.

    2010-09-20

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry are investigated at long infrared wavelengths. Using such wavelengths allows one to extend the measurement range and decrease the sensitivity of the techniques to external perturbations. We discuss the behavior of reflection by the object surfaces due to the long wavelength. We have developed different experimental configurations associating a CO2 laser emitting at 10.6{mu}m and microbolometer arrays. Phase-shifting in-plane and out-of-plane electronic speckle pattern interferometry and lensless digital holographic interferometry are demonstrated on rotation measurements of a solid object.

  13. Development of a (Hg, Cd)Te photodiode detector, Phase 2. [for 10.6 micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    High speed sensitive (Hg,Cd)Te photodiode detectors operating in the 77 to 90 K temperature range have been developed for the 10.6 micron spectral region. P-N junctions formed by impurity (gold) diffusion in p-type (Hg, Cd) Te have been investigated. It is shown that the bandwidth and quantum efficiency of a diode are a constant for a fixed ratio of mobility/lifetime ratio of minority carriers. The minority carrier mobility and lifetime uniquely determine the bandwidth and quantum efficiency and indicate the shallow n on p (Hg,Cd) Te diodes are preferable as high performance, high frequency devices.

  14. Wideband long-pulse operation of an efficient electro-optic modulator at 10.6 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, N. W.; Grimm, J. G.; Eng, R. S.

    1990-10-01

    A high-efficiency high-power bulk-type CdTe single-sideband electrooptic modulator operating at 10.6 microns was designed by dividing the modulator into two sections and driving each section separately so that the relative phase of the microwave drive and optical beam are identical at the entrance to each section. This was done at selected frequencies at high power and high efficiency and then over a wide instantaneous bandwidth at lower power. High conversion efficiency over a wide microwave band was demonstrated. The experimental data compared well with theoretical predictions, supporting the quantitative theory that predicts further bandwidth improvement with more separately driven modulator sections.

  15. Comparison of cloud boundaries measured with 8.6 mm radar and 10.6 micrometer lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uttal, Taneil; Intrieri, Janet M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most basic cloud properties is location; the height of cloud base and the height of cloud top. The glossary of meteorology defines cloud base (top) as follows: 'For a given cloud or cloud layer, that lowest (highest) level in the atmosphere at which the air contains a perceptible quantity of cloud particles.' Our studies show that for a 8.66 mm radar, and a 10.6 micrometer lidar, the level at which cloud hydrometers become 'perceptible' can vary significantly as a function of the different wavelengths, powers, beamwidths and sampling rates of the two remote sensors.

  16. Structural properties of PbVO3 perovskites under hydrostatic pressure conditions up to 10.6 GPa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Tan, Dayong; Xiao, Wansheng; Song, Maoshuang; Chen, Ming; Xiong, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian

    2012-10-31

    High-pressure synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction experiments were performed on PbVO(3) tetragonal perovskite in a diamond anvil cell under hydrostatic pressures of up to 10.6 GPa at room temperature. The compression behavior of the PbVO(3) tetragonal phase is highly anisotropic, with the c-axis being the soft direction. A reversible tetragonal to cubic perovskite structural phase transition was observed between 2.7 and 6.4 GPa in compression and below 2.2 GPa in decompression. This transition was accompanied by a large volume collapse of 10.6% at 2.7 GPa, which was mainly due to electronic structural changes of the V(4+) ion. The polar pyramidal coordination of the V(4+) ion in the tetragonal phase changed to an isotropic octahedral coordination in the cubic phase. Fitting the observed P-V data using the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with a fixed [Formula: see text] of 4 yielded a bulk modulus K(0) = 61(2) GPa and a volume V(0) = 67.4(1) Å(3) for the tetragonal phase, and the values of K(0) = 155(3) GPa and V(0) = 58.67(4) Å(3) for the cubic phase. The first-principles calculated results were in good agreement with our experiments. PMID:23041755

  17. Behavior of welds in liquid lead containing 10-6 wt% and 10-8 wt% oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, A.; Müller, G.; Weisenburger, A.

    2013-06-01

    Specimens with welded joints of P91 TIG (tungsten inert gas welding), P91 EB (electron beam welding) and frictions stir welding, with P92 (EB), PM2000 (EB) and combination of P91-PM2000 EB were tested 2000 h in stagnant liquid Pb at 550 °C with an oxygen concentration of 10-6 wt% and 10-8 wt%. After exposure at 10-6 wt% all specimens showed an oxide layer on the surface. If the grain size of the welds varies strongly from that of the bulk material like in the friction stir welds, a change in oxide thickness could be observed. Also precipitations which pin the oxide formers or reduce the diffusion rate can lead to thicker oxide layers or a stronger dissolution attack like it was observed on the dissimilar weld P91/PM2000 EB. The specimens have similar microstructures in all regions (weld, heat affected zone and bulk material) and due to a post-weld heat treatment show everywhere the same behavior.

  18. Pyruvate kinase M2 is a phosphotyrosine-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Christofk, H.R.; Vander Heiden, M.G.; Wu, N.; Asara, J.M.; Cantley, L.C.

    2008-06-03

    Growth factors stimulate cells to take up excess nutrients and to use them for anabolic processes. The biochemical mechanism by which this is accomplished is not fully understood but it is initiated by phosphorylation of signalling proteins on tyrosine residues. Using a novel proteomic screen for phosphotyrosine-binding proteins, we have made the observation that an enzyme involved in glycolysis, the human M2 (fetal) isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), binds directly and selectively to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. We show that binding of phosphotyrosine peptides to PKM2 results in release of the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, leading to inhibition of PKM2 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that this regulation of PKM2 by phosphotyrosine signalling diverts glucose metabolites from energy production to anabolic processes when cells are stimulated by certain growth factors. Collectively, our results indicate that expression of this phosphotyrosine-binding form of pyruvate kinase is critical for rapid growth in cancer cells.

  19. Fermi surface behavior in the ABJM M2-brane theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolfe, Oliver; Henriksson, Oscar; Rosen, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We calculate fermionic Green's functions for states of the three-dimensional Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena M2-brane theory at large N using the gauge-gravity correspondence. We embed extremal black brane solutions in four-dimensional maximally supersymmetric gauged supergravity, obtain the linearized Dirac equations for each spin-1 /2 mode that cannot mix with a gravitino, and solve these equations with infalling boundary conditions to calculate retarded Green's functions. For generic values of the chemical potentials, we find Fermi surfaces with universally non-Fermi liquid behavior, matching the situation for four-dimensional N =4 super-Yang-Mills. Fermi surface singularities appear and disappear discontinuously at the point where all chemical potentials are equal, reminiscent of a quantum critical point. One limit of parameter space has zero entropy at zero temperature, and fermionic fluctuations are perfectly stable inside an energy region around the Fermi surface. An ambiguity in the quantization of the fermions is resolved by supersymmetry.

  20. Human pyruvate kinase M2: a multifunctional protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vibhor; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2010-11-01

    Glycolysis, a central metabolic pathway, harbors evolutionary conserved enzymes that modulate and potentially shift the cellular metabolism on requirement. Pyruvate kinase, which catalyzes the last but rate-limiting step of glycolysis, is expressed in four isozymic forms, depending on the tissue requirement. M2 isoform (PKM2) is exclusively expressed in embryonic and adult dividing/tumor cells. This tetrameric allosterically regulated isoform is intrinsically designed to downregulate its activity by subunit dissociation (into dimer), which results in partial inhibition of glycolysis at the last step. This accumulates all upstream glycolytic intermediates as an anabolic feed for synthesis of lipids and nucleic acids, whereas reassociation of PKM2 into active tetramer replenishes the normal catabolism as a feedback after cell division. In addition, involvement of this enzyme in a variety of pathways, protein-protein interactions, and nuclear transport suggests its potential to perform multiple nonglycolytic functions with diverse implications, although multidimensional role of this protein is as yet not fully explored. This review aims to provide an overview of the involvement of PKM2 in various physiological pathways with possible functional implications. PMID:20857498

  1. Modeling of M2 Tidal Circulation in Kyounggi Bay, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Park, Y.; Kim, Y.; Jung, K.; Woo, S.

    2008-12-01

    Kyounggi Bay located along the western coast of Korea is a macrotidal zone of 7.9 m tidal range during the spring tide and tidal flats very well developed. Within the bay there are several islands, and the coast lines are crooked significantly so that the geometry of the bay is very complex. To study the tidal circulation of this area, we conducted numerical modeling using a finite volume coastal ocean model, FVCOM, which could represent the complex topography properly. The model domain is about 40 km × 53 km, and the smallest grid is about 72 m. Therefore, the narrowest waterway, Yeomha, is well resolved. Only M2 tidal forcing is considered at the open boundary. There are three rivers in the bay and experiments were conducted with or without the fresh water discharge from the three rivers. Some of the previous modeling studies showed that the fresh water discharge could reverse the direction of the residual flows in Yeomha Waterways, but in the present experiment the river discharge could not reverse the residual flow. Other aspects of the tidal flow in this area were examined.

  2. Sum rules for M2 and other cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.

    1995-08-01

    Sum rules were derived for parity-changing operators consisting of an odd-l spherical harmonic coupled to the spin operator sigma. The conditions are that the valence nucleons are in the oscillator shell with Q quanta and the shell with Q-1 quanta is full and the shell with Q+1 quanta is empty. Thus this applies to the 1p, 2sd and 3pf as valence shells, where the sum rules would be useful for inelastic electron scattering and other reactions. In particular a complete M2 sum rule was derived including the weak contribution from the orbital operator. The contribution from the spurious center-of-mass motion was also derived. The expression was tested by comparing to summations of transition strengths given by shell-model calculations. For nuclei with mass greater than {approximately}A = 70 one would need to include the effect of the intruding level with Q+1 quanta and J = Q+3/2. This problem will be considered in the coming year.

  3. Exogenous S1P Exposure Potentiates Ischemic Stroke Damage That Is Reduced Possibly by Inhibiting S1P Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjung; Han, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sejin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Choi, Ji Woong; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Initial and recurrent stroke produces central nervous system (CNS) damage, involving neuroinflammation. Receptor-mediated S1P signaling can influence neuroinflammation and has been implicated in cerebral ischemia through effects on the immune system. However, S1P-mediated events also occur within the brain itself where its roles during stroke have been less well studied. Here we investigated the involvement of S1P signaling in initial and recurrent stroke by using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (M/R) model combined with analyses of S1P signaling. Gene expression for S1P receptors and involved enzymes was altered during M/R, supporting changes in S1P signaling. Direct S1P microinjection into the normal CNS induced neuroglial activation, implicating S1P-initiated neuroinflammatory responses that resembled CNS changes seen during initial M/R challenge. Moreover, S1P microinjection combined with M/R potentiated brain damage, approximating a model for recurrent stroke dependent on S1P and suggesting that reduction in S1P signaling could ameliorate stroke damage. Delivery of FTY720 that removes S1P signaling with chronic exposure reduced damage in both initial and S1P-potentiated M/R-challenged brain, while reducing stroke markers like TNF-α. These results implicate direct S1P CNS signaling in the etiology of initial and recurrent stroke that can be therapeutically accessed by S1P modulators acting within the brain. PMID:26576074

  4. Magellan/M2FS Spectroscopy of the Reticulum 2 Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Bailey, John I., III; Koposov, Sergey E.; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn

    2015-08-01

    We present results from spectroscopic observations with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) of 182 stellar targets along the line of sight (LOS) to the newly discovered “ultrafaint” object Reticulum 2 (Ret 2). For 37 of these targets, the spectra are sufficient to provide simultaneous estimates of LOS velocity ({v}{los}, median random error {δ }{v{los}}=1.4 km s-1), effective temperature ({T}{eff}, {δ }{T{eff}}=478 K), surface gravity ({log}g, {δ }{logg}=0.63 dex), and iron abundance ([{Fe}/{{H}}], {δ }[{Fe/{{H}}]}=0.47 dex). We use these results to confirm 17 stars as members of Ret 2. From the member sample we estimate a velocity dispersion of {σ }{v{los}}= {3.6}-0.7+1.0 km s-1 about a mean of < {v}{los}> = {64.3}-1.2+1.2 km s-1 in the solar rest frame (˜ -90.9 km s-1 in the Galactic rest frame), and a metallicity dispersion of {σ }[{Fe/{{H}}]} = {0.49}-0.14+0.19 dex about a mean of < [{Fe}/{{H}}]> = -{2.58}-0.33+0.34. These estimates marginalize over possible velocity and metallicity gradients, which are consistent with zero. Our results place Ret 2 on chemodynamical scaling relations followed by the Milky Way’s dwarf-galactic satellites. Under assumptions of dynamic equilibrium and negligible contamination from binary stars—both of which must be checked with deeper imaging and repeat spectroscopic observations—the estimated velocity dispersion suggests a dynamical mass of M({R}{{h}})≈ 5{R}{{h}}{σ }{v{los}}{}2/(2G) = {2.4}-0.8+1.4× {10}5 {M}⊙ enclosed within projected halflight radius {R}{{h}}˜ 32 pc, with mass-to-light ratio ≈ 2M({R}{{h}})/{L}V = {467}-168+286 in solar units. This paper presents data gathered with the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  5. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  6. Effect of oxidizable electrode material on resistive switching characteristics of ZnO(x)S(1-x) films.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoungah; Park, Sukhyung; Chung, Isaac; Kim, Sangsig

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the memory characteristics of ZnO(x(S(1-x) based resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) devices with Al and Pt bottom electrodes (BEs). Both the ReRAM devices with Al and Pt BEs exhibit unipolar resistive switching behaviors, regardless of the materials of the BEs. The ratios of the high resistance state (HRS) to the low resistance state (LRS) of the Au/annealed ZnO(x)S(1-x)/Al and the Au/annealed ZnO(x)S(1-x)/Pt devices are more than 10(6) and 10(4), respectively. The HRS depends more significantly on the material of the BE than the LRS. The resistance in the HRS of the device with the Al BE is more stable in the endurance characteristics and higher in magnitude than that of the device with the Pt BE. For an anealed ZnO(x)S(1-x)/Al film, the oxygen signal in the auger depth profile shows the formation of an AIO(x) layer at the interface between the annealed ZnO(x)S(1-x) layer and the Al BE. The difference between the memory characteristics of the annealed ZnO(x)S(1-x) devices with the Al and Pt BEs is explained with the presence or absence of the oxidized layers formed in the interfaces between the annealed ZnO(x)S(1-x) films and the BEs. PMID:25958497

  7. Conformationally Constrained, Stable, Triplet Ground State (S = 1) Nitroxide Diradicals. Antiferromagnetic Chains of S = 1 Diradicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Takahashi, Masahiro; Pink, Maren; Spagnol, Gaelle; Rajca, Suchada

    2008-06-30

    Nitroxide diradicals, in which nitroxides are annelated to m-phenylene forming tricyclic benzobisoxazine-like structures, have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, magnetic resonance (EPR and {sup 1}H NMR) spectroscopy, as well as magnetic studies in solution and in solid state. For the octamethyl derivative of benzobisoxazine nitroxide diradical, the conformationally constrained nitroxide moieties are coplanar with the m-phenylene, leading to large values of 2J (2J/k > 200 K in solution and 2J/k >> 300 K in the solid state). For the diradical, in which all ortho and para positions of the m-phenylene are sterically shielded, distortion of the nitroxide moieties from coplanarity is moderate, such that the singlet-triplet gaps remain large in both solution (2J/k > 200 K) and the solid state (2J/k {approx} 400-800 K), though an onset of thermal depopulation of the triplet ground state is detectable near room temperature. These diradicals have robust triplet ground states with strong ferromagnetic coupling and good stability at ambient conditions. Magnetic behavior of the nitroxide diradicals at low temperature is best fit to the model of one-dimensional S = 1 Heisenberg chains with intrachain antiferromagnetic coupling. The antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = 1 diradicals may be associated with the methyl nitroxide C-H {hor_ellipsis} O contacts, including nonclassical hydrogen bonds. These unprecedented organic S = 1 antiferromagnetic chains are highly isotropic, compared to those of the extensively studied Ni(II)-based chains.

  8. Synthesis of silicon-based nanoparticles by 10.6 μm nanosecond CO2 laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, D. M.; Chai, J. S.; Zekic, A. A.; Trtica, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Maletic, S.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon-based nanoparticles were produced by irradiating a single-crystal silicon target with 10.6 μm nanosecond transverse excited atmospheric (TEA) pulsed CO2 laser in de-ionized water. The effects of the laser pulse energies and repetition rate were studied. To reveal the role of thermal effects, a low laser repetition rate has been applied, excluding the interaction of the laser beam with the previously generated cavitation bubble. The analysis of the influence of the laser pulse energies and the laser repetition rate showed that the increase of the laser pulse energies leads to an increase of the nanoparticle size. An explanation of such results was proposed and the importance of the role of the target surface temperature in the ablation process is discussed.

  9. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in endothelial cells by S1P1 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Tölle, M; Klöckl, L; Wiedon, A; Zidek, W; van der Giet, M; Schuchardt, M

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Lysophospholipid interaction with sphingosine 1-phosphat (S1P) receptors results in eNOS activation in different cells. In endothelial cells, eNOS activation via S1P1 or S1P3 was shown controversially. The aim of this study is to investigate the meaning of both S1P receptors for eNOS activation in human endothelial cells. Therefore, several S1P1 and S1P3 agonists in combination with antagonists and specific RNAi approach were used. eNOS activation was measured in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) via DAF2-DA-based fluorescence microscopy. For investigation of the signaling pathway, agonists/antagonist studies, RNAi approach, Luminex™ multiplex, and Western Blot were used. In HUVEC, both the S1P1 agonist AUY954 as well as the S1P1,3 agonist FTY720P induced eNOS activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Other S1P1 agonists activated eNOS to a lesser extent. The AUY954-induced eNOS activation was blocked by the S1P1 antagonist W146, the combination of W146 and the S1P3 antagonist CAY10444 and the S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by CAY10444 indicating the meaning of S1P1 for the AUY954-induced eNOS activation. The FTY720P-induced eNOS activation was blocked only by the combination of W146 and CAY10444 and the combined S1P1,3 antagonist VPC23019, but not by W146 or CAY10444 indicating the importance of both S1P1 and S1P3 for FTY720-induced eNOS activation. These results were confirmed using specific siRNA against S1P1 and S1P3. The S1P1,3 activation results in Akt phosphorylation and subsequent activation of eNOS via phosphorylation at serine(1177) and dephosphorylation at threonine(495). Beside former investigations with rather unspecific S1P receptor activation these data show potent selective S1P1 activation by using AUY954 and with selective S1P receptor inhibition evidence was provided that both S1P1 and S1P3 lead to downstream activation of eNOS in

  10. 12 CFR Appendix M2 to Part 1026 - Sample Calculations of Repayment Disclosures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sample Calculations of Repayment Disclosures M2 Appendix M2 to Part 1026 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 1026, App. M2 Appendix M2 to Part 1026—Sample Calculations of Repayment Disclosures...

  11. 12 CFR Appendix M2 to Part 226 - Sample Calculations of Repayment Disclosures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sample Calculations of Repayment Disclosures M2 Appendix M2 to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 226, App. M2 Appendix M2 to Part...

  12. 12 CFR Appendix M2 to Part 1026 - Sample Calculations of Repayment Disclosures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sample Calculations of Repayment Disclosures M2 Appendix M2 to Part 1026 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 1026, App. M2 Appendix M2 to Part 1026—Sample Calculations of Repayment Disclosures...

  13. 12 CFR Appendix M2 to Part 226 - Actual Repayment Disclosures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual Repayment Disclosures M2 Appendix M2 to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 226, App. M2 Appendix M2 to Part 226—Actual Repayment Disclosures (a) Calculating actual...

  14. Roles for lysophospholipid S1P receptors in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kyoko; Chun, Jerold

    2011-02-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been highlighted by the efficacy of FTY720 (fingolimod), which upon phosphorylation can modulate S1P receptor activities. FTY720 has become the first oral treatment for relapsing MS that was approved by the FDA in September 2010. Phosphorylated FTY720 modulates four of the five known S1P receptors (S1P(1), S1P(3), S1P(4), and S1P(5)) at high affinity. Studies in human MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), have revealed that FTY720 exposure alters lymphocyte trafficking via sequestration of auto-aggressive lymphocytes within lymphoid organs, representing the current understanding of its mechanism of action. These effects primarily involve S1P(1), which is thought to attenuate inflammatory insults in the central nervous system (CNS). In addition, FTY720's actions may involve direct effects on S1P receptor-mediated signaling in CNS cells, based upon the known expression of S1P receptors in CNS cell types relevant to MS, access to the CNS through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and in vitro studies. These data implicate lysophospholipid signaling--via S1P(1) and perhaps other lysophospholipid receptors--in therapeutic approaches to MS and potentially other diseases with immunological and/or neurological components. PMID:20979571

  15. Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Alterations and Declined M2 Receptor Density Were Involved in Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats after Long Term Treatment with Autoantibodies against M2 Muscarinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Li; Wu, Ye; Wang, Jie; Lv, Tingting; Liu, Huirong

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that autoantibodies (M2-AA) against the second extracellular loop of M2 muscarinic receptor (M2AChR-el2) from dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) serum could induce DCM-like morphological changes in mice hearts. However, the effects of M2-AA on the cardiac function during the process of DCM and the potential mechanisms are not fully known. The present study was designed to dynamically observe the cardiac function, mitochondrial changes, and M2 receptor binding characteristics in rats long-term stimulated with M2-AA in vivo. Methods M2-AA-positive model was established by actively immunizing healthy male Wistar rats with synthetic M2AChR-el2 peptide for 18 months. Meanwhile, vehicle group rats were administrated with physiological saline. The change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was detected by radionuclide imaging. The ultrastructure of mitochondria was observed under electron microscopy. The M2 receptor binding characteristics were determined by radioactive ligand binding assay. Results After immunization for 12 months, compared with vehicle group, M2AChR-el2-immunized rats showed decreased myocardial contractility and cardiac diastolic function evidenced by declined maximal rate of rise of ventricular pressure and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, respectively. Additionally, mitochondrial swelling and vacuolation were observed. At 18 months, M2AChR-el2-immunized rats manifested significant decreased cardiac systolic and diastolic function and pathological changes such as enlargement of right ventricular cavity and wall thinning; and the mitochondrial damage was aggravated. Furthermore, the M2 receptor maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of the M2AChR-el2-immunized rats significantly decreased, while the M2 receptor dissociation constant (Kd) was increased. Conclusions Our study suggested that long-term stimulation with M2-AA leaded to the ventricular dilatation and gradual deterioration of cardiac dysfunction

  16. Measurement of Double Charmonium Production in$e^+e^-$ Annihilations at $\\sqrt{s}=10.6$ GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-29

    The authors study e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} J/{psi} c{bar c} by measuring the invariant mass distribution recoiling against fully reconstructed J/{psi} decays, using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with a center-of-mass energy of 10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector. They observe signals for {eta}{sub c}(1S), {chi}{sub c0}, and {eta}{sub c}(2S) in the recoil mass distribution, thus confirming previous measurements. The authors measure {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} J/{psi} + c{bar c}){Beta}(c{bar c} {yields} > 2 charged) to be 17.6 {+-} 2.8(stat){sub -2.1}{sup +1.5}(syst) fb, 10.3 {+-} 2.5(stat){sub -1.8}{sup +1.4}(syst) fb, and 16.4 {+-} 3.7(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +2.4}(syst) fb with c{bar c} = {eta}{sub c}(1S), {chi}{sub c0}, and {eta}{sub c}(2S), respectively.

  17. The Charpy impact properties of martensitic 10.6% Cr steel (MANET-1) before and after neutron exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.; Rohrig, H.D.

    1994-12-31

    The MANET-I martensitic 10.6% Cr type of steel was developed as a potential structural material for the first wall and the blanket of a fusion device within the framework of the Nuclear Fusion Project. An extensive irradiation program (FRUST/SIENA) was elaborated to study the influence of radiation upon the Charpy impact characteristics. In addition to unirradiated reference specimens, 87 irradiated subsize Charpy specimens (3 x 4 x 27 mm{sup 3}) were examined under eight different heat treatments at irradiation temperatures between 287{degrees}C and 475{degrees}C and exposure doses of 5 dpa to 15 dpa. On the basis of the numerous test results and their interpretation it is possible to describe radiation induced material embrittlement, and, consequently, the deterioration of the Charpy impact properties. The description is limited, on the one hand, by the variations in the test results and, on the other hand, by the gaps in the test matrix. Therefore, additional investigations, especially in the low irradiation temperature and low dose regimes will be the subject of further ongoing work.

  18. THE HIGH-VELOCITY MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN MASSIVE CLUSTER-FORMING REGION G10.6-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: pho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t

    2010-12-20

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the {sup 12}CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity {sup 12}CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, {approx}10{sup 5} years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 10{sup 47} erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  19. Resonating Valence Bond states for low dimensional S=1 antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Xin; Zhou, Yi; Ng, Tai-Kai

    2014-03-01

    We study S = 1 spin liquid states in low dimensions. We show that the resonating-valence-bond (RVB) picture of S = 1 / 2 spin liquid state can be generalized to S = 1 case. For S = 1 system, a many-body singlet (with even site number) can be decomposed into superposition of products of two-body singlets. In other words, the product states of two-body singlets, called the singlet pair states (SPSs), are over complete to span the Hilbert space of many-body singlets. Furthermore, we generalized fermionic representation and the corresponding mean field theory and Gutzwiller projected stats to S = 1 models. We applied our theory to study 1D anti-ferromagnetic bilinear-biquadratic model and show that both the ground states (including the phase transition point) and the excited states can be understood excellently well within the framework. Our method can be applied to 2D S = 1 antiferromagnets.

  20. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  1. Motion-to-Energy (M2Eâ?¢) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  2. Motion-to-Energy (M2Eâ„¢) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2008-05-30

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  3. Validity of using recombinant melon profilin, Cuc m 2, for diagnosis of melon allergy

    PubMed Central

    Sankian, Mojtaba; Bagheri, Yaser; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Varasteh, Abdol-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Allergy is a clinical disorder affecting humans worldwide. Allergenic extracts prepared from natural source materials remain heterogeneous in composition and content, but are regularly used for diagnosis and immunotherapy. Recombinant allergens are suitable candidates to use in place of natural allergens; however, the recombinant allergens should be assessed and compared with the natural ones. Cuc m 2 (profilin), one of the most important allergens of melon (Cucumis melo), has been cloned and was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli). We aimed to evaluate the validity of recombinant Cuc m 2 (rCuc m 2) in the diagnosis of melon allergy and investigate whether rCuc m 2 could be used as a replacement for natural Cuc m 2 (nCuc m 2). Methods: nCuc m 2 was purified by immuno-affinity chromatography and rCuc m 2 was purified by metal-affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE and western blotting were carried out to evaluate the purification methods. Skin prick tests (SPT), and enzyme immunoassays to determine specific IgE, were performed with the natural and recombinant purified allergens on 53 patients with melon allergy. Results: rCuc m 2 elicited no significantly different responses in skin compared with nCuc m 2. All patients' sera showed similar ODs in ELISAs with natural and recombinant profilin. Conclusion: rCuc m 2 evoked strong immuno-reactivity equivalent to nCuc m 2, and has potential for diagnosis of melon allergy. PMID:26989703

  4. Precision polarizability measurements of atomic cesium's 8 s 2S1 / 2 and 9 s 2S1 / 2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Hannah; Kortyna, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    We report hyperfine-resolved scalar polarizabilities for cesium's 8 s 2S1 / 2 and 9 s 2S1 / 2 states using resonant two-photon spectroscopy. Two single-mode, external-cavity diode lasers drive the 6 s 2S1 / 2 --> 6 p 2P1 / 2 --> ns 2S1 / 2 transition (n = 8 or 9). Both laser beams are split and counter-propagate through an effusive beam and a vapor cell. An electric field applied across two parallel plates imposes Stark shifts on the ns 2S1 / 2 levels in the effusive beam. Electric-field strengths are measured in situ. The laser frequency is calibrated in the vapor cell using a phase modulation technique, with the modulation frequency referenced to the ground-state hyperfine splitting of atomic rubidium. Our measured 8 s 2S1 / 2 polarizability, 38370 +/- 380 a03, agrees with previous theory and experiments. Our measured 9 s 2S1 / 2 polarizability, 150700 +/- 1100 a03, agrees within two sigma of theory, but we are unaware of previous measurements. We also verify that these polarizabilities are independent of the hyperfine levels, placing upper limits on the differential polarizabilities of 200 +/- 260 a03 for the 8 s 2S1 / 2 state and 490 +/- 450 a03 for the 9 s 2S1 / 2 state. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-0653107.

  5. PPARγ Ligands Switched High Fat Diet-Induced Macrophage M2b Polarization toward M2a Thereby Improving Intestinal Candida Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Olagnier, David; Bernad, José; Perez, Laurence; Burcelin, Rémy; Valentin, Alexis; Auwerx, Johan; Pipy, Bernard; Coste, Agnès

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammation that predisposes to insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes. In this metabolic context, gastrointestinal (GI) candidiasis is common. We recently demonstrated that the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone promotes the clearance of Candida albicans through the activation of alternative M2 macrophage polarization. Here, we evaluated the impact of high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and the effect of rosiglitazone (PPARγ ligand) or WY14643 (PPARα ligand) both on the phenotypic M1/M2 polarization of peritoneal and cecal tissue macrophages and on the outcome of GI candidiasis. We demonstrated that the peritoneal macrophages and the cell types present in the cecal tissue from HF fed mice present a M2b polarization (TNF-αhigh, IL-10high, MR, Dectin-1). Interestingly, rosiglitazone induces a phenotypic M2b-to-M2a (TNF-αlow, IL-10low, MRhigh, Dectin-1high) switch of peritoneal macrophages and of the cells present in the cecal tissue. The incapacity of WY14643 to switch this polarization toward M2a state, strongly suggests the specific involvement of PPARγ in this mechanism. We showed that in insulin resistant mice, M2b polarization of macrophages present on the site of infection is associated with an increased susceptibility to GI candidiasis, whereas M2a polarization after rosiglitazone treatment favours the GI fungal elimination independently of reduced blood glucose. In conclusion, our data demonstrate a dual benefit of PPARγ ligands because they promote mucosal defence mechanisms against GI candidiasis through M2a macrophage polarization while regulating blood glucose level. PMID:20877467

  6. A phase I dose escalation study of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy in elderly patients with esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yongling; Qiu, Guoqing; Sheng, Liming; Sun, Xiaojiang; Zheng, Yuanda; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) are often associated with significant incidence of toxic effects in elderly patients with esophageal cancer. This phase I trial was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of S-1, an oral 5-FU derivative, when given with radiotherapy in elderly patients. Methods Patients who were age of 70 years or older with histologically confirmed esophageal cancer, and had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score of 0–2 were eligible for this study. Radiotherapy was administered in 1.8 Gy fractions 5 times weekly to a total dose of 54 Gy. S-1 was administered on days 1–14 and 29–42 at the following dosages: 60, 70, and 80 mg/m2/day. Trial registration: NCT01175447 (ClinicalTrials.gov). Results Twelve previously untreated patients were enrolled in this study. No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in six patients treated at the 60 and 70 mg/m2 dose levels. DLT was observed in four of six patients treated at the 80 mg/m2 dose level. Two patients developed grade 3 esophagitis, one patient developed grade 3 esophagitis and pneumonitis, and one patient developed grade 3 thrombocytopaenia. Endoscopic complete response (CR) was observed in eight patients (66.7%). The median progression free survival (PFS) was 20 months and median overall survival was 29 months. Conclusions The MTD of S-1 was 80 mg/m2, and the recommended dose (RD) for phase II studies was 70 mg/m2. This regimen was well tolerated and active in elderly patients with esophageal cancer, meriting further investigation in phase II studies. PMID:27076940

  7. Influenza M2 Transmembrane Domain Senses Membrane Heterogeneity and Enhances Membrane Curvature.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chian Sing; Khadka, Nawal K; She, Fengyu; Cai, Jianfeng; Pan, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    Targeting host cell membranes by M2 of influenza A virus is important for virus invasion and replication. We study the transmembrane domain of M2 (M2TM) interacting with mica-supported planar bilayers and free-standing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Using solution atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that the size of M2TM oligomers is dependent on lipid composition. The addition of M2TM to lipid bilayers containing liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases reveals that M2TM preferentially partitions into the Ld phase; phase-dependent partitioning results in a larger rigidity of the Ld phase. We next use fluorescence microscopy to study the effects of M2TM on phase-coexisting GUVs. In particular, M2TM is found to increase GUVs' miscibility transition temperature Tmix. The augmented thermodynamic stability can be accounted for by considering an enhanced energy barrier of lipid mixing between coexisting phases. Our GUV study also shows that M2TM can elicit an array of vesicle shapes mimicking virus budding. M2TM enhanced membrane curvature is consistent with our AFM data, which show altered membrane rigidity and consequently line tension at domain edges. Together, our results highlight that in addition to conducting protons, M2TM can actively regulate membrane heterogeneity and augment membrane curvature. PMID:27285399

  8. Understanding the Mysterious M2 Macrophage through Activation Markers and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rőszer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The alternatively activated or M2 macrophages are immune cells with high phenotypic heterogeneity and are governing functions at the interface of immunity, tissue homeostasis, metabolism, and endocrine signaling. Today the M2 macrophages are identified based on the expression pattern of a set of M2 markers. These markers are transmembrane glycoproteins, scavenger receptors, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and cytokine receptors with diverse and often yet unexplored functions. This review discusses whether these M2 markers can be reliably used to identify M2 macrophages and define their functional subdivisions. Also, it provides an update on the novel signals of the tissue environment and the neuroendocrine system which shape the M2 activation. The possible evolutionary roots of the M2 macrophage functions are also discussed. PMID:26089604

  9. Pharmacological comparison of the cloned human and rat M2 muscarinic receptor genes expressed in the murine fibroblast (B82) cell line.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, I; Yamamura, H I; Waite, S L; Varga, E V; Roeske, W R

    1998-02-01

    The coding sequence of the human m2 receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and stably transfected into a murine fibroblast cell line (B82). We have compared the human M2 clonal cell line (HM2-B10) with the previously established B82 cell line (M2LKB2-2) expressing the rat M2 receptor to assess drug specificity, drug selectivity and effector coupling. Both transfected cell lines showed a high level of specific, saturable [3H](-)-N-methyl-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding with Kd values of 243 pM (155-352 pM) and 345 pM (234-539 pM) and Bmax values of 97 +/- 4 and 338 +/- 16 fmol/10(6) cells, respectively. Inhibition of [3H](-)-N-methyl-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to HM2-B10 cells and M2LKB2-2 cells showed the same rank order of potency for the antagonists: atropine > dexetimide > 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide > himbacine > methoctramine > 11-[[2-[(diethylamino) methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5,11-dihidro-6H-pyrido-[2,3-b](1, 4)-benzodiazepine-6-one > hexahydro-sila-difenidol hydro-chloride > pirenzepine. Correlation analysis of the pKi values indicate that the expressed human and rat M2 receptors have nearly identical ligand-binding characteristics. Carbachol inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation with similar potency in both cell lines [EC50 = 2.4 microM (0.2-2.8) and 1.1 microM (0.2-5.3) for the human and rat M2 receptor, respectively]. In the M2LKB2-2 cells, carbachol slightly stimulated the [3H]inositol monophosphate formation but had no significant effect in HM2-B10 cells. In conclusion, the human and rat M2 receptors expressed in the B82 cell line have very similar binding properties but exhibit slight differences in effector coupling mechanisms. PMID:9454790

  10. Degenerative Sacrolisthesis of S1-S2: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rajendra, Thakre Kunwar; Issac, Thomas; Swamy, B Mallikarjuna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is usually seen at L4-L5 level and less frequently at L5-S1 level. This is a rare case report of spondylolisthesis of S1 over S2 with lumbarization of S1. Lumbarization of S1 is seen in just 1-2% of the population and to have spondylolisthesis in this segment is even rarer. The purpose is to report a rare case of DS at S1-S2 level. Case Report: This is a single case report of a 66-year-old gentleman who presented with complains of lower backache for 2 years and acute retention of urine to the emergency department. Detailed clinical and radiological evaluation of the spine was done which revealed lumbarization of S1 with spondylolisthesis at S1-S2 and facetal hypertrophy at L5, S1, and S2. He underwent decompression and stabilization at L5, S1, and S2 along with placement of autologous bone graft. The bladder symptoms disappeared after 3 weeks. At 1-year follow-up, patient’s clinical symptoms were relieved, and he improved clinically. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is probably the first case of DS of sacral vertebrae to be reported in English literature. The prevalence of complete lumbarization is around 1.8% and to get spondylolisthesis in this segment is even rarer, hence the lack of literature in this regard. Since this is the first of its kind of case, further case series or longitudinal studies of such cases may help understand better the pathomechanics related to spondylolisthesis at this level. PMID:27299082

  11. Effects of 2.1 and 3.5x10(6) sex-sorted sperm dosages on conception rates of Holstein cows and heifers.

    PubMed

    DeJarnette, J M; McCleary, C R; Leach, M A; Moreno, J F; Nebel, R L; Marshall, C E

    2010-09-01

    The objective was to compare conceptions rates of Holstein cows and heifers after artificial insemination (AI) with 2.1 or 3.5x10(6) sex-sorted sperm or 15x10(6) conventional sperm. Ejaculates collected from 7 Holstein sires were cryopreserved conventionally at 15x10(6) sperm per dose or sorted to 90% purity for X-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa using flow cytometry and cryopreserved at either 2.1 or 3.5x10(6) sperm per dose. All treatments were processed in an egg-yolk (20%), Tris, glycerol (7%) extender and packaged in color-coded 0.25-mL French straws. Straws (n=700 straws/dosage per sire) were packaged and distributed in aliquots of 12 (4 straws/sperm dosage) to 69 Holstein herds with an across-herd goal of achieving approximately 50% use in heifers and cows. Straw color was recorded in the on-farm recordkeeping system at the time of AI and retrieved by electronic download. Data for cows and heifers were analyzed separately. Among heifers, 6,268 services were retrieved from 45 herds (298+/-4.2 services/sperm dose per sire; range: 244 to 344). Conception rate of heifers was influenced by the sire by treatment interaction. Conception rate of the 2.1 and 3.5x10(6) sex-sorted sperm dosages were comparable in 6 of 7 sires. Conception rate of both sex-sorted dosages were less than those of conventional semen for 6 of 7 sires. Across sires, heifer conception rates for 2.1 and 3.5x10(6) sex-sorted sperm dosages and 15x10(6) conventional dosages were 44, 46, and 61%, respectively. Among cows, 5,466 services were retrieved from 52 herds (260+/-3.3 services/sperm dose per sire; range: 236 to 289). Conception rates of cows were influenced by herd, sire, and sperm dosage. Conception rates of the 2.1 and 3.5x10(6) sex-sorted sperm dosage were comparable for all 7 sires. Conception rates of 2.1x10(6) sex-sorted sperm dosage were less than those of conventional semen for 4 of 7 sires and conception rates of the 3.5x10(6) sex-sorted sperm dosage were less than those of

  12. Novel Markers to Delineate Murine M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kyle A.; Amici, Stephanie A.; Webb, Lindsay M.; Ruiz-Rosado, Juan de Dios; Popovich, Phillip G.; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    Classically (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages exhibit distinct phenotypes and functions. It has been difficult to dissect macrophage phenotypes in vivo, where a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes exists, and also in vitro, where low or non-selective M2 marker protein expression is observed. To provide a foundation for the complexity of in vivo macrophage phenotypes, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional signature of murine M0, M1 and M2 macrophages and identified genes common or exclusive to either subset. We validated by real-time PCR an M1-exclusive pattern of expression for CD38, G-protein coupled receptor 18 (Gpr18) and Formyl peptide receptor 2 (Fpr2) whereas Early growth response protein 2 (Egr2) and c-Myc were M2-exclusive. We further confirmed these data by flow cytometry and show that M1 and M2 macrophages can be distinguished by their relative expression of CD38 and Egr2. Egr2 labeled more M2 macrophages (~70%) than the canonical M2 macrophage marker Arginase-1, which labels 24% of M2 macrophages. Conversely, CD38 labeled most (71%) in vitro M1 macrophages. In vivo, a similar CD38+ population greatly increased after LPS exposure. Overall, this work defines exclusive and common M1 and M2 signatures and provides novel and improved tools to distinguish M1 and M2 murine macrophages. PMID:26699615

  13. β-Adrenergic-stimulated macrophages: Comprehensive localization in the M1-M2 spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Donald M; Ho, Hsin-Yun; Ong, Tiffany H; Kawanishi, Carly K; Stoffers, Victoria L; Ahlawat, Nivedita; Ma, Jeffrey C Y; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Sloan, Erica K

    2016-10-01

    β-Adrenergic signaling can regulate macrophage involvement in several diseases and often produces anti-inflammatory properties in macrophages, which are similar to M2 properties in a dichotomous M1 vs. M2 macrophage taxonomy. However, it is not clear that β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages may be classified strictly as M2. In this in vitro study, we utilized recently published criteria and transcriptome-wide bioinformatics methods to map the relative polarity of murine β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages within a wider M1-M2 spectrum. Results show that β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages did not fit entirely into any one pre-defined category of the M1-M2 spectrum but did express genes that are representative of some M2 side categories. Moreover, transcript origin analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiles located β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages firmly on the M2 side of the M1-M2 spectrum and found active suppression of M1 side gene transcripts. The signal transduction pathways involved were mapped through blocking experiments and bioinformatics analysis of transcription factor binding motifs. M2-promoting effects were mediated specifically through β2-adrenergic receptors and were associated with CREB, C/EBPβ, and ATF transcription factor pathways but not with established M1-M2 STAT pathways. Thus, β-adrenergic-signaling induces a macrophage transcriptome that locates on the M2 side of the M1-M2 spectrum but likely accomplishes this effect through a signaling pathway that is atypical for M2-spectrum macrophages. PMID:27485040

  14. NEW MASER EMISSION FROM NONMETASTABLE AMMONIA IN NGC 7538. III. DETECTION OF THE (10,6) TRANSITION AND A VELOCITY GRADIENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.

    2012-11-01

    We present the first astronomical detection of the {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (J, K) = (10, 6) line: nonthermal emission at several velocities in the Galactic star-forming region NGC 7538. Using the Very Large Array we have imaged the (10,6) and (9,6) ammonia masers at several positions within NGC 7538 IRS 1. The individual sources have angular sizes {approx}< 0.1 arcsec corresponding to brightness temperatures T{sub B} {approx}> 10{sup 6} K. We apply the pumping model of Brown and Cragg, confirming the conjecture that multiple ortho-ammonia masers can occur with the same value of K. The positions and velocities of the (10,6) and (9,6) masers are modeled as motion in a possible disk or torus and are discussed in the context of recent models of the region.

  15. 7S(1/2) ? 9S(1/2) two-photon spectroscopy of trapped francium.

    PubMed

    Simsarian, J E; Shi, W; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D; Zhao, W Z

    1996-12-01

    We report on the spectroscopic measurement of the (210)Fr 9S(1/2) energy obtained by two-photon excitation of atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optic trap. The resonant intermediate level 7P(3/2) is the upper state of the trapping transition. We have measured the energy difference between the 9S(1/2) state and the 7S(1/2) ground state to be 25 671.021 +/- 0.006 cm(-1). PMID:19881852

  16. MicroRNA-720 suppresses M2 macrophage polarization by targeting GATA3

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yan; Yi, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are highly plastic cells with the ability to differentiate into both M1- and M2-polarized phenotypes. As a distinct M2-polarized population, tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis owing to their pro-angiogenic and immune-suppressive functions in tumour microenvironment. In the present study, we found that the microRNA-720 (miR-720) was down-regulated in TAMs isolated from breast carcinomas and M2-polarization macrophages. Overexpression of miR-720 attenuated M2 phenotype expression and thus inhibited M2 polarization. We further identified GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), a transcriptional factor that plays an important role in M2 macrophage polarization, was the downstream target of miR-720. Ectopic expression of GATA3 restored the M2 phenotype in miR-720 overexpressed macrophages. Importantly, overexpression of miR-720 inhibited pro-migration behaviour and phagocytic ability of M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, our data suggest that miR-720 plays an important role in regulating M2 macrophage polarization and function. PMID:27354564

  17. A Novel Vaccine Using Nanoparticle Platform to Present Immunogenic M2e against Avian Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Babapoor, Sankhiros; Neef, Tobias; Mittelholzer, Christian; Girshick, Theodore; Garmendia, Antonio; Shang, Hongwei; Khan, Mazhar I.; Burkhard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Using peptide nanoparticle technology, we have designed two novel vaccine constructs representing M2e in monomeric (Mono-M2e) and tetrameric (Tetra-M2e) forms. Groups of specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens were immunized intramuscularly with Mono-M2e or Tetra-M2e with and without an adjuvant. Two weeks after the second boost, chickens were challenged with 107.2 EID50 of H5N2 low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus. M2e-specific antibody responses to each of the vaccine constructs were tested by ELISA. Vaccinated chickens exhibited increased M2e-specific IgG responses for each of the constructs as compared to a non-vaccinated group. However, the vaccine construct Tetra-M2e elicited a significantly higher antibody response when it was used with an adjuvant. On the other hand, virus neutralization assays indicated that immune protection is not by way of neutralizing antibodies. The level of protection was evaluated using quantitative real time PCR at 4, 6, and 8 days post-challenge with H5N2 LPAI by measuring virus shedding from trachea and cloaca. The Tetra-M2e with adjuvant offered statistically significant (P < 0.05) protection against subtype H5N2 LPAI by reduction of the AI virus shedding. The results suggest that the self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticle shows promise as a potential platform for a development of a vaccine against AI. PMID:23074652

  18. Metformin prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting M2-like polarization of tumor associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ling; Liang, Guikai; Yao, Zhangting; Zhang, Jieqiong; Liu, Ruiyang; Chen, Huihui; Zhou, Yulu; Wu, Honghai; Yang, Bo; He, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that M2-like polarized tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) plays an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, establishing TAMs, especially M2-like TAMs as an appealing target for therapy intervention. Here we found that metformin significantly suppressed IL-13 induced M2-like polarization of macrophages, as illustrated by reduced expression of CD206, down-regulation of M2 marker mRNAs, and inhibition of M2-like macrophages promoted migration of cancer cells and endothelial cells. Metformin triggered AMPKα1 activation in macrophage and silencing of AMPKα1 partially abrogated the inhibitory effect of metformin in IL-13 induced M2-like polarization. Administration of AICAR, another activator of AMPK, also blocked the M2-like polarization of macrophages. Metformin greatly reduced the number of metastases of Lewis lung cancer without affecting tumor growth. In tumor tissues, the percentage of M2-like macrophage was decreased and the area of pericyte-coated vessels was increased. Further, the anti-metastatic effect of metformin was abolished when the animals were treated with macrophages eliminating agent clodronate liposome. These findings suggest that metformin is able to block the M2-like polarization of macrophages partially through AMPKα1, which plays an important role in metformin inhibited metastasis of Lewis lung cancer. PMID:26497364

  19. Enhanced regeneration of phosphorus during formation of the most recent eastern Mediterranean sapropel (S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slomp, Caroline P.; Thomson, John; de Lange, Gert J.

    2002-04-01

    Phosphorus regeneration and burial fluxes during and after formation of the most recent sapropel S1 were determined for two deep-basin, low-sedimentation sites in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Organic C/P ratios and burial fluxes indicate enhanced regeneration of P relative to C during deposition of sapropel S1. This is largely due to the enhanced release of P from organic matter during sulfate reduction. Release of P from Fe-bound P also increased, but this was only a relatively minor source of dissolved P. Pore-water HPO 42- concentrations remained too low for carbonate fluorapatite formation. An increased burial of biogenic Ca-P (i.e., fish debris) was observed for one site. Estimated benthic fluxes of P during sapropel formation were elevated relative to the present day (˜900 to 2800 vs. ˜70 to 120 μmol m -2 yr -1). The present-day sedimentary P cycle in the deep-basin sediments is characterized by two major zones of reaction: (1) the zone near the sediment-water interface where substantial release of HPO 42- from organic matter takes place, and (2) the oxidation front at the top of the S1 where upward-diffusing HPO 42- from below the sapropel is sorbed to Fe-oxides. The efficiency of aerobic organisms in retaining P is reflected in the low organic C/P ratios in the oxidized part of the sapropel. Burial efficiencies for reactive P were significantly lower during S1 times compared with the present day (˜7 to 15% vs. 64 to 77%). Budget calculations for the eastern Mediterranean Sea demonstrate that the weakening of the antiestuarine circulation and the enhanced regeneration of P both contributed to a significant increase in deep-water HPO 42- concentrations during sapropel S1 times. Provided that sufficient vertical mixing occurred, enhanced regeneration of P at the seafloor may have played a key role in maintaining increased productivity during sapropel S1 formation.

  20. Establishing a Research Center: The Minority Male Community College Collaborative (M2C3)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, J. Luke; Urias, Marissa Vasquez; Harris, Frank, III

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the establishment of the Minority Male Community College Collaborative (M2C3), a research and practice center at San Diego State University. M2C3 partners with community colleges across the United States to enhance access, achievement, and success among men of color. This chapter begins with a description of the national…

  1. Wound administration of M2-polarized macrophages does not improve murine cutaneous healing responses.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Nadine; Roumans, Nadia; Gijbels, Marion J; Romano, Andrea; Post, Mark J; de Winther, Menno P J; van der Hulst, Rene R W J; Xanthoulea, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in all stages of cutaneous wound healing responses and dysregulation of macrophage function can result in derailed wound repair. The phenotype of macrophages is influenced by the wound microenvironment and evolves during healing from a more pro-inflammatory (M1) profile in early stages, to a less inflammatory pro-healing (M2) phenotype in later stages of repair. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential of exogenous administration of M2 macrophages to promote wound healing in an experimental mouse model of cutaneous injury. Bone marrow derived macrophages were stimulated in-vitro with IL-4 or IL-10 to obtain two different subsets of M2-polarized cells, M2a or M2c respectively. Polarized macrophages were injected into full-thickness excisional skin wounds of either C57BL/6 or diabetic db/db mice. Control groups were injected with non-polarized (M0) macrophages or saline. Our data indicate that despite M2 macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype in-vitro, they do not improve wound closure in wild type mice while they delay healing in diabetic mice. Examination of wounds on day 15 post-injury indicated delayed re-epithelialization and persistence of neutrophils in M2 macrophage treated diabetic wounds. Therefore, topical application of ex-vivo generated M2 macrophages is not beneficial and contraindicated for cell therapy of skin wounds. PMID:25068282

  2. The Phenotypic and Functional Features of Human M2 Macrophages Generated Under Low Serum Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, L V; Shevela, E Ya; Tikhonova, M A; Ostanin, A A; Chernykh, E R

    2016-02-01

    The phenotypic and functional features of human M2 macrophages, in particular, their immunosuppressive activity, can considerably vary depending on M2 polarizing stimulus. This study was aimed at the investigation of cytokine production and pro-apoptogenic/inhibitory molecule expression in macrophages generated with GM-CSF using either standard conditions (M1) or deficiency of serum/growth factors (M2-LS cells). In contrast to M1, M2-LS cells were characterized by an enhanced content of CD206(+), B7-H1(+), FasL(+) and TRAIL(+) cells along with a decreased production of IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, TNF-α, IL-17 and MCP-1. In addition, M2-LS exhibited a lower T cell stimulatory activity in MLC that was associated with the higher numbers of apoptotic and the lower numbers of proliferating T cells. B7-H1 plays a key role in M2-LS-mediated cytotoxic effects as the neutralization of B7-H1 reduces the apoptosis-inducing activity of M2-LS, while the blocking of CD206 and TRAIL reduces the cytostatic activity of M2 macrophages. PMID:26678544

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition attenuates hypoxic cancer cells induced m2-polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P; Shrivastava, R; Tripathi, C; Jain, N K; Tewari, B N; Lone, M-U-D; Baghel, K S; Kumar, V; Misra, S; Bhadauria, S; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), represent a major subpopulation of tumor infiltrating immune cells. These alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages are well known for their pro-tumor functions. Owing to their established role in potentiating tumor-neovasculogenesis and metastasis, TAMs have emerged as promising target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. One of the key TAMs related phenomenon that is amenable to therapeutic intervention is their phenotype switching into alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages. Hindering macrophage polarization towards a pro-tumor M2 phenotype, or better still reprogramming the M2 like TAMs towards M1 subtype is being considered a beneficial anti-cancer strategy. Hypoxic tumor milieu has been proposed as one of the most plausible factor governing M2-polarization of macrophages. We recently demonstrated that hypoxic tumor cells imparted a pro—angiogenic M2 skewed phenotype to macrophages. Furthermore, sizeable body of data indicates for participation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in macrophage polarization. Concordantly, inhibition of COX-2 is associated with impaired macrophage polarization. Prompted by this in the current study we decided to explore if inhibition of COX-2 activity via chemical inhibitors may prevent hypoxic cancer cell induced M2-polarization of macrophages. We observed that treatment with Flunixin meglumine, an established preferential inhibitor of COX-2 activity markedly inhibited hypoxic cancer cell induced of M2-polarization of macrophages thereby indicating for usage of COX-2 inhibition as possible anti-cancer treatment modality. PMID:25210855

  4. Wound Administration of M2-Polarized Macrophages Does Not Improve Murine Cutaneous Healing Responses

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, Nadine; Roumans, Nadia; Gijbels, Marion J.; Romano, Andrea; Post, Mark J.; de Winther, Menno P. J.; van der Hulst, Rene R. W. J.; Xanthoulea, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in all stages of cutaneous wound healing responses and dysregulation of macrophage function can result in derailed wound repair. The phenotype of macrophages is influenced by the wound microenvironment and evolves during healing from a more pro-inflammatory (M1) profile in early stages, to a less inflammatory pro-healing (M2) phenotype in later stages of repair. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential of exogenous administration of M2 macrophages to promote wound healing in an experimental mouse model of cutaneous injury. Bone marrow derived macrophages were stimulated in-vitro with IL-4 or IL-10 to obtain two different subsets of M2-polarized cells, M2a or M2c respectively. Polarized macrophages were injected into full-thickness excisional skin wounds of either C57BL/6 or diabetic db/db mice. Control groups were injected with non-polarized (M0) macrophages or saline. Our data indicate that despite M2 macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype in-vitro, they do not improve wound closure in wild type mice while they delay healing in diabetic mice. Examination of wounds on day 15 post-injury indicated delayed re-epithelialization and persistence of neutrophils in M2 macrophage treated diabetic wounds. Therefore, topical application of ex-vivo generated M2 macrophages is not beneficial and contraindicated for cell therapy of skin wounds. PMID:25068282

  5. Structural biology of the S1P1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Michael A; Peach, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The sphingosine 1 phosphate receptor family has been studied widely since the initial discovery of its first member, endothelium differentiation gene 1. Since this initial discovery, the family has been renamed and the primary member of the family, the S1P1 receptor, has been targeted for a variety of disease indications and successfully drugged for the treatment of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the S1P1 receptor has been determined by X-ray crystallography and the specifics of the sphingosine 1 phosphate ligand binding pocket mapped. Key structural features for the S1P1 receptor will be reviewed and the potential binding modes of additional pharmacologically active agents against the receptor will be analyzed in an effort to better understand the structural basis of important receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:24728592

  6. S1-hypersensitive sites in eukaryotic promoter regions.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T; Schon, E; Gora-Maslak, G; Patterson, J; Efstratiadis, A

    1984-01-01

    We have examined by fine mapping the S1 nuclease-hypersensitivity of the 5' flanking regions of the human beta-globin and rat preproinsulin II genes and of the SV40 origin/enhancer region. In all cases S1-hypersensitive sites are located in known or presumed promoter/regulatory regions. Though a consensus DNA sequence is not evident, all of these sites reside in predominantly homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches. The alternate (non-B) DNA structure which is revealed by the enzymatic probe is a sequence-dependent feature of a short stretch of DNA, which is retained upon transplantation into a foreign environment. The alternate structure exhibits S1-nicking patterns uniquely different from those associated with the presence of Z-DNA. Images PMID:6095186

  7. S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Zhou, Yan; Min, Ke; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Ni

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). METHODS: We extracted reported endpoints, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time-to-treatment failure (TTF), objective response rate (ORR) and adverse effects, from randomized controlled trials identified in PubMed, the Cochrane library, Science Direct, EMBASE and American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings. Stata software was used to calculate the pooled values. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials involving 2176 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Compared to non-S-1-based regimens, the use of S-1-based regimens were associated with an increase in ORR (RR = 1.300; 95%CI: 1.028-1.645); OS (HR = 0.89; 95%CI: 0.81-0.99; P = 0.025), TTF (HR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.75-0.92; P = 0.000), and a lower risk of febrile neutropenia (RR = 0.225; P = 0.000) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032). OS, PFS and TTF were prolonged, especially in the Asian population. In subgroup analysis, statistically significant increases in ORR (RR = 1.454; P = 0.029), OS (HR = 0.895; P = 0.041) and TTF (HR = 0.832; P = 0.000) were found when S-1-based chemotherapy was compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. The incidence of leukopenia (RR = 0.584; P = 0.002) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032) was higher in the 5-FU-based arm. S-1-based regimens had no advantage in ORR, OS, PFS, TTF and grade 3 or 4 adverse events over capecitabine-based regimens. CONCLUSION: S-1-based chemotherapy may be a good choice for AGC because of longer survival times, better tolerance and more convenient use. PMID:25206296

  8. Genetic control of immune responses to influenza A matrix 2 protein (M2).

    PubMed

    Misplon, Julia A; Lo, Chia-Yun; Gabbard, Jon D; Tompkins, S Mark; Epstein, Suzanne L

    2010-08-16

    Vaccines should protect genetically diverse populations. Therefore we tested the candidate "universal" influenza A matrix protein 2 (M2) vaccine in multiple mouse strains. Mice were primed with M2 DNA and boosted with M2 recombinant adenovirus (rAd). C57BL/6 (B6) mice developed no antibody or T-cell response to M2, while BALB/c responded strongly. CBA responses were intermediate. Both MHC and background genes influenced responsiveness. To improve low responses we immunized with adjuvanted peptide-carrier conjugates, or co-immunized with nucleoprotein (NP), which can augment T-cell help. The conjugate vaccine enhanced some outcomes but not others. Co-immunizing with NP improved outcomes over either NP or M2 immunizations alone. These results have implications for vaccination of genetically diverse populations. PMID:20600476

  9. Notch signaling regulates M2 type macrophage polarization during the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Zhou, Qingjun; Yuan, Gongqiang; Dong, Muchen; Shi, Weiyun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in the pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). M2 macrophages can promote tissue remodeling and repair. In this study, CD206 positive M2 type macrophages were found in preretinal fibrous membranes of the mouse model of PVR induced by the intravitreal injection of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Notch signaling determines M2 macrophage polarization. The specific inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by the intravitreal injection of γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT attenuated RPE cells-induced PVR formation as demonstrated by the decreased expression of α-SMA, and inhibited M2 type macrophage infiltation as demonstrated by the decreased expression of Arg-1. Notch signaling may modulate PVR formation by regulating M2 type macrophage polarization. PMID:26410397

  10. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  11. Winding Hopfions on R2×S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-11-01

    We study Hopfions in the Faddeev-Skyrme model with potential terms on R2×S1. Apart from the conventional Hopfions, there exist winding Hopfions, that is, the lump (baby Skyrmion) strings with the lump charge Q with the U(1) modulus twisted P times along S1, having the Hopf charge PQ. We consider two kinds of potential terms, that is, the potential linear in the field and the ferromagnetic potential with two easy axes, and present stable solutions numerically. We also point out that a Q-lump carries the unit Hopf charge per the period in d=2+1.

  12. Adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages promotes locomotor recovery in adult rats after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shan-Feng; Chen, Yue-Juan; Zhang, Jing-Xing; Shen, Lin; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Jian-Sheng; Hu, Jian-Guo; Lü, He-Zuo

    2015-03-01

    Classically activated pro-inflammatory (M1) and alternatively activated anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages populate the local microenvironment after spinal cord injury (SCI). The former type is neurotoxic while the latter has positive effects on neuroregeneration and is less toxic. In addition, while the M1 macrophage response is rapidly induced and sustained, M2 induction is transient. A promising strategy for the repair of SCI is to increase the fraction of M2 cells and prolong their residence time. This study investigated the effect of M2 macrophages induced from bone marrow-derived macrophages on the local microenvironment and their possible role in neuroprotection after SCI. M2 macrophages produced anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor β and infiltrated into the injured spinal cord, stimulated M2 and helper T (Th)2 cells, and produced high levels of IL-10 and -13 at the site of injury. M2 cell transfer decreased spinal cord lesion volume and resulted in increased myelination of axons and preservation of neurons. This was accompanied by significant locomotor improvement as revealed by Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale, grid walk and footprint analyses. These results indicate that M2 adoptive transfer has beneficial effects for the injured spinal cord, in which the increased number of M2 macrophages causes a shift in the immunological response from Th1- to Th2-dominated through the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn induces the polarization of local microglia and/or macrophages to the M2 subtype, and creates a local microenvironment that is conducive to the rescue of residual myelin and neurons and preservation of neuronal function. PMID:25476600

  13. Studies on Nanoparticle Based Avian Influenza Vaccines to Present Immunogenic Epitopes of the Virus with Concentration on Ectodomain of Matrix 2 (M2e) Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babapoor Dighaleh, Sankhiros

    2011-12-01

    Avian influenza is an infectious disease of avian species caused by type A influenza viruses with a significant economic impact on the poultry industry. Vaccination is the main prevention strategy in many countries worldwide. However, available vaccines elicit antibodies against two major surface protein of the virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), where they constantly change by point mutations. Influenza viruses can also easily undergo gene reassortment. Therefore, to protect chickens against new strain of avian influenza virus, as well as control and prevent virus spread among farms, new vaccines needed to be designed which is a tedious, time consuming and expensive. Recently, conserved regions of the influenza genome have been evaluated as possible universal vaccines to eliminate constant vaccine updates based on circulating virus. In this study, peptide nanotechnology was used to generate vaccine nanoparticles that carry the highly conserved external domain of matrix 2 protein (M2e). These nanoparticles presented M2e in monomeric or tetrameric forms, designated as PSC-M2e-CH and BNSC-M2eN-CH. respectively. First, to demonstrate immunogenicity of these nanoparticles, we measured anti-M2e antibody in chickens, particularly when a high dose was applied. Prior to vaccination-challenge study, the challenge dose were determined by oculonasal inoculation of 10 6 EID50 or 107.7 EID50 of low pathogenicity AI virus HSN2 followed by measuring cloacal and tracheal virus shedding. A biphasic virus shedding pattern was observed with two peaks of virus shedding at days 4 and 8 for both tracheal and cloacal swabs. The chickens infected with 107.7 EID50 had significant virus shedding as compared with 106 EID50. Based on results of mentioned studies, a vaccination-challenge study was conducted by using 75mug of each vaccine construct per inoculation (with and without adjuvant) and higher dose of virus for challenge. BN5C-M2e-CH with adjuvant significantly reduced the

  14. Continuation maintenance therapy with S-1 in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Seiichiro; Karayama, Masato; Inui, Naoki; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Kuroishi, Shigeki; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Yokomura, Koshi; Koshimizu, Naoki; Toyoshima, Mikio; Imokawa, Shiro; Asada, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Masafumi; Yamada, Takashi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Maintenance therapy is a standard therapeutic strategy in non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer. However, there is no consensus regarding the benefit of maintenance therapy for patients with squamous cell lung cancer. We assessed maintenance therapy with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine agent, following induction therapy with carboplatin and S-1 in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. Methods In this phase II trial, chemotherapy-naïve patients with squamous cell lung cancer were enrolled to induction therapy with four cycles of carboplatin (at an area under the curve of 5 on day 1) and S-1 (80 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-14) in a 28-day cycle. Patients who achieved disease control after induction therapy received maintenance therapy with S-1 in a 21-day cycle until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival after administration of maintenance therapy. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled in the study. The median progression-free survival from the start of maintenance therapy was 3.0 months (95 % confidence interval, 2.5-3.5). The most common toxicities associated with maintenance therapy were anemia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue, but they were not severe. Conclusion S-1 maintenance therapy might be a feasible treatment option in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. PMID:27279143

  15. Bacterial versus human sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) in the design of potential S1PL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luis; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-09-15

    A series of potential active-site sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) inhibitors have been designed from scaffolds 1 and 2, arising from virtual screening using the X-ray structures of the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Both enzymes are very similar at the active site, as confirmed by the similar experimental kinetic constants shown by the fluorogenic substrate RBM13 in both cases. However, the docking scoring functions used probably overestimated the weight of electrostatic interactions between the ligands and key active-site residues in the protein environment, which may account for the modest activity found for the designed inhibitors. In addition, the possibility that the inhibitors do not reach the enzyme active site should not be overlooked. Finally, since both enzymes show remarkable structural differences at the access channel and in the proximity to the active site cavity, caution should be taken when designing inhibitors acting around that area, as evidenced by the much lower activity found in StS1PL for the potent hS1PL inhibitor D. PMID:27475537

  16. Atypical muscarinic allosteric modulation: cooperativity between modulators and their atypical binding topology in muscarinic M2 and M2/M5 chimeric receptors.

    PubMed

    Tränkle, Christian; Dittmann, Andreas; Schulz, Uwe; Weyand, Oliver; Buller, Stefan; Jöhren, Kirstin; Heller, Eberhard; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Ellis, John; Höltje, Hans Dieter; Mohr, Klaus

    2005-12-01

    The binding and function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can be modulated allosterically. Some allosteric muscarinic ligands are "atypical", having steep concentration-effect curves and not interacting competitively with "typical" allosteric modulators. For atypical agents, a second allosteric site has been proposed. Different approaches have been used to gain further insight into the interaction with M2 receptors of two atypical agents, tacrine and the bispyridinium compound 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bispyridinium dibromide (Duo3). Interaction studies, using radioligand binding assays and the allosteric ligands obidoxime, Mg2+, and the new tool hexamethonium to antagonize the allosteric actions of the atypical ligands, showed different modes of interaction for tacrine and Duo3 at M2 receptors. A negatively cooperative interaction was observed between hexamethonium and tacrine (but not Duo3). A tacrine dimer that exhibited increased allosteric potency relative to tacrine but behaved like a typical allosteric modulator was competitively inhibited by hexamethonium. M2/M5-receptor mutants revealed a dependence of tacrine and Duo3 affinity on different receptor epitopes. This was confirmed by docking simulations using a three-dimensional model of the M2 receptor. These showed that the allosteric site could accommodate two molecules of tacrine simultaneously but only one molecule of Duo3, which binds in different mode from typical allosteric agents. Therefore, the atypical actions of tacrine and Duo3 involve different modes of receptor interaction, but their sites of attachment seem to be the "common" allosteric binding domain at the entrance to the orthosteric ligand binding pocket of the M2-receptor. Additional complex behavior may be rationalized by allosteric interactions transmitted within a receptor dimer. PMID:16157694

  17. Regional distribution of M1, M2 and non-M1, non-M2 subtypes of muscarinic binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.; Tran, L.P. )

    1990-12-01

    The distribution of subtypes of the muscarinic receptor in homogenates of the rat brain was investigated by measuring the competitive inhibition of the binding (3H)N-methylscopolamine by pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 (11((2-((diethylamino)methyl)-1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one). In most brain regions, the competitive binding curves for AF-DX 116 and pirenzepine were consistent with a two-site model. The dissociation constant of pirenzepine for its high-affinity site (M1 receptor) was approximately 10(-8) M, whereas the dissociation constant of AF-DX 116 for its high affinity site (M2 receptor) was approximately 10(-7) M. In many regions, particularly those in the forebrain, the sum of the densities of the M1 and M2 binding sites was substantially less than 100% of the total sites, indicating the existence of a third population of sites lacking high affinity for both pirenzepine and AF-DX 116. We have designated these latter sites as non-M1, non-M2 muscarinic receptors. In general, the densities of the M1 and non-M1, non-M2 binding sites were highest in cerebral cortex, corpus striatum and hippocampus, intermediate in thalamus and hypothalamus, and lowest in midbrain, medulla-pons and cerebellum, whereas the M2 binding site had a relatively low, uniform density throughout the brain. The binding capacity of (3H)N-methylquinuclidinyl benzilate was estimated to be 20 to 30% lower than that of (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in various regions of the forebrain, but not in more caudal regions of the brain where the two radioligands had approximately the same binding capacities.

  18. Human alpha s1-casein: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, L K; Due, H A; Petersen, T E

    1995-05-01

    The human counterpart of alpha s1-casein has been purified by a combination of gel-filtration and ion-exchange chromatography under denaturing conditions. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the presence of a diffuse ladder with a high molecular mass which upon reduction was replaced by several closely spaced bands of lower molecular masses and a broad diffuse band corresponding to kappa-casein. Amino acid sequence analysis of the closely spaced bands all resulted in the same N-terminal sequence which was found to be homologous with alpha s1-casein from other species. Sequence analysis of a major radiolabelled tryptic peptide from purified 14C-carboxymethylated alpha s1-casein demonstrated that the protein contains at least two cysteine residues. As judged by SDS-PAGE in the presence or absence of a reducing agent, the molecular structure of the polymers constituting the ladder is composed of heteropolymers of alpha s1- and kappa-casein cross-linked by disulfide bonds. PMID:7749638

  19. Solidification Microstructure of AISI M2 High Speed Steel Manufactured by the Horizontal Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. F.; Fang, F.; Jiang, J. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, AISI M2 high speed steel is produced by the horizontal continuous casting process. The difference of solidification microstructure in ingots by mould casting and continuous casting has been examined by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution electron microscope (HREM). The results show that the as-cast structure consists of iron matrix and networks of M2C eutectic carbides, which are greatly refined in the continuous casting ingot compared to the case of ingot by mould casting. Meanwhile, the morphology of M2C eutectic carbides changes from the plate-like shape into the fibrous one. Micro-twining and stacking faults are observed in the plate-like M2C, whereas they are rarely identified in the fibrous M2C. Based on the characteristic of morphology and microstructure, it is expected that the plate-like M2C is a faceted phase while the fibrous M2C is a non-faceted phase.

  20. M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production in a vimentin filaments-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Han, Yuling; Wang, Xinlu; Gao, Guangxia

    2016-01-01

    M2BP (also called 90K) is an interferon-stimulated gene product that is upregulated in HIV-1 infection. A recent study revealed that M2BP reduces the infectivity of HIV-1 by inhibiting the processing of the viral envelope protein. Here we report that in addition to reducing viral infectivity, M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production. We provide evidence showing that M2BP inhibits HIV-1 Gag trafficking to the plasma membrane in a vimentin-dependent manner. When vimentin filaments were collapsed by treating cells with acrylamide or by overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of vimentin, M2BP inhibition of HIV-1 virion production was significantly relieved. We further show that M2BP interacts with both HIV-1 Gag and vimentin and thereby mediates their interactions. We propose that M2BP traps HIV-1 Gag to vimentin filaments to inhibit the transportation of HIV-1 Gag to the plasma membrane. These findings uncover a novel mechanism by which a host antiviral factor inhibits HIV-1 virion production. PMID:27604950

  1. M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production in a vimentin filaments-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Han, Yuling; Wang, Xinlu; Gao, Guangxia

    2016-01-01

    M2BP (also called 90K) is an interferon-stimulated gene product that is upregulated in HIV-1 infection. A recent study revealed that M2BP reduces the infectivity of HIV-1 by inhibiting the processing of the viral envelope protein. Here we report that in addition to reducing viral infectivity, M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production. We provide evidence showing that M2BP inhibits HIV-1 Gag trafficking to the plasma membrane in a vimentin-dependent manner. When vimentin filaments were collapsed by treating cells with acrylamide or by overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of vimentin, M2BP inhibition of HIV-1 virion production was significantly relieved. We further show that M2BP interacts with both HIV-1 Gag and vimentin and thereby mediates their interactions. We propose that M2BP traps HIV-1 Gag to vimentin filaments to inhibit the transportation of HIV-1 Gag to the plasma membrane. These findings uncover a novel mechanism by which a host antiviral factor inhibits HIV-1 virion production. PMID:27604950

  2. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders. PMID:26687487

  3. A humanized anti-M2 scFv shows protective in vitro activity against influenza

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Velappan, Nileena; Schmidt, Jurgen G

    2008-01-01

    M2 is one of the most conserved influenza proteins, and has been widely prospected as a potential universal vaccine target, with protection predominantly mediated by antibodies. In this paper we describe the creation of a humanized single chain Fv from 14C2, a potent monoclonal antibody against M2. We show that the humanized scFv demonstrates similar activity to the parental mAb: it is able to recognize M2 in its native context on cell surfaces and is able to show protective in vitro activity against influenza, and so represents a potential lead antibody candidate for universal prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in influenza.

  4. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Voith, G.; Dingermann, T.

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I{gamma} promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I{gamma} promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Voith, G; Dingermann, T

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I gamma promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I gamma promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. PMID:9636297

  6. From a 32 m2 system with 90 CPV modules to a 105 m2 system with 12 CPV modules - Soitec's new CPV system CX-S530

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombert, Andreas; Wanka, Sven; Gerster, Eckart; van Riesen, Sascha; Neubauer, Martin; Lange, Gerrit; Hamidi, Amir; Burke, Thomas; Stör, Jakob; Aipperspach, Wolfgang; Taliercio, Cecile; Mader, Lucas; Valli, Alessandro; Ziegler, Martin; Hepp, Stefan; Heile, Inka; Gerstmaier, Tobias; Haarburger, Karl-Friedrich

    2012-10-01

    In 2008, Soitec started to launch a 32m2 CPV system which included 90 modules per tracker. In order to realize the fast installation of multi-MW power plants the CPV module CX-M500 with an aperture area of 7,84 m2 was developed together with the new tracker CX-T030 which is optimized for carrying 12 of the new modules. This paper gives an overview over the evolution of this CPV system. The module is based on components of the field proven earlier Concentrix module generations. The tracker is a classical pylon type with two AC motor powered slewing ring drives. A new control device was developed which uses the power-optimized sun tracking algorithm. The major development steps and their results are presented.

  7. Corrosion behavior of austenitic steels in liquid lead bismuth containing 10-6 wt% and 10-8 wt% oxygen at 400-500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, A.; Weisenburger, A.; Müller, G.

    2014-05-01

    Three austenitic steels (316L, DIN 1.4970 tube and rod material) were tested up to 5000 h at temperatures between 400 and 500 °C in PbBi containing 10-8 wt% oxygen and at 450 °C and 500 °C in PbBi with 10-6 wt% oxygen. Protective scales grown on the surface up to 450 °C consist mainly of Cr rich oxides. However, after 5000 h at 500 °C dissolution attack occurred. At 10-6 wt% and 450 °C the thin Cr rich oxide scale is interrupted by areas with a thicker duplex-layered oxide of magnetite and spinel. At the higher temperature of 500 °C the whole surface is covered by the duplex-layered oxide scale.

  8. Is the addition of cisplatin to S-1 better than S-1 alone for patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancer?

    PubMed

    Ajani, Jaffer A

    2008-09-01

    The investigators of the recent phase III SPIRITS trial found that the addition of cisplatin to S-1 (a fourth generation oral fluoropyrimidine) provided a significant overall survival advantage (P = 0.04) over treatment with S-1 alone among previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer. In addition, the combination had an acceptable safety profile. This trial establishes a new first-line standard treatment for patients with advanced gastric cancer in Japan. Level 1 evidence for prolonged survival of patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancer has been established for docetaxel (V-325 trial) and cisplatin (SPIRITS trial) but not for S-1. Fluoropyrimidines (S-1 included) have been considered part of standard front-line therapy without the establishment of level 1 evidence for prolonging survival. The future lies in the rapid incorporation of biologic agents in combination with cytotoxics, with a continued focus on safety and convenience, and efforts to individualize therapy for each patient. Individualized therapy may be defined as the selection of optimum treatment for a specific patient on the basis of knowledge of the cancer's genetic and epigenetic alterations and the patient's genotype. PMID:18628737

  9. Variable-reflectance thin-film polarization-independent beam splitters for 0.6328- and 10.6-microm laser light.

    PubMed

    Azzam, R M

    1985-03-01

    Truly polarization-independent beam splitters for 0.6328- and 10.6-microm (He-Ne and CO(2)) laser radiation are designed using single-layer-coated (Cleartran) ZnS and Ge prisms. These devices are found to be reasonably achromatic, their reflectance (beam-splitting ratio) can be varied over a wide range with little accompanying polarization error, and they are tolerent to small film-thickness and film refractive-index errors. PMID:19724362

  10. Constitutive Activation of an Anthocyanin Regulatory Gene PcMYB10.6 Is Related to Red Coloration in Purple-Foliage Plum

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Wang, Lu; Deng, Xianbao; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-01-01

    Cherry plum is a popular ornamental tree worldwide and most cultivars are selected for purple foliage. Here, we report the investigation of molecular mechanism underlying red pigmentation in purple-leaf plum ‘Ziyeli’ (Prunus cerasifera Ehrhar f. atropurpurea (Jacq.) Rehd.), which shows red color pigmentation in fruit (flesh and skin) and foliage. Six anthocyanin-activating MYB genes, designated PcMYB10.1 to PcMYB10.6, were isolated based on RNA-Seq data from leaves of cv. Ziyeli. Of these PcMYB10 genes, five (PcMYB10.1 through PcMYB10.5) show distinct spatial and temporal expression patterns, while the PcMYB10.6 gene is highly expressed in all the purple-coloured organs of cv. Ziyeli. Constitutive activation of PcMYB10.6 is closely related to red pigmentation in the leaf, fruit (flesh and skin), and sepal. However, the PcMYB10.6 activation cannot induce red pigmentation in the petal of cv. Ziyeli during late stages of flower development due to due to a lack of expression of PcUFGT. The inhibition of red pigmentation in the petal of cherry plum could be attributed to the high-level expression of PcANR that directs anthocyanidin flux to proanthocyanidin biosynthesis. In addition, PcMYB10.2 is highly expressed in fruit and sepal, but its expression cannot induce red pigmentation. This suggests the PcMYB10 gene family in cherry plum may have diverged in function and PcMYB10.2 plays little role in the regulation of red pigmentation. Our study provides for the first time an example of constitutive activation of an anthocyanin-activating MYB gene in Prunus although its underlying mechanism remains unclear. PMID:26247780

  11. Clinical benefits of combined chemotherapy with S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel in advanced gastric cancer patients with palliative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Feng, Ye; Gao, Yongjian; Hou, Ruizhi

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Advanced gastric cancer accounts for a substantial portion of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Surgical intervention is the curative therapeutic approach, but patients with advanced gastric cancer are not eligible for the radical resection. The present work aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of palliative surgery combined with S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Method A total of 20 patients who underwent palliative resection of gastric cancer in China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University from 2010 to 2011 were evaluated. Days 20–30 postoperative, these patients started to receive chemotherapy of S-1 (40 mg/m2, oral intake twice a day) and intravenous infusion of oxaliplatin (135 mg/m2) and docetaxel (75 mg/m2). After three cycles of chemotherapy (21 days/cycle), patients were evaluated, and only those who responded toward the treatment continued to receive six to eight cycles of the treatment and were included in end point evaluation. Patients’ survival time and adverse reactions observed along the treatment were compared with those treated with FOLFOX. Results Out of 20 patients evaluated, there was one case of complete response, nine cases of partial response, six cases of stable disease, and four cases of progressive disease. The total efficacy (complete response + partial response) and clinical benefit rates were 50% and 80%, respectively. Of importance, the treatment achieved a significantly longer survival time compared to FOLFOX, despite the fact that both regimens shared common adverse reactions. The adverse reactions were gastrointestinal reaction, reduction in white blood cells, and peripheral neurotoxicity. All of them were mild, having no impact on the treatment. Conclusion Combination therapy of S-1, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel improves the survival of gastric cancer patients treated with palliative resection, with adverse reactions being

  12. Effects of orbital and spin current interference in E1 and M2 nuclear excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharova, N. G.

    2015-12-15

    The interference of contributions from the orbital and spin currents to the E1 and M2 resonances is investigated. The results of the current interference analysis within the shell model are compared with the experimental data.

  13. MIS M2 initiation and termination link to the shallow CAS open and close?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ning; Ramstein, Gilles; Dumas, Christophe; Contoux, Camille

    2016-04-01

    The Marine Isotope Stage M2 (3.264 -3.312 Ma) occurred just prior to the well documented warm mid-Pliocene (mPWP). With a 0.5‰ benthic foraminiferal δ180 shift (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005), MIS M2 is thought to be a glacial comparable period associated with huge but uncertain sea-level records of 20-60m below present levels (Naish et al. 2009; Miller et al. 2012; Dwyer et al. 2009). However, the mechanism of M2 initiation and termination are still an enigma, since CO2 records were relatively higher than the Quaternary glaciation period and the minima summer insolation during M2 was stronger than other glacial periods. By inferring from data records, De Schepper (2013) proposed that the shallow open Central American Seaway (CAS) observed during M2 could play as a trigger in M2 initiation, then the closure of this shallow CAS resulted from M2 large ice sheet build-up terminates this glacial period. But this assumption has not been test by the model. In this study, we apply IPSL-CM5A Atmosphere-Ocean coupled General Circulation Model (AOGCM) and GRISLI ice sheet model to investigate mechanisms of M2 initiation and termination. We firstly investigate the role of "shallow open CAS" (De Schepper et al. 2013) on M2 initiation. In the mean time we also take into account the main forcing during M2, which includes astronomical parameters, Greenhouse gases and vegetation. Our results show that shallow open CAS plays an important role in reducing northward heat transport in Atlantic low latitudes by 0.05 - 0.1 PW, but it is not a key factor in NH ice sheet build-up; Astronomical parameters and CO2 concentration are essential to create a basic global cooling environment for M2 (cooling by ~3.65 K than mPWP); Cold vegetation replacement amplifies the cooling in north high latitudes by ~ 8 K, which finally allows large ice sheet building up in Northern Hemisphere (12.25 m sea level drop is simulated with considering ice sheet feedback on the climate). The simulated ice sheet

  14. Secular changes of the M2 tide in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of long time series of hourly tide-gauge data at four stations in the Gulf of Maine reveal that the amplitude of the M2 tide underwent a nearly linear secular increase throughout most of the twentieth century. In the early 1980s, however, the amplitude of M2 abruptly dropped. Sea level changes alone appear inadequate to explain either the long-term trend or the recent trend discontinuity. Tidal models that account for Holocene sea level rise do predict an amplification of M2, but much smaller than the currently observed trends. Nor do recent annual mean sea levels correlate with the recent trend discontinuity. Some unknown fraction of the open Atlantic may be similarly affected, since the M2 discontinuity, but not the long-term secular increase in the tide, is evident also at Halifax.

  15. Secular changes of the M2 tide in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. D.

    2006-03-01

    Analyses of long time series of hourly tide-gauge data at four stations in the Gulf of Maine reveal that the amplitude of the M 2 tide underwent a nearly linear secular increase throughout most of the 20th century. In the early 1980s, however, the amplitude of M 2 abruptly dropped. Sea level changes alone appear inadequate to explain either the long-term trend or the recent trend discontinuity. Tidal models that account for Holocene sea level rise do predict an amplification of M 2, but much smaller than the currently observed trends. Nor do recent annual mean sea levels correlate with the recent trend discontinuity. Some unknown fraction of the open Atlantic may be similarly affected, since the M 2 discontinuity, but not the long-term secular increase in the tide, is evident also at Halifax.

  16. Comparing the use of 4.6 um lasers versus 10.6 um lasers for mitigating damage site growth on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2010-10-21

    The advantage of using mid-infrared (IR) 4.6 {micro}m lasers, versus far-infrared 10.6 {micro}m lasers, for mitigating damage growth on fused silica is investigated. In contrast to fused silica's high absorption at 10.6 {micro}m, silica absorption at 4.6 {micro}m is two orders of magnitude less. The much reduced absorption at 4.6 {micro}m enables deep heat penetration into fused silica when it is heated using the mid-IR laser, which in turn leads to more effective mitigation of damage sites with deep cracks. The advantage of using mid-IR versus far-IR laser for damage growth mitigation under non-evaporative condition is quantified by defining a figure of merit (FOM) that relates the crack healing depth to laser power required. Based on our FOM, we show that for damage cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation using a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation using a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser.

  17. Antireflection coating on germanium for dual channel (3-5 and 7.5-10.6 μm) thermal imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Kant, P.; Bandyopadhyay, P. K.; Chandra, P.; Nijhawan, O. P.

    1999-02-01

    The dual channel thermal imager, operating in the 3-5 and 7.5-10.6 μm wavelength bands, is one of the latest achievements in instrumentation for target recognition and acquisition. While the 3-5 μm band is utilised for detecting hot objects such as engine exhausts of vehicles and fighter planes, the 7.5-10.6 μm band is employed for human bodies and objects at ambient temperatures. Many substrates are available which transmit in both these wavelength bands and their transmission can be enhanced by providing a suitable antireflection coating. In this paper, a broad band antireflection coating on germanium substrate is reported. The design approach involves achieving a continuously varying refractive index from that of the incident medium to the substrate. The continuously varying refractive index profile may be generated by using a sequence of thin layers of high and low refractive index materials. In this design a continuous refractive index profile is approximated by using a 13-layer stack of thorium fluoride and germanium as low and high index coating materials respectively. This coating conforms to environmental stability standards and shows an average transmission of 91% in 3-5 μm band and 94.5% in 7.5-10.6 μm band with a peak of 97% at 9 μm on 10 mm thick germanium substrate. Polycrystalline germanium has 2.5% absorption for a 10 mm thick substrate.

  18. M2 Polarization of Human Macrophages Favors Survival of the Intracellular Pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Buchacher, Tanja; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Stockinger, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens have developed various strategies to escape immunity to enable their survival in host cells, and many bacterial pathogens preferentially reside inside macrophages, using diverse mechanisms to penetrate their defenses and to exploit their high degree of metabolic diversity and plasticity. Here, we characterized the interactions of the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae with polarized human macrophages. Primary human monocytes were pre-differentiated with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or macrophage colony-stimulating factor for 7 days to yield M1-like and M2-like macrophages, which were further treated with interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide or with interleukin-4 for 48 h to obtain fully polarized M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells exhibited distinct morphology with round or spindle-shaped appearance for M1 and M2, respectively, distinct surface marker profiles, as well as different cytokine and chemokine secretion. Macrophage polarization did not influence uptake of C. pneumoniae, since comparable copy numbers of chlamydial DNA were detected in M1 and M2 at 6 h post infection, but an increase in chlamydial DNA over time indicating proliferation was only observed in M2. Accordingly, 72±5% of M2 vs. 48±7% of M1 stained positive for chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, with large perinuclear inclusions in M2 and less clearly bordered inclusions for M1. Viable C. pneumoniae was present in lysates from M2, but not from M1 macrophages. The ability of M1 to restrict chlamydial replication was not observed in M1-like macrophages, since chlamydial load showed an equal increase over time for M1-like and M2-like macrophages. Our findings support the importance of macrophage polarization for the control of intracellular infection, and show that M2 are the preferred survival niche for C. pneumoniae. M1 did not allow for chlamydial proliferation, but failed to completely eliminate chlamydial infection, giving further evidence

  19. M2 Polarization of Human Macrophages Favors Survival of the Intracellular Pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Buchacher, Tanja; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Stockinger, Hannes; Fischer, Michael B; Weber, Viktoria

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens have developed various strategies to escape immunity to enable their survival in host cells, and many bacterial pathogens preferentially reside inside macrophages, using diverse mechanisms to penetrate their defenses and to exploit their high degree of metabolic diversity and plasticity. Here, we characterized the interactions of the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae with polarized human macrophages. Primary human monocytes were pre-differentiated with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or macrophage colony-stimulating factor for 7 days to yield M1-like and M2-like macrophages, which were further treated with interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide or with interleukin-4 for 48 h to obtain fully polarized M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells exhibited distinct morphology with round or spindle-shaped appearance for M1 and M2, respectively, distinct surface marker profiles, as well as different cytokine and chemokine secretion. Macrophage polarization did not influence uptake of C. pneumoniae, since comparable copy numbers of chlamydial DNA were detected in M1 and M2 at 6 h post infection, but an increase in chlamydial DNA over time indicating proliferation was only observed in M2. Accordingly, 72±5% of M2 vs. 48±7% of M1 stained positive for chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, with large perinuclear inclusions in M2 and less clearly bordered inclusions for M1. Viable C. pneumoniae was present in lysates from M2, but not from M1 macrophages. The ability of M1 to restrict chlamydial replication was not observed in M1-like macrophages, since chlamydial load showed an equal increase over time for M1-like and M2-like macrophages. Our findings support the importance of macrophage polarization for the control of intracellular infection, and show that M2 are the preferred survival niche for C. pneumoniae. M1 did not allow for chlamydial proliferation, but failed to completely eliminate chlamydial infection, giving further evidence

  20. A Novel M2e Based Flu Vaccine Formulation for Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Denis; Rivest, Marie; Babin, Cindy; López-Macias, Constantino; Savard, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background The USA 2004 influenza virus outbreak H3N8 in dogs heralded the emergence of a new disease in this species. A new inactivated H3N8 vaccine was developed to control the spread of the disease but, as in humans and swine, it is anticipated that the virus will mutate shift and drift in the dog population. Therefore, there is a need for a vaccine that can trigger a broad protection to prevent the spread of the virus and the emergence of new strains. Methodology and Principal Findings The universal M2e peptide is identical in almost all the H3N8 influenza strains sequenced to date and known to infect dogs. This epitope is therefore a good choice for development of a vaccine to provide broad protection. Malva mosaic virus (MaMV) nanoparticles were chosen as a vaccine platform to improve the stability of the M2e peptide and increase its immunogenicity in animals. The addition of an adjuvant (OmpC) purified from Salmonella typhi membrane in the vaccine formulation increased the immune response directed to the M2e peptide significantly and enlarged the protection to include the heterosubtypic strain of influenza in a mouse model. An optimal vaccine formulation was also shown to be immunogenic in dogs. Conclusions and Significance The MaMV vaccine platform triggered an improved immune response directed towards the universal M2e peptide. The adjuvant OmpC increased the immune response to the M2e peptide and protection to a heterosubtypic influenza strain that harbors a different M2e peptide in a mouse model. Antibodies generated by the vaccine formulation showed cross-reactivity with M2e peptides derived from influenza strains H9N2, H5N1 and H1N1. The vaccine formulation shows a potential for commercialization of a new M2e based vaccine in dogs. PMID:24098576

  1. Spectrum of the Dirac operator on Gr{sub 2}(C{sup m+2})

    SciTech Connect

    Milhorat, J.

    1998-01-01

    The spectrum of the Dirac operator, acting on the quaternion-Kaehler spin symmetric space Gr{sub 2}(C{sup m+2}), is explicitly computed by harmonic analysis methods: in particular `branching rules` for irreducible representations of the Lie group SU(m+2) and its subgroup S(U(m){times}U(2)), are given. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Immunization with the MAEBL M2 Domain Protects against Lethal Plasmodium yoelii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Juliana A.; Bargieri, Daniel Y.; Carvalho, Bruna O.; Albrecht, Letusa; Lopes, Stefanie C. P.; Kayano, Ana Carolina A. V.; Farias, Alessandro S.; Chia, Wan Ni; Claser, Carla; Malleret, Benoit; Russell, Bruce; Castiñeiras, Catarina; Santos, Leonilda M. B.; Brocchi, Marcelo; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Soares, Irene S.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a world-threatening disease largely because of the lack of a long-lasting and fully effective vaccine. MAEBL is a type 1 transmembrane molecule with a chimeric cysteine-rich ectodomain homologous to regions of the Duffy binding-like erythrocyte binding protein and apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) antigens. Although MAEBL does not appear to be essential for the survival of blood-stage forms, ectodomains M1 and M2, homologous to AMA1, seem to be involved in parasite attachment to erythrocytes, especially M2. MAEBL is necessary for sporozoite infection of mosquito salivary glands and is expressed in liver stages. Here, the Plasmodium yoelii MAEBL-M2 domain was expressed in a prokaryotic vector. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with doses of P. yoelii recombinant protein rPyM2-MAEBL. High levels of antibodies, with balanced IgG1 and IgG2c subclasses, were achieved. rPyM2-MAEBL antisera were capable of recognizing the native antigen. Anti-MAEBL antibodies recognized different MAEBL fragments expressed in CHO cells, showing stronger IgM and IgG responses to the M2 domain and repeat region, respectively. After a challenge with P. yoelii YM (lethal strain)-infected erythrocytes (IE), up to 90% of the immunized animals survived and a reduction of parasitemia was observed. Moreover, splenocytes harvested from immunized animals proliferated in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of rPyM2-MAEBL. Protection was highly dependent on CD4+, but not CD8+, T cells toward Th1. rPyM2-MAEBL antisera were also able to significantly inhibit parasite development, as observed in ex vivo P. yoelii erythrocyte invasion assays. Collectively, these findings support the use of MAEBL as a vaccine candidate and open perspectives to understand the mechanisms involved in protection. PMID:26169268

  3. Immunization with the MAEBL M2 Domain Protects against Lethal Plasmodium yoelii Infection.

    PubMed

    Leite, Juliana A; Bargieri, Daniel Y; Carvalho, Bruna O; Albrecht, Letusa; Lopes, Stefanie C P; Kayano, Ana Carolina A V; Farias, Alessandro S; Chia, Wan Ni; Claser, Carla; Malleret, Benoit; Russell, Bruce; Castiñeiras, Catarina; Santos, Leonilda M B; Brocchi, Marcelo; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Soares, Irene S; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Rénia, Laurent; Costa, Fabio T M

    2015-10-01

    Malaria remains a world-threatening disease largely because of the lack of a long-lasting and fully effective vaccine. MAEBL is a type 1 transmembrane molecule with a chimeric cysteine-rich ectodomain homologous to regions of the Duffy binding-like erythrocyte binding protein and apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) antigens. Although MAEBL does not appear to be essential for the survival of blood-stage forms, ectodomains M1 and M2, homologous to AMA1, seem to be involved in parasite attachment to erythrocytes, especially M2. MAEBL is necessary for sporozoite infection of mosquito salivary glands and is expressed in liver stages. Here, the Plasmodium yoelii MAEBL-M2 domain was expressed in a prokaryotic vector. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with doses of P. yoelii recombinant protein rPyM2-MAEBL. High levels of antibodies, with balanced IgG1 and IgG2c subclasses, were achieved. rPyM2-MAEBL antisera were capable of recognizing the native antigen. Anti-MAEBL antibodies recognized different MAEBL fragments expressed in CHO cells, showing stronger IgM and IgG responses to the M2 domain and repeat region, respectively. After a challenge with P. yoelii YM (lethal strain)-infected erythrocytes (IE), up to 90% of the immunized animals survived and a reduction of parasitemia was observed. Moreover, splenocytes harvested from immunized animals proliferated in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of rPyM2-MAEBL. Protection was highly dependent on CD4(+), but not CD8(+), T cells toward Th1. rPyM2-MAEBL antisera were also able to significantly inhibit parasite development, as observed in ex vivo P. yoelii erythrocyte invasion assays. Collectively, these findings support the use of MAEBL as a vaccine candidate and open perspectives to understand the mechanisms involved in protection. PMID:26169268

  4. Molecular structure of Si_xS_(1-x) glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Boolchand, P.

    2000-03-01

    Bulk Si_xS_1-x glasses in the 0.15S_1/2)4 tetrahedra, S_8-ring and Sn chains. The observed lineshapes change systematically with x, in a manner qualitatively similar to the case of corresponding Selenide glasses( D. Selvanathan, W. J. Bresser, P. Boolchand, B. Goodman Solid State Comm. 111, 619(1999)). Glass transition temperatures established by T-modulated DSC show an increase with x. Results of Raman and MDSC will be correlated, and discussed in relation to the nature of stiffness transitions anticipated in this binary glass system near x ~0.20.

  5. The regulatory peptide pidotimod facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and its function.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenglan; Fu, Xudong; Fu, Aikun; Du, Wei; Ji, Jian; Li, Weifen

    2014-05-01

    Pidotimod is a synthetic dipeptide with biological and immunological activity in innate immune responses. It has been reported that pidotimod could promote functional maturation of dendritic cells, but little is known about the regulation of macrophages. Recent studies have demonstrated that M1 or M2 polarized macrophages are of great importance for responses to microorganism infection or host mediators. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of pidotimod on mouse bone marrow-derived macrophage polarization and its function. The results showed that pidotimod had no influence on M1-polarized macrophage. While interestingly, a significant increase of M2 marker gene expression (Arg1, Fizz1, Ym1, MR) was observed (p < 0.01) in IL-4-induced M2 macrophage treated with pidotimod. In addition, cell surface expression of mannose receptor was dramatically enhanced using fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Furthermore, the function of M2 macrophage was also determinated. The results showed that the supernatant of pidotimod-treated M2 macrophage could increase the migration (p < 0.05) and enhance the wound closure rate (p < 0.05) of MLE-12 cells. Collectively, it could be concluded that pidotimod significantly facilitated IL-4-induced M2 macrophage polarization and improves its function. PMID:24481486

  6. Mechanisms of Cross-protection by Influenza Virus M2-based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Yu-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza virus vaccines are based on strain-specific surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) antigens and effective only when the predicted vaccine strains and circulating viruses are well-matched. The current strategy of influenza vaccination does not prevent the pandemic outbreaks and protection efficacy is reduced or ineffective if mutant strains emerge. It is of high priority to develop effective vaccines and vaccination strategies conferring a broad range of cross protection. The extracellular domain of M2 (M2e) is highly conserved among human influenza A viruses and has been utilized to develop new vaccines inducing cross protection against different subtypes of influenza A virus. However, immune mechanisms of cross protection by M2e-based vaccines still remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we review immune correlates and mechanisms conferring cross protection by M2e-based vaccines. Molecular and cellular immune components that are known to be involved in M2 immune-mediated protection include antibodies, B cells, T cells, alveolar macrophages, Fc receptors, complements, and natural killer cells. Better understanding of protective mechanisms by immune responses induced by M2e vaccination will help facilitate development of broadly cross protective vaccines against influenza A virus. PMID:26557805

  7. Novel spirothiazamenthane inhibitors of the influenza A M2 proton channel.

    PubMed

    Arns, Steve; Balgi, Aruna D; Shimizu, Yoko; Pfeifer, Tom A; Kumar, Nag; Shidmoossavee, Fahimeh S; Sun, Sharon; Tai, Sheldon S-H; Agafitei, Olga; Jaquith, James B; Bourque, Elyse; Niikura, Masahiro; Roberge, Michel

    2016-09-14

    The development of treatments for influenza that inhibit the M2 proton channel without being susceptible to the widespread resistance mechanisms associated with the adamantanes is an ongoing challenge. Using a yeast high-throughput yeast growth restoration assay designed to identify M2 channel inhibitors, a single screening hit was uncovered. This compound (3), whose structure was incorrectly identified in the literature, is an inhibitor with similar potency to amantadine against WT M2. A library of derivatives of 3 was prepared and activity against WT M2 and the two principal mutant strains (V27A and S31N) was assessed in the yeast assay. The best compounds were further evaluated in an antiviral plaque reduction assay using engineered WT, V27A and S31N M2 influenza A strains with otherwise identical genetic background. Compound 63 was found to inhibit all three virus strains in this cell based antiviral assay at micromolar concentrations, possibly through a mechanism other than M2 inhibition. PMID:27187859

  8. Comparison of fecal pyruvate kinase isoform M2 and calprotectin in acute diarrhea in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Elzbieta; Nowak, Jan K.; Moczko, Jerzy; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Fecal concentrations of pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (M2-PK) and calprotectin (FC) serve as biomarkers of inflammation of gastrointestinal mucosa. The value of M2-PK in discriminating between patients with viral and bacterial acute diarrhea (AD) is currently unknown. We analyzed M2-PK and FC concentrations in fifty hospitalized children with AD (29 of which were caused by rotavirus and 21 by Salmonella enteritidis) as well as 32 healthy subjects. There was no difference in the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves plotted for the two tests in differentiating rotaviral from bacterial AD. The sensitivity and specificity of M2-PK at optimal cut-off (20 U/g) were 75.9% and 71.4%, respectively. M2-PK and FC had similar values in distinguishing between children with AD caused by rotavirus and Salmonella enteritidis. The performance of both tests in hospitalized patients did not meet the needs of everyday clinical practice. Moreover, no advantage of fecal tests over the measurement of CRP was documented. PMID:24759699

  9. Monocyte Differentiation towards Protumor Activity Does Not Correlate with M1 or M2 Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chimal-Ramírez, G. Karina; Espinoza-Sánchez, Nancy Adriana; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages facilitate breast cancer progression. Macrophages were initially classified as M1 or M2 based on their distinct metabolic programs and then expanded to include antitumoral (M1) and protumoral (M2) activities. However, it is still uncertain what markers define the pro- and antitumoral phenotypes and what conditions lead to their formation. In this study, monocytic cell lines and primary monocytes were subjected to commonly reported protocols of M1/M2 polarization and conditions known to engage monocytes into protumoral functions. The results showed that only IDO enzyme and CD86 M1 markers were upregulated correlating with M1 polarization. TNF-α, CCR7, IL-10, arginase I, CD36, and CD163 were expressed indistinguishably from M1 or M2 polarization. Similarly, protumoral engaging resulted in upregulation of both M1 and M2 markers, with conditioned media from the most aggressive breast cancer cell line promoting the greatest changes. In spite of the mixed phenotype, M1-polarized macrophages exhibited the highest expression/secretion of inflammatory mediators, many of which have previously been associated with breast cancer aggressiveness. These data argue that although the existence of protumoral macrophages is unquestionable, their associated phenotypes and the precise conditions driving their formation are still unclear, and those conditions may need both M1 and M2 stimuli. PMID:27376091

  10. The Global S_1 Tide in Earth's Nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Einšpigel, David; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Diurnal S_1 tidal oscillations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system induce small perturbations of Earth's prograde annual nutation, but matching geophysical model estimates of this Sun-synchronous rotation signal with the observed effect in geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data has thus far been elusive. The present study assesses the problem from a geophysical model perspective, using four modern-day atmospheric assimilation systems and a consistently forced barotropic ocean model that dissipates its energy excess in the global abyssal ocean through a parameterized tidal conversion scheme. The use of contemporary meteorological data does, however, not guarantee accurate nutation estimates per se; two of the probed datasets produce atmosphere-ocean-driven S_1 terms that deviate by more than 30 μ as (microarcseconds) from the VLBI-observed harmonic of -16.2+i113.4 μ as. Partial deficiencies of these models in the diurnal band are also borne out by a validation of the air pressure tide against barometric in situ estimates as well as comparisons of simulated sea surface elevations with a global network of S_1 tide gauge determinations. Credence is lent to the global S_1 tide derived from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the operational model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). When averaged over a temporal range of 2004 to 2013, their nutation contributions are estimated to be -8.0+i106.0 μ as (MERRA) and -9.4+i121.8 μ as (ECMWF operational), thus being virtually equivalent with the VLBI estimate. This remarkably close agreement will likely aid forthcoming nutation theories in their unambiguous a priori account of Earth's prograde annual celestial motion.

  11. Angular momentum budget of the radiational S1 ocean tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Dobslaw, Henryk; Poropat, Lea; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The balance of diurnal S1 oceanic angular momentum (OAM) variations through torques at the sea surface and the bottom topography is validated using both a barotropic and a baroclinic numerical tide model. This analysis discloses the extent to which atmosphere-driven S1 forward simulations are reliable for use in studies of high-frequency polar motion and changes in length-of-day. Viscous and dissipative torques associated with wind stress, bottom friction, as well as internal tidal energy conversion are shown to be small, and they are overshadowed by gravitational and pressure-related interaction forces. In particular, the zonal OAM variability of S1 is almost completely balanced by the water pressure torque on the local bathymetry, whereas in the prograde equatorial case also the air pressure torque on the seafloor as well as ellipsoidal contributions from the non-spherical atmosphere and solid Earth must be taken into account. Overall, the OAM budget is well closed in both the axial and the equatorial directions, thus allowing for an identification of the main diurnal angular momentum sinks in the ocean. The physical interaction forces are found to be largest at shelf breaks and continental slopes in low latitudes, with the most dominant contribution coming from the Indonesian archipelago.

  12. S1P metabolism in cancer and other pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Weng In

    2010-01-01

    Nearly two decades ago, the sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate was discovered to function as a lipid mediator and regulator of cell proliferation. Since that time, sphingosine 1-phosphate has been shown to mediate a diverse array of fundamental biological processes including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, vascular maturation and lymphocyte trafficking. Sphingosine 1-phosphate acts primarily via signaling through five ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors. Intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate molecules are transported extracellularly and gain access to its cognate receptors for autocrine and paracrine fashion and for signaling at distant sites reached through blood and lymphatic circulation systems. Intracellular pools of sphingosine 1-phosphate available for signaling are tightly regulated by three enzymes that include sphinosine kinase, S1P lyase and S1P phosphatase. Alterations in S1P levels as well as the enzymes involved in its synthesis and catabolism have been observed in many types of malignancy. These enzymes are being evaluated for their role in mediating cancer formation and progression, as well as their potential to serve as targets of anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, the impact of sphingosine 1-phosphate, its cognate receptors, and the enzymes of sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolism on cell survival, apoptosis, autophagy, cellular transformation, invasion, angiogenesis and hypoxia in relation to cancer biology and treatment are discussed. PMID:20167244

  13. Search for ammonia in comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Codella, C.; Tozzi, G. P.; Comoretto, G.; Crovisier, J.; Nesti, R.; Panella, D.; Boissier, J.; Brucato, J. R.; Bolli, P.; Massi, F.; Tofani, G.

    2015-12-01

    Comets are uniquely pristine bodies providing unique insights about the formation of our Solar System. In this work, we focus on a dynamically new comet as it enters the inner Solar System for the first time after residing for billion of years in the Oort Cloud. Such comets are particularly important because they are thought to be not differentiated by solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of organic matter close to the surface. Here we report the results of a search for NH3(1,1) emission at 23.7 GHz towards comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) using a new dual-feed K band receiver mounted on the Medicina 32-m antenna. We observed the comet close to its perihelion, from 25 to 29 November 2013, when its heliocentric distance changed from 0.25 AU to 0.03 AU. We derive an upper limit of Q(NH3) of about 2.5×1029 mol s-1 on 26 November, that is consistent with the last peak of water production rate of ∼2×1030 mol s-1 within the last few days before the perihelion.

  14. Phase II study of gemcitabine plus S-1 chemotherapy in recurrent and metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, PeiJian; Ou, XueQing; Liao, Hai; Liu, YuMeng; Wang, SiYang; Cheng, ZhiBin; Lin, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: No standard salvage regimen has been established for patients with recurrent and metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and disease progression after prior platinum-based chemotherapy. This phase II study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) chemotherapy as a remedial regimen in this setting. Methods: In this multicenter phase II study, 49 patients with recurrent and metastatic NPC who failed previous platinum-based chemotherapy received gemcitabine (1.0 g/m2 on days 1 and 8) plus oral S-1 chemotherapy (twice daily from day 1 to 14). Each cycle was repeated every 3 weeks for two cycles at least. The dose of S-1 was determined according to the body surface area (BSA): 40 mg twice a day for BSA <1.25 m2; 50 mg twice a day for 1.25 m2 ⩽ BSA <1.5 m2; and 60 mg twice a day for BSA ⩾1.5 m2. Results: Treatment was generally well-tolerated. A total of seven patients (14.3%) had grade 3 toxicities and the main toxicity was myelosuppression, whereas the nonhematology adverse events were minimal. There were 3 complete responses (6.4%), 17 partial responses (36.2%), and the overall response rate was 42.6% (95% confidence interval: 27.3–61.2). Median time to progression was 5.8 months and median survival was 14.8 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 64% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions: Gemcitabine plus S-1 offers a satisfactory clinical activity and an acceptable safety profile for recurrent and metastatic NPC patients after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:27239233

  15. Rac2 Controls Tumor Growth, Metastasis and M1-M2 Macrophage Differentiation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok R.; Zulcic, Muamera; Bao, Lei; Messer, Karen; Ideker, Trey; Dutkowski, Janusz; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well-established that the macrophage M1 to M2 transition plays a role in tumor progression, the molecular basis for this process remains incompletely understood. Herein, we demonstrate that the small GTPase, Rac2 controls macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and the metastatic phenotype in vivo. Using a genetic approach, combined with syngeneic and orthotopic tumor models we demonstrate that Rac2-/- mice display a marked defect in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Microarray, RT-PCR and metabolomic analysis on bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from the Rac2-/- mice identify an important role for Rac2 in M2 macrophage differentiation. Furthermore, we define a novel molecular mechanism by which signals transmitted from the extracellular matrix via the α4β1 integrin and MCSF receptor lead to the activation of Rac2 and potentially regulate macrophage M2 differentiation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a macrophage autonomous process by which the Rac2 GTPase is activated downstream of the α4β1 integrin and the MCSF receptor to control tumor growth, metastasis and macrophage differentiation into the M2 phenotype. Finally, using gene expression and metabolomic data from our Rac2-/- model, and information related to M1-M2 macrophage differentiation curated from the literature we executed a systems biologic analysis of hierarchical protein-protein interaction networks in an effort to develop an iterative interactome map which will predict additional mechanisms by which Rac2 may coordinately control macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and metastasis. PMID:24770346

  16. Mechanisms of Action of Novel Influenza A/M2 Viroporin Inhibitors Derived from Hexamethylene Amiloride.

    PubMed

    Jalily, Pouria H; Eldstrom, Jodene; Miller, Scott C; Kwan, Daniel C; Tai, Sheldon S-H; Chou, Doug; Niikura, Masahiro; Tietjen, Ian; Fedida, David

    2016-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of influenza viruses with resistance to approved antivirals highlights the need for new anti-influenza therapeutics. Here we describe the functional properties of hexamethylene amiloride (HMA)-derived compounds that inhibit the wild-type and adamantane-resistant forms of the influenza A M2 ion channel. For example, 6-(azepan-1-yl)-N-carbamimidoylnicotinamide ( 9: ) inhibits amantadine-sensitive M2 currents with 3- to 6-fold greater potency than amantadine or HMA (IC50 = 0.2 vs. 0.6 and 1.3 µM, respectively). Compound 9: competes with amantadine for M2 inhibition, and molecular docking simulations suggest that 9: binds at site(s) that overlap with amantadine binding. In addition, tert-butyl 4'-(carbamimidoylcarbamoyl)-2',3-dinitro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylate ( 27: ) acts both on adamantane-sensitive and a resistant M2 variant encoding a serine to asparagine 31 mutation (S31N) with improved efficacy over amantadine and HMA (IC50 = 0.6 µM and 4.4 µM, respectively). Whereas 9: inhibited in vitro replication of influenza virus encoding wild-type M2 (EC50 = 2.3 µM), both 27: and tert-butyl 4'-(carbamimidoylcarbamoyl)-2',3-dinitro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylate ( 26: ) preferentially inhibited viruses encoding M2(S31N) (respective EC50 = 18.0 and 1.5 µM). This finding indicates that HMA derivatives can be designed to inhibit viruses with resistance to amantadine. Our study highlights the potential of HMA derivatives as inhibitors of drug-resistant influenza M2 ion channels. PMID:27193582

  17. A novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide providing heterologous protection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Ma, Ji-Hong; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Hui; Li, Guo-Xin; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SwIVs) cause considerable morbidity and mortality in domestic pigs, resulting in a significant economic burden. Moreover, pigs have been considered to be a possible mixing vessel in which novel strains loom. Here, we developed and evaluated a novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide (M2e-MAP) as a supplemental antigen for inactivated H3N2 vaccine to provide cross-protection against two main subtypes of SwIVs, H1N1 and H3N2. The novel tetra-branched MAP was constructed by fusing four copies of M2e to one copy of foreign T helper cell epitopes. A high-yield reassortant H3N2 virus was generated by plasmid based reverse genetics. The efficacy of the novel H3N2 inactivated vaccines with or without M2e-MAP supplementation was evaluated in a mouse model. M2e-MAP conjugated vaccine induced strong antibody responses in mice. Complete protection against the heterologous swine H1N1 virus was observed in mice vaccinated with M2e-MAP combined vaccine. Moreover, this novel peptide confers protection against lethal challenge of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1). Taken together, our results suggest the combined immunization of reassortant inactivated H3N2 vaccine and the novel M2e-MAP provided cross-protection against swine and human viruses and may serve as a promising approach for influenza vaccine development. PMID:27051342

  18. Circulating cell-free DNA indicates M1/M2 responses during septic peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yi; Gao, Xingjuan; Wang, Wenxiao; Xu, Xiaojuan; Yu, Lijuan; Ju, Xiuli; Li, Aimin

    2016-09-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has been widely suggested as clinical indicator in diseases, including sepsis. It was thought that the cfDNA was coming from the cell lysis, necrosis and apoptosis caused by tissue damages during sepsis. M1 or M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo, which is highly relevant with the tissue damages in sepsis. The correlation between cfDNA and M1/M2 responses during sepsis was never investigated. Here, we used bacteria injection induced septic peritonitis mouse model in both M1-dominant C57bl/6 and M2-dominant Balb/c mouse strains. We found that M2-dominant Balb/c mice showed better prognosis of septic peritonitis than C57bl/6 mice, which is corresponded with lower level of cfDNA in septic Balb/c mice compared to septic C57bl/6 mice. By assessing the M1 and M2 related cytokines in both septic Balb/c and C57bl/6 mice, we found out that Balb/c mice has lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and higher interleukin 10 (IL-10) productions than C57bl/6 mice during septic peritonitis. Especially, when monitoring the monocyte subtypes in peripheral blood of these septic mice, we found out that C57bl/6 showed higher inflammatory (Ly6C(high)) monocyte (corresponding to M1 macrophage) proportion than Balb/c mice. Interestingly, we find out that cfDNA is highly correlated with the ratio of Ly6C(high) monocytes versus Ly6C(low) monocytes, which represents M1/M2 (killing/healing) responses. Our study suggested that the cfDNA is a good indicator for evaluating M1/M2 responses in septic peritonitis. PMID:27335257

  19. Mechanism for proton conduction of the M(2) ion channel of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Mould, J A; Li, H C; Dudlak, C S; Lear, J D; Pekosz, A; Lamb, R A; Pinto, L H

    2000-03-24

    The M(2) integral membrane protein of influenza A virus forms a proton-selective ion channel. We investigated the mechanism for proton transport of the M(2) protein in Xenopus oocytes using a two-electrode voltage clamp and in CV-1 cells using the whole cell patch clamp technique. Membrane currents were recorded while manipulating the external solution to alter either the total or free proton concentration or the solvent itself. Membrane conductance decreased by approximately 50% when D(2)O replaced H(2)O as the solvent. From this, we conclude that hydrogen ions do not pass through M(2) as hydronium ions, but instead must interact with titratable groups that line the pore of the channel. M(2) currents measured in solutions of low buffer concentration (<15 mM in oocytes and <0.15 mM in CV-1 cells) were smaller than those studied in solutions of high buffer concentration. Furthermore, the reversal voltage measured in low buffer was shifted to a more negative voltage than in high buffer. Also, at a given pH, M(2) current amplitude in 15 mM buffer decreased when pH-pK(a) was increased by changing the buffer pK(a). Collectively, these results demonstrate that M(2) currents can be limited by external buffer capacity. The data presented in this study were also used to estimate the maximum single channel current of the M(2) ion channel, which was calculated to be on the order of 1-10 fA. PMID:10722698

  20. Modelling the enigmatic Late Pliocene Glacial Event - Marine Isotope Stage M2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Aisling; Haywood, Alan; Dowsett, Harry; Hunter, Stephen; Tindall, Julia; Hill, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The Pliocene Epoch (5.2 to 2.58 Ma) and specifically the PRISM interval (3.0 to 3.3 Ma) have frequently been targeted to investigate the nature of warm climates. However, the full range of climate variability within the Pliocene is often overlooked. Although not as dramatic as the glacial and interglacial cycles that typified the Pleistocene, Pliocene records also exhibit climate variability on orbital timescales and intervals which were apparently cooler than modern climate. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2 (~3.3 Ma) is a globally recognisable positive oxygen isotope excursion (cooling event) that disturbs an otherwise relatively (compared to present-day) warm background climate state. It remains unclear whether this event corresponds to significant ice sheet build-up in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. Estimates of sea level for this interval vary, and range from modern values to estimates of 65m sea level fall with respect to present day. Here we implement plausible M2 ice sheet configurations into a coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model (HadCM3) to test the hypothesis that larger-than-modern ice sheet configurations may have existed at M2. Climate model results are compared with available terrestrial data (e.g. biomes, precipitation and warm month temperatures) and marine temperature and oceanographic reconstructions to provide guidance as to which experimental set-up might offer the most compatible reconstruction of global climate during MIS M2. Whilst the outcomes of our data/model comparisons are not in all cases straight forward to interpret, there is little indication that results from model simulations in which significant ice masses have been prescribed in the Northern Hemisphere are incompatible with high resolution proxy data from the North Atlantic, Northeast Arctic Russia, North Africa and the Southern Ocean. Therefore, our model results do not preclude the possibility of the existence of larger ice masses during M2 in the Northern or Southern

  1. [Adipose-derived stem cells promote the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuehong; Pang, Chunyan; Bai, Li; Zhang, Ying; Geng, Lixia

    2016-03-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on M1/M2 macrophages and whether ADSCs are able to promote the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages. Methods M1 macrophages were induced from J774.1 macrophages by 24-hour stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon γ (IFN-γ), and M2 macrophages were induced from J774.1 macrophages by interleukin 4 (IL-4) for another 24 hours. Then M1/M2 macrophages were separately cultured in the presence of ADSCs for 24 hours. The M1/M2 macrophages and their corresponding supernatants were collected for further analysis. The expressions of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), CD86, arginase 1 (Arg1), mannose receptors/CD206 (MR/CD206), IL-10, found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), chitinase 3-like 3 (Ym-1) were detected by real-time PCR and ELISA. Results ADSCs significantly decreased the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, CCL2 and CD86, and increased the levels of Arg1, CD206 and IL-10 in M1 macrophages. In the supernatant of M1 macrophages, the expressions of IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced, while those of CD206 were enhanced. In M2 macrophages, ADSCs resulted in down-regulation of IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, CD86 and up-regulation of Arg1, CD206, FIZZ-1, Ym-1 and IL-10. In the supernatant of M2 macrophages, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were down-regulated and those of CD206 were up-regulated. Conclusion ADSCs can inhibit the gene expression of M1 macrophages and promote the gene expression of M2 macrophages, as well as mediate the polarization from M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages. PMID:26927552

  2. M2 tidal parameter modulation revealed by superconducting gravimeter time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurers, Bruno; Van Camp, Michel; Francis, Olivier; Pálinkáš, Vojtech

    2016-04-01

    Analyzing consecutive and independent 1-yr data sets of 10 European superconducting gravimeters (SG) reveals statistically significant temporal variations of M2 tidal parameters. Both common short-term (< 2 yr) and long-term (> 2 yr) features are identified in all SG time series but one. The averaged variations of the amplitude factor are about 0.2 per mille. The path of load vector variations equivalent to the temporal changes of tidal parameters suggests the presence of an 8.85 yr modulation (lunar perigee). The tidal waves having the potential to modulate M2 with this period belong to the 3rd degree constituents. Their amplitude factors turn out to be much closer to body tide model predictions than that of the main 2nd degree M2, which indicates ocean loading for 3rd degree waves to be less prominent than for 2nd degree waves within the M2 group. These two different responses to the loading suggest that the observed long-term modulation is more due to insufficient frequency resolution of limited time series rather than to time variable loading. Presently, SG gravity time series are still too short to prove if time variable loading processes are involved too as in case of the annual M2 modulation known to appear for analysis intervals of less than 1 yr. The observed variations provide an upper accuracy limit for Earth model validation and permit estimating the temporal stability of SG scale factors and assessing the quality of gravity time series.

  3. ICAM-1 suppresses tumor metastasis by inhibiting macrophage M2 polarization through blockade of efferocytosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Liu, J; Piao, C; Shao, J; Du, J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) can profoundly influence tumor-specific immunity. Tumor-associated macrophages are M2-polarized macrophages that promote key processes in tumor progression. Efferocytosis stimulates M2 macrophage polarization and contributes to cancer metastasis, but the signaling mechanism underlying this process is unclear. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which has been implicated in mediating cell-cell interaction and outside-in cell signaling during the immune response. We report that ICAM-1 expression is inversely associated with macrophage infiltration and the metastasis index in human colon tumors by combining Oncomine database analysis and immunohistochemistry for ICAM-1. Using a colon cancer liver metastasis model in ICAM-1-deficient (ICAM-1(-/-)) mice and their wild-type littermates, we found that loss of ICAM-1 accelerated liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Moreover, ICAM-1 deficiency increased M2 macrophage polarization during tumor progression. We further demonstrated that ICAM-1 deficiency in macrophages led to promotion of efferocytosis of apoptotic tumor cells through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway. More importantly, coculture of ICAM-1(-/-) macrophages with apoptotic cancer cells resulted in an increase of M2-like macrophages, which was blocked by an efferocytosis inhibitor. Our findings demonstrate a novel role for ICAM-1 in suppressing M2 macrophage polarization via downregulation of efferocytosis in the tumor microenvironment, thereby inhibiting metastatic tumor progression. PMID:26068788

  4. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Halaney, David L; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E; Feldman, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture. PMID:26538329

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Controls M2 Macrophage Differentiation and Foam Cell Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisu; Riek, Amy E.; Weng, Sherry; Petty, Marvin; Kim, David; Colonna, Marco; Cella, Marina; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are essential in atherosclerosis progression, but regulation of the M1 versus M2 phenotype and their role in cholesterol deposition are unclear. We demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key regulator of macrophage differentiation and cholesterol deposition. Macrophages from diabetic patients were classically or alternatively stimulated and then exposed to oxidized LDL. Alternative stimulation into M2 macrophages lead to increased foam cell formation by inducing scavenger receptor CD36 and SR-A1 expression. ER stress induced by alternative stimulation was necessary to generate the M2 phenotype through JNK activation and increased PPARγ expression. The absence of CD36 or SR-A1 signaling independently of modified cholesterol uptake decreased ER stress and prevented the M2 differentiation typically induced by alternative stimulation. Moreover, suppression of ER stress shifted differentiated M2 macrophages toward an M1 phenotype and subsequently suppressed foam cell formation by increasing HDL- and apoA-1-induced cholesterol efflux indicating suppression of macrophage ER stress as a potential therapy for atherosclerosis. PMID:22356914

  6. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halaney, David L.; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture.

  7. Quantitative changes in tumor-associated M2 macrophages characterize cholangiocarcinoma and their association with metastasis.

    PubMed

    Thanee, Malinee; Loilome, Watcharin; Techasen, Anchalee; Namwat, Nisana; Boonmars, Thidarut; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) includes numerous non-neoplastic cells such as leukocytes and fibroblasts that surround the neoplasm and influence its growth. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are documented as key players in facilitating cancer appearance and progression. Alteration of the macrophage (CD68, CD163) and fibroblast (α-SMA, FSP-1) cells in Opisthorchis viverrini (Ov)-induced cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) was here assessed using liver tissues from an established hamster model and from 43 human cases using immunohistochemistry. We further investigated whether M2-activated TAMs influence CCA cell migration ability by wound healing assay and Western blot analysis. Macrophages and fibroblasts change their phenotypes to M2-TAMs (CD68+, CD163+) and CAFs (α-SMA+, FSP-1+), respectively in the early stages of carcinogenesis. Interestingly, a high density of the M2-TAMs CCA in patients is significantly associated with the presence of extrahepatic metastases (p=0.021). Similarly, CD163+ CCA cells are correlated with metastases (p=0.002), and they may be representative of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with increased metastatic activity. We further showed that M2-TAM conditioned medium can induce CCA cell migration as well as increase N-cadherin expression (mesenchymal marker). The present work revealed that significant TME changes occur at an early stage of Ov-induced carcinogenesis and that M2-TAMs are key factors contributing to CCA metastasis, possibly via EMT processes. PMID:25854403

  8. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km per second with a low-power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and approx. 1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km per second solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs, Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  9. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km/s, with a low power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and -1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km/s. solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs. Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  10. Importin-11, a nuclear import receptor for the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, UbcM2.

    PubMed

    Plafker, S M; Macara, I G

    2000-10-16

    Importins are members of a family of transport receptors (karyopherins) that mediate the nucleocytoplasmic transport of protein and RNA cargoes. We identified importin-11 as a potential new human member of this family, on the basis of limited similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein, Lph2p, and cloned the complete open reading frame. Importin-11 interacts with the Ran GTPase, and constitutively shuttles between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. A yeast dihybrid screen identified UbcM2, an E2-type ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, as a binding partner and potential transport cargo for importin-11. Importin-11 and UbcM2 interact directly, and the complex is disassembled by Ran:GTP but not by Ran:GDP. UbcM2 is constitutively nuclear and shuttles between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Nuclear import of UbcM2 requires Ran and importin-11, and is inhibited by wheatgerm agglutinin, energy depletion or dominant interfering mutants of Ran and importin-beta. These data establish importin-11 as a new member of the karyopherin family of transport receptors, and identify UbcM2 as a nuclear member of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme family. PMID:11032817

  11. Xuebijing Injection Promotes M2 Polarization of Macrophages and Improves Survival Rate in Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Yao, Feng-Hua; Chai, Yan-Fen; Dong, Ning; Sheng, Zhi-Yong; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Xuebijing (XBJ) injection, a concoction of several Chinese herbs, has been widely used as an immunomodulator for the treatment of severe sepsis in China. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for its efficacy have not been fully elucidated. In our study, we determined the flow cytometry markers (F4/80, CD11c, and CD206), the levels of secreted cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10), and the expression of specific proteins of M2 (Ym1, Fizz1, and Arg1) to assess macrophage polarization. Treatment with XBJ lowered M1 associated cytokine levels and increased the level of M2 associated cytokine level. The percentage of M2 phenotype cells of XBJ group was much higher than that of the control group. Expressions of phosphorylated Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) were markedly enhanced after the administration of XBJ; on the other hand, the M2 associated cytokines and proteins were decreased following treatment with JAK1 or STAT6 inhibitor. In addition, the treatment of XBJ significantly improved the survival rate of septic mice. These studies demonstrate that XBJ can markedly promote M2 polarization and improve the survival rate of septic mice, thereby contributing to therapeutic effect in the treatment of septic complications. PMID:26064161

  12. Bonding and magnetism in nanosized graphene molecules: Singlet states of zigzag edged hexangulenes C6m2H6m(m =2,3,…,10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Michael R.; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-12-01

    A novel molecular phenomenon is predicted on the basis of trends identified in an ab initio density functional theory study of the electronic and geometric structure of the hexagonal shaped zigzag edged graphene hydrocarbon molecules C6m2H6m(m =2,…,10). Electrons in the interior organize to form a graphene core that grows with edge size m. Electrons in the highest occupied molecular orbital levels, localized primarily on the perimeter carbons, polarize the interior atoms with a intensity that decays rapidly with distance from the perimeter. Three distinctive bond length patterns emerge: (i) a central graphene core that grows with size m; (ii) shape-similar transverse and radial bond length patterns on interior rows close to the edges; and (iii) quinoidal bonds radiating from each apex that link adjacent edges. Concomitant with these changes are: (i) a monotonic decrease in atomic charge from center to perimeter and (ii) relegation of spin in diradical states to the outer atomic rows of the bipartite lattice.

  13. Bonding and magnetism in nanosized graphene molecules: Singlet states of zigzag edged hexangulenes C(6m(2) )H(6m)(m=2,3,...,10).

    PubMed

    Philpott, Michael R; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-12-01

    A novel molecular phenomenon is predicted on the basis of trends identified in an ab initio density functional theory study of the electronic and geometric structure of the hexagonal shaped zigzag edged graphene hydrocarbon molecules C(6m(2) )H(6m)(m=2,...,10). Electrons in the interior organize to form a graphene core that grows with edge size m. Electrons in the highest occupied molecular orbital levels, localized primarily on the perimeter carbons, polarize the interior atoms with a intensity that decays rapidly with distance from the perimeter. Three distinctive bond length patterns emerge: (i) a central graphene core that grows with size m; (ii) shape-similar transverse and radial bond length patterns on interior rows close to the edges; and (iii) quinoidal bonds radiating from each apex that link adjacent edges. Concomitant with these changes are: (i) a monotonic decrease in atomic charge from center to perimeter and (ii) relegation of spin in diradical states to the outer atomic rows of the bipartite lattice. PMID:19968359

  14. Enhanced temperature and emission from a standoff 266 nm laser initiated LIBS plasma using a simultaneous 10.6 microm CO2 laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Pal, Avishekh; Waterbury, Robert D; Dottery, Edwin L; Killinger, Dennis K

    2009-05-25

    A deep UV 266 nm laser induced LIBS plasma has been enhanced by using a simultaneous 10.6 microm CO(2) laser pulse at standoff ranges up to 55 m for several targets including metals, ceramics and plastics. The LIBS plasma emission was produced, for the first time, by a 266 nm laser and was enhanced by several orders of magnitude using the CO(2) laser pulse. The temperature of the enhanced LIBS plasma was measured, for the first time, and was observed to increase by about 3000K due to the addition of the CO(2) laser pulse. PMID:19466135

  15. MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures with electron mobility exceeding 1 × 10(6) cm(2)/Vs.

    PubMed

    Falson, Joseph; Kozuka, Yusuke; Uchida, Masaki; Smet, Jurgen H; Arima, Taka-Hisa; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The inherently complex chemical and crystallographic nature of oxide materials has suppressed the purities achievable in laboratory environments, obscuring the rich physical degrees of freedom these systems host. In this manuscript we provide a systematic approach to defect identification and management in oxide molecular beam epitaxy grown MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures which host two-dimensional electron systems. We achieve samples displaying electron mobilities in excess of 1 × 10(6) cm(2)/Vs. This data set for the MgZnO/ZnO system firmly establishes that the crystalline quality has become comparable to traditional semiconductor materials. PMID:27229479

  16. Antireflecting and polarizing dielectric single-layer coating at oblique incidence on absorbing substrates at λ = 10.6 μm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, E.; Julea, T.

    Transparent single-layer antireflection coating on an absorbing substrate for p and s polarizations of the infrared light at λ = 10.6 μm as a function of the angle of incidence is studied in this paper. Two cases of low absorbing Ge, GaAs, ZnSe substrates and high absorbing Cu substrate are considered. It is found that the Cu substrate coated by an adequate antireflecting single-layer film functions as an excellent Rs = 0 reflection polarizer.

  17. Position , photometric and morphological monitoring of comet-sungrazer S/2012 S1 (ISON) in Kyiv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churyumov, Klim; Baransky, Alexandr

    Comet-sungrazer C/2012 S1 (ISON) was observed at the observational station of Kyiv Shevchenko National University ( MPC 585 ) from 28 Sept. 2012 to 1 Nov. 2013 During the 16 nights of observation obtained and sent to the database MPC - 214 astromerical exact positions of the comet. In parallel with the astrometrical monitoring of the comet were obtained a series of photometrical observations of cometary central condensation (m_2) through filter R. During Oct. - Dec. 2012 a magnitude of the central condensation of the comet (m(2) ) increased gradually from 17.6(m) to 16.8(m) . In the period from Dec. 28, 2012 to Jan. 2, 2013 there was observed a jump of increasing of comet brightness by ampliitude 1.1(m) from 16.8(m) to 15.7(m) , which was initiated by a sharp increasing of numbers of the sunspot : on Dec. 31, 2012 the Wolf number was 87 , and on Jan. 4 it reached of a values 167. Until the end of Feb. 2013 a cometary magnitude reached a values 15.4(m) . During Feb.- May 2013 the magnitude of the comet almost did not change. In the summer of 2013 , the comet did not observe because the small elongation of the comet. In autumn 2013 , a month before perihelion passage , the comet was observed during temporal interval Oct. 20 - Nov. 1. In the course of this period cometary magnitude of the central condensation rapidly increased from 13.4(m) to 11.6(m) . In the anti-solar direction the large tail was observed. Near the head in the direction of the comet tail a bright - helically twisted jet was observed.

  18. Juvenile-onset G(M2)-gangliosidosis in an African-American child with nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Paciorkowski, Alex R; Sathe, Swati; Zeng, Bei-Jin; Torres, Paola; Rosengren, Sally S; Kolodny, Edwin

    2008-04-01

    G(M2)-gangliosidosis is a neurodegenerative lysosomal disease with several clinical variants. We describe a 2-year-old black child with juvenile-onset disease, who presented with abnormal eye movements and cherry-red spots of the maculae. Mutation analysis of the HEXA gene revealed the patient to be a compound heterozygote (M1V/Y37N). The M1V mutation was previously described in an African-American child with acute infantile G(M2)-gangliosidosis. The Y37N mutation is novel. This combination of mutations is consistent with juvenile-onset disease, and provides further evidence for the association of the M1V mutation with individuals of black ancestry. The presence of oculomotor abnormalities is an unusual finding in this form of G(M2)-gangliosidosis, and adds to the phenotypic spectrum. PMID:18358410

  19. M2IS (modular miniature imaging sensor) for law enforcement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Gerald R.; Shaffer, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Raytheon Electronics Systems, under contract from the DARPA Advanced Technology Office, has designed, fabricated and delivered the Modular Miniature Imaging Sensor (M2IS). M2IS is a rifle- or tripod-mountable system that integrates a high-performance multispectral sensor with an eyesafe laser rangefinder and a digital compass. A cooled 480 X 640 InSb focal plane array and dual-FOV reflective optics provide capability to acquire and identify targets at ranges of several kilometers. The LRF and compass facilitate reporting target location. M2IP provides the law enforcement officer an integrated surveillance and targeting system that consumes less than 6.5 W and weighs less than 7.5 lbs. This paper describes measured performance and capabilities of the system.

  20. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis. PMID:26382298

  1. Holographic cosmology from a system of M2-M5 branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Faizal, Mir; Setare, Mohammad Reza; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the holographic cosmology using a M2-M5 brane configuration. In this configuration, a M2-brane will be placed in between a M5-brane and an anti-M5-brane. The M2-brane will act as a channel for energy to flow from an anti-M5-brane to a M5-brane, and this will increase the degrees of freedom on the M5-brane causing inflation. The inflation will end when the M5-brane and anti-M5-brane get separated. However, at a later stage the distance between the M5-brane and the anti-M5-bran can reduce and this will cause the formation of tachyonic states. These tachyonic states will again open a bridge between the M5-branes and the anti-M5-branes, which will cause further acceleration of the universe.

  2. Test Pilot John A. Manke and M2-F3 Lifting Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    NASA research pilot John A. Manke is seen here in front of the M2-F3 lifting body. Manke was hired by NASA on May 25, 1962, as a flight research engineer. He was later assigned to the pilot's office and flew various support aircraft including the F-104, F-5D, F-111 and C-47. The M2-F3 reached a top speed of l,064 mph (Mach 1.6). Highest altitude reached by the vehicle was 7l,500 feet on December 21, 1972, the date of its last flight with NASA pilot John Manke at the controls. The information the lifting body program generated contributed to the data base that led to development of today's Space Shuttle program. NASA donated The M2-F3 vehicle to the Smithsonian Institution in December 1973.

  3. Differential Binding of Rimantadine Enantiomers to Influenza A M2 Proton Channel.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anna K; Batsomboon, Paratchata; Dai, Jian; Hung, Ivan; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Dudley, Gregory B; Cross, Timothy A

    2016-02-10

    Rimantadine hydrochloride (α-methyl-1-adamantane-methalamine hydrochloride) is a chiral compound which exerts antiviral activity against the influenza A virus by inhibiting proton conductance of the M2 ion channel. In complex with M2, rimantadine has always been characterized as a racemic mixture. Here, we report the novel enantioselective synthesis of deuterium-labeled (R)- and (S)-rimantadine and the characterization of their protein-ligand interactions using solid-state NMR. Isotropic chemical shift changes strongly support differential binding of the enantiomers to the proton channel. Position restrained simulations satisfying distance restraints from (13)C-(2)H rotational-echo double-resonance NMR show marked differences in the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the two enantiomers at the binding site. Together these results suggest a complex set of interactions between (R)-rimantadine and the M2 proton channel, leading to a higher stability for this enantiomer of the drug in the channel pore. PMID:26804976

  4. Crystal structure of the drug-resistant S31N influenza M2 proton channel.

    PubMed

    Thomaston, Jessica L; DeGrado, William F

    2016-08-01

    The M2 protein is a small proton channel found in the influenza A virus that is necessary for viral replication. The M2 channel is the target of a class of drugs called the adamantanes, which block the channel pore and prevent the virus from replicating. In recent decades mutations have arisen in M2 that prevent the adamantanes from binding to the channel pore, with the most prevalent of these mutations being S31N. Here we report the first crystal structure of the S31N mutant crystallized using lipidic cubic phase crystallization techniques and solved to 1.59 Å resolution. The Asn31 residues point directly into the center of the channel pore and form a hydrogen-bonded network that disrupts the drug-binding site. Ordered waters in the channel pore form a continuous hydrogen bonding network from Gly34 to His37. PMID:27082171

  5. M2-F1 in flight being towed by a C-47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The M2-F1 Lifting Body is seen here being towed behind a C-47 at the Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. In this rear view, the M2-F1 is flying above and to one side of the C-47. This was done to avoid wake turbulence from the towplane. Lacking wings, the M2-F1 used an unusual configuration for its control surfaces. It had two rudders on the fins, two elevons (called 'elephant ears') mounted on the outsides of the fins, and two body flaps on the upper rear fuselage. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. These initial tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind the C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and

  6. Most general spherically symmetric M2-branes and type-IIB strings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhaolong; Lue, H.

    2009-09-15

    We obtain the most general spherically symmetric M2-branes and type-IIB strings, with R{sup 1,2}xSO(8) and R{sup 1,1}xSO(8) isometries, respectively. We find that there are 12 different classes of M2-branes, and we study their curvature properties. In particular, we obtain new smooth M2-brane wormholes that connect two asymptotic regions: one is flat and the other can be either flat or AdS{sub 4}xS{sup 7}. We find that these wormholes are traversable with certain timelike trajectories. We also obtain the most general Ricci-flat solutions in five dimensions with R{sup 1,1}xSO(3) isometries.

  7. Argyres-Douglas theories, S 1 reductions, and topological symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buican, Matthew; Nishinaka, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, we proposed closed-form expressions for the superconformal indices of the ({A}1,{A}2n-3) and ({A}1,{D}2n) Argyres-Douglas (AD) superconformal field theories (SCFTs) in the Schur limit. Following up on our results, we turn our attention to the small S 1 regime of these indices. As expected on general grounds, our study reproduces the S 3 partition functions of the resulting dimensionally reduced theories. However, we show that in all cases—with the exception of the reduction of the ({A}1,{D}4) SCFT—certain imaginary partners of real mass terms are turned on in the corresponding mirror theories. We interpret these deformations as R symmetry mixing with the topological symmetries of the direct S 1 reductions. Moreover, we argue that these shifts occur in any of our theories whose four-dimensional { N }=2 superconformal U{(1)}R symmetry does not obey an SU(2) quantization condition. We then use our R symmetry map to find the four-dimensional ancestors of certain three-dimensional operators. Somewhat surprisingly, this picture turns out to imply that the scaling dimensions of many of the chiral operators of the four-dimensional theory are encoded in accidental symmetries of the three-dimensional theory. We also comment on the implications of our work on the space of general { N }=2 SCFTs.

  8. Superfocusing of high-M2 semiconductor laser beams: experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskii, G. S.; Melissinaki, V.; Dudelev, V. V.; Losev, S. N.; Soboleva, K. K.; Kolykhalova, E. D.; Deryagin, A. G.; Kuchinskii, V. I.; Viktorov, Evgeny A.; Farsari, M.; Sibbett, W.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2014-05-01

    The focusing of multimode laser diode beams is probably the most significant problem that hinders the expansion of the high-power semiconductor lasers in many spatially-demanding applications. Generally, the `quality' of laser beams is characterized by so-called `beam propagation parameter' M2, which is defined as the ratio of the divergence of the laser beam to that of a diffraction-limited counterpart. Therefore, M2 determines the ratio of the beam focal-spot size to that of the `ideal' Gaussian beam focused by the same optical system. Typically, M2 takes the value of 20-50 for high-power broad-stripe laser diodes thus making the focal-spot 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than the diffraction limit. The idea of `superfocusing' for high-M2 beams relies on a technique developed for the generation of Bessel beams from laser diodes using a cone-shaped lens (axicon). With traditional focusing of multimode radiation, different curvatures of the wavefronts of the various constituent modes lead to a shift of their focal points along the optical axis that in turn implies larger focal-spot sizes with correspondingly increased values of M2. In contrast, the generation of a Bessel-type beam with an axicon relies on `self-interference' of each mode thus eliminating the underlying reason for an increase in the focal-spot size. For an experimental demonstration of the proposed technique, we used a fiber-coupled laser diode with M2 below 20 and an emission wavelength in ~1μm range. Utilization of the axicons with apex angle of 140deg, made by direct laser writing on a fiber tip, enabled the demonstration of an order of magnitude decrease of the focal-spot size compared to that achievable using an `ideal' lens of unity numerical aperture.

  9. Ovarian cancer stem-like cells elicit the polarization of M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Cai, Da-Jun; Li, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is a life‑threatening disease in females worldwide. The polarization of macrophages is crucial in oncogenesis and the development of ovarian cancer. Increasing evidence has supported the correlation between ovarian cancer stem‑like cells (OCSCs) and macrophages, however, whether OCSCs can affect the polarization of macrophages and the underlying mechanisms involved remain to be elucidated. To examine the interplay between OCSCs and macrophages, a co‑culture system was used to detect the effect of OCSCs on macrophage polarization. The expression of cluster of differentiation 206+ and the secretion of interleukin‑10 were significantly increased and the production of tumor necrosis factor‑α was suppressed, confirming macrophage polarization to M2 macrophages. Further investigation of the macrophages in a Transwell culture system with OCSCs revealed polarization to the M2 macrophages to a similar extent, indicating that the cytokines of the OCSCs, rather than direct cell‑cell contact, are important for the polarization of M2 macrophages. Furthermore, the expression levels of chemokine (C‑C motif) ligand (CCL)2, cyclooxygenase (COX)‑2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were increased in the Transwell system and the inhibition of COX‑2, but not CCL2, significantly decreased the polarization of the M2 macrophages. In addition, mechanistic analysis revealed the importance of the COX‑2/PGE2 pathway in OCSCs to activate Janus kinase (JAK) signaling in macrophages to elicit M2 polarization. These findings provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that OCSCs are capable of altering macrophages into the M2 phenotype via the overexpression of COX‑2 and the increased production of PGE2 cytokines and that the JAK signaling pathway in macrophages is important for this alteration. The present study provided evidence supporting possible molecular targets for cancer treatment. PMID:25672286

  10. Search for variability in the kinematics of the ionised circumstellar region of M2-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Peimbert, S.; Arrieta, A.; Georgiev, L.

    In our previous study of M2-9 we found that the radial velocities of the forbidden lines of the ionized species in the nuclear spectra show a negative gradient which correlates with density, electron temperature and electron pressure. The size of the ionized region is relatively small and the travel time with the observed velocities is of order of decades. In an attempt to reveal the nature of the unusual velocity gradient, we present second epoch observational spectral data of the nucleus of M2-9.

  11. Modelling the enigmatic Late Pliocene Glacial Event - Marine Isotope Stage M2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, Aisling M.; Haywood, Alan M.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Tindall, Julia C.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Hill, Daniel J.; Pickering, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The Pliocene Epoch (5.2 to 2.58 Ma) has often been targeted to investigate the nature of warm climates. However, climate records for the Pliocene exhibit significant variability and show intervals that apparently experienced a cooler than modern climate. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2 (~ 3.3 Ma) is a globally recognisable cooling event that disturbs an otherwise relatively (compared to present-day) warm background climate state. It remains unclear whether this event corresponds to significant ice sheet build-up in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. Estimates of sea level for this interval vary, and range from modern values to estimates of 65 m sea level fall with respect to present day. Here we implement plausible M2 ice sheet configurations into a coupled atmosphere–ocean climate model to test the hypothesis that larger-than-modern ice sheet configurations may have existed at M2. Climate model results are compared with proxy climate data available for M2 to assess the plausibility of each ice sheet configuration. Whilst the outcomes of our data/model comparisons are not in all cases straight forward to interpret, there is little indication that results from model simulations in which significant ice masses have been prescribed in the Northern Hemisphere are incompatible with proxy data from the North Atlantic, Northeast Arctic Russia, North Africa and the Southern Ocean. Therefore, our model results do not preclude the possibility of the existence of larger ice masses during M2 in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere. Specifically they are not able to discount the possibility of significant ice masses in the Northern Hemisphere during the M2 event, consistent with a global sea-level fall of between 40 m and 60 m. This study highlights the general need for more focused and coordinated data generation in the future to improve the coverage and consistency in proxy records for M2, which will allow these and future M2 sensitivity tests to be interrogated

  12. Modelling the enigmatic Late Pliocene Glacial Event - Marine Isotope Stage M2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Aisling M.; Haywood, Alan M.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Tindall, Julia C.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Hill, Daniel J.; Pickering, Steven J.

    2015-05-01

    The Pliocene Epoch (5.2 to 2.58 Ma) has often been targeted to investigate the nature of warm climates. However, climate records for the Pliocene exhibit significant variability and show intervals that apparently experienced a cooler than modern climate. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2 (~ 3.3 Ma) is a globally recognisable cooling event that disturbs an otherwise relatively (compared to present-day) warm background climate state. It remains unclear whether this event corresponds to significant ice sheet build-up in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. Estimates of sea level for this interval vary, and range from modern values to estimates of 65 m sea level fall with respect to present day. Here we implement plausible M2 ice sheet configurations into a coupled atmosphere-ocean climate model to test the hypothesis that larger-than-modern ice sheet configurations may have existed at M2. Climate model results are compared with proxy climate data available for M2 to assess the plausibility of each ice sheet configuration. Whilst the outcomes of our data/model comparisons are not in all cases straight forward to interpret, there is little indication that results from model simulations in which significant ice masses have been prescribed in the Northern Hemisphere are incompatible with proxy data from the North Atlantic, Northeast Arctic Russia, North Africa and the Southern Ocean. Therefore, our model results do not preclude the possibility of the existence of larger ice masses during M2 in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere. Specifically they are not able to discount the possibility of significant ice masses in the Northern Hemisphere during the M2 event, consistent with a global sea-level fall of between 40 m and 60 m. This study highlights the general need for more focused and coordinated data generation in the future to improve the coverage and consistency in proxy records for M2, which will allow these and future M2 sensitivity tests to be interrogated further.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of PEGylated recombinant human endostatin (M2ES) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zuo-gang; Jia, Lin; Guo, Li-fang; Yu, Min; Sun, Xu; Nie, Wen; Fu, Yan; Rao, Chun-ming; Wang, Jun-zhi; Luo, Yong-zhang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: M2ES is PEGylated recombinant human endostatin. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion of M2ES in rats. Methods: 125I-radiolabeled M2ES was administered to rats by intravenous bolus injection at 3 mg/kg. The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of M2ES were investigated using the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation method. Results: The serum M2ES concentration-time curve after a single intravenous dose of 3 mg/kg in rats was fitted with a non-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated as follows: Cmax=28.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=71.5 h, AUC(0–∞)=174.6 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=17.2 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=57.6 h, and Vss=989.8 mL/kg for the total radioactivity; Cmax=30.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=60.1 h, AUC(0–∞)=146.2 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=20.6 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=47.4 h, and Vss=974.6 mL/kg for the TCA precipitate radioactivity. M2ES was rapidly and widely distributed in various tissues and showed substantial deposition in kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. The radioactivity recovered in the urine and feces by 432 h post-dose was 71.3% and 8.3%, respectively. Only 0.98% of radioactivity was excreted in the bile by 24 h post-dose. Conclusion: PEG modification substantially prolongs the circulation time of recombinant human endostatin and effectively improves its pharmacokinetic behavior. M2ES is extensively distributed in most tissues of rats, including kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. Urinary excretion was the major elimination route for M2ES. PMID:26027657

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  15. Bilateral key comparison CCM.P-K3.1 for absolute pressure measurements from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedchak, J. A.; Bock, Th; Jousten, K.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the bilateral key comparison CCM.P-K3.1 between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) for absolute pressure in the range from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 9 × 10-4 Pa. This comparison was a follow-up to the comparison CCM.P-K3. Two ionization gauges and two spinning rotor gauges (SRGs) were used as the transfer standards for the comparison. The SRGs were used to compare the standards at a pressure of 9 × 10-4 Pa and to normalize the ionization gauge readings. The two ionization gauges were used to compare the standards in the pressure range of from 3 × 10-6 Pa to 3 × 10-4 Pa. Both laboratories used dynamic expansion chambers as standards in the comparison. The two labs showed excellent agreement with each other and with the CCM.P-K3 key comparison reference value (KCRV) over the entire range. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. M2-F1 in flight over lakebed on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Following the first M2-F1 airtow flight on 16 August 1963, the Flight Research Center used the vehicle for both research flights and to check out new lifting-body pilots. These included Bruce Peterson, Don Mallick, Fred Haise, and Bill Dana from NASA. Air Force pilots who flew the M2-F1 included Chuck Yeager, Jerry Gentry, Joe Engle, Jim Wood, and Don Sorlie, although Wood, Haise, and Engle only flew on car tows. In the three years between the first and last flights of the M2-F1, it made about 400 car tows and 77 air tows. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and

  17. M2-F1 lifting body aircraft on a flatbed truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    After the grounding of the M2-F1 in 1966, it was kept in outside storage on the Dryden complex. After several years, its fabric and plywood structure was damaged by the sun and weather. Restoration of the vehicle began in February 1994 under the leadership of NASA retiree Dick Fischer, with other retirees who had originally worked on the M2-F1's construction and flight research three decades before also participating. The photo shows the now-restored M2-F1 returning to the site of its flight research, now called the Dryden Flight Research Center, on 22 August 1997. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, NASA Flight Research Center (later Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA) management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available

  18. Dynamical instability in the S =1 Bose-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaoka, Rui; Tsuchiura, Hiroki; Yamashita, Makoto; Toga, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical instabilities of superfluid flows in the S =1 Bose-Hubbard model. The time evolution of each spin component in a condensate is calculated based on the dynamical Gutzwiller approximation for a wide range of interactions, from a weakly correlated regime to a strongly correlated regime near the Mott-insulator transition. Owing to the spin-dependent interactions, the superfluid flow of the spin-1 condensate decays at a different critical momentum from a spinless case when the interaction strength is the same. We furthermore calculate the dynamical phase diagram of this model and clarify that the obtained phase boundary has very different features depending on whether the average number of particles per site is even or odd. Finally, we analyze the density and spin modulations that appear in association with the dynamical instability. We find that spin modulations are highly sensitive to the presence of a uniform magnetic field.

  19. Effect of anisotropy in the S=1 underscreened Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Lacroix, Claudine; Iglesias, José Roberto; Coqblin, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    We study the effect of crystal field anisotropy in the underscreened S=1 Kondo lattice model. Starting from the two orbital Anderson lattice model and including a local anisotropy term, we show, through Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, that local anisotropy is equivalent to an anisotropic Kondo interaction (J∥≠J⊥). The competition and coexistence between ferromagnetism and Kondo effect in this effective model is studied within a generalized mean-field approximation. Several regimes are obtained, depending on the parameters, exhibiting or not coexistence of magnetic order and Kondo effect. Particularly, we show that a re-entrant Kondo phase at low temperature can be obtained. We are also able to describe phases where the Kondo temperature is smaller than the Curie temperature (TK

  20. Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

    1989-07-01

    The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (/beta//sub to/ /approximately/ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m/sup 2/. The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E.; O’Carroll, Simon J.; Graham, E. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. PMID:26813587

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 polarizes THP-1 cells into M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Crystal; Singla, Reetu; Singal, Pawan K; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Singla, Dinender K

    2012-07-01

    It was hypothesized that monocyte treatment with bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) would significantly enhance monocyte polarization into M2 macrophages as well as increasing the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In a cell culture system using monocytes (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1), we studied the effects of BMP7 on monocytes polarizing into M2 macrophages. The data demonstrate that THP-1 cells contain a BMP type II receptor (BMPR2), and that its activation is significantly (p < 0.05) increased following treatment with BMP7. Furthermore, there was an increase of M2 macrophages, BMPR2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-1ra compared with the respective controls. Moreover, treatment with BMP7 caused a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), compared with the controls. In conclusion, we suggest for the first time that BMP7 has a unique potential to polarize monocytes into M2 macrophages, required for tissue repair, which will have significant applications for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:22720873

  3. M2-polarized macrophages contribute to neovasculogenesis, leading to relapse of oral cancer following radiation

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Makiko; Kioi, Mitomu; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Sugiura, Kei; Mitsudo, Kenji; Aoki, Ichiro; Taniguchi, Hideki; Tohnai, Iwai

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that radiation is one of the standard therapies in the treatment of patients with oral cancer, tumours can recur even in the early stages of the disease, negatively impacting prognosis and quality of life. We previously found that CD11b+ bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) were recruited into human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), leading to re-organization of the vasculature and tumour regrowth. However, it is not yet known how these cells contribute to tumour vascularization. In the present study, we investigated the role of infiltrating CD11b+ myeloid cells in the vascularization and recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In a xenograft mouse model, local irradiation caused vascular damage and hypoxia in the tumour and increased infiltration of CD11b+ myeloid cells. These infiltrating cells showed characteristics of M2 macrophages (M2Mφs) and are associated with the promotion of vascularization. M2Mφs promoted tumour progression in recurrence after irradiation compared to non-irradiated tumours. In addition, we found that CD11b+ myeloid cells, as well as CD206+ M2Mφs, are increased during recurrence after radiotherapy in human OSCC specimens. Our findings may lead to the development of potential clinical biomarkers or treatment targets in irradiated OSCC patients. PMID:27271009

  4. Predominance of M2-polarized macrophages in bladder cancer affects angiogenesis, tumor grade and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUCHI, HISASHI; TANAKA, MICHIO; TANAKA, AYAKO; TSUNEMI, AKISA; YAMAMOTO, HIDENOBU

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) often assume an immunoregulatory M2 phenotype. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify the correlation of vascularity and TAMs, in particular the M2 phenotype in the stroma and tumor areas, with the clinical and pathological outcomes of patients with bladder cancer. The TAM counts and microvessel counts (MVCs) were determined immunohistochemically in 21 patients with bladder cancer. The number of infiltrating TAMs was measured using immunohistochemistry with anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)68 and anti-CD163 antibodies, to identify a macrophage lineage marker and an M2-polarized-specific cell surface receptor, respectively. CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages were evaluated in the stroma and tumor areas, and areas with a high density of infiltrating cell spots were counted. MVCs were determined using immunohistochemistry with anti-CD34 antibodies. The results revealed that the higher ratio of CD163+/CD68+ macrophages in the stroma, tumor and total tumor tissues were correlated with a higher stage and grade (P<0.05). In addition, the low ratio of CD68+/CD34+ microvessels was correlated with a higher stage (P<0.05). There was also a positive correlation between TAMs and MVC (r2=0.25; P<0.05). These results suggest that the TAM polarized M2 phenotype affects microvessels, pathological outcome, tumor grade and invasiveness. PMID:27123124

  5. A survey on M2M systems for mHealth: a wireless communications perspective.

    PubMed

    Kartsakli, Elli; Lalos, Aris S; Antonopoulos, Angelos; Tennina, Stefano; Renzo, Marco Di; Alonso, Luis; Verikoukis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    In the new era of connectivity, marked by the explosive number of wireless electronic devices and the need for smart and pervasive applications, Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications are an emerging technology that enables the seamless device interconnection without the need of human interaction. The use of M2M technology can bring to life a wide range of mHealth applications, with considerable benefits for both patients and healthcare providers. Many technological challenges have to be met, however, to ensure the widespread adoption of mHealth solutions in the future. In this context, we aim to provide a comprehensive survey on M2M systems for mHealth applications from a wireless communication perspective. An end-to-end holistic approach is adopted, focusing on different communication aspects of the M2M architecture. Hence, we first provide a systematic review ofWireless Body Area Networks (WBANs), which constitute the enabling technology at the patient's side, and then discuss end-to-end solutions that involve the design and implementation of practical mHealth applications. We close the survey by identifying challenges and open research issues, thus paving the way for future research opportunities. PMID:25264958

  6. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  7. Wooden shell of M2-F1 being assembled at El Mirage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Wooden shell of the M2-F1 being assembled at El Mirage, CA. While Flight Research Center technicians built the internal steel structure of the M2-F1, sailplane builder Gus Briegleb built the vehicle's outer wooden shell. Its skin was 3/32-inch mahogany plywood, with 1/8-inch mahogany rib sections reinforced with spruce. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to

  8. M2-F1 mounted in NASA Ames Research Center 40x80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    After the first attempted ground-tow tests of the M2-F1 in March 1963, the vehicle was taken to the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA, for wind-tunnel testing. During these tests, Milt Thompson and others were in the M2-F1 to position the control surfaces for each test. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C

  9. M2-F1 in flight over lakebed on tow line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    After initial ground-tow flights of the M2-F1 using the Pontiac as a tow vehicle, the way was clear to make air tows behind a C-47. The first air tow took place on 16 August 1963. Pilot Milt Thompson found that the M2-F1 flew well, with good control. This first flight lasted less than two minutes from tow-line release to touchdown. The descent rate was 4,000 feet per minute. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got

  10. Proposed Ames M2-F1, M1-L half-cone, and Langley lenticular bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Dale Reed, who inaugurated the lifting-body flight research at NASA's Flight Research Center (later, Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA), originally proposed that three wooden outer shells be built. These would then be attached to the single internal steel structure. The three shapes were (viewer's left to right) the M2-F1, the M1-L, and a lenticular shape. Milt Thompson, who supported Reed's advocacy for a lifting-body research project, recommended that only the M2-F1 shell be built, believing that the M1-L shape was 'too radical,' while the lenticular one was 'too exotic.' Although the lenticular shape was often likened to that of a flying saucer, Reed's wife Donna called it the 'powder puff.' The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey

  11. Abundance, distribution, mobility and oligomeric state of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in live cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nenasheva, Tatiana A.; Neary, Marianne; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Birdsall, Nigel J.M.; Breckenridge, Ross A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cardiac rhythm via regulation of the inward potassium current. To increase our understanding of M2 receptor physiology we used Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy to visualize individual receptors at the plasma membrane of transformed CHOM2 cells, a cardiac cell line (HL-1), primary cardiomyocytes and tissue slices from pre- and post-natal mice. Receptor expression levels between individual cells in dissociated cardiomyocytes and heart slices were highly variable and only 10% of murine cardiomyocytes expressed muscarinic receptors. M2 receptors were evenly distributed across individual cells and their density in freshly isolated embryonic cardiomyocytes was ~ 1 μm− 2, increasing at birth (to ~ 3 μm− 2) and decreasing back to ~ 1 μm− 2 after birth. M2 receptors were primarily monomeric but formed reversible dimers. They diffused freely at the plasma membrane, moving approximately 4-times faster in heart slices than in cultured cardiomyocytes. Knowledge of receptor density and mobility has allowed receptor collision rate to be modeled by Monte Carlo simulations. Our estimated encounter rate of 5–10 collisions per second, may explain the latency between acetylcholine application and GIRK channel opening. PMID:23357106

  12. Chop Deficiency Protects Mice Against Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis by Attenuating M2 Macrophage Production.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yingying; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhijun; He, Long; Zhu, Jianghui; Zhang, Meng; He, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Zhenshun; Ao, Qilin; Cao, Yong; Yang, Ping; Su, Yunchao; Zhao, Jianping; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Qilin; Ning, Qin; Xiang, Xudong; Xiong, Weining; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Yongjian

    2016-05-01

    C/EBP homologous protein (Chop) has been shown to have altered expression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), but its exact role in IPF pathoaetiology has not been fully addressed. Studies conducted in patients with IPF and Chop(-/-) mice have dissected the role of Chop and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pulmonary fibrosis pathogenesis. The effect of Chop deficiency on macrophage polarization and related signalling pathways were investigated to identify the underlying mechanisms. Patients with IPF and mice with bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis were affected by the altered Chop expression and ER stress. In particular, Chop deficiency protected mice against BLM-induced lung injury and fibrosis. Loss of Chop significantly attenuated transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production and reduced M2 macrophage infiltration in the lung following BLM induction. Mechanistic studies showed that Chop deficiency repressed the M2 program in macrophages, which then attenuated TGF-β secretion. Specifically, loss of Chop promoted the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and suppressors of cytokine signaling 3, and through which Chop deficiency repressed signal transducer and activator of transcription 6/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling, the essential pathway for the M2 program in macrophages. Together, our data support the idea that Chop and ER stress are implicated in IPF pathoaetiology, involving at least the induction and differentiation of M2 macrophages. PMID:26883801

  13. Adiponectin Enhances Cold-Induced Browning of Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via Promoting M2 Macrophage Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hui, Xiaoyan; Gu, Ping; Zhang, Jialiang; Nie, Tao; Pan, Yong; Wu, Donghai; Feng, Tianshi; Zhong, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Lam, Karen S L; Xu, Aimin

    2015-08-01

    Adiponectin is an abundant adipokine with pleiotropic protective effects against a cluster of obesity-related cardiometabolic disorders. However, its role in adaptive thermogenesis has scarcely been explored. Here we showed that chronic cold exposure led to a markedly elevated production of adiponectin in adipocytes of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (scWAT), which in turn bound to M2 macrophages in the stromal vascular fraction. Chronic cold exposure-induced accumulation of M2 macrophages, activation of beige cells, and thermogenic program were markedly impaired in scWAT of adiponectin knockout (ADN KO) mice, whereas these impairments were reversed by replenishment with adiponectin. Mechanistically, adiponectin was recruited to the cell surface of M2 macrophages via its binding partner T-cadherin and promoted the cell proliferation by activation of Akt, consequently leading to beige cell activation. These findings uncover adiponectin as a key efferent signal for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis by mediating the crosstalk between adipocytes and M2 macrophages in scWAT. PMID:26166748

  14. M2-F1 lifting body and Paresev 1B on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    In this photo of the M2-F1 lifting body and the Paresev 1B on the ramp, the viewer sees two vehicles representing different approaches to building a research craft to simulate a spacecraft able to land on the ground instead of splashing down in the ocean as the Mercury capsules did. The M2-F1 was a lifting body, a shape able to re-enter from orbit and land. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) used a Rogallo wing that could be (but never was) used to replace a conventional parachute for landing a capsule-type spacecraft, allowing it to make a controlled landing on the ground. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop

  15. LTE-advanced random access mechanism for M2M communication: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Rashid; Sarowa, Sandeep; Jaglan, Reena Rathee; Khan, Mohammad Junaid; Agrawal, Sunil

    2016-03-01

    Machine Type Communications (MTC) enables one or more self-sufficient machines to communicate directly with one another without human interference. MTC applications include smart grid, security, e-Health and intelligent automation system. To support huge numbers of MTC devices, one of the challenging issues is to provide a competent way for numerous access in the network and to minimize network overload. In this article, the different control mechanisms for overload random access are reviewed to avoid congestion caused by random access channel (RACH) of MTC devices. However, past and present wireless technologies have been engineered for Human-to-Human (H2H) communications, in particular, for transmission of voice. Consequently the Long Term Evolution (LTE) -Advanced is expected to play a central role in communicating Machine to Machine (M2M) and are very optimistic about H2H communications. Distinct and unique characteristics of M2M communications create new challenges from those in H2H communications. In this article, we investigate the impact of massive M2M terminals attempting random access to LTE-Advanced all at once. We discuss and review the solutions to alleviate the overload problem by Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP). As a result, we evaluate and compare these solutions that can effectively eliminate the congestion on the random access channel for M2M communications without affecting H2H communications.

  16. M2-polarized macrophages contribute to neovasculogenesis, leading to relapse of oral cancer following radiation.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Makiko; Kioi, Mitomu; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Sugiura, Kei; Mitsudo, Kenji; Aoki, Ichiro; Taniguchi, Hideki; Tohnai, Iwai

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that radiation is one of the standard therapies in the treatment of patients with oral cancer, tumours can recur even in the early stages of the disease, negatively impacting prognosis and quality of life. We previously found that CD11b(+) bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) were recruited into human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), leading to re-organization of the vasculature and tumour regrowth. However, it is not yet known how these cells contribute to tumour vascularization. In the present study, we investigated the role of infiltrating CD11b(+) myeloid cells in the vascularization and recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In a xenograft mouse model, local irradiation caused vascular damage and hypoxia in the tumour and increased infiltration of CD11b(+) myeloid cells. These infiltrating cells showed characteristics of M2 macrophages (M2Mφs) and are associated with the promotion of vascularization. M2Mφs promoted tumour progression in recurrence after irradiation compared to non-irradiated tumours. In addition, we found that CD11b(+) myeloid cells, as well as CD206(+) M2Mφs, are increased during recurrence after radiotherapy in human OSCC specimens. Our findings may lead to the development of potential clinical biomarkers or treatment targets in irradiated OSCC patients. PMID:27271009

  17. Structural basis for proton conduction and inhibition by the influenza M2 protein

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei; DeGrado, William F

    2012-01-01

    The influenza M2 protein forms an acid-activated and drug-sensitive proton channel in the virus envelope that is important for the virus lifecycle. The functional properties and high-resolution structures of this proton channel have been extensively studied to understand the mechanisms of proton conduction and drug inhibition. We review biochemical and electrophysiological studies of M2 and discuss how high-resolution structures have transformed our understanding of this proton channel. Comparison of structures obtained in different membrane-mimetic solvents and under different pH using X-ray crystallography, solution NMR, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed how the M2 structure depends on the environment and showed that the pharmacologically relevant drug-binding site lies in the transmembrane (TM) pore. Competing models of proton conduction have been evaluated using biochemical experiments, high-resolution structural methods, and computational modeling. These results are converging to a model in which a histidine residue in the TM domain mediates proton relay with water, aided by microsecond conformational dynamics of the imidazole ring. These mechanistic insights are guiding the design of new inhibitors that target drug-resistant M2 variants and may be relevant for other proton channels. PMID:23001990

  18. Marine microbial biodiversity, bioinformatics and biotechnology (M2B3) data reporting and service standards

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Contextual data collected concurrently with molecular samples are critical to the use of metagenomics in the fields of marine biodiversity, bioinformatics and biotechnology. We present here Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics and Biotechnology (M2B3) standards for “Reporting” and “Serving” data. The M2B3 Reporting Standard (1) describes minimal mandatory and recommended contextual information for a marine microbial sample obtained in the epipelagic zone, (2) includes meaningful information for researchers in the oceanographic, biodiversity and molecular disciplines, and (3) can easily be adopted by any marine laboratory with minimum sampling resources. The M2B3 Service Standard defines a software interface through which these data can be discovered and explored in data repositories. The M2B3 Standards were developed by the European project Micro B3, funded under 7th Framework Programme “Ocean of Tomorrow”, and were first used with the Ocean Sampling Day initiative. We believe that these standards have value in broader marine science. PMID:26203332

  19. Molecular Mechanisms That Influence the Macrophage M1–M2 Polarization Balance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Zen, Ke

    2014-01-01

    As an essential component of innate immunity, macrophages have multiple functions in both inhibiting or promoting cell proliferation and tissue repair. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of macrophages. Classical M1 and alternative M2 activation of macrophages, mirroring the Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells, represent two extremes of a dynamic changing state of macrophage activation. M1-type macrophages release cytokines that inhibit the proliferation of surrounding cells and damage contiguous tissue, and M2-type macrophages release cytokines that promote the proliferation of contiguous cells and tissue repair. M1–M2 polarization of macrophage is a tightly controlled process entailing a set of signaling pathways, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks. An imbalance of macrophage M1–M2 polarization is often associated with various diseases or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, identification of the molecules associated with the dynamic changes of macrophage polarization and understanding their interactions is crucial for elucidating the molecular basis of disease progression and designing novel macrophage-mediated therapeutic strategies. PMID:25506346

  20. A Survey on M2M Systems for mHealth: A Wireless Communications Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kartsakli, Elli; Lalos, Aris S.; Antonopoulos, Angelos; Tennina, Stefano; Di Renzo, Marco; Alonso, Luis; Verikoukis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    In the new era of connectivity, marked by the explosive number of wireless electronic devices and the need for smart and pervasive applications, Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications are an emerging technology that enables the seamless device interconnection without the need of human interaction. The use of M2M technology can bring to life a wide range of mHealth applications, with considerable benefits for both patients and healthcare providers. Many technological challenges have to be met, however, to ensure the widespread adoption of mHealth solutions in the future. In this context, we aim to provide a comprehensive survey on M2M systems for mHealth applications from a wireless communication perspective. An end-to-end holistic approach is adopted, focusing on different communication aspects of the M2M architecture. Hence, we first provide a systematic review of Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs), which constitute the enabling technology at the patient's side, and then discuss end-to-end solutions that involve the design and implementation of practical mHealth applications. We close the survey by identifying challenges and open research issues, thus paving the way for future research opportunities. PMID:25264958

  1. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of comet ISON (2012 S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, H.; A'Hearn, M.; Feldman, P.; Bodewits, D.; Combi, M.; Dello Russo, N.; McCandliss, S.

    2014-07-01

    We performed ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to monitor the evolution of CO production with heliocentric distance, search for compositional changes associated with the intense heating episode near perihelion, and measure the D/H ratio. We observed C/ISON with Hubble at four different epochs: May 2.5 (r=3.8 au, Δ=4.3 au), Oct 8.8 (r=1.5 au, Δ= 1.9 au), Oct 21.9 (r=1.23 au, Δ = 1.53 au), and Nov 1.5 (r=1.0 au, Δ =1.2 au). No molecular or atomic emissions were detected in May, but a stringent upper limit on the CO production rate was obtained (Q[CO] ≤ 1.0 × 10^{27} molecules s^{-1}, 3 σ). OH emission was detected during all the later observations and showed strong temporal variations on Nov 1. CO was clearly detected on Oct 21.9 and Nov 1.5, from which we derive CO/H_{2}O ˜0.015. Both atomic carbon and sulfur emissions were detected on Nov 1. No atomic deuterium emission was detected during the attempts to measure it on Nov 1, as the comet's gas production rates were significantly smaller than some early predictions suggested. A lightcurve derived from HST optical imaging observations on Nov 1, contemporaneous with the UV spectroscopy, suggests a nucleus rotational period of ˜10.4 hr, but the range of plausible values is fairly broad.

  2. M2-F1 on lakebed with Pontiac convertible tow vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 lifting body, dubbed the 'flying bathtub' by the media, was the precursor of a remarkable series of wingless flying vehicles that contributed data used in the space shuttle and the X-38 Technology Demonstrator for crew return from the International Space Station. The early tow tests were done using the 1963 Pontiac Catalina convertible modified for the purpose. The first flight attempt occurred on 1 March 1963 but was unsuccessful due to control-system problems. It was not until 5 April 1963, after tests in the Ames Research Center wind tunnel, that Milt Thompson made the first M2-F1 tow flight. Based on the ideas and basic design of Alfred J. Eggers and others at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (now the Ames Research Center), Mountain View, Calif., in the mid-1950s, the M2-F1 came to be built over a four-month period in 1962-63 for a cost of only about $30,000 plus perhaps an additional $8,000-$10,000 for an ejection seat and $10,000 for solid-propellant rockets to add time to the landing flare. Engineers and technicians at the NASA Flight Research Center (now NASA Dryden) kept costs low by designing and fabricating it partly in-house, with the plywood shell constructed by a local sailplane builder. Someone at the time estimated that it would have cost a major aircraft company $150,000 to build the same vehicle. Unlike the later lifting bodies, the M2-F1 was unpowered and was initially towed until it was airborne by a souped-up Pontiac convertible. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina

  3. M2b Monocytes Provoke Bacterial Pneumonia and Gut Bacteria-Associated Sepsis in Alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimoto, Yusuke; Asai, Akira; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Ito, Ichiaki; Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Garcia, Melanie C; Suzuki, Sumihiro; Kobayashi, Makiko; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Suzuki, Fujio

    2015-12-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption markedly impairs host antibacterial defense against opportunistic infections. γ-irradiated NOD-SCID IL-2Rγ(null) mice inoculated with nonalcoholic PBMCs (control PBMC chimeras) resisted Klebsiella pneumonia and gut bacteria-associated sepsis, whereas the chimeras created with alcoholic PBMCs (alcoholic PBMC chimeras) were very susceptible to these infections. M1 monocytes (IL-12(+)IL-10(-)CD163(-)CD14(+) cells), major effector cells in antibacterial innate immunity, were not induced by a bacterial Ag in alcoholic PBMC cultures, and M2b monocytes (CCL1(+)CD163(+)CD14(+) cells), which predominated in alcoholic PBMCs, were shown to be inhibitor cells on the Ag-stimulated monocyte conversion from quiescent monocytes to M1 monocytes. CCL1, which functions to maintain M2b macrophage properties, was produced by M2b monocytes isolated from alcoholic PBMCs. These M2b monocytes reverted to quiescent monocytes (IL-12(-)IL-10(-)CCL1(-)CD163(-)CD14(+) cells) in cultures supplemented with CCL1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide, and the subsequent quiescent monocytes easily converted to M1 monocytes under bacterial Ag stimulation. Alcoholic PBMC chimeras treated with CCL1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide were resistant against pulmonary infection by K. pneumoniae and sepsis stemming from enterococcal translocation. These results indicate that a majority of monocytes polarize to an M2b phenotype in association with alcohol abuse, and this polarization contributes to the increased susceptibility of alcoholics to gut and lung infections. Bacterial pneumonia and gut bacteria-associated sepsis, frequently seen in alcoholics, can be controlled through the polarization of macrophage phenotypes. PMID:26525287

  4. Unprimed, M1 and M2 Macrophages Differentially Interact with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; Fong, Shao B.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis. Tissue macrophages are amongst the first immune cells to respond to bacteria and depending on the cytokine profile at the infection site, macrophages are primed to react to infection in different ways. Priming of naive macrophages with IFN-γ produces a classical pro-inflammatory, antibacterial M1 macrophage after TLR ligation, whereas priming with IL-4 induces an anti-inflammatory tissue-repair M2 phenotype. Previous work has shown that M1 are preferentially generated in gingival tissue following infection with P. gingivalis. However, few studies have investigated the interactions of macrophage subsets with P. gingivalis cells. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of naive, M1 and M2 macrophages to phagocytose P. gingivalis and investigate how this interaction affects both the bacterial cell and the macrophage. M1 and M2 macrophages were both found to have enhanced phagocytic capacity compared with that of naive macrophages, however only the naive and M1 macrophages were able to produce a respiratory burst in order to clear the bacteria from the phagosome. P. gingivalis was found to persist in naive and M2, but not M1 macrophages for 24 hours. Phagocytosis of P. gingivalis also induced high levels of TNF-α, IL-12 and iNOS in M1 macrophages, but not in naive or M2 macrophages. Furthermore, infection of macrophages with P. gingivalis at high bacteria to macrophage ratios, while inducing an inflammatory response, was also found to be deleterious to macrophage longevity, with high levels of apoptotic cell death found in macrophages after infection. The activation of M1 macrophages observed in this study may contribute to the initiation and maintenance of a pro-inflammatory state during chronic periodontitis. PMID:27383471

  5. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, María Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ) or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  6. Optical Spectroscopy of the M2 and T Phases of Vanadium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, T. J.; Qazilbash, M. M.; Hendriks, C.; Walter, E. J.; Krakauer, H.; Yoon, Joonseok; Ju, Honglyoul; Smith, R.; Carr, G. L.

    The salient feature of the familiar structural transition that accompanies the metal-insulator transition in bulk VO2 is a pairing of all of the vanadium ions in the M1 insulating phase. This pairing has long been thought critical to the emergence of insulating behavior. However, there exist two less familiar insulating states, M2 and T. These phases notably exhibit distinctly different V-V pairing. In the M2 phase, only half of the vanadium ions exhibit pairing while the other half carry local spin 1/2 magnetic moments and are equally spaced in quasi-one dimensional chains. The T phase has two types of inequivalent vanadium chains, each consisting of V-V pairs but with different spacing between V ions in the pairs. The M1 phase has been studied extensively with optical spectroscopy. By studying the two less familiar insulating phases, M2 and T, one can investigate how changes in V-V pairing affect the properties of the VO2 insulating state. We performed infrared and optical spectroscopy on the M2 and T phases in the same sample. Despite a clear change in the lattice structure, the inter-band transitions are insensitive to changes in the V-V pairing. This result conclusively establishes that intra-atomic Coulomb repulsion between electrons provides the dominant contribution to the energy gap in all insulating phases of VO2. Our work highlights the necessity of considering the M2 and T phases of VO2 in future experimental and theoretical research.

  7. MMP28 promotes macrophage polarization toward M2 cells and augments pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Sina A.; Johnston, Laura K.; Huizar, Isham; Birkland, Timothy P.; Hanson, Josiah; Wang, Ying; Parks, William C.; Manicone, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the MMP family function in various processes of innate immunity, particularly in controlling important steps in leukocyte trafficking and activation. MMP28 (epilysin) is a member of this family of proteinases, and we have found that MMP28 is expressed by macrophages and regulates their recruitment to the lung. We hypothesized that MMP28 regulates other key macrophage responses, such as macrophage polarization. Furthermore, we hypothesized that these MMP28-dependent changes in macrophage polarization would alter fibrotic responses in the lung. We examined the gene expression changes in WT and Mmp28−/− BMDMs, stimulated with LPS or IL-4/IL-13 to promote M1 and M2 cells, respectively. We also collected macrophages from the lungs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-exposed WT and Mmp28−/− mice to evaluate changes in macrophage polarization. Lastly, we evaluated the macrophage polarization phenotypes during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in WT and Mmp28−/− mice and assessed mice for differences in weight loss and total collagen levels. We found that MMP28 dampens proinflammatory macrophage function and promots M2 programming. In both in vivo models, we found deficits in M2 polarization in Mmp28−/− mice. In bleomycin-induced lung injury, these changes were associated with reduced fibrosis. MMP28 is an important regulator of macrophage polarization, promoting M2 function. Loss of MMP28 results in reduced M2 polarization and protection from bleomycin-induced fibrosis. These findings highlight a novel role for MMP28 in macrophage biology and pulmonary disease. PMID:23964118

  8. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, María Carolina; Lefimil, Claudia; Rodas, Paula I.; Vernal, Rolando; Lopez, Mercedes; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Imarai, Mónica; Escobar, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ) and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ) or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ) activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM) upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26125939

  9. Phase I study of weekly nab-paclitaxel combined with S-1 in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsurutani, Junji; Kuroi, Katsumasa; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Miyazaki, Masaki; Nishina, Shinichi; Makimura, Chihiro; Tanizaki, Junko; Okamoto, Kunio; Yamashita, Toshinari; Aruga, Tomoyuki; Shigekawa, Takashi; Komoike, Yoshifumi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study of a weekly nab-paclitaxel and S-1 combination therapy in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The primary objective was to estimate the maximum tolerated and recommended doses. Each treatment was repeated every 21 days. Levels 1, 2a, 2b, and 3 were set depending on the S-1 dose (65 or 80 mg/m2) and nab-paclitaxel infusion schedule (days 1 and 8 or days 1, 8, and 15). Fifteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in one patient at Level 3 (100 mg/m2 nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8, and 15 with 80 mg/m2 S-1 daily for 14 days, followed by 7 days of rest). Although the maximum tolerated dose was not reached, the recommended dose was determined to be Level 3. Neutropenia was the most frequent grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse event. For patients with measurable lesions, the response rate was 50.0% and the median time to treatment failure and median progression-free survival was 13.2 and 21.0 months, respectively. The present results show the feasibility and potential for long-term administration of this combination therapy. PMID:25786335

  10. M2-F1 in flight during low-speed car tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The M2-F1 shown in flight during a low-speed car tow runs across the lakebed. Such tests allowed about two minutes to test the vehicle's handling in flight. NASA Flight Research Center (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center) personnel conducted as many as 8 to 14 ground-tow flights in a single day either to test the vehicle in preparation for air tows or to train pilots to fly the vehicle before they undertook air tows. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially concieved as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30

  11. M2-F1 fabrication by Grierson Hamilton, Bob Green, and Ed Browne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Flight Research Center discretionary funds paid for the M2-F-1's construction. NASA mechanics, sheet-metal smiths, and technicians did much of the work in a curtained-off area of a hangar called the 'Wright Bicycle Shop.' The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C-47 aircraft and released. These initial car-tow tests

  12. Potent Neutralization of Influenza A Virus by a Single-Domain Antibody Blocking M2 Ion Channel Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guowei; Meng, Weixu; Guo, Haijiang; Pan, Weiqi; Liu, Jinsong; Peng, Tao; Chen, Ling; Chen, Chang-You

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus poses serious health threat to humans. Neutralizing antibodies against the highly conserved M2 ion channel is thought to offer broad protection against influenza A viruses. Here, we screened synthetic Camel single-domain antibody (VHH) libraries against native M2 ion channel protein. One of the isolated VHHs, M2-7A, specifically bound to M2-expressed cell membrane as well as influenza A virion, inhibited replication of both amantadine-sensitive and resistant influenza A viruses in vitro, and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, M2-7A showed blocking activity for proton influx through M2 ion channel. These pieces of evidence collectively demonstrate for the first time that a neutralizing antibody against M2 with broad specificity is achievable, and M2-7A may have potential for cross protection against a number of variants and subtypes of influenza A viruses. PMID:22164266

  13. Measurement of optical absorption in polycrystalline CVD diamond plates by the phase photothermal method at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Luk'yanov, A Yu; Serdtsev, E V; Volkov, P V; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Savel'ev, A V; Konov, Vitalii I; Khomich, A V

    2008-12-31

    A highly-efficient phase photothermal method is developed for quantitative measurements of the small optical absorption coefficient in thin plates made of highly transparent materials in which bulk losses significantly exceed surface losses. The bulk absorption coefficient at 10.6 {mu}m is estimated in polycrystalline diamond plates grown from the vapour phase (a CVD diamond). The results are compared with those for natural and synthetic diamond single crystals and with the concentrations of nitrogen and hydrogen impurities. The absorption coefficient of the best samples of the CVD diamond did not exceed 0.06 cm{sup -1}, which, taking into account the high thermal conductivity of the CVD diamond (1800-2200 W mK{sup -1} at room temperature), makes this material attractive for fabricating output windows of high-power CO{sub 2} lasers, especially for manufacturing large-size optics. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Possible Dust Models for C/2012 S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) provided a great opportunity to study a dynamically new Oort-cloud comet on its initial and only passage through the inner solar system. Contrary to expectations, the comet's activity fluctuated from high through a quiescent phase, and a major outburst days before its perihelion passage, ending in a dramatic race to complete disintegration on perihelion day, 28 November 2013. Amateur observations to professional ground-based, sub-orbital telescopes indicate the various changes of visible factors such as Afrho, a proxy for dust activity, and the measured production rates for water, consistent with the disintegration of the nucleus. Hines et al. (2013; ApJ Lett. 780) detected positive polarization in the inner coma and negative polarization in the outer coma, indicative of a jet, independently confirmed by Li et al. (2013, ApJ Lett., 779). Thermal emission observations of the comet pre-perihelion from NAOJ/Subaru/COMICS, a mid-infrared spectrometer, indicated a body with an equivalent brightness temperature of 265K (Ootsubo et al., 2013, ACM, Helsinki,FI); thermal observations acquired at the NASA/Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) with The Aerospace Corporation spectrometer (BASS, PI. R. Russell), before and after the November 12, 2013 outburst observed by the CIOC_ISON amateur network, indicates a brightness temperature of 330K and the presence, albeit weak, of the 11.3-micron crystalline silicate feature (Sitko et al., 2014, LPI abstract 1537). A Monte Carlo comet dust tail model, applied to extract the dust environment parameters of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from both Earth-based and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) calibrated observations, performed from about 6 AU (inbound), to right after perihelion passage, when just a small portion of the original comet nucleus survived in the form of a cloud of tiny particles, indicates that particles underwent disintegration and fragmentation (Moreno et al., 2014, ApJ Lett., 791). Ongoing work

  15. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3–4 compared to those with 0–2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  16. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  17. Synthesis and Immunogenicity Assessment of Elastin-Like Polypeptide-M2e Construct as an Influenza Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ingrole, Rohan S.; Tao, Wenqian; Tripathy, Jatindra N.; Gill, Harvinder S.

    2014-01-01

    The 23 amino acid-long extracellular domain of the influenza virus transmembrane protein M2 (M2e) has remained highly conserved since the 1918 pandemic, and is thus considered a good candidate for development of a universal influenza A vaccine. However, M2e is poorly immunogenic. In this study we assessed the potential of increasing immunogenicity of M2e by constructing a nanoscale-designed protein polymer containing the M2e sequence and an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) nanodomain consisting of alanine and tyrosine guest residues (ELP(A2YA2)24). The ELP nanodomain was included to increase antigen size, and to exploit the inherent thermal inverse phase transition behavior of ELPs to purify the protein polymer. The ELP(A2YA2)24 + M2e nanodomained molecule was recombinantly synthesized. Characterization of its inverse phase transition behavior demonstrated that attachment of M2e to ELP(A2YA2)24 increased its transition temperature compared to ELP(A2YA2)24. Using a dot blot test we determined that M2e conjugated to ELP is recognizable by M2e–specific antibodies, suggesting that the conjugation process does not adversely affect the immunogenic property of M2e. Further, upon vaccinating mice with ELP(A2YA2)24 + M2e it was found that indeed the nanodomained protein enhanced M2e–specific antibodies in mouse serum compared to free M2e peptide and ELP(A2YA2)24. The immune serum could also recognize M2 expressed on influenza virions. Overall, this data suggests the potential of using molecules containing M2e–ELP nano-domains to develop a universal influenza vaccine. PMID:25825595

  18. Photometry of distant active comet C/2010 S1 (LINEAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, O.; Kulyk, I.; Korsun, P.; Romanjuk, Ya.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of photometric observations of a dynamically new comet C/2010 S1 (LINEAR), conducted on June 18, 2012. The comet demonstrated a considerable level of physical activity at a heliocentric distance of 6.3 AU. The brightness, measured under a phase angle of 8.9 degrees, was equal to 14.55^{m}±0.06^{m} and 14.21^{m}±0.04^{m} in V- and R-bands, respectively. The brightness distribution over the coma was found to be inversely proportional to the projected onto the sky plane nucleocentric distance, with a slope of approximately -1. Therefore, the calculated Afρ parameter, approximately 8400 cm and 8200 cm for V and R filters, respectively, was used to estimate the dust production rate. Assuming a steady outflow of dust particles from the nucleus, the dust production rate was estimated to be between 20 and 60 kg/s, depending on the assumed value of the grain's albedo. The V-R colour index obtained from the near-nucleus region of the coma is in agreement with the solar V-R colour index, and does not indicate significant reddening of the reflected solar radiation in the spectral region of 540-683 nm.

  19. Outgassing and chemical evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Vervack, Ronald J.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Cochran, Anita; McKay, Adam J.; Harris, Walter M.; Weaver, Harold A.; Lisse, Carey M.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Biver, Nicolas; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Crovisier, Jacques; Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (λ/Δλ ~ 25,000) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on UT 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC at the W. M. Keck Observatory, and UT 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL at the NASA IRTF. H2O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing by about a factor of 40 between October 26 (Rh = 1.12 AU) and November 20 (Rh = 0.43 AU). Short-term variability of H2O was also seen as the production rate increased by nearly a factor of two during observations obtained over a period of about six hours on November 19. C2H6, CH3OH and CH4 abundances were slightly depleted relative to H2O in ISON compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C2H2, HCN and OCS abundances relative to H2O appear to be close to the range of mean values, whereas H2CO and NH3 were significantly enhanced. We will compare derived chemical abundances in ISON to other comets measured with infrared spectroscopy.

  20. Special and innovative aspects of the GTC M2 drive mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Enrique; Zago, Lorenzo; Gallieni, Daniele

    2003-02-01

    The paper presents some special, innovative and technological aspects of the secondary mirror mechanism for the GTC 10.8-m telescope, such as: The dual control loop of the hexapod actuators, which provides the GTC M2 alignment system with an absolute accuracy better than a few microns, and a resolution as low as 200 nm. The particular design of the hexapod flexure joints, which ensures frictionless joints without backlash, while effectively limiting the travel of the hexapod to the desired range only. The locking devices, based on an original rotating cam principle, which ensure the safe locking of the M2 support to the hexapod lower plate when the chopper function is not utilized. CuBe flexure parts have been manufactured by Electrodischarge Machining (EDM), and heat treated for maximum strength and fatigue load. A systematic approach to the Reliability, Maintainability and Safety aspects, aimed at ensuring the operational feasibility of the mechanism along its life cycle.

  1. Microstructural characterization of laser surface melted AISI M2 tool steel.

    PubMed

    Arias, J; Cabeza, M; Castro, G; Feijoo, I; Merino, P; Pena, G

    2010-09-01

    We describe the microstructure of Nd:YAG continuous wave laser surface melted high-speed steel, namely AISI M2, treated with different laser scanning speeds and beam diameters on its surface. Microstructural characterization of the remelted surface layer was performed using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The combination of the three techniques provided new insights into the substantial changes induced by laser surface melting of the steel surface layer. The advantage of the method is that it avoids the difficult and tedious work of preparing samples of this hard material for transmission electron microscopy, which is the technique normally used to study these fine microstructures. A melted zone with a dendritic structure and a partially melted zone with a heterogeneous cellular structure were observed. M(2)C carbides with different morphologies were identified in the resolidified surface layer after laser melting. PMID:20701656

  2. Azithromycin protects mice against ischemic stroke injury by promoting macrophage transition towards M2 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Amantea, Diana; Certo, Michelangelo; Petrelli, Francesco; Tassorelli, Cristina; Micieli, Giuseppe; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Puccetti, Paolo; Fallarino, Francesca; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2016-01-01

    To develop novel and effective treatments for ischemic stroke, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin in a mouse model system of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Intraperitoneal administration of azithromycin significantly reduced blood-brain barrier damage and cerebral infiltration of myeloid cells, including neutrophils and inflammatory macrophages. These effects resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of cerebral ischemic damage, and in a remarkable amelioration of neurological deficits up to 7 days after the insult. Neuroprotection was associated with increased arginase activity in peritoneal exudate cells, which was followed by the detection of Ym1- and arginase I-immunopositive M2 macrophages in the ischemic area at 24-48 h of reperfusion. Pharmacological inhibition of peritoneal arginase activity counteracted azithromycin-induced neuroprotection, pointing to a major role for drug-induced polarization of migratory macrophages towards a protective, non-inflammatory M2 phenotype. PMID:26518285

  3. Foton-M2 Russian/US Biology Experiments - Development, Implementation, and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilyin, Eugene A.; Tairbekov, Murad G.; Vasques, Marilyn F.; Skidmore, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    The Russian Foton-M2 unmanned research satellite launched from Baikonur, Kazakhstan on May 31, 2005. The satellite was recovered 16 days later in northern Kazakhstan near Kustanay. Prior to this mission, the long history of joint NASA/IMBP research using Russian unmanned spacecraft was in danger of withering due to inactivity. This cooperative history included 9 Bion Russian spaceflights in the period from 1975 to 1997 where NASA had participated first as a guest and finally as a contractual partner. In an effort to reinvigorate this long-standing collaboration, the Institute for Biomedical Problems (IMBP) invited NASA participation in Russian experiments that had been manifested to fly on the Foton-M2 mission.

  4. The new VLT-DSM M2 unit: construction and electromechanical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallieni, Daniele; Biasi, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    We present the design, construction and validation of the new M2 unit of the VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror. In the framework of the Adaptive Optics Facility program, ADS and Microgate designed a new secondary unit which replaces the current Dornier one. The M2 is composed by the mechanical structure, a new hexapod positioner and the Deformable Secondary Mirror unit.The DSM is based on the well proven contactless, voice coil motor technology that has been already successfully implemented in the MMT, LBT and Magellan adaptive secondaries, and is considered a promising technical choice for the E-ELT M4 and the GMT ASM. The VLT adaptive unit has been fully integrated and, before starting the optical calibration, has completed the electromechanical characterization, focused on the dynamic performance. With respect to the previous units we introduced several improvements, both in hardware and control architecture that allowed achieving a significant enhancement of the system dynamics and reduction of power consumption.

  5. The Construction of M2M System with Sensor Networks Using Digital Plethysmograph Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Norihisa; Asakawa, Kazuhisa; Takahashi, Yoshitsugu; Yamada, Tomoko; Togashi, Atsushi; Sawamoto, Jun

    In recent years, the research of sensor networks advances and it is expected to be used in a wide variety of fields such as traceability system of products, environmental monitoring, health care, etc. We develop a M2M system with the sensor network technology for collection and analysis of the state of health and feedback of advices for better physical activity without human intervention. The system detects abnormality from pulse wave data from pulse wave sensor attached to the user. In this paper, we construct M2M sensor network system with continuous monitoring of arterial pulse wave and an advice generation function based on pr-installed rules, then we evaluate the usefulness of the system through experiment.

  6. Stability of the M2 phase of vanadium dioxide induced by coherent epitaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quackenbush, N. F.; Paik, H.; Wahila, M. J.; Sallis, S.; Holtz, M. E.; Huang, X.; Ganose, A.; Morgan, B. J.; Scanlon, D. O.; Gu, Y.; Xue, F.; Chen, L.-Q.; Sterbinsky, G. E.; Schlueter, C.; Lee, T.-L.; Woicik, J. C.; Guo, J.-H.; Brock, J. D.; Muller, D. A.; Arena, D. A.; Schlom, D. G.; Piper, L. F. J.

    2016-08-01

    Tensile strain along the cR axis in epitaxial VO2 films raises the temperature of the metal insulator transition and is expected to stabilize the intermediate monoclinic M2 phase. We employ surface-sensitive x-ray spectroscopy to distinguish from the TiO2 substrate and identify the phases of VO2 as a function of temperature in epitaxial VO2/TiO2 thin films with well-defined biaxial strain. Although qualitatively similar to our Landau-Ginzburg theory predicted phase diagrams, the M2 phase is stabilized by nearly an order of magnitude more strain than expected for the measured temperature window. Our results reveal that the elongation of the cR axis is insufficient for describing the transition pathway of VO2 epitaxial films and that a strain induced increase of electron correlation effects must be considered.

  7. On the Diophantine equation x^2+q^2m=2y^p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengely, Sz

    In this paper we consider the Diophantine equation $x^2+q^{2m}=2y^p$ where $m,p,q,x,y$ are integer unknowns with $m>0,$ $p$ and $q$ are odd primes and $\\gcd(x,y)=1.$ We prove that there are only finitely many solutions $(m,p,q,x,y)$ for which $y$ is not a sum of two consecutive squares. We also study the above equation with fixed $y$ and with fixed $q.$

  8. Spreading Depression Requires Microglia and is Decreased by their M2a Polarization from Environmental Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Pusic, Kae M.; Pusic, Aya D.; Kemme, Jordan; Kraig, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia play an important role in fine-tuning neuronal activity. In part, this involves their production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), which increases neuronal excitability. Excessive synaptic activity is necessary to initiate spreading depression (SD). Increased microglial production of pro-inflammatory cytokines promotes initiation of SD, which, when recurrent, may play a role in conversion of episodic to high frequency and chronic migraine. Previous work shows that this potentiation of SD occurs through increased microglial production of TNFα and reactive oxygen species, both of which are associated with an M1-skewed microglial population. Hence, we explored the role of microglia and their M1 polarization in SD initiation. Selective ablation of microglia from rat hippocampal slice cultures confirmed that microglia are essential for initiation of SD. Application of minocycline to dampen M1 signaling led to increased SD threshold. In addition, we found that SD threshold was increased in rats exposed to environmental enrichment. These rats had increased neocortical levels of interleukin-11 (IL-11), which decreases TNFα signaling and polarized microglia to an M2a-dominant phenotype. M2a microglia reduce pro-inflammatory signaling and increase production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and therefore may protect against SD. Nasal administration of IL-11 to mimic effects of environmental enrichment likewise increased M2a polarization and increased SD threshold, an effect also seen in vitro. Similarly, application of conditioned medium from M2a polarized primary microglia to slice cultures also increased SD threshold. Thus, microglia and their polarization state play an essential role in SD initiation, and perhaps by extension migraine with aura and migraine. PMID:24723305

  9. Industry 4.0, M2m, Iot&S - All Equal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrin, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    Similarity between Industry 4.0, M2M, IOT&S. Advantages and disadvantages obtained using this three important methods. Decreasing costs while components are getting smaller and smaller in a world with better networking. Influence of business management applications integrated in smart factory logistic. The most important impacts in merging virtual and real production world, with the improvement of best processes having the same goal: creating value by open innovation

  10. M2 Proton Channel: Toward a Model of a Primitive Proton Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  11. Agonists with supraphysiological efficacy at the muscarinic M2 ACh receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schrage, R; Seemann, WK; Klöckner, J; Dallanoce, C; Racké, K; Kostenis, E; De Amici, M; Holzgrabe, U; Mohr, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Artificial agonists may have higher efficacy for receptor activation than the physiological agonist. Until now, such ‘superagonism’ has rarely been reported for GPCRs. Iperoxo is an extremely potent muscarinic receptor agonist. We hypothesized that iperoxo is a ‘superagonist’. Experimental Approach Signalling of iperoxo and newly synthesized structural analogues was compared with that of ACh at label-free M2 muscarinic receptors applying whole cell dynamic mass redistribution, measurement of G-protein activation, evaluation of cell surface agonist binding and computation of operational efficacies. Key Results In CHO-hM2 cells, iperoxo significantly exceeds ACh in Gi/Gs signalling competence. In the orthosteric loss-of-function mutant M2-Y1043.33A, the maximum effect of iperoxo is hardly compromised in contrast to ACh. ‘Superagonism’ is preserved in the physiological cellular context of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Structure–signalling relationships including iperoxo derivatives with either modified positively charged head group or altered tail suggest that ‘superagonism’ of iperoxo is mechanistically based on parallel activation of the receptor protein via two orthosteric interaction points. Conclusion and Implications Supraphysiological agonist efficacy at muscarinic M2 ACh receptors is demonstrated for the first time. In addition, a possible underlying molecular mechanism of GPCR ‘superagonism’ is provided. We suggest that iperoxo-like orthosteric GPCR activation is a new avenue towards a novel class of receptor activators. Linked Article This article is commented on by Langmead and Christopoulos, pp. 353–356 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12142 PMID:23062057

  12. M2 proton channel: toward a model of a primitive proton pump.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels. PMID:25777465

  13. Epitope Mapping of Avian Influenza M2e Protein: Different Species Recognise Various Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Noor Haliza; Ignjatovic, Jagoda; Tarigan, Simson; Peaston, Anne; Hemmatzadeh, Farhid

    2016-01-01

    A common approach for developing diagnostic tests for influenza virus detection is the use of mouse or rabbit monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies against a target antigen of the virus. However, comparative mapping of the target antigen using antibodies from different animal sources has not been evaluated before. This is important because identification of antigenic determinants of the target antigen in different species plays a central role to ensure the efficiency of a diagnostic test, such as competitive ELISA or immunohistochemistry-based tests. Interest in the matrix 2 ectodomain (M2e) protein of avian influenza virus (AIV) as a candidate for a universal vaccine and also as a marker for detection of virus infection in vaccinated animals (DIVA) is the rationale for the selection of this protein for comparative mapping evaluation. This study aimed to map the epitopes of the M2e protein of avian influenza virus H5N1 using chicken, mouse and rabbit monoclonal or monospecific antibodies. Our findings revealed that rabbit antibodies (rAbs) recognized epitope 6EVETPTRN13 of the M2e, located at the N-terminal of the protein, while mouse (mAb) and chicken antibodies (cAbs) recognized epitope 10PTRNEWECK18, located at the centre region of the protein. The findings highlighted the difference between the M2e antigenic determinants recognized by different species that emphasized the importance of comparative mapping of antibody reactivity from different animals to the same antigen, especially in the case of multi-host infectious agents such as influenza. The findings are of importance for antigenic mapping, as well as diagnostic test and vaccine development. PMID:27362795

  14. The equations of Dirac and the M 2(ℍ)-representation of Cl 1,3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vroegindeweij, P. G.

    1993-11-01

    In its original form Dirac's equations have been expressed by use of the γ-matrices γμ, μ= 0, 1, 2, 3. They are elements of the matrix algebra M 4 (ℂ). As emphasized by Hestenes several times, the γ-matrices are merely a (faithful) matrix representation of an orthonormal basis of the orthogonal space ℝ 1,3, generating the real Clifford algebra Cl 1,3 . This orthonormal basis is also denoted by γμ, μ= 0, 1, 2, 3. The use of the matrix algebra M 4 (ℂ) to represent Cl 1,3 has some unsatisfactory aspects. The γ-matrices contain imaginary numbers as entries whereas Cl 1,3 is real. Moreover, as a matrix algebra Cl 1,3 is M 2 (ℍ) but only a part of M 4 (ℂ). For that reason we investigate in this paper several forms of Dirac's equations in terms of M 2 (ℍ) instead of M 4 (ℂ). In Section 1 we survey Dirac's equations describing the interaction of matter with electromagnetic, electroweak, and strong fields. Section 2 deals with electromagnetic/weak interactions employing M 2 (ℍ). Finally, in Section 3 we deal with Dirac's equations for strong interactions between quarks. In contrast to su (2) ⊕ u (1), the Lie algebra su (3) is not isomorphic to any subalgebra of Cl 1,3 . Therefore we do not give a description of strong interactions by use of M 2 (ℍ). Instead of such an approach we describe these interactions using the space of quadruples of bivector fields in Cl 1,3 . The thus obtained description has remarkable formal resemblance to the original Dirac equations using wave functions with values in the linear space ℂ 4.

  15. M1 and M2 Macrophages: The Chicken and the Egg of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to describe a critical advance in understanding how immune responses work. Macrophages are required for all animal life: ‘Inhibit’ type macrophages in all animals (called M1) can rapidly kill pathogens, and are thus the primary host defense, and ‘Heal’ type macrophages (M2) routinely repair and maintain tissue integrity. Macrophages perform these activities in all animals without T cells, and also in T cell-deficient vertebrates. Although adaptive immunity can amplify macrophage polarization, the long-held notion that macrophages need to be ‘activated’ or ‘alternatively activated’ by T cells is incorrect; indeed, immunology has had it backward. M1/M2-type macrophages necessarily direct T cells toward Th1- or Th2-like activities, respectively. That such macrophage-innate activities are the central directing element in immune responses is a dramatic change in understanding how immune systems operate. Most important, this revelation is opening up whole new approaches to immunotherapy. For example, many modern diseases, such as cancer and atherosclerosis, may not display ‘foreign’ antigens. However, there are clear imbalances in M1/M2-type responses. Correcting such innate imbalances can result in better health. Macrophages are the chicken and the egg of immunity. PMID:25138714

  16. Parthenolide Relieves Pain and Promotes M2 Microglia/Macrophage Polarization in Rat Model of Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Jurga, Agnieszka M.; Pilat, Dominika

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains a challenge because pathomechanism is not fully understood. It is believed that glial activation and increased spinal nociceptive factors are crucial for neuropathy. We investigated the effect of parthenolide (PTL) on the chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI)-induced neuropathy in rat. We analyzed spinal changes in glial markers and M1 and M2 polarization factors, as well as intracellular signaling pathways. PTL (5 µg; i.t.) was preemptively and then daily administered for 7 days after CCI. PTL attenuated the allodynia and hyperalgesia and increased the protein level of IBA1 (a microglial/macrophage marker) but did not change GFAP (an astrocyte marker) on day 7 after CCI. PTL reduced the protein level of M1 (IL-1β, IL-18, and iNOS) and enhanced M2 (IL-10, TIMP1) factors. In addition, it downregulated the phosphorylated form of NF-κB, p38MAPK, and ERK1/2 protein level and upregulated STAT3. In primary microglial cell culture we have shown that IL-1β, IL-18, iNOS, IL-6, IL-10, and TIMP1 are of microglial origin. Summing up, PTL directly or indirectly attenuates neuropathy symptoms and promotes M2 microglia/macrophages polarization. We suggest that neuropathic pain therapies should be shifted from blanketed microglia/macrophage suppression toward maintenance of the balance between neuroprotective and neurotoxic microglia/macrophage phenotypes. PMID:26090236

  17. RESTful M2M Gateway for Remote Wireless Monitoring for District Central Heating Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bo; Wei, Zesan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the increased interest in energy conservation and environmental protection, combined with the development of modern communication and computer technology, has resulted in the replacement of distributed heating by central heating in urban areas. This paper proposes a Representational State Transfer (REST) Machine-to-Machine (M2M) gateway for wireless remote monitoring for a district central heating network. In particular, we focus on the resource-oriented RESTful M2M gateway architecture, and present an uniform devices abstraction approach based on Open Service Gateway Initiative (OSGi) technology, and implement the resource mapping mechanism between resource address mapping mechanism between RESTful resources and the physical sensor devices, and present the buffer queue combined with polling method to implement the data scheduling and Quality of Service (QoS) guarantee, and also give the RESTful M2M gateway open service Application Programming Interface (API) set. The performance has been measured and analyzed. Finally, the conclusions and future work are presented. PMID:25436650

  18. TPL-2 Regulates Macrophage Lipid Metabolism and M2 Differentiation to Control TH2-Mediated Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Entwistle, Lewis J.; Khoury, Hania; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Mahmood, Radma; Mansour, Nuha R.; Ching-Cheng Huang, Stanley; Pearce, Edward J.; Pedro S. de Carvalho, Luiz; Ley, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent TH2 cytokine responses following chronic helminth infections can often lead to the development of tissue pathology and fibrotic scarring. Despite a good understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in fibrogenesis, there are very few therapeutic options available, highlighting a significant medical need and gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of TH2-mediated immunopathology. In this study, we found that the Map3 kinase, TPL-2 (Map3k8; Cot) regulated TH2-mediated intestinal, hepatic and pulmonary immunopathology following Schistosoma mansoni infection or S. mansoni egg injection. Elevated inflammation, TH2 cell responses and exacerbated fibrosis in Map3k8–/–mice was observed in mice with myeloid cell-specific (LysM) deletion of Map3k8, but not CD4 cell-specific deletion of Map3k8, indicating that TPL-2 regulated myeloid cell function to limit TH2-mediated immunopathology. Transcriptional and metabolic assays of Map3k8–/–M2 macrophages identified that TPL-2 was required for lipolysis, M2 macrophage activation and the expression of a variety of genes involved in immuno-regulatory and pro-fibrotic pathways. Taken together this study identified that TPL-2 regulated TH2-mediated inflammation by supporting lipolysis and M2 macrophage activation, preventing TH2 cell expansion and downstream immunopathology and fibrosis. PMID:27487182

  19. Fasciola hepatica tegumental antigens indirectly induce an M2 macrophage-like phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Adams, P N; Aldridge, A; Vukman, K V; Donnelly, S; O'Neill, S M

    2014-10-01

    The M2 subset of macrophages has a critical role to play in host tissue repair, tissue fibrosis and modulation of adaptive immunity during helminth infection. Infection with the helminth, Fasciola hepatica, is associated with M2 macrophages in its mammalian host, and this response is mimicked by its excretory-secretory products (FhES). The tegumental coat of F. hepatica (FhTeg) is another major source of immune-modulatory molecules; we have previously shown that FhTeg can modulate the activity of both dendritic cells and mast cells inhibiting their ability to prime a Th1 immune response. Here, we report that FhTeg does not induce Th2 immune responses but can induce M2-like phenotype in vivo that modulates cytokine production from CD4(+) cells in response to anti-CD3 stimulation. FhTeg induces a RELMα expressing macrophage population in vitro, while in vivo, the expression of Arg1 and Ym-1/2 but not RELMα in FhTeg-stimulated macrophages was STAT6 dependent. To support this finding, FhTeg induces RELMα expression in vivo prior to the induction of IL-13. FhTeg can induce IL-13-producing peritoneal macrophages following intraperitoneal injection This study highlights the important role of FhTeg as an immune-modulatory source during F. hepatica infection and sheds further light on helminth-macrophage interactions. PMID:25039932

  20. The catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in PP2Cα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chang; Tang, Jun-Yi; Xu, Yun-Fei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Hong-Da; Wang, Hao-An; Wang, Wen-Bo; Meng, Fan-Guo; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-02-01

    PP2C family phosphatases (the type 2C family of protein phosphatases; or metal-dependent phosphatase, PPM) constitute an important class of signaling enzymes that regulate many fundamental life activities. All PP2C family members have a conserved binuclear metal ion active center that is essential for their catalysis. However, the catalytic role of each metal ion during catalysis remains elusive. In this study, we discovered that mutations in the structurally buried D38 residue of PP2Cα (PPM1A) redefined the water-mediated hydrogen network in the active site and selectively disrupted M2 metal ion binding. Using the D38A and D38K mutations of PP2Cα as specific tools in combination with enzymology analysis, our results demonstrated that the M2 metal ion determines the rate-limiting step of substrate hydrolysis, participates in dianion substrate binding and stabilizes the leaving group after P-O bond cleavage. The newly characterized catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in this family not only provides insight into how the binuclear metal centers of the PP2C phosphatases are organized for efficient catalysis but also helps increase our understanding of the function and substrate specificity of PP2C family members.

  1. The catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in PP2Cα.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang; Tang, Jun-yi; Xu, Yun-fei; Xiao, Peng; Liu, Hong-da; Wang, Hao-an; Wang, Wen-bo; Meng, Fan-guo; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-peng

    2015-01-01

    PP2C family phosphatases (the type 2C family of protein phosphatases; or metal-dependent phosphatase, PPM) constitute an important class of signaling enzymes that regulate many fundamental life activities. All PP2C family members have a conserved binuclear metal ion active center that is essential for their catalysis. However, the catalytic role of each metal ion during catalysis remains elusive. In this study, we discovered that mutations in the structurally buried D38 residue of PP2Cα (PPM1A) redefined the water-mediated hydrogen network in the active site and selectively disrupted M2 metal ion binding. Using the D38A and D38K mutations of PP2Cα as specific tools in combination with enzymology analysis, our results demonstrated that the M2 metal ion determines the rate-limiting step of substrate hydrolysis, participates in dianion substrate binding and stabilizes the leaving group after P-O bond cleavage. The newly characterized catalytic role of the M2 metal ion in this family not only provides insight into how the binuclear metal centers of the PP2C phosphatases are organized for efficient catalysis but also helps increase our understanding of the function and substrate specificity of PP2C family members. PMID:25708299

  2. Structure of the atypical bacteriocin pectocin M2 implies a novel mechanism of protein uptake

    PubMed Central

    Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Zeth, Kornelius; Roszak, Aleksander W; McCaughey, Laura C; Cogdell, Richard J; Milner, Joel J; Kelly, Sharon M; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The colicin-like bacteriocins are potent protein antibiotics that have evolved to efficiently cross the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria by parasitizing nutrient uptake systems. We have structurally characterized the colicin M-like bacteriocin, pectocin M2, which is active against strains of Pectobacterium spp. This unusual bacteriocin lacks the intrinsically unstructured translocation domain that usually mediates translocation of these bacteriocins across the outer membrane, containing only a single globular ferredoxin domain connected to its cytotoxic domain by a flexible α-helix, which allows it to adopt two distinct conformations in solution. The ferredoxin domain of pectocin M2 is homologous to plant ferredoxins and allows pectocin M2 to parasitize a system utilized by Pectobacterium to obtain iron during infection of plants. Furthermore, we identify a novel ferredoxin-containing bacteriocin pectocin P, which possesses a cytotoxic domain homologous to lysozyme, illustrating that the ferredoxin domain acts as a generic delivery module for cytotoxic domains in Pectobacterium. PMID:24865810

  3. [Construction of recombinant adenoviral vector expressing genes of the conservative influenza proteins M2 and nucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Esmagambetov, I B; Sedova, E S; Shcherbinin, D N; Lysenko, A A; Garas, M N; Shmarov, M M; Logunov, D Iu

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is a highly contagious and one of the most massive infection diseases. General epidemiological significance has a strain, which belongs to subtype A. A high degree of genetic variety leads to the permanent changes in the antigenic structure of the influenza virus. Therefore, the current influenza vaccines require periodic updating of the composition of strains. Presently, it is important to develop a universal vaccine that can protect against different strains of influenza A virus at the same time and is based on the conserved antigens of the influenza virus. The recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing genes of conserved viral antigenes may be a promising candidate vaccine against influenza A. Using the method of the homologous recombination, we developed in this study recombinant adenovirus of fifth serotype that expresses genes of the ion channel M2 and nucleoprotein NP of the influenza virus A. Genes of the consensus protein M2 and NP of human influenza A virus were included into the structure of the viral genome. The expression of the antigens M2 and NP using recombinant adenovirus vector was detected by a Western blot assay. The immunogenicity of the developed recombinant adenovirus vector was demonstrated by the intranasal immunization of laboratory mice. PMID:25080815

  4. M2-F3 and project personnel after the 100th flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The 100th flight of the heavy-weight lifting bodies was completed on October 5, 1972, with pilot Bill Dana soaring to an altitude of 66,300 feet and a Mach number of 1.370 (about 904 miles per hour) in the M2-F3. This was call for a celebration as the crew responsible for maintaining and operating the vehicle, the engineers who requested the flight, the pilots who flew the M2, and the Director of the NASA Flight Research Center gather in front of the M2-F3 lifting body for a photograph. Kneeling left to right are Bill Dana, (unknown person),* Jay King, and Herb Anderson. In the cockpit is Bill Szuwalski. Standing left to right are: Dale Reed, Robert Kempel, Milt Thompson, Bill Clifton, an Air Force fire fighter, Jerry Brandt, Johnny Armstrong, an Air Force fire fighter, Gary Layton, Jack Kolf, Ming Tang, (unknown person),* Byron Gibbs, Joe Huxman, (unknown person)*, Bill Mersereau, Bill Arnold, John Manke, Dr. Bill Winters, (unknown person)*, Bill LePage, Glenn Ford, Lee Scherer, Director of Center, (two unknown people),* Stan Butchart, and Berwin Kock. *=Identification incomplete at this time.)

  5. Dynamic RACH Partition for Massive Access of Differentiated M2M Services

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qinghe; Li, Wanyu; Liu, Lingjia; Ren, Pinyi; Wang, Yichen; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    In machine-to-machine (M2M) networks, a key challenge is to overcome the overload problem caused by random access requests from massive machine-type communication (MTC) devices. When differentiated services coexist, such as delay-sensitive and delay-tolerant services, the problem becomes more complicated and challenging. This is because delay-sensitive services often use more aggressive policies, and thus, delay-tolerant services get much fewer chances to access the network. To conquer the problem, we propose an efficient mechanism for massive access control over differentiated M2M services, including delay-sensitive and delay-tolerant services. Specifically, based on the traffic loads of the two types of services, the proposed scheme dynamically partitions and allocates the random access channel (RACH) resource to each type of services. The RACH partition strategy is thoroughly optimized to increase the access performances of M2M networks. Analyses and simulation demonstrate the effectiveness of our design. The proposed scheme can outperform the baseline access class barring (ACB) scheme, which ignores service types in access control, in terms of access success probability and the average access delay. PMID:27043568

  6. M2 baroclinic tide variability modulated by the ocean circulation south of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, Sergey M.; Guo, Xinyu; Miyama, Toru; Ichikawa, Kaoru; Waseda, Takuji; Miyazawa, Yasumasa

    2015-05-01

    We analyze a concurrent simulation result of the ocean circulation and tidal currents using a data-assimilative ocean general circulation model covering the Western North Pacific with horizontal resolution of 1/36° to investigate possible interactions between them. Four sites of active M2 internal tide variability in open ocean (hot spots), such as Tokara Strait, Izu Ridge, Luzon Strait, and Ogasawara Ridge, are detected from both the satellite observation and the simulation. Energy cycle analysis of the simulated M2 baroclinic tide indicates two types of the hot spots: dissipation (Tokara Strait and Izu Ridge) and radiation (Luzon Strait and Ogasawara Ridge) dominant sites. Energy conversion from barotropic to baroclinic M2 tides at the hot spots is modulated considerably by the lower-frequency changes in the density field. Modulation at the two spots (Tokara Strait and Izu Ridge) is affected by the Kuroshio path variation together with the seasonal variation of the shallow thermocline. At the other two sites, influence from changes in the relatively deep stratification through the Kuroshio intrusion into South China Sea (Luzon Strat) and mesoscale eddy activity (Ogasawara Ridge) is dominant in the modulation.

  7. Determination of Foton M-2 satellite attitude motion by the data of microacceleration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuselinck, T.; van Bavinchove, C.; Sazonov, V. V.; Chebukov, S. Yu.

    2009-12-01

    The results of reconstruction of uncontrolled attitude motion of the Foton M-2 satellite using measurements with the accelerometer TAS-3 are presented. The attitude motion of this satellite has been previously determined by the measurement data of the Earth’s magnetic field and the angular velocity. The TAS-3 data for this purpose are used for the first time. These data contain a well-pronounced additional component which made impossible their direct employment for the reconstruction of the attitude motion and whose origin was unknown several years ago. Later it has become known that the additional component is caused by the influence of the Earth’s magnetic field. The disclosure of this fact allowed us to take into account a necessary correction in processing of TAS-3 data and to use them for the reconstruction of the attitude motion of Foton M-2. Here, a modified method of processing TAS-3 data is described, as well as results of its testing and employing. The testing consisted in the direct comparison of the motion reconstructed by the new method with the motion constructed by the magnetic measurements. The new method allowed us to find the actual motion of Foton M-2 in the period June 9, 2005-June 14, 2005, when no magnetic measurements were carried out.

  8. RESTful M2M gateway for remote wireless monitoring for district central heating networks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo; Wei, Zesan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the increased interest in energy conservation and environmental protection, combined with the development of modern communication and computer technology, has resulted in the replacement of distributed heating by central heating in urban areas. This paper proposes a Representational State Transfer (REST) Machine-to-Machine (M2M) gateway for wireless remote monitoring for a district central heating network. In particular, we focus on the resource-oriented RESTful M2M gateway architecture, and present an uniform devices abstraction approach based on Open Service Gateway Initiative (OSGi) technology, and implement the resource mapping mechanism between resource address mapping mechanism between RESTful resources and the physical sensor devices, and present the buffer queue combined with polling method to implement the data scheduling and Quality of Service (QoS) guarantee, and also give the RESTful M2M gateway open service Application Programming Interface (API) set. The performance has been measured and analyzed. Finally, the conclusions and future work are presented. PMID:25436650

  9. TPL-2 Regulates Macrophage Lipid Metabolism and M2 Differentiation to Control TH2-Mediated Immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Yashaswini; Perez-Lloret, Jimena; Li, Yanda; Entwistle, Lewis J; Khoury, Hania; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Mahmood, Radma; Mansour, Nuha R; Ching-Cheng Huang, Stanley; Pearce, Edward J; Pedro S de Carvalho, Luiz; Ley, Steven C; Wilson, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    Persistent TH2 cytokine responses following chronic helminth infections can often lead to the development of tissue pathology and fibrotic scarring. Despite a good understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in fibrogenesis, there are very few therapeutic options available, highlighting a significant medical need and gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of TH2-mediated immunopathology. In this study, we found that the Map3 kinase, TPL-2 (Map3k8; Cot) regulated TH2-mediated intestinal, hepatic and pulmonary immunopathology following Schistosoma mansoni infection or S. mansoni egg injection. Elevated inflammation, TH2 cell responses and exacerbated fibrosis in Map3k8-/-mice was observed in mice with myeloid cell-specific (LysM) deletion of Map3k8, but not CD4 cell-specific deletion of Map3k8, indicating that TPL-2 regulated myeloid cell function to limit TH2-mediated immunopathology. Transcriptional and metabolic assays of Map3k8-/-M2 macrophages identified that TPL-2 was required for lipolysis, M2 macrophage activation and the expression of a variety of genes involved in immuno-regulatory and pro-fibrotic pathways. Taken together this study identified that TPL-2 regulated TH2-mediated inflammation by supporting lipolysis and M2 macrophage activation, preventing TH2 cell expansion and downstream immunopathology and fibrosis. PMID:27487182

  10. Biosynthetic relationship among aflatoxins B1, B2, M1, and M2.

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, M F; Ehrlich, K; Bennett, J W

    1985-01-01

    Aflatoxins are a family of toxic, acetate-derived decaketides that arise biosynthetically through polyhydroxyanthraquinone intermediates. Most studies have assumed that aflatoxin B1 is the biosynthetic precursor of the other aflatoxins. We used a strain of Aspergillus flavus which accumulates aflatoxin B2 to investigate the later stages of aflatoxin biosynthesis. This strain produced aflatoxins B2 and M2 but no detectable aflatoxin B1 when grown over 12 days in a low-salt, defined growth medium containing asparagine. Addition of dichlorvos to this growth medium inhibited aflatoxin production with concomitant accumulation of versiconal hemiacetal acetate. When mycelial pellets were grown for 24, 48, and 72 h in growth medium and then transferred to a replacement medium, only aflatoxin B2 and M2 were recovered after 96 h of incubation. Addition of sterigmatocystin to the replacement medium led to the recovery of higher levels of aflatoxins B2 and M2 than were detected in control cultures, as well as to the formation of aflatoxins B1 and M1 and O-methylsterigmatocystin. These results support the hypothesis that aflatoxins B1 and B2 can arise independently via a branched pathway. PMID:3925881

  11. Dynamic RACH Partition for Massive Access of Differentiated M2M Services.

    PubMed

    Du, Qinghe; Li, Wanyu; Liu, Lingjia; Ren, Pinyi; Wang, Yichen; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    In machine-to-machine (M2M) networks, a key challenge is to overcome the overload problem caused by random access requests from massive machine-type communication (MTC) devices. When differentiated services coexist, such as delay-sensitive and delay-tolerant services, the problem becomes more complicated and challenging. This is because delay-sensitive services often use more aggressive policies, and thus, delay-tolerant services get much fewer chances to access the network. To conquer the problem, we propose an efficient mechanism for massive access control over differentiated M2M services, including delay-sensitive and delay-tolerant services. Specifically, based on the traffic loads of the two types of services, the proposed scheme dynamically partitions and allocates the random access channel (RACH) resource to each type of services. The RACH partition strategy is thoroughly optimized to increase the access performances of M2M networks. Analyses and simulation demonstrate the effectiveness of our design. The proposed scheme can outperform the baseline access class barring (ACB) scheme, which ignores service types in access control, in terms of access success probability and the average access delay. PMID:27043568

  12. Characterization of the hrpZ gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicolaM2

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Mejía, César; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; López-Ramírez, Varinia; Valenzuela-Soto, Humberto; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola is a natural pathogen of members of the Brassicaceae plant family. Using a transposon-based mutagenesis strategy in Pseudomonas syringaepv. maculicola M2 (PsmM2), we conducted a genetic screen to identify mutants that were capable of growing in M9 medium supplemented with a crude extract from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. A mutant containing a transposon insertion in the hrpZ gene (PsmMut8) was unable to infect adult plants from Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica oleracea, suggesting a loss of pathogenicity. The promotorless cat reporter present in the gene trap was expressed if PsmMut8 was grown in minimal medium (M9) supplemented with the leaf extract but not if grown in normal rich medium (KB). We conducted phylogenetic analysis using hrpAZB genes, showing the classical 5-clade distribution, and nucleotide diversity analysis, showing the putative position for selective pressure in this operon. Our results indicate that the hrpAZB operon from Pseudomonas syringaepv. maculicola M2 is necessary for its pathogenicity and that its diversity would be under host-mediated diversifying selection. PMID:26413080

  13. Characterization of the hrpZ gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola M2.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Mejía, César; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; López-Ramírez, Varinia; Valenzuela-Soto, Humberto; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola is a natural pathogen of members of the Brassicaceae plant family. Using a transposon-based mutagenesis strategy in Pseudomonas syringaepv. maculicola M2 (PsmM2), we conducted a genetic screen to identify mutants that were capable of growing in M9 medium supplemented with a crude extract from the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. A mutant containing a transposon insertion in the hrpZ gene (PsmMut8) was unable to infect adult plants from Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica oleracea, suggesting a loss of pathogenicity. The promotorless cat reporter present in the gene trap was expressed if PsmMut8 was grown in minimal medium (M9) supplemented with the leaf extract but not if grown in normal rich medium (KB). We conducted phylogenetic analysis using hrpAZB genes, showing the classical 5-clade distribution, and nucleotide diversity analysis, showing the putative position for selective pressure in this operon. Our results indicate that the hrpAZB operon from Pseudomonas syringaepv. maculicola M2 is necessary for its pathogenicity and that its diversity would be under host-mediated diversifying selection. PMID:26413080

  14. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Receptor Agonists Mediate Pro-fibrotic Responses in Normal Human Lung Fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 Receptors and Smad-independent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways. PMID:23589284

  15. Cross Protection against Influenza A Virus by Yeast-Expressed Heterologous Tandem Repeat M2 Extracellular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Jongsang; Kim, Cheol; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    The influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) is well conserved across human influenza A subtypes, but there are few residue changes among avian and swine origin influenza A viruses. We expressed a tandem repeat construct of heterologous M2e sequences (M2e5x) derived from human, swine, and avian origin influenza A viruses using the yeast expression system. Intramuscular immunization of mice with AS04-adjuvanted M2e5x protein vaccines was effective in inducing M2e-specific antibodies reactive to M2e peptide and native M2 proteins on the infected cells with human, swine, or avian influenza virus, mucosal and systemic memory cellular immune responses, and cross-protection against H3N2 virus. Importantly, M2e5x immune sera were found to confer protection against different subtypes of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A viruses in naïve mice. Also, M2e5x-immune complexes of virus-infected cells stimulated macrophages to secrete cytokines via Fc receptors, indicating a possible mechanism of protection. The present study provides evidence that M2e5x proteins produced in yeast cells could be developed as a potential universal influenza vaccine. PMID:26366729

  16. Cross Protection against Influenza A Virus by Yeast-Expressed Heterologous Tandem Repeat M2 Extracellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Jongsang; Kim, Cheol; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    The influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) is well conserved across human influenza A subtypes, but there are few residue changes among avian and swine origin influenza A viruses. We expressed a tandem repeat construct of heterologous M2e sequences (M2e5x) derived from human, swine, and avian origin influenza A viruses using the yeast expression system. Intramuscular immunization of mice with AS04-adjuvanted M2e5x protein vaccines was effective in inducing M2e-specific antibodies reactive to M2e peptide and native M2 proteins on the infected cells with human, swine, or avian influenza virus, mucosal and systemic memory cellular immune responses, and cross-protection against H3N2 virus. Importantly, M2e5x immune sera were found to confer protection against different subtypes of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A viruses in naïve mice. Also, M2e5x-immune complexes of virus-infected cells stimulated macrophages to secrete cytokines via Fc receptors, indicating a possible mechanism of protection. The present study provides evidence that M2e5x proteins produced in yeast cells could be developed as a potential universal influenza vaccine. PMID:26366729

  17. Sulfur- and Silicon-bearing Molecules in Planetary Nebulae: The Case of m2-48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, J. L.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular-line observations of the bipolar planetary nebula (PN) M2-48 have been conducted using the Sub-Millimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory at 1, 2, and 3 mm. M2-48 is estimated to be ~4800 yr old, midway through the PN evolutionary track. SiO and SO2 were detected in this source—the first identification of either molecule in a PN. CN, HCN, HNC, CS, SO, HCO+, N2H+, and several 13C isotopologues such as 13CN, H13CN, and H13CO+ were also observed toward this object. A radiative transfer analysis of multiple SiO transitions indicates a gas kinetic temperature of T K ~ 55 K and a density of n(H2) ~ 9 × 105 cm-3 in M2-48, in agreement with previous CS and CO modeling. After CO, CN, and SO were found to be the most prevalent molecules in this nebula, with fractional abundances, relative to H2, of f ~ 3.8 × 10-7 and 2.4 × 10-7, respectively. SO2 and HCN are also abundant, with f ~ 1.2 × 10-7, indicating an [SO]/[SO2] ratio of ~2. Relatively high ion abundances were measured in M2-48 as well, with f ~ 10-7 for both HCO+ and N2H+. An [HCN]/[HNC] ratio of ~2 was determined, as typically observed in other PNe, independent of age. The high abundances of SO and SO2, along with the presence of SiO with f ~ 2.9 × 10-8, suggest O/C > 1 in this source; furthermore, the prevalence of CN and N2H+ indicates nitrogen enrichment. The 12C/13C ratio of ~3 in the nebula was also established. These factors indicate hot-bottom burning occurred in the progenitor star of M2-48, suggesting an initial mass > 4 M ⊙.

  18. SULFUR- AND SILICON-BEARING MOLECULES IN PLANETARY NEBULAE: THE CASE OF M2-48

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. L.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2014-10-20

    Molecular-line observations of the bipolar planetary nebula (PN) M2-48 have been conducted using the Sub-Millimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory at 1, 2, and 3 mm. M2-48 is estimated to be ∼4800 yr old, midway through the PN evolutionary track. SiO and SO{sub 2} were detected in this source—the first identification of either molecule in a PN. CN, HCN, HNC, CS, SO, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and several {sup 13}C isotopologues such as {sup 13}CN, H{sup 13}CN, and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} were also observed toward this object. A radiative transfer analysis of multiple SiO transitions indicates a gas kinetic temperature of T {sub K} ∼ 55 K and a density of n(H{sub 2}) ∼ 9 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} in M2-48, in agreement with previous CS and CO modeling. After CO, CN, and SO were found to be the most prevalent molecules in this nebula, with fractional abundances, relative to H{sub 2}, of f ∼ 3.8 × 10{sup –7} and 2.4 × 10{sup –7}, respectively. SO{sub 2} and HCN are also abundant, with f ∼ 1.2 × 10{sup –7}, indicating an [SO]/[SO{sub 2}] ratio of ∼2. Relatively high ion abundances were measured in M2-48 as well, with f ∼ 10{sup –7} for both HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}. An [HCN]/[HNC] ratio of ∼2 was determined, as typically observed in other PNe, independent of age. The high abundances of SO and SO{sub 2}, along with the presence of SiO with f ∼ 2.9 × 10{sup –8}, suggest O/C > 1 in this source; furthermore, the prevalence of CN and N{sub 2}H{sup +} indicates nitrogen enrichment. The {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio of ∼3 in the nebula was also established. These factors indicate hot-bottom burning occurred in the progenitor star of M2-48, suggesting an initial mass > 4 M {sub ☉}.

  19. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Silveira, C L; Eldefrawi, A T; Eldefrawi, M E

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-[3H]cis-methyldioxolane ([3H]CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites (KD 2.74 nM; Bmax of 82 fmol/mg protein) was detected and [3H]CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with [3H]CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the [3H]CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. [3H]CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of [3H]CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM [3H]CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting [3H]CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration. Nevertheless, the high affinities that cardiac muscarinic

  20. The Usefulness of a Novel Screening Kit for Colorectal Cancer Using the Immunochromatographic Fecal Tumor M2 Pyruvate Kinase Test

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Cheol; Kim, Jeong Ho; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Tae Ho; Jun, Eun Jung; Oh, Jung-Whan; Kim, Chang Whan; Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Byung-Wook; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Soo-Heon; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims M2 pyruvate kinase (M2-PK) is an enzyme that is produced in undifferentiated and proliferating tissues. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness of the immunochromatographic M2 pyruvate kinase (iM2-PK) for the screening of colorectal cancer (CRC) and premalignant lesions. Methods Healthy volunteers and patients with colorectal neoplasia were enrolled in six academic hospitals in the capital province of Korea. The iM2-PK value was compared with the immunochromatographic fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) and fecal tumor M2-PK enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results A total of 323 subjects were enrolled. The sensitivity of iM2-PK for CRC was 92.8%, which was superior to iFOBT (47.5%, p<0.0001). For adenomatous lesions, the sensitivity of iM2-PK was 69.4%, which was also superior to iFOBT (12.1%, p<0.001). Compared with M2-PK ELISA, iM2-PK exhibited significantly enhanced sensitivity for CRC (97.5% vs 80.0%, p=0.0289). The sensitivity of iM2-PK was higher in advanced stages of CRC compared with cancers confined to the mucosa and submucosa (p<0.05). However, lymph node metastasis had no influence on the sensitivity of iM2-PK. Conclusions The iM2-PK exhibited increased sensitivity for identifying CRC and adenomatous lesions compared with iFOBT. Given its rapid results and convenience, CRC screening using iM2-PK is promising. PMID:25473070

  1. Search for ammonia in comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Codella, C.; Tozzi, G.; Comoretto, G.; Crovisier, J.; Nesti, R.; Panella, D.; Boissier, J.; Bolli, P.; Brucato, J.; Massi, F.; Tofani, G.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are pristine bodies of the Solar System and their studies can give precious hints on the formation of the Solar System itself. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important, because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of organic matter close to the surface. Here we report the results of a search for NH_3(1,1) emission at 23.7 GHz in comet C/2012 S1 ISON using a new dual-feed K-band receiver mounted on the Medicina 32-m antenna. We observed the comet once close to its perihelion, from 2013 Nov. 25 to Nov. 28, when its heliocentric distance changed from 0.25 au to 0.03 au. We integrated about 6 hrs per day, obtaining high-spectral-resolution (1 km/s) spectra with a typical rms noise of 10 mK. Such sensitivity allowed us to derive an upper limit of Q(NH_3) of about 2.5 ×10^{29} mol/s on November 26. This upper limit would correspond to a Q(H_2O) of about 2.5 ×10^{31} mol/s, assuming the typical Q(H_2O)/Q(NH_3) ratio of 100. These findings confirm that no significant Q(H_2O) enhancement happened near the perihelion, consistent with a definitive decrease of molecules production rate.

  2. Ultraviolet Observations Of C/2012 S1 (ISON) By MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crismani, Matteo; Schneider, N.; Stewart, I.; Combi, M.; Fougere, N.

    2013-10-01

    On its journey to Mars, MAVEN has been serendipitously positioned to study the anticipated sungrazing comet C/2012 S1(ISON) and offers important scientific observations. The MAVEN mission is the first to attempt to understand the evolution of the Martian atmosphere by determining the effects of atmospheric loss to space. The IUVS instrument has two large field of regard(55x11 and 24x11 degrees) and observes in the mid and far ultraviolet (115-340 nm). It was designed to be able to map the atmosphere in several neutral and some ionized species. These performance characteristics make IUVS ideal to study ISON, as it can take both two dimensional spatial scans as well as spectral data. Tentative plans indicate the comet can be acquired on Dec 8th, assuming that the comet survives the near sun encounter. If observations prove possible, IUVS will be able to study ISON shortly after perihelion, and from a different vantage point from Earth. Science goals include UV observations of D/H, morphology & time evolution of the hydrogen coma and UV spectroscopy of the inner coma. IUVS can potentially make a major contribution to the international community by measuring D/H, thus contributing to our understanding of the origin of Earth’s water. IUVS will also make MUV and FUV observations of molecular species in the inner coma, valuable for understanding the chemical evolution of cometary molecular gases. The poster will present provisional observation plans as well as simulated spectra and spatial profiles. We welcome input from the community on these plans, in the spirit of maximizing the scientific return of the international campaign. The work has been supported by the MAVEN project and NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX09AB59G.

  3. WILL COMET ISON (C/2012 S1) SURVIVE PERIHELION?

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Matthew M.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2013-10-10

    On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ∼200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm{sup –3} are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm{sup –3}, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

  4. Gravitational dynamics in s+1+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gergely, Laszlo A.; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2005-09-15

    We present the concomitant decomposition of an (s+2)-dimensional space-time both with respect to a timelike and a spacelike direction. The formalism we develop is suited for the study of the initial value problem and for canonical gravitational dynamics in braneworld scenarios. The bulk metric is replaced by two sets of variables. The first set consists of one tensorial (the induced metric g{sub ij}), one vectorial (M{sup i}) and one scalar (M) dynamical quantity, all defined on the s space. Their time evolutions are related to the second fundamental form (the extrinsic curvature K{sub ij}), the normal fundamental form (K{sup i}) and normal fundamental scalar (K), respectively. The nondynamical set of variables is given by the lapse function and the shift vector, which however has one component less. The missing component is due to the externally imposed constraint, which states that physical trajectories are confined to the (s+1)-dimensional brane. The pair of dynamical variables (g{sub ij}, K{sub ij}), well known from the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner decomposition is supplemented by the pairs (M{sup i}, K{sup i}) and (M, K) due to the bulk curvature. We give all projections of the junction condition across the brane and prove that for a perfect fluid brane neither of the dynamical variables has jump across the brane. Finally we complete the set of equations needed for gravitational dynamics by deriving the evolution equations of K{sub ij}, K{sup i} and K on a brane with arbitrary matter.

  5. First Global Climate Model Simulations of the M2 Pliocene Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, A.; Haywood, A.; Hunter, S. J.; Tindall, J.; Valdes, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Pliocene Epoch (5.2 to 2.6 Ma) and specifically the PRISM interval (3.0 to 3.3 Ma) have frequently been targeted to investigate warm intervals in Earth history (e.g. Haywood et al., 2013). However, climate variability within the Pliocene is often overlooked. Although not as dramatic as the glacial and interglacial cycles that typified the Pleistocene, the Pliocene also exhibited climate variability and periods which were apparently cooler than modern (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005). Of particular interest is the major cooling event that occurred around 3.3 Ma during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2. This 'Pliocene glacial' punctuates an otherwise relatively warm background climate and has been referred to as a failed attempt of the climate to reach a full glacial state (De Schepper et al., 2009; Haug and Tiedemann, 1998). The onset of full Northern Hemisphere (NH) glaciation finally occurred at the end of the Pliocene (~ 2.75 Ma). Although numerous temperature reconstructions from around the world's oceans tend to capture the MIS M2 cooling event, the exact nature of M2 remains enigmatic. Sea level records vary but suggest a maximum sea level drop of ~65 m compared to modern, which in itself is significant enough to necessitate the growth of a NH ice sheet (Dwyer and Chandler, 2009). Previous ice sheet modelling suggests that ~8 m sea level equivalent (SLE) ice could be stored on Antarctica (Pollard and DeConto, 2009) and this larger ice sheet (compared to modern) is potentially supported by the increase in ice-rafted debris (IRD) found offshore of East Antarctica during this time (Passchier, 2011). IRD in the North Atlantic would suggest the presence of an ice sheet on Greenland (e.g. Kleiven et al., 2002), but the locations of other ice caps in the NH are not determined due to the destructive nature of subsequent Pleistocene ice sheet advances. Moreover, recent evidence questions whether the climate in the NH was favourable at all for the initiation of ice sheets

  6. Rat hippocampal muscarinic autoreceptors are similar to the M2 (cardiac) subtype: comparison with hippocampal M1, atrial M2 and ileal M3 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    1. Affinity constants for 15 non-selective or putatively selective muscarinic antagonists were determined at muscarinic autoreceptors and postsynaptic receptors (linked to phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis) in rat hippocampal slices, at muscarinic receptors mediating contractility in guinea-pig atria or ileal smooth muscle and at binding sites in rat cerebral cortical membranes labelled with [3H]-1-quinuclidinyl benzilate or [3H]-pirenzepine. 2. Comparison of the affinities of these antagonists at central M1 receptors (inositol-monophosphate formation in rat hippocampal slices) with their affinities at peripheral M1 receptors (inhibition by McN-A-343 of electrically stimulated twitches in rabbit vas deferens) provides support for the suggestion that these receptors may differ pharmacologically. 3. Comparison of affinity constants obtained by displacement of specifically bound [3H]-pirenzepine from rat cerebral cortical membranes with those obtained in functional tests showed poor correlations between affinities for binding sites and for functional atrial receptors or for hippocampal autoreceptors. A significant correlation was found between affinities for [3H]-pirenzepine binding and those determined at muscarinic receptors linked to PI turnover in rat hippocampus. A significant correlation was also obtained between the affinities for specific [3H]-pirenzepine binding sites in cortical membranes and the affinities at ileal receptors. 4. Comparison of the affinity values for muscarinic autoreceptors in rat hippocampus with affinity values obtained from in vitro models of muscarinic receptor subtypes showed no significant correlations between these autoreceptors and either M1 or M3 receptors. A significant correlation was found between antagonist affinities for hippocampal autoreceptors and muscarinic receptors in the heart. Therefore, muscarinic autoreceptors in rat hippocampus are pharmacologically similar to the M2 (cardiac) muscarinic receptor subtype. PMID

  7. Dale Reed with model in front of M2-F1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Dale Reed with a model of the M2-F1 in front of the actual lifting body. Reed used the model to show the potential of the lifting bodies. He first flew it into tall grass to test stability and trim, then hand-launched it from buildings for longer flights. Finally, he towed the lifting-body model aloft using a powered model airplane known as the 'Mothership.' A timer released the model and it glided to a landing. Dale's wife Donna used a 9 mm. camera to film the flights of the model. Its stability as it glided--despite its lack of wings--convinced Milt Thompson and some Flight Research Center engineers including the center director, Paul Bikle, that a piloted lifting body was possible. The lifting body concept evolved in the mid-1950s as researchers considered alternatives to ballistic reentries of piloted space capsules. The designs for hypersonic, wingless vehicles were on the boards at NASA Ames and NASA Langley facilities, while the US Air Force was gearing up for its Dyna-Soar program, which defined the need for a spacecraft that would land like an airplane. Despite favorable research on lifting bodies, there was little support for a flight program. Dryden engineer R. Dale Reed was intrigued with the lifting body concept, and reasoned that some sort of flight demonstration was needed before wingless aircraft could be taken seriously. In February 1962, he built a model lifting body based upon the Ames M2 design, and air-launched it from a radio controlled 'mothership.' Home movies of these flights, plus the support of research pilot Milt Thompson, helped pursuade the facilities director, Paul Bikle, to give the go-ahead for the construction of a full-scale version, to be used as a wind-tunnel model and possibly flown as a glider. Comparing lifting bodies to space capsules, an unofficial motto of the project was, 'Don't be Rescued from Outer Space--Fly Back in Style.' The construction of the M2-F1 was a joint effort by Dryden and a local glider manufacturer, the

  8. A role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)–S1P receptor 2 pathway in epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC)

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yako, Yuta; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Kajita, Mihoko; Kameyama, Takeshi; Kon, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Susumu; Ohba, Yusuke; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    At the initial step of carcinogenesis, transformation occurs in single cells within epithelia, where the newly emerging transformed cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells. A recent study revealed that normal epithelial cells have an ability to sense and actively eliminate the neighboring transformed cells, a process named epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC). However, the molecular mechanism of this tumor-suppressive activity is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated a role for the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)–S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) pathway in EDAC. First, we show that addition of the S1PR2 inhibitor significantly suppresses apical extrusion of RasV12-transformed cells that are surrounded by normal cells. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 in normal cells induces the same effect, indicating that S1PR2 in the surrounding normal cells plays a positive role in the apical elimination of the transformed cells. Of importance, not endogenous S1P but exogenous S1P is involved in this process. By using FRET analyses, we demonstrate that S1PR2 mediates Rho activation in normal cells neighboring RasV12-transformed cells, thereby promoting accumulation of filamin, a crucial regulator of EDAC. Collectively these data indicate that S1P is a key extrinsic factor that affects the outcome of cell competition between normal and transformed epithelial cells. PMID:26631556

  9. AS04-adjuvanted virus-like particles containing multiple M2 extracellular domains of influenza virus confer improved protection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Jong Seok; Ko, Eun-Ju; Kwon, Young-Man; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-07-31

    The ectodomain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) of influenza virus is suggested to be a rational target for a universal influenza A vaccine. However, there are some concerns that M2e vaccines might not be highly effective in the general population with diverse genetic backgrounds. Here we examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the baculovirus-derived virus-like particles containing multiple M2e (M2eVLP) with AS04 adjuvant in a C57BL/6 mouse strain (H-2(b)). M2eVLP vaccine induced significant levels of M2e-specific IgG in C57BL/6 mice after vaccination. Furthermore, M2eVLP adjuvanted with AS04 was more effective than M2eVLP alone in conferring protection as well as in inducing recall humoral and T cell responses specific for M2e after lethal influenza virus challenge. A mechanistic study provides evidence that activation of dendritic cells by the toll-like receptor 4 agonist MPL in the AS04 adjuvant was associated with interferon-γ producing CD4 T cell responses. Our results suggest that AS04 adjuvanted M2eVLP vaccines have the potential to improve cross-protection. PMID:24951867

  10. HYDROGEN CHLORIDE IN DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT TO W31C (G10.6-0.4)

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Godard, B.

    2013-04-10

    We report the detection of hydrogen chloride, HCl, in diffuse molecular clouds on the line of sight toward the star-forming region W31C (G10.6-0.4). The J = 1-0 lines of the two stable HCl isotopologues, H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl, are observed using the 1b receiver of the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HCl line is detected in absorption, over a wide range of velocities associated with diffuse clouds along the line of sight to W31C. The analysis of the absorption strength yields a total HCl column density of a few 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, implying that HCl accounts for {approx}0.6% of the total gas-phase chlorine, which exceeds the theoretical model predictions by a factor of {approx}6. This result is comparable to those obtained from the chemically related species H{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and HCl{sup +}, for which large column densities have also been reported on the same line of sight. The source of discrepancy between models and observations is still unknown; however, the detection of these Cl-bearing molecules provides key constraints for the chlorine chemistry in the diffuse gas.

  11. Residual energy deposition in dental enamel during IR laser ablation at 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragadio, Jerome N.; Lee, Christian K.; Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the residual heat deposition during laser ablation at those IR laser wavelengths best suited for the removal of dental caries. The principal factor limiting the rate of laser ablation of dental hard tissue is the risk of excessive heat accumulation in the tooth, which has the potential for causing damage to the pulp. Optimal laser ablation systems minimize the residual energy deposition in the tooth by transferring deposited laser energy to kinetic and internal energy of ejected tissue components. The residual heat deposition in the tooth was measured at laser wavelengths of 2.79, 2.94, 9.6 and 10.6 micrometer and pulse widths of 150 ns - 150 microsecond(s) . The residual energy was at a minimum for fluences well above the ablation threshold where it saturates at values from 25 - 70% depending on pulse duration and wavelength for the systems investigated. The lowest values of the residual energy were measured for short (less than 20 microseconds) CO2 laser pulses at 9.6 micrometer and for Q-switched erbium laser pulses. This work was supported by NIH/NIDCR R29DE12091 and the Center for Laser Applications in Medicine, DOE DEFG0398ER62576.

  12. Patterned FeNi soft magnetic strips film with tunable resonance frequency from 1 to 10.6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Li, Xinxi; Wang, Yan; Ren, Jiankun; Zhang, Yan; Dai, Bo; Yan, Haiyang; Sun, Guangai; Peng, Shuming

    2016-01-01

    Soft magnetic films with a wide-range tunable ferromagnetic resonance frequency are suitable for miniaturization and multifunctionalization of microwave integrated circuits. Fabrication of these films for high-frequency applications is usually complicated and difficult. We demonstrate a simple method to fabricate patterned FeNi soft magnetic strip films by magnetron sputtering and photolithography. Films prepared by this method exhibits a tunable in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (IPUMA) for different strip widths and gaps. As the strip widths changing from 500 to 2 μm, the IPUMA field increases monotonically from 2.2 to 576 Oe and resonance frequency from 1 to 10.6 GHz(which covers four microwave bands, including the L,S,C and X bands) respectively. This ultra-wide-range adjustability of resonance frequency can be attributed to shape anisotropy of strips. Considering that FeNi alloy has relatively low magnetocrystalline anisotropy, so a wider adjustable range of resonance frequency could be obtained using materials with stronger magnetocrystalline anisotropy. PMID:27561328

  13. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10.6 microns with airborne and ground-based CO2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado High Plains. I - Lidar intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Vaughan, J. Michael; Brown, Derek W.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    An airborne continuous-wave (CW) focused CO2 Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar were to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6-micron wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter, the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than about 50 percent near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients, the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  14. Patterned FeNi soft magnetic strips film with tunable resonance frequency from 1 to 10.6 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yong; Li, Xinxi; Wang, Yan; Ren, Jiankun; Zhang, Yan; Dai, Bo; Yan, Haiyang; Sun, Guangai; Peng, Shuming

    2016-01-01

    Soft magnetic films with a wide-range tunable ferromagnetic resonance frequency are suitable for miniaturization and multifunctionalization of microwave integrated circuits. Fabrication of these films for high-frequency applications is usually complicated and difficult. We demonstrate a simple method to fabricate patterned FeNi soft magnetic strip films by magnetron sputtering and photolithography. Films prepared by this method exhibits a tunable in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (IPUMA) for different strip widths and gaps. As the strip widths changing from 500 to 2 μm, the IPUMA field increases monotonically from 2.2 to 576 Oe and resonance frequency from 1 to 10.6 GHz(which covers four microwave bands, including the L,S,C and X bands) respectively. This ultra-wide-range adjustability of resonance frequency can be attributed to shape anisotropy of strips. Considering that FeNi alloy has relatively low magnetocrystalline anisotropy, so a wider adjustable range of resonance frequency could be obtained using materials with stronger magnetocrystalline anisotropy. PMID:27561328

  15. EXTENDED CULTURE OF MACROPHAGES FROM DIFFERENT SOURCES AND MATURATION RESULTS IN A COMMON M2 PHENOTYPE

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Lisa M.; Holt-Casper, Dolly; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Grainger, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses to biomaterials heavily influence the environment surrounding implanted devices, often producing foreign body reactions. The macrophage is a key immunomodulatory cell type consistently associated with implanted biomaterials and routinely employed in short term in vitro cell studies of biomaterials aiming to reproduce host responses. Inconsistencies within these studies, including differently sourced cells, different durations of culture, and assessment of different activation markers, lead to many conflicting results in vitro that confound consistency and conclusions. We hypothesize that different experimentally popular monocyte-macrophage cell types have intrinsic in vitro culture-specific differences that yield conflicting results. Recent studies demonstrate changes in cultured macrophage cytokine expression over time, leading to the hypothesis that changes in macrophage phenotype also occur in response to extended culture. Here, macrophage cells of different transformed and primary-derived origins were cultured for 21 days on model polymer biomaterials. Cell type-based differences in morphology and cytokine/chemokine expression as well as changes in cell surface biomarkers associated with differentiation stage, activation state, and adhesion were compared. Results reflect consistent macrophage development towards an M2 phenotype via up-regulation of the macrophage mannose receptor for all cell types following 21-day extended culture. Significantly, implanted biomaterials experiencing the foreign body response and encapsulation in vivo often elicit a shift towards an analogous M2 macrophage phenotype. In vitro “default” of macrophage cultures, regardless of lineage, to this M2 state in the presence of biomaterials at long culture periods is not recognized but has important implications to in vitro modeling of in vivo host response. PMID:25684281

  16. Three Lifting Bodies on Lakebed (X-24A, M2-F3, HL-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 20, 1972. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970, and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC--now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March

  17. Three Lifting Bodies on Lakebed (X-24A, M2-F3, HL-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 20, 1972. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970 and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  18. M2 Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulates rat airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Airways chronic inflammatory conditions in asthma and COPD are characterized by tissue remodeling, being smooth muscle hyperplasia, the most important feature. Non-neuronal and neuronal Acetylcholine acting on muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) has been postulated as determinant of tissue remodeling in asthma and COPD by promoting proliferation and phenotypic changes of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). The objective was to evaluate proliferative responses to muscarinic agonist as carbamylcholine (Cch) and to identify the MAchR subtype involved. ASMC were isolated from tracheal fragments of Sprague–Dawley rats by enzymatic digestion. Proliferation assays were performed by MTS-PMS method. Viability was confirmed by trypan blue exclusion method. Mitogens as, epidermal growth factor (EGF), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) increased ASMC proliferation (p < 0.05, n = 5). Cch alone increased ASMC proliferation at 24 and 48 hrs. However, combination of Cch with other mitogens exhibited a dual effect, synergistic proliferation effect in the presence of EGF (5 ng/mL) and 5% FBS and inhibiting the proliferation induced by 10% FBS, EGF (10 ng/mL) and TNF-α (10 ng/mL). To determine the MAChR subtype involved in these biological responses, a titration curve of selective muscarinic antagonists were performed. The Cch stimulatory and inhibitory effects on ASCM proliferation was blocked by AF-DX-116 (M2AChR selective antagonist), in greater proportion than 4-DAMP (M3AChR selective antagonist), suggesting that the modulation of muscarinic agonist-induced proliferation is M2AChR mediated responses. Thus, M2AChR can activate multiple signal transduction systems and mediate both effects on ASMC proliferation depending on the plethora and variable airway microenvironments existing in asthma and COPD. PMID:24377382

  19. Extended culture of macrophages from different sources and maturation results in a common M2 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Lisa M; Holt-Casper, Dolly; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Grainger, David W

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory responses to biomaterials heavily influence the environment surrounding implanted devices, often producing foreign-body reactions. The macrophage is a key immunomodulatory cell type consistently associated with implanted biomaterials and routinely used in short-term in vitro cell studies of biomaterials aiming to reproduce host responses. Inconsistencies within these studies, including differently sourced cells, different durations of culture, and assessment of different activation markers, lead to many conflicting results in vitro that confound consistency and conclusions. We hypothesize that different experimentally popular monocyte-macrophage cell types have intrinsic in vitro culture-specific differences that yield conflicting results. Recent studies demonstrate changes in cultured macrophage cytokine expression over time, leading to the hypothesis that changes in macrophage phenotype also occur in response to extended culture. Here, macrophage cells of different transformed and primary-derived origins were cultured for 21 days on model polymer biomaterials. Cell type-based differences in morphology and cytokine/chemokine expression as well as changes in cell surface biomarkers associated with differentiation stage, activation state, and adhesion were compared. Results reflect consistent macrophage development toward an M2 phenotype via up-regulation of the macrophage mannose receptor for all cell types following 21-day extended culture. Significantly, implanted biomaterials experiencing the foreign-body response and encapsulation in vivo often elicit a shift toward an analogous M2 macrophage phenotype. In vitro "default" of macrophage cultures, regardless of lineage, to this M2 state in the presence of biomaterials at long culture periods is not recognized, but has important implications to in vitro modeling of in vivo host response. PMID:25684281

  20. Baicalin ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease through polarization of macrophages to an M2 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Jin, Zaishun; Yu, Jianbo; Liang, Jun; Yang, Qingdong; Li, Fujuan; Shi, Xuekui; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestinal tract. Baicalin, originally isolated from the root of the Chinese herb Huangqin (Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi) and its main active ingredient, has a protective effect against inflammatory responses in several diseases. The present study investigated the effects of baicalin on macrophage polarization and its therapeutic role in IBD. Murine peritoneal macrophages and mice with colitis were treated with baicalin. Macrophage subset distribution, M1 and M2 macrophage-associated mRNA expression, and interferon regulatory factor 4 and 5 (IRF4 and IRF5) expression were analyzed. siRNA transfection into mouse peritoneal macrophages was utilized to suppress IRF4. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, western blot, and real-time PCR analyses were performed. Baicalin (50μM) limited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced M1 macrophage polarization; decreased LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-23, and IRF5 expression; and increased IL-10, arginase-1 (Arg-1), and IRF4 expression. siRNA-mediated IRF4 silencing significantly impaired baicalin activity. Furthermore, pretreatment with baicalin (100mg/kg) in mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis ameliorated the severity of colitis and significantly decreased the disease activity index (baicalin group, 3.33±0.52 vs. DSS group, 5.67±1.03). Baicalin (100mg/kg) also repressed IRF5 protein expression and promoted IRF4 protein expression in the lamina propria mononuclear cells, and induced macrophage polarization to the M2 phenotype. In summary, our results showed that baicalin upregulates IRF4 protein expression and reverses LPS-induced macrophage subset redistribution. Thus, baicalin alleviates DSS-induced colitis by modulating macrophage polarization to the M2 phenotype. PMID:27039210

  1. Interleukin-17 induces an atypical M2-like macrophage subpopulation that regulates intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Kenichiro; Seo, Naohiro; Torii, Mie; Ma, Nei; Muraoka, Daisuke; Tawara, Isao; Masuya, Masahiro; Tanaka, Kyosuke; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Katayama, Naoyuki; Kato, Takuma

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a pleiotropic cytokine that acts on both immune and non-immune cells and is generally implicated in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Although IL-17 as well as their source, mainly but not limited to Th17 cells, is also abundant in the inflamed intestine, the role of IL-17 in inflammatory bowel disease remains controversial. In the present study, by using IL-17 knockout (KO) mice, we investigated the role of IL-17 in colitis, with special focus on the macrophage subpopulations. Here we show that IL-17KO mice had increased susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis which was associated with decrease in expression of mRNAs implicated in M2 and/or wound healing macrophages, such as IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist, arginase 1, cyclooxygenase 2, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Lamina propria leukocytes from inflamed colon of IL-17KO mice contained fewer CD11b+Ly6C+MHC Class II+ macrophages, which were derived, at least partly, from blood monocytes, as compared to those of WT mice. FACS-purified CD11b+ cells from WT mice, which were more abundant in Ly6C+MHC Class II+ cells, expressed increased levels of genes associated M2/wound healing macrophages and also M1/proinflammatory macrophages. Depletion of this population by topical administration of clodronate-liposome in the colon of WT mice resulted in the exacerbation of colitis. These results demonstrate that IL-17 confers protection against the development of severe colitis through the induction of an atypical M2-like macrophage subpopulation. Our findings reveal a previously unappreciated mechanism by which IL-17 exerts a protective function in colitis. PMID:25254662

  2. Towards Efficient Mobile M2M Communications: Survey and Open Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carlos; Aguiar, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications enable networked devices and services to exchange information and perform actions seamlessly without the need for human intervention. They are viewed as a key enabler of the Internet of Things (IoT) and ubiquitous applications, like mobile healthcare, telemetry, or intelligent transport systems. We survey existing work on mobile M2M communications, we identify open challenges that have a direct impact on performance and resource usage efficiency, especially the impact on energy efficiency, and we review techniques to improve communications. We review the ETSI standard and application protocols, and draw considerations on the impact of their use in constrained mobile devices. Nowadays, smartphones are equipped with a wide range of embedded sensors, with varied local and wide area connectivity capabilities, and thus they offer a unique opportunity to serve as mobile gateways for other more constrained devices with local connectivity. At the same time, they can gather context data about users and environment from the embedded sensors. These capabilities may be crucial for mobile M2M applications. Finally, in this paper, we consider a scenario where smartphones are used as gateways that collect and aggregate data from sensors in a cellular network. We conclude that, in order for their use to the feasible in terms of a normal depletion time of a smartphone's battery, it is a good advice to maximize the collection of data necessary to be transmitted from nearby sensors, and maximize the intervals between transmissions. More research is required to devise energy efficient transmission methods that enable the use of smartphones as mobile gateways. PMID:25333291

  3. Optical trapping with superfocused high-M2 laser diode beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskii, G. S.; Dudelev, V. V.; Melissinaki, V.; Losev, S. N.; Soboleva, K. K.; Deryagin, A. G.; Kuchinskii, V. I.; Farsari, M.; Sibbett, W.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2015-03-01

    Many applications of high-power laser diodes demand tight focusing. This is often not possible due to the multimode nature of semiconductor laser radiation possessing beam propagation parameter M2 values in double-digits. We propose a method of `interference' superfocusing of high-M2 diode laser beams with a technique developed for the generation of Bessel beams based on the employment of an axicon fabricated on the tip of a 100 μm diameter optical fiber with high-precision direct laser writing. Using axicons with apex angle 1400 and rounded tip area as small as ~10 μm diameter, we demonstrate 2-4 μm diameter focused laser `needle' beams with approximately 20 μm propagation length generated from multimode diode laser with beam propagation parameter M2=18 and emission wavelength of 960 nm. This is a few-fold reduction compared to the minimal focal spot size of ~11 μm that could be achieved if focused by an `ideal' lens of unity numerical aperture. The same technique using a 1600 axicon allowed us to demonstrate few-μm-wide laser `needle' beams with nearly 100 μm propagation length with which to demonstrate optical trapping of 5-6 μm rat blood red cells in a water-heparin solution. Our results indicate the good potential of superfocused diode laser beams for applications relating to optical trapping and manipulation of microscopic objects including living biological objects with aspirations towards subsequent novel lab-on-chip configurations.

  4. Towards efficient mobile M2M communications: survey and open challenges.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carlos; Aguiar, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications enable networked devices and services to exchange information and perform actions seamlessly without the need for human intervention. They are viewed as a key enabler of the Internet of Things (IoT) and ubiquitous applications, like mobile healthcare, telemetry, or intelligent transport systems. We survey existing work on mobile M2M communications, we identify open challenges that have a direct impact on performance and resource usage efficiency, especially the impact on energy efficiency, and we review techniques to improve communications. We review the ETSI standard and application protocols, and draw considerations on the impact of their use in constrained mobile devices. Nowadays, smartphones are equipped with a wide range of embedded sensors, with varied local and wide area connectivity capabilities, and thus they offer a unique opportunity to serve as mobile gateways for other more constrained devices with local connectivity. At the same time, they can gather context data about users and environment from the embedded sensors. These capabilities may be crucial for mobile M2M applications. Finally, in this paper, we consider a scenario where smartphones are used as gateways that collect and aggregate data from sensors in a cellular network. We conclude that, in order for their use to the feasible in terms of a normal depletion time of a smartphone's battery, it is a good advice to maximize the collection of data necessary to be transmitted from nearby sensors, and maximize the intervals between transmissions. More research is required to devise energy efficient transmission methods that enable the use of smartphones as mobile gateways. PMID:25333291

  5. Atmospheric Turbulence Measurements With the Automatic Mini UAV 'M2AV Carolo'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bange, J.; van den Kroonenberg, A. C.; Spieß, T.; Buschmann, M.; Krüger, L.; Heindorf, A.; Vörsmann, P.

    2007-05-01

    The limitations of manned airborne meteorological measurements led to the development of an autonomously operating mini aircraft, the Meteorological Mini-UAV (M2AV), at the Institute of Aerospace Systems, Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany. The task was to develop, test and verify a meteorological sensor package as payload for an already available automatic carrier aircraft, the UAV 'Carolo T200', which operates autonomously i.e. without remote control. The M2AV is a self constructed model aircraft with two electrically powered engines and a wingspan of two meters. The maximum take-off weight is 4.5~kg (the M2AV is therefore classified as an model plane which simplifies authority issues), including 1.5~kg of payload. It is hand-launched which makes operation of the aircraft easy. With an endurance of approximately 50 minutes, the range accounts for 60 km at a cruising speed of 20~m/s. The M2AV is capable of performing turbulence measurements (wind vector, temperature and humidity) within the troposphere and offers an economic component during meteorological campaigns. The meteorological sensors are mounted on a noseboom to minimise the aircraft's influence on the measurements and to position the sensors closely to each other. Wind is measured via a small five-hole probe, an inertia measurement unit and GPS. The flight mission (waypoints, altitudes, airspeed) is planned and assigned to the aircraft before the semi- automatic launch. The flight is only controlled by the on-board autopilot system which only communicates with a ground station (laptop PC) for the exchange of measured data and command updates like new waypoints etc. The talk gives details on the technical items, calibration and first missions. Results from first field experiments like the LAUNCH-2005 campaign near Berlin are used for data quality assessment by comparison with simultaneous lidar and sodar measurements. An in situ comparison with the highly accurate helicopter-borne turbulence

  6. The r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences in the binary polyhedral group <2, m, 2>

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveci, Ömür; Ćiçekci, Deniz

    2016-04-01

    In [1], Deveci et al. defined the r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences from the Hurwitz matrices obtained from the characteristic polynomial of the k-step Fibonacci sequence. Also, they extended the r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences to groups. In this work, we obtain the periods of the r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences in the binary polyhedral group <2, m, 2> for generating triple {x, y, z} and generating pair {y, z} by the aid of the periods of the r-step Fibonacci-Hurwitz sequences according to modulo m.

  7. Aberrant expression of the S1P regulating enzymes, SPHK1 and SGPL1, contributes to a migratory phenotype in OSCC mediated through S1PR2

    PubMed Central

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Johnson, Steven P.; Lai, Sook Ling; Panja Bernam, Suthashini; Lopes, Victor; Wei, Wenbin; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R.; Herr, Deron R.; Murray, Paul G.; Yap, Lee Fah; Paterson, Ian C.

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease with a 5-year mortality rate of around 50%. Molecular targeted therapies are not in routine use and novel therapeutic targets are required. Our previous microarray data indicated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signalling was deregulated in OSCC. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of S1P signalling to the pathogenesis of OSCC. We show that the expression of the two major enzymes that regulate S1P levels were altered in OSCC: SPHK1 was significantly upregulated in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa and low levels of SGPL1 mRNA correlated with a worse overall survival. In in vitro studies, S1P enhanced the migration/invasion of OSCC cells and attenuated cisplatin-induced death. We also demonstrate that S1P receptor expression is deregulated in primary OSCCs and that S1PR2 is over-expressed in a subset of tumours, which in part mediates S1P-induced migration of OSCC cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that FTY720 induced significantly more apoptosis in OSCC cells compared to non-malignant cells and that FTY720 acted synergistically with cisplatin to induce cell death. Taken together, our data show that S1P signalling promotes tumour aggressiveness in OSCC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27160553

  8. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  9. Aberrant expression of the S1P regulating enzymes, SPHK1 and SGPL1, contributes to a migratory phenotype in OSCC mediated through S1PR2.

    PubMed

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Johnson, Steven P; Lai, Sook Ling; Panja Bernam, Suthashini; Lopes, Victor; Wei, Wenbin; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R; Herr, Deron R; Murray, Paul G; Yap, Lee Fah; Paterson, Ian C

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease with a 5-year mortality rate of around 50%. Molecular targeted therapies are not in routine use and novel therapeutic targets are required. Our previous microarray data indicated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signalling was deregulated in OSCC. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of S1P signalling to the pathogenesis of OSCC. We show that the expression of the two major enzymes that regulate S1P levels were altered in OSCC: SPHK1 was significantly upregulated in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa and low levels of SGPL1 mRNA correlated with a worse overall survival. In in vitro studies, S1P enhanced the migration/invasion of OSCC cells and attenuated cisplatin-induced death. We also demonstrate that S1P receptor expression is deregulated in primary OSCCs and that S1PR2 is over-expressed in a subset of tumours, which in part mediates S1P-induced migration of OSCC cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that FTY720 induced significantly more apoptosis in OSCC cells compared to non-malignant cells and that FTY720 acted synergistically with cisplatin to induce cell death. Taken together, our data show that S1P signalling promotes tumour aggressiveness in OSCC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27160553

  10. Machine to machine (M2M) technology in demand responsive commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David S.; Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01

    Machine to Machine (M2M) is a term used to describe the technologies that enable computers, embedded processors, smart sensors, actuators and mobile devices to communicate with one another, take measurements and make decisions--often without human intervention. M2M technology was applied to five commercial buildings in a test. The goal was to reduce electric demand when a remote price signal rose above a predetermine price. In this system, a variable price signal was generated from a single source on the Internet and distributed using the meta-language, XML (Extensible Markup Language). Each of five commercial building sites monitored the common price signal and automatically shed site-specific electric loads when the price increased above predetermined thresholds. Other than price signal scheduling, which was set up in advance by the project researchers, the system was designed to operate without human intervention during the two-week test period. Although the buildings responded to the same price signal, the communication infrastructures used at each building were substantially different. This study provides an overview of the technologies used at each building site, the price generator/server, and each link in between. Network architecture, security, data visualization and site-specific system features are characterized. The results of the test are discussed, including: functionality at each site, measurement and verification techniques, and feedback from energy managers and building operators. Lessons learned from the test and potential implications for widespread rollout are provided.

  11. Decisive disappearance search at high Δ m2 with monoenergetic muon neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axani, S.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-11-01

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the Δ m2˜1 eV2 anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged-current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for νμ disappearance associated with currently favored light sterile neutrino models and features the ability to reconstruct the neutrino oscillation wave within a single, extended detector. The required detector design, technology, and costs are modest. The KPipe measurements will be robust since they depend on a known energy neutrino source with low expected backgrounds. Further, since the measurements rely only on the measured rate of detected events as a function of distance, with no required knowledge of the initial flux and neutrino interaction cross section, the results will be largely free of systematic errors. The experimental sensitivity to oscillations, based on a shape-only analysis of the L /E distribution, will extend an order of magnitude beyond present experimental limits in the relevant high-Δ m2 parameter space.

  12. Status of the secondary mirrors (M2) for the Gemini 8-m telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knohl, Ernst-Dieter; Schoeppach, Armin; Pickering, Michael A.

    1998-08-01

    The 1-m diameter lightweight secondary mirrors (M2) for the Gemini 8-m telescopes will be the largest CVD-SiC mirrors ever produced. The design and manufacture of these mirrors is a very challenging task. In this paper we will discuss the mirror design, structural and mechanical analysis, and the CVD manufacturing process used to produce the mirror blanks. The lightweight design consist of a thin faceplate (4-mm) and triangular backstructure cells with ribs of varying heights. The main drivers in the design were weight (40 kg) and manufacturing limitations imposed on the backstructure cells and mirror mounts. Finite element modeling predicts that the mirror design will meet all of the Gemini M2 requirements for weight, mechanical integrity, resonances, and optical performance. Special design considerations were necessary to avoid stress concentration in the mounting areas and to meet the requirement that the mirror survive an 8-g earthquake. The highest risk step in the mirror blank manufacturing process is the near-net-shape CVD deposition of the thin, curved faceplate. Special tooling and procedures had to be developed to produce faceplates free of fractures, cracks, and stress during the cool-down from deposition temperature (1350 C) to room temperature. Due to time delay with the CVD manufacturing process in the meantime a backup solution from Zerodur has been started. This mirror is now in the advanced polishing process. Because the design of both mirrors is very similar an excellent comparison of both solutions is possible.

  13. Myeloid PTEN deficiency protects livers from ischemia reperfusion injury by facilitating M2 macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Shi; Rao, Jianhua; Zhu, Jianjun; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Lu, Ling; Wang, Xuehao; Zhai, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Although the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in regulating cell proliferation is well established, its function in immune responses remains to be fully appreciated. In the current study, we analyzed myeloid-specific PTEN function in regulating tissue inflammatory immune response in a murine liver partial warm ischemia model. Myeloid-specific PTEN knockout (KO) resulted in liver protection from ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) by deviating the local innate immune response against ischemia reperfusion toward the regulatory type: expression of proinflammatory genes was selectively decreased and anti-inflammatory IL-10 was simultaneously increased in ischemia reperfusion livers of PTEN KO mice compared with those of wild-type (WT) mice. PI3K inhibitor and IL-10-neutralizing Abs, but not exogenous LPS, recreated liver IRI in these KO mice. At the cellular level, Kupffer cells and peritoneal macrophages isolated from KO mice expressed higher levels of M2 markers and produced lower TNF-α and higher IL-10 in response to TLR ligands than did their WT counterparts. They had enhanced Stat3- and Stat6-signaling pathway activation, but diminished Stat1-signaling pathway activation, in response to TLR4 stimulation. Inactivation of Kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride enhanced proinflammatory immune activation and increased IRI in livers of myeloid PTEN KO mice. Thus, myeloid PTEN deficiency protects livers from IRI by facilitating M2 macrophage differentiation. PMID:24771857

  14. Regulation of Notch 1 signaling in THP-1 cells enhances M2 macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Singla, Reetu D; Wang, Jing; Singla, Dinender K

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage polarization is emerging as an important area of research for the development of novel therapeutics to treat inflammatory diseases. Within the current study, the role of Notch1R in macrophage differentiation was investigated as well as downstream effects in THP-1 monocytes cultured in "inflammation mimicry" media. Interference of Notch signaling was achieved using either the pharmaceutical inhibitor DAPT or Notch1R small interfering RNA (siRNA), and Notch1R expression, macrophage phenotypes, and anti- and proinflammatory cytokine expression were evaluated. Data presented show that Notch1R expression on M1 macrophages as well as M1 macrophage differentiation is significantly elevated during cellular stress (P < 0.05). However, under identical culture conditions, interference to Notch signaling via Notch1R inhibition mitigated these results as well as promoted M2 macrophage differentiation. Moreover, when subjected to cellular stress, macrophage secretion of proinflammatory cytokines was significantly heightened (P < 0.05). Importantly, Notch1R inhibition not only diminished proinflammatory cytokine secretion but also enhanced anti-inflammatory protein release (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that Notch1R plays a pivotal role in M1 macrophage differentiation and heightened inflammatory responses. Therefore, we conclude that inhibition of Notch1R and subsequent downstream signaling enhances monocyte to M2 polarized macrophage outcomes and promotes anti-inflammatory mediation during cellular stress. PMID:25260616

  15. Substance P induces M2-type macrophages after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei H; Chung, Eunkyung; Chi, Guang F; Ahn, Woosung; Lim, Ji E; Hong, Hyun S; Kim, Dae W; Choi, Hyeongwon; Kim, Jiyoung; Son, Youngsook

    2012-09-12

    The potential benefits or the tissue-damaging effects of inflammatory response after central nervous system injuries have long been disputed. Recent studies have noted that substance P (SP), a neuropeptide, plays an important role in the wound-healing process by recruiting bone marrow stem cells to the injured tissue. In this study, we examined whether SP can enhance recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) in Sprague-Dawley rats through its known function of stem cell mobilization and/or through the modulation of inflammation. We examined proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and markers for macrophage subtypes. SP treatment modulated the SCI microenvironment toward a more anti-inflammatory and reparative one by inducing interleukin-10 and M2 macrophages and suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-α. This modulation was achieved at 1 day much earlier than SP-stimulated bone marrow stem cells' mobilization. Early intervention of the devastating inflammatory response by SP treatment caused the lesion cavity to become filled with robust axonal outgrowth that overlaid the M2 macrophages at 2 weeks--all of which culminated in tissue sparing and improvement in functional recovery from the SCI. SP is therefore a potential anti-inflammatory modulator for the treatment of injury-induced inflammatory central nervous system disorders. PMID:22825006

  16. Straining to observe the M2 phase in epitaxial VO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quackenbush, Nicholas; Wahila, Matthew; Piper, Louis; Paik, Hanjong; Holtz, Megan; Huang, Xin; Brock, Joel; Muller, David; Schlom, Darrell; Woicik, Joseph; Arena, Dario

    It has been more than a decade since it was shown that the transition temperature TMIT of VO2 in epitaxial thin films can be tuned by compressive and tensile strain along the rutile c-axis. Since this discovery, uniaxial strain studies of VO2 nanobeams have demonstrated that compressive strain indeed lowers TMIT, thus stabilizing the metallic rutile phase. However, even minor tensile strain induces an intermediate insulating monoclinic M2 phase. Whether this phase can be stabilized in thin films remains contentious owing to the constraints of sample and/or interface quality. Here, we present hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature-dependent soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of high quality ultrathin epitaxial VO2 films on TiO2 (001) and (100) substrates. The VO2/TiO2(001) are absent of intermediate phases and maintain a MIT similar to unstrained VO2, while the VO2/TiO2(100) films display a stable M2 phase between the M1 and rutile endpoint phases. We discuss our findings in terms of differences between uniaxial and biaxial strain. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation under DMR-1409912.

  17. M2SG: mapping human disease-related genetic variants to protein sequences and genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renkai; Cong, Qian; Li, Wenlin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a manually curated compendium of human genetic variants and the corresponding phenotypes, mostly human diseases. Instead of directly documenting the native sequences for gene entries, OMIM links its entries to protein and DNA sequences in other databases. However, because of the existence of gene isoforms and errors in OMIM records, mapping a specific OMIM mutation to its corresponding protein sequence is not trivial. Combining computer programs and extensive manual curation of OMIM full-text descriptions and original literature, we mapped 98% of OMIM amino acid substitutions (AASs) and all SwissProt Variant (SwissVar) disease-related AASs to reference sequences and confidently mapped 99.96% of all AASs to the genomic loci. Based on the results, we developed an online database and interactive web server (M2SG) to (i) retrieve the mapped OMIM and SwissVar variants for a given protein sequence; and (ii) obtain related proteins and mutations for an input disease phenotype. This database will be useful for analyzing sequences, understanding the effect of mutations, identifying important genetic variations and designing experiments on a protein of interest. Availability and implementation: The database and web server are freely available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/M2S/mut2seq.cgi. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24002112

  18. Characterizing detergent mediated reconstitution of viral protein M2 in large unilamellar vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyre, Mariel; Grossman, Carl; Crouch, Catherine; Howard, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    Influenza M2 is a model membrane protein whose function is to induce curvature and vesicle formation in the process of viral infection. To study embedded M2 in synthetic phospholipid vesicles (large unilamellar vesicles or LUVs), a concentration of detergent and buffer is optimized to balance protein solubility, proteolipid concentration, and LUV stability. Adding detergent also causes the LUVs to partially disassemble and form micelles, which warrants detergent removal to restore LUV integrity. We explore methods of measuring the coexistence of detergent micelles and LUVs to track the different phases of the system as detergent is removed. A combination of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and chemical analysis are used to measure the properties of this system. With detergent/LUV number densities as high as 5 we find coexistence of micelles and LUVs at 50% to 60%. As the detergent is removed, the micelle concentration drops to lower than 30% while detergent levels drop to nearly zero. These results may indicate a polydispersed LUV size distribution after detergent mediated reconstitution. Supported by HHMI and Swarthmore College.

  19. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor–mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius; Moyer, Amanda; Jürgensen, Henrik Jessen; Peters, Diane E.; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Selvaraj, Arul; Yamada, Susan S.; Brenner, David A.; Burgdorf, Sven; Engelholm, Lars H.; Behrendt, Niels; Holmbeck, Kenn; Weigert, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase–dependent manner and was subsequently routed to lysosomes for complete degradation. Collagen uptake was predominantly executed by a quantitatively minor population of M2-like macrophages, whereas more abundant Col1a1-expressing fibroblasts and Cx3cr1-expressing macrophages internalized collagen at lower levels. Genetic ablation of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor–associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies a key role of M2-like macrophages in this process. PMID:24019537

  20. Mid-infrared imaging of the bipolar planetary nebula M2-9 from SOFIA

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, M. W.; Sahai, R.; Davis, J.; Livingston, J.; Lykou, F.; DE Buizer, J.; Keller, L.; Adams, J.; Gull, G.; Henderson, C.; Herter, T.; Schoenwald, J.

    2014-01-10

    We have imaged the bipolar planetary nebula M2-9 using SOFIA's FORCAST instrument in six wavelength bands between 6.6 and 37.1 μm. A bright central point source, unresolved with SOFIA's ∼4''-5'' beam, is seen at each wavelength, and the extended bipolar lobes are clearly seen at 19.7 μm and beyond. The photometry between 10 and 25 μm is well fit by the emission predicted from a stratified disk seen at large inclination, as has been proposed for this source by Lykou et al. and by Smith and Gehrz. The principal new results in this paper relate to the distribution and properties of the dust that emits the infrared radiation. In particular, a considerable fraction of this material is spread uniformly through the lobes, although the dust density does increase at the sharp outer edge seen in higher resolution optical images of M2-9. The dust grain population in the lobes shows that small (<0.1 μm) and large (>1 μm) particles appear to be present in roughly equal amounts by mass. We suggest that collisional processing within the bipolar outflow plays an important role in establishing the particle size distribution.

  1. IEEE802.15.6 NB portable BAN clinic and M2M international standardization.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Masahiro; Nohara, Yasunobu

    2013-01-01

    The increase of non communicable diseases (NCDs) will change the direction of health services to emphasize the role of preventive medicine in healthcare services. The first short-range medical body are network (BAN) standard IEEE802.15.6 is expected to be used for secure and user-friendly sensor devices for portable medical equipment. A BAN is an enabler for uploading medical data to a backend system for remote diagnoses and treatment. Machine-to-Machine (M2M) infrastructure is also a key technology for providing flexible and affordable services extending electronic health record (EHR) systems. This paper proposes a BAN-based portable clinic that collects health-check data from user-friendly medical devices and sensors and sends the data to a local backend server, and it evaluates the clinic in fields of actual usage. We discuss issues experienced from actual deployment of the system and focus on integrating it into upcoming healthcare M2M infrastructure to achieve affordable and dependable clinic services. We explain the components and workflow of the clinic and the system model. The system is set up at a temporary health center and has a network link to a remote medical help center. The paper concludes with our plan to introduce our system to contribute to internationally standardized preventive medicine. PMID:24110023

  2. From Monocytes to M1/M2 Macrophages: Phenotypical vs. Functional Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Italiani, Paola; Boraschi, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Studies on monocyte and macrophage biology and differentiation have revealed the pleiotropic activities of these cells. Macrophages are tissue sentinels that maintain tissue integrity by eliminating/repairing damaged cells and matrices. In this M2-like mode, they can also promote tumor growth. Conversely, M1-like macrophages are key effector cells for the elimination of pathogens, virally infected, and cancer cells. Macrophage differentiation from monocytes occurs in the tissue in concomitance with the acquisition of a functional phenotype that depends on microenvironmental signals, thereby accounting for the many and apparently opposed macrophage functions. Many questions arise. When monocytes differentiate into macrophages in a tissue (concomitantly adopting a specific functional program, M1 or M2), do they all die during the inflammatory reaction, or do some of them survive? Do those that survive become quiescent tissue macrophages, able to react as naïve cells to a new challenge? Or, do monocyte-derived tissue macrophages conserve a “memory” of their past inflammatory activation? This review will address some of these important questions under the general framework of the role of monocytes and macrophages in the initiation, development, resolution, and chronicization of inflammation. PMID:25368618

  3. Myeloid Angiogenic Cells Act as Alternative M2 Macrophages and Modulate Angiogenesis through Interleukin-8

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Reinhold J; O’Neill, Christina L; O’Doherty, T Michelle; Knott, Henry; Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; Gardiner, Tom A; Stitt, Alan W

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) promote angiogenesis, and clinical trials have shown such cell therapy to be feasible for treating ischemic disease. However, clinical outcomes have been contradictory owing to the diverse range of EPC types used. We recently characterized two EPC subtypes, and identified outgrowth endothelial cells as the only EPC type with true progenitor and endothelial characteristics. By contrast, myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs) were shown to be monocytic cells without endothelial characteristics despite being widely described as “EPCs.” In the current study we demonstrated that although MACs do not become endothelial cells or directly incorporate into a microvascular network, they can significantly induce endothelial tube formation in vitro and vascular repair in vivo. MAC-derived interleukin-8 (IL-8) was identified as a key paracrine factor, and blockade of IL-8 but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) prevented MAC-induced angiogenesis. Extracellular IL-8 transactivates VEGFR2 and induces phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Further transcriptomic and immunophenotypic analysis indicates that MACs represent alternative activated M2 macrophages. Our findings demonstrate an unequivocal role for MACs in angiogenesis, which is linked to paracrine release of cytokines such as IL-8. We also show, for the first time, the true identity of these cells as alternative M2 macrophages with proangiogenic, antiinflammatory and pro–tissue-repair properties. PMID:21670847

  4. IL-33 Contributes to Schistosoma japonicum-induced Hepatic Pathology through Induction of M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Zhang, Qixian; Li, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zhen; Shen, Jia; Sun, Rui; Wei, Jie; Zhao, Jia; Wu, Xiaoying; Feng, Feng; Zhong, Shuping; Sun, Xi; Wu, Zhongdao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is involved in T helper (Th)2-biased immune responses in mice infected with Schistosoma, but the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated. Herein, we investigated the role of IL-33 and its receptor ST2L in hepatic granuloma pathology induced by Schistosoma japonicum infection. We found that IL-33 induced the increased production of IL-5 and IL-13 from splenocytes and liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) of infected mice. The infected mice developed significantly higher number of ST2L-expressing cells in spleen and liver. Most of the ST2L-expressing cells in liver were F4/80+ macrophages, indicating the key role of macrophages in the response to IL-33. However, the liver MNCs in male-only worm infection had a poor response to IL-33, though elevated serum IL-33 was observed. ST2L+F4/80+ cells were lower in male-only worm infection than that of mixed infection. IL-33 and soluble egg antigen (SEA) upregulated ST2L expression on macrophages in vitro and ST2L-expressing macrophage displayed MHCII-CD11b+M2 phenotype. Macrophage deletion significantly attenuated IL-33-induced type 2 immunity and egg granuloma formation during S. japonicum infection. These data demonstrate that IL-33 contributes to hepatic granuloma pathology through induction of M2 macrophages during S. japonicum infection. PMID:27445267

  5. Meteorological profiling of the lower troposphere using the research UAV "M2AV Carolo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Bange, J.; Beyrich, F.

    2011-04-01

    Vertical profiles of temperature, humidity and wind up to a height of 1500 m a.g.l. (above ground level) were measured with the automatically operating small unmanned research aircraft M2AV (Meteorological Mini Aerial Vehicle) during the LITFASS-2009 LIndenberg-To-Falkenberg: Aircraft, Scintillometer and large-eddy Simulation) experiment. The campaign took place in July 2009 over the heterogeneous landscape around the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg - Richard-Aßmann-Observatory in the eastern part of Germany. Due to a high vertical resolution of about 10 cm the M2AV data show details of the turbulent structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). One profile took about 10-15 min allowing for a continuous monitoring of certain phases of ABL development by successive ascents and descents during one flight (50-60 min duration). Two case studies of measurements performed during the morning and evening ABL transition periods are discussed in detail. Comparison of the aircraft-based temperature, humidity and wind profiles with tower, sodar/RASS, wind profiler/RASS, radiosoundings and microwave radiometer profiler measurements show good agreement taking into account the different sampling strategies of these measurement systems.

  6. Meteorological profiling of the lower troposphere using the research UAV "M2AV Carolo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Bange, J.; Beyrich, F.

    2010-11-01

    Vertical profiles of temperature, humidity and wind up to a height of 1500 m a.g.l. (above ground level) were measured with the automatically operating small unmanned research aircraft M2AV (Meteorological Mini Aerial Vehicle) during the LITFASS-2009 (LIndenberg-To-Falkenberg: Aircraft, Scintillometer and large-eddy Simulation) experiment. The campaign took place in July 2009 over the heterogeneous landscape around the Meteorologcial Observatory Lindenberg - Richard-Aßmann-Observatory in the eastern part of Germany. Due to a high vertical resolution of about 10 cm the M2AV data show details of the turbulent structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). One profile takes about 10-15 min allowing for a continuous monitoring of certain phases of ABL development by successive ascents and descents during one flight (50-60 min duration). Two case studies of measurements performed during the morning and evening ABL transition periods are discussed in detail. Comparison of the aircraft-based temperature, humidity and wind profiles with tower, sodar/RASS, wind profiler/RASS, radiosoundings and microwave radiometer profiler measurements show good agreement taking into account the different sampling strategies of these measurement systems.

  7. Genetic characterization of three qnrS1-harbouring multidrug-resistance plasmids and qnrS1-containing transposons circulating in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Le, Vien; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Cerdeno-Tarraga, Ana; Campbell, James I.; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; Schultsz, Constance; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) refers to a family of closely related genes that confer decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMQR genes are generally associated with integrons and/or plasmids that carry additional antimicrobial resistance genes active against a range of antimicrobials. In Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam, we have previously shown a high frequency of PMQR genes within commensal Enterobacteriaceae. However, there are limited available sequence data detailing the genetic context in which the PMQR genes reside, and a lack of understanding of how these genes spread across the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we aimed to determine the genetic background facilitating the spread and maintenance of qnrS1, the dominant PMQR gene circulating in HCMC. We sequenced three qnrS1-carrying plasmids in their entirety to understand the genetic context of these qnrS1-embedded plasmids and also the association of qnrS1-mediated quinolone resistance with other antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Annotation of the three qnrS1-containing plasmids revealed a qnrS1-containing transposon with a closely related structure. We screened 112 qnrS1-positive commensal Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the community and in a hospital in HCMC to detect the common transposon structure. We found the same transposon structure to be present in 71.4 % (45/63) of qnrS1-positive hospital isolates and in 36.7 % (18/49) of qnrS1-positive isolates from the community. The resulting sequence analysis of the qnrS1 environment suggested that qnrS1 genes are widely distributed and are mobilized on elements with a common genetic background. Our data add additional insight into mechanisms that facilitate resistance to multiple antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria in Vietnam. PMID:26272054

  8. Caries resistance of lased human root surface with 10.6 μm CO2 laser-thermal, morphological, and microhardness analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.; Freitas, A. C. P.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Steiner-Oliveira, C.; Nobre-Dos-Santos, M.; Youssef, M. N.

    2010-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on enamel have been shown, its effects on root surface demineralization remains uncertain. The objectives of this in vitro research was to establish safe parameters for a pulsed 10.6 μm CO2 laser and to evaluate its effect on morphological features of the root surface, as well as on the reduction of root demineralization. Ninety-five human root surfaces were randomly divided into five groups: G1-No treatment (control); G2—2.5 J/cm2; G3—4.0 J/cm2; G4—5.0 J/cm2; and G5—6.0 J/cm2. Intrapulpal temperature was evaluated during root surface irradiation by a thermocouple and morphological changes were evaluated by SEM. After the surface treatment, the specimens were submitted to a 7-day pH-cycling model. Subsequently, the cross-sectional Knoop microhardness values were measured. For all irradiated groups, intrapulpal temperature changes were less than 1.5°C. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated that fluences as low as 4.0 J/cm2 were sufficient to induce morphological changes in the root surface. Additionally, for fluences reaching or exceeding 4.0 J/cm2, laser-induced inhibitory effects on root surface demineralization were observed. It was concluded that laser energy density in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 J/cm2 could be applied to a dental root to reduce demineralization of this surface without compromising pulp vitality.

  9. Mitomycin C plus S-1 as second-line therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer: a noncomparative phase II study.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Hoon; Kim, Young Saing; Hong, Junshik; Park, Jinny; Nam, Eunmi; Cho, Eun Kyung; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Woon Kee; Chung, Min

    2008-03-01

    S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine consisting of the 5-fluorouracil prodrug tegafur combined with two modulating substances, gimeracil and potassium oxonate. On the basis of the potential additive effect between mitomycin C (MMC) and 5-fluorouracil as a continuous infusion, we conducted a phase II study to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the combination of S-1 and MMC as second-line chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Patients with measurable AGC, progressive after one prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease, received MMC (7 mg/m2) on day 1 and S-1 (40 mg/m2) twice daily as an intermittent regimen of 4 weeks of treatment followed by a 2-week rest. Treatment was repeated every 6 weeks. The primary objective was the response rate. For 43 patients registered, 42 patients were treated with MMC plus S-1. A total of 121 chemotherapy cycles were delivered (median: 2; range: 1-6). The patients' median age was 53 years (range: 31-75) and nine (21%) had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. In an intent-to-treat analysis, nine patients (21%) achieved an objective response, which was maintained for 4.1 months. The median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.4 months (95% confidence interval: 2.3-4.5) and 8.0 months (95% confidence interval: 6.1-9.9), respectively. Although fatigue was the most frequently encountered toxicity safety profiles were generally predictable and manageable. One patient developed hemolytic anemia, which was resolved spontaneously. Grade > or = 2 hand-foot syndrome was observed in only three patients. Second-line chemotherapy with MMC and S-1 is an active and tolerable regimen for AGC patients with good performance status. PMID:18510177

  10. Biomarker analysis in patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy: orotate phosphoribosyltransferase expression is associated with treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Sil; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Haeryoung; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Jong Seok

    2011-12-01

    This study was performed to analyze the impact of protein expression related to fluoropyrimidine and cisplatin metabolism (thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, thymidine phosphorylase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase [OPRT], excision repair cross-complementation 1, Fanconi anemia complementation group D2, glutathione S-transferase P1, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1) on treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic or relapsed gastric cancer (MRGC) receiving S-1/cisplatin chemotherapy. Protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Of the 43 patients who had received S-1 (80 mg/m2/day; days 1-14) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2; day 1) every 3 weeks and had available tissue blocks, IHC was successfully performed in 41 patients. Patients with high OPRT levels in tumor tissues (IHC score≥6) had superior progression-free survival (PFS) (23.3 vs. 14.1 weeks [median]) and overall survival (OS) (72.4 vs. 55.4 weeks [median]) to those with low OPRT levels (IHC score≤5; P-values<.05). Expression levels of other proteins were not predictive of treatment outcomes. In multivariate analysis, both a good performance status and a high OPRT level were independently associated with prolonged PFS and OS. The OPRT expression level may be a good predictive marker in S-1/cisplatin-treated patients with MRGC. PMID:20533001

  11. The S1P/S1PR2 axis regulates early airway T cell infiltration in murine mast cell-dependent acute allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Hait, Nitai C.; Wedman, Piper; Chumanevich, Alena; Kolawole, Elizabeth M.; Price, Megan M.; Falanga, Yves T.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Ryan, John J.; Milstien, Sheldon; Sabbadini, Roger; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid produced by mast cells (MC) upon cross-linking of their high affinity receptors for IgE by antigen (Ag) that can amplify MC responses by binding to its S1P receptors. Acute MC-dependent allergic reaction can lead to systemic shock but the early events of its development in lung tissues have not been investigated, and S1P functions in the onset of allergic processes remain to be examined. Objective We used a highly specific neutralizing anti-S1P antibody (mAb) and an S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) antagonist, JTE-013, to study S1P and S1PR2 signaling contributions to MC- and IgE-dependent airway allergic responses in mice within minutes after Ag challenge. Methods Allergic reaction was triggered by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of Ag in sensitized mice pre-treated i.p. with anti-S1P or isotype control mAb, or JTE-013 or vehicle prior to Ag challenge. Results Kinetics experiments revealed early pulmonary infiltration of mostly T cells around blood vessels of sensitized mice 20 minutes post-Ag exposure. Pre-treatment with anti-S1P mAb inhibited in vitro MC activation, as well as in vivo development of airway infiltration and MC activation, reducing serum levels of histamine, cytokines and the chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and RANTES/CCL5. S1PR2 antagonism or deficiency, or MC deficiency recapitulated these results. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated MC S1PR2 dependency for chemokine release and the necessity for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) activation. Conclusion Activation of S1PR2 by S1P and downstream Stat3 signaling in MC regulate early T cell recruitment to antigen-challenged lungs by chemokine production. PMID:25512083

  12. Biochemical characterization and functional analysis of the POU transcription factor POU-M2 of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lina; Li, Yu; Wang, Yejing; Zhao, Peng; Wei, Shuguang; Li, Zhenzhen; Chang, Huaipu; He, Huawei

    2016-05-01

    POU-M2 is a homeodomain transcription factor which plays important roles in the development and silk synthesis of Bombyx mori. In this study, we expressed, purified and characterized POU-M2 and studied its transcription regulation on fibroin heavy chain gene of Bombyx mori. Gel filtration showed POU-M2 existed as a dimer in solution. Far-UV circular dichroism spectra indicated POU-M2 had a well-defined α-helix structure and the α-helix content was about 26.4%. The thermal unfolding transition of POU-M2 was a cooperative process. Tm, ΔH and ΔS were 45.15±0.2°C, 138.4±0.5KJ/mol and 0.4349±0.04KJ/(mol·K), respectively. Western blotting analysis indicated the expression level of POU-M2 increased slightly from day 3 to day 7 of the fifth instar larvae in the posterior silk gland. POU-M2 was positioned in the nucleus of cells. The luciferase reporter assay demonstrated POU-M2 could stimulate the promoter activity of fibroin heavy chain gene, and the activation effect was dependent on the amount of POU-M2. Our study suggested POU-M2 may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of fibroin heavy chain gene. These findings expand toward a better understanding of the structure of POU-M2 and its function in silk synthesis of Bombyx mori. PMID:26854886

  13. Characterization of the N-glycans of recombinant bee venom hyaluronidase (Api m 2) expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Soldatova, Lyudmila N; Tsai, Chaoming; Dobrovolskaia, Ekaterina; Marković-Housley, Zora; Slater, Jay E

    2007-01-01

    Honeybee venom hyaluronidase (Api m 2) is a major glycoprotein allergen. Previous studies have indicated that recombinant Api m 2 expressed in insect cells has enzyme activity and IgE binding comparable with that of native Api m 2. In contrast, Api m 2 expressed in Escherichia coli does not. In this study, we characterized the carbohydrate side chains of Api m 2 expressed in insect cells, and compared our data with the established carbohydrate structure of native Api m 2. We assessed both the monosaccharide and the oligosaccharide content of recombinant Api m 2 using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis and HPLC. To identify the amino acid residues at which glycosylation occurs, we digested recombinant Api m 2 with endoproteinase Glu-C and identified the fragments that contained carbohydrate by specific staining. Recombinant Api m 2 expressed in insect cells contains N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, and fucose, as well as trace amounts of glucose and galactose, and the oligosaccharide analysis is consistent with heterogeneous oligosaccharide chains consisting of two to seven monosaccharides. No sialic acid or N-acetylgalactosamine were detected. These results are similar to published data for native Api m 2, although some monosaccharide components appear to be absent in the recombinant protein. Analysis of proteolytic digests indicates that of the four candidate N-glycosylation sites, carbohydrate chains are attached at asparagines 115 and 263. Recombinant Api m 2 expressed in insect cells has enzymic activity and IgE binding comparable with the native protein, and its carbohydrate composition is very similar. PMID:17479607

  14. Carboxyl- and amino-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles differentially affect the polarization profile of M1 and M2 macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ann-Kathrin; Syrovets, Tatiana; Haas, Karina A; Loos, Cornelia; Musyanovych, Anna; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Simmet, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Exposure to microenvironmental stimuli determines their polarization into proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. M1 exhibit high expression of proinflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β, and M2 promote tissue repair, but likewise support tumor growth and cause immune suppression by expressing IL-10. Thus, the M1/M2 balance critically determines tissue homeostasis. By using carboxyl- (PS-COOH) and amino-functionalized (PS-NH2) polystyrene nanoparticles, the effects of surface decoration on the polarization of human macrophages were investigated. The nanoparticles did not compromise macrophage viability nor did they affect the expression of the M1 markers CD86, NOS2, TNF-α, and IL-1β. By contrast, in M2, both nanoparticles impaired expression of scavenger receptor CD163 and CD200R, and the release of IL-10. PS-NH2 also inhibited phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by both, M1 and M2. PS-COOH did not impair phagocytosis by M2, but increased protein mass in M1 and M2, TGF-β1 release by M1, and ATP levels in M2. Thus, nanoparticles skew the M2 macrophage polarization without affecting M1 markers. Given the critical role of the M1 and M2 polarization for the immunological balance in patients with cancer or chronic inflammation, functionalized nanoparticles might serve as tools for reprogramming the M1/M2 polarization. PMID:26854393

  15. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction. PMID:26539121

  16. A polarizing question: do M1 and M2 microglia exist?

    PubMed

    Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-07-26

    Microglial research has entered a fertile, dynamic phase characterized by novel technologies including two-photon imaging, whole-genome transcriptomic and epigenomic analysis with complementary bioinformatics, unbiased proteomics, cytometry by time of flight (CyTOF; Fluidigm) cytometry, and complex high-content experimental models including slice culture and zebrafish. Against this vivid background of newly emerging data, investigators will encounter in the microglial research literature a body of published work using the terminology of macrophage polarization, most commonly into the M1 and M2 phenotypes. It is the assertion of this opinion piece that microglial polarization has not been established by research findings. Rather, the adoption of this schema was undertaken in an attempt to simplify data interpretation at a time when the ontogeny and functional significance of microglia had not yet been characterized. Now, terminology suggesting established meaningful pathways of microglial polarization hinders rather than aids research progress and should be discarded. PMID:27459405

  17. Gamma rays emitted in the decay of 31-year 178m2Hf

    SciTech Connect

    MB, S; PW, W; GC, B; JJ, C; PE, G; G, H; R, P; F, S; HC, S

    2003-10-15

    The spontaneous decay of the K{sup {pi}} = 16{sup +}, 31-year {sup 178m2}Hf isomer has been investigated with a 15 kBq source placed at the center of a 20-element {gamma}-ray spectrometer. High-multipolarity M4 and E5 transitions, which represent the first definitive observation of direct {gamma}-ray emission from the isomer, have been identified, together with other low-intensity transitions. Branching ratios for these other transitions have elucidated the spin dependence of the mixing between the two known K{sup {pi}} = 8{sup -} bands. The M4 and E5 {gamma}-ray decays are the first strongly K-forbidden transitions to be identified with such high multipolarities, and demonstrate a consistent extension of K-hindrance systematics, with an inhibition factor of approximately 100 per degree of K forbiddenness. Some unplaced transitions are also reported.

  18. Neuroinflammation and M2 microglia: the good, the bad, and the inflamed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The concept of multiple macrophage activation states is not new. However, extending this idea to resident tissue macrophages, like microglia, has gained increased interest in recent years. Unfortunately, the research on peripheral macrophage polarization does not necessarily translate accurately to their central nervous system (CNS) counterparts. Even though pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines can polarize microglia to distinct activation states, the specific functions of these states is still an area of intense debate. This review examines the multiple possible activation states microglia can be polarized to. This is followed by a detailed description of microglial polarization and the functional relevance of this process in both acute and chronic CNS disease models described in the literature. Particular attention is given to utilizing M2 microglial polarization as a potential therapeutic option in treating diseases. PMID:24889886

  19. M2-F1 lifting body and Paresev 1B on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    In this photo of the M2-F1 lifting body and the Paresev 1B on the ramp, the viewer sees two vehicles representing different approaches to building a research craft to simulate a spacecraft able to land on the ground instead of splashing down in the ocean as the Mercury capsules did. The M2-F1 was a lifting body, a shape able to re-enter from orbit and land. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) used a Rogallo wing that could be (but never was) used to replace a conventional parachute for landing a capsule-type spacecraft, allowing it to make a controlled landing on the ground. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop

  20. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Coppel, R.L.; McNeilage, L.J.; Surh, C.D.; Van De Water, J.; Spithill, T.W.; Whittingham, S.; Gershwin, M.E. )

    1988-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a M{sub r} 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects.

  1. CCRL2 regulates M1/M2 polarization during EAE recovery phase.

    PubMed

    Mazzon, Cristina; Zanotti, Lucia; Wang, Li; Del Prete, Annalisa; Fontana, Elena; Salvi, Valentina; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Sozzani, Silvano

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine (CC motif) receptor-like 2 is a 7-transmembrane protein related to the family of the atypical chemokine receptors, which are proteins devoid of chemotactic activity and involved in the control of inflammation. Experimental autoimmune encephalitis is an autoimmune disorder that replicates the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis. Chemokine (CC motif) receptor-like 2-deficient mice developed exacerbated, nonresolving disease with protracted inflammatory response and increased demyelination. The increased severity of the disease was associated with higher levels of microglia/macrophage activation markers and imbalanced M1/M2 polarization. Thus, chemokine (CC motif) receptor-like 2 is involved in the downregulation of central nervous system-associated experimental autoimmune encephalitis inflammation in the recovery phase of the disease. Therefore chemokine (CC motif) receptor-like 2 should be considered to be a molecule involved in the regulation of the inflammatory response associated with multiple sclerosis. PMID:26744451

  2. M2, S2, K1 models of the global ocean tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, M. E.; Hendershott, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    Ocean tidal signals appear in many geophysical measurements. Geophysicists need realistic tidal models to aid in interpretation of their data. Because of the closeness to resonance of dissipationless ocean tides, it is difficult for numerical models to correctly represent the actual open ocean tide. As an approximate solution to this problem, test functions derived by solving Laplace's Tidal Equations with ocean loading and self gravitation are used as a basis for least squares dynamic interpolation of coastal and island tidal data for the constituents M2, S2, and Kl. The resulting representations of the global tide are stable over at least a ?5% variation in the mean depth of the model basin, and they conserve mass. Maps of the geocentric tide, the induced free space potential, the induced vertical component of the solid earth tide, and the induced vertical component of the gravitational field for each contituent are presented.

  3. Doping golden clusters: MAu-19 and M2Au-18 (M = Cu and Na)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Fa, Wei

    2012-04-01

    The structural and electronic properties of MAu-19 and M2Au-18 (M = Cu and Na) have been studied by the relativistic density-functional calculations. It is found that the most stable configurations of CuAu-19 and Cu2Au-18 are the face-centered and two-face-centered doped structures based upon the tetrahedral structure Au-20. In contrast, the ground states of Na-doped gold clusters (NaAu-19 and Na2Au-18) exhibit flat-cage configurations. The PES of these ground states are depicted that may be helpful to identify their configurations in the future experiments. The face-centered and two-face-centered doped tetrahedral structures of CuAu-19 and Cu2Au-18 have a large HOMO-LUMO gap, indicating that they are chemically stable.

  4. M2 pore mutations convert the glycine receptor channel from being anion- to cation-selective.

    PubMed Central

    Keramidas, A; Moorhouse, A J; French, C R; Schofield, P R; Barry, P H

    2000-01-01

    Three mutations in the M2 transmembrane domains of the chloride-conducting alpha1 homomeric glycine receptor (P250Delta, A251E, and T265V), which normally mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission, produced a cation-selective channel with P(Cl)/P(Na), = 0.27 (wild-type P(Cl)/P(Na) = 25), a permeability sequence P(Cs) > P(K) > P(Na) > P(Li), an impermeability to Ca(2+), and a reduced glycine sensitivity. Outside-out patch measurements indicated reversed and accentuated rectification with extremely low mean single channel conductances of 3 pS (inward current) and 11 pS (outward current). The three inverse mutations, to those analyzed in this study, have previously been shown to make the alpha7 acetylcholine receptor channel anion-selective, indicating a common location for determinants of charge selectivity of inhibitory and excitatory ligand-gated ion channels. PMID:10866951

  5. Spaceflight Effects on Hemopoiesis of Lower Vertebrates Flown on Foton-M2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domaratskaya, E. I.; Payushina, O. V.; Butorina, M. N.; Nikonova, T. M.; Grigorian, E. N.; Mitashov, V. I.; Tairbekov, M. G.; Almeida, E.; Khrushchov, N. G.

    2006-01-01

    Intact and operated newts Pleumdeles waltl flown on Foton-M2 for 16 days were used to study the effects of spaceflight as well as tail amputation and lensectomy on their hemopoiesis. The flight did not produce noticeable changes in the peripheral blood of nonoperated newts. However, in operated animals, the number of lymphocytes increased whereas that of neutrophils decreased. There were no morphological differences in hemopoietic organs (liver and spleen) between flown non-operated and operated animals or their controls. However, in both non-operated and operated newts the liver weight and the number of hemopoietic cells in it increased. In contrast to nonoperated newts, space-flown mammals typically showed significant changes in blood cell counts. Experiments with BrdU incorporation revealed labeled cells in the hemopoietic area of the liver as well as in blood and spleen. This observation gives evidence that the BrdU label can be used to study proliferation of hemopoietic cells.

  6. Pyruvate Kinase M2 in Blood Circulation Facilitates Tumor Growth by Promoting Angiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangwei; Zhang, Yinwei; Qiao, Jingjuan; Yang, Jenny J.; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    It is long known that pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is released into the circulation of cancer patients. The PKM2 levels in patients have been suggested as a diagnostic marker for many types of cancers. However, it is not known how PKM2 is released in the blood, and whether the circulating PKM2 has any physiological function(s) in tumor progression. In this report, we demonstrate that PKM2 in the blood facilitates tumor growth by promoting tumor angiogenesis. Our experiments show that PKM2 promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and cell-ECM adhesion. Only the dimeric PKM2 possess the activity in promoting tumor angiogenesis, which is consistent with the observations that PKM2 in circulation of cancer patients is a dimer form. PMID:25070887

  7. Aft Body Closure: Predicted Strut Effects at M=2.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Garritz, Javier A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the predicted M = 2.4 strut-interference effects on a closed aftbody with empennage for the TCA baseline model. The strut mounting technique was needed in order to assess the impact of aft-end shaping, i.e. open for a sting or closed to better represent a flight vehicle. However,this technique can potentially lead to unanticipated effects that are measured on the aft body. Therefore, a set of computations were performed in order to examine the closed aft body with and without strut present, at both zero and non-zero angles of sideslip (AOS). The work was divided into a computational task performed by Javier A. Garriz, using an inviscid (Euler) solver, and a monitoring/reporting task done by John E. Lamar. All this work was performed during FY98 at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  8. Semidiurnal M2 internal tides in the Indo-Australian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, K.; Wijffels, S.

    2006-09-01

    Clear signals of internal tide propagation are found at the semidiurnal M2 frequency in the eastern South Indian Ocean over the abyssal plain of the Indonesian Australian Basin. We find a spatially and temporally coherent internal tide with phase propagation estimated from satellite altimetry suggesting generation along the Indonesian Archipelago and the Australian North West Shelf east of 115°E. A sinusoidal fit is used to estimate internal tide phase and amplitude along vertical cross sections from expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data along volunteer merchant shipping lines. It is likely tidal energy in the middle of the Indonesian Australian Basin is from both northern and southern source regions, and may sustain a second region of enhanced mixing for the Indonesian Throughflow.

  9. The navigational experiments on microgravitational space platform “FOTON-M2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokonov, Igor V.; Semkin, Nikolay D.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents the review of results of the navigating experiments which have been carried out during flight of microgravitational space platform (MSP) Foton-M2 in May-June 2005. The brief characteristic of the created MIRAGE-M equipment consisting from magnitometric system and satellite radionavigation receiver is given. The measurements have allowed to restore unguided MSP movement and to estimate a level of microaccelerations (microgravitations) onboard during flight, and have provided precision time-position binding of the research experiments. The data from the equipments transmitted on the telemetering channel have allowed testing the information technologies of virtual support of experiments in space. Flight testing of the equipment has allowed make a conclusion on usefulness of accommodation onboard the small-sized auxiliary navigating system focused for work with users of research experiments. The experiments on MSP Foton-M2 are the development of experiments with MIRAGE equipment carried out in 1999 during flight time of MSP Foton-12 [N.D. Semkin, V.V. Ivanov, V.I. Abrushkin, V.L. Balakin, I.V. Belokonov, K.E. Voronov, The experiments with magnetic fields formed by technical equipment inside Foton-12 spacecraft: the results of the MIRAGE experiments, in: Proceedings of International Conference "Scientific and Technological Experiments on Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Satellites: Results, Problems and Outlooks", 25-30 June 2000, pp. 116-122; V.L. Balakin, I.V. Belokonov, V.V. Ivanov, "Determination of motion of spacecraft Foton-12 as a result of magnetic fields measurement in MIRAGE experiment", pp. 231-238 (published in the same place)]. Paper is executed within the framework of the grant of the Russian Fund of Fundamental Researches 06-08-00244.

  10. nuMoM2b Sleep Disordered Breathing Study: Objectives and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Facco, Francesca L.; Parker, Corette B.; Reddy, Uma M.; Silver, Robert M.; Louis, Judette M.; Basner, Robert C.; Chung, Judith H.; Schubert, Frank P.; Pien, Grace W.; Redline, Susan; Mobley, Daniel; Koch, Matthew A.; Simhan, Hyagriv N.; Chia-Ling, Nhan-Chang; Parry, Samuel; Grobman, William A.; Haas, David M.; Wing, Deborah A.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the Sleep Disordered Breathing substudy of the Nulliparous Pregnancy Outcomes Study Monitoring Mothers-to-be (nuMoM2b) is to determine whether sleep disordered breathing during pregnancy is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods nuMoM2b is a prospective cohort study of 10,037 nulliparous women with singleton gestations, conducted across 8 sites, with a central Data Coordinating and Analysis Center. The Sleep Disordered Breathing substudy recruited 3702 women from the cohort to undergo objective, overnight in-home assessments of sleep disordered breathing. A standardized Level 3 home sleep test was performed between 60–150 weeks of pregnancy (Visit 1) and again between 220–310 weeks of pregnancy (Visit 3). Scorings of tests were conducted by a central Sleep Reading Center. Participants and their health care providers were notified if test results met “urgent referral” criteria based on threshold levels of apnea hypopnea indices, oxygen saturation levels or ECG abnormalities, but otherwise were not notified of test results. The primary pregnancy outcomes to be analyzed in relation to maternal sleep disordered breathing are preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, fetal growth restriction, and preterm birth. Results Objective data were obtained at Visit 1 on 3261 women, 88.1% of studies attempted; and at Visit 3 on 2511 women, 87.6% of studies attempted. Basic characteristics of the substudy cohort are reported in this methods paper. Conclusion The substudy is designed to address important questions regarding the relationship of sleep disordered breathing on the risk of preeclampsia and other outcomes of relevance to maternal and child health. PMID:25746730

  11. A disc inside the bipolar planetary nebula M2-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykou, F.; Chesneau, O.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Lagadec, E.; Balick, B.; Smith, N.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: Bipolarity in proto-planetary and planetary nebulae is associated with events occurring in or around their cores. Past infrared observations have revealed the presence of dusty structures around the cores, many in the form of discs. Characterising those dusty discs provides invaluable constraints on the physical processes that govern the final mass expulsion of intermediate mass stars. We focus this study on the famous M2-9 bipolar nebula, where the moving lighthouse beam pattern indicates the presence of a wide binary. The compact and dense dusty core in the centre of the nebula can be studied by means of optical interferometry. Methods: M2-9 was observed with VLTI/MIDI at 39-47 m baselines with the UT2-UT3 and UT3-UT4 baseline configurations. These observations are interpreted using a dust radiative transfer Monte Carlo code. Results: A disc-like structure is detected perpendicular to the lobes, and a good fit is found with a stratified disc model composed of amorphous silicates. The disc is compact, 25 × 35 mas at 8 μm and 37 × 46 mas at 13 μm. For the adopted distance of 1.2 kpc, the inner rim of the disc is ~15 AU. The mass represents a few percent of the mass found in the lobes. The compactness of the disc puts strong constraints on the binary content of the system, given an estimated orbital period 90-120 yr. We derive masses of the binary components between 0.6-1.0 M⊙ for a white dwarf and 0.6-1.4 M⊙ for an evolved star. We present different scenarios on the geometric structure of the disc accounting for the interactions of the binary system, which includes an accretion disc as well. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, ESO N: 079.D-146.

  12. Oxysterol mixture and, in particular, 27-hydroxycholesterol drive M2 polarization of human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Barbara; Bellora, Francesca; Ricciarelli, Roberta; De Ciucis, Chiara; Furfaro, AnnaLisa; Leardi, Riccardo; Colla, Renata; Pacini, Davide; Traverso, Nicola; Moretta, Alessandro; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Bottino, Cristina; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in atherosclerosis progression. Classically activated M1 macrophages have been found in rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques whereas alternatively activated macrophages, M2, localize in stable plaque. Macrophage accumulation of cholesterol and of its oxidized derivatives (oxysterols) leads to the formation of foam cells, a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions. In this study, the effects of oxysterols in determining the functional polarization of human macrophages were investigated. Monocytes, purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors, were differentiated into macrophages (M0) and treated with an oxysterol mixture, cholesterol, or ethanol, every 4 H for a total of 4, 8, and 12 H. The administration of the compounds was repeated in order to maintain the levels of oxysterols constant throughout the treatment. Compared with ethanol treatment, the oxysterol mixture decreased the surface expression of CD36 and CD204 scavenger receptors and reduced the amount of reactive oxygen species whereas it did not affect either cell viability or matrix metalloprotease-9 activity. Moreover, the oxysterol mixture increased the expression of both liver X receptor α and ATP-binding cassette transporter 1. An enhanced secretion of the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 accompanied these events. The results supported the hypothesis that the constant levels of oxysterols and, in particular, of 27-hydroxycholesterol stimulate macrophage polarization toward the M2 immunomodulatory functional phenotype, contributing to the stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. © 2015 The Authors BioFactors published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 42(1):80-92, 2016. PMID:26669587

  13. Use of acetylcholine mustard to study allosteric interactions at the M2 muscarinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hinako; Figueroa, Katherine W.; Ehlert, Frederick J.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the interaction of a nitrogen mustard derivative of acetylcholine with the human M2 muscarinic receptor expressed in CHO cells using the muscarinic radioligand, [3H]N-methylscopolamine. Acetylcholine mustard caused a concentration-dependent, first order loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding at 37°C, with the half maximal rate constant occurring at 24 µM and a maximal rate constant of 0.16 min−1. We examined the effects of various ligands on the rate of alkylation of M2 receptors by acetylcholine mustard. N-methylscopolamine and McN-A-343 (4-(trimethylamino)-2-butynyl-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate) competitively slowed the rate of alkylation, whereas the inhibition by gallamine reached a plateau at high concentrations, indicating allosteric inhibition. In contrast, WIN 51708 (17-β-hydroxy-17-α-ethynyl-5-α-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) had no effect. We also measured the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by acetylcholine mustard at 0°C, conditions under which there is little or no detectable covalent binding. In these experiments, the dissociation constant of the aziridinium ion of acetylcholine mustard was estimated to be 12.3 µM. In contrast, the parent mustard and alcoholic hydrolysis product of acetylcholine mustard were without effect. Our results show that measurement of the effects of ligands on the rate of inactivation of the orthosteric site by a small site-directed electrophile is a powerful method for discriminating competitive inhibition from allosterism. PMID:18682569

  14. Plasma control of shock wave configuration in off-design mode of M = 2 inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falempin, Francois; Firsov, Alexander A.; Yarantsev, Dmitry A.; Goldfeld, Marat A.; Timofeev, Konstantin; Leonov, Sergey B.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this work was to study the steering effect of a weakly ionized plasma on a supersonic flow structure in a two-dimensional aerodynamic configuration with a three-shock compression ramp in an off-design operational mode. Experiments were performed in wind tunnel T-313 of ITAM SB RAS, with the model air inlet designed for operation at a flow of Mach number M = 2. The inlet was tested at M = 2, 2.5, and 3 and with Re = (25-36) × 106/m and an angle of attack AoA = 0°, 5°, and 8°. For the regulation of the inlet characteristics, a plasma generator with electrical power W pl = 2-10 kW was flush-mounted upstream of the compression ramp. A significant plasma effect on the shock configuration at the inlet and on the flow parameters after air compression is considered. It is shown that the main shock wave angle is controllable by means of the plasma power magnitude and, therefore, can be accurately adjusted to the cowl lip of an inlet with a fixed geometry. An additional plasma effect has been demonstrated through a notable increase in the pressure recovery coefficient in a flowpass extension behind the inlet because of an nearly isentropic pattern of flow compression with the plasma turned on. Numerical simulation brings out the details of 3D distribution of the flow structure and parameters throughout the model at thermal energy deposition in inlet near the compression surfaces. We conclude that the plasma-based technique may be a feasible method for expanding supersonic inlet operational limits.

  15. Microwave & Magnetic (M2) Proteomics of a Mouse Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa M.; Van Remmen, Holly; Purkar, Anjali; Mahesula, Swetha; Gelfond, J AL; Sabia, Marian; Qi, Wenbo; Lin, Ai-Ling; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Haskins, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Short-term increases in oxidative stress and decreases in motor function, including debilitating effects on balance and motor control, can occur following primary mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI). However, the long-term effects on motor unit impairment and integrity as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying secondary injuries are poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in central nervous system-specific protein (CSP) expression might correlate to these long-term effects. To test our hypothesis, we longitudinally assessed a closed-skull mTBI mouse model, vs. sham control, at 1, 7, 30, and 120 days post-injury. Motor impairment was determined by rotarod and grip strength performance measures, while motor unit integrity was determined using electromyography. Relative protein expression was determined by microwave & magnetic (M2) proteomics of ipsilateral brain tissue, as previously described. Isoprostane measurements were performed to confirm a primary oxidative stress response. Decoding the relative expression of 476 ± 56 top-ranked proteins for each specimen revealed statistically significant changes in the expression of two well-known CSPs at 1, 7 and 30 days post-injury: P < 0.001 for myelin basic protein (MBP) and P < 0.05 for myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG). This was confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, MAG, αII-spectrin (SPNA2) and neurofilament light (NEFL) expression at 30 days post-injury were directly related to grip strength (P < 0.05). While higher-powered studies of larger cohorts merit further investigation, this study supports the proof-of-concept that M2 proteomics is a rapid method to quantify putative protein biomarkers and therapeutic targets of mTBI and suggests the feasibility of CSP expression correlations to long-term effects on motor impairment. PMID:26157646

  16. Coupling of G Proteins to Reconstituted Monomers and Tetramers of the M2 Muscarinic Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Redka, Dar'ya S.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Elmslie, Gwendolynne; Paranthaman, Pranavan; Shivnaraine, Rabindra V.; Ellis, John; Ernst, Oliver P.; Wells, James W.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors can be reconstituted as monomers in nanodiscs and as tetramers in liposomes. When reconstituted with G proteins, both forms enable an allosteric interaction between agonists and guanylyl nucleotides. Both forms, therefore, are candidates for the complex that controls signaling at the level of the receptor. To identify the biologically relevant form, reconstituted monomers and tetramers of the purified M2 muscarinic receptor were compared with muscarinic receptors in sarcolemmal membranes for the effect of guanosine 5′-[β,γ-imido]triphosphate (GMP-PNP) on the inhibition of N-[3H]methylscopolamine by the agonist oxotremorine-M. With monomers, a stepwise increase in the concentration of GMP-PNP effected a lateral, rightward shift in the semilogarithmic binding profile (i.e. a progressive decrease in the apparent affinity of oxotremorine-M). With tetramers and receptors in sarcolemmal membranes, GMP-PNP effected a vertical, upward shift (i.e. an apparent redistribution of sites from a state of high affinity to one of low affinity with no change in affinity per se). The data were analyzed in terms of a mechanistic scheme based on a ligand-regulated equilibrium between uncoupled and G protein-coupled receptors (the “ternary complex model”). The model predicts a rightward shift in the presence of GMP-PNP and could not account for the effects at tetramers in vesicles or receptors in sarcolemmal membranes. Monomers present a special case of the model in which agonists and guanylyl nucleotides interact within a complex that is both constitutive and stable. The results favor oligomers of the M2 receptor over monomers as the biologically relevant state for coupling to G proteins. PMID:25023280

  17. 26 CFR 31.3121(s)-1 - Concurrent employment by related corporations with common paymaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with common paymaster. 31.3121(s)-1 Section 31.3121(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(s)-1 Concurrent employment by related corporations with... this section. Section 3121(s) and this section apply only to remuneration disbursed in the form...

  18. 26 CFR 1.6050S-1 - Information reporting for qualified tuition and related expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Information reporting for qualified tuition and related expenses. 1.6050S-1 Section 1.6050S-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6050S-1 Information reporting for...

  19. Strong evidence for ZZ production in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S; Group, R C

    2008-05-23

    We report the first evidence of Z boson pair production at a hadron collider with a significance exceeding 4 standard deviations. This result is based on a data sample corresponding to 1.9 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity from pp[over] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector. In the lll'l' channel, we observe three ZZ candidates with an expected background of 0.096(-0.063)+0.092 events. In the llnunu channel, we use a leading-order calculation of the relative ZZ and WW event probabilities to discriminate between signal and background. In the combination of lll'l' and llnunu channels, we observe an excess of events with a probability of 5.1 x 10(-6) to be due to the expected background. This corresponds to a significance of 4.4 standard deviations. The measured cross section is sigma(pp[over]-->ZZ)=1.4(-0.6)+0.7(stat+syst) pb, consistent with the standard model expectation. PMID:18518523

  20. Precipitation Kinetics of M2C Carbide in Severely Ausformed 13Co-8Ni Secondary Hardening Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ki Sub; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Hong Kyu; Song, Young Beum; Kwon, Hoon

    2015-04-01

    With continuous heating calorimetric data as a basis, the kinetics of M2C formation during isothermal aging was modeled in severely ausformed 13Co-8Ni steels using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami theory coupled with a variation of effective activation energy with respect to the degree of transformation. These results were compared with small-angle neutron scattering measurements and discussed in terms of variations in the thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of M2C precipitation. In particular, the M2C carbides in the deformed samples contained more Fe content compared with the non-deformed samples. As this can be ascribed to the ausforming effect increasing the driving force for M2C nucleation, it consequently leads to the decrease of the growth/coarsening rate for M2C carbides at over-aged conditions.

  1. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  2. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  3. Chemical rescue of histidine selectivity filter mutants of the M2 ion channel of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Padmavati; Lamb, Robert A; Pinto, Lawrence H

    2005-06-01

    The influenza virus M2 proton-selective ion channel activity facilitates virus uncoating, a process that occurs in the acidic environment of the endosome. The M2 channel causes acidification of the interior of the virus particle, which results in viral protein-protein dissociation. The M2 protein is a homotetramer that contains in its aqueous pore a histidine residue (His-37) that acts as a selectivity filter and a tryptophan residue (Trp-41) that acts as a channel gate. Substitution of His-37 modifies M2 ion channel properties drastically. However, the results of such experiments are difficult to interpret because substitution of His-37 could cause gross structural changes to the channel pore. We described here experiments in which partial or, in some cases, full rescue of specific M2 ion channel properties of His-37 substitution mutants was achieved by addition of imidazole to the bathing medium. Chemical rescue was demonstrated for three histidine substitution mutant ion channels (M2-H37G, M2-H37S, and M2-H37T) and for two double mutants in which the Trp-41 channel gate was also mutated (H37G/W41Y and H37G/W41A). Currents of the M2-H37G mutant ion channel were inhibited by Cu(II), which has been shown to coordinate with His-37 in the wild-type channel. Chemical rescue was very specific for imidazole. Buffer molecules that were neutral when protonated (4-morpholineethanesulfonic acid and 3-morpholino-2-hydroxypropanesulfonic acid) did not rescue ion channel activity of the M2-H37G mutant ion channel, but 1-methylimidazole did provide partial rescue of function. These results were consistent with a model for proton transport through the pore of the wild-type channel in which the imidazole side chain of His-37 acted as an intermediate proton acceptor/donor group. PMID:15784624

  4. The Clinically-tested S1P Receptor Agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, Demonstrate Subtype-Specific Bradycardia (S1P1) and Hypertension (S1P3) in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C.; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E.; Dinallo, Roger M.; Horan, Joshua C.; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1PX receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2–3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P1,5 agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P1 mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P3 receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P1 receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P3 receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  5. The clinically-tested S1P receptor agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, demonstrate subtype-specific bradycardia (S1P₁) and hypertension (S1P₃) in rat.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Ryan M; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E; Dinallo, Roger M; Horan, Joshua C; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K; Reinhart, Glenn A

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1P(X) receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2-3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P₁,₅ agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P₁ mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P₃ receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P₁ receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P₃ receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  6. A randomized phase II study of S-1 plus oral leucovorin versus S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, M.; Okusaka, T.; Omuro, Y.; Isayama, H.; Fukutomi, A.; Ikeda, M.; Mizuno, N.; Fukuzawa, K.; Furukawa, M.; Iguchi, H.; Sugimori, K.; Furuse, J.; Shimada, K.; Ioka, T.; Nakamori, S.; Baba, H.; Komatsu, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Hyodo, I.; Boku, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of adding oral leucovorin (LV) to S-1 when compared with S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). Patients and methods Gemcitabine-refractory PC patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 at 40, 50, or 60 mg according to body surface area plus LV 25 mg, both given orally twice daily for 1 week, repeated every 2 weeks (SL group), or S-1 monotherapy at the same dose as the SL group for 4 weeks, repeated every 6 weeks (S-1 group). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Among 142 patients enrolled, 140 were eligible for efficacy assessment (SL: n = 69 and S-1: n = 71). PFS was significantly longer in the SL group than in the S-1 group [median PFS, 3.8 versus 2.7 months; hazard ratio (HR), 0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37–0.85; P = 0.003]). The disease control rate was significantly higher in the SL group than in the S-1 group (91% versus 72%; P = 0.004). Overall survival (OS) was similar in both groups (median OS, 6.3 versus 6.1 months; HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.54–1.22; P = 0.463). After adjusting for patient background factors in a multivariate analysis, OS tended to be better in the SL group (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47–1.07; P = 0.099). Both treatments were well tolerated, although gastrointestinal toxicities were slightly more severe in the SL group. Conclusion The addition of LV to S-1 significantly improved PFS in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced PC, and a phase III trial has been initiated in a similar setting. Clinical trials number Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center: JapicCTI-111554. PMID:26681680

  7. Label-Free Fluorescence Assay of S1 Nuclease and Hydroxyl Radicals Based on Water-Soluble Conjugated Polymers and WS₂ Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Li, Junting; Zhao, Qi; Tang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new method for detecting S1 nuclease and hydroxyl radicals based on the use of water-soluble conjugated poly[9,9-bis(6,6-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)-fluorene)-2,7-ylenevinylene-co-alt-2,5-dicyano-1,4-phenylene)] (PFVCN) and tungsten disulfide (WS₂) nanosheets. Cationic PFVCN is used as a signal reporter, and single-layer WS₂ is used as a quencher with a negatively charged surface. The ssDNA forms complexes with PFVCN due to much stronger electrostatic interactions between cationic PFVCN and anionic ssDNA, whereas PFVCN emits yellow fluorescence. When ssDNA is hydrolyzed by S1 nuclease or hydroxyl radicals into small fragments, the interactions between the fragmented DNA and PFVCN become weaker, resulting in PFVCN being adsorbed on the surface of WS₂ and the fluorescence being quenched through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The new method based on PFVCN and WS₂ can sense S1 nuclease with a low detection limit of 5 × 10(-6) U/mL. Additionally, this method is cost-effective by using affordable WS₂ as an energy acceptor without the need for dye-labeled ssDNA. Furthermore, the method provides a new platform for the nuclease assay and reactive oxygen species, and provides promising applications for drug screening. PMID:27304956

  8. Resistance-Mutation (N31) Effects on Drug Orientation and Channel Hydration in Amantadine-Bound Influenza A M2.

    PubMed

    Gleed, Mitchell L; Ioannidis, Harris; Kolocouris, Antonios; Busath, David D

    2015-09-01

    The mechanism of amantadine binding to the S31 variant of the M2 protein of Influenza A is well understood, but the reasons behind N31 M2 amantadine insensitivity remain under investigation. Many molecular dynamics studies have evaluated the influence of amantadine position within the channel pore on its ability to inhibit proton conductance in M2, but little is known about the influence of amantadine rotational orientation. Replica-exchange umbrella sampling, steered, and classic molecular dynamics simulations were performed on amantadine in the solid-state NMR structure of S31 M2 and an N31 M2 homologue, both in the homotetramer configuration, to explore the effects of the position and tilt angle of amantadine on inhibition of the M2 channel. Steered simulations show that amantadine rotates with the amine toward the bulk water as it passes into the hydrophobic entryway lined by Val27 side chains. Results from all simulation types performed indicate that amantadine has a strong, specific orientation with the amine turned inward toward the central cavity in the S31 M2 pore but has variable orientation and a strong propensity to remain outward pointing in N31 M2. Free energy profiles from umbrella sampling, measured relative to bulk water, show amantadine binds more strongly to the S31 M2 pore by 8 kcal/mol in comparison to amantadine in the N31 pore, suggesting that it can escape more readily from the N31 channel through the Val27 secondary gate, whereas it is captured by the S31 channel in the same region. Lower water density and distribution near amantadine in S31 M2 reveal that the drug inhibits proton conductance in S31 M2 because of its inward-pointing configuration, whereas in N31 M2, amantadine forms hydrogen bonds with an N31 side chain and does not widely occlude water occupancy in any configuration. Both amantadine's weaker binding to and weaker water occlusion in N31 M2 might contribute to its inefficacy as an inhibitor of the mutant protein. PMID

  9. A M2FS Spectroscopic Study of Low-mass Young Stars in Orion OB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleida, Catherine C.; Briceno, Cesar; Calvet, Nuria; Mateo, Mario L.; Hernandez, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Surveys of pre-main sequence stars in the ~4-10 Myr range provide a window into the decline of the accretion phase of stars and the formation of planets. Nearby star clusters and stellar associations allow for the study of these young stellar populations all the way down to the lowest mass members. One of the best examples of nearby 4-10 Myr old stellar populations is the Orion OB1 association. The CIDA Variability Survey of Orion OB1 (CVSO - Briceño et al. 2001) has used the variability properties of low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars to identify hundreds of K and M-type stellar members of the Orion OB1 association, a number of them displaying IR-excess emission and thought to be representative of more evolved disk-bearing young stars. Characterizing these young, low-mass objects using spectroscopy is integral to understanding the accretion phase in young stars. We present preliminary results of a spectroscopic survey of candidate and confirmed Orion OB1 low-mass members taken during November 2014 and February 2014 using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber Spectrograph (M2FS), a PI instrument on the Magellan Clay Telescope (PI: M. Matteo). Target fields located in the off-cloud regions of Orion were identified in the CVSO, and observed using the low and high-resolution modes of M2FS. Both low and high-resolution spectra are needed in order to confirm membership and derive masses, ages, kinematics and accretion properties. Initial analysis of these spectra reveal many new K and M-type members of the Orion OB1 association in these low extinction, off-cloud areas. These are the more evolved siblings of the youngest stars still embedded in the molecular clouds, like those in the Orion Nebula Cluster. With membership and spectroscopic indicators of accretion we are building the most comprehensive stellar census of this association, enabling us to derive a robust estimate of the fraction of young stars still accreting at a various ages, a key constraint for the end of

  10. S1P lyase in skeletal muscle regeneration and satellite cell activation: Exposing the hidden lyase☆

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Julie D.; de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid whose actions are essential for many physiological processes including angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking and development. In addition, S1P serves asamuscle trophic factor that enables efficient muscle regeneration. This is due in part to S1P's ability to activate quiescent muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) that are needed for muscle repair. However, the molecular mechanism by which S1P activates SCs has not been well understood. Further, strategies for harnessing S1P signaling to recruit SCs for therapeutic benefit have been lacking. S1P is irreversibly catabolized by S1P lyase (SPL), a highly conserved enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of S1P at carbon bond C2–3, resulting in formation of hexadecenal and ethanolamine-phosphate. SPL enhances apoptosis through substrate- and product-dependent events, thereby regulating cellular responses to chemotherapy, radiation and ischemia. SPL is undetectable in resting murine skeletal muscle. However, we recently found that SPL is dynamically upregulated in skeletal muscle after injury. SPL upregulation occurred in the context of a tightly orchestrated genetic program that resulted in a transient S1P signal in response to muscle injury. S1P activated quiescent SCs via a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-dependent pathway, thereby facilitating skeletal muscle regeneration. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), exhibited skeletal muscle SPL upregulation and S1P deficiency. Pharmacological SPL inhibition raised skeletal muscle S1P levels, enhanced SC recruitment and improved mdx skeletal muscle regeneration. These findings reveal how S1P can activate SCs and indicate that SPL suppression may provide a therapeutic strategy for myopathies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in Lysophospholipid Research. PMID:22750505

  11. Multi-mission Observation Operator (M2O2) service for mission-independent data assimilation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, R. J.; Lee, M.; Lynnes, C.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-mission observation operator (M2O2) system facilitates simultaneous assimilation of the retrieved atmospheric components from multiple missions by streamlining the interface between model systems and observation data services. The M2O2 system is composed of two types of transformation services, a data transformation service that composes assimilation information from the level 2 mission data products, and a model transformation service that provides multi-mission observation force function integrating the assimilation information from the data transformation service. The prototype M2O2 system was employed for simultaneous assimilation of Ozone observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Tropospheric emission sounder (TES) with the GEOSChem-adjoint model system. Under NASA's Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) program, we are developing an operational M2O2 service as an integral part of the Goddard Earth System Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) utilizing the "on-demand" quality filtering and file format conversion capabilities. In this paper, we discuss the M2O2 web-service-protocol that allows customization of mission-unique quality control, data field extraction, and data product integration, and the M2O2 assimilation software layer that interacts with the M2O2 web-service and delivers mission-independent assimilation information to the model community.

  12. An efficient blocking M2L translation for low-frequency fast multipole method in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Toru; Shimba, Yuta; Isakari, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshiro

    2016-05-01

    We propose an efficient scheme to perform the multipole-to-local (M2L) translation in the three-dimensional low-frequency fast multipole method (LFFMM). Our strategy is to combine a group of matrix-vector products associated with M2L translation into a matrix-matrix product in order to diminish the memory traffic. For this purpose, we first developed a grouping method (termed as internal blocking) based on the congruent transformations (rotational and reflectional symmetries) of M2L-translators for each target box in the FMM hierarchy (adaptive octree). Next, we considered another method of grouping (termed as external blocking) that was able to handle M2L translations for multiple target boxes collectively by using the translational invariance of the M2L translation. By combining these internal and external blockings, the M2L translation can be performed efficiently whilst preservingthe numerical accuracy exactly. We assessed the proposed blocking scheme numerically and applied it to the boundary integral equation method to solve electromagnetic scattering problems for perfectly electrical conductor. From the numerical results, it was found that the proposed M2L scheme achieved a few times speedup compared to the non-blocking scheme.

  13. Small interfering RNA targeting m2 gene induces effective and long term inhibition of influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Sui, Hong-Yan; Zhao, Guang-Yu; Huang, Jian-Dong; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful new means to inhibit viral infection specifically. However, the selection of siRNA-resistant viruses is a major concern in the use of RNAi as antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we conducted a lentiviral vector with a H1-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression cassette to deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into mammalian cells. Using this vector that also expresses enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) as surrogate marker, stable shRNA-expressing cell lines were successfully established and the inhibition efficiencies of rationally designed siRNAs targeting to conserved regions of influenza A virus genome were assessed. The results showed that a siRNA targeting influenza M2 gene (siM2) potently inhibited viral replication. The siM2 was not only effective for H1N1 virus but also for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1. In addition to its M2 inhibition, the siM2 also inhibited NP mRNA accumulation and protein expression. A long term inhibition effect of the siM2 was demonstrated and the emergence of siRNA-resistant mutants in influenza quasispecies was not observed. Taken together, our study suggested that M2 gene might be an optimal RNAi target for antiviral therapy. These findings provide useful information for the development of RNAi-based prophylaxis and therapy for human influenza virus infection. PMID:19479060

  14. NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC): M2 Tower; Boulder, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jager, D.; Andreas, A.

    1996-09-24

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado, is a world-class research facility managed by NREL for the U.S. Department of Energy. NWTC researchers work with members of the wind energy industry to advance wind power technologies that lower the cost of wind energy through research and development of state-of-the-art wind turbine designs. NREL's Measurement and Instrument Data Center provides data from NWTC's M2 tower which are derived from instruments mounted on or near an 82 meter (270 foot) meteorological tower located at the western edge of the NWTC site and about 11 km (7 miles) west of Broomfield, and approximately 8 km (5 miles) south of Boulder, Colorado. The data represent the mean value of readings taken every two seconds and averaged over one minute. The wind speed and direction are measured at six heights on the tower and air temperature is measured at three heights. The dew point temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, totalized liquid precipitation, and global solar radiation are also available.

  15. First passage times in M2[X ]|G |1 |R queue with hysteretic overload control policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechinkin, Alexander V.; Razumchik, Rostislav R.; Zaryadov, Ivan S.

    2016-06-01

    One of the reported approaches towards the solution of overload problem in networks of SIP servers is the implementation of multi-level hysteretic control of arrivals in SIP servers. Each level, being the parameter of the policy, specifies operation mode of SIP server i.e. it implicitly indicates what SIP server must do with the arriving packets. The choice of parameters' values is not guided by standards and is usually left for the network owner. In general, all operation modes of the considered policy can be grouped into two groups: normal mode (when all arriving packets are accepted) and congested mode (when part or all arriving packets are being dropped). Such grouping may serve as the criteria for choosing parameters' values of the policy: pick those values which minimize SIP server sojourn time in congested mode. In this short note we propose some analytical results which facilitate the solution of stated minimization problem. The considered mathematical model of SIP server is the queueing system M2[X ]|G |1 |R with batch arrivals and bi-level hysteretic control policy, which specifies three operation modes: normal (customers both flows are accepted), overload (only customers from one flow are accepted), discard (customers from both flows are blocked/lost)). The switching between modes can occur only on service completions. Analytical method allowing computation of stationary sojourn times in different operation modes (as well as first passage times between modes) is presented in brief. Numerical example is given.

  16. Bipolar/rod-shaped microglia are proliferating microglia with distinct M1/M2 phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tam, Wing Yip; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are generally considered the resident immune cells in the central nervous system (CNS) that regulate the primary events of neuroinflammatory responses. Microglia also play key roles in repair and neurodegeneration of the CNS after injury. Recent studies showed that trains of bipolar/rod-shaped microglia align end-to-end along the CNS injury site during the initial recovery phase. However, the cellular characteristics of bipolar/rod-shaped microglia remain largely unknown. Here, we established a highly reproducible in vitro culture model system to enrich and characterize bipolar/rod-shaped microglia by simply generating multiple scratches on a poly-d-lysine/laminin-coated culture dish. Trains of bipolar/rod-shaped microglia formed and aligned along the scratches in a manner that morphologically resembled microglial trains observed in injured brain. These bipolar/rod-shaped microglia were highly proliferative and expressed various M1/M2 markers. Further analysis revealed that these bipolar/rod-shaped microglia quickly transformed into amoeboid microglia within 30 minutes of lipopolysaccharide treatment, leading to the upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and the activation of Jak/Stat. In summary, our culture system provides a model to further characterize this highly dynamic cell type. We suggest that bipolar/rod-shaped microglia are crucial for repairing the damaged CNS and that the molecular mechanisms underlying their morphological changes may serve as therapeutic biomarkers. PMID:25452009

  17. Allosteric interactions of three muscarine antagonists at bovine tracheal smooth muscle and cardiac M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of [3H]dexetimide dissociation from muscarine receptors in bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes were studied in the absence and presence of three muscarine antagonists. It was found that [3H]dexetimide dissociation from cardiac muscarine receptors was monophasic and very fast (half life less than 1 min) and was slowed by the cardioselective muscarine antagonists, gallamine, methoctramine and AF-DX 116, concentration dependently. [3H]Dexetimide dissociation from tracheal muscarine receptors was biphasic, with a fast phase (half-life less than 1 min) followed after 4-5 min by a slow phase (half-life = 38.5 min). The fast component, but not the slow component, was slowed by the muscarine antagonists with concentration dependencies very similar to those found in the heart. We conclude from these data that the major population of tracheal smooth muscle muscarine receptors resembles the cardiac M2 type not only with respect to equilibrium binding affinities but also with respect to the secondary, allosteric binding site on the muscarine receptor. The results also imply that the cardiac receptor subtype is much more sensitive to allosteric modulation than the glandular/smooth muscle receptor subtype. PMID:2714370

  18. Distributed net-centric architecture of m2m acquisition units with optical GVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Dipnarayan; Choi, Jun; Hassan, Mashfique

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the architecture of a low-latency symmetric multiprocessing optical soft memory system to cluster computing inside the core of an adaptive optical signal processor with the aid of soft decision algebraic polynomial algorithms. The optical system hardware is shown to evolve along with the iterator instantiations of the soft algorithm that forms the core of the memory map. The system enables efficient cache coherence protocols used in unit multiprocessors to be run across a homogeneous cluster in optical soft memory systems. We define a structure called the Optical Generalized Viterbi Algorithm Data Structure (Optical GVA DS) that makes up the system map for adaptive optical signal processing. The system executes transforms where algorithms for handling the entire data vector is processed, shortening the computational complexity effectively. Thus the optical soft memory system as described by the evolving Optical GVA DS iterator instantiates enables the design of parallel processors to handle modulated data in the optical domain. This is of importance in the realization of distributed netcentric architectures and forms the basis of large-scale real-time data processing and acquisition in m2m units.

  19. Two-dimensional topological insulators in group-11 chalcogenide compounds: M2Te (M =Cu ,Ag )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yandong; Kou, Liangzhi; Dai, Ying; Heine, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) are recently recognized states of quantum matter that are highly interesting for lower-power-consuming electronic devices owing to their nondissipative transport properties protected from backscattering. So far, only few 2D TIs, suffering from small bulk band gap (<10 meV ), have been experimentally confirmed. Here, through first-principles calculations, we propose a family of 2D TIs in group-11 chalcogenide 2D crystals, M2Te (M =Cu ,Ag ) . The nontrivial topological states in C u2Te and A g2Te 2D crystals, identified by topological invariant and edge state calculations, exhibit sizeable bulk gaps of 78 and 150 meV, respectively, suggesting that they are candidates for room-temperature applications. Moreover, strain engineering leads to effective control of the nontrivial gaps of C u2Te and A g2Te , and a topological phase transition can be realized in C u2Te , while the nontrivial phase in A g2Te is stable against strain. Their dynamic and thermal stabilities are further confirmed by employing phonon calculations and ab initio molecular dynamic simulations.

  20. Pyruvate Kinase M2: A Novel Biomarker for the Early Detection of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Son, Ji Yeon; Kang, Ye Rim; An, Ji Hye; Kwon, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho Sub; Moon, Aree; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers for the early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) is clinically important. Acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients is closely associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional biomarkers, such as serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), are frequently used to diagnose AKI. However, these biomarkers increase only after significant structural damage has occurred. Recent efforts have focused on identification and validation of new noninvasive biomarkers for the early detection of AKI, prior to extensive structural damage. Furthermore, AKI biomarkers can provide valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms of this complex and heterogeneous disease. Our previous study suggested that pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), which is excreted in the urine, is a sensitive biomarker for nephrotoxicity. To appropriately and optimally utilize PKM2 as a biomarker for AKI requires its complete characterization. This review highlights the major studies that have addressed the diagnostic and prognostic predictive power of biomarkers for AKI and assesses the potential usage of PKM2 as an early biomarker for AKI. We summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the role of biomarkers and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of AKI. This review will elucidate the biological basis of specific biomarkers that will contribute to improving the early detection and diagnosis of AKI. PMID:26977258

  1. Pyruvate Kinase M2: A Novel Biomarker for the Early Detection of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Son, Ji Yeon; Kang, Ye Rim; An, Ji Hye; Kwon, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho Sub; Moon, Aree; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers for the early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) is clinically important. Acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients is closely associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional biomarkers, such as serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), are frequently used to diagnose AKI. However, these biomarkers increase only after significant structural damage has occurred. Recent efforts have focused on identification and validation of new noninvasive biomarkers for the early detection of AKI, prior to extensive structural damage. Furthermore, AKI biomarkers can provide valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms of this complex and heterogeneous disease. Our previous study suggested that pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), which is excreted in the urine, is a sensitive biomarker for nephrotoxicity. To appropriately and optimally utilize PKM2 as a biomarker for AKI requires its complete characterization. This review highlights the major studies that have addressed the diagnostic and prognostic predictive power of biomarkers for AKI and assesses the potential usage of PKM2 as an early biomarker for AKI. We summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the role of biomarkers and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of AKI. This review will elucidate the biological basis of specific biomarkers that will contribute to improving the early detection and diagnosis of AKI. PMID:26977258

  2. Activation and proton transport mechanism in influenza A M2 channel.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories 2 μs in length have been generated for the pH-activated, tetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus in all protonation states of the pH sensor located at the His(37) tetrad. All simulated structures are in very good agreement with high-resolution structures. Changes in the channel caused by progressive protonation of His(37) provide insight into the mechanism of proton transport. The channel is closed at both His(37) and Trp(41) sites in the singly and doubly protonated states, but it opens at Trp(41) upon further protonation. Anions access the charged His(37) and by doing so stabilize the protonated states of the channel. The narrow opening at the His(37) site, further blocked by anions, is inconsistent with the water-wire mechanism of proton transport. Instead, conformational interconversions of His(37) correlated with hydrogen bonding to water molecules indicate that these residues shuttle protons in high-protonation states. Hydrogen bonds between charged and uncharged histidines are rare. The valve at Val(27) remains on average quite narrow in all protonation states but fluctuates sufficiently to support water and proton transport. A proton transport mechanism in which the channel, depending on pH, opens at either the histidine or valine gate is only partially supported by the simulations. PMID:24209848

  3. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-08-26

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. The interaction of PKM2 with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases the availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small-molecule PKM2 activators inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small-molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site that is distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. This data supports the notion that small-molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism.

  4. Experiment "Regeneration" Performed Aboard the Russian Spacecraft Foton-M2 in 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigoryan, Elonora; Almeida, Eduardo; Domaratskaya, Elena; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Aleinikova, Karina; Tairbekov, Murad; Mitashov, Victor

    2006-01-01

    The experiments on the newts performed earlier aboard Russian biosate llites showed that the rate of lens and tail regeneration in space wa s greater than on the ground. In parallel it was found that the numbe r of cells in S-phase was greater in space-flown animals than in the ground controls. However, it was unclear whether cell proliferation stimulation was induced by micro-g per se. Molecular mechanisms under lying the change also remained obscure. These issues were addressed b y the joint Russian-American experiment "Regeneration" flown on Foton -M2 in 2005. The method for in-flight delivering DNA precursor BrdU was developed. The experiment showed that during the flight the numbe r of S-phase cells in the regenerating eyes and tails increased. Thes e data together with those obtained earlier suggest that cell prolife ration increases in response to the effects of both micro-g and 1-g a fter return to Earth. The expression of bFGF in regenerating tissues of "flown" newts and ground controls was examined using immuno-histo chemistry. Obtained results suggest that this growth factor is a part icipant of the promotional effect of space flight upon cell prolifera tion in lens and tail regenerates.

  5. Efficient Plasma Production in Low Background Neutral Pressures with the M2P2 Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Winglee, R.; Slough, J.; Giersch, L.

    2003-01-01

    Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) seeks the creation of a large-scale (10 km radius) magnetic wall or bubble (i.e. a magnetosphere) by the electromagnetic inflation of a small-scale (20 cm radius) dipole magnet. The inflated magnetosphere will intercept the solar wind and thereby provide high-speed propulsion with modest power and fuel requirements due to the gain provided by the ambient medium. Magnetic field inflation is produced by the injection of plasma onto the dipole magnetic field eliminating the need for large mechanical structures and added material weight at launch. For successful inflation of the magnetic bubble a beta near unity must be achieved along the imposed dipole field. This is dependent on the plasma parameters that can be achieved with a plasma source that provide continuous operation at the desired power levels of 1 to 2 kilowatts. Over the last two years we have been developing a laboratory prototype to demonstrate the inflation of the magnetic field under space-like conditions. In this paper we will present some of the latest results from the prototype development at the University of Washington and show that the prototype can produce high ionization efficiencies while operating in near space like neutral background pressures producing electron temperatures of a few tens of electron volts. This allows for operation with propellant expenditures lower than originally estimated.

  6. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. PKM2 interaction with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small molecule PKM2 activators inhibit growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. These data support the notion that small molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism. PMID:22922757

  7. M2L4 coordination capsules with tunable anticancer activity upon guest encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmedova, Anife; Mihaylova, Rositsa; Momekova, Denitsa; Shestakova, Pavletta; Stoykova, Silviya; Zaharieva, Joana; Yamashina, Masahiro; Momekov, Georgi; Akita, Munetaka; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2016-08-16

    Metallosupramolecular cages and capsules have gained increasing popularity as both molecular containers and anticancer agents. For successful combination of these properties a thorough analysis of the effect of guest encapsulation on the host's cytotoxic properties is highly required. Here we report on the cytotoxicity modulation of Pt(ii) and Pd(ii)-linked M2L4 coordination capsules upon encapsulation of guest molecules such as pyrene and caffeine. The anticancer activity of the capsules against various human cancer cells (HT-29, T-24, HL-60 and its resistant counterparts HL-60/Dox and HL-60/CDDP) significantly altered upon the guest encapsulation. The encapsulation of pyrene molecules causes a decrease in the cytotoxicity of the Pt(ii) capsule, which is stronger than that of the Pd(ii) capsule. The cytotoxicities of the caffeine containing capsules are lower than that of the empty capsules (except for HL-60), but still superior to cisplatin under the same conditions. The observed trends in the anticancer activity of the capsules and their host-guest complexes correlate with their different stabilities toward glutathione, estimated by NMR-based kinetic experiments. Mechanistic insights into the observed cytotoxicities are obtained by fluorescence microscopy imaging of tumor cells treated with the capsules and their pyrene complexes. The data suggest the glutathione-triggered disassembly of the capsular structures as a potential activation pathway for their cytotoxicities. PMID:27488015

  8. Analysis of Cell Proliferation in Newt (Pleurodeles waltl) Tissue Regeneration during Spaceflight in Foton M-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almeida, E. A. C.; Roden, C.; Phillips, J. A.; Yusuf, R.; Globus, R. K.; Searby, N.; Vercoutere, W.; Morey-Holton, E.; Tairbekov, M.; Grigoryan, N.; Domaratskaya, E.; Poplinskaya, V.; Mitashov, V.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial organisms exposed to microgravity during spaceflight expe rience musculoskeletal degeneration. It is still not understood if lo nger-term exposures to microgravity induce degeneration in other tiss ues, and if these effects are also observed in neutrally buoyant aqu atic organisms that may be pre-adapted to mechanical unloading. The " Regeneration" experiment conducted collaboratively between Russian an d US scientists for 16 days in the Russian Foton M-2 spaceflight soug ht to test the hypothesis that microgravity alters the proliferation of cells in regenerating tail tissue of the newt Pleurodeles waltl. Our initial results indicate that we successfUlly delivered the proli feration marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxy Uridine (BrdU) during spaceflight, and that it was incorporated in the nuclei of cells in regenerating tis sues. Cells in spaceflight tail regenerates proliferated at a slight ly slower rate and were more undifferentiated than those in ground sy nchronous controls. In addition, the size of regenerating tails from spaceflight was smaller than synchronous controls. However, onboard temperature recordings show that the temperature in spaceflight was a bout 2 C lower than ground synchronous controls, possibly explaining the observed differences. Additional post-facto ground controls at ma tched temperatures will correctly determine the effects of spaceflig ht on regenerative cell proliferation in the newt.

  9. In vitro effects of some flavonoids and phenolic acids on human pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Erdem; Guler, Caglar; Adem, Sevki

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 (PKM2) is one of the most important control point enzyme in glycolysis pathway. Hence, its inhibitors and activators are currently considered as the potential anticancer agents. The effect of 28 polyphenolic compounds on the enzyme activity was investigated in vitro. Among these compounds, neoeriocitrin, (-)-catechin gallate, fisetin, (±)-taxifolin and (-)-epicatechin have the highest inhibition effect with IC50 value within 0.65-1.33 µM range. Myricetin and quercetin 3-β-D-glucoside exhibited the highest activation effect with 0.51 and 1.34 µM AC50 values, respectively. Twelve of the compounds showed inhibition effect within 7-38 µM range of IC50 value. Sinapinic acid and p-coumaric acid showed an activation effect with 26.2 and 22.2 µM AC50 values, respectively. The results propose that the polyphenolics may be the potential PKM2 inhibitors/activators, and they may be used as lead compounds for the synthesis of new inhibitors or activators of this enzyme. PMID:25798688

  10. Inhibitory and Activating Effects of Some Flavonoid Derivatives on Human Pyruvate Kinase Isoenzyme M2.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Krohn, Karsten; Guler, Caglar; Comaklı, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Kuzu, Muslum

    2016-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 (PKM2) is expressed excessively in many different cancer types and it plays an important role in the control of glucose metabolism. Thus, it is evaluated as an important target in the development of medication for cancer. The flavonoids comprise a large group of natural products with variable phenolic structures and occur mainly in plants. They are of great interest due to their biological properties. In this study, the effects of various flavonoid derivatives on the PKM2 enzyme activity were analyzed in vitro. The flavonoid derivatives 1 and 2 showed inhibition effect with IC50 values of <60 μM. IC50 values of compounds 3-8 were calculated as 134, 415, 145, 163, 295 μM, and 3.5 mM, respectively. The molecules 9-12 showed an activation effect with values of AC50 of less than 90 μM. The IC50 values of the derivatives 13-17 were calculated as 115, 150, 200, 221, and 275 μM, respectively. The results show that catechin derivatives can be probably used as lead compounds for the design of PKM2 enzyme activators and inhibitors. PMID:26708302

  11. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Regulates Gene Transcription by Acting as A Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueliang; Wang, Haizhen; Jenny, J. Yang; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a glycolysis enzyme catalyzing conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate with transferring a phosphate from PEP to ADP. We report here that PKM2 localizes to the cell nucleus. The levels of nuclear PKM2 correlate with cell proliferation. PKM2 activates transcription of MEK5 by phosphorylating stat3 at Y705. In vitro phosphorylation assays show that PKM2 is a protein kinase using PEP as phosphate donor. ADP competes with the protein substrate binding, indicating that the substrate may bind to the ADP site of PKM2. Our experiments suggest that PKM2 dimer is an active protein kinase, while the tetramer is an active pyruvate kinase. Expression a PKM2 mutant that exists as a dimer promotes cell proliferation, indicating that protein kinase activity of PKM2 plays a role in promoting cell proliferation. Our study reveals an important link between metabolism alteration and gene expression during tumor transformation and progression. PMID:22306293

  12. SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 regulates pyruvate kinase M2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Yao-Li; Chen, Li-Ju; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Min-Husan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Boo, Yin-Pin; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is known to promote tumourigenesis through dimer formation of p-PKM2Y105. Here, we investigated whether SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) decreases p-PKM2Y105 expression and, thus, determines the sensitivity of sorafenib through inhibiting the nuclear-related function of PKM2. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot confirmed the effect of SHP-1 on PKM2Y105 dephosphorylation. Lactate production was assayed in cells and tumor samples to determine whether sorafenib reversed the Warburg effect. Clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor samples were assessed for PKM2 expression. SHP-1 directly dephosphorylated PKM2 at Y105 and further decreased the proliferative activity of PKM2; similar effects were found in sorafenib-treated HCC cells. PKM2 was also found to determine the sensitivity of targeted drugs, such as sorafenib, brivanib, and sunitinib, by SHP-1 activation. Significant sphere-forming activity was found in HCC cells stably expressing PKM2. Clinical findings suggest that PKM2 acts as a predicting factor of early recurrence in patients with HCC, particularly those without known risk factors (63.6%). SHP-1 dephosphorylates PKM2 at Y105 to inhibit nuclear function of PKM2 and determines the efficacy of targeted drugs. Targeting PKM2 by SHP-1 might provide new therapeutic insights for patients with HCC. PMID:26959741

  13. Rates of E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions in Ni II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Hibbert, A.; Ramsbottom, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present rates for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions among the 295 fine-structure levels of the configurations 3d9, 3d84s, 3d74s2, 3d84p, and 3d74s4p, determined through an extensive configuration interaction calculation. Methods: The CIV3 code developed by Hibbert and coworkers is used to determine for these levels configuration interaction wave functions with relativistic effects introduced through the Breit-Pauli approximation. Results: Two different sets of calculations have been undertaken with different 3d and 4d functions to ascertain the effect of such variation. The main body of the text includes a representative selection of data, chosen so that key points can be discussed. Some analysis to assess the accuracy of the present data has been undertaken, including comparison with earlier calculations and the more limited range of experimental determinations. The full set of transition data is given in the supplementary material as it is very extensive. Conclusions: We believe that the present transition data are the best currently available. Full Table 4 and Tables 5-8 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A107

  14. The transglutaminase type 2 and pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 interplay in autophagy regulation.

    PubMed

    Altuntas, Sara; Rossin, Federica; Marsella, Claudia; D'Eletto, Manuela; Diaz-Hidalgo, Laura; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Campanella, Michelangelo; Antonioli, Manuela; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2015-12-29

    Autophagy is a self-degradative physiological process by which the cell removes worn-out or damaged components. Constant at basal level it may become highly active in response to cellular stress. The type 2 transglutaminase (TG2), which accumulates under stressful cell conditions, plays an important role in the regulation of autophagy and cells lacking this enzyme display impaired autophagy/mitophagy and a consequent shift their metabolism to glycolysis. To further define the molecular partners of TG2 involved in these cellular processes, we analysed the TG2 interactome under normal and starved conditions discovering that TG2 interacts with various proteins belonging to different functional categories. Herein we show that TG2 interacts with pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), a rate limiting enzyme of glycolysis which is responsible for maintaining a glycolytic phenotype in malignant cells and displays non metabolic functions, including transcriptional co-activation and protein kinase activity. Interestingly, the ablation of PKM2 led to the decrease of intracellular TG2's transamidating activity paralleled by an increase of its tyrosine phosphorylation. Along with this, a significant decrease of ULK1 and Beclin1 was also recorded, thus suggesting a block in the upstream regulation of autophagosome formation. These data suggest that the PKM2/TG2 interplay plays an important role in the regulation of autophagy in particular under cellular stressful conditions such as those displayed by cancer cells. PMID:26702927

  15. The transglutaminase type 2 and pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 interplay in autophagy regulation

    PubMed Central

    Altuntas, Sara; Rossin, Federica; Marsella, Claudia; D'Eletto, Manuela; Hidalgo, Laura Diaz; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Campanella, Michelangelo; Antonioli, Manuela; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a self-degradative physiological process by which the cell removes worn-out or damaged components. Constant at basal level it may become highly active in response to cellular stress. The type 2 transglutaminase (TG2), which accumulates under stressful cell conditions, plays an important role in the regulation of autophagy and cells lacking this enzyme display impaired autophagy/mitophagy and a consequent shift their metabolism to glycolysis. To further define the molecular partners of TG2 involved in these cellular processes, we analysed the TG2 interactome under normal and starved conditions discovering that TG2 interacts with various proteins belonging to different functional categories. Herein we show that TG2 interacts with pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), a rate limiting enzyme of glycolysis which is responsible for maintaining a glycolytic phenotype in malignant cells and displays non metabolic functions, including transcriptional co-activation and protein kinase activity. Interestingly, the ablation of PKM2 led to the decrease of intracellular TG2's transamidating activity paralleled by an increase of its tyrosine phosphorylation. Along with this, a significant decrease of ULK1 and Beclin1 was also recorded, thus suggesting a block in the upstream regulation of autophagosome formation. These data suggest that the PKM2/TG2 interplay plays an important role in the regulation of autophagy in particular under cellular stressful conditions such as those displayed by cancer cells. PMID:26702927

  16. Nitroxyl (HNO) reduces endothelial and monocyte activation and promotes M2 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Karen L; Sampson, Amanda K; Irvine, Jennifer C; Shihata, Waled A; Michell, Danielle L; Lumsden, Natalie G; Lim, Chloe; Huet, Olivier; Drummond, Grant R; Kemp-Harper, Barbara K; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2016-09-01

    Nitroxyl anion (HNO) donors are currently being assessed for their therapeutic utility in several cardiovascular disorders including heart fail