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Sample records for 10-day storage period

  1. 28 CFR 5.801 - Activity beyond 10-day period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activity beyond 10-day period. 5.801... AGENTS REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.801 Activity beyond 10-day period. A registrant who has within the 10-day period filed an amendment to his registration statement pursuant to a Notice...

  2. 28 CFR 5.801 - Activity beyond 10-day period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activity beyond 10-day period. 5.801... AGENTS REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.801 Activity beyond 10-day period. A registrant who has within the 10-day period filed an amendment to his registration statement pursuant to a Notice...

  3. 28 CFR 5.801 - Activity beyond 10-day period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Activity beyond 10-day period. 5.801... AGENTS REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.801 Activity beyond 10-day period. A registrant who has within the 10-day period filed an amendment to his registration statement pursuant to a Notice...

  4. 28 CFR 5.801 - Activity beyond 10-day period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Activity beyond 10-day period. 5.801... AGENTS REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.801 Activity beyond 10-day period. A registrant who has within the 10-day period filed an amendment to his registration statement pursuant to a Notice...

  5. 28 CFR 5.801 - Activity beyond 10-day period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activity beyond 10-day period. 5.801... AGENTS REGISTRATION ACT OF 1938, AS AMENDED § 5.801 Activity beyond 10-day period. A registrant who has within the 10-day period filed an amendment to his registration statement pursuant to a Notice...

  6. WASP-117b: a 10-day-period Saturn in an eccentric and misaligned orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Doyle, A. P.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R. G.

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery of WASP-117b, the first planet with a period beyond 10 days found by the WASP survey. The planet has a mass of Mp = 0.2755 ± 0.0089 MJ, a radius of Rp= 1.021_{-0.065+0.076 Rjup} and is in an eccentric (e = 0.302 ± 0.023), 10.02165 ± 0.00055 d orbit around a main-sequence F9 star. The host star's brightness (V = 10.15 mag) makes WASP-117 a good target for follow-up observations, and with a periastron planetary equilibrium temperature of Teq= 1225_{-39+36} K and a low planetary mean density (ρp= 0.259_{-0.048+0.054 ρjup}) it is one of the best targets for transmission spectroscopy among planets with periods around 10 days. From a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we infer a projected angle between the planetary orbit and stellar spin axes of β = -44 ± 11 deg, and we further derive an orbital obliquity of ψ = 69.6 +4.7-4.1 deg. Owing to the large orbital separation, tidal forces causing orbital circularization and realignment of the planetary orbit with the stellar plane are weak, having had little impact on the planetary orbit over the system lifetime. WASP-117b joins a small sample of transiting giant planets with well characterized orbits at periods above 8 days. Based on data obtained with WASP-South, CORALIE and EulerCam at the Euler-Swiss telescope, TRAPPIST, and HARPS at the ESO 3.6 m telescope (Prog. IDs 087.C-0649, 089.C-0151, 090.C-0540)Photometric and radial velocities are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A81

  7. The power spectrum of the solar wind speed for periods greater than 10 days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenimore, E. E.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of the more than 11 years of solar wind speed data obtained by Vela 2-6 and Imp 6-8 to study the power spectrum of speed variations in the range near the solar rotational frequency is discussed. The broad bands of power near periods of 27 days (corresponding to the rotational period of the sun), 13.5 days, and higher harmonics are characterized, and it is suggested that the described individual peaks in both the solar wind and the geomagnetic spectra are probably not due to differential rotation. The alternate explanation is that the multipeak nature of the power spectra are explained by a wave packet concept in which recurring highspeed streams are described as a series of pulses (separated by a constant period) that last for a varying number of solar rotations.

  8. Twenty years of interplanetary magnetic field variations with periods in the range of 10 days to 3 years

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, A.; Lepping, R.P.; King, J.H.

    1995-06-01

    Twenty years of interplanetary magnetic field data collected primarily by the IMP-8 spacecraft near Earth has been analyzed by a dynamic periodogram method in search of significant periodicities in the range of 10 days to 3 years. The method has the advantage of detecting variations with time in the periodicities besides determining the power and phase of the dominant variations. It has been found that the well known periodicities near 1 year and 27 days are strongly modulated by the solar cycle. Both of these periodicities are only detected during solar minimum. During solar maximum. a number of unusual variations are observed. Special emphasis will be placed on the recently reported 1.3 year variation in solar wind parameters besides periods in the interplanetary magnetic field near 51, 73 and 154 days. Correlations with solar wind plasma and solar index variations will also be presented.

  9. Twenty years of interplanetary magnetic field variations with periods in the range of 10 days to 3 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Lepping, R. P.; King, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty years of interplanetary magnetic field data collected primarily by the IMP-8 spacecraft near Earth has been analyzed by a dynamic periodogram method in search of significant periodicities in the range of 10 days to 3 years. The method has the advantage of detecting variations with time in the periodicities besides determining the power and phase of the dominant variations. It has been found that the well known periodicities near 1 year and 27 days are strongly modulated by the solar cycle. Both of these periodicities are only detected during solar minimum. During solar maximum. a number of unusual variations are observed. Special emphasis will be placed on the recently reported 1.3 year variation in solar wind parameters besides periods in the interplanetary magnetic field near 51, 73 and 154 days. Correlations with solar wind plasma and solar index variations will also be presented.

  10. ACLCP Periodical Storage Center: Feasibility Study, September 1974-April 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cieslicki, Dorothy

    A study of alternative models for establishing a cooperative storage center for little used library materials by the members of the Area College Libraries of Central Pennsylvania (ACLCP) focused on periodicals. Considerations discussed include advantages--lower cost; space for growth and better access to holdings retained in active collections;…

  11. Comparison of blood ethanol stabilities in different storage periods

    PubMed Central

    Isiklar, Ozben Ozden; Kocak, Havva; Meral, Ayfer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Measurements of blood ethanol concentrations must be accurate and reliable. The most important factors affecting blood ethanol stability are temperature and storage time. In this study, we aimed to compare ethanol stability in plasma samples at -20 °C for the different storage periods. Materials and methods Blood samples were collected from intoxicated drivers (N = 80) and initial plasma ethanol concentrations were measured immediately. Plasma samples were then stored at -20 °C and re-assessed after 2, 3, 4, or 5 months of storage. Differences between the initial and stored ethanol concentrations in each group (N = 20) were analyzed using Wilcoxon matched-pairs test. The deviation from the initial concentration was calculated and compared with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA’88) Proficiency Testing Limits. Relationships between the initial concentrations and deviations from initial concentrations were analyzed by Spearman’s correlation analysis. For all statistical tests, differences with P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Statistically significant differences were observed between the initial and poststorage ethanol concentrations in the overall sample group (P < 0.001). However, for the individual storage duration groups, analytically significant decreases were observed only for samples stored for 5 months, deviations from the initial concentrations exceeded the allowable total error (TEa). Ethanol decreases in the other groups did not exceed the TEa. Conclusion According to our results, plasma ethanol samples can be kept at -20 °C for up to 3-4 months until re-analysis. However, each laboratory should also establish its own work-flow rules and criterion for reliable ethanol measurement in forensic cases. PMID:25672467

  12. The influence of storage period on the antioxidants level of red blood cells and the plasma before transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ogunro, P S; Ogungbamigbe, T O; Muhibi, M A

    2010-06-01

    Stored blood is used for transfusion in humans but peroxidative processes occur in stored blood before transfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the length of storage on plasma antioxidant levels and RBCs antioxidant enzyme activity. Blood collected from 15 donors and preserved with anticoagulant (citerate phosphate, dextrose adenine (CPDA-1) were examined. The concentration of total antioxidant status (TAS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and potassium (K+) in the plasma as well as glutathione peroxidise (GSH- Px), glutathione superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in erythrocytes were determined on days 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 of storage. Day 1 of the study is the day of donation. A 24.8% increase in plasma concentration of MDA and 15.8% increase in the concentration K+ on day 15 were recorded (p < 0.05). A 27% decrease in the plasma concentration of TAS was observed on day 20 compared with day 1 (p < 0.05). Similarly GSH-Px activity is stored RBC decreased by 17.1%, on day 15 (p < 0.05). SOD activities reduced by 17.1% on day 20, CAT activities reduced by 12.6% on day 15 (in each case p < 0.05). In this study blood stored in CPDA-1 shows that those glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes systems in erythrocytes and antioxidant defence in plasma were depleting gradually depending on the day of storage. We concluded based on our finding that 10 days period can be considered a safe storage limits for transfusion in relation to oxidative stress the RBCs were subjected in the storage medium.

  13. Effects of preincubation heating of broiler hatching eggs during storage, flock age, and length of storage period on hatchability.

    PubMed

    Gucbilmez, M; Ozlü, S; Shiranjang, R; Elibol, O; Brake, J

    2013-12-01

    The effects of heating of eggs during storage, broiler breeder age, and length of egg storage on hatchability of fertile eggs were examined in this study. Eggs were collected from Ross 344 male × Ross 308 broiler breeders on paper flats, held overnight (1 d) at 18°C and 75% RH, and then transferred to plastic trays. In experiment 1, eggs were obtained at 28, 38, and 53 wk of flock age. During a further 10 d of storage, eggs either remained in the storage room (control) or were subjected to a heat treatment regimen of 26°C for 2 h, 37.8°C for 3 h, and 26°C for 2 h in a setter at d 5 of storage. In experiment 2, eggs from a flock at 28 wk of age were heated for 1 d of a 6-d storage period. Eggs from a 29-wk-old flock were either heated at d 1 or 5 of an 11-d storage period in experiment 3. In experiment 4, 27-wk-old flock eggs were heated twice at d 1 and 5 of an 11-d storage period. Control eggs stored for 6 or 11 d were coincubated as appropriate in each experiment. Heating eggs at d 5 of an 11-d storage period increased hatchability in experiment 1. Although no benefit of heating 28-wk-old flock eggs during 6 d of storage in experiment 2 was observed, heating eggs from a 29-wk-old flock at d 1 or 5 of an 11-d storage period increased hatchability in experiment 3. Further, heating eggs from a 27-wk-old flock twice during 11 d of storage increased hatchability in experiment 4. These effects were probably due to the fact that eggs from younger flocks had been reported to have many embryos at a stage of development where the hypoblast had not yet fully developed (less than EG-K12 to EG-K13), such that heating during extended storage advanced these embryos to a more resistant stage.

  14. Influence of maturity and storage period on physical and biochemical characteristics of pear during post cold storage at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Dhillon, W S

    2015-08-01

    The fruits of semi-soft pear (Pyrus communis) cv. Punjab Beauty harvested at three different harvest dates were stored at 0-1(0) C temperature with 90-95 % Relative Humidity for 30, 45, 60 and 75 days to assess the physical and chemical changes during storage. After every storage interval, the fruits were removed and kept at room temperature for 3 and 6 days to study the shelf life of fruits. Immature fruits always had the highest values of flesh firmness; optimum-mature fruits had the next and over-mature fruits the lowest at each corresponding sampling period during storage. The fruits harvested at optimum stage of maturity exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) lower incidence of fruit softening and physiological loss in weight. These fruits retained excellent quality up to 60 days of storage in cool chamber with 3 days shelf life at ambient temperature. The fruits of first harvest date were incapable of developing acceptable flavor and quality upon ripening throughout the storage period. However, the fruits harvested at post-optimum stage recorded maximum physiological loss in weight and lesser firmness thus making them suitable for immediate consumption with no shelf life at ambient temperature storage.

  15. [Microbiological stability through storage period of Sphyraena ensis in Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Dayana; Jiménez-Díaz, Manuel; Arias-Echandi, María Laura

    2011-06-01

    At the present study some of the microbiological and biochemical changes that occur through storage period in Sphyraena ensis, a fish specie of frequent consumption in Costa Rica were studied. Samples of S. ensis obtained during rainy and dry season were evaluated. Analysis included aerobic psychrotrophic count, identification and count of Vibrio, Enterococcus and Pseudomonas through a six day storage period at two different refrigeration temperatures, 2 and 7 degrees C. Same time, a commercial enzymatic immunoassay was used for the evaluation of the variation on the concentration of histamine produced in the different samples. Results obtained show that there is an increase on the bacteriological counts through the storage period, this increase is bigger as refrigeration temperature increases. Most of the samples maintained at 7 degrees C showed counts above 106 CFU/g after three days of storage, those stored at 2 degrees C did not present such high population levels. Nevertheless, after 6 days of storage, all samples, despite the storage temperature used, presented levels above the described one. Also, an histamine concentration increased through storage time, especially when the product was conserved at the higher temperature due to an increase in the number of histidine descarboxilating bacteria. There is no statistical difference between the counts obtained during rainy or dry season; nevertheless, there is a difference assicieated to the bacterial genera isolated.

  16. Germination rate of Phyllospadix japonicus seeds relative to storage methods and periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Im; Lee, Kun-Seop; Son, Min Ho

    2014-03-01

    To determine the optimal storage method and longest possible storage period of Phyllospadix japonicus seeds, we examined post-storage germination rates using different storage methods and periods for P. japonicus seeds harvested in Korean coastal waters. P. japonicus seeds are classified as recalcitrant seeds with an average moisture content of 45.4%. Germination rates of P. japonicus seeds stored in seawater at 4 °C, seawater at room temperature with air supply, and an aquarium with continuous seawater circulation ranged from 35.0% to 43.5%, whereas seeds stored in seawater at 30°C, a refrigerator at -20°C, and a desiccator at room temperature did not germinate. Seeds stored at 4°C maintained germination rates of 72.5˜73.0% until 30 days of storage, but showed rapidly decreasing germination rates after 60 days and no germination after 180 days. Since few studies have investigated seed storage of P. japonicus, these results will serve as useful data for seed-based P. japonicus habitat restoration.

  17. 77 FR 64759 - Rescission of 10-Day Agency Discretionary Period in Assigning Unsatisfactory Safety Ratings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Fitness procedures; Safety Ratings, 56 FR 40801, 40802, 40806 (Aug. 18, 1991) (FHWA final rule). \\3\\ http... procedure for determining the safety fitness of an owner or operator of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV... additional 60 days after the 61st day following the fitness determination ``if the Secretary determines...

  18. Surface composition XPS analysis of a plasma treated polystyrene: Evolution over long storage periods.

    PubMed

    Ba, Ousmane M; Marmey, Pascal; Anselme, Karine; Duncan, Anthony C; Ponche, Arnaud

    2016-09-01

    A polystyrene surface (PS) was initially treated by cold nitrogen and oxygen plasma in order to incorporate in particular amine and hydroxyl functions, respectively. The evolution of the chemical nature of the surface was further monitored over a long time period (580 days) by chemical assay, XPS and contact angle measurements. Surface density quantification of primary amine groups was performed using three chemical amine assays: 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (4-NBZ), Sulfo succinimidyl 6-[3'(2 pyridyldithio)-pionamido] hexanoate (Sulfo-LC-SPDP) and iminothiolane (ITL). The results showed amine densities were in the range of 2 per square nanometer (comparable to the results described in the literature) after 5min of nitrogen plasma treatment. Over the time period investigated, chemical assays, XPS and contact angles suggest a drastic significant evolution of the chemical nature of the surface within the first two weeks. Beyond that time period and up to almost two years, nitrogen plasma modified substrates exhibits a slow and continuous oxidation whereas oxygen plasma modifed polystyrene surface is chemically stable after two weeks of storage. The latter appeared to "ease of" showing relatively mild changes within the one year period. Our results suggest that it may be preferable to wait for a chemical "stabilization" period of two weeks before subsequent covalent immobilization of proteins onto the surface. The originality of this work resides in the study of the plasma treated surface chemistry evolution over long periods of storage time (580 days) considerably exceeding those described in the literature.

  19. Phenotypic Plasticity Promotes Balanced Polymorphism in Periodic Environments by a Genomic Storage Effect.

    PubMed

    Gulisija, Davorka; Kim, Yuseob; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2016-04-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is known to evolve in perturbed habitats, where it alleviates the deleterious effects of selection. But the effects of plasticity on levels of genetic polymorphism, an important precursor to adaptation in temporally varying environments, are unclear. Here we develop a haploid, two-locus population-genetic model to describe the interplay between a plasticity modifier locus and a target locus subject to periodically varying selection. We find that the interplay between these two loci can produce a "genomic storage effect" that promotes balanced polymorphism over a large range of parameters, in the absence of all other conditions known to maintain genetic variation. The genomic storage effect arises as recombination allows alleles at the two loci to escape more harmful genetic backgrounds and associate in haplotypes that persist until environmental conditions change. Using both Monte Carlo simulations and analytical approximations we quantify the strength of the genomic storage effect across a range of selection pressures, recombination rates, plasticity modifier effect sizes, and environmental periods.

  20. Characterization of Genes Encoding Key Enzymes Involved in Anthocyanin Metabolism of Kiwifruit during Storage Period

    PubMed Central

    Li, Boqiang; Xia, Yongxiu; Wang, Yuying; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    ‘Hongyang’ is a red fleshed kiwifruit with high anthocyanin content. In this study, we mainly investigated effects of different temperatures (25 and 0°C) on anthocyanin biosynthesis in harvested kiwifruit, and characterized the genes encoding key enzymes involved in anthocyanin metabolism, as well as evaluated the mode of the action, by which low temperature regulates anthocyanin accumulation in ‘Hongyang’ kiwifruit during storage period. The results showed that low temperature could effectively enhance the anthocyanin accumulation of kiwifruit in the end of storage period (90 days), which related to the increase in mRNA levels of ANS1, ANS2, DRF1, DRF2, and UGFT2. Moreover, the transcript abundance of MYBA1-1 and MYB5-1, the genes encoding an important component of MYB–bHLH–WD40 (MBW) complex, was up-regulated, possibly contributing to the induction of specific anthocyanin biosynthesis genes under the low temperature. To further investigate the roles of AcMYB5-1/5-2/A1-1 in regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis, genes encoding the three transcription factors were transiently transformed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Overexpression of AcMYB5-1/5-2/A1-1 activated the gene expression of NtANS and NtDFR in tobacco. Our results suggested that low temperature storage could stimulate the anthocyanin accumulation in harvested kiwifruit via regulating several structural and regulatory genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:28344589

  1. Effects of season and storage period on accumulation of individual carotenoids in pumpkin flesh (Cucurbita moschata).

    PubMed

    Jaswir, Irwandi; Shahidan, Norshazila; Othman, Rashidi; Has-Yun Hashim, Yumi Zuhanis; Octavianti, Fitri; bin Salleh, Mohammad Noor

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are antioxidants with pharmaceutical potential. The major carotenoids important to humans are α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and β-cryptoxanthin. Some of the biological functions and actions of these individual carotenoids are quite similar to each other, whereas others are specific. Besides genotype and location, other environmental effects such as temperature, light, mineral uptake, and pH have been found affect carotenoid development in plant tissues and organs. Therefore, this research investigated the effects of the season and storage periods during postharvest handling on the accumulation of carotenoid in pumpkin. This study shows that long-term storage of pumpkins resulted in the accumulation of lutein and β-carotene with a slight decrease in zeaxanthin. The amounts of β-carotene ranged from 174.583±2.105 mg/100g to 692.871±22.019 mg/100g, lutein from 19.841±9.693 mg/100g to 59.481±1.645 mg/100g, and zeaxanthin from not detected to 2.709±0.118 mg/100g. The pumpkins were collected three times in a year; they differed in that zeaxanthin was present only in the first season, while the amounts of β-carotene and lutein were the highest in the second and third seasons, respectively. By identifying the key factors among the postharvest handling conditions that control specific carotenoid accumulations, a greater understanding of how to enhance the nutritional values of pumpkin and other crops will be gained. Postharvest storage conditions can markedly enhance and influence the levels of zeaxanthin, lutein, and β-carotene in pumpkin. This study describes how the magnitudes of these effects depend on the storage period and season.

  2. Evaluation of bionanocomposites as packaging material on properties of soft white cheese during storage period.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Ahmed M; El-Sayed, Samah M; Salama, Heba H; El-Sayed, Hoda S; Dufresne, A

    2015-11-05

    Novel bionanocomposites based on chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol)/titanium nanoparticles (CS/PVA/TiO2 nanocomposite) were prepared and used as packaging materials for soft white cheese. The prepared bionanocomposites were characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM and FT-IR. The CS/PVA/TiO2 bionanocomposites exhibited good mechanical properties. Furthermore, the obtained bionanocomposites exhibited superior antibacterial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli) bacteria and fungi (Candidia albicans). The soft white cheese was manufactured and packaged within the CS/PVA/TiO2 nanocomposite films and stored at 7 °C for 30 days. The color, rheological and chemical properties of cheese were evaluated, also the influence of CS/PVA/TiO2 bionanocomposites on microbiological analysis of soft white cheese was assessed, the results indicated that the total bacterial counts, mold & yeast and coliform decreased with the increasing storage period and disappeared at the end of storage period compared with control. Consequently, CS/PVA/TiO2 bionanocomposite can be used in food packaging applications.

  3. 78 FR 69703 - 10-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys; Physical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 10-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Generic Customer Satisfaction... Customer Satisfaction Surveys Physical Inspection Alignment Pilot Program--Expansion Announcement....

  4. 10-Day survival of Hyalella azteca as a function of water quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Javidmehr, Alireza; Kass, Philip H; Deanovic, Linda A; Connon, Richard E; Werner, Inge

    2015-05-01

    Estuarine systems are among the most impacted ecosystems due to anthropogenic contaminants; however, they present unique challenges to toxicity testing with regard to varying water quality parameters. The euryhaline amphipod species, Hyalella azteca, is widely used in toxicity testing and well suited for testing estuarine water samples. Nevertheless, the influence of relevant water quality parameters on test endpoints must be quantified in order to efficiently use this species for routine monitoring. Here, we studied the influence of five water quality parameters: electrical conductivity, pH, un-ionized ammonia, dissolved oxygen and temperature, on H. azteca survival in a water column toxicity test. A model was developed to quantify and predict the independent and interacting effects of water quality variables on 10-day survival. The model allows simultaneous assessment of multiple potential predictors recorded during the tests. Data used for modeling came from 1089 tests performed on ambient water samples over a period of three years (2006-2008). The final model reflects significant effects of predictors and their two-way interactions. The effect of each level of all predictors on survival probability of H. azteca was examined by comparing levels of each predictor at a time, while holding all others at their lowest (reference) level. This study showed that predictors of survival in water column tests should not be evaluated in isolation in the interpretation of H. azteca water column tests. Our model provides a useful tool to predict expected control survival based on relevant water quality parameters, and thus enables the use of H. azteca tests for toxicity monitoring in estuaries with a wide range of water quality conditions.

  5. Effects of oral dosage form and storage period on the antioxidant properties of four species used in traditional herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Barreira, João C M; Barros, Lillian; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2011-04-01

    Herbal infusions and decoctions in water are some of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. Although water is not a good solvent for many of the active components in herbs, liquid preparations are rich in several bioactive compounds. Most of them have powerful antioxidant activity and have been related to medicinal herbs' properties. Herein, decoctions and infusions in water of lemon-verbena (Aloysia citrodora) aerial parts and leaves, fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) aerial parts with different periods of storage (0, 30, 60 and 120 days), were prepared. The effects of the method of preparation and storage period on their antioxidant properties were analysed. For all the analysed species, infusions gave better results than the corresponding decoctions. Spearmint infusions showed the highest antioxidant properties, at all the storage periods, probably due to the highest levels and synergy between phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid found in this sample. Linear discriminant analysis confirmed that the length of storage period has a significant influence on the antioxidant activity and antioxidant content. Flavonoids and reducing sugars proved to be the parameters that most highly contributed to cluster individual groups according to different periods of storage.

  6. OBSERVATIONS ON THE 10-DAY CHIRONOMUS TENTANS SURVIVAL AND GROWTH BIOASSAY IN EVALUATING GREAT LAKES SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 10-day bioassay with larval chironomids (Chironomus tentans) was used to evaluate sediment samples from harbors at Michigan City, IN, St. Joseph, MI, Grand Haven, MI and Toledo, OH for toxicity, based on the endpoints of survival, dry weight, and growth. Larval responses in se...

  7. Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program: Progress summary for the period April 1986 through March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1988-10-01

    This report discusses recent progress in the DOE program, directed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to develop seasonal thermal energy storage (STES). STES has been identified as one method to substantially improve energy efficiency and economics in certain sectors of our economy. It provides a potentially economic means of using waste heat and climatic energy resources to meet a significant portion of our growing energy need for building and industrial process heating and cooling. Environmental benefits accompany the use of STES in many applications. Furthermore, STES can contribute to reduced reliance on premium fuels that are often obtained from foreign sources. Lastly by improving the energy economics of industry, STES can contribute to improved US industrial competitiveness. The report is provided in four sections; the first being this introduction Section 2 of the report describes the program and briefly documents its organization, goals, history, and long-term plans. Section 3 describes the progress during the period from April, 1986, through March, 1988. Section 4 provides a short update on international development of STES. 17 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Colles' fracture: dorsal splint or complete cast during the first 10 days?

    PubMed

    Wik, Tina Strømdal; Aurstad, Ase T; Finsen, Vilhjalmur

    2009-04-01

    In a prospective randomised trial of conservatively treated Colles' fractures, we compared radiological outcomes and complication rates for two immobilisation methods, either complete cast (34 cases) or dorsal splint (38 cases), during the first 10 days after reduction. Radiographs were evaluated for dorsal tilt, radial tilt and radial shortening; results were almost identical in the two groups. There was a mean difference of 3.4 degrees in dorsal angulation in favour of dorsal splinting 10 days after reduction and a mean difference of 1.6mm in radial length in favour of complete casting at 5 weeks. There was no difference between the two treatments groups in reported pain or cast problems. Thus individual preference may be followed in choice of immobilisation method.

  9. Changes of hematological references depends on storage period and temperature conditions in rats and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Because changes in rat and dog hematological parameters according to storage conditions have been poorly documented, we sought to examine such changes. Blood analysis was performed using two hematology analyzers (ADVIA 2120i and Sysmex XN-V) after storage at room temperature and in cold storage for 5, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Interassay coefficients of variation for hematological parameters analyzed with the ADVIA 2120i and the XN-V showed similar. The levels of hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and platelet (PLT) showed significant variations with time in blood samples of rats and dogs. The leukocyte subpopulation showed high variation with storage conditions. The data for leukocyte differential counts obtained using the ADVIA 2120i, XN-V, and a manual differential counting procedure showed good agreement for neutrophils and lymphocyte counts, but monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils showed differences between the procedures. In conclusions, most rat and dog hematological parameters showed minimal changes; however, some showed high variation with storage time and temperature, especially PLT and leukocyte subpopulations. In conclusion, when performing hematological analysis in dogs and rats, it will be exactitude to analyze blood samples in fresh condition and at least within 24 h in the cold storage. PMID:28053618

  10. Fermentation of liquid coproducts and liquid compound diets: Part 1. Effects on chemical composition during a 6-day storage period.

    PubMed

    Scholten, R H; Rijnen, M M; Schrama, J W; Boer, H; Vesseur, P C; Den Hartog, L A; van der Peet-Schwering, C M; Verstegen, M W

    2001-06-01

    The effects of a 6-day storage period on changes in dry matter, crude ash, crude protein, true protein, crude fat, starch, soluble starch, sugar and lactose of three liquid coproducts and two liquid compound diets were studied. The three liquid coproducts studied were: liquid wheat starch (LWS), mashed potato steam peel (PSP) and cheese whey (CW), and the two liquid compound diets were: liquid grower diet (LGD) and liquid finisher diet (LFD). The loss of corrected dry matter after a 6-day storage, expressed in relation to the initial content, was 1.9, 6.2, 9.6, 4.6 and 4.2% for LWS, PSP, CW, LGD and LFD, respectively. During storage, the total amount of starch decreased 2.7, 24.0, 28.1 and 33.3% for LWS, PSP, LGD and LFD, respectively. The total amount of lactose decreased 23.5% for CW. The gross energy value of the products did not change remarkably during the 6-day storage period; gross energy losses being less than 3% of the initial gross energy content.

  11. The Effect of Adopting New Storage Methods for Extending Product Validity Periods on Manufacturers Expected Inventory Costs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The validness of the expiration dates (validity period) that manufacturers provide on food product labels is a crucial food safety problem. Governments must study how to use their authority by implementing fair awards and punishments to prompt manufacturers into adopting rigorous considerations, such as the effect of adopting new storage methods for extending product validity periods on expected costs. Assuming that a manufacturer sells fresh food or drugs, this manufacturer must respond to current stochastic demands at each unit of time to determine the purchase amount of products for sale. If this decision maker is capable and an opportunity arises, new packaging methods (e.g., aluminum foil packaging, vacuum packaging, high-temperature sterilization after glass packaging, or packaging with various degrees of dryness) or storage methods (i.e., adding desiccants or various antioxidants) can be chosen to extend the validity periods of products. To minimize expected costs, this decision maker must be aware of the processing costs of new storage methods, inventory standards, inventory cycle lengths, and changes in relationships between factors such as stochastic demand functions in a cycle. Based on these changes in relationships, this study established a mathematical model as a basis for discussing the aforementioned topics. PMID:25302332

  12. Effects of sperm concentration at semen collection and storage period of frozen semen on dairy cow conception.

    PubMed

    Haugan, T; Gröhn, Y T; Kommisrud, E; Ropstad, E; Reksen, O

    2007-01-01

    The present study was based on data obtained from artificial inseminations (AIs) performed with cryopreserved semen from elite bulls used in the Norwegian breeding program. Semen was diluted to standardize the number of spermatozoa to 18 million per AI dose. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the net sperm concentration at semen collection and the storage period in liquid nitrogen have any effect on probability of conception in dairy cattle. We demonstrated that the natural range of sperm concentration at semen collection within some of the bulls was associated with the probability of conception. However, no primary trend among bulls was found on the effect of sperm concentration at semen collection. This appears to be due to differences among bulls in their response to the dilution ratio of seminal plasma to extender. The effect of storage time was investigated in semen that had been stored between 1000 days and 2400 days in AI straws in liquid nitrogen at the AI center. Our findings showed that use of semen with the longest storage period, i.e. 1951-2400 days, resulted in a more than one percentage point lower probability of conception than semen with a shorter storage period. In conclusion, the net sperm concentration at semen collection, which affects the dilution ratio of seminal plasma to extender, should be considered individually among bulls to achieve optimal reproductive performance. Furthermore, this study gives support to the idea that a measurable degree of damage to the spermatozoa could occur during the preservation time in liquid nitrogen.

  13. Periodization

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Daniel S.; Reiman, Michael P.; Walker, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. Periodization is a concept of systematic progression—that is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing periodization schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on periodization principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of periodization, as well as periodization program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of periodization principles into rehabilitation programs. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1979 to 2009 was implemented with the keywords periodization, strength training, rehabilitation, endurance, power, hypertrophy, and resistance training with the Boolean term AND in all possible combinations in the English language. Each author also undertook independent hand searching of article references used in this review. Results: Based on the studies researched, periodized strength training regimens demonstrate improved outcomes as compared to nonperiodized programs. Conclusions: Despite the evidence in the strength training literature supporting periodization programs, there is a considerable lack of data in the rehabilitation literature about program design and successful implementation of periodization into rehabilitation programs. PMID:23015982

  14. BOREAS RSS-7 Regional LAI and FPAR Images From 10-Day AVHRR-LAC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Chen, Jing; Cihlar, Josef

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Remote Sensing Science (BOREAS RSS-7) team collected various data sets to develop and validate an algorithm to allow the retrieval of the spatial distribution of Leaf Area Index (LAI) from remotely sensed images. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) level-4c 10-day composite Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images produced at CCRS were used to produce images of LAI and the Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) absorbed by plant canopies for the three summer IFCs in 1994 across the BOREAS region. The algorithms were developed based on ground measurements and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images. The data are stored in binary image format files.

  15. Field validation of 10-day freshwater sediment toxicity tests using Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.S.; Bigham, G.N.

    1995-12-31

    Two of the toxicity tests commonly used to evaluate freshwater sediments are the 10-day amphipod (Hyalella azteca) and chironomid (Chironomus tentans) tests. EPA and ASTM have recently developed standardized protocols for these tests. Although both tests are considered sensitive indicators of sediment toxicity, little information exists on how well test results correspond to adverse biological effects in the field. In this study, the lethal and sublethal (i.e., biomass) responses of the two toxicity tests were compared with alterations of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages (i.e., benthic effects) at 56 stations in Onondaga Lake, New York. The lake has received municipal and industrial discharges for more than 100 years, and sediment chemical concentrations range widely throughout the lake. Toxicity results for Onondaga Lake were compared with reference conditions using the t-test, and benthic effects were determined using classification analysis of log-transformed taxa abundances. In general, a relatively high level of agreement was found between results of the toxicity tests and alterations of benthic assemblages. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found between all toxicity test endpoints and taxa richness of benthic assemblages. In addition, significant concordance (P {le} 0.01, binomial test) was found between toxicity designations for the 56 stations based on toxicity tests and toxicity designations based on benthic effects. Despite the general level of agreement among the various biological indicators, chironomid biomass and benthic effects were found to be the most sensitive indicators of toxicity, whereas amphipod survival and biomass were the least sensitive indicators. This study suggests that results of the 10-day amphipod and chironomid toxicity tests are highly predictive of adverse biological effects in the field.

  16. A periodically-switched ODE model for N-bunch beamloading in a storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, C.

    1999-04-20

    A new baseband formulation of the coupled cavity/longitudinal-bunch ODEs is derived. Assuming linearity, a model of the form {dot x}(t) = A(t)x(t) + B(t)u(t) arises, where A(t) and B(t) are piecewise constant, and periodic with the revolution period T{sub 0}. Such models, known in the control community as (periodic) switched systems, have known (in)stability criteria and control theoretic properties, which can be useful in the analysis and control of multiple bunch beamloading.

  17. Relationship between Mean Winds and Large 10-day Precipitation Anomalies over the Continental U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, H. Mark

    2008-01-01

    To better understand the role of surface boundary forcing upon interannual and decadal variability of droughts and precipitation excesses over the continental U. S., an observational study has been carried out to better investigate the dynamical linkages between surface boundary forcing and droughts/floods. This study examines the relationship during the warm season between observed mean wind patterns on the 10-15 day time scale and anomalies in precipitation on that same time scale over the U. S. Each of the 7 cases of significant 10-day, warm-season drought over the U, S. since 1948 that has been investigated was accompanied by significant continental-scale ridging of the mean 10-day 250 mb wind pattern over the continental U.S. and a mid-Pacific relative maximum of 250 mb wind speed of at least 30 m/sec within 20 degrees of the international Date Line. This perhaps suggests the presence of a wave-guide phenomenon over the Pacific. The drought signal for each of these cases was still quite evident when averaged over the monthly time scale. While peak magnitudes of the precipitation anomalies were much larger for the 7 chosen cases of significant of precipitation excess were than for the drought cases none of the patterns of precipitation excess were as unambiguous or wide-spread as the drought cases. In only 2 to 3 cases was there evidence of a continental trough in the 250 mb winds. In fact, one case showed slight ridging over Canada and the extreme northern U.S. Strong southerly low-level jets, however, were evident in the 925 mb winds over south-central Texas or the nearby Gulf of Mexico in virtually all of the excessive precipitation cases, while the Great Plains LLJ was weak or displaced to the north of Texas in most of the drought cases. We will further investigate the asymmetry between droughts and precipitation excesses in their horizontal homogeneity and extent, in their temporal evolution, and in how the are forced by the combined effects of the mean

  18. Prolonged use for at least 10 days of intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kiyohiro; Morishita, Yasuo; Hinohara, Hiroshi; Kadoi, Yuji; Hayashi, Yoshiro; Tajima, Yukio; Kunimoto, Fumio

    2005-11-01

    Intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) is a useful therapy for refractory heart failure. However, the safe duration of this therapy and possible complications due to long-term IABP support remain unclear. In this study, we reviewed retrospectively patients requiring the long-term use of IABP, defined here as 10 days or more, to estimate the background and prognosis of patients undergoing long-term use of IABP. The characteristics and perioperative status were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. A total of 18 patients including 12 males and 6 females required long-term IABP use. IABP was induced in 13 patients (72%) following cardiac surgery and in 5 without cardiac surgery. The mean duration of IABP support was 17 +/- 7 days. Seven patients survived and 11 died of heart failure and/or associated other organ failure. Multiple organ failure (MOF) was recognized in 10 patients, and the incidence of MOF was significantly (P = 0.005) lower in the survivors (14%) compared to the nonsurvivors (82%). The percentage of postcardiac surgery patients was also significantly (P = 0.027) higher in nonsurvivors (91%) than in survivors (43%). Logistic regression analysis identified MOF and cardiac surgery as independent predictors for death. Femoral arterial-venous fistula was the only IABP-related complication. In patients receiving long-term IABP, attention should be paid to other organ complications associated with heart failure, and the use of other circulatory supports such as PCPS or VAD to avoid MOF should be considered if necessary.

  19. A toxicity scoring system for the 10-day whole sediment test with Corophium insidiosum (Crawford).

    PubMed

    Prato, Ermelinda; Biandolino, Francesca; Libralato, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    This study developed a tool able to evaluate the potential contamination of marine sediments detecting the presence or absence of toxicity supporting environmental decision-making processes. When the sample is toxic, it is important to classify its level of toxicity to understand its subsequent effects and management practices. Corophium insidiosum is a widespread and frequently recorded species along the Mediterranean Sea, North Sea and western Baltic Sea with records also in the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean. This amphipod is found in high abundance in shallow brackish inshore areas and estuaries also with high turbidity. At Italian level, C. insidiosum is more frequently collectable than Corophium orientale, making routine toxicity tests easier to be performed. Moreover, according to the international scientific literature, C. insidiosum is more sensitive than C. orientale. Whole sediment toxicity data (10 days) with C. insidiosum were organised in a species-specific toxicity score on the basis of the minimum significance difference (MSD) approach. Thresholds to rank samples as non-toxic and toxic were based on sediment samples (n=84) from the Gulf of Taranto (Italy). A five-class toxicity score (absent, low, medium, high and very high toxicity) was developed, considering the distribution of the 90th percentile of the MSD normalised to the effects on the negative controls (samples from reference sites). This toxicity score could be useful for interpreting sediment potential impacts and providing quick responsive management information.

  20. Effect of 10-day broccoli consumption on inflammatory status of young healthy smokers.

    PubMed

    Riso, Patrizia; Vendrame, Stefano; Del Bo', Cristian; Martini, Daniela; Martinetti, Antonia; Seregni, Ettore; Visioli, Francesco; Parolini, Marina; Porrini, Marisa

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 10-day broccoli (250 g/day) intake on dietary markers and markers of inflammations in young male smokers. A dietary intervention study with a repeated measures crossover design was conducted. Circulating levels of carotenoids, folate, C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 6 receptor (IL-6sR) and adiponectin were measured. Broccoli intake significantly increased plasma levels of folate (+17%) and lutein (+39%), while no significant effect was observed for TNF-α, IL-6, IL-6sR or adiponectin. Plasma CRP decreased by 48% (post-hoc analysis, p <  0.05) following broccoli diet; this resulted to be independent from the plasma variations in lutein and folate. An inverse correlation between lycopene, TNF-α and IL-6sR was observed at baseline. In conclusion, broccoli consumption may reduce CRP levels in smokers, consistent with epidemiologic observations that fruit and vegetable intake is associated with lower circulating CRP concentrations.

  1. Assessment of four different test designs for Hyalella azteca 10 days sediment toxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Romero, P. |; Oris, J.T.; Bailer, J.; DePoy, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to assess the adequacy of four experimental designs of the Hyalella azteca 10 days sediment toxicity test. The authors conducted a series of sediment toxicity tests using an EPA recommended experimental design (8 chambers with 10 organisms per treatment) and three other designs. These had the same total number of organisms (80) per treatment and the same sediment:water ratio (1:1.5) but different number of chambers (4,2,1). The number of organisms recovered, the time to sort and count the animals, as well as the time to make a water change were compared for these four designs. Logistic regression was used to analyze the recovery data while one-way analysis of variance methods were used to analyze the time responses. The results showed that the four treatments were comparable in terms of proportion of organisms recovered. However, the sorting time and the water change time decreased as the number of chambers decreased, making those designs with less chambers more desirable.

  2. Microstructure and hydrogen storage properties of Mg-Ni-Ce alloys with a long-period stacking ordered phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lishuai; Li, Jinshan; Zhang, Tiebang; Song, Lin; Kou, Hongchao

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of catalytic actions of transition metals and rare earth metals on Mg-based hydrogen storage alloys and aiming at alleviating the adverse influence of Mg oxidation, Mg-Ni-Ce alloys with different Ni and Ce contents were prepared by near equilibrium solidification. A new 18R-type long-period stacking ordered phase (LPSO) was formed coherently with Mg, Ni-substituted Mg12Ce and Mg2Ni in Mg-rich Mg-Ni-Ce ternary alloys. Distinct from the reported LPSO structures in other Mg-based alloys, in which the LPSO structures were fundamentally long period stacking variants of hexagonal close-packed structure of Mg, the LPSO structure found in the present work was a variant of Mg12Ce. Nanocrystalline alloys were obtained by high-energy ball milling the as-cast alloys. Nanocrystals of Mg, Mg2Ni and Mg12Ce with grain size in the range of 3-5 nm were observed in ball milled samples. The activation performance, isothermal hydrogenation behavior and anti-oxidation properties of the ball milled samples were systematically investigated and corresponding mechanisms were discussed based on detailed microstructural characteristics. CeH2.73 was formed after hydrogenation and spontaneously transformed into CeO2 during air exposure. The anti-oxidation properties of Mg-based hydrogen storage alloy were substantially improved with the addition of Ce by forming CeH2.73/CeO2 composite.

  3. Performance of raw bovine meat preservation by hyperbaric storage (quasi energetically costless) compared to refrigeration.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Paulo; Pereira, Sofia A; Santos, Mauro D; Alves, Susana P; Bessa, Rui J B; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Saraiva, Jorge A

    2016-11-01

    Hyperbaric storage at room temperature (without temperature control) of raw bovine meat was studied and compared to refrigeration. Samples were first stored for 12h at 50, 100 and 150MPa, and in a second set of experiments, for a longer period of 10days at 50MPa. For the 12h storage, refrigeration and 50MPa had a similar microbial growth inhibition effect and, at 100 and 150MPa an additional microbial inactivation effect was found. For the longer experiment (10days at 50MPa) results pointed for a shelf-life increase of raw beef compared to samples stored under refrigeration. For both tests (12h and 10days) samples preserved under pressure showed no detrimental effect on physicochemical parameters comparatively to the initial and refrigerated samples. These results indicate that hyperbaric storage at room temperature not only allows high energy savings, but additionally has potential to extend the shelf-life of a perishable food product compared to refrigeration.

  4. Alternation of secondary metabolites and quality attributes in Valencia Orange fruit ( Citrus sinensis ) as influenced by storage period and edible covers.

    PubMed

    Shamloo, M M; Sharifani, M; Daraei Garmakhany, A; Seifi, E

    2015-04-01

    Flavonoids (FGs) are a large group of polyphenolic compounds with low molecular weight, found in free and glycozidic forms in plants. Citrus fruits can be used as a food supplement containing hesperidin and flavonoids to prevent infections and boost the immune system in human body. The aim of this study was the investigation of the effect of clove oil and storage period on the amount of hesperidin and naringin component in orange peel (cv. Valencia). Four treatments including clove oil (1 %), wax, mixture of wax-clove oil, control and storage period were applied. Treated fruits were stored at 7 °C and 85 % relative humidity for 3 months and naringin, hesperidin, antioxidant activity, total pheenolic compounds, TSS, Vitamin C, fruits weight loss, pH, acidity and carbohydrates content were measured every 3 weeks. The amount of hesperidin and naringin was determined using high performance liquid chromatography at the detection wavelength of 285 nm. Antioxidant activity was measured using the 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl-hydrate (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. Total phenolic compounds were measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu micro method. Results showed that naringin and hesperidin were decreased during storage. Different treatment only had significant effect on the amount of hesperidin while storage period affected both of narigin and hesperidin. Results of correlation study, indicated strong relation between antioxidant activity and amount of naringin and hesperidin during storage time. However, at the end of storage period, the amount of hesperidin and naringin were diminished independent of different covers. Probably anaerobic condition caused such reduction. Results showed that the amount of TSS, fruit hardness, weight loss, total sugar and fructose content were increased during storage period while total acidity, pH and glucose content showed descending trend during storage periods. In conclusion, hesperidin and naringin of peels can be used as

  5. [Assessment of changes in physiological status of alcohol-dependent patients in the course of 10-day detoxication treatment].

    PubMed

    Slósarska, M; Wójcik, M; Habrat, B

    1994-01-01

    Heart rate, respiratory rate, postural muscle tone and tapping in 14 alcohol dependent patients (type II ac. Cloninger) during 10 days of detoxification were investigated. Despite subjective mood increased, no longer observed were tachycardia and clinical symptoms of alcohol withdrawal; increased muscle tonus and faster respiration rhythm were observed. The observed physiological changes in alcohol dependent patients after 10 days of abstinence suggest that continuation of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy after detoxification in acute alcohol withdrawal is recommended.

  6. An ab initio periodic study of acidic chabazite as a candidate for dihydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Torres, F J; Civalleri, B; Pisani, C; Ugliengo, P

    2006-06-01

    A theoretical B3LYP study, adopting a polarized double-zeta quality Gaussian basis set, was performed to characterize acidic chabazite by using the periodic CRYSTAL03 program. Different Si/Al loadings (1/1, 3/1, 5/1, and 11/1) were considered, and for each of them the most stable aluminum distribution and location of the acidic proton, needed as charge balancer, were identified. With the optimal structures, the energy of formation and the anharmonic O-H stretching frequency were calculated with the latter being in good agreement with the experimental data. The B3LYP optimal position of H2 physisorbed at the acidic Brönsted sites of chabazite (Si/Al = 11/1 and 5/1) brings about an interaction energy definitely smaller than that derived from infrared spectroscopy, because of the known deficiencies of this functional to cope with dispersive interactions. The latter was included by means of an ONIOM-like procedure that combines periodic B3LYP energy with results at the MP2 level on selected clusters cut out of the chabazite framework. Adsorption of two H2 molecules for Si/Al = 5/1 chabazite showed a complete independence of each Brönsted site, and neither through-space nor intrastructure polarization effects are present. Within the periodic B3LYP approach shifts in both O-H and H-H anharmonic frequencies were also computed and compared with unperturbed values and with the available experimental results.

  7. Whole body and regional body composition changes following 10-day hypoxic confinement and unloading-inactivity.

    PubMed

    Debevec, Tadej; McDonnell, Adam C; Macdonald, Ian A; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2014-03-01

    Future planetary habitats will expose inhabitants to both reduced gravity and hypoxia. This study investigated the effects of short-term unloading and normobaric hypoxia on whole body and regional body composition (BC). Eleven healthy, recreationally active, male participants with a mean (SD) age of 24 (2) years and body mass index of 22.4 (3.2) kg·m(-2) completed the following 3 10-day campaigns in a randomised, cross-over designed protocol: (i) hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB; FIO2 = 0.147 (0.008); PIO2 = 93.8 (0.9) mm Hg), (ii) hypoxic bed rest (HBR; FIO2 = 0.147 (0.008); PIO2 = 93.8 (0.9) mm Hg), and (iii) normoxic bed rest (NBR; FIO2 = 0.209; PIO2 = 133.5 (0.7) mm Hg). Nutritional requirements were individually precalculated and the actual intake was monitored throughout the study protocol. Body mass, whole body, and regional BC were assessed before and after the campaigns using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The calculated daily targeted energy intake values were 2071 (170) kcal for HBR and NBR and 2417 (200) kcal for HAMB. In both HBR and NBR campaigns the actual energy intake was within the targeted level, whereas in the HAMB the intake was lower than targeted (-8%, p < 0.05). Body mass significantly decreased in all 3 campaigns (-2.1%, -2.8%, and -2.0% for HAMB, HBR, and NBR, respectively; p < 0.05), secondary to a significant decrease in lean mass (-3.8%, -3.8%, -4.3% for HAMB, HBR, and NBR, respectively; p < 0.05) along with a slight, albeit not significant, increase in fat mass. The same trend was observed in the regional BC regardless of the region and the campaign. These results demonstrate that, hypoxia per se, does not seem to alter whole body and regional BC during short-term bed rest.

  8. Effect of field natural rubber latex with different ammonia contents and storage period on physical properties of latex concentrate, stability of skim latex and dipped film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santipanusopon, Sirinapa; Riyajan, Sa-Ad

    2009-07-01

    The effect of ammonia treatment in field natural rubber (NR) latex with different storage period time on the properties of concentrated NR latex and stability of skim latex was investigated. Fresh NR latex was treated with various ammonia contents such as 0.35, 0.60 and 0.80% w/w, and then they were centrifuged to get the concentrated NR latex with 60% dry rubber content (DRC) containing 0.16, 0.18 and 0.25% w/w, respectively and skim NR latex with roughly 5% DRC containing 0.42, 0.60 and 0.80% w/w, respectively. The effect of storage times with ∼0, 15, 30 and 45 days for concentrated NR latex with different ammonia contents on their properties such as alkalinity, magnesium content and viscosity was observed. It was found that generally, magnesium content in field NR latex and latex concentrate decreased with storage period times. The alkalinity content in both concentrated NR and skim latex increased with increasing ammonia content in field latex. The viscosity of concentrated NR latex increased as a function of storage period time of field NR latex. The stability of skim latex depends on storage period time of field NR latex with different ammonias. The tensile strength of dipped films obtained from field NR latex with 0.80% w/w of ammonia was dependent on storage period time of field NR latex.

  9. Beneficial Effect of Short Pretransplant Period of Hypothermic Pulsatile Perfusion of the Warm-Ischemic Kidney after Cold Storage: Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Alberto; Humanes, Blanca; Jado, Juan Carlos; Mojena, Marina; González-Nicolás, María Ángeles; Del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Tejedor, Alberto; Lledó-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Warm ischemia (WI) produces a significant deleterious effect in potential kidney grafts. Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) seems to improve immediate graft function after transplant. Our aim was to analyze the effect of short pretransplant periods of pulsatile HMP on histology and renal injury in warm-ischemic kidneys. Twelve minipigs were used. WI was achieved in the right kidney by applying a vascular clamp for 45 min. After nephrectomy, autotransplant was performed following one of two strategies: cold storage of the kidneys or cold storage combined with perfusion in pulsatile HMP. The graft was removed early to study renal morphology, inflammation (fibrosis), and apoptosis. Proinflammatory activity and fibrosis were less pronounced after cold storage of the kidneys with HMP than after cold storage only. The use of HMP also decreased apoptosis compared with cold storage only. The detrimental effects on cells of an initial and prolonged period of WI seem to improve with a preservation protocol that includes a short period of pulsatile HMP after cold storage and immediately before the transplant, in comparison with cold storage only.

  10. Beneficial Effect of Short Pretransplant Period of Hypothermic Pulsatile Perfusion of the Warm-Ischemic Kidney after Cold Storage: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Humanes, Blanca; Jado, Juan Carlos; Mojena, Marina; González-Nicolás, María Ángeles; del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Lledó-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Warm ischemia (WI) produces a significant deleterious effect in potential kidney grafts. Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) seems to improve immediate graft function after transplant. Our aim was to analyze the effect of short pretransplant periods of pulsatile HMP on histology and renal injury in warm-ischemic kidneys. Twelve minipigs were used. WI was achieved in the right kidney by applying a vascular clamp for 45 min. After nephrectomy, autotransplant was performed following one of two strategies: cold storage of the kidneys or cold storage combined with perfusion in pulsatile HMP. The graft was removed early to study renal morphology, inflammation (fibrosis), and apoptosis. Proinflammatory activity and fibrosis were less pronounced after cold storage of the kidneys with HMP than after cold storage only. The use of HMP also decreased apoptosis compared with cold storage only. The detrimental effects on cells of an initial and prolonged period of WI seem to improve with a preservation protocol that includes a short period of pulsatile HMP after cold storage and immediately before the transplant, in comparison with cold storage only. PMID:27556029

  11. Endothelial function after 10 days of bed rest in individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Mette P; Højbjerre, Lise; Alibegovic, Amra C; Nielsen, Lars B; Stallknecht, Bente; Vaag, Allan A; Dela, Flemming

    2011-10-01

    Physical inactivity is considered to be deleterious to vascular health, and in particular in first-degree relatives to patients with type 2 diabetes (FDR) and persons born with low birth weight (LBW), who may later in life develop cardiovascular disease. A period of imposed physical inactivity could unmask this risk. We hypothesized that the impact of physical inactivity on endothelial function would be more marked in subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (LBW and FDR) compared with a matched control group (CON), all of whom were recruited via advertisements and via the Danish Birth Registry. Twenty LBW, 20 CON and 13 FDR were studied before and after 10 days of bed rest. Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography during brachial intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine or adenosine at baseline and with superimposed hyperinsulinaemia. Markers of endothelial activation and inflammation were measured in plasma. Bed rest did not change the vasodilator responses to adenosine or acetylcholine alone in any group, but reduced vasodilator responses to adenosine or acetylcholine during hyperinsulinaemia in LBW. Bed rest impaired insulin-mediated vasodilatation in CON and LBW and increased endothelial activation markers in FDR and LBW but not in CON. Vasodilator responses were very low in FDR prior to bed rest, and did not decrease further during bed rest. Physical inactivity does not impair endothelium-dependent vasodilatation per se, but the vascular vasodilator effect of insulin diminished in CON and LBW after bed rest. In FDR, a further deterioration of FBF with inactivity is not possible.

  12. Short-term effects on bone turnover of replacing milk with cola beverages: a 10-day interventional study in young men.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mette; Jensen, Marlene; Kudsk, Jane; Henriksen, Marianne; Mølgaard, Christian

    2005-12-01

    In the Western world, increased consumption of carbonated soft drinks combined with a decreasing intake of milk may increase the risk of osteoporosis. This study was designed to reflect the trend of replacing milk with carbonated beverages in a group of young men on a low-calcium diet and studies the effects of this replacement on calcium homeostasis and bone turnover. This controlled crossover intervention study included 11 healthy men (22-29 years) who were given a low-calcium basic diet in two 10-day intervention periods with an intervening 10-day washout. During one period, they drank 2.5 l of Coca Cola per day and during the other period 2.5 l of semi-skimmed milk. Serum concentrations of calcium, phosphate, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D), osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) and cross-linked C-telopeptides (CTX), plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) and urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides (NTX) were determined at baseline and endpoint of each intervention period. An increase in serum phosphate (P<0.001), 1,25(OH)2D (P<0.001), PTH (P=0.046) and osteocalcin (P<0.001) was observed in the cola period compared to the milk period. Also, bone resorption was significantly increased following the cola period, seen as increased serum CTX (P<0.001) and urinary NTX (P<0.001) compared to the milk period. No changes were observed in serum concentrations of calcium or B-ALP. This study demonstrates that over a 10-day period high intake of cola with a low-calcium diet induces increased bone turnover compared to a high intake of milk with a low-calcium diet. Thus, the trend towards a replacement of milk with cola and other soft drinks, which results in a low calcium intake, may negatively affect bone health as indicated by this short-term study.

  13. Interpreting detailed brine chemistry changes during early periods of in-zone CO2 storage at Cranfield site, Mississippi, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. Y.; Islam, A.; Lu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical reactions can play important role on the long-term geological storage of CO2 in sites where the target formations have reactive minerals. Although the use of batch models (experimental or theoretical) is expedient, it leaves questions about how to interpret the results from the context of field scale injection. The goal of this study is to investigate changes in fluid compositions using a detailed reactive transport model. Most published CO2 geochemical studies tend to consider only a small number of components because of expensive calculations and therefore simultaneous mobility of large number of heavy metals is not clearly known. In this study we present results of coupled multiphase, multicomponent reactive transport simulations of Cranfield site, Mississipi, USA at relatively fine scale, which are obtained using the parallel PFLOTRAN code. The geochemical system consists of 22 primary or basis species, in-situ CO2 and O2 gaseous components, and 5 minerals. The number of secondary elements is 37, representing very simple to complex mineralizations occurred simultaneously in saline formation (1.81 molality). The fluid chemical compositions were measured from production fluids and mineral composition of the formation was obtained from XRD analysis of core samples. The results show brine chemistry changes in the reservoir and shed insights on the need to monitor the mobility of heavy metals such as Mg, Ca, Al, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ba, and Cd. The study provides simultaneous potential mobile inventory of these metals in the storage formations and warns possible risk through leakage into overlying zone. From storage point of view we also aim to observe the sensitivity of aforementioned constituents. Our results show pH drop from 6.91 to 3.5 and relatively small changes in HCO3- and Fe concentrations. However aqueous Ca and Al increase by orders of magnitude. The detailed geochemical effect shows trapping efficiency increased by few percent. The brine

  14. Alterations in resting oxygen consumption in women exposed to 10 days of cold air

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.W.; Thomas, J.R. )

    1991-03-11

    Repeated exposure to cold air reduces the metabolic response to cold air exposure in man. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the change in resting metabolic rate (RMR) with exposure to 22C air and 4C air during a 12 day period. Four women sat in 22C air for 45 min followed by 45 min in 4C air each day for ten days. The authors measured RMR during a 45 min period in 22C air followed by 45 min in 4C air on four days. All subjects began their morning exposures on a Monday within 2 days of the onset of menses completing the study on a Friday, 12 days later. Subjects dressed in a T-shirt, shorts and cotton socks. During 45 min of exposure to warm air, RMR remained steady at 10% of VO{sub 2peak} on Day 1 and 10% on Day 5. RMR during exposure to warm air significantly increased to 13% of VO{sub 2peak} on Day 8 and remained elevated at 13% on Day 12. During exposure to cold air RMR peaked at 31% of CO{sub 2peak} by the 5th min on Day 1. Peak RMR on Day 5 was significantly lower. Pea RMR in the cold remained lower on Days 8 and 12. During cold exposure RMR peaked and then declined to steady-state during min 15 to 45. Steady-state RMR during cold exposure was significantly lower on Day 5, Day 7 and Day 12 when compared to the 23% of VO{sub 2peak} on Day 1. The authors found that RMR in cold air is significantly attenuated by Day 5 and remains lower through Day 12. RMR during warm air exposure is elevated 3% by Day 8 after five (5) days of repeated cold exposure followed by two (2) days without exposure to cold air, and RMR remains elevated on Day 12.

  15. Long-period Seismicity at the Napoleonville Salt Dome: Implications for Local Seismic Monitoring of Underground Hydrocarbon Storage Caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, D. S.; Ford, S. R.; Nayak, A.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of a large sinkhole at the Napoleonville salt dome, Assumption Parish, Louisiana, in August 2012 was accompanied by a rich sequence of complex seismic events, including long-period (LP) events that were recorded 11 km away at Transportable Array station 544A in White Castle, Louisiana. The LP events have relatively little energy at short periods, which make them difficult to detect using standard high-frequency power detectors, and the majority of energy that reaches the station is peaked near 0.4 Hz. The analysis of the local records reveals that the onset of the 0.4 Hz signals coincides with the S-wave arrival, and therefore it may be a shaking induced resonance in a fluid filled cavern. We created a low-frequency (0.1-0.6 Hz) power detector (short-term average / long-term average) that operated on all three components of the broadband instrument, since considerable energy was detected on the horizontal components. The detections from the power detector were then used as templates in three-channel correlation detectors thereby increasing the number of detections by a little more than a factor of two to nearly 3000. The rate of LP events is approximately one event every other day at the beginning of recording in March 2011. Around 2 May 2012 the rate changes to approximately 7 events per day and then increases to 25 events per day at the beginning of July 2012. Finally, in the days leading up to the sinkhole formation there are approximately 200 LP events per day. The analysis of these events could aid in the development of local seismic monitoring methods for underground industrial storage caverns. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Carotenoid evolution during short-storage period of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum conv. durum) and tritordeum (×Tritordeum Ascherson et Graebner) whole-grain flours.

    PubMed

    Mellado-Ortega, Elena; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of storage temperature on carotenoid composition in durum wheat and tritordeum whole-grain flours. For both cereal genotypes, total carotenoid content significantly decreased during storage, following a temperature dependent first-order kinetic model. Individual and total carotenoid content decay were similar for durum wheat, with a maximum at 50 °C at the end of the storage period (94%). In contrast, the evolution of lutein ester fractions in tritordeum showed lower losses than for free lutein (∼ 50%), and consequently the total carotenoid content was less affected (83%). A decrease in the lutein monoesters fraction was observed, coinciding with an increase in the diesterified forms, especially for lutein dilinoleate. These data suggest an esterifying activity in flours different from the enzyme systems operating in vivo (xanthophyll acyl transferase). The formation of lutein diesters, with greater stability, explains the slower carotenoid degradation in tritordeum whole-grain flours.

  17. FLASH SPECTROSCOPY: EMISSION LINES FROM THE IONIZED CIRCUMSTELLAR MATERIAL AROUND <10-DAY-OLD TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Khazov, D.; Yaron, O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Manulis, I.; Rubin, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Horesh, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Perley, D.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Sollerman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Nugent, P. E.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Ebeling, H.; and others

    2016-02-10

    Supernovae (SNe) embedded in dense circumstellar material (CSM) may show prominent emission lines in their early-time spectra (≤10 days after the explosion), owing to recombination of the CSM ionized by the shock-breakout flash. From such spectra (“flash spectroscopy”), we can measure various physical properties of the CSM, as well as the mass-loss rate of the progenitor during the year prior to its explosion. Searching through the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF and iPTF) SN spectroscopy databases from 2009 through 2014, we found 12 SNe II showing flash-ionized (FI) signatures in their first spectra. All are younger than 10 days. These events constitute 14% of all 84 SNe in our sample having a spectrum within 10 days from explosion, and 18% of SNe II observed at ages <5 days, thereby setting lower limits on the fraction of FI events. We classified as “blue/featureless” (BF) those events having a first spectrum that is similar to that of a blackbody, without any emission or absorption signatures. It is possible that some BF events had FI signatures at an earlier phase than observed, or that they lack dense CSM around the progenitor. Within 2 days after explosion, 8 out of 11 SNe in our sample are either BF events or show FI signatures. Interestingly, we found that 19 out of 21 SNe brighter than an absolute magnitude M{sub R} = −18.2 belong to the FI or BF groups, and that all FI events peaked above M{sub R} = −17.6 mag, significantly brighter than average SNe II.

  18. Flash Spectroscopy: Emission Lines from the Ionized Circumstellar Material Around <10-Day-Old Type II Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Khazov, Daniel; Yaron, O.; Gal-Yam, A.; ...

    2016-02-02

    Supernovae (SNe) embedded in dense circumstellar material (CSM) may show prominent emission lines in their early-time spectra (≤10 days after the explosion), owing to recombination of the CSM ionized by the shock-breakout flash. From such spectra ("flash spectroscopy"), we can measure various physical properties of the CSM, as well as the mass-loss rate of the progenitor during the year prior to its explosion. In this paper, by searching through the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF and iPTF) SN spectroscopy databases from 2009 through 2014, we found 12 SNe II showing flash-ionized (FI) signatures in their first spectra. All are younger thanmore » 10 days. These events constitute 14% of all 84 SNe in our sample having a spectrum within 10 days from explosion, and 18% of SNe II observed at ages <5 days, thereby setting lower limits on the fraction of FI events. We classified as "blue/featureless" (BF) those events having a first spectrum that is similar to that of a blackbody, without any emission or absorption signatures. It is possible that some BF events had FI signatures at an earlier phase than observed, or that they lack dense CSM around the progenitor. Within 2 days after explosion, 8 out of 11 SNe in our sample are either BF events or show FI signatures. Finally and interestingly, we found that 19 out of 21 SNe brighter than an absolute magnitude MR = -18.2 belong to the FI or BF groups, and that all FI events peaked above MR = -17.6 mag, significantly brighter than average SNe II.« less

  19. Flash Spectroscopy: Emission Lines from the Ionized Circumstellar Material Around <10-Day-Old Type II Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Khazov, Daniel; Yaron, O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Manulis, I.; Rubin, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Cao, Y.; Perley, D.; Sollerman, J.; Horesh, A.; Sullivan, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Ebeling, H.; Taddia, F.; Johansson, J.; Laher, R. R.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Wozniak, Przemyslaw R.; Matheson, T.

    2016-02-02

    Supernovae (SNe) embedded in dense circumstellar material (CSM) may show prominent emission lines in their early-time spectra (≤10 days after the explosion), owing to recombination of the CSM ionized by the shock-breakout flash. From such spectra ("flash spectroscopy"), we can measure various physical properties of the CSM, as well as the mass-loss rate of the progenitor during the year prior to its explosion. In this paper, by searching through the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF and iPTF) SN spectroscopy databases from 2009 through 2014, we found 12 SNe II showing flash-ionized (FI) signatures in their first spectra. All are younger than 10 days. These events constitute 14% of all 84 SNe in our sample having a spectrum within 10 days from explosion, and 18% of SNe II observed at ages <5 days, thereby setting lower limits on the fraction of FI events. We classified as "blue/featureless" (BF) those events having a first spectrum that is similar to that of a blackbody, without any emission or absorption signatures. It is possible that some BF events had FI signatures at an earlier phase than observed, or that they lack dense CSM around the progenitor. Within 2 days after explosion, 8 out of 11 SNe in our sample are either BF events or show FI signatures. Finally and interestingly, we found that 19 out of 21 SNe brighter than an absolute magnitude MR = -18.2 belong to the FI or BF groups, and that all FI events peaked above MR = -17.6 mag, significantly brighter than average SNe II.

  20. Modified atmosphere packaging and vacuum packaging for long period chilled storage of dry-cured Iberian ham.

    PubMed

    Parra, V; Viguera, J; Sánchez, J; Peinado, J; Espárrago, F; Gutierrez, J I; Andrés, A I

    2010-04-01

    Dry-cured Iberian ham slices were stored under vacuum and under four different modified atmospheres (60/40=60%N(2)+40%CO(2); 70/30=70%N(2)+30%CO(2); 80/20=80%N(2)+20%CO(2); argon=70%argon+30%CO(2)) at 4+/-1 degrees C during 120 days. Gas composition, moisture content, pH, colour, pigment content, and lipid stability were measured, as well as sensory and microbial analysis were carried out throughout storage. A loss of intensity of red colour (a(*)-values) was observed during storage in ham slices (P<0.05). Consistently, MbFe(II)NO content also decreased throughout storage (P>0.05). Slices of ham packed in 40%CO(2) (60/40) and 30%CO(2) (70/30) showed lower a(*)-values than the rest of the batches after 60 days (P<0.05), though differences were not evident after 120 days (P>0.05). TBARs values showed an upward trend during the storage of packaged slices (P<0.05). Vacuum-packed slices showed the lowest TBARs values and those packed with 40%CO(2), the highest. Sensory attributes did not vary significantly (P>0.05) throughout storage under refrigeration and packed either in vacuum or in modified atmospheres. No safety problems were detected in relation to the microbial quality in any case.

  1. Evaluation of the Shore A hardness of silicone for facial prosthesis as to the effect of storage period and chemical disinfection.

    PubMed

    Guiotti, Aimée Maria; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2010-03-01

    The failure of facial prostheses is caused by limitations in the properties of existing materials, especially flexibility and durability. Therefore, this study evaluated the Shore A hardness of silicone used for fabrication of facial prostheses, Silastic MDX4-4210, according to the influence of storage period, daily disinfection, and 2 types of pigmentation. Thirty specimens were fabricated and divided in 3 groups: colorless, pigmented with makeup, and pigmented with iron oxide. Analysis of results was assessed on a Shore A hardness meter immediately, 6 months, and 1 year after fabrication of specimens, following the guidelines of the American Society for Testing and Materials. The hardness values were statistically analyzed by the Tukey test. The silicone exhibited an increase in hardness with time. However, the hardness was stable from 6 months to 1 year. It was concluded that the silicone is within the values of Shore A hardness reported in the literature, regardless of the storage period, pigmentation, and chemical disinfection.

  2. Non-destructive determination of total polyphenols content and classification of storage periods of Iron Buddha tea using multispectral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chuanwu; Liu, Changhong; Pan, Wenjuan; Ma, Fei; Xiong, Can; Qi, Li; Chen, Feng; Lu, Xuzhong; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Total polyphenols is a primary quality indicator in tea which is consumed worldwide. The feasibility of using near infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy (800-2500nm) and multispectral imaging (MSI) system (405-970nm) for prediction of total polyphenols contents (TPC) of Iron Buddha tea was investigated in this study. The results revealed that the predictive model by MSI using partial least squares (PLS) analysis for tea leaves was considered to be the best in non-destructive and rapid determination of TPC. Besides, the ability of MSI to classify tea leaves based on storage period (year of 2004, 2007, 2011, 2012 and 2013) was tested and the classification accuracies of 95.0% and 97.5% were achieved using LS-SVM and BPNN models, respectively. These overall results suggested that MSI together with suitable analysis model is a promising technology for rapid and non-destructive determination of TPC and classification of storage periods in tea leaves.

  3. A 10-day confinement to normobaric hypoxia impairs toe, but not finger temperature response during local cold stress.

    PubMed

    Kounalakis, Stylianos N; Keramidas, Michail E; Amon, Mojca; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2017-02-01

    The study examined the effects of a 10-day normobaric hypoxic confinement on the finger and toe temperature responses to local cooling. Eight male lowlanders underwent a normoxic (NC) and, in a separate occasion, a normobaric hypoxic confinement (HC; FO2: 0.154; simulated altitude ~3400m). Before and after each confinement, subjects immersed for 30min their right hand and, in a different session, their right foot in 8°C water, while breathing either room air (AIR) or a hypoxic gas mixture (HYPO). Throughout the cold-water immersion tests, thermal responses were monitored with thermocouples on fingers and toes. Neither confinement influenced thermal responses in the fingers during the AIR or HYPO test. In the foot, by contrast, HC, but not NC, reduced the average toe temperature by ~1.5°C (p=0.03), both during the AIR and HYPO test. We therefore conclude that a 10-day confinement to normobaric hypoxia per se augments cold-induced vasoconstriction in the toes, but not in the fingers. The mechanism underlying this dissimilarity remains to be established.

  4. Efficacy and safety of grepafloxacin 600 mg daily for 10 days in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Topkis, S; Swarz, H; Breisch, S A; Maroli, A N

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of grepafloxacin in treating patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) was assessed in an open-label, noncomparative study. Patients (N = 273) received grepafloxacin 600 mg QD for 10 days. A total of 237 patients (87%) completed the study. In assessable patients, the clinical success rate at follow-up (4 to 6 weeks after the last dose) was 89% (211/238 patients). In microbiologically assessable patients, the eradication rate at follow-up was 95% (86/91 isolates). Grepafloxacin was highly effective in the treatment of bacterial CAP caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (irrespective of penicillin susceptibility), Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus aureus and in the therapy of atypical pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila. Grepafloxacin was well tolerated, with the most frequently reported drug-related adverse events being taste perversion and nausea. Grepafloxacin 600 mg QD for 10 days was highly effective and well tolerated in the treatment of patients with CAP.

  5. Efficacy and safety of a 10-day course of 400 or 600 milligrams of grepafloxacin once daily for treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis: comparison with a 10-day course of 500 milligrams of ciprofloxacin twice daily.

    PubMed

    Chodosh, S; Lakshminarayan, S; Swarz, H; Breisch, S

    1998-01-01

    A randomized, prospective, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter study investigated the efficacy and safety of 10 days of oral therapy with grepafloxacin at 400 mg once daily, grepafloxacin at 600 mg once daily, or ciprofloxacin at 500 mg twice daily in 624 patients with acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. At the end of treatment, clinical success (cure or improvement) was achieved for 93% (140 of 151), 88% (137 of 156), and 91% (145 of 160) of patients in the groups receiving grepafloxacin at 400 mg, grepafloxacin at 600 mg, and ciprofloxacin, respectively (clinically evaluable population). At follow-up (14 to 28 days posttreatment), the clinical success rates were 87% (124 of 143), 81% (122 of 151), and 80% (123 of 154) in the groups receiving grepafloxacin at 400 mg and 600 mg and ciprofloxacin, respectively. A total of 379 pathogens were isolated from 290 patients, with the most common isolates being Moraxella catarrhalis (21%), Staphylococcus aureus (20%), Haemophilus influenzae (18%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (7%). For the evaluable population, successful bacteriologic response was obtained at the end of treatment for 96% (92 of 96), 98% (87 of 89), and 92% (82 of 90) of patients receiving grepafloxacin at 400 mg, grepafloxacin at 600 mg, and ciprofloxacin, respectively, and was maintained in 86% (82 of 95), 88% (78 of 89), and 82% (69 of 84) of patients, respectively, at follow-up. All pretreatment S. pneumoniae isolates were susceptible to grepafloxacin, but two strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin. All treatments were well tolerated, with the most frequently reported drug-related adverse events being nausea, taste perversion, and headache. All drug-related adverse events in the grepafloxacin groups were mild or moderate in severity. This study demonstrates that 10-day courses of grepafloxacin given at 400 or 600 mg once daily were as effective, clinically and bacteriologically, as ciprofloxacin given at 500 mg twice daily for the

  6. A randomized trial of 7-day doripenem versus 10-day imipenem-cilastatin for ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare a 7-day course of doripenem to a 10-day course of imipenem-cilastatin for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to Gram-negative bacteria. Methods This was a prospective, double-blinded, randomized trial comparing a fixed 7-day course of doripenem one gram as a four-hour infusion every eight hours with a fixed 10-day course of imipenem-cilastatin one gram as a one-hour infusion every eight hours (April 2008 through June 2011). Results The study was stopped prematurely at the recommendation of the Independent Data Monitoring Committee that was blinded to treatment arm assignment and performed a scheduled review of data which showed signals that were close to the pre-specified stopping limits. The final analyses included 274 randomized patients. The clinical cure rate at the end of therapy (EOT) in the microbiological intent-to-treat (MITT) population was numerically lower for patients in the doripenem arm compared to the imipenem-cilastatin arm (45.6% versus 56.8%; 95% CI, -26.3% to 3.8%). Similarly, the clinical cure rate at EOT was numerically lower for patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa VAP, the most common Gram-negative pathogen, in the doripenem arm compared to the imipenem-cilastatin arm (41.2% versus 60.0%; 95% CI, -57.2 to 19.5). All cause 28-day mortality in the MITT group was numerically greater for patients in the doripenem arm compared to the imipenem-cilastatin arm (21.5% versus 14.8%; 95% CI, -5.0 to 18.5) and for patients with P. aeruginosa VAP (35.3% versus 0.0%; 95% CI, 12.6 to 58.0). Conclusions Among patients with microbiologically confirmed late-onset VAP, a fixed 7-day course of doripenem was found to have non-significant higher rates of clinical failure and mortality compared to a fixed 10-day course of imipenem-cilastatin. Consideration should be given to treating patients with VAP for more than seven days to optimize clinical outcome. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00589693

  7. Obtaining and storage of ready-to-use segments from traditional orange obtained by enzymatic peeling.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Bel, P; Egea, I; Serrano, M; Romojaro, A; Pretel, M T

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize all parameters implied in the process of obtaining orange segments as minimally processed product by enzymatic peeling, from the method of segment obtaining to the storage conditions, and also to evaluate two films with different permeability. Enzymatic peeling was carried out by fruit infusion under vacuum conditions in a commercial preparation of pectinases and cellulases (Peelzym II). The best condition to obtain Cadenera segments by enzymatic peeling was 1 mL/L of Peelzym II applied at 53 kPa with three vacuum pulses of 2 min and a subsequent period of 30 min in the enzymatic solution at atmospheric pressure. The segments were packaged in two films with different permeability and they were stored for 10 days at 4 °C. Samplings were carried out after 4, 7 and 10 days of storage. The results showed that the concentration of CO(2) in the less permeable film (PA 120) ranged between 0.7 and 1.2 mL/100 mL, while in the most permeable one (PA 240) was around 0.2 mL/100 mL. Under these conditions, the weight loss was kept at low levels until day 7 of storage, showing a significant increase after 10 days. Colour (a/b) increased with the peeling process and it remained without significant changes during the whole storage period for both films. The antioxidant capacity slightly decreased after 10 days of storage. The microbial flora was reduced after the enzymatic peeling. Both the sensory and the microbiological quality were kept in adequate levels for consumption during 7 days. From this moment, they lost sweetness and aroma and the microbial development increased. Thus, the use of the most permeable film and a maximum storage time of 7 days are recommended to maintain the most quality of the segments.

  8. 10 day flight performance of the plant generic bioprocessing apparatus (PGBA) plant growth facility aboard STS-77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Alex; Chamberlain, Dale J.; Forsyth, Sasha W.; Hanna, David S.; Scovazzo, Paul; Horner, Michael B.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Todd, Paul; Heyenga, A. Gerard; Kliss, Mark H.; Bula, Raymond; Yetka, Robert

    1997-01-01

    PGBA, a plant growth facility developed for space flight biotechnology research, successfully grew a total of 30 plants in a closed, multi-crop chamber for 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor (STS-77). Artemisia annua, Catharanthus roseus, Pinus taeda, Spinacia oleracea and Trifolium repens were the five species studied during this mission. The primary mission objectives were to study the effects of microgravity for commercial and pharmaceutical production purposes. PGBA is a payload that represents a consortium of interests including BioServe Space Technologies (payload sponsor), NASA Ames Research Center (Controlled Ecological Life Support System, CELSS, Flight Program), Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), and industrial affiliates (spaceflight effects on plants and formation of plant products such as pharmaceuticals). Although BioServe is responsible for the flight hardware development and integration of PGBA, NASA Ames, WSCAR and industrial affiliates provide significant hardware subsystems and technical biological expertise support.

  9. 10 day flight performance of the plant generic bioprocessing apparatus (PGBA) plant growth facility aboard STS-77

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehn, A.; Chamberlain, D.J.; Forsyth, S.W.; Hanna, D.S.; Scovazzo, P.; Horner, M.B.; Stodieck, L.S.; Todd, P.; Heyenga, A.G.; Kliss, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    PGBA, a plant growth facility developed for space flight biotechnology research, successfully grew a total of 30 plants in a closed, multi-crop chamber for 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor (STS-77). {ital Artemisia annua, Catharanthus roseus, Pinus taeda, Spinacia oleracea and Trifolium repens} were the five species studied during this mission. The primary mission objectives were to study the effects of microgravity for commercial and pharmaceutical production purposes. PGBA is a payload that represents a consortium of interests including BioServe Space Technologies (payload sponsor), NASA Ames Research Center (Controlled Ecological Life Support System, CELSS, Flight Program), Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), and industrial affiliates (spaceflight effects on plants and formation of plant products such as pharmaceuticals). Although BioServe is responsible for the flight hardware development and integration of PGBA, NASA Ames, WSCAR and industrial affiliates provide significant hardware subsystems and technical biological expertise support. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Seasonal, Episodic and Periodic Changes in Terrestrial Water Storage Recorded By DEEP Piezometric Monitoring in the Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna DELTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, W. G.; Shamsudduha, M.; Taylor, R. G.; Ahmed, K. M.; Mukherjee, A.; Lapworth, D.; Zahid, A.

    2014-12-01

    Piezometric monitoring in vertical profile at sites across the southern and coastal floodplains of the Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna (GBM) delta confirms gravitational flow in sediments of the Bengal Aquifer System (BAS) to a depth of at least 320 m (the maximum depth of measurement). Individual and paired records of groundwater head indicate seasonal recovery and recession of water storage, periodic and episodic ground surface loading, and earth tide responses. Lunar periodicity in groundwater head fluctuation coincident with tide height at one coastal site is consistent with tidal surface loading/unloading. Diurnal tidal fluctuations in the same record change amplitude and shift phase with depth, also indicative of surface loading/unloading. Transience in the surface loading signals with depth is governed by the vertically integrated hydraulic properties of the thick BAS sedimentary sequence. Inland, earth tide responses of smaller amplitude and lacking phase shift with depth are ubiquitous in the background signal. Most records include clearly resolvable episodic deflections in the order of 0.1 m water head and up to 0.5 m water head, near simultaneous with depth, corresponding to individual episodes of rainfall. The episodic head deflections provide a record of change in terrestrial water storage (ΔTWS) comprising undifferentiated surface water flooding, soil moisture and shallow groundwater recharge - a direct land-based equivalent of satellite estimates of ΔTWS. Enigmatic short-term recession from individual deflection peaks may be related to elastic deformation and ground surface lowering under terrestrial water storage loading.

  11. Effect of Storage Period on the Changes of Odorous Compound Concentrations and Bacterial Ecology for Identifying the Cause of Odor Production from Pig Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ok Hwa; Cho, Sung Back; Han, Deug Woo; Lee, Sang Ryoung; Kwag, Jeong Hoon; Park, Sung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Odor from buildings where pigs are housed is generated by anaerobic fermentation of undigested materials in pig slurry stored for several weeks in pit. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of storage period on the level of odorous compounds in pig slurry and on its bacterial community. A slurry sample (15 L) was taken from the pit of a finisher pig building and incubated in acryl chambers for six- weeks. Slurry for analysis was sampled every two-week. Levels of odorous compounds in the slurry sample were drastically changed after two weeks of storage period; levels of phenols and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were decreased (P<0.05), whereas indoles and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) were increased (P<0.05). Among dominant bacteria, Bacteroides and Porphyromonadacese_uc_g revealed a strong positive correlation with the levels of phenols and SCFAs. Populations of AC160630_g, Acholeplasmatales_uc_g, Mollicutes_uc_g and Cloacamonas_f_uc_g positively correlated with indole and BCFAs content. Taken together, levels of odorous compounds were increased after two weeks of storage, possibly because of changes in the predominant bacterial groups to those that use protein as a carbon source in the hypo-carbohydrate conditions. PMID:27642752

  12. [Algal community structure and water quality assessment on drawdown area of Kaixian waters in Three Gorges Reservoir during winter storage period].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing-Song; Xie, Dan; Li, Zhe; Chen, Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Chen, Yong-Bo; Long, Man

    2012-04-01

    The old town area of Kaixian county was flooded and showed reservoir characteristics after the water level of Three Gorges Reservoir got 172. 8 m in December 2008. The aquatic ecology and nutritional status of Kaixian drawdown area after water storage are still rarely reported. To understand the current water environment and changes in algal community structure of Kaixian drawdown area after 172.8 m water level, the algal composition, abundance, biomass distribution and changes of its sampling spots including Hanfeng Lake were observed twice during winter storage period in January and December 2009. The trends in phytoplankton community structure were analyzed and the water quality assessment of nutritional status was carried out. The results indicated that 6 phylums, 37 genera, 69 species of phytoplankton in total were identified in the two sampling, and the dominant species were Dinophyta and Cryptophyta. The cell density and biomass in December 2009 were lower than those in January 2009. The evaluation results of algal population structure and pollution indicators showed that the nutrition level of Kaixian drawdown area during the winter storage period was mesotrophic to eutrophic type, while diversity analysis result indicated moderate pollution.

  13. [Temporal variation of trophic status in drawdown area of Hanfeng Lake in the storage period of Three Gorges Reservoir in China].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi; He, Bing-Hui; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Yu-Fei

    2015-03-01

    In order to explore the temporal variations of nutrient and biomass in drawdown area of Hanfeng Lake of the Three Gorges Reservoir region, this paper continuously observed the water quality in the storage period of 2013 October to 2014 February. And the concentrations of nutrients, water physical parameters and chlorophyll were determined. The results showed that the concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll increased, and the nutrition degree increased after the flooding. The concentrations of TN, TP, permanganate index and Chl-a in water in February 2014 were 4.7 times, 1.0 time, 0.2 times and 3.27 times the amount in October 2013. It should be noticed that the concentrations of TN and TP were above the algae growth limit value, which would be easy to cause water eutrophication with prolonged residence time. The single-factor evaluation of Chl-a reflected that the water quality was changed from poor nutrient to eutrophic. The results of N/P showed that TN in Han Feng Lake was a factor limiting the growth of algae in different period. In October to December 2013 and February 2014, TN limited the growth of algae. In January 2014, TP limited the growth of algae. The Chl-a had a significant positive correlation to pH, DO, NH4(+) -N, NO3(-) -N, TN, permanganate index and TP, but significant negative correlations were observed with SD and TEMP. The water quality was influenced by the same source of pollution during the storage period. The result of factor analysis showed that the water quality in riparian zone of Hanfeng Lake was mainly affected by pH, DO, NO3(-)-N, TN, while Chl-a, TP, NH4(+) -N and aerobic organics pollution could not be ignored. The water had self-purification capacity in the early phase of the storage period, the eutrophication aggravated with the increase of retention time, and it should be controlled. During the storage period of the Three Gorges Reservoir, the nutrition levels of south river and east river were relatively high, and the

  14. Geo-mechanical Model Testing for Stability of Underground Gas Storage in Halite During the Operational Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuguang; Zhang, Qiangyong; Li, Shucai; Liu, Dejun

    2016-07-01

    A 3D geo-mechanical model test is conducted to study the stability of underground gas storage in halite, modeled after the Jintan gas storage constructed in bedded salt rock in China. A testing apparatus is developed to generate long-term stable trapezoid geostresses onto the model cavity, corresponding to the actual gas storage cavern. The time-depending character of the material is simulated using a rheological material, which was tested using a self-developed apparatus. The model cavern is built using an ellipsoid wooden mold divided into small blocks which are assembled and placed into the designed position during the model construction. They are then pulled out one by one to form the cavern. The ellipsoid cavern wall is then lined within a latex balloon. Gas is injected into the cavity and extracted to simulate the operational process of gas injection and recovery. Optical sensors embedded into the model to measure the displacement around the cavity showed that the largest deformation occurs in the middle section of the cavity. The deformation rate increases with increasing gas pressure. At 11 MPa the cavity is in equilibrium with the geostress. The pressure is highest during the gas recovery stages, indicating that gas recovery can threaten the cavern's operational stability, while high gas injection causes rock mass compression and deformation outward from the cavern. The deformation is the combination of cavern convergence and gas-induced rebound which leads to tensile and compression during gas injection and recovery. Hence, the fatigue properties of salt rock should be studied further.

  15. Effects of different ratios and storage periods of liquid brewer's yeast mixed with cassava pulp on chemical composition, fermentation quality and in vitro ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kamphayae, Sukanya; Kumagai, Hajime; Angthong, Wanna; Narmseelee, Ramphrai; Bureenok, Smerjai

    2016-06-11

    This study aims to evaluate the chemical composition, fermentation quality and in vitro ruminal fermentation of various ratios and storage periods of liquid brewer's yeast (LBY) mixed with cassava pulp (CVP). Four mixtures of fresh LBY and CVP were made (LBY0, LBY10, LBY20 and LBY30 for LBY:CVP at 0:100, 10:90, 20:80 and 30:70, respectively) on a fresh matter basis, in 500 g in plastic bags and stored at 30 to 32 °C. After storage, the bags were opened weekly from weeks 0 to 4. Fermentation quality and in vitro gas production (IVGP) were determined, as well as the dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber and acid detergent lignin contents. The contents of CP and EE increased, whereas all other components decreased, in proportion to LBY inclusion (p<0.01). The DM and OM contents gradually decreased in weeks 3 and 4 (p<0.05), while EE contents were lowest in week 0. The pH, ammonia nitrogen per total nitrogen (NH3-N/TN) and V-score in each mixture and storage period demonstrated superior fermentation quality (pH≤4.2, NH3-N/TN ≤12.5% and V-score >90%). The pH increased and NH3-N/TN decreased, with proportionate increases of LBY, whereas the pH decreased and NH3-N/TN increased, as the storage periods were extended (p<0.01). Although IVGP decreased in proportion to the amount of LBY inclusion (p<0.01), in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) was unaffected by the mixture ratios. The highest IVGP and IVOMD were observed in week 0 (p<0.01). We have found that the inclusion of LBY (as high as 30%) into CVP improves the chemical composition of the mixture, thereby increasing the CP content, while decreasing IVGP, without decreasing fermentation quality and IVOMD. In addition, a preservation period of up to four weeks can guarantee superior fermentation quality in all types of mixtures. Therefore, we recommend limiting the use of cassava pulp as a feed ingredient, given its low

  16. Comparative study of 5-day cefcapene-pivoxil and 10-day amoxicillin or cefcapene-pivoxil for treatment of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    In order to compare the bacteriological and clinical efficacy and safety of cefcapene-pivoxil (CFPN-PI) for 5 days, CFPN-PI for 10 days, and amoxicillin (AMPC) for 10 days for the treatment of pharyngitis due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GAS) in children, a prospective multicenter randomized open-label comparative study was performed with 12 pediatric clinics in Asahikawa between June 2006 and February 2007. Two hundred and fifty children (age range 6 months to 12 years) with signs and symptoms of acute pharyngitis were enrolled. All had a positive throat culture for GAS and were fully evaluable. Eighty-two patients received CFPN-PI 9-10 mg/kg/day three times a day for 5 days, 88 received CFPN-PI three times a day for 10 days, and 80 received AMPC three times a day for 10 days. The CFPN-PI for 5 days regimen, the CFPN-PI for 10 days regimen, and the AMPC for 10 days regimen produced bacteriological eradication at the end of treatment in 93.8%, 96.2%, and 91.7% of the patients, respectively. The clinical cure rate observed at the end of therapy was 100% of the patients in the three groups. Relapse rates were 1.3% in CFPN-PI for 5 days, 4.0% in CFPN-PI for 10 days, and 2.9% in AMPC for 10 days. There were no significant differences in eradication rate, clinical cure rate, and relapse rate between the three treatment groups. The only adverse effects were infrequent diarrhea in all three groups, and a rash which occurred in 6 patients (8.0%) of the AMPC treatment group. Five days of treatment with CFPN-PI was as efficacious in bacteriological eradication and clinical response as 10 days of CFPN-PI or AMPC treatment.

  17. Comparison of the differential expression miRNAs in Wistar rats before and 10 days after S.japonicum infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When compared to the murine permissive host of Schistosoma japonicum, Wistar rats are less susceptible to Schistosoma japonicum infection, and are considered to provide a less suitable microenvironment for parasite growth and development. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), are a class of endogenous, non-coding small RNAs, that impose an additional, highly significant, level of gene regulation within eukaryotes. Methods To investigate the regulatory mechanisms provided by miRNA in the schistosome-infected rat model, we utilized a miRNA microarray to compare the progression of miRNA expression within different host tissues both before and 10 days after cercarial infection, in order to identify potential miRNAs with roles in responding to a schistosome infection. Results Among the analysed miRNAs, 16 within the liver, 61 within the spleen and 10 within the lung, were differentially expressed in infected Wistar rats. Further analysis of the differentially expressed miRNAs revealed that many important signal pathways are triggered after infection with S. japonicum in Wistar rats. These include the signal transduction mechanisms associated with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, cellular differentiation, with a particular emphasis on adipocyte and erythroid differentiation. Conclusions The results presented here include the identification of specific differentially expressed miRNAs within the liver, lungs and spleen of Wistar rats. These results highlighted the function of host miRNA regulation during an active schistosome infection. Our study provides a better understanding of the regulatory role of miRNA in schistosome infection, and host–parasite interactions in a non-permissive host environment. PMID:23617945

  18. The effect of packaging material and storage period on microwave-dried potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cubes.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Shahrzad; Ziaolhagh, Hamid Reza; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Heydari-Majd, Mojtaba; Tajali, Rohallah; Nezarat, Somayeh; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-06-01

    The effect of three packaging materials (transparent biaxially oriented polypropylene laminate (BOPP); semi-transparent BOPP; polyethylene-polyamide (PE-PA) laminate) in three packaging conditions (vacuum, N2, natural atmosphere) and in two temperature treatments (blanching in hot water; steam) on microwave-dried potato (Solanum tuberosum L.; Solanaceae) cubes was studied. After storage for 60 and 120 days, the amount of ascorbic acid (AA), shrinkage and rehydration were determined. Dried potato cubes packaged under N2 atmosphere had the highest rehydration value (3.142 %). Since there is a direct relationship between the amount of water loss and shrinkage, samples packaged in PE-PA laminate packages under vacuum showed 4.947 % less shrinkage than transparent BOPP or semi-transparent BOPP due to low permeability of these packages. Potatoes stored for 120 days resulted in 7.89 % more shrinkage than those stored for 60 days. The least loss in AA occurred in PE-PA laminate packaging. The shelf-life of potato cubes can be increased and their quantitative and qualitative characteristics can be best preserved by package-drying in PE-PA laminate under vacuum conditions.

  19. Effect of nano-composite and Thyme oil (Tymus Vulgaris L) coating on fruit quality of sweet cherry (Takdaneh Cv) during storage period

    PubMed Central

    Nabifarkhani, Naser; Sharifani, Mehdi; Daraei Garmakhany, Amir; Ganji Moghadam, Ebrahim; Shakeri, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Sweet cherry is one of the most appreciated fruit by consumers since it is an early season fruit and has an excellent quality. In this study effect of active nano composite formed from chitosan (as a matrix material), nano cellulose fiber (1% concentration) and Thyme oils (Tymus Vulgaris L) at 1% concentration on fruits quality was investigated. Treated fruits were stored at 1°C for 5 weeks and changes of different qualities attributes including weight loss, total acidity, TSS, anthocyanin, total sugar and malic acid content (by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method) were measured each week. Results showed that nano composite and Thyme oil significantly affect fruit's water retention and so decrease fruit weight loss and preserve anthocyanin (P < 0.05). None of applied treatments had any significant effects in comparison with control in regard to acidity while total sugar content and TSS significantly affected by treatment compared to control samples. Result of HPLC analysis showed that there was no significant difference between different treatment and control sample in term of malic acid concentrations during storage period but increase storage time lead to increase malic acid concentration in all treatments. For conclusion it can be Saied that fruits coating with nano-composite, lead to increase fruit shelf life, better appearance and prevents fungal growth that may be due to creation of an active packaging by these compounds. PMID:26288725

  20. Effect of nano-composite and Thyme oil (Tymus Vulgaris L) coating on fruit quality of sweet cherry (Takdaneh Cv) during storage period.

    PubMed

    Nabifarkhani, Naser; Sharifani, Mehdi; Daraei Garmakhany, Amir; Ganji Moghadam, Ebrahim; Shakeri, Alireza

    2015-07-01

    Sweet cherry is one of the most appreciated fruit by consumers since it is an early season fruit and has an excellent quality. In this study effect of active nano composite formed from chitosan (as a matrix material), nano cellulose fiber (1% concentration) and Thyme oils (Tymus Vulgaris L) at 1% concentration on fruits quality was investigated. Treated fruits were stored at 1°C for 5 weeks and changes of different qualities attributes including weight loss, total acidity, TSS, anthocyanin, total sugar and malic acid content (by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method) were measured each week. Results showed that nano composite and Thyme oil significantly affect fruit's water retention and so decrease fruit weight loss and preserve anthocyanin (P < 0.05). None of applied treatments had any significant effects in comparison with control in regard to acidity while total sugar content and TSS significantly affected by treatment compared to control samples. Result of HPLC analysis showed that there was no significant difference between different treatment and control sample in term of malic acid concentrations during storage period but increase storage time lead to increase malic acid concentration in all treatments. For conclusion it can be Saied that fruits coating with nano-composite, lead to increase fruit shelf life, better appearance and prevents fungal growth that may be due to creation of an active packaging by these compounds.

  1. Randomized, double-blind study of short-course (5 day) grepafloxacin versus 10 day clarithromycin in patients with acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Langan, C E; Zuck, P; Vogel, F; McIvor, A; Peirzchala, W; Smakal, M; Staley, H; Marr, C

    1999-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of grepafloxacin were compared with clarithromycin in a randomized, double-blind, multicentre clinical trial of 805 patients with acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB). Patients were randomized to receive grepafloxacin 400 mg od for either 5 (n = 273) or 10 days (n = 268) or clarithromycin 250 mg bd for 10 days (n = 261). Patients were assessed pre-treatment, 3-5 days during treatment, 1-3 days post-treatment and at follow-up (21-28 days post-treatment). The clinical success rates for the evaluable patients were 91% in the 5 day grepafloxacin group, 95% in the 10 day grepafloxacin group and 86% in the clarithromycin group. At follow-up, respective rates were 72%, 81% and 73%. A total of 513 pathogens were isolated from the pre-treatment sputum specimens of 400 (49%) patients. The primary pathogens were Haemophilus influenzae (36% of isolates), Haemophilus parainfluenzae (27%), Moraxella catarrhalis (12%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (11%) and Staphylococcus aureus (3%). Pathogens were eradicated or presumed eradicated at post-treatment in 85%, 91% and 58% of evaluable patients treated with grepafloxacin for 5 days, grepafloxacin 10 days and clarithromycin 10 days, respectively. The eradication rates in both grepafloxacin groups were significantly greater than the clarithromycin group (P<0.001). All treatments were well tolerated and incidence of drug-related adverse events in each group was comparable. This study demonstrates that both a 5 and a 10 day regimen of grepafloxacin 400 mg od are as clinically and bacteriologically effective as in the treatment of ABECB clarithromycin 250 mg bd. for 10 days.

  2. Chronic central administration of apelin-13 over 10 days increases food intake, body weight, locomotor activity and body temperature in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Hoggard, N; Adams, A C; Roca, P; Speakman, J R

    2008-01-01

    The peptide apelin has been located in a wide range of tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, stomach and adipose tissue. Apelin and its receptor has also been detected in the arcuate and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, which are involved in the control of feeding behaviour and energy expenditure. This distribution suggests apelin may play a role in energy homeostasis, but previous attempts to discern the effects of apelin by acute injection into the brain have yielded conflicting results. We examined the effect of a chronic 10-day intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of apelin-13 into the third ventricle on food intake, body temperature and locomotor activity in C57BL/6 mice. Apelin-13 (1 microg/day) increased food intake significantly on days 3-7 of infusion; thereafter, food intake of treated and control individuals converged. This convergence was potentially because of progressive conversion of apelin-13 to [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 which has a four-fold lower receptor binding affinity at the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, APJ. Locomotor activity was also higher in the apelin-treated mice, especially during the nocturnal peak, when most feeding occurs, and the first hours of the light phase. Body temperature was also elevated during this increased period of activity, but was otherwise unaffected. Apelin-13-infused animals gained more weight than the saline-infused controls, suggesting the elevated locomotor activity did not offset the increased food intake. Elevated locomotion and the consequent increases in body temperature were probably secondary effects to the increased food intake. These results suggest that apelin-13 may play a central role in the control of feeding behaviour and is one of only two peripheral ligands known to stimulate rather than inhibit intake. As apelin production is elevated during obesity, this may provide an important feed-forward mechanism exacerbating the problem. Antagonists of the apelin receptor may

  3. Fermentation of liquid coproducts and liquid compound diets: Part 2. Effects on pH, acid-binding capacity, organic acids and ethanol during a 6-day storage period.

    PubMed

    Scholten, R H; Rijnen, M M; Schrama, J W; Boer, H; van der Peet-Schwering, C M; Den Hartog, L A; Vesseur, P C; Verstegen, M W

    2001-06-01

    The effects of a 6-day storage period on changes in pH, acid-binding capacity, level of organic acids and ethanol of three liquid coproducts [liquid wheat starch (LWS), mashed potato steam peel (PSP) and cheese whey (CW)] and two liquid compound diets [liquid grower diet (LGD) and liquid finisher diet (LFD)] were studied. All products, except LWS, showed a significant decrease in pH and acid-binding capacity during storage. At the end of the storage period, all products reached a pH of between 3.5 and 3.9. In general, it can be concluded that the lactic acid content, and to a lesser extent the acetic acid content, increased dramatically during storage. In contrast, the ethanol content increased significantly in the liquid compound diets only. The pattern of changes in pH and organic acids during the 6-day storage period was different between the liquid coproducts and the liquid compound diets. At the start of storage, liquid coproducts are already in the 'middle' of the fermentation process, while liquid compound diets need approximately 24-36 h before fermentation begins. Consequently, in practice a different approach to obtain fermented diets is needed for liquid coproducts and liquid compound diets.

  4. Audiograms estimated from brainstem tone-evoked potentials in dogs from 10 days to 1.5 months of age.

    PubMed

    Poncelet, Luc C; Coppens, Angélique G; Deltenre, Paul F

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build audiograms from thresholds of brainstem tone-evoked potentials in dogs and to evaluate age-related change of the audiogram in puppies. Results were obtained from 9 Beagle puppies 10-47 days of age. Vertex to mastoid brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in response to 5.1-millisecond Hanning-gated sine waves with frequencies octave-spaced from 0.5 to 32 kHz were recorded. Three dogs were examined at 10, 13, 19, 25, and 45 days. Four other dogs were examined at 16 days. Data from 7 dogs between 42 and 47 days of age were pooled to obtain audiogram reference values in 1.5-month-old puppies. The best auditory threshold lowered from above 60 dB sound pressure level (SPL) to values close to 0 dB SPL between 13 and 25 days of age and then stabilized. The audible frequency range widened, including 32 kHz in all tested dogs from the 19th day. In the 7 1.5-month-old puppies, the mean auditory threshold decreased by 11 dB per octave from 0.5 to 2 kHz. The auditory threshold was lowest and held the same value from 2 to 8 kHz. The mean auditory threshold increased by 20 dB per octave from 8 to 32 kHz. Near threshold, click-evoked potentials test only a small part of the audible frequency range in dogs. Use of tone-evoked potentials may become a powerful tool in investigating dogs with possible partial hearing loss, including during the auditory system maturation period.

  5. Comparison of modified atmosphere packaging and vacuum packaging for long period storage of dry-cured ham: effects on colour, texture and microbiological quality.

    PubMed

    García-Esteban, Marta; Ansorena, Diana; Astiasarán, Iciar

    2004-05-01

    Slices of dry-cured hams (Biceps femoris muscle) were stored during 8 weeks under vacuum and modified atmospheres (100% N(2) and a mixture of 20% CO(2) and 80% N(2)) in order to study the modifications on colour, texture and microbial counts during that period. Lightness was found to be more stable when samples were stored with 20% CO(2) and 80% N(2) without statistical differences between vacuum and 100% N(2). A slight whiteness was observed in the vacuum packed samples. Yellowness increased during time in vacuum packed samples, although no differences were found among the three conditions at the end of the study. Redness values were not affected by time or by the packaging system. With regard to texture, values found for all samples were within the normal range for this type of products, although it was observed that modified atmosphere packaging preserved samples better from hardening than vacuum packaging. No safety problems were detected in relation to the microbial quality in any case. In general, no clear differences were found among the three packaging systems for colour, texture and microbial quality in the storage conditions studied.

  6. Effects of washing, peeling, storage, and fermentation on residue contents of carbaryl and mancozeb in cucumbers grown in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Saeedi Saravi, S S; Shokrzadeh, M

    2016-06-01

    Cucumbers grown in two different greenhouses were exposed to mancozeb and carbaryl at different times. The effects of 10-day preharvest period, water and detergent washing, peeling, predetermined storage period at 4°C (refrigeration), and fermentation on the reduction of residue levels in the plant tissues were investigated. Mancozeb and carbaryl residues in cucumbers were determined by gas chromatography-electron capture detection. Results showed that residue levels in samples, which were collected after 10 days following the pesticide application, were significantly lower than the samples collected after 2 h subsequent to the pesticide application. The culinary applications were effective in reducing the residue levels of the pesticides in cucumbers. As a result, non-fermentative pickling in sodium chloride and acetic acid was the most effective way to reduce the mancozeb and carbaryl residues of the cucumbers.

  7. Influence of a 10-Day Mimic of Our Ancient Lifestyle on Anthropometrics and Parameters of Metabolism and Inflammation: The “Study of Origin”

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Núñez, Begoña; Raison, Charles L.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance are intimately related entities that are common to most, if not all, chronic diseases of affluence. We hypothesized that a short-term intervention based on “ancient stress factors” may improve anthropometrics and clinical chemical indices. We executed a pilot study of whether a 10-day mimic of a hunter-gatherer lifestyle favorably affects anthropometrics and clinical chemical indices. Fifty-five apparently healthy subjects, in 5 groups, engaged in a 10-day trip through the Pyrenees. They walked 14 km/day on average, carrying an 8-kilo backpack. Raw food was provided and self-prepared and water was obtained from waterholes. They slept outside in sleeping bags and were exposed to temperatures ranging from 12 to 42°C. Anthropometric data and fasting blood samples were collected at baseline and the study end. We found important significant changes in most outcomes favoring better metabolic functioning and improved anthropometrics. Coping with “ancient mild stress factors,” including physical exercise, thirst, hunger, and climate, may influence immune status and improve anthropometrics and metabolic indices in healthy subjects and possibly patients suffering from metabolic and immunological disorders. PMID:27366752

  8. Influence of a 10-Day Mimic of Our Ancient Lifestyle on Anthropometrics and Parameters of Metabolism and Inflammation: The "Study of Origin".

    PubMed

    Pruimboom, Leo; Ruiz-Núñez, Begoña; Raison, Charles L; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance are intimately related entities that are common to most, if not all, chronic diseases of affluence. We hypothesized that a short-term intervention based on "ancient stress factors" may improve anthropometrics and clinical chemical indices. We executed a pilot study of whether a 10-day mimic of a hunter-gatherer lifestyle favorably affects anthropometrics and clinical chemical indices. Fifty-five apparently healthy subjects, in 5 groups, engaged in a 10-day trip through the Pyrenees. They walked 14 km/day on average, carrying an 8-kilo backpack. Raw food was provided and self-prepared and water was obtained from waterholes. They slept outside in sleeping bags and were exposed to temperatures ranging from 12 to 42°C. Anthropometric data and fasting blood samples were collected at baseline and the study end. We found important significant changes in most outcomes favoring better metabolic functioning and improved anthropometrics. Coping with "ancient mild stress factors," including physical exercise, thirst, hunger, and climate, may influence immune status and improve anthropometrics and metabolic indices in healthy subjects and possibly patients suffering from metabolic and immunological disorders.

  9. Comparative trial of 3 days of azithromycin versus 10 days of clarithromycin in the treatment of children with acute otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Arguedas, A; Loaiza, C; Rodriguez, F; Herrera, M L; Mohs, E

    1997-02-01

    The authors compared the efficacy, safety and tolerance of azithromycin and clarithromycin in pediatric patients with acute otitis media. A randomized, open clinical trial was performed comparing azithromycin and clarithromycin in children aged 6 months to 12 years of age with acute otitis media with effusion. Patients were allocated to azithromycin at 10 mg/kg once daily for 3 days or to clarithromycin at 15 mg/kg day divided into two equal doses for 10 days. Clinical examinations and tympanometric evaluations were performed at baseline, day 3-5, day 10-14, day 28-30 and day 50-60. Tympanocentesis fluid cultures were collected at enrollment and urine and blood samples were obtained at baseline and day 10-14. Of 100 patients enrolled, 97 were considered evaluable. The most common middle ear pathogens were Streptococcus pneumoniae (60%), Haemophilus influenzae (15%) and Staphylococcus aureus (13%). Fifty patients (100%) treated with azithromycin and 45 (95.7%) patients treated with clarithromycin had a satisfactory clinical response. Rates of persistence of middle ear effusion and possible drug related side effects were comparable. Based on the efficacy and safety results, azithromycin for 3 days and clarithromycin for 10 days are considered to represent an attractive alternative for the treatment of children with acute otitis media.

  10. Energy Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  11. 16S Based Microbiome Analysis from Healthy Subjects’ Skin Swabs Stored for Different Storage Periods Reveal Phylum to Genus Level Changes

    PubMed Central

    Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Bambach, Isabella; Patra, Vijaykumar; Trajanoski, Slave; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Microbiome research and improvements in high throughput sequencing technologies revolutionize our current scientific viewpoint. The human associated microbiome is a prominent focus of clinical research. Large cohort studies are often required to investigate the human microbiome composition and its changes in a multitude of human diseases. Reproducible analyses of large cohort samples require standardized protocols in study design, sampling, storage, processing, and data analysis. In particular, the effect of sample storage on actual results is critical for reproducibility. So far, the effect of storage conditions on the results of microbial analysis has been examined for only a few human biological materials (e.g., stool samples). There is a lack of data and information on appropriate storage conditions on other human derived samples, such as skin. Here, we analyzed skin swab samples collected from three different body locations (forearm, V of the chest and back) of eight healthy volunteers. The skin swabs were soaked in sterile buffer and total DNA was isolated after freezing at -80°C for 24 h, 90 or 365 days. Hypervariable regions V1-2 were amplified from total DNA and libraries were sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq desktop sequencer in paired end mode. Data were analyzed using Qiime 1.9.1. Summarizing all body locations per time point, we found no significant differences in alpha diversity and multivariate community analysis among the three time points. Considering body locations separately significant differences in the richness of forearm samples were found between d0 vs. d90 and d90 vs. d365. Significant differences in the relative abundance of major skin genera (Propionibacterium, Streptococcus, Bacteroides, Corynebacterium, and Staphylococcus) were detected in our samples in Bacteroides only among all time points in forearm samples and between d0 vs. d90 and d90 vs. d365 in V of the chest and back samples. Accordingly, significant differences were detected

  12. LunHab: Interactive effects of a 10-day sustained exposure to hypoxia and bedrest on aerobic exercise capacity in male lowlanders.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Michail E; Mekjavic, Igor B; Eiken, Ola

    2017-04-09

    The study examined the interactive effects of a 10-day exposure to hypoxia and bedrest on the whole body peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2 peak ) during maximal exercise, and on skeletal-muscle and cerebral oxygenation during submaximal exercise. Nine males underwent three 10-day confinements, in a Latin-square order: (i) a normoxic bedrest [NBR; partial pressure of inspired O2 (PI O2 ) = 134.2 ± 0.7 mmHg], (ii) a hypoxic bedrest (HBR; PI O2  = 102.9 ± 0.1 mmHg at day 1, 91.5 ± 1.2 mmHg at days 3-10), and (iii) a hypoxic ambulation (HAMB; PI O2 as in HBR). Before, one (R + 1) and three (R+3) days after each confinement, subjects performed exhaustive, incremental-load and moderate-intensity constant-load (CLTs) cycle-ergometry trials, while breathing either room air, or a hypoxic gas mixture. During the CLTs, changes in the regional oxygenation of the cerebral frontal cortex, and the vastus lateralis and intercostal muscles were monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy. At R+1, the confinement-related impairment in V˙O2 peak was greater after HBR than after NBR or HAMB, regardless of whether the trial was performed in room-air or hypoxia (HBR: -16.2%, NBR: -8.3%, HAMB: -4.1%; P = 0.001). During the CLTs, bedrest aggravated the exercise-induced reduction in locomotor- and respiratory-muscle oxygenation (P ≤ 0.05); an effect that was less after HBR than after NBR (P ≤ 0.05). The hypoxia exercise-induced cerebral vasodilatatory response was blunted by HBR, likely due to the marked hyperventilation-dependent hypocapnea, attendant to the sustained hypoxic stimulus. Hence, short-term exposure to hypoxia potentiates the reduction in V˙O2 peak , but it mitigates the impairment in skeletal-muscle oxidative capacity induced by bedrest. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. RNAi of the translation inhibition gene 4E-BP identified from the hard tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, affects lipid storage during the off-host starvation period of ticks.

    PubMed

    Kume, Aiko; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Takazawa, Yuko; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2012-08-01

    4E-BP, an eIF4E-binding protein, is well known as a cap-dependent translation inhibitor. Here, the 4E-BP homolog, Hl4E-BP, was isolated and identified from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. Hl4E-BP transcripts were ubiquitously expressed in the active stages, including the larvae, nymphs, and female adults, and the transcription levels were found to be higher in unfed than engorged ticks. In contrast, the expression levels of non-phosphorylated Hl4E-BP, which is a 13.4-kDa protein detected by the anti-recombinant Hl4E-BP antibody, were the highest in engorged ticks and significantly decreased progressively during the unfed starvation period of ticks. The functional role of Hl4E-BP as a metabolic brake was verified by histochemical observations on the lipid storage in midguts and fat bodies during the starvation period using ticks injected with dsHl4E-BP. The results indicate that Hl4E-BP is highly relevant to the lipid storage of ticks during the non-feeding starvation period. Our results suggest, for the first time, that Hl4E-BP may have a crucial role in the starvation resistance of ticks in an off-host condition via lipid metabolism control, although it was unclear whether Hl4E-BP might be involved in lipid synthesis regulation and/or lipid consumption inhibition.

  14. Comparison of clinical efficacy between 3-day combined clavulanate/amoxicillin preparation treatment and 10-day amoxicillin treatment in children with pharyngolaryngitis or tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Haruo; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Inoue, Nobue; Ishikawa, Nobuyasu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Himi, Kyoko; Kurosaki, Tomomichi

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of 3-day treatment with a combined clavulanate/amoxicillin preparation (Clavamox combination dry syrup for pediatric cases) and 10-day treatment with amoxicillin against pediatric pharyngolaryngitis and tonsillitis caused by Group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus was compared. Among the patients included in the efficacy evaluation (54 from the clavulanate/amoxicillin group and 43 from the amoxicillin group), the clinical response rate on completion of treatment was 98.1 % in the clavulanate/amoxicillin group and 92.9 % in the amoxicillin group, thus supporting the equivalent efficacy of these two therapies. The Group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus eradication rate at approximately 1-2 weeks after completion/discontinuation of treatment was 65.4 % in the clavulanate/amoxicillin group and 85.4 % in the amoxicillin group. Even in cases from which the pathogen continued to be isolated, relapse/recurrence of clinical symptoms was seldom seen. Urinalysis, conducted to assess the presence or absence of acute glomerulonephritis, revealed no abnormality in any patient. These results suggest that 3-day treatment with this clavulanate/amoxicillin preparation is expected to provide a valid means of treating pediatric pharyngolaryngitis and tonsillitis caused by Group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus.

  15. EPIC 211391664b: A 32 M ⊕ Neptune-size Planet in a 10 Day Orbit Transiting an F8 Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Oscar; Grziwa, Sascha; Gandolfi, Davide; Fridlund, Malcolm; Endl, Michael; Deeg, Hans J.; Cagigal, Manuel P.; Lanza, Antonino F.; Prada Moroni, Pier G.; Smith, Alexis M. S.; Korth, Judith; Bedell, Megan; Cabrera, Juan; Cochran, William D.; Cusano, Felice; Csizmadia, Szilard; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Guenther, Eike W.; Hatzes, Artie P.; Nespral, David; Pätzold, Martin; Prieto-Arranz, Jorge; Rauer, Heike

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of K2-98b (EPIC 211391664b), a transiting Neptune-size planet monitored by the K2 mission during its Campaign 5. We combine the K2 time-series data with ground-based photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations to confirm the planetary nature of the object and derive its mass, radius, and orbital parameters. K2-98b is a warm Neptune-like planet in a 10 day orbit around a V = 12.2 mag F-type star with M ⋆ = 1.074 ± 0.042 M ⊙, R ⋆ = {1.311}-0.048+0.083 R ⊙, and age of {5.2}-1.0+1.2 {Gyr}. We derive a planetary mass and radius of M p = 32.2 ± 8.1 M ⊕ and R p = {4.3}-0.2+0.3 R ⊕. K2-98b joins the relatively small group of Neptune-size planets whose mass and radius have been derived with a precision better than 25%. We estimate that the planet will be engulfed by its host star in ∼3 Gyr, due to the evolution of the latter toward the red giant branch.

  16. Effects of 10 days 6 degrees head-down tilt on the responses to fluid loading and lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisch, F.; Heer, M.; Beck, L.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Kropp, J.; Schulz, H.; Hillebrecht, A.; Meyer, M.

    1991-01-01

    In an international collaborative project six normal male subjects were studied before, during and after 10 days 6 degrees HDT. Fluid intake was controlled at 40 ml/(kgbw day). Urine volume and body weight were determined daily. Fluid loading and LBNP were performed in all three phases of the study. Body weight diminished by 2.6% because of fluid loss. Blood volume diminished by 13%. The responses to fluid loading were similar in the three phases of the study. Sixty minutes after end of infusion only 5.5% of the infused saline remained in the intravascular compartment. Excess interstitial fluid was eliminated in the next 24 hs but a negative balance was recorded also in the following day. The compliance of the lower limbs expressed as the rate of limb volume change/unit LBNP change was increased at the end of the HDT phase and during the post HDT phase. The set point of intravascular volume was defended, as shown by the response to FL. HDT increased the compliance of the lower limbs.

  17. In vitro evaluation of COM.TEC apheresis platelet concentrates using a preparation set and pathogen inactivation over a storage period of five days.

    PubMed

    Moog, R; Fröhlich, A; Mayaudon, V; Lin, L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vitro data on platelets collected by apheresis, processed on a preparation set followed by photochemical treatment (PCT). Fifteen single-donor platelet concentrates (PCs) were collected by apheresis (COM.TEC blood cell separator, Fresenius, Bad Homburg, Germany). The platelets were transferred to the preparation set and plasma was removed after centrifugation to resuspend the platelets in approximately 37% plasma and 63% platelet additive solution InterSol. PCT was done by exposing the platelets to amotosalen HCl followed by illumination with ultraviolet light. Blood cell counts and in vitro PLT function were measured up to 5 days. An average of 3.44 +/- 0.28 x 10(11) platelets were collected in a product volume of 351 +/- 21 mL. Plasma removal resulted in a mean platelet loss of 7.8%. After PCT, a progressive decrease in platelet function was observed. LDH level rose through storage (171 +/- 81 U/L) to levels approximating LDH levels observed post-collection (180 +/- 103 U/L). There was a gradual decrease of the platelets to respond to hypotonic shock response from 90 +/- 9 % post-plasma reduction to 48 +/- 16% at day 5. All PLT units met the European requirements for leukoreduction and the pH limit of 6.8 up to day 5 post-collection. The new preparation set was capable of producing platelet units meeting the requirements for PCT. Despite differences observed in in vitro platelet function parameters, PLTs at storage day 5 fit the German and European guidelines.

  18. Forecasting Flooding in the Brahmaputra and Ganges Delta of Bangladesh on Short (1-10 days), Medium (20-30 days) and Seasonal Time Scales (1-6 months)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. J.; Hoyos, C. D.; Hopson, T. M.; Chang, H.; Jian, J.

    2007-12-01

    Following the devastating flood years of 1998 during which 60% of Bangladesh was under water for a period of 3 months, the Climate Forecast Applications in Bangladesh (CFAB) project was formed with funding by USAID and NSF which eventually resulted in a joint project with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF), the Asian Disaster Preparedness Centre (ADPC) and the Bangladesh Flood Forecasting and Warning Centre. The project was organized and developed through the Georgia Institute of Technology. The aim of CFAB was to develop innovative methods of extending the warning of flooding in Bangladesh noting that there was a unique problem: India provided no upstream discharge data to Bangladesh so that before CFAB the maximum lead time of a forecast was that given by measuring river discharge at the India-Bangladesh border: no lead-time at the border and 2 days in the southern parts of the country. Given that the Brahmaputra and Ganges catchment areas had to be regarded as essentially unguaged, it was clear that innovative techniques had to be developed. On of the basic criterion was that the system should provide probabilistic forecasts in order for the Bangladeshis to assess risk. A three-tier system was developed to allow strategic and tactical decisions to be made for agricultural purposes and disaster mitigation: seasonal (1-6 months: strategic), medium range (20-30 days: strategic/tactical) and short range (1-10 days: tactical). The system that has been developed brings together for the first time operational meteorological forecasts (ensemble forecasts from ECMWF), with satellite and discharge data and a suite of hydrological models. In addition, with ADPC and FFWC we have developed an in-country forecast dispersion system that allows a rapid dissemination. The system has proven to be rather successful, especially in the short range. The flooding events of 2004 were forecast with all forecasting tiers at the respective lead time. In

  19. Energy storage apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.; Evans, H. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A high efficiency, flywheel type energy storage device which comprises an electronically commutated d.c. motor/generator unit having a massive flywheel rotor magnetically suspended around a ring shaped stator is presented. During periods of low energy demand, the storage devices were operated as a motor, and the flywheel motor was brought up to operating speed. Energy was drawn from the device functioning as a generator as the flywheel rotor rotated during high energy demand periods.

  20. Effect of 10 days of bedrest on metabolic and vascular insulin action: a study in individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Mette P; Alibegovic, Amra C; Højbjerre, Lise; Vaag, Allan; Stallknecht, Bente; Dela, Flemming

    2010-04-01

    Physical inactivity is a known risk factor for type 2 diabetes. We studied whole body and forearm insulin sensitivity in subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes [persons with low birth weight (LBW group; n = 20) and first-degree relatives to type 2 diabetic patients (FDR group; n = 13)] as well as a control (CON) group (n = 20) matched for body mass index, age, and physical activity levels before and after 10 days of bedrest. Subjects were studied by hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic clamp combined with arterial and deep venous catheterization of the forearm. Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. All groups responded with a decrease in whole body insulin sensitivity in response to bedrest [CON group: 6.8 +/- 0.5 to 4.3 +/- 0.3 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) (P < 0.0001), LBW group: 6.2 +/- 0.5 to 4.3 +/- 0.3 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) (P < 0.0001), and FDR group: 4.3 +/- 0.7 to 3.1 +/- 0.3 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) (P = 0.068)]. The percent decrease was significantly greater in the CON group compared with the FDR group (CON group: 34 +/- 4%, LBW group: 27 +/- 4%, and FDR group: 10 +/- 13%). Forearm insulin-stimulated glucose clearance decreased significantly in the CON and LBW groups in response to bedrest; in the FDR group, clearance was very low before bedrest and no change was observed. Before bedrest, the CON and LBW groups demonstrated a significant increase in FBF during hyperinsulinemia; after bedrest, an increase in FBF was observed only in the CON group. In conclusion, bedrest induced a pronounced reduction in whole body, skeletal muscle, and vascular insulin sensitivity in the CON and LBW groups. The changes were most pronounced in the CON group. In the FDR group, insulin resistance was already present before bedrest, but even this group displayed a high sensitivity to changes in daily physical activity.

  1. Nitrogen deposition may enhance soil carbon storage via change of soil respiration dynamic during a spring freeze-thaw cycle period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guoyong; Xing, Yajuan; Xu, Lijian; Wang, Jianyu; Meng, Wei; Wang, Qinggui; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Zhidong; Jiang, Siling; Liu, Boqi; Han, Shijie

    2016-06-01

    As crucial terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests play an important role in global soil carbon dioxide flux, and this process can be sensitive to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It is often reported that the nitrogen addition induces a change in soil carbon dioxide emission in growing season. However, the important effects of interactions between nitrogen deposition and the freeze-thaw-cycle have never been investigated. Here we show nitrogen deposition delays spikes of soil respiration and weaken soil respiration. We found the nitrogen addition, time and nitrogen addition×time exerted the negative impact on the soil respiration of spring freeze-thaw periods due to delay of spikes and inhibition of soil respiration (p < 0.001). The values of soil respiration were decreased by 6% (low-nitrogen), 39% (medium-nitrogen) and 36% (high-nitrogen) compared with the control. And the decrease values of soil respiration under medium- and high-nitrogen treatments during spring freeze-thaw-cycle period in temperate forest would be approximately equivalent to 1% of global annual C emissions. Therefore, we show interactions between nitrogen deposition and freeze-thaw-cycle in temperate forest ecosystems are important to predict global carbon emissions and sequestrations. We anticipate our finding to be a starting point for more sophisticated prediction of soil respirations in temperate forests ecosystems.

  2. Nitrogen deposition may enhance soil carbon storage via change of soil respiration dynamic during a spring freeze-thaw cycle period

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guoyong; Xing, Yajuan; Xu, Lijian; Wang, Jianyu; Meng, Wei; Wang, Qinggui; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Zhidong; Jiang, Siling; Liu, Boqi; Han, Shijie

    2016-01-01

    As crucial terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests play an important role in global soil carbon dioxide flux, and this process can be sensitive to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It is often reported that the nitrogen addition induces a change in soil carbon dioxide emission in growing season. However, the important effects of interactions between nitrogen deposition and the freeze-thaw-cycle have never been investigated. Here we show nitrogen deposition delays spikes of soil respiration and weaken soil respiration. We found the nitrogen addition, time and nitrogen addition×time exerted the negative impact on the soil respiration of spring freeze-thaw periods due to delay of spikes and inhibition of soil respiration (p < 0.001). The values of soil respiration were decreased by 6% (low-nitrogen), 39% (medium-nitrogen) and 36% (high-nitrogen) compared with the control. And the decrease values of soil respiration under medium- and high-nitrogen treatments during spring freeze-thaw-cycle period in temperate forest would be approximately equivalent to 1% of global annual C emissions. Therefore, we show interactions between nitrogen deposition and freeze-thaw-cycle in temperate forest ecosystems are important to predict global carbon emissions and sequestrations. We anticipate our finding to be a starting point for more sophisticated prediction of soil respirations in temperate forests ecosystems. PMID:27358164

  3. Nitrogen deposition may enhance soil carbon storage via change of soil respiration dynamic during a spring freeze-thaw cycle period.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guoyong; Xing, Yajuan; Xu, Lijian; Wang, Jianyu; Meng, Wei; Wang, Qinggui; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Zhidong; Jiang, Siling; Liu, Boqi; Han, Shijie

    2016-06-30

    As crucial terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests play an important role in global soil carbon dioxide flux, and this process can be sensitive to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It is often reported that the nitrogen addition induces a change in soil carbon dioxide emission in growing season. However, the important effects of interactions between nitrogen deposition and the freeze-thaw-cycle have never been investigated. Here we show nitrogen deposition delays spikes of soil respiration and weaken soil respiration. We found the nitrogen addition, time and nitrogen addition×time exerted the negative impact on the soil respiration of spring freeze-thaw periods due to delay of spikes and inhibition of soil respiration (p < 0.001). The values of soil respiration were decreased by 6% (low-nitrogen), 39% (medium-nitrogen) and 36% (high-nitrogen) compared with the control. And the decrease values of soil respiration under medium- and high-nitrogen treatments during spring freeze-thaw-cycle period in temperate forest would be approximately equivalent to 1% of global annual C emissions. Therefore, we show interactions between nitrogen deposition and freeze-thaw-cycle in temperate forest ecosystems are important to predict global carbon emissions and sequestrations. We anticipate our finding to be a starting point for more sophisticated prediction of soil respirations in temperate forests ecosystems.

  4. A computer simulation of the oxygen balance in a cold climate winter storage WSP during the critical spring warm-up period.

    PubMed

    Banks, C J; Koloskov, G B; Lock, A C; Heaven, S

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers factors that determine the oxygen balance in extreme climate waste stabilisation ponds during the critical spring warm-up period. At this time BOD load on the pond is a maximum, due to accumulation of wastewater under the ice during the winter. The paper describes the operation of a typical cold climate WSP and the events leading to a balanced steady state system as spring develops into summer. A mathematical model to simulate conditions within a batch fed experimental pond over the transient period is described. To model temperature changes in the water body experimental data were fitted to a generalised equation based on diurnal fluctuations in air temperature. The results are plotted in a normalised form and show the diurnal fluctuation and time lapse as the depth of the pond increases. Maximum daily water temperature lags behind maximum light intensity. Bacterial growth is simulated by a Monod kinetic model in which growth rate depends on initial substrate concentration; temperature compensation is applied using a temperature activity coefficient. Oxygen utilisation is calculated from substrate removal. Algal growth rate is more complicated as it is affected by temperature and light availability. Algal oxygen production potential is considered in terms of its primary metabolite yield, which is then used in a Monod equation to estimate the growth rate. The model uses a mass balance approach to determine dissolved oxygen concentration in the pond. The model is still in a simple form but shows reasonable agreement, in terms of events and time lapses, to measured parameters in experimental ponds recovering from ice cover.

  5. The storage period of the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor blocks does not influence the concentration and purity of the isolated DNA in a series of 83 renal and thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nechifor-Boilă, Adela Corina; Loghin, Andrada; Vacariu, Victor; Halaţiu, Vasile Bogdan; Borda, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Optimal recovery of nucleic acids from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is highly dependent on a series of pre-extraction steps, mainly related (but not limited) to fixation. The aim of our study was to investigate if the storage period of the FFPE blocks had a significant effect on the isolated DNA. We examined the quantity and purity of the isolated DNA from 83 FFPE blocks, corresponding to malignant thyroid (n=28) and renal (n=55) carcinomas that had been stored in our department for up to eight years. The DNA extraction protocol was based on a precipitation method (MasterPure™ DNA Purification Kit, Epicentre), in accordance to the manufacturer instructions, optimized in our laboratory. A spectrophotometer was used to determine the yield (A260) and purity (A260/A280 ratio) of the isolated DNA. We successfully isolated good DNA quantity and purity from all our study cases (mean concentration: 223.4 ± 104.16 ng/μL; mean A260/A280 ratio: 1.68 ± 0.09). Moreover, no statistically significant differences were observed between tumor blocks stored for 2-3 years and 7-8 years, respectively, both in terms of DNA quantity (p=0.196) and purity (p=0.663). In conclusion, we successfully validated an efficient, reproducible DNA extraction technique that provided a good range of DNA concentrations and purity, regardless the type of tissue (thyroid or kidney). Moreover, we demonstrated that the storage period of the FFPE blocks does not have a significant influence on the DNA quantity and purity.

  6. Alterations of the phylloepiphytic bacterial community associated with interactions of Escherichia coli O157:H7 during storage of packaged spinach at refrigeration temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Velasco, Gabriela; Davis, Marjorie; Boyer, Renee R; Williams, Robert C; Ponder, Monica A

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of packaging and storage temperature on the spinach phylloepiphytic bacterial community and fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Freshly harvested spinach was rinsed and/or disinfected, packaged and stored under typical retail conditions (4 degrees C) or under temperature abuse conditions (10 degrees C) for a period of 15 days. The final population size of culturable epiphytic bacteria after 15 days of storage was not affected by the temperature of storage or the presence of E. coli O157:H7. However, analysis of the bacterial community using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16s rDNA revealed changes with time of storage and the presence of E. coli O157:H7. Excision and sequencing of prominent DGGE bands identified that the majority of sequences belonged to the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Alphaprotebacteria. After 10 days of storage at 4 degrees C or 10 degrees C the population became more dominated by psychrotrophic bacteria. Removal of the epiphytic bacteria resulted in significant increases in numbers of E coli O157:H7 at 10 degrees C and was associated with decreased expression of E. coli O157:H7 virulence (stxA, curli, eaeA) and stress response (rpoS, sodB) genes. In conclusion, storage temperature and time of storage of packaged spinach affected the diversity of the epiphytic spinach microbiota which influenced the growth, establishment, physiology and potentially virulence of E. coli O157:H7.

  7. Energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  8. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  10. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  11. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  12. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  13. Effects of a 10-Day Intensive Health Promotion Program Combining Diet and Physical Activity on Body Composition, Physical Fitness, and Blood Factors of Young Adults: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Soon; Lee, Jae Koo; Yeun, Young Ran

    2017-04-11

    BACKGROUND A lifestyle characterized by poor eating habits and physical inactivity is a risk factor for multiple lifestyle diseases in young adults. This study assessed the effects of implementing an intensive 10-day health promotion program combining diet and physical activities on body composition, physical fitness, and biochemical parameters of young adults. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this randomized pilot study, 30 female undergraduate students were randomly allocated to an intervention and a control group. The health promotion program consisted of unlimited amounts of vegetarian food; aerobic, flexibility, and strength exercises (3 hours/day); lectures on health (3 hours/day); massage practice (2 hours/day); and healthy cooking practice (1 hour/day). The effects of the intervention were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. RESULTS The intensive 10-day health promotion program significantly reduced body weight, body mass index, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood glucose, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. At the same time, participants demonstrated increased back muscle, leg muscle, and grip strength; waist and shoulder flexibility; balance; and cardiorespiratory endurance. CONCLUSIONS The intensive 10-day health promotion program is a viable intervention for improving body composition, physical fitness, glycemic control, and blood lipid levels in young adults.

  14. The First 10 Days; Interest Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Fulton, Jean

    Interest centers are designed to meet the needs of the other children in the class while a small group works with the teacher on the Oral Language Program. This manual is intended to assist teachers in organizing the centers, which will be used for about an hour each day. Arrangement of furniture is discussed, suggestions are made for an art…

  15. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  16. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1981-01-01

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  17. Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program designed to demonstrate the storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis using heat or cold available from waste or other sources during a surplus period is described. Factors considered include reduction of peak period demand and electric utility load problems and establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. The initial thrust of the STES Program toward utilization of ground water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage is emphasized.

  18. 40 CFR 61.275 - Periodic report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.275 Periodic report. (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel to... storage vessel in which: (i) The internal floating roof is not resting on the surface of the...

  19. 40 CFR 61.275 - Periodic report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.275 Periodic report. (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel to... storage vessel in which: (i) The internal floating roof is not resting on the surface of the...

  20. 40 CFR 61.275 - Periodic report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.275 Periodic report. (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel to... storage vessel in which: (i) The internal floating roof is not resting on the surface of the...

  1. 40 CFR 61.275 - Periodic report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.275 Periodic report. (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel to... storage vessel in which: (i) The internal floating roof is not resting on the surface of the...

  2. 40 CFR 61.275 - Periodic report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.275 Periodic report. (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel to... storage vessel in which: (i) The internal floating roof is not resting on the surface of the...

  3. Investigation of Lithium Ion Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Leonine; Rao, Gopalkrishna M.

    1999-01-01

    NASA/GSFC is interested in flying lithium ion cells for geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) satellites. To determine the preferred solstice storage conditions for the lithium ion chemistry, we have been studying either a constant current storage with a maximum voltage clamp or storage with only a voltage clamp. The cells used for this study are two 4Ah SAFT cylindrical lithium ion cells, two 1.5Ah Wilson Great Batch lithium ion cells, and one 8Ah Lithium Technology lithium polymer cell. In each pair, one cell is clamped at 4V, and the other is trickle charged at C/500 with a 4.lV clamp. The Lithium Technology cell is only undergoing voltage clamped storage testing. After each storage period the cells are subjected to a capacity test (C/2 discharge, C/10 charge) and a charge retention test at room temperature. Results after 4 weeks and 8 weeks of storage testing will be presented here.

  4. 12 CFR 329.104 - Ten-day grace period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ten-day grace period. 329.104 Section 329.104... INTEREST ON DEPOSITS § 329.104 Ten-day grace period. This interpretive rule provides for 10-day grace... calendar days following the maturity of a time deposit, the bank may continue to pay interest on...

  5. Terrestrial Energy Storage SPS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Terrestrial energy storage systems for the SSP system were evaluated that could maintain the 1.2 GW power level during periods of brief outages from the solar powered satellite (SPS). Short-term outages of ten minutes and long-term outages up to four hours have been identified as "typical" cases where the ground-based energy storage system would be required to supply power to the grid. These brief interruptions in transmission could result from performing maintenance on the solar power satellite or from safety considerations necessitating the power beam be turned off. For example, one situation would be to allow for the safe passage of airplanes through the space occupied by the beam. Under these conditions, the energy storage system needs to be capable of storing 200 MW-hrs and 4.8 GW-hrs, respectively. The types of energy storage systems to be considered include compressed air energy storage, inertial energy storage, electrochemical energy storage, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and pumped hydro energy storage. For each of these technologies, the state-of-the-art in terms of energy and power densities were identified as well as the potential for scaling to the size systems required by the SSP system. Other issues addressed included the performance, life expectancy, cost, and necessary infrastructure and site locations for the various storage technologies.

  6. Storage systems for solar thermal power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, J. E.; Gordon, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    A major constraint to the evolution of solar thermal power systems is the need to provide continuous operation during periods of solar outage. A number of high temperature thermal energy storage technologies which have the potential to meet this need are currently under development. The development status is reviewed of some thermal energy storage technologies specifically oriented towards providing diurnal heat storage for solar central power systems and solar total energy systems. These technologies include sensible heat storage in caverns and latent heat storage using both active and passive heat exchange processes. In addition, selected thermal storage concepts which appear promising to a variety of advanced solar thermal system applications are discussed.

  7. Electricity storage using a thermal storage scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation, many of which have an unpredictably intermittent nature, will inevitably lead to a greater demand for large-scale electricity storage schemes. For example, the expanding fraction of electricity produced by wind turbines will require either backup or storage capacity to cover extended periods of wind lull. This paper describes a recently proposed storage scheme, referred to here as Pumped Thermal Storage (PTS), and which is based on "sensible heat" storage in large thermal reservoirs. During the charging phase, the system effectively operates as a high temperature-ratio heat pump, extracting heat from a cold reservoir and delivering heat to a hot one. In the discharge phase the processes are reversed and it operates as a heat engine. The round-trip efficiency is limited only by process irreversibilities (as opposed to Second Law limitations on the coefficient of performance and the thermal efficiency of the heat pump and heat engine respectively). PTS is currently being developed in both France and England. In both cases, the schemes operate on the Joule-Brayton (gas turbine) cycle, using argon as the working fluid. However, the French scheme proposes the use of turbomachinery for compression and expansion, whereas for that being developed in England reciprocating devices are proposed. The current paper focuses on the impact of the various process irreversibilities on the thermodynamic round-trip efficiency of the scheme. Consideration is given to compression and expansion losses and pressure losses (in pipe-work, valves and thermal reservoirs); heat transfer related irreversibility in the thermal reservoirs is discussed but not included in the analysis. Results are presented demonstrating how the various loss parameters and operating conditions influence the overall performance.

  8. Electricity storage using a thermal storage scheme

    SciTech Connect

    White, Alexander

    2015-01-22

    The increasing use of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation, many of which have an unpredictably intermittent nature, will inevitably lead to a greater demand for large-scale electricity storage schemes. For example, the expanding fraction of electricity produced by wind turbines will require either backup or storage capacity to cover extended periods of wind lull. This paper describes a recently proposed storage scheme, referred to here as Pumped Thermal Storage (PTS), and which is based on “sensible heat” storage in large thermal reservoirs. During the charging phase, the system effectively operates as a high temperature-ratio heat pump, extracting heat from a cold reservoir and delivering heat to a hot one. In the discharge phase the processes are reversed and it operates as a heat engine. The round-trip efficiency is limited only by process irreversibilities (as opposed to Second Law limitations on the coefficient of performance and the thermal efficiency of the heat pump and heat engine respectively). PTS is currently being developed in both France and England. In both cases, the schemes operate on the Joule-Brayton (gas turbine) cycle, using argon as the working fluid. However, the French scheme proposes the use of turbomachinery for compression and expansion, whereas for that being developed in England reciprocating devices are proposed. The current paper focuses on the impact of the various process irreversibilities on the thermodynamic round-trip efficiency of the scheme. Consideration is given to compression and expansion losses and pressure losses (in pipe-work, valves and thermal reservoirs); heat transfer related irreversibility in the thermal reservoirs is discussed but not included in the analysis. Results are presented demonstrating how the various loss parameters and operating conditions influence the overall performance.

  9. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing

  10. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with

  11. Beta-carotene storage, conversion to retinoic acid, and induction of the lipocyte phenotype in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Renata B; Ziulkoski, Ana L; Fortuna, Vitor A; Guaragna, Regina M; Guma, Fátima C R; Trugo, Luiz C; Borojevic, Radovan

    2004-05-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major site of retinol (ROH) metabolism and storage. GRX is a permanent murine myofibroblastic cell line, derived from HSCs, which can be induced to display the fat-storing phenotype by treatment with retinoids. Little is known about hepatic or serum homeostasis of beta-carotene and retinoic acid (RA), although the direct biogenesis of RA from beta-carotene has been described in enterocytes. The aim of this study was to identify the uptake, metabolism, storage, and release of beta-carotene in HSCs. GRX cells were plated in 25 cm(2) tissue culture flasks, treated during 10 days with 3 micromol/L beta-carotene and subsequently transferred into the standard culture medium. beta-Carotene induced a full cell conversion into the fat-storing phenotype after 10 days. The total cell extracts, cell fractions, and culture medium were analyzed by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography for beta-carotene and retinoids. Cells accumulated 27.48 +/- 6.5 pmol/L beta-carotene/10(6) cells, but could not convert it to ROH nor produced retinyl esters (RE). beta-Carotene was directly converted to RA, which was found in total cell extracts and in the nuclear fraction (10.15 +/- 1.23 pmol/L/10(6) cells), promoting the phenotype conversion. After 24-h chase, cells contained 20.15 +/- 1.12 pmol/L beta-carotene/10(6) cells and steadily released beta-carotene into the medium (6.69 +/- 1.75 pmol/ml). We conclude that HSC are the site of the liver beta-carotene storage and release, which can be used for RA production as well as for maintenance of the homeostasis of circulating carotenoids in periods of low dietary uptake.

  12. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-09-30

    Energy storage technology is critical if the U.S. is to achieve more than 25% penetration of renewable electrical energy, given the intermittency of wind and solar. Energy density is a critical parameter in the economic viability of any energy storage system with liquid fuels being 10 to 100 times better than batteries. However, the economical conversion of electricity to fuel still presents significant technical challenges. This project addressed these challenges by focusing on a specific approach: efficient processes to convert electricity, water and nitrogen to ammonia. Ammonia has many attributes that make it the ideal energy storage compound. The feed stocks are plentiful, ammonia is easily liquefied and routinely stored in large volumes in cheap containers, and it has exceptional energy density for grid scale electrical energy storage. Ammonia can be oxidized efficiently in fuel cells or advanced Carnot cycle engines yielding water and nitrogen as end products. Because of the high energy density and low reactivity of ammonia, the capital cost for grid storage will be lower than any other storage application. This project developed the theoretical foundations of N2 catalysis on specific catalysts and provided for the first time experimental evidence for activation of Mo 2N based catalysts. Theory also revealed that the N atom adsorbed in the bridging position between two metal atoms is the critical step for catalysis. Simple electrochemical ammonia production reactors were designed and built in this project using two novel electrolyte systems. The first one demonstrated the use of ionic liquid electrolytes at room temperature and the second the use of pyrophosphate based electrolytes at intermediate temperatures (200 – 300 ºC). The mechanism of high proton conduction in the pyrophosphate materials was found to be associated with a polyphosphate second phase contrary to literature claims and ammonia production rates as high as 5X 10

  13. Transfer of Listeria monocytogenes serovars from cantaloupe rind surfaces to fresh cut pieces during preparation: effect of native microflora waiting period and storage temperature on the population of pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most recent outbreak of listerosis linked to consumption of fresh-cut cantaloupes suggests the need to investigate the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of native microflora of cantaloupe pieces during storage. Whole cantaloupes were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (8.3 CFU/ml ...

  14. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of days after the last one. The Menstrual Cycle Most girls get their first period between the ... to skip periods or to have an irregular menstrual cycle. Illness, rapid weight change, or stress can also ...

  15. Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well as the technical challenges and research goals for storing hydrogen on board a vehicle.

  16. Archive Storage Media Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Reviews requirements for a data archive system and describes storage media alternatives that are currently available. Topics discussed include data storage; data distribution; hierarchical storage architecture, including inline storage, online storage, nearline storage, and offline storage; magnetic disks; optical disks; conventional magnetic…

  17. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is a vital resource and also a dynamic component of the water cycle. Unconfined aquifer storage is less responsive to short term weather conditions than the near surface terrestrial water storage (TWS) components (soil moisture, surface water, and snow). However, save for the permanently frozen regions, it typically exhibits a larger range of variability over multi-annual periods than the other components. Groundwater is poorly monitored at the global scale, but terrestrial water storage (TWS) change data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission are a reasonable proxy for unconfined groundwater at climatic scales.

  18. 12 CFR 329.104 - Ten-day grace period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ten-day grace period. 329.104 Section 329.104... INTEREST ON DEPOSITS § 329.104 Ten-day grace period. This interpretive rule provides for 10-day grace periods during which interest may be paid on a deposit without violating § 329.2. (a) During the...

  19. Effect of storage time and temperature on Poisson ratio of tomato fruit skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuna-Broniowska, I.; Gładyszewska, B.; Ciupak, A.

    2012-02-01

    The results of studies investigating the effects of storage time and temperature on variations in Poisson ratio of the skin of two greenhouse tomato varieties - Admiro and Encore were presented. In the initial period of the study, Poisson ratio of the skin of tomato fruit cv. Admiro, stored at 13°C, varied between 0.7 and 0.8. After the successive 10 days of the experiment, it decreased to approximately 0.6 and was stabilized until the end of study. By contrast, the skin of tomatoes cv. Encore was characterized by lower values and lower variability of Poisson ratio in the range of 0.4 to 0.5 during storage. The examinations involving tomato fruit cv. Admiro stored at 21°C were completed after 12 days due to fruit softening and progressive difficulty with preparing analytical specimens. The value of Poisson ratio for both varieties stored at room temperature fluctuated throughout the experiment to approximate 0.5.

  20. Pathogen inactivation during passage of stormwater through a constructed reedbed and aquifer transfer, storage and recovery.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, J P S; Toze, S; Hodgers, L; Shackelton, M; Barry, K; Page, D; Dillon, P

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the potential inactivation rates of selected enteric microorganisms in captured urban stormwater within a constructed reedbed and in tertiary carbonated aquifer during an Aquifer Storage, Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) scheme. The study was undertaken in-situ in the constructed reedbed and aquifer using diffusion chambers. The results showed that all tested bacteria had one log(10) reduction time of less than 6 and 2.5 days respectively in constructed reedbeds and aquifer, which suggests that presence of enteric bacteria in the recovered water is unlikely. However, adenovirus and Cryptosporidium oocysts showed lower inactivation rates with one log(10) reduction times of more than 33 days in the constructed reedbeds. This means that the constructed reedbed with a mean residence time 10 days cannot be relied upon as an efficient treatment barrier for virus and protozoa. Storage of stormwater in aquifer with brackish water resulted in slow inactivation of enteric viruses over the 35 day incubation period with adenovirus and rotavirus showing slowest inactivation times (extrapolated T(90) of >100 days). Cryptosporidium oocysts showed similar inactivation rate in the constructed reedbed and aquifer.

  1. Single-dose (30 mg/kg) azithromycin compared with 10-day amoxicillin/clavulanate for the treatment of uncomplicated acute otitis media: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial☆

    PubMed Central

    Block, Stan L; Arrieta, Antonio; Seibel, Matthew; McLinn, Samuel; Eppes, Stephen; Murphy, Mary J

    2003-01-01

    Background: The long half-life of azithromycin allows for single-dose oral therapy for acute otitis media (AOM). Objective: This study was designed to compare the efficacy and tolerability of single-dose azithromycin with 10-day, twice-daily amoxicillin/clavulanate for the treatment of new-onset, uncomplicated AOM in children. Methods: Children aged 6 months to 12 years with new-onset AOM were randomly assigned to receive either a single 30-mg/kg dose of azithromycin or standard-dose amoxicillin/clavulanate (45 mg/kg administered BID for 10 days) in a double-blind, double-placebo, multicenter clinical trial. The diagnosis of AOM was based on specific clinical signs and symptoms, and was confirmed by pneumatic otoscopy and acoustic reflectometry (level ≥3). Clinical response was assessed on days 12–16 and 28–32. Results: Mean (SD) age of children receiving azithromycin (n = 173) or amoxicillin/clavulanate (n = 173) was 2.7 (2.3) years and 3.4 (2.8) years, respectively, with 43% and 36% ≤2 years of age. Most (53.2%) of the children were boys, and most (51.2%) were white. Clinical success rates (intent-to-treat) for azithromycin and amoxicillin/clavulanate, respectively, were 87% and 88% (95% CI, −9.2 to 6.5) on day 12–16 and 75% and 75% (95% CI, −10.2 to 10.5) on day 28–32. The incidences of treatment-related adverse events for azithromycin and amoxicillin/clavulanate were 16.8% and 22.5%, respectively. Corresponding rates of diarrhea were 6.4% and 12.7%, respectively. Vomiting, which was generally mild, occurred in 7 children in each group. One azithromycin patient and 5 amoxicillin/clavulanate patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events. The compliance rate for azithromycin was significantly higher than that for amoxicillin/clavulanate (99% vs 83%; P<0.001). Conclusions: In this trial comparing the efficacy of single-dose azithromycin (30 mg/kg) with twice-daily amoxicillin/clavulanate (45 mg/kg) for the treatment of new

  2. Cathodochromic storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosomworth, D. R.; Moles, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    A memory and display device has been developed by combing a fast phosphor layer with a cathodochromic layer in a cathode ray tube. Images are stored as patterns of electron beam induced optical density in the cathodo-chromic material. The stored information is recovered by exciting the backing, fast phosphor layer with a constant current electron beam and detecting the emitted radiation which is modulated by absorption in the cathodochromic layer. The storage can be accomplished in one or more TV frames (1/30 sec each). More than 500 TV line resolution and close to 2:1 contrast ratio are possible. The information storage time in a dark environment is approximately 24 hours. A reconstituted (readout) electronic video signal can be generated continuously for times in excess of 10 minutes or periodically for several hours.

  3. Period Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may also have other symptoms, such as lower back pain, nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. Period pain is not ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  4. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  5. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  6. Periodized wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossnagle, G.; Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.

    1993-12-01

    The properties of periodized Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and contrasted against their counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrate by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of periodized wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and several tabulated values are included.

  7. [Antibiotic therapy against acute tonsillopharyngitis in children due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococci: comparison of clinical efficacy, the bactericidal effects, and effects on oral flora between cefditoren pivoxil for 5 days and amoxicillin for 10 days].

    PubMed

    Tsumura, Naoki; Nagai, Kensuke; Hidaka, Hidenobu; Otsu, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yuhei; Ikezawa, Shigeru; Honma, Shinichi; Shindo, Shizuo; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2011-06-01

    We compared the clinical efficacy, the bactericidal effects, effect on the oral microbial flora, and adverse reactions between cefditoren pivoxil (CDTR-PI) for 5 days and amoxicillin (AMPC) for 10 days in children with acute group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) tonsillopharyngitis, and simultaneously examined the emm genotype and drug susceptibility of the isolated GAS. The results showed that the clinical efficacy was 100% for CDTR-PI and 97.9% for AMPC, with no difference between the two groups, and the bacterial elimination rate was 100% in both groups. No serious adverse event was noted in either group. On the other hand, concerning changes in the oral microbial flora between before and after treatment, the amount of bacteria showed no change in the CDTR-PI group (p = 0.5761) but clearly decreased in the AMPC group (p = 0.0049). This indicates that CDTR-PI does not disturb the oral microbial flora compared with AMPC. Also, the emm types determined in the 112 GAS strains isolated in this study were similar to those that have recently been isolated frequently in Japan. Concerning the drug resistance, none of the isolates showed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, but 45% of them were resistant to macrolides. The advantages of short-term treatment are considered to include a lower cost, improvement in drug compliance, decrease in the frequency of the occurrence of adverse reactions, decrease in the frequency of the appearance of drug-resistant strains, and alleviation of the psychological burden of patients and their parents. For these reasons, we conclude that CDTR-PI for 5 days is a useful option for the treatment of acute GAS tonsillopharyngitis in children.

  8. Portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, POR-006 SKID D storage plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, O.D.

    1997-09-04

    This document provides a storage plan for portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, AND POR-006 SKID D. The exhausters will be stored until they are needed by the TWRS (Tank Waste Remediation Systems) Saltwell Pumping Program. The storage plan provides criteria for portable exhauster storage, periodic inspections during storage, and retrieval from storage.

  9. A Plutonium Storage Container Pressure Measurement Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Grim, T.J.

    2002-05-10

    Plutonium oxide and metal awaiting final disposition are currently stored at the Savannah River Site in crimp sealed food pack cans. Surveillances to ensure continued safe storage of the cans include periodic lid deflection measurements using a mechanical device.

  10. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  11. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  12. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  13. Storage requirements for Georgia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Robert F.

    1983-01-01

    The suitability of a stream as a source of water supply or for waste disposal may be severely limited by low flow during certain periods. A water user may be forced to provide storage facilities to supplement the natural flow if the low flow is insufficient for his needs. This report provides data for evaluating the feasibility of augmenting low streamflow by means of storage facilities. It contains tabular data on storage requirements for draft rates that are as much as 60 percent of the mean annual flow at 99 continuous-record gaging stations, and draft-storage diagrams for estimating storage requirements at many additional sites. Through analyses of streamflow data, the State was divided into four regions. Draft-storage diagrams for each region provide a means of estimating storage requirements for sites on streams where data are scant, provided the drainage area, mean annual flow, and the 7-day, 10-year low flow are known or can be estimated. These data are tabulated for the 99 gaging stations used in the analyses and for 102 partial-record sites where only base-flow measurements have been made. The draft-storage diagrams are useful not only for estimating in-channel storage required for low-flow augmentation, but also can be used for estimating the volume of off-channel storage required to retain wastewater during low-flow periods for later release. In addition, these relationships can be helpful in estimating the volume of wastewater to be disposed of by spraying on land, provided that the water disposed of in this manner is only that for which streamflow dilution water is not currently available. Mean annual flow can be determined for any stream within the State by using the runoff map in this report. Low-flow indices can be estimated by several methods, including correlation of base-flow measurements with concurrent flow at nearby continuous-record gaging stations where low-flow indices have been determined.

  14. Changes in antioxidant and fruit quality in hot water-treated ‘Hom Thong’ banana fruit during storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of hot water treatment on antioxidant phytochemicals and fruit quality were investigated in banana fruit of cv. Gros Michel (Musa acuminata, AAA Group, locally called cv. Hom Thong) by immersing fruits in hot water (50 'C) for 10 min, before storage at 25 'C for 10 days or 14 'C for 8 da...

  15. Energy storage criteria handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.; Cole, R. L.; Hull, A. B.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide information and criteria necessary for the selection and sizing of energy storage technologies for use at U.S. Naval facilities. The handbook gives Naval base personnel procedures and information to select the most viable energy storage options to provide the space conditioning (heating and cooling) and domestic hot water needs of their facility. The handbook may also be used by contractors, installers, designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the energy storage business. The handbook is organized into three major sections: a general section, a technical section, and an example section. While a technical background is assumed for the latter two sections, the general section is simply written and can serve as an introduction to the field of energy storage. The technical section examines the following energy storage technologies: sensible heat storage, latent heat storage, cold storage, thermochemical storage, mechanical storage, pumped hydro storage, and electrochemical storage. The example section is limited to thermal storage and includes examples for: water tank storage, rockbed storage, latent heat storage, and cold water storage.

  16. Holographic Optical Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timucin, Dogan A.; Downie, John D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    , and security medium as well. The evolution of holographic optical memories has followed a path not altogether different from holography itself, with several cycles of alternating interest over the past four decades. P. J. van Heerden is widely credited for being the first to elucidate the principles behind holographic data storage in a 1963 paper, predicting bit storage densities on the order of 1/lambda(sup 3) with source wavelength lambda - a fantastic capacity of nearly 1 TB/cu cm for visible light! The science and engineering of such a storage paradigm was heavily pursued thereafter, resulting in many novel hologram multiplexing techniques for dense data storage, as well as important advances in holographic recording materials. Ultimately, however, the lack of such enabling technologies as compact laser sources and high performance optical data I/O devices dampened the hopes for the development of a commercial product. After a period of relative dormancy, successful applications of holography in other arenas sparked a renewed interest in holographic data storage in the late 1980s and the early 1990s. Currently, with most of the critical optoelectronic device technologies in place and the quest for an ideal holographic recording medium intensified, holography is once again considered as one of several future data storage paradigms that may answer our constantly growing need for higher-capacity and faster-access memories.

  17. Storage time and eggshell colour of pheasant eggs vs. the number of blastodermal cells and hatchability results.

    PubMed

    Kozuszek, Radosław; Kontecka, Helena; Nowaczewski, Sebastian; Rosiński, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the number of the embryo blastodermal cells and hatchability of pheasant from eggs of different eggshell colours depending on the length of the storage period before hatching. On the day of collection, dark-brown and olive eggs were characterised by a similar and significantly higher (by about 48%) number of embryo BCs in comparison with light-brown and blue eggs. Dark-brown eggs stored longer than one day had the highest, while blue-shelled eggs the lowest, number of BCs. The number of BCs found in eggs with blue and light-brown coloured eggshells stored for 10 days was similar and significantly lower (by 27.7%) in comparison with dark-brown eggs. With the lengthening of the storage period, the number of blastodermal cells in eggs of all eggshell colours declined as a result of necrobiosis. In comparison with the dark-brown and olive-shelled eggs, eggs with blue eggshells had higher (by about 7.0%) weight loss during the 21 days until hatching. The dark-brown and olive eggs were found to have a 10.3% higher proportion of eggs considered as fertilised in comparison with the blue-shelled eggs. Eggs with dark-brown shells stored for 2-4 days prior to hatching, in comparison with blue-shelled eggs, had a higher proportion of fertilised eggs. The dark-brown and olive eggs stored for 7 and more days before hatching possessed a higher value of this trait in comparison with the eggs of light-brown and blue eggshells (x = 80.9 against 66.4%). The highest drop in the share of fertilised eggs, which amounted on average to 3.25% for each day of storage, was observed in the blue-shelled eggs. The dark-brown eggs stored for 7 days before being placed in an incubator had higher hatchability from fertilised eggs (by 17.8%) in comparison with the eggs with blue eggshells. In the case of eggs stored for 8 to 10 days, values for this trait were higher for the dark-brown and olive-coloured eggs than for the blue-shelled eggs. The highest mean

  18. Update on Saturn's energetic electron periodicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, James F.

    2017-01-01

    The periodicities in fluxes of energetic electrons (110-365 keV) in Saturn's magnetosphere were determined from late 2004 to mid-2016. The electron periods were calculated using Lomb periodogram analyses within windows of 200 days at sliding intervals of 10 days, which tracked changes in the periodicity. Sometimes the periodicity showed a clear duality, as in 2007-2008, while at other times the two periods came together so closely as to be indistinguishable, as after equinox in 2010 and in 2015. At still other times, the periodicity apparently vanished altogether, as in 2014. These periodicities generally agreed with those of other phenomena such as the magnetic field and radio emissions. Whether dual or mono, the periods generally remained between 10.58 h and 10.84 h, with two statistical peaks at 10.68 h and 10.81 h. This observation suggests that magnetospheric periodicities at Saturn lie within a limited range of values, which places constraints on the generative mechanism for the phenomena.

  19. Fate of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in simulated swine manure storage.

    PubMed

    Joy, Stacey R; Li, Xu; Snow, Daniel D; Gilley, John E; Woodbury, Bryan; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L

    2014-05-15

    The behavior of three antibiotics (bacitracin, chlortetracycline, and tylosin) and two classes of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), tet and erm, were monitored in swine manure slurry under anaerobic conditions. First-order decay rates were determined for each antibiotic with half-lives ranging from 1 day (chlortetracycline) to 10 days (tylosin). ARGs were monitored in the swine manure slurry, and losses of approximately 1 to 3 orders of magnitude in relative abundance were observed during the 40 day storage period. First-order degradation profiles were observed for chlortetracycline and its corresponding resistance genes, tet(X) and tet(Q). Tylosin was degraded to approximately 10% of the starting concentration by day 40; however, the relative abundance of erm(B) remained at 50-60% of the initial relative abundance while the relative abundance of erm(F) decreased by 80-90%, consistent with tylosin. These results indicate that tet resistance genes respond primarily to chlortetracycline antimicrobials, and may be lost when the parent tetracycline compound is degraded. In contrast, erm(B) resistance gene may respond to a range of antimicrobials in animal manure, and may persist despite losses of tylosin.

  20. Digital image storage.

    PubMed

    Wallack, Seth

    2008-01-01

    Digital image archival requires less physical storage space, allows for rapid storage and retrieval and avoids loss in image quality over time or with image duplication compared with film storage. Because medical imaging data are critically important and, by law, must be stored in a safe, accessible manner, it is imperative not to have one computer error destroy all copies of the image data. Several options for image storage media are available including magnetic tape, optical media, spinning disks and solid state. Other considerations include on-site vs. off-site storage, redundancy, on-line vs. off-line storage, and removable storage media for disaster recovery. The different storage media can be used in different configurations to provide sufficient protection of digital data. Choose a storage system that will keep your data safe from unauthorized access, hardware failure, and clinic disasters.

  1. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of conducting experiments with the formed elements of the blood under conditions of microgravity opens up important opportunities to improve the understanding of basic formed element physiology, as well as, contribution to improved preservation of the formed elements for use in transfusion. The physiological, biochemical, and physical changes of the membrane of the erythrocyte, platelet, and leukocyte was studied during storage under two specific conditions: standard blood bank conditions and microgravity, utilizing three FDA approved plastic bags. Storage lesions; red cell storage on Earth; platelet storage on Earth; and leukocyte storage Earth were examined. The interaction of biomaterials and blood cells was studied during storage.

  2. Storage and flood routing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, R.W.; Godfrey, R.G.

    1960-01-01

    The basic equations used in flood routing are developed from the law of continuity. In each method the assumptions are discussed to enable the user to select an appropriate technique. In the stage-storage method the storage is related to the mean gage height in the reach under consideration. In the discharge-storage method the storage is determined, from weighted values of inflow and outflow discharge. In the reservoir-storage method the storage is considered as a function of outflow discharge alone. A detailed example is given for each method to illustrate that particular technique.

  3. Storage Characteristics of Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Smart, M. C.; Blosiu, J. O.; Surampudi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Lithium ion cells are being developed under the NASA/Air Force Consortium for the upcoming aerospace missions. First among these missions are the Mars 2001 Lander and Mars 2003 Lander and Rover missions. Apart from the usual needs of high specific energy, energy density and long cycle life, a critical performance characteristic for the Mars missions is low temperature performance. The batteries need to perform well at -20 C, with at least 70% of the rated capacity realizable at moderate discharge rates (C/5). Several modifications have been made to the lithium ion chemistry, mainly with respect to the electrolyte, both at JPL' and elsewhere to achieve this. Another key requirement for the battery is its storageability during pre-cruise and cruise periods. For the Mars programs, the cruise period is relatively short, about 12 months, compared to the Outer Planets missions (3-8 years). Yet, the initial results of our storage studies reveal that the cells do sustain noticeable permanent degradation under certain storage conditions, typically of 10% over two months duration at ambient temperatures, attributed to impedance buildup. The build up of the cell impedance or the decay in the cell capacity is affected by various storage parameters, i.e., storage temperature, storage duration, storage mode (open circuit, on buss or cycling at low rates) and state of charge. Our preliminary studies indicate that low storage temperatures and states of charge are preferable. In some cases, we have observed permanent capacity losses of approx. 10% over eight-week storage at 40 C, compared to approx. 0-2% at O C. Also, we are attempting to determine the impact of cell chemistry and design upon the storageability of Li ion cells.

  4. Atmospheric drivers of storage water use in Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, H.; Steppe, K.; Nadezhdina, N.; de Beeck, M. Op; Deckmyn, G.; Meiresonne, L.; Lemeur, R.; Čermák, J.; Ceulemans, R.; Janssens, I. A.

    2007-02-01

    In this study we determined the microclimatic drivers of storage water use in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in a temperate climate. The storage water use was modeled using the ANAFORE model, integrating a dynamic water flow and - storage model with a process-based transpiration model. The model was calibrated and validated with sap flow measurements for the growing season of 2000 (26 May-18 October). Because there was no severe soil drought during the study period, we were able to study atmospheric effects. Incoming radiation was the main driver of storage water use. The general trends of sap flow and storage water use are similar, and follow more or less the pattern of incoming radiation. Nevertheless, considerable differences in the day-to-day pattern of sap flow and storage water use were observed, mainly driven by vapour pressure deficit (VPD). During dry atmospheric conditions (high VPD) storage water use was reduced. This reduction was disproportionally higher than the reduction in measured sap flow. Our results suggest that the trees did not rely more on storage water during periods of atmospheric drought, without severe soil drought. A third important factor was the tree water deficit. When storage compartments were depleted beyond a threshold, storage water use was limited due to the low water potential in the storage compartments. The maximum relative contribution of storage water to daily transpiration was also constrained by an increasing tree water deficit.

  5. Sequential determination of fat- and water-soluble vitamins in green leafy vegetables during storage.

    PubMed

    Santos, J; Mendiola, J A; Oliveira, M B P P; Ibáñez, E; Herrero, M

    2012-10-26

    The simultaneous analysis of fat- and water-soluble vitamins from foods is a difficult task considering the wide range of chemical structures involved. In this work, a new procedure based on a sequential extraction and analysis of both types of vitamins is presented. The procedure couples several simple extraction steps to LC-MS/MS and LC-DAD in order to quantify the free vitamins contents in fresh-cut vegetables before and after a 10-days storage period. The developed method allows the correct quantification of vitamins C, B(1), B(2), B(3), B(5), B(6), B(9), E and provitamin A in ready-to-eat green leafy vegetable products including green lettuce, ruby red lettuce, watercress, swiss chard, lamb's lettuce, spearmint, spinach, wild rocket, pea leaves, mizuna, garden cress and red mustard. Using this optimized methodology, low LOQs were attained for the analyzed vitamins in less than 100 min, including extraction and vitamin analysis using 2 optimized procedures; good repeatability and linearity was achieved for all vitamins studied, while recoveries ranged from 83% to 105%. The most abundant free vitamins found in leafy vegetable products were vitamin C, provitamin A and vitamin E. The richest sample on vitamin C and provitamin A was pea leaves (154 mg/g fresh weight and 14.4 mg/100g fresh weight, respectively), whereas lamb's lettuce was the vegetable with the highest content on vitamin E (3.1 mg/100 g fresh weight). Generally, some losses of vitamins were detected after storage, although the behavior of each vitamin varied strongly among samples.

  6. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  7. Wet storage in the USA: recent experience and directions

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, K.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.

    1986-03-01

    Wet storage has been the only licensed option for spent fuel management for US commercial power reactor operators, except for a period of commercial reprocessing at the Nuclear Fuel Services facility, 1965-71. Developments are underway to bring dry storage to licensed status on the US by mid-1986. However, wet storage will remain the predominant storage method, at least beyond the turn of the century. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 establishes current US policy regarding responsibilities for spent fuel management. The Nuclear Waste Confidence Rulemaking proceedings address the viability of extended wet storage for US reactors. US utilities have moved aggressively to implement optimized utilization of wet storage technology, assisted in some areas by federal programs. This paper summarizes US policy and regulatory aspects of wet storage and the status of several wet storage technology developments, including: dense racking, double tiering, credit for burnup in rack designs, transshipment, impacts of extended burnup, rod consolidation, and pool decommissioning.

  8. Energy Storage Criteria Handbook.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    of energy storage. A glossary defines most of the technical terms used. , The general section first outlines the available energy storage technologies...the end of each chapter and in the sources listed in the bibliography. The example section is limited to thermal energy storage. First , the . currently...a technical back’ )und wanting to thoroughly under- stand one or more areas of energy storage -chnology should first read Chapter 2, and possibly

  9. Thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The planning and implementation of activities associated with lead center management role and the technical accomplishments pertaining to high temperature thermal energy storage subsystems are described. Major elements reported are: (1) program definition and assessment; (2) research and technology development; (3) industrial storage applications; (4) solar thermal power storage applications; and (5) building heating and cooling applications.

  10. Storage Media for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautman, Rodes

    1983-01-01

    Reviews computer storage devices designed to provide additional memory for microcomputers--chips, floppy disks, hard disks, optical disks--and describes how secondary storage is used (file transfer, formatting, ingredients of incompatibility); disk/controller/software triplet; magnetic tape backup; storage volatility; disk emulator; and…

  11. Depletion of florfenicol amine in tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) maintained in a recirculating aquaculture system following Aquaflor(R)-medicated feed therapy (20 mg/kg BW/d for 10 days)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Whitsel, Melissa K.; Charles, Shawn; Schleis, Susan M.; Crouch, Louis S.; Endris, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaflor® [50% w w−1 florfenicol (FFC)], is approved for use in freshwater-reared warmwater finfish which include tilapia Oreochromis spp. in the United States to control mortality from Streptococcus iniae. The depletion of florfenicol amine (FFA), the marker residue of FFC, was evaluated after feeding FFC-medicated feed to deliver a nominal 20 mg FFC kg−1 BW d−1 dose (1.33× the label use of 15 mg FFC kg−1 BW d−1) to Nile tilapia O. niloticus and hybrid tilapia O. niloticus × O. aureus held in a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) at production-scale holding densities. Florfenicol amine concentrations were determined in fillets taken from 10 fish before dosing and from 20 fish at nine time points after dosing (from 1 to 240 h post-dosing). Water samples were assayed for FFC before, during and after the dosing period. Parameters monitored included daily feed consumption and biofilter function (levels of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate). Mean fillet FFA concentration decreased from 13.77 μg g−1 at 1-h post dosing to 0.39 μg g−1 at 240-h post dosing. Water FFC concentration decreased from a maximum of 1400 ng mL−1 at 1 day post-dosing to 847 ng mL−1 at 240 h post-dosing. There were no adverse effects noted on fish, feed consumption or biofilter function associated with FFC-medicated feed administration to tilapia.

  12. Air-storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, T.J.

    1981-10-01

    The air storage system, the critical component making CAES technically and economically feasible, is described in three of its forms. All have geological containments and reflect economics of scale requiring fairly large plant ratings and storage capacities. All three systems also are based on good precedent experience and there are a number of willing bidders in the engineering and construction field attesting to the readiness of the technology. The salient features of each storage system type are summarized. Hard rock caverns have the widest siting opportunity in a variety of geology, are well within construction capability in good quality rock with maximum control of system design through engineering, have the highest cost of the storage system options study and the potential for longest time to startup, are difficult and expensive to expand for increased storage or plant rating. The salt-solutioned cavern has limited siting opportunities, is a very economical storage system, and storage increase is possible through cavern additions.

  13. 77 FR 38758 - Proposed Amendment to the Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits; Comment Period Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... of Identity for Distilled Spirits; Comment Period Extension AGENCY: Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade..., Proposed Amendment to the Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits, for an additional 10 days. In Notice... proposes to amend the standards of identity regulations for distilled spirits to include ``Cacha a'' as...

  14. Effects of gravity on the circadian period in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Dean M.; Demaria, Victor H.; Fuller, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of increased gravity force on the circadian period of body temperature and activity of rats was investigated using rats implanted with a small radio telemetry device and, after a 2-week recovery and a 3-week control period at 1G, rotated at for 4 weeks at a constant 2G field in a 18-ft-diam centrifuge. Measurements of the mean freerunning period of the temperature and activity rhythms after 10 days showed that the exposure to 2G led to a functional separation of the pacemakers that regulate the activity and the temperature in the animals. Each pacemaker reacted differently: the activity period increased and the temperature period decreased. By the third or the fourth week, the activity and the temperature periods have returned to 1G control levels.

  15. Lysosomal Storage Disorders in the Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Staretz-Chacham, Orna; Lang, Tess C.; LaMarca, Mary E.; Krasnewich, Donna; Sidransky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders are rare inborn errors of metabolism, with a combined incidence of 1 in 1500 to 7000 live births. These relatively rare disorders are seldom considered when evaluating a sick newborn. A significant number of the >50 different lysosomal storage disorders, however, do manifest in the neonatal period and should be part of the differential diagnosis of several perinatal phenotypes. We review the earliest clinical features, diagnostic tests, and treatment options for lysosomal storage disorders that can present in the newborn. Although many of the lysosomal storage disorders are characterized by a range in phenotypes, the focus of this review is on the specific symptoms and clinical findings that present in the perinatal period, including neurologic, respiratory, endocrine, and cardiovascular manifestations, dysmorphic features, hepatosplenomegaly, skin or ocular involvement, and hydrops fetalis/congenital ascites. A greater awareness of these features may help to reduce misdiagnosis and promote the early detection of lysosomal storage disorders. Implementing therapy at the earliest stage possible is crucial for several of the lysosomal storage disorders; hence, an early appreciation of these disorders by physicians who treat newborns is essential. PMID:19336380

  16. Evidences for isochronous behavior in electron and ion storage for a low energy electrostatic storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanjers, T. L.; Sullivan, M. R.; Reddish, T. J.; Hammond, P.

    2014-02-01

    The temporal width of a stored bunch of low energy (~30 eV) electrons circulating in desk-top sized passive electrostatic storage ring has been observed to be unchanging with orbit number. The storage ring has been operated with a range of asymmetric voltages for both stored electron and ion bunches with a particular focus on controllably probing the edges of stable storage regions to explore variations in the temporal widths as a function of storage time. For electron storage an operating condition is identified in which the temporal width approaches a constant value after a period of increase - isochronous behavior. Measurements using stored ions indicate similar behavior can be achieved. Possible mechanisms for the observed behavior are discussed.

  17. Solar thermal power storage applications lead laboratory overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radosevich, L. G.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of the applications elements of the thermal energy storage for Solar Thermal Applications program is described. The program includes the accelerated development of thermal storage technologies matched to solar thermal power system requirements and scheduled milestones. The program concentrates on storage development in the FY80 to 85 time period with emphasis on the more near-term solar thermal power system application.

  18. Ceramic Electrolyte Membrane Technology: Enabling Revolutionary Electrochemical Energy Storage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-05

    Electrochemical Energy Storage The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official...Revolutionary Electrochemical Energy Storage Report Title The goal of this work is to enable the development of safe, high energy density batteries by...Reporting Period: January 1, 2014 – December 31, 2014) CERAMIC ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY: ENABLING REVOLUTIONARY ELECTROCHEMICAL ENERGY STORAGE

  19. Challenges in hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüth, F.

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogen is one possible medium for energy storage and transportation in an era beyond oil. Hydrogen appears to be especially promising in connection with electricity generation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells in cars. However, before such technologies can be implemented on a larger scale, satisfactory solutions for on-board storage of hydrogen are required. This is a difficult task due to the low volumetric and gravimetric storage density on a systems level which can be achieved so far. Possibilities include cryogenic storage as liquid hydrogen, high pressure storage at 70 MPa, (cryo)adsorptive storage, or various chemical methods of binding and releasing hydrogen. This survey discusses the different options and the associated advantages and disadvantages.

  20. Global terrestrial water storage capacity and flood potential using GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reager, J. T.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial water storage anomaly from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and precipitation observations from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) are applied at the regional scale to show the usefulness of a remotely sensed, storage-based flood potential method. Over the GRACE record length, instances of repeated maxima in water storage anomaly that fall short of variable maxima in cumulative precipitation suggest an effective storage capacity for a given region, beyond which additional precipitation must be met by marked increases in runoff or evaporation. These saturation periods indicate the possible transition to a flood-prone situation. To investigate spatially and temporally variable storage overflow, a monthly storage deficit variable is created and a global map of effective storage capacity is presented for possible use in land surface models. To highlight a flood-potential application, we design a monthly global flood index and compare with Dartmouth Flood Observatory flood maps.

  1. Preliminary survey and evaluation of nonaquifer thermal energy storage concepts for seasonal storage

    SciTech Connect

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1980-11-01

    Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The main energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)

  2. Measurement of storage ring motion at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The mechanical stability of the Advanced Light Source storage ring is examined over a period of 1.5 years from the point of view of floor motion. The storage ring beam position monitor stability is examined under various operating conditions.

  3. 19 CFR 163.5 - Methods for storage of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methods for storage of records. 163.5 Section 163... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.5 Methods for storage of records. (a) Original records... required retention periods and as original records, whether paper or electronic, unless alternative...

  4. Determination of storage coefficients during pumping and recovery.

    PubMed

    Ashjari, Javad

    2013-01-01

    An aquifer test is used mostly to determine the storage coefficient and transmissivity. Although residual drawdown data are widely used in estimating the transmissivity of aquifers, the estimation of storage coefficients with recovery data is controversial. Some researchers have proposed methods to estimate storage coefficients with recovery data by assuming equality of storage coefficients for the recovery and pumping periods (S = S'). The aim of this study is to determine storage coefficients without such an assumption, that is, S≠S'. The method is a modified version of Banton-Bangoy's method without considering drawdown data due to pumping. Drawdown is plotted vs. the logarithmic ratio (t'/t) or time since pumping stopped to the duration of pumping and the ratio of storage coefficient during recovery to the storage coefficient from the pumping period (S'/S). The method is verified with one case study and two synthetic examples. Thus, it is possible to determine storage coefficient of pumping period accurately without any data from pumping period by recovery data.

  5. 18 CFR 157.215 - Underground storage testing and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of the Natural Gas Act for Certain Transactions and Abandonment § 157.215 Underground storage testing...-period; (2) The quantity of natural gas injected into the prospective storage fields pursuant to the... REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT APPLICATIONS FOR...

  6. Enhancing Resilience in Youth through a 10-Day Developmental Voyage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayhurst, Jill; Hunter, John A.; Kafka, Sarah; Boyes, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the potential for resilience to be enhanced in a group of youth participating in a developmental voyage, and to identify the factors that contribute to increased resilience following the voyage. Two studies are reported. Study 1 revealed that voyage participants experienced increased resilience over the course…

  7. Syncom 4 deploy, LDEF retrieval highlight 10-day Columbia flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of Space Shuttle Mission STS-32 are described along with major flight activities, prelaunch and launch operations, trajectory sequence of events, and landing and post-landing operations. The primary objectives of STS-32 are the deployment of a Navy synchronous communications satellite (Syncom 4) and the retrieval of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) launched from the Challenger in April 1984. Secondary STS-32 payloads include a protein crystal growth experiment, the Fluids Experiment Apparatus (FEA) for the investigation of microgravity materials processing, the Mesoscale Lighting Experiment, the Latitude-Longitude Locator Experiment, the Americal Flight Echocardiograph, and an experiment to investigate neurospora circadian rhythms in a microgravity environment.

  8. Stress monitoring in a Guinness 10-day scuba dive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puiu, A.; Giubileo, G.; Addolorato, G.; Revelli, L.; Gasbarrini, G.; Bellantone, R.; D'Amore, A.; Lombardi, C. P.; Carrozza, C.

    2007-04-01

    Nowadays, there is high demand for sensitive gas sensors both for human and environmental monitoring. This paper deals with a high-resolution (0.2 ppb) laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopic system realized at ENEA Frascati, Italy, applied for monitoring stress in scuba divers during sustained immersion by analyzing breath samples. Blood tests and psychometric tests for scuba divers were performed at Catholic University in Rome. Results will be reported and discussed.

  9. A new storage-ring light source

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  10. How ecosystems organize their moisture storage requirement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, H.

    2014-12-01

    The moisture storage capacity in the root zone of ecosystems acts as a buffer against climatic variability and is a critical factor controlling many physical, biogeochemical and biological processes including land-atmosphere exchanges, rainfall-runoff generation, carbon cycling and nutrient dynamics. Notwithstanding its importance this storage capacity cannot be directly observed at catchment scale. Approaching this problem from a different angle, we can try to understand how adaptive systems cope with the variability of essential inputs through the creation of buffers. Surprisingly, there appears to be a strong correspondence between how societies and ecosystems try to safeguard their water supply. People build reservoirs to buffer against periods of water shortage; ecosystems essentially do the same by creating sufficient moisture storage in their root zone. Both try to do this at minimum expense: people by optimizing the amount of storage at minimum costs; and ecosystems by creating an optimum root zone buffer at minimum biomass investment. A classical engineering way for designing the size of a reservoir is the Rippl (1883) diagram, where tangents to the accumulated inflow determine the required storage. It is a logical method for people to size the storage required to satisfy the long-term water demand. Using this principle, over time, many societies have tried to regulate their rivers, leveling out the natural dynamics of the system. But are people unique in trying to even out unwanted fluctuations or to bridge periods of water shortage? Like societies, ecosystems adjust their storage buffer to climatic variability. Similar to the way in which engineers design reservoirs, we can estimate the root zone storage capacity at catchment scale on the basis of observed climate and hydrological data. This approach was proven to be remarkably accurate not only in 11 catchments of the Ping river in Thailand but also in 413 catchments across the USA, with diverse climate

  11. Storage of Maize in Purdue Improved Crop Storage (PICS) Bags.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott B; Murdock, Larry L; Baributsa, Dieudonne

    2017-01-01

    Interest in using hermetic technologies as a pest management solution for stored grain has risen in recent years. One hermetic approach, Purdue Improved Crop Storage (PICS) bags, has proven successful in controlling the postharvest pests of cowpea. This success encouraged farmers to use of PICS bags for storing other crops including maize. To assess whether maize can be safely stored in PICS bags without loss of quality, we carried out laboratory studies of maize grain infested with Sitophilus zeamais (Motshulsky) and stored in PICS triple bags or in woven polypropylene bags. Over an eight month observation period, temperatures in the bags correlated with ambient temperature for all treatments. Relative humidity inside PICS bags remained constant over this period despite the large changes that occurred in the surrounding environment. Relative humidity in the woven bags followed ambient humidity closely. PICS bags containing S. zeamais-infested grain saw a significant decline in oxygen compared to the other treatments. Grain moisture content declined in woven bags, but remained high in PICS bags. Seed germination was not significantly affected over the first six months in all treatments, but declined after eight months of storage when infested grain was held in woven bags. Relative damage was low across treatments and not significantly different between treatments. Overall, maize showed no signs of deterioration in PICS bags versus the woven bags and PICS bags were superior to woven bags in terms of specific metrics of grain quality.

  12. Storage of Maize in Purdue Improved Crop Storage (PICS) Bags

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Interest in using hermetic technologies as a pest management solution for stored grain has risen in recent years. One hermetic approach, Purdue Improved Crop Storage (PICS) bags, has proven successful in controlling the postharvest pests of cowpea. This success encouraged farmers to use of PICS bags for storing other crops including maize. To assess whether maize can be safely stored in PICS bags without loss of quality, we carried out laboratory studies of maize grain infested with Sitophilus zeamais (Motshulsky) and stored in PICS triple bags or in woven polypropylene bags. Over an eight month observation period, temperatures in the bags correlated with ambient temperature for all treatments. Relative humidity inside PICS bags remained constant over this period despite the large changes that occurred in the surrounding environment. Relative humidity in the woven bags followed ambient humidity closely. PICS bags containing S. zeamais-infested grain saw a significant decline in oxygen compared to the other treatments. Grain moisture content declined in woven bags, but remained high in PICS bags. Seed germination was not significantly affected over the first six months in all treatments, but declined after eight months of storage when infested grain was held in woven bags. Relative damage was low across treatments and not significantly different between treatments. Overall, maize showed no signs of deterioration in PICS bags versus the woven bags and PICS bags were superior to woven bags in terms of specific metrics of grain quality. PMID:28072835

  13. ERDA's Chemical Energy Storage Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisher, J. H.; Kelley, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The Chemical Energy Storage Program is described with emphasis on hydrogen storage. Storage techniques considered include pressurized hydrogen gas storage, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage, storage in hydride compounds, and aromatic-alicyclic hydrogen storage. Some uses of energy storage are suggested. Information on hydrogen production and hydrogen use is also presented. Applications of hydrogen energy systems include storage of hydrogen for utilities load leveling, industrial marketing of hydrogen both as a chemical and as a fuel, natural gas supplementation, vehicular applications, and direct substitution for natural gas.

  14. 7 CFR 1767.70 - Record storage media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... following are required: (a) The storage media shall have a life expectancy at least equal to the applicable retention period provided for in the master index of records, unless there is a quality transfer from...

  15. 7 CFR 1770.4 - Record storage media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... subject to the following conditions: (a) The storage media must have a life expectancy at least equal to the applicable retention period provided for in the master index of records, unless there is...

  16. STORAGE STABILITY OF PESTICIDES IN EXTRACT SOLVENTS AND SAMPLING MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Demonstrating that pesticides are stable in field media and their extracts over extended storage periods allows operational flexibility and cost efficiency. Stability of the 31 neutral pesticides and 2 acid herbicides of the Agricultural Health Study exposure pilot was evaluate...

  17. 7 CFR 1767.70 - Record storage media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... following are required: (a) The storage media shall have a life expectancy at least equal to the applicable retention period provided for in the master index of records, unless there is a quality transfer from...

  18. 7 CFR 1770.4 - Record storage media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... subject to the following conditions: (a) The storage media must have a life expectancy at least equal to the applicable retention period provided for in the master index of records, unless there is...

  19. Air-storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, T. J.

    1981-10-01

    The air storage system, the critical component making compressed air energy storage technically economically feasible, is described in three of its forms. All have geological containments and reflect economics of scale requiring fairly large plant ratings and storage capacities. All three systems also are based on good precedent experience and there are a number of willing bidders in the engineering and construction field attesting to the readiness of the technology. The salient features of each storage system type are summarized. Hard rock caverns have the widest siting opportunity with a variety of geology, are well within construction capability in good quality rock with maximum control of system design through engineering, and have the highest cost of the storage system options study. They have the potential for longest time to startup and are difficult and expensive to expand for increased storage or plant rating. The salt-solutioned cavern has limited siting opportunities, is a very economical storage system, and storage increase is possible through cavern additions.

  20. Open systems storage platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Kirby

    1992-01-01

    The building blocks for an open storage system includes a system platform, a selection of storage devices and interfaces, system software, and storage applications CONVEX storage systems are based on the DS Series Data Server systems. These systems are a variant of the C3200 supercomputer with expanded I/O capabilities. These systems support a variety of medium and high speed interfaces to networks and peripherals. System software is provided in the form of ConvexOS, a POSIX compliant derivative of 4.3BSD UNIX. Storage applications include products such as UNITREE and EMASS. With the DS Series of storage systems, Convex has developed a set of products which provide open system solutions for storage management applications. The systems are highly modular, assembled from off the shelf components with industry standard interfaces. The C Series system architecture provides a stable base, with the performance and reliability of a general purpose platform. This combination of a proven system architecture with a variety of choices in peripherals and application software allows wide flexibility in configurations, and delivers the benefits of open systems to the mass storage world.

  1. Wind-energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    Program SIMWEST can model wind energy storage system using any combination of five types of storage: pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel, and pneumatic. Program is tool to aid design of optional system for given application with realistic simulation for further evaluation and verification.

  2. Bases for extrapolating materials durability in fuel storage pools

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    A major body of evidence indicates that zirconium alloys have the most consistent and reliable durability in wet storage, justifying projections of safe wet storage greater than 50 y. Aluminum alloys have the widest range of durabilities in wet storage; systematic control and monitoring of water chemistry have resulted in low corrosion rates for more than two decades on some fuels and components. However, cladding failures have occurred in a few months when important parameters were not controlled. Stainless steel is extremely durable when stress, metallurgical and water chemistry factors are controlled. LWR SS cladding has survived for 25 y in wet storage. However, sensitized, stressed SS fuels and components have seriously degraded in fuel storage pools (FSPs) at {approximately} 30 C. Satisfactory durability of fuel assembly and FSP component materials in extended wet storage requires investments in water quality management and surveillance, including chemical and biological factors. The key aspect of the study is to provide storage facility operators and other decision makers a basis to judge the durability of a given fuel type in wet storage as a prelude to basing other fuel management plans (e.g. dry storage) if wet storage will not be satisfactory through the expected period of interim storage.

  3. 12. NORTHWEST CORNER OF STORAGE MAGAZINE (BUILDING 342) IN STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. NORTHWEST CORNER OF STORAGE MAGAZINE (BUILDING 342) IN STORAGE AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  4. Plutonium storage criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, D.; Ascanio, X.

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  5. Warm storage for arc magmas.

    PubMed

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K; Harrison, T Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-06

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the "cold storage" model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  6. Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, R. G.; Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T.

    Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

  7. Flywheel energy storage using superconducting magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, R.G.; Uherka, K.; Hull, J.; Mulcahy, T.

    1994-04-01

    Storage of electrical energy on a utility scale is currently not practicable for most utilities, preventing the full utilization of existing base-load capacity. A potential solution to this problem is Flywheel Energy Storage (FES), made possible by technological developments in high-temperature superconducting materials. Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC), the research arm of Commonwealth Edison Company, and Argonne National Laboratory are implementing a demonstration project to advance the state of the art in high temperature superconductor (HTS) bearing performance and the overall demonstration of efficient Flywheel Energy Storage. Currently, electricity must be used simultaneously with its generation as electrical energy storage is not available for most utilities. Existing storage methods either are dependent on special geography, are too expensive, or are too inefficient. Without energy storage, electric utilities, such as Commonwealth Edison Company, are forced to cycle base load power plants to meet load swings in hourly customer demand. Demand can change by as much as 30% over a 12-hour period and result in significant costs to utilities as power plant output is adjusted to meet these changes. HTS FES systems can reduce demand-based power plant cycling by storing unused nighttime capacity until it is needed to meet daytime demand.

  8. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-09-14

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors.

  9. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R.; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors. PMID:26365061

  10. Fracture prevalence during an unusual period of snow and ice in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the current study was to assess the effect of an unusual 10-day snow and ice period on the prevalence of fractures in an emergency department (ED) in the Netherlands. Furthermore, patients with fractures during the snow and ice period were compared to those in the control period with respect to gender, age, location of accident, length of stay, disposition, and anatomical site of the injury. Methods Fracture prevalence during a 10-day study period with snow and ice (January 14, 2013 until January 23, 2013) was compared to a similar 10-day control period without snow or ice (January 16, 2012 until January 25, 2012). The records of all patients with a fracture were manually selected. Besides this, basic demographics, type of fracture, and location of the accident (inside or outside) were compared. Results A total of 1,785 patients visited the ED during the study period and 1,974 during the control period. A fracture was found in 224 patients during the study period and in 109 patients during the control period (P <0.01). More fractures sustained outside account for this difference. No differences were found in gender, mean age, and length of ED stay. However, during the snow and ice period the percentage of fractures in the middle-aged (31–60 yrs) was significantly higher than in the control period (P <0.01). Conclusions The number of fractures sustained more than doubled during a period with snow and ice as compared to the control period. In contrast to other studies outside the Netherlands, not the elderly, but the middle-aged were most affected by the slippery conditions. PMID:24872860

  11. Feasibility Study for The Setting Up of a Safety System for Monitoring CO2 Storage at Prinos Field, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Lymperopoulos, Panagiotis; Tasianas, Alexandros; Shariatipour, Seyed

    2016-10-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in subsurface geological structures can mitigate global warming. A comprehensive safety and monitoring system for CO2 storage has been undertaken for the Prinos hydrocarbon field, offshore northern Greece; a system which can prevent any possible leakage of CO2. This paper presents various monitoring strategies of CO2 subsurface movement in the Prinos reservoir, the results of a simulation of a CO2 leak through a well, an environmental risk assessment study related to the potential leakage of CO2 from the seafloor and an overall economic insight of the system. The results of the simulation of the CO2 leak have shown that CO2 reaches the seabed in the form of gas approximately 13.7 years, from the beginning of injection. From that point onwards the amount of CO2 reaching the seabed increases until it reaches a peak at around 32.9 years. During the injection period, the CO2 plume develops only within the reservoir. During the post-injection period, the CO2 reaches the seabed and develops side branches. These correspond to preferential lateral flow pathways of the CO2 and are more extensive for the dissolved CO2 than for the saturated CO2 gas. For the environmental risk assessment, we set up a model, using ArcGIS software, based on the use of data regarding the speeds of the winds and currents encountered in the region. We also made assumptions related to the flow rate of CO2. Results show that after a period of 10 days from the start of CO2 leakage the CO2 has reached halfway to the continental shores where the “Natura” protected areas are located. CO2 leakage modelling results show CO2 to be initially flowing along a preferential flow direction, which is towards the NE. However, 5 days after the start of leakage of CO2, the CO2 is also flowing towards the ENE. The consequences of a potential CO2 leak are considered spatially limited and the ecosystem is itself capable of recovering. We have tried to determine the costs necessary for the

  12. Aflatoxins and safe storage

    PubMed Central

    Villers, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described. PMID:24782846

  13. Aflatoxins and safe storage.

    PubMed

    Villers, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described.

  14. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  15. Data storage technology comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1990-01-01

    The role of data storage and data storage technology is an integral, though conceptually often underestimated, portion of data processing technology. Data storage is important in the mass storage mode in which generated data is buffered for later use. But data storage technology is also important in the data flow mode when data are manipulated and hence required to flow between databases, datasets and processors. This latter mode is commonly associated with memory hierarchies which support computation. VLSI devices can reasonably be defined as electronic circuit devices such as channel and control electronics as well as highly integrated, solid-state devices that are fabricated using thin film deposition technology. VLSI devices in both capacities play an important role in data storage technology. In addition to random access memories (RAM), read-only memories (ROM), and other silicon-based variations such as PROM's, EPROM's, and EEPROM's, integrated devices find their way into a variety of memory technologies which offer significant performance advantages. These memory technologies include magnetic tape, magnetic disk, magneto-optic disk, and vertical Bloch line memory. In this paper, some comparison between selected technologies will be made to demonstrate why more than one memory technology exists today, based for example on access time and storage density at the active bit and system levels.

  16. Striped tertiary storage arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.

    1993-01-01

    Data stripping is a technique for increasing the throughput and reducing the response time of large access to a storage system. In striped magnetic or optical disk arrays, a single file is striped or interleaved across several disks; in a striped tape system, files are interleaved across tape cartridges. Because a striped file can be accessed by several disk drives or tape recorders in parallel, the sustained bandwidth to the file is greater than in non-striped systems, where access to the file are restricted to a single device. It is argued that applying striping to tertiary storage systems will provide needed performance and reliability benefits. The performance benefits of striping for applications using large tertiary storage systems is discussed. It will introduce commonly available tape drives and libraries, and discuss their performance limitations, especially focusing on the long latency of tape accesses. This section will also describe an event-driven tertiary storage array simulator that is being used to understand the best ways of configuring these storage arrays. The reliability problems of magnetic tape devices are discussed, and plans for modeling the overall reliability of striped tertiary storage arrays to identify the amount of error correction required are described. Finally, work being done by other members of the Sequoia group to address latency of accesses, optimizing tertiary storage arrays that perform mostly writes, and compression is discussed.

  17. SERI solar energy storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Wright, J. D.; Wyman, C. E.

    1980-02-01

    Research on advanced technologies, system analyses, and assessments of thermal energy storage for solar applications in support of the Thermal and Chemical Energy Storage program are presented. Currently, research is in progress on direct contact latent heat storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Systems analyses are being performed of thermal energy storage for solar thermal applications, and surveys and assessments are being prepared of thermal energy storage in solar applications.

  18. SERI solar energy storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin, F.; Copeland, R. J.; Kotch, A.; Kriz, T.; Luft, W.; Nix, R. G.; Wright, J. O.

    1982-05-01

    Thermal energy storage technologies are identified for specific solar thermal applications. The capabilities and limitations of direct-contact thermal storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport are examined. Storage of energy from active solar thermal systems for industrial process heat and the heating of buildings is analyzed and seasonal energy storage is covered. The coordination of numerous thermal energy storage research and development activities is described.

  19. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  20. Used fuel extended storage security and safeguards by design roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard; Jones, Robert; Ketusky, Edward; England, Jeffrey; Scherer, Carolynn; Sprinkle, James; Miller, Michael.; Rauch, Eric; Scaglione, John; Dunn, T.

    2016-05-01

    In the United States, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is safely and securely stored in spent fuel pools and dry storage casks. The available capacity in spent fuel pools across the nuclear fleet has nearly reached a steady state value. The excess SNF continues to be loaded in dry storage casks. Fuel is expected to remain in dry storage for periods beyond the initial dry cask certification period of 20 years. Recent licensing renewals have approved an additional 40 years. This report identifies the current requirements and evaluation techniques associated with the safeguards and security of SNF dry cask storage. A set of knowledge gaps is identified in the current approaches. Finally, this roadmap identifies known knowledge gaps and provides a research path to deliver the tools and models needed to close the gaps and allow the optimization of the security and safeguards approaches for an interim spent fuel facility over the lifetime of the storage site.

  1. Thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Picklesimer, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    The general scope of study on thermal energy storage development includes: (1) survey and review possible concepts for storing thermal energy; (2) evaluate the potentials of the surveyed concepts for practical applications in the low and high temperature ranges for thermal control and storage, with particular emphasis on the low temperature range, and designate the most promising concepts; and (3) determine the nature of further studies required to expeditiously convert the most promising concept(s) to practical applications. Cryogenic temperature control by means of energy storage materials was also included.

  2. Low temperature storage container for transporting perishables to space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, William G (Inventor); Owen, James W. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention is directed to the long term storage of frozen and refrigerated food and biological samples by the space shuttle to the space station. A storage container is utilized which has a passive system so that fluid/thermal and electrical interfaces with the logistics module is not required. The container for storage comprises two units, each having an inner storage shell and an outer shell receiving the inner shell and spaced about it. The novelty appears to lie in the integration of thermally efficient cryogenic storage techniques with phase change materials, including the multilayer metalized surface thin plastic film insulation and the vacuum between the shells. Additionally the fiberglass constructed shells having fiberglass honeycomb portions, and the lining of the space between the shells with foil combine to form a storage container which may keep food and biological samples at very low temperatures for very long periods of time utilizing a passive system.

  3. Effect of semen extender and storage temperature on ram sperm motility over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage of ram semen for long period of time depends on a number of factors, including type of extender and storage temperature. A study compared the effect of semen extender and storage temperature on motility of ram semen stored for 72 h. Semen collected via electroejaculator from 5 mature Katahd...

  4. 40 CFR 63.11497 - What are the standards and compliance requirements for storage tanks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section for periods of planned routine maintenance of a control device for storage tanks. (1) Add no... requirements for storage tanks? 63.11497 Section 63.11497 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... compliance requirements for storage tanks? (a) You must comply with the emission limits and...

  5. 40 CFR 63.11497 - What are the standards and compliance requirements for storage tanks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... section for periods of planned routine maintenance of a control device for storage tanks. (1) Add no... requirements for storage tanks? 63.11497 Section 63.11497 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... compliance requirements for storage tanks? (a) You must comply with the emission limits and...

  6. 36 CFR 1234.14 - What are the requirements for environmental controls for records storage facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... storage space that is designed to preserve them for their full retention period. New records storage... environmental controls for records storage facilities? 1234.14 Section 1234.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT FACILITY STANDARDS FOR...

  7. Energy Storage: George Crabtree

    ScienceCinema

    Crabtree, George

    2016-12-14

    George Crabtree, Argonne scientist and Director of Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, discusses the importance of developing the next generation of batteries and how that could help transform the electricity grid.

  8. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOEpatents

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  9. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  10. Pumping and Breastmilk Storage

    MedlinePlus

    ... by washing your pumping equipment with soap and water and letting the equipment air dry. Storage of breastmilk Store your breastmilk in clean glass or hard BPA-free plastic bottles with tight-fitting lids. You can also use ...

  11. Energy Storage: George Crabtree

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George

    2016-10-06

    George Crabtree, Argonne scientist and Director of Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, discusses the importance of developing the next generation of batteries and how that could help transform the electricity grid.

  12. Industrial storage applications overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of a technology demonstration for the food processing industry, development and technology demonstrations for selected near-term, in-plant applications and advanced industrial applications of thermal energy storage are overviewed.

  13. Underground pumped hydroelectric storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. D.; Doherty, T. J.; Kannberg, L. D.

    1984-07-01

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-velocity requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more.

  14. Wet storage integrity update

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  15. Cryptographic Cloud Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamara, Seny; Lauter, Kristin

    We consider the problem of building a secure cloud storage service on top of a public cloud infrastructure where the service provider is not completely trusted by the customer. We describe, at a high level, several architectures that combine recent and non-standard cryptographic primitives in order to achieve our goal. We survey the benefits such an architecture would provide to both customers and service providers and give an overview of recent advances in cryptography motivated specifically by cloud storage.

  16. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J. T.; Larsen, R. S.; Shapiro, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

  17. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

  18. WEAPONS STORAGE AREA. FROM RIGHT TO LEFT, ABOVEGROUND STORAGE MAGAZINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEAPONS STORAGE AREA. FROM RIGHT TO LEFT, ABOVEGROUND STORAGE MAGAZINE (BUILDING 3568), SPARES INERT STORAGE BUILDING (BUILDING 3570), MISSILE ASSEMBLY SHOP (BUILDING 3578) AND SEGREGATED MAGAZINE STORAGE BUILDING (BUILDING 3572). VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, U.S. Route 9, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  19. Secure Storage Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to clarify the challenges associated with storage for secure enclaves. The major focus areas for the report are: - review of relevant parallel filesystem technologies to identify assets and gaps; - review of filesystem isolation/protection mechanisms, to include native filesystem capabilities and auxiliary/layered techniques; - definition of storage architectures that can be used for customizable compute enclaves (i.e., clarification of use-cases that must be supported for shared storage scenarios); - investigate vendor products related to secure storage. This study provides technical details on the storage and filesystem used for HPC with particular attention on elements that contribute to creating secure storage. We outline the pieces for a a shared storage architecture that balances protection and performance by leveraging the isolation capabilities available in filesystems and virtualization technologies to maintain the integrity of the data. Key Points: There are a few existing and in-progress protection features in Lustre related to secure storage, which are discussed in (Chapter 3.1). These include authentication capabilities like GSSAPI/Kerberos and the in-progress work for GSSAPI/Host-keys. The GPFS filesystem provides native support for encryption, which is not directly available in Lustre. Additionally, GPFS includes authentication/authorization mechanisms for inter-cluster sharing of filesystems (Chapter 3.2). The limitations of key importance for secure storage/filesystems are: (i) restricting sub-tree mounts for parallel filesystem (which is not directly supported in Lustre or GPFS), and (ii) segregation of hosts on the storage network and practical complications with dynamic additions to the storage network, e.g., LNET. A challenge for VM based use cases will be to provide efficient IO forwarding of the parallel filessytem from the host to the guest (VM). There are promising options like para-virtualized filesystems to

  20. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Periodic paralysis - hypokalemic; Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis; HOKPP; HypoKPP; HypoPP ... is not inherited. Unlike other forms of periodic paralysis, people with hypoPP have normal thyroid function. But ...

  1. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Periodic paralysis - hyperkalemic; Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis; HyperKPP; HyperPP; Gamstorp disease ... factors include having other family members with periodic paralysis. It affects men more often than women.

  2. Efficient storage system for breath hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Murray, R D; Kerzner, B; MacLean, W C; McClung, H J; Gilbert, M

    1985-10-01

    Recommended materials for breath hydrogen collection (plastic syringes with twist lock closure) are only adequate for relatively brief periods because of gradual hydrogen loss and considerable variability between duplicate samples. To document the most favorable storage conditions for breath hydrogen, we compared hydrogen retention in plastic syringes using a conventional twist-in-lock closure versus a simple, inexpensive syringe closure, a Critocap. Hydrogen retention was studied at 25, 5, and -20 degrees C in two different syringe brands over 72 h of storage. An analysis of variance confirms the superiority of Critocaps over twist-in-lock closures (p less than 0.001). Reliability was maximal when samples were placed in environments less than 5 degrees C. When storage time was extended to 7 days, mean hydrogen retention was 86 +/- 6% (means +/- SD).

  3. Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, L.; Blake, D.

    2005-01-01

    The design of the next generation solar parabolic trough systems for power production will require the development of new thermal energy storage options with improved economics or operational characteristics. Current heat-transfer fluids such as VP-1?, which consists of a eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, allow a maximum operating temperature of ca. 300 C, a limit above which the vapor pressure would become too high and would require pressure-rated tanks. The use of VP-1? also suffers from a freezing point around 13 C that requires heating during cold periods. One of the goals for future trough systems is the use of heat-transfer fluids that can act as thermal storage media and that allow operating temperatures around 425 C combined with lower limits around 0 C. This paper presents an outline of our latest approach toward the development of such thermal storage fluids.

  4. Storage of Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess. seeds.

    PubMed

    Nery, F C; Prudente, D O; Alvarenga, A A; Paiva, R; Nery, M C

    2016-09-26

    Calophyllum brasiliense is a species native to Brazil and has potential for use in the timber industry, in the reforestation of degraded areas, besides having medicinal properties. Its propagation is mainly by seeds which, depending on their recalcitrant characteristics, leads to difficulty in conservation, due to changes in its physiological potential during storage. Aiming to contribute to the expansion of its cultivation, rational use and conservation, the objective of this study was to investigate the behavior of C. brasiliense seeds during storage. Different packings (paper, aluminum and polyethylene) and environmental conditions (room temperature and cold chamber) were quarterly tested over 12 months, by evaluating germination viability and vigor. Based on the results, it was concluded that packaging in polyethylene and freezer storage provided the best conditions for the conservation of seeds, keeping them viable for a period of nine months.

  5. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... periods; Intermenstrual bleeding; Spotting; Metrorrhagia Images Female reproductive anatomy Bleeding between periods Uterus References Bulun SE. The physiology and pathology of the female reproductive axis. In: ...

  6. Spacecraft cryogenic gas storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenic gas storage systems were developed for the liquid storage of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium. Cryogenic storage is attractive because of the high liquid density and low storage pressure of cryogens. This situation results in smaller container sizes, reduced container-strength levels, and lower tankage weights. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used cryogenic gas storage systems as standard spacecraft equipment. In addition to the Gemini and Apollo cryogenic gas storage systems, other systems were developed and tested in the course of advancing the state of the art. All of the cryogenic storage systems used, developed, and tested to date for manned-spacecraft applications are described.

  7. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  8. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  9. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    PubMed

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  10. Patients' views on the embryo storage time limits.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Margarida; Samorinha, Catarina; Alves, Elisabete; Machado, Helena; Amorim, Mariana; Silva, Susana

    2015-08-01

    The establishment of the length of embryo storage has been based on socio-political criteria. There are different regulations, guidelines and health care policies worldwide. This mixed-methods study aimed to assess the opinion of patients about the embryo storage time limit, and the perception of the criteria underlying the establishment of the storage period offered to them. Between August 2011 and December 2012, 534 IVF patients from Portugal participated in a quantitative questionnaire and 34 couples were interviewed. Overall, 38% of participants preferred the duration of 4-5 years, 38% extended it beyond 5 years and 23% indicated 3 years. Having experienced at least one previous cycle was directly associated with agreeing with a duration of storage longer than 5 years, for both women and men. Having children was inversely associated with longer duration of storage, among women. One-third of the 34 interviewed couples stated that their knowledge concerning embryo storage was insufficient. Nevertheless, all the interviewees reported at least one possible reason for the legal establishment of the storage period offered to them, highlighting financial costs and decreased embryo quality. There are misconceptions and gaps in awareness of cryopreservation, which may shape patients' opinions. Accurate information regarding policy on storage of embryos is needed.

  11. Effects of storage on mixed-culture biological electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Hermansson, Malte; Modin, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    Storage methods are important to preserve the viability and biochemical characteristics of microbial cultures between experiments or during periods when bioreactors are inactive. Most of the research on storage has focused on isolates; however, there is an increasing interest in methods for mixed cultures, which are of relevance in environmental biotechnology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different storage methods on electrochemically active enrichment cultures. Acetate-oxidizing bioanodes generating a current density of about 5 A m−2 were enriched in a microbial electrolysis cell. The effect of five weeks of storage was evaluated using electrochemical techniques and microbial community analysis. Storage by refrigeration resulted in quicker re-activation than freezing in 10% glycerol, while the bioelectrochemical activity was entirely lost after storage using dehydration. The results showed that the bioelectrochemical activity of bioanodes stored at low temperature could be retained. However, during the re-activation period the bioanodes only recovered 75% of the current density generated before storage and the bacterial communities were different in composition and more diverse after storage than before. PMID:26678949

  12. Effects of storage on mixed-culture biological electrodes.

    PubMed

    Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Hermansson, Malte; Modin, Oskar

    2015-12-18

    Storage methods are important to preserve the viability and biochemical characteristics of microbial cultures between experiments or during periods when bioreactors are inactive. Most of the research on storage has focused on isolates; however, there is an increasing interest in methods for mixed cultures, which are of relevance in environmental biotechnology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different storage methods on electrochemically active enrichment cultures. Acetate-oxidizing bioanodes generating a current density of about 5 A m(-2) were enriched in a microbial electrolysis cell. The effect of five weeks of storage was evaluated using electrochemical techniques and microbial community analysis. Storage by refrigeration resulted in quicker re-activation than freezing in 10% glycerol, while the bioelectrochemical activity was entirely lost after storage using dehydration. The results showed that the bioelectrochemical activity of bioanodes stored at low temperature could be retained. However, during the re-activation period the bioanodes only recovered 75% of the current density generated before storage and the bacterial communities were different in composition and more diverse after storage than before.

  13. Optomechanical light storage in a silica microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Victor; Dong, Chunhua; Kuzyk, Mark C.; Wang, Hailin

    2013-02-01

    Coherent interconversion between an optical and a mechanical excitation in an optomechanical resonator can be used for the storage of an optical pulse as an excitation in a mechanical oscillator. This optomechanical light storage is enabled by external writing and readout pulses at one mechanical frequency below the optical resonance. In this paper, we expand an earlier experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.133601 107, 133601 (2011)] on storing an optical pulse as a radial breathing mode in a silica microsphere. We show that the heterodyne beating between a readout pulse and the corresponding retrieved pulse features a periodic oscillation with a well-defined phase and with the beating period given by the mechanical frequency, demonstrating directly the coherent nature of the light storage process. The coherent interconversion accelerates with increasing optomechanical coupling rates, providing an effective mechanism for tailoring the temporal profile of the retrieved pulse. Experimental studies on both light storage and optomechanically induced transparency under nearly the same conditions also illustrate the connections between these two closely related processes.

  14. Kauai Island Utility Cooperative energy storage study.

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil, Abbas Ali; Yamane, Mike; Murray, Aaron T.

    2009-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed an assessment of the benefits of energy storage for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative. This report documents the methodology and results of this study from a generation and production-side benefits perspective only. The KIUC energy storage study focused on the economic impact of using energy storage to shave the system peak, which reduces generator run time and consequently reduces fuel and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. It was determined that a 16-MWh energy storage system would suit KIUC's needs, taking into account the size of the 13 individual generation units in the KIUC system and a system peak of 78 MW. The analysis shows that an energy storage system substantially reduces the run time of Units D1, D2, D3, and D5 - the four smallest and oldest diesel generators at the Port Allen generating plant. The availability of stored energy also evens the diurnal variability of the remaining generation units during the off- and on-peak periods. However, the net economic benefit is insufficient to justify a load-leveling type of energy storage system at this time. While the presence of storage helps reduce the run time of the smaller and older units, the economic dispatch changes and the largest most efficient unit in the KIUC system, the 27.5-MW steam-injected combustion turbine at Kapaia, is run for extra hours to provide the recharge energy for the storage system. The economic benefits of the storage is significantly reduced because the charging energy for the storage is derived from the same fuel source as the peak generation source it displaces. This situation would be substantially different if there were a renewable energy source available to charge the storage. Especially, if there is a wind generation resource introduced in the KIUC system, there may be a potential of capturing the load-leveling benefits as well as using the storage to dampen the dynamic instability that the wind generation could introduce into

  15. Comparison of cask and drywell storage concepts for a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.E.

    1982-12-01

    The Department of Energy, through its Richland Operations Office is evaluating the feasibility, timing, and cost of providing a federal capability for storing the spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes that DOE may be obligated by law to manage until permanent waste disposal facilities are available. Three concepts utilizing a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage (MRS/IS) facility have been developed and analyzed. The first concept, co-location with a reprocessing plant, has been developed by staff of Allied General Nuclear Services. the second concept, a stand-alone facility, has been developed by staff of the General Atomic Company. The third concept, co-location with a deep geologic repository, has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory with the assistance of the Westinghouse Hanford Company and Kaiser Engineers. The objectives of this study are: to develop preconceptual designs for MRS/IS facilities: to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facilities, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such facilities; and to estimate the life-cycle costs of the facilities when operated in response to a set of scenarios that define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, generally spanning the years 1989 to 2037. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life-cycle costs for the MRS/IS facilities. In the first scenario, the reprocessing plant is placed in service in 1989 and HLW canisters are stored until a repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at intervals as needed to meet the demand. In the second scenario, the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

  16. Energy storage connection system

    DOEpatents

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  17. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  18. Radioactive waste storage issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Daniel E.

    1994-08-15

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

  19. Berkeley Storage Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, Alex; Gu, Junmin; Natarajan, Vijaya; Shoshani, Arie

    2007-03-01

    Storage Resource Managers (SRMs) are middleware components whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of shared storage components on the Grid, They provide storage availability for the planning and execution of a Grid job. SRMs manage two types of resources: space and files. When managing space, SRMs negotiate space allocation with the requesting client, andlor assign default space quotas. When managing files, SRMs allocate space for files, invoke file transfer services to move files into the space. phi files for a certain lifetime, release files upon the clients’ request, and use file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. SPMs can be designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and make dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, SRMs perform automatic gathage collection of unused files by removing selected files whose lifetime has expired when space is needed. BeStMan is a Java implementation of SRM functionality by the Scientific Data Management Group at LBNL. It manages multiple disks as well as the HPSS mass storage system, and can be adapted to other storage systems. The BeStMan package contains the SRM server, the SRM client tools, and SRM testing tools.

  20. Lectin staining of epithelia lining the uterovaginal junction and sperm-storage tubules in chicken hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most mammals sperm are subject to a transient storage period in the caudal region of the oviduct during which they undergo cellular and molecular modifications associated with capacitation. During this storage period sperm bind to a terminal carbohydrate moiety associated with a glycoconjugate o...

  1. RF Stabilization for Storage of Antiprotons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond A.

    2005-01-01

    Portable storage of antimatter is an important step in the experimental exploration of antimatter in propulsion applications. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is a Penning-Malmberg ion trap being developed to trap and store low energy antiprotons for a period of weeks. The antiprotons can then be transported for use in experiments. HiPAT is being developed and evaluated using normal matter, before an attempt is made to store and transport antiprotons. Stortd ions have inherent instabilities that limit the storage lifetime. RF stabilization at cyclotron resonance frequencies is demonstrated over a period of 6 days for normal matter ion clouds. A variety of particles have been stored, including protons, C+ ions, and H2+ ions. Cyclotron resonance frequencies are defined and experimental evidence presented to demonstrate excitation of cyclotron waves in the plasma for all three species of ions.

  2. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Most people think of groundwater as a resource, but it is also a useful indicator of climate variability and human impacts on the environment. Groundwater storage varies slowly relative to other non-frozen components of the water cycle, encapsulating long period variations and trends in surface meteorology. On seasonal to interannual timescales, groundwater is as dynamic as soil moisture, and it has been shown that groundwater storage changes have contributed to sea level variations. Groundwater monitoring well measurements are too sporadic and poorly assembled outside of the United States and a few other nations to permit direct global assessment of groundwater variability. However, observational estimates of terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations from the GRACE satellites largely represent groundwater storage variations on an interannual basis, save for high latitude/altitude (dominated by snow and ice) and wet tropical (surface water) regions. A figure maps changes in mean annual TWS from 2009 to 2010, based on GRACE, reflecting hydroclimatic conditions in 2010. Severe droughts impacted Russia and the Amazon, and drier than normal weather also affected the Indochinese peninsula, parts of central and southern Africa, and western Australia. Groundwater depletion continued in northern India, while heavy rains in California helped to replenish aquifers that have been depleted by drought and withdrawals for irrigation, though they are still below normal levels. Droughts in northern Argentina and western China similarly abated. Wet weather raised aquifer levels broadly across western Europe. Rains in eastern Australia caused flooding to the north and helped to mitigate a decade long drought in the south. Significant reductions in TWS seen in the coast of Alaska and the Patagonian Andes represent ongoing glacier melt, not groundwater depletion. Figures plot time series of zonal mean and global GRACE derived non-seasonal TWS anomalies (deviation from the mean of

  3. Wideband optical storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, H. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper has five purposes. First, to focus upon the key relationships that bound the technology choices for large, archival, digital storage devices; second, to identify the motivations for selecting the optical technology for a petabit-exabit level storage system (10 to the 15th to 10 to the 18th bits); third, to present a generic example and a specific implementation of a terabit-level optical storage device; fourth, to characterize the global design space constraints that will allow one to build a technology-limited optical store; and fifth, to sketch the outline of the BYTERON concept, a wideband 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 17th bit optical store concept and contrast its performance to that of an optical store that is in operation today

  4. Inertial energy storage device

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Kelly, James J.; Pollard, Roy E.

    1978-01-01

    The inertial energy storage device of the present invention comprises a composite ring formed of circumferentially wound resin-impregnated filament material, a flanged hollow metal hub concentrically disposed in the ring, and a plurality of discrete filament bandsets coupling the hub to the ring. Each bandset is formed of a pair of parallel bands affixed to the hub in a spaced apart relationship with the axis of rotation of the hub being disposed between the bands and with each band being in the configuration of a hoop extending about the ring along a chordal plane thereof. The bandsets are disposed in an angular relationship with one another so as to encircle the ring at spaced-apart circumferential locations while being disposed in an overlapping relationship on the flanges of the hub. The energy storage device of the present invention has the capability of substantial energy storage due to the relationship of the filament bands to the ring and the flanged hub.

  5. Cathodic protection maintenance for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Koszewski, L.

    1995-12-31

    Cathodic protection systems are utilized to mitigate corrosion on the external bottom surfaces of aboveground storage tanks (ASTs). Cathodic protection systems should be part of a preventative maintenance program to minimize in-service failures. A good maintenance program will permit determination of continuous adequate cathodic protection of ASTs, through sustained operation and also provide the opportunity to detect cathodic protection system malfunctions, through periodic observations and testing.

  6. The electrostatic storage tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An electrostatic camera system is discussed which is based on the electrostatic storage tube. The development of the system was begun following a series of experiments which indicated that the device offers signficantly improved performance over currently available devices. The approach used in developing the high performance camera involves: converting the input image to an electron image at low loss, applying a low noise gain process, and storing the resulting charge pattern in a low-loss target. The basic processes and elements of the electrostatic storage tube are illustrated and discussed. Graphs that depict the camera performance characteristics are included.

  7. Thermal energy storage material

    DOEpatents

    Leifer, Leslie

    1976-01-01

    A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

  8. CHEMICAL STORAGE: MYTHS VERSUS REALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F

    2007-03-19

    A large number of resources explaining proper chemical storage are available. These resources include books, databases/tables, and articles that explain various aspects of chemical storage including compatible chemical storage, signage, and regulatory requirements. Another source is the chemical manufacturer or distributor who provides storage information in the form of icons or color coding schemes on container labels. Despite the availability of these resources, chemical accidents stemming from improper storage, according to recent reports (1) (2), make up almost 25% of all chemical accidents. This relatively high percentage of chemical storage accidents suggests that these publications and color coding schemes although helpful, still provide incomplete information that may not completely mitigate storage risks. This manuscript will explore some ways published storage information may be incomplete, examine the associated risks, and suggest methods to help further eliminate chemical storage risks.

  9. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Occurring in the Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Süleyman; Bakal, Ömer; İnangil, Gökhan; Şen, Hüseyin; Özkan, Sezai

    2015-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy simulates acute myocardial infarction, and it is characterised by reversible left ventricular failure. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnosed after emergency angiography performed in a patient with evidence of acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period will be described in this report. Transurethral resection of a bladder tumour (TUR-BT) was performed in a 92-year-old male patient by the urology clinic. The patient was transferred to the post-anaesthesia care unit after the operation. An echocardiography was performed because of the sudden onset of dyspnoea, tachycardia (140-150 beats per minute, rhythm-atrial fibrillation) and ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography (ECG) at the first postoperative hour, and midapical dyskinesia was detected at the patient. An immediate angiography was performed due to suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. Patent coronary arteries and temporary aneurysmatic dilatation of the apex of the heart were revealed by angiography. As a result of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by the cardiology service. The patient was discharged uneventfully following 10 days in the intensive care unit. Aneurysm of the apex of the left ventricle and normal anatomy of the coronary arteries in the angiography have diagnostic value for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Diuretics (furosemide) and beta-blockers (metoprolol) are commonly used for the treatment of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Even though Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare and benign disease, it should be kept in mind in patients suspected for acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period.

  10. Cold water aquifer storage. [air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, D. L.; Davison, R. R.; Harris, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    A working prototype system is described in which water is pumped from an aquifer at 70 F in the winter time, chilled to a temperature of less than 50 F, injected into a ground-water aquifer, stored for a period of several months, pumped back to the surface in the summer time. A total of 8.1 million gallons of chilled water at an average temperature of 48 F were injected. This was followed by a storage period of 100 days. The recovery cycle was completed a year later with a total of 8.1 million gallons recovered. Approximately 20 percent of the chill energy was recovered.

  11. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  12. Legal and regulatory issues affecting compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-07-01

    Several regulatory and legal issues that can potentially affect implementation of a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system are discussed. This technology involves the compression of air using base load electric power for storage in an underground storage medium. The air is subsequently released and allowed to pass through a turbine to generate electricity during periods of peak demand. The storage media considered most feasible are a mined hard rock cavern, a solution-mined cavern in a salt deposit, and a porous geologic formation (normally an aquifer) of suitable structure. The issues are discussed in four categories: regulatory issues common to most CAES facilities regardless of storage medium, regulatory issues applicable to particular CAES reservoir media, issues related to possible liability from CAES operations, and issues related to acquisition of appropriate property rights for CAES implementation. The focus is on selected federal regulation. Lesser attention is given to state and local regulation. (WHK)

  13. Duration of red blood cell storage and inflammatory marker generation

    PubMed Central

    Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Chou, Ming Li; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving treatment for several pathologies. RBCs for transfusion are stored refrigerated in a preservative solution, which extends their shelf-life for up to 42 days. During storage, the RBCs endure abundant physicochemical changes, named RBC storage lesions, which affect the overall quality standard, the functional integrity and in vivo survival of the transfused RBCs. Some of the changes occurring in the early stages of the storage period (for approximately two weeks) are reversible but become irreversible later on as the storage is extended. In this review, we aim to decipher the duration of RBC storage and inflammatory marker generation. This phenomenon is included as one of the causes of transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), an emerging concept developed to potentially elucidate numerous clinical observations that suggest that RBC transfusion is associated with increased inflammatory events or effects with clinical consequence. PMID:28263172

  14. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  15. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING WEST STORAGE BASIN AT FUEL STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING WEST STORAGE BASIN AT FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-51-689. Unknown Photographer, 1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Storage research roundup

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With so much research being done in the areas of potato production, variety development, genetics, disease resistance and pest management it is easy to miss some of the research being done on potato storage. Below are highlights from a few of the noteworthy papers published recently that relate to t...

  17. Pneumatic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D.

    1995-09-19

    An essential component to hybrid electric and electric vehicles is energy storage. A power assist device could also be important to many vehicle applications. This discussion focuses on the use of compressed gas as a system for energy storage and power in vehicle systems. Three possible vehicular applications for which these system could be used are discussed in this paper. These applications are pneumatically driven vehicles, series hybrid electric vehicles, and power boost for electric and conventional vehicles. One option for a compressed gas system is as a long duration power output device for purely pneumatic and hybrid cars. This system must provide enough power and energy to drive under normal conditions for a specified time or distance. The energy storage system for this use has the requirement that it will be highly efficient, compact, and have low mass. Use of a compressed gas energy storage as a short duration, high power output system for conventional motor vehicles could reduce engine size or reduce transient emissions. For electric vehicles this kind of system could lengthen battery life by providing battery load leveling during accelerations. The system requirements for this application are that it be compact and have low mass. The efficiency of the system is a secondary consideration in this application.

  18. Inertial storage for satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhaure, D.

    1984-01-01

    A new system is being developed that performs satellite attitude control, attitude reference, and energy storage utilizing inertia wheels. The baseline approach consists of two counter rotating flywheels suspended in specially designed magnetic bearings, spin axis motor/generators, and a control system. The control system regulates the magnetic bearings and spin axis motor/generators and interacts with other satellite subsystems (photovoltaic array, star trackers, Sun sensors, magnetic torquers, etc.) to perform the three functions. Existing satellites utilize separate subsystems to perform attitude control, provide attitude reference, and store energy. These functions are currently performed using reaction or momentum wheels, gyros, batteries, and devices that provide an absolute reference (Sun sensors and star trackers). A Combined Attitude, Reference, and Energy Storage (CARES) system based on high energy density inertial energy storage wheels (flywheels) has potential advantages over existing technologies. Even when used only for energy storage, this system offers the potential for substantial improvements in life, energy efficiency, and weight over existing battery technologies. Utilizing this same device for both attitude control and attitude reference would result in significant additional savings in overall satellite weight and complexity.

  19. Tuber Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    SHEWRY, PETER R.

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose‐binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers. PMID:12730067

  20. Tuber storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Shewry, Peter R

    2003-06-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose-binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers.

  1. The Open Storage Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orcutt, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades, open storage facilities have been established at four major museums in order to address the long-standing problem of lack of gallery space for putting collections on view. While making tens of thousands of objects available to visitors represents a great leap forward in accessibility, it raises inherent questions about…

  2. Solar Energy: Heat Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat storage is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  3. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  4. Underground pumped hydroelectric storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1984-07-01

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

  5. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  6. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  7. Community College Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pederson, Eldor O.

    Drawing from an examination of community college periodicals, their availability and characteristics, the academic affiliations of contributing authors, and the topics of their articles, this paper discusses the minor role which community college periodicals appear to play. A list of 35 periodicals dealing primary with community college education…

  8. Silo Storage Preconceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

    2012-09-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage option’s primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argon’s design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, “Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study” (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

  9. Oxidative and colour changes in meat from three lines of free-range reared Iberian pigs slaughtered at 90 kg live weight and from industrial pig during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Mario; Morcuende, David; Cava, Ramón

    2003-11-01

    The oxidative stability and colour evolution during refrigerated storage (10 days at +4 °C) of Longissimus dorsi muscle from three lines of Iberian pigs and industrial genotype pigs were studied. The Iberian pigs were reared in an extensive system and fed on a commercial feed with access to pasture grazing, while industrial genotype pigs were reared in an intensive system. Fresh Longissimus dorsi of Iberian pig lines showed a more intense and redder colour, with a statistically significant higher CIE chroma and a*-value as well as a lower L*-value (P<0.05) compared with those of industrial genotype pigs. Pig genotype significantly affected the colour and lipid oxidation changes of m. Longissimus dorsi during refrigerated storage. The decrease in L*-value during the refrigerated storage was more intense in industrial pig's Longissimus dorsi than in those from Iberian pig lines. CIE a*-value decrease was more intense in 'Lampiño' Iberian line and industrial Longissimus dorsi than in the other two Iberian pig lines, however CIE a*-value was significantly higher in muscles from Iberian pig lines than in muscle of industrial genotype (P<0.05) at the end of refrigerated storage. The Iberian and industrial pig's Longissimus dorsi did not show statistically significant differences in TBA-RS values (mg MDA/kg meat) at the end of the refrigerated storage period (P>0.05). To establish relationships between parameters measured in fresh meat and oxidation and colour changes during refrigerated storage, correlations and multiple regression models were calculated. CIE a*-values at day 10 were positively correlated with values of fresh muscles for a*, C18:1 percentages and negatively correlated with polyunsaturated fatty acids percentages of neutral and polar lipids. Inversely, TBA-RS values at day 10 showed a positive correlation with initial values for phospholipid content and polyunsaturated fatty acids of neutral and polar lipid fractions, while C18:1 percentage were

  10. NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-06-30

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

  11. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Philip D.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  12. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOEpatents

    Metz, P.D.

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  13. Warm storage for arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K.; Harrison, T. Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-01

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the “cold storage” model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  14. Exhaust system with emissions storage device and plasma reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hoard, John W.

    1998-01-01

    An exhaust system for a combustion system, comprising a storage device for collecting NO.sub.x, hydrocarbon, or particulate emissions, or mixture of these emissions, and a plasma reactor for destroying the collected emissions is described. After the emission is collected in by the storage device for a period of time, the emission is then destroyed in a non-thermal plasma generated by the plasma reactor. With respect to the direction of flow of the exhaust stream, the storage device must be located before the terminus of the plasma reactor, and it may be located wholly before, overlap with, or be contained within the plasma reactor.

  15. Testing the Effect of Refrigerated Storage on Testate Amoeba Samples.

    PubMed

    Mazei, Yuri; Chernyshov, Viktor; Tsyganov, Andrey N; Payne, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Samples for analysis of testate amoebae and other protists frequently need to be stored for many months before microscopy. This storage commonly involves refrigeration, but we know that testate amoebae can live and reproduce in these conditions. This raises the question: do communities change during storage and how might this effect the data produced? We analysed Sphagnum samples over a 16-week period to address this question. Our results show no evidence for detectable change. This is a reassuring result supporting much current practice although we suggest that frozen storage or the addition of a fixative may be worthwhile precautions where feasible.

  16. Phosphonium chloride for thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development of systems for storage of thermal energy is discussed. Application of phosphonium chloride for heat storage through reversible dissociation is described. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of phosphonium chloride are analyzed and dangers in using phosphonium chloride are explained.

  17. Safety Tips: Hazardous Chemical Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses storage of hazardous chemicals and provides a list of eight basic safety rules to use in developing a safe storage system. Suggestions include not storing materials alphabetically, storing nonreactive chemicals together, and not storing oxidizers and fuels together. (JN)

  18. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  19. Storage properties of low fat fish and rice flour coextrudates

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluru, J.S.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Bandyopadhyay, Sukumar; Bawa, A.S.

    2008-12-01

    Storage properties of an extruded mixture of fish meat and rice flour were investigated. These properties included the determination of an isotherm for equilibrium moisture content vs. water activity at 30oC. Vitamin-A and total tocopherols and gain in peroxides and free fatty acid were measured during storage at this temperature. The acceptability of the extruded meal in terms of sensory characteristics were studied at the end of the storage period (45 days). Sorption isotherm indicated that the safe aw levels of the extrudates were 0.4-0.7. During the first 15 days of storage a loss of 53.1 % and 50 % of vitamin-A (IU/g) and total tocopherols (%) was observed. The peroxide and free fatty content increased from 46 to 109 mg/kg and 3.8 to 7.7 %, respectively during the same period. Non-linear model described the best the loss of vitamin-A, and tocopherols and gain in peroxide values and free fatty acid content. The loss of vitamin-A and total tocopherols almost followed a similar trend during the complete storage period of 45 days. The gain in peroxides was more prominent compared to free fatty acid content during the initial 15 days of storage. The ANOVA table indicated that the sensory attributes of the product fried for different times (15-120 s) were significantly and the product fried at 15 sec were most acceptable.

  20. Commoditization of High Performance Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Studham, Scott S.

    2004-04-01

    The commoditization of high performance computers started in the late 80s with the attack of the killer micros. Previously, high performance computers were exotic vector systems that could only be afforded by an illustrious few. Now everyone has a supercomputer composed of clusters of commodity processors. A similar commoditization of high performance storage has begun. Commodity disks are being used for high performance storage, enabling a paradigm change in storage and significantly changing the price point of high volume storage.

  1. Fuel Aging in Storage and Transportation (FAST): Accelerated Characterization and Performance Assessment of the Used Nuclear Fuel Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean

    2016-08-02

    This Integrated Research Project (IRP) was established to characterize key limiting phenomena related to the performance of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage systems. This was an applied engineering project with a specific application in view (i.e., UNF dry storage). The completed tasks made use of a mixture of basic science and engineering methods. The overall objective was to create, or enable the creation of, predictive tools in the form of observation methods, phenomenological models, and databases that will enable the design, installation, and licensing of dry UNF storage systems that will be capable of containing UNF for extended period of time.

  2. Hydrogen Fire in a Storage Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, Zena M.

    2010-01-01

    On October 23, 2007, the operations team began a procedure to sample the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage vessels ("tanks"), and associated transfer system. This procedure was being performed to determine the conditions within the system, and if necessary, to purge the system of any excess Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2) in preparation for reactivation of the system. The system had not been used since 2003. The LH2 storage system contains two (2) spherical pressure vessels of 225,000 gallons in volume, with a maximum working pressure (MAWP) of 50 psig. Eight inch transfer piping connects them to the usage point. Operations began with activation of the burnstack for the LH2 storage area. Pneumatic (GN2) systems in the storage area were then activated and checked. Pressurization of storage tank number 1 with gaseous nitrogen (GN2) was initiated, with a target pressure of 10 psig, at which point samples were planned to be taken. At 5 psig, a loud noise was heard in the upper area of tank number 2. Smoke was seen exiting the burnstack and from the insulation on vent lines for both tanks. At this time tank number 1 was vented and the pressurization system was secured. The mishap resulted in physical damage to both storage tanks, as well as to some of the piping for both tanks. Corrective action included repair of the damaged hardware by a qualified contractor. Preventive action included documented organizational policy and procedures for establishing standby and mothball conditions for facilities and equipment, including provisions as detailed in the investigation report recommendations: Recommendation 1: The using organization should define necessary activities in order to place hydrogen systems in long term periods of inactivity. The defined activities should address requirements for rendering inert, isolation (i.e., physical disconnect, double block and bleed, etc.) and periodic monitoring. Recommendation 2: The using organization should develop a process to periodically monitor

  3. Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

    2008-06-01

    Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

  4. Optimizing Ice Thermal Storage to Reduce Energy Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher L.

    Energy cost for buildings is an issue of concern for owners across the U.S. The bigger the building, the greater the concern. A part of this is due to the energy required to cool the building and the way in which charges are set when paying for energy consumed during different times of the day. This study will prove that designing ice thermal storage properly will minimize energy cost in buildings. The effectiveness of ice thermal storage as a means to reduce energy costs lies within transferring the time of most energy consumption from on-peak to off-peak periods. Multiple variables go into the equation of finding the optimal use of ice thermal storage and they are all judged with the final objective of minimizing monthly energy costs. This research discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, energy demand, and the total energy cost. A tool for optimal design of ice thermal storage is developed, considering variables such as chiller and ice storage sizes and charging and discharge times. The simulations take place in a four-story building and investigate the potential of Ice Thermal Storage as a resource in reducing and minimizing energy cost for cooling. The simulations test the effectiveness of Ice Thermal Storage implemented into the four-story building in ten locations across the United States.

  5. Capacity retention in hydrogen storage alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anani, A.; Visintin, A.; Srinivasan, S.; Appleby, A. J.; Reilly, J. J.; Johnson, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of our examination of the properties of several candidate materials for hydrogen storage electrodes and their relation to the decrease in H-storage capacity upon open-circuit storage over time are reported. In some of the alloy samples examined to date, only about 10 percent of the hydrogen capacity was lost upon storage for 20 days, while in others, this number was as high as 30 percent for the same period of time. This loss in capacity is attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) hydrogen desorbed from the electrode due to pressure differences between the cell and the electrode sample; and (2) chemical and/or electrochemical degradation of the alloy electrode upon exposure to the cell environment. The former process is a direct consequence of the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the hydride alloy phase and the partial pressure of hydrogen in the hydride phase in equilibrium with that in the electrolyte environment, while the latter is related to the stability of the alloy phase in the cell environment. Comparison of the equilibrium gas-phase dissociation pressures of these alloys indicate that reversible loss of hydrogen capacity is higher in alloys with P(eqm) greater than 1 atm than in those with P(eqm) less than 1 atm.

  6. Test profiles for stationary energy storage applications

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.C.; Cole, J.F.; Taylor, P.A.

    1998-09-01

    Evaluation of battery and other energy storage technologies for stationary uses is progressing rapidly toward application-specific testing that uses computer-based data acquisition and control equipment, active electronic loads and power supplies, and customized software, to enable sophisticated test regimes that simulate actual use conditions. These simulated-use tests provide more accurate performance and life evaluations than simple constant resistance or current testing regimes. Some of the tests use stepped constant-power charge and discharge regimes to simulate conditions created by electric utility applications such as frequency regulation and spinning reserve. Other test profiles under development simulate conditions for the energy storage component of Remote Area Power Supplies (RAPS) that include renewable and/or fossil-fueled generators. Various RAPS applications have unique sets of service conditions that require specialized test profiles. However, almost all RAPS tests and many tests that represent other stationary applications need to simulate significant time periods during which storage devices operate at low-to-medium states-of-charge without full recharge. Consideration of these and similar issues in simulated-use test regimes is necessary to effectively predict the responses of the various types of batteries in specific stationary applications. This paper describes existing and evolving stationary applications for energy storage technologies and test regimes that are designed to simulate them. The paper also discusses efforts to develop international testing standards.

  7. Multiplexed Holographic Data Storage in Bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrl, David J.; Krile, Thomas F.

    1997-01-01

    High density optical data storage, driven by the information revolution, remains at the forefront of current research areas. Much of the current research has focused on photorefractive materials (SBN and LiNbO3) and polymers, despite various problems with expense, durability, response time and retention periods. Photon echo techniques, though promising, are questionable due to the need for cryogenic conditions. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) films are an attractive alternative recording medium. Great strides have been made in refining BR, and materials with storage lifetimes as long as 100 days have recently become available. The ability to deposit this robust polycrystalline material as high quality optical films suggests the use of BR as a recording medium for commercial optical disks. Our own recent research has demonstrated the suitability of BR films for real time spatial filtering and holography. We propose to fully investigate the feasibility of performing holographic mass data storage in BR. Important aspects of the problem to be investigated include various data multiplexing techniques (e.g. angle- amplitude- and phase-encoded multiplexing, and in particular shift-multiplexing), multilayer recording techniques, SLM selection and data readout using crossed polarizers for noise rejection. Systems evaluations of storage parameters, including access times, memory refresh constraints, erasure, signal-to-noise ratios and bit error rates, will be included in our investigations.

  8. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

  9. Status of work at PNL supporting dry storage of spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.E.; McKinnon, M.A.; Michener, T.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1992-01-01

    Three projects related to dry storage of light-water reactor spent fuel are being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Performance testing of six dry storage systems (four metal casks and two concrete storage systems) has been completed and results compiled. Two computer codes for predicting spent fuel and storage system thermal performance, COBRA-SFS and HYDRA-II, have been developed and have been reviewed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Air oxidation testing of spent fuel was conducted from 1984 through 1990 to obtain data to support recommendations of temperature-time limits for air dry storage for periods up to 40 years.

  10. Antioxidants, free radicals, storage proteins, puroindolines, and proteolytic activities in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) seeds during accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Calucci, Lucia; Capocchi, Antonella; Galleschi, Luciano; Ghiringhelli, Silvia; Pinzino, Calogero; Saviozzi, Franco; Zandomeneghi, Maurizio

    2004-06-30

    Seeds of bread wheat were incubated at 40 degrees C and 100% relative humidity for 0, 3, 4, 6, and 10 days. The effects of accelerated aging on seed germinability and some biochemical properties of flour (carotenoid, free radical, and protein contents and proteolytic activity) and gluten (free radical content and flexibility) were investigated. Seed germinability decreased during aging, resulting in seed death after 10 days. A progressive decrease of carotenoid content, in particular, lutein, was observed, prolonging the incubation, whereas the free radical content increased in both flour and gluten. A degradation of soluble and storage proteins was found, associated with a marked increase of proteolytic activity and a loss of viscoelastic properties of gluten. On the contrary, puroindolines were quite resistant to the treatment. The results are discussed in comparison with those previously obtained during accelerated aging of durum wheat seeds.

  11. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Langpape, R.

    1984-06-05

    The invention relates to an electrochemical storage cell on the basis of alkali metal and chalcogen, particularly sodium and sulfur. The storage cell has an anode space for receiving the anolyte and a cathode space for receiving the catholyte. The two spaces are separated from each other by a cup-shaped solid electrolyte. The solid electrolyte is surrounded in the region of the anode space by a capillary structure over the entire length. The capillary structure has at least one widened portion which is formed by an outward-pointing bulge of the capillary structure. The widened portion extends over the entire length of the capillary structure. Each widened portion is traversed in its interior by a canal. The cylinder surface of this canal is formed by a metal screen. The entrance opening of this canal is directly adjacent to the exit opening of a supply container for the sodium.

  12. Seed storage oil mobilization.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ian A

    2008-01-01

    Storage oil mobilization starts with the onset of seed germination. Oil bodies packed with triacylglycerol (TAG) exist in close proximity with glyoxysomes, the single membrane-bound organelles that house most of the biochemical machinery required to convert fatty acids derived from TAG to 4-carbon compounds. The 4-carbon compounds in turn are converted to soluble sugars that are used to fuel seedling growth. Biochemical analysis over the last 50 years has identified the main pathways involved in this process, including beta-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, and gluconeogenesis. In the last few years molecular genetic dissection of the overall process in the model oilseed species Arabidopsis has provided new insight into its complexity, particularly with respect to the specific role played by individual enzymatic steps and the subcellular compartmentalization of the glyoxylate cycle. Both abscisic acid (ABA) and sugars inhibit storage oil mobilization and a substantial degree of the control appears to operate at the transcriptional level.

  13. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Optical storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.

    1991-01-01

    A new holographic image storage device which uses four-wave mixing in two photorefractive crystals is described. Photorefractive crystals promise information storage densities on the order of 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 12) bits per cubic centimeter at real-time rates. Several studies in recent years have investigated the use of photorefractive crystals for storing holographic image information. However, all of the previous studies have focused on techniques for storing information in a single crystal. The disadvantage of using a single crystal is that the read process is destructive. Researchers have developed techniques for fixing the information in a crystal so that it may be read many times. However, when fixed, the information cannot be readily erased and overwritten with new information. It two photorefractive crystals are used, holographic image information may be stored dynamically. That is, the stored image information may be read out more than once, and it may be easily erased and overwritten with new image information.

  15. PACS and image storage.

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Laura J

    2009-07-01

    Storage and retrieval of digital images is an integral component of any digital imaging system. A picture archiving and communication system (PACS) includes hardware and software that allows for display, storage, retrieval, and communication functions. PACS software allows for manipulation of the images to enhance interpretation by way of changes in contrast, brightness, magnification, and measurements, among others. Digital images for medical imaging should be in the digital imaging communications in medicine file format. This specified format allows for interconnectivity between imaging systems from different vendors and is important to ensure appropriate security. A hospital information system or radiology information system can be used to tie the patient record with the digital images in a paperless medical record system.

  16. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Haberfellner, F.; Prappacher, G.

    1985-01-08

    Electrochemical storage cell of the sodium and sulfur type with at least one anode space for receiving the anolyte and a cathode space for receiving the catholyte, which are separated from each other by an alkali ion-conducting solid electrolyte and are bounded at least in some areas by a metallic housing. The cathode space is in communication via at least one connecting element with at least one supply container for the sodium polysulfide being formed in the chemical reaction.

  17. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Steinleitner, G.

    1984-05-01

    Electrochemical storage cell or battery with at least one anode space for receiving the anolyte and one cathode space for receiving the catholyte which spaces are separated from each other by an alkali ion-conducting solid electrolyte and are bounded at least in some places by a metallic housing. A safety space which is subdivided into at least two safety zones, adjoins at least in some places, the solid electrolyte.

  18. Energy Storage Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Jankovsky, Amy L.; Reid, Concha M.; Miller, Thomas B.; Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program funded the Energy Storage Project to develop battery and fuel cell technology to meet the expected energy storage needs of the Constellation Program for human exploration. Technology needs were determined by architecture studies and risk assessments conducted by the Constellation Program, focused on a mission for a long-duration lunar outpost. Critical energy storage needs were identified as batteries for EVA suits, surface mobility systems, and a lander ascent stage; fuel cells for the lander and mobility systems; and a regenerative fuel cell for surface power. To address these needs, the Energy Storage Project developed advanced lithium-ion battery technology, targeting cell-level safety and very high specific energy and energy density. Key accomplishments include the development of silicon composite anodes, lithiated-mixed-metal-oxide cathodes, low-flammability electrolytes, and cell-incorporated safety devices that promise to substantially improve battery performance while providing a high level of safety. The project also developed "non-flow-through" proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell stacks. The primary advantage of this technology set is the reduction of ancillary parts in the balance-of-plant--fewer pumps, separators and related components should result in fewer failure modes and hence a higher probability of achieving very reliable operation, and reduced parasitic power losses enable smaller reactant tanks and therefore systems with lower mass and volume. Key accomplishments include the fabrication and testing of several robust, small-scale nonflow-through fuel cell stacks that have demonstrated proof-of-concept. This report summarizes the project s goals, objectives, technical accomplishments, and risk assessments. A bibliography spanning the life of the project is also included.

  19. Selecting fuel storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, R. )

    1993-07-01

    Until the use of underground storage tanks (USTs) for fuel storage was mandated by the 1970 Uniform Fire Code, above-ground storage tanks (ASTs) were widely used. The tanks were relatively crude by today's standards so the technical superiority and fire protection afforded by use of underground tanks soon made USTs the system of choice for almost all uses. As a result, tens of thousands of tanks have been underground for more than 20 years, and at some point, many of them began leaking. Often, the first sign of these leaks appeared when groundwater became contaminated. The EPA responded to this major environmental problem by strictly regulating the use of below-ground tanks to store flammable liquids. These added regulations have had a severe effect on both service stations and private fueling. The removal of underground tanks and the removal and disposal of any contaminated soil is an extremely expensive proposition. Furthermore, new Uniform Fire Code regulations have added to the costs, imposing requirements for double-walled tanks, corrosion protection, electronic leak monitoring, and annual tank testing. These requirements, plus the financial responsibility requirements the EPA imposed on owners and users of below-ground tanks, led directly to a reconsideration of the use of above-ground tanks for some applications.

  20. Mass storage at NSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    The need to manage large amounts of data on robotically controlled devices has been critical to the mission of this Agency for many years. In many respects this Agency has helped pioneer, with their industry counterparts, the development of a number of products long before these systems became commercially available. Numerous attempts have been made to field both robotically controlled tape and optical disk technology and systems to satisfy our tertiary storage needs. Custom developed products were architected, designed, and developed without vendor partners over the past two decades to field workable systems to handle our ever increasing storage requirements. Many of the attendees of this symposium are familiar with some of the older products, such as: the Braegen Automated Tape Libraries (ATL's), the IBM 3850, the Ampex TeraStore, just to name a few. In addition, we embarked on an in-house development of a shared disk input/output support processor to manage our every increasing tape storage needs. For all intents and purposes, this system was a file server by current definitions which used CDC Cyber computers as the control processors. It served us well and was just recently removed from production usage.

  1. Maui energy storage study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Karlson, Benjamin

    2012-12-01

    This report investigates strategies to mitigate anticipated wind energy curtailment on Maui, with a focus on grid-level energy storage technology. The study team developed an hourly production cost model of the Maui Electric Company (MECO) system, with an expected 72 MW of wind generation and 15 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in 2015, and used this model to investigate strategies that mitigate wind energy curtailment. It was found that storage projects can reduce both wind curtailment and the annual cost of producing power, and can do so in a cost-effective manner. Most of the savings achieved in these scenarios are not from replacing constant-cost diesel-fired generation with wind generation. Instead, the savings are achieved by the more efficient operation of the conventional units of the system. Using additional storage for spinning reserve enables the system to decrease the amount of spinning reserve provided by single-cycle units. This decreases the amount of generation from these units, which are often operated at their least efficient point (at minimum load). At the same time, the amount of spinning reserve from the efficient combined-cycle units also decreases, allowing these units to operate at higher, more efficient levels.

  2. Periodic chiral structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggard, Dwight L.; Engheta, Nader; Pelet, Philippe; Liu, John C.; Kowarz, Marek W.; Kim, Yunjin

    1989-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a structure that is both chiral and periodic are investigated using coupled-mode equations. The periodicity is described by a sinusoidal perturbation of the permittivity, permeability, and chiral admittance. The coupled-mode equations are derived from physical considerations and used to examine bandgap structure and reflected and transmitted fields. Chirality is observed predominantly in transmission, whereas periodicity is present in both reflection and transmission.

  3. Thermal storage for electric utilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swet, C. J.; Masica, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Applications of the thermal energy storage (TES) principle (storage of sensible heat or latent heat, or heat storage in reversible chemical reactions) in power systems are evaluated. Load leveling behind the meter, load following at conventional thermal power plants, solar thermal power generation, and waste heat utilization are the principal TES applications considered. Specific TES examples discussed include: storage heaters for electric-resistance space heating, air conditioning TES in the form of chilled water or eutectic salt baths, hot water TES, and trans-seasonal storage in heated water in confined aquifers.

  4. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-02-27

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

  5. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-10-24

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2005 through September 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) receiving proposals in response to the RFP, and (2) organizing and hosting the proposal selection meeting on August 30-31, 2005.

  6. Fuel performance in water storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, A.P.; Scott, J.G.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.; McDannel, G.E.

    1993-11-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Department of Energy (DOE). A variety of different types of fuels have been stored there since the 1950`s prior to reprocessing for uranium recovery. In April of 1992, the DOE decided to end fuel reprocessing, changing the mission at ICPP. Fuel integrity in storage is now viewed as long term until final disposition is defined and implemented. Thus, the condition of fuel and storage equipment is being closely monitored and evaluated to ensure continued safe storage. There are four main areas of fuel storage at ICPP: an original underwater storage facility (CPP-603), a modern underwater storage facility (CPP-666), and two dry fuel storage facilities. The fuels in storage are from the US Navy, DOE (and its predecessors the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission), and other research programs. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels. In the underwater storage basins, fuels are clad with stainless steel, zirconium, and aluminum. Also included in the basin inventory is canned scrap material. The dry fuel storage contains primarily graphite and aluminum type fuels. A total of 55 different fuel types are currently stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The corrosion resistance of the barrier material is of primary concern in evaluating the integrity of the fuel in long term water storage. The barrier material is either the fuel cladding (if not canned) or the can material.

  7. Periodic Solutions of Spatially Periodic Hamiltonian Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-10

    Theorem 0.2 generalizes Theorem 1.5 of Rabinowitz in [201. 3 Equation (0.1), under spatially periodic assumptions has been studied by several au...n x n symmetric matrix, H satisfying (HO), (H1) and (H2), and f = (0, fq) satisfying (fM), (fl) and (f2), Rabinowitz in [201 showed the existence of... Rabinowitz [17]. We consider a functional I : E x M ) R of class C’, where E is a Hilbert space and M is a compact manifold. Assuming that I satisfies a

  8. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air presure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  9. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1980-01-01

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  10. Model analysis of the effects of atmospheric drivers on storage water use in Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, H.; Steppe, K.; Nadezhdina, N.; de Beeck, M. Op; Deckmyn, G.; Meiresonne, L.; Lemeur, R.; Čermák, J.; Ceulemans, R.; Janssens, I. A.

    2007-08-01

    Storage water use is an indirect consequence of the interplay between different meteorological drivers through their effect on water flow and water potential in trees. We studied these microclimatic drivers of storage water use in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in a temperate climate. The storage water use was modeled using the ANAFORE model, integrating a dynamic water flow and - storage model with a process-based transpiration model. The model was calibrated and validated with sap flow measurements for the growing season of 2000 (26 May-18 October). Because there was no severe soil drought during the study period, we were able to study atmospheric effects. Incoming radiation and vapour pressure deficit (VPD) were the main atmospheric drivers of storage water use. The general trends of sap flow and storage water use are similar, and follow more or less the pattern of incoming radiation. Nevertheless, considerable differences in the day-to-day pattern of sap flow and storage water use were observed. VPD was determined to be one of the main drivers of these differences. During dry atmospheric conditions (high VPD) storage water use was reduced. This reduction was higher than the reduction in measured sap flow. Our results suggest that the trees did not rely more on storage water during periods of atmospheric drought, without severe soil drought. The daily minimum tree water content was lower in periods of high VPD, but the reserves were not completely depleted after the first day of high VPD, due to refilling during the night. Nevertheless, the tree water content deficit was a third important factor influencing storage water use. When storage compartments were depleted beyond a threshold, storage water use was limited due to the low water potential in the storage compartments. The maximum relative contribution of storage water to daily transpiration was also constrained by an increasing tree water content deficit.

  11. The effects of storage on the net calorific value of wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jun Sian; Sokhansanj, S.; Lau, A. K.; ...

    2015-06-30

    The wood pellet export from Canada to Europe has been increasing steadily in recent years (roughly 1.8 million ton in 2013). Due to distances involved, wood pellets remain in transit and storage for months before their final consumption. The net calorific value determines the price of wood pellet purchase in Europe. There have been concerns about the changes of net calorific values over time. In this study, the effects of storage time, storage configuration, storage temperature, and wood pellet quality on the net calorific value of wood pellets for a period of 6 months were investigated. Storage configurations were openmore » or closed and storage temperatures were 25 °C, 35 °C and 45 °C. Two types of wood pellets used were whitewood and mixed. The results in closed storage indicated that storage time had a positive effect on the net calorific value where the net calorific value increased by 1% to 2% over the storage period. In open storage, the moisture content had the most significant impact on the net calorific value. The net calorific values of the two types of wood pellets were found to be significantly different at p < 0.001. A multivariable linear regression and analyses of variance performed verified the graphical results. Lastly, the authors postulated that the higher energy potential compounds, such as aldehyde and ketone, produced during pellet storage, caused the increase in net calorific values.« less

  12. The effects of storage on the net calorific value of wood pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun Sian; Sokhansanj, S.; Lau, A. K.; Lim, C. J.; Bi, X. T.; Basset, Vaughan; Yazdanpanah, F.; Melin, S.

    2015-06-30

    The wood pellet export from Canada to Europe has been increasing steadily in recent years (roughly 1.8 million ton in 2013). Due to distances involved, wood pellets remain in transit and storage for months before their final consumption. The net calorific value determines the price of wood pellet purchase in Europe. There have been concerns about the changes of net calorific values over time. In this study, the effects of storage time, storage configuration, storage temperature, and wood pellet quality on the net calorific value of wood pellets for a period of 6 months were investigated. Storage configurations were open or closed and storage temperatures were 25 °C, 35 °C and 45 °C. Two types of wood pellets used were whitewood and mixed. The results in closed storage indicated that storage time had a positive effect on the net calorific value where the net calorific value increased by 1% to 2% over the storage period. In open storage, the moisture content had the most significant impact on the net calorific value. The net calorific values of the two types of wood pellets were found to be significantly different at p < 0.001. A multivariable linear regression and analyses of variance performed verified the graphical results. Lastly, the authors postulated that the higher energy potential compounds, such as aldehyde and ketone, produced during pellet storage, caused the increase in net calorific values.

  13. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  14. Multidimensional period doubling structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yup; Flom, Dvir; Ben-Abraham, Shelomo I

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops the formalism necessary to generalize the period doubling sequence to arbitrary dimension by straightforward extension of the substitution and recursion rules. It is shown that the period doubling structures of arbitrary dimension are pure point diffractive. The symmetries of the structures are pointed out.

  15. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  16. Influence of soil and climate on root zone storage capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euser, Tanja; McMillan, Hilary; Hrachowitz, Markus; Winsemius, Hessel; Savenije, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    The root zone water storage capacity (Sr) of a catchment is an important variable for the hydrological behaviour of a catchment; it strongly influences the storage, transpiration and runoff generation in an area. However, the root zone storage capacity is largely heterogeneous and not measurable. There are different theories about the variables affecting the root zone storage capacity; among the most debated are soil, vegetation and climate. The effect of vegetation and soil is often accounted for by detailed soil and land use maps. To investigate the effect of climate on the root zone storage capacity, an analogue can be made between the root zone storage capacity of a catchment and the human habit to design and construct reservoirs: both storage capacities help to overcome a dry period of a certain length. Humans often use the mass curve technique to determine the required storage needed to design the reservoir capacity. This mass curve technique can also be used to derive the root zone storage capacity created by vegetation in a certain ecosystem and climate (Gao et al., 2014). Only precipitation and discharge or evaporation data are required for this method. This study tests whether Sr values derived by both the mass curve technique and from soil maps are comparable for a range of catchments in New Zealand. Catchments are selected over a gradient of climates and land use. Special focus lies on how Sr values derived for a larger catchment are representative for smaller nested catchments. The spatial differences are examined between values derived from soil data and from climate and flow data. Gao, H., Hrachowitz, M., Schymanski, S.J., Fenicia, F., Sriwongsitanon, N., Savenije, H.H.G, (2014): Climate controls how ecosystems size the root zone storage capacity at catchment scale. DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061668

  17. PCB storage requirements

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic chemicals that had become widely used in industrial applications due to their practical physical and chemical properties. Historical uses of PCBs include dielectric fluids (used in utility transformers, capacitors, etc.), hydraulic fluids, and other applications requiring stable, fire-retardant materials. Due to findings that PCBs may cause adverse health effects and due to their persistence and accumulation in the environment, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), enacted on october 11, 1976, banned the manufacture of PCBs after 1978 [Section 6(e)]. The first PCB regulations, promulgated at 40 CFR Part 761, were finalized on February 17, 1978. These PCB regulations include requirements specifying disposal methods and marking (labeling) procedures, and controlling PCB use. To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in its efforts to comply with the TSCA statute and implementing regulations, the Office of Environmental Guidance has prepared the document ``Guidance on the Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).`` That document explains the requirements specified in the statute and regulations for managing PCBs, including PCB use, storage, transport, and disposal. The requirements specified at 40 CFR Part 761.65 require most PCB wastes to be stored in a facility that meets the specifications of that section. Additionally, the regulations include rules concerning time limits for PCBs and PCB Items in storage, rules concerning leaking electrical equipment, and rules concerning types of containers used to store PCBs and PCB Items. This Information Brief supplements the PCB guidance document by responding to common questions concerning storage requirements for PCBs. It is one of a series of Information Briefs pertinent to PCB management issues.

  18. Pseudocapacitors for Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Anuradha

    Fluctuation in the demand for electrical power and the intermittent nature of the supply of energy from renewable sources like solar and wind have made the need for energy storage a dire necessity. Current storage technologies like batteries and supercapacitors fall short either in terms of power output or in their ability to store sufficient energy. Pseudocapacitors combine features of both and offer an alternative to stabilize the power supply. They possess high rates of charge and discharge and are capable of storing much more energy in comparison to a supercapacitor. In the quest for solutions that are economical and feasible, we have investigated Prussian Blue in aqueous electrolytes for its use as a pseudocapacitor. Two different active materials based on Prussian Blue were prepared; one that has just Prussian Blue and the other that contains a mixture of Prussian Blue and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Four electrolytes differing in the valence of the cation were employed for the study. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge were used to characterize the electrodes. Our experiments have shown specific capacitances of Prussian Blue electrodes in the range of 140-720 F/g and that of Prussian Blue-CNT electrodes in the range of ˜52 F/g. The remarkable capacity of charge storage in Prussian Blue electrodes is attributed to its electrochemical activity ensuring surface redox and its tunnel-like structure allowing ease of entry and exit for ions like Potassium. Simple methods of synthesis have yielded specific capacitances of the order of hundreds of Farads per gram showing that Prussian Blue has promise as an electrode material for applications needing high rates of charge-discharge.

  19. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hasenauer, D.

    1983-09-20

    An electrochemical storage cell is disclosed based on alkali metal and chalcogen comprising at least one anode space for the alkali metal anolyte and a cathode space for the chalcogen catholyte, with the anode space and the cathode space separated from each other by an alkali ion-conducting solid electrolyte wall and a metallic housing bounding the cell. The solid electrolyte wall has a plurality of spaced, outwardly extending hollow recesses, and at least one current collector disposed between each pair of adjacent recesses.

  20. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Steinleitner, G.

    1985-05-07

    Electrochemical storage cell of the alkali metal and chalcogen type with at least one anode space for the alkali metal anolyte, and a cathode space for the chalcogen catholyte, with the anode space and the cathode space separated from each other by an alkali ion-conducting solid electrolyte wall, the improvement comprising the addition in the anode space of sodium and of a capturing material with O/sub 2/-getter properties in an amount sufficient to absorb detrimental bound or free oxygen.

  1. Waste gas storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, Brian D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Method for storing a waste gas mixture comprised of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and inert gases, the gas mixture containing corrosive contaminants including inorganic acids and bases and organic solvents, and derived from space station operations. The gas mixture is stored under pressure in a vessel formed of a filament wound composite overwrap on a metal liner, the metal liner being pre-stressed in compression by the overwrap, thereby avoiding any tensile stress in the liner, and preventing stress corrosion cracking of the liner during gas mixture storage.

  2. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  3. BINARY STORAGE ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Chu, J.C.

    1958-06-10

    A binary storage device is described comprising a toggle provided with associsted improved driver circuits adapted to produce reliable action of the toggle during clearing of the toggle to one of its two states. or transferring information into and out of the toggle. The invention resides in the development of a self-regulating driver circuit to minimize the fluctuation of the driving voltages for the toggle. The disclosed driver circuit produces two pulses in response to an input pulse: a first or ''clear'' pulse beginning nt substantially the same time but endlrg slightly sooner than the second or ''transfer'' output pulse.

  4. Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation developed the drive train for use in the Chrysler Corporation's Patriot Mark II, which includes the Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) system. In Chrysler's experimental hybrid- electric car, the hybrid drive train uses an advanced turboalternator that generates electricity by burning a fuel; a powerful, compact electric motor; and a FES that eliminates the need for conventional batteries. The FES system incorporates technology SatCon developed in more than 30 projects with seven NASA centers, mostly for FES systems for spacecraft attitude control and momentum recovery. SatCon will continue to develop the technology with Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  5. Interim storage study report

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host

  7. Inner and outer waste storage vaults with leak-testing accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Splinter, B.C.

    1985-04-23

    A storage arrangement for waste materials of the type which tend to pollute the environment consists of a waterproof reinforced concrete vault, preferably located underground, and a permanent reinforced concrete storage vault within the underground vault and spaced from the walls thereof by a water lock. Sealed containers filled with chemical or nuclear waste are deposited in the permanent storage vault and sealed therein with bitumen. The underground vault is provided with an access opening to the water lock to enable testing of the water periodically for contamination due to leakage from the permanent storage vault. If no leakage is evident after a predetermined time period has elapsed, the permanent storage vault is removed from the underground vault and shipped to a permanent storage site.

  8. Effect of harvesting system and fruit cold storage on virgin olive oil chemical composition and quality of superintensive cultivated 'Arbequina' olives.

    PubMed

    Yousfi, Khaled; Weiland, Carlos M; García, José M

    2012-05-09

    Storage at 3 and 18 °C of 'Arbequina' olives (Olea europaea L.) cultivated in hedgerows and harvested manually or mechanically (wine grape harvester) was tested. Fruit characteristics and oil quality were monitored. Mechanical harvesting caused internal fruit damage that induced its rapid softening and decay, but also facilitated obtaining higher amounts of oil, which suffered a rapid deterioration during fruit storage. This oil presented lower tocopherol and phenol contents and lower oxidative stability than the oil extracted from manually harvested olives, but showed similar fatty acid composition. Cold storage (3 °C) delayed all of these deterioration processes. It allowed maintaining the best commercial level of quality ("extra") in the oil from mechanically harvested olives for 10 days. This cold storage could be considered as an alternative to the increase in machinery for processing the growing olive production, due to both hedgerow cultivation and mechanized harvesting.

  9. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  10. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  11. Spatial dynamics of carbon storage: a case study from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sivrikaya, Fatih; Baskent, Emin Zeki; Bozali, Nuri

    2013-11-01

    Forest ecosystems have an important role in carbon cycle at both regional and global scales as an important carbon sink. Forest degradation and land cover changes, caused by deforestation and conversion to non-forest area, have a strong impact on carbon storage. The carbon storage of forest biomass and its changes over time in the Hartlap planning unit of the southeastern part of Turkey have been estimated using the biomass expansion factor method based on field measurements of forests plots with forest inventory data between 1991 and 2002. The amount of carbon storage associated with land use and land cover changes were also analyzed. The results showed that the total forested area of the Hartlap planning unit slightly increased by 2.1%, from 27,978.7 ha to 28,282.6 ha during the 11-year period, and carbon storage increased by 9.6%, from 390,367.6 to 427,826.9 tons. Carbon storage of conifer and mixed forests accounted for about 70.6% of carbon storage in 1991, and 67.8% in 2002 which increased by 14,274.6 tons. Land use change and increasing forest area have a strong influence on increasing biomass and carbon storage.

  12. [Effects of storage time on quality of Desmodium styracifolium seeds].

    PubMed

    Yang, Quan; Tang, Xiao-min; Pan, Hai-yun; Mei, Ling-feng; Zhang, Chun-rong; Cheng, Xuan-xuan; Huang, Lu-qi

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic changes of germination percentage, germination potential, thousand-seed weight, antioxidase activity in Desmodium styracifolium seeds with different storage time were tested, and electrical conductivity, contents of soluble sugar, soluble protein, starch in seed leach liquor were also determined in order to reveal the mechanism of seed deterioration. The results as the following. (1) The germination percentage, germination potential and thousand-seed weight of D. styracifolium seeds declined, while the seed coat color darkened with the extension of storage time. (2) The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) decreased with the prolongation of storage period. The SOD activity declined fastest in 1,095-1,185 d of storage, while the POD activity declined significantly in 365-395 d of storage. (3) The electrical conductivity and the contents of soluble sugar, starch in seed leach liquor increased, while the content of soluble protein declined with the extension of storage time. (4) Correlation analysis indicated that the germination percentage, germination potential and thousand-seed weight of D. styracifolium seeds have a significantly positive correlation with SOD and POD activity, while have a significantly negative correlation with the electrical conductivity, contents of soluble sugar and starch. It can be concluded that during the storage of D. styracifolium seeds, physiological and biochemical changes including decrease in antioxidase activity, rise in electrical conductivity, degradation effluent of soluble sugar and starch, degradation of soluble protein were the main factors leading to the seed deterioration.

  13. Reduction of virgin olive oil bitterness by fruit cold storage.

    PubMed

    Yousfi, Khaled; Cayuela, José A; García, José M

    2008-11-12

    Green mature olives (Olea europaea L. cv. 'Manzanilla', 'Picual', and 'Verdial') were stored at 5 degrees C, and the oil extracted from them showed a middle intensity level of sensory-evaluated bitterness. The storage times necessary for this reduction were different for the three varieties tested, requiring 4, 6, and 8 weeks, respectively, for 'Manzanilla', 'Picual', and 'Verdial' olives. The level of commercial quality of the extracted oil did not deteriorate as a consequence of previous fruit storage. Olives matured during refrigeration at 5 degrees C, as the increase of maturation index and the decrease of color index and fruit firmness indicated. Similarly, as the fruit storage period progressed, the total phenolic compound content of the extracted oils decreased. Although the use of green mature olives may require a more prolonged storage time, it allows for a better postharvest handling of the fruits, which are more resistant to physical damage or fungal infections than the riper ones.

  14. Crosstalk compensation in analysis of energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Christophersen, Jon P; Morrison, John L; Morrison, William H; Motloch, Chester G; Rose, David M

    2014-06-24

    Estimating impedance of energy storage devices includes generating input signals at various frequencies with a frequency step factor therebetween. An excitation time record (ETR) is generated to include a summation of the input signals and a deviation matrix of coefficients is generated relative to the excitation time record to determine crosstalk between the input signals. An energy storage device is stimulated with the ETR and simultaneously a response time record (RTR) is captured that is indicative of a response of the energy storage device to the ETR. The deviation matrix is applied to the RTR to determine an in-phase component and a quadrature component of an impedance of the energy storage device at each of the different frequencies with the crosstalk between the input signals substantially removed. This approach enables rapid impedance spectra measurements that can be completed within one period of the lowest frequency or less.

  15. Setting the Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  16. The Periodic Table CD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  17. Underground Energy Storage Program: 1981 annual report. Volume I. Progress summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1982-06-01

    This is the 1981 annual report for the Underground Energy Storage Program administered by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The two-volume document describes all of the major research funded under this program during the period March 1981 to March 1982. Volume I summarizes the activities and notable progress toward program objectives in both Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). Major changes in program emphasis and structure are also documented.

  18. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    SciTech Connect

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J.

    1995-12-31

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  19. Ion storage dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  20. Storage ring injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some basic issues involved in injecting the beam into storage rings with the principal parameters of those studied at the workshop have been considered. The main conclusion is that straightforward adjustments of the storage ring parameters makes injection easy. The largest number of injected turns is fourteen, and the phase space dilution allowance seems adequate to ensure very small beam loss during injection. The adjustments also result in lower bending magnet fields, and high field superconducting magnets (e.g., 5 Tesla) are not necessary. The design changes do not necessarily affect the Keil-Schnell criterion for stability of the longitudinal microwave instability, although that criterion appears to be irrelevant. Because the beams are expected to be unstable, but with slow growth rates, the vacuum chamber impedances required to give equal risetimes for the various designs are compared for systems posing various degrees of difficulty for injection. Finally, the impact of the parameters on cost is noted, and a system is considered that cuts the length of the linac in half by using doubly charged ions.

  1. ANR storage - a success story

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J.F.

    1980-11-01

    In only 2 years, ANR Storage has sold 50 billion CF of long-term underground natural gas storage service and another 15 billion CF under short-term contracts. Most of the new storage capacity lies in the depleted gas fields of Michigan's Niagaran reef trend, where the low development costs, superior field performance, and minimal base-gas requirements make such service economically attractive. Via the in-place transmission-pipeline network, ANR's storage customers now serve 15 states, some over 1000 miles from the storage fields. In partnership with Panhandle Eastern Pipe Line Co., ANR is now developing the Borchers North storage reservoir in southwestern Kansas, which will have a 35 billion CF working capacity. ANR invested $92.4 million in its Michigan operation; the Kansas project will cost about $73 million.

  2. Improved storage efficiency through geologic modeling and reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ammer, J.R.; Mroz, T.H.; Covatch, G.L.

    1997-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), through partnerships with industry, is demonstrating the importance of geologic modeling and reservoir simulation for optimizing the development and operation of gas storage fields. The geologic modeling and reservoir simulation study for the Natural Fuel Gas Supply Corporation CRADA was completed in September 1995. The results of this study were presented at the 1995 Society of Petroleum Engineers` (SPE) Eastern Regional Meeting. Although there has been no field verification of the modeling results, the study has shown the potential advantages and cost savings opportunities of using horizontal wells for storage enhancement. The geologic modeling for the Equitrans` CRADA was completed in September 1995 and was also presented at the 1995 SPE Eastern Regional Meeting. The reservoir modeling of past field performance was completed in November 1996 and prediction runs are currently being made to investigate the potential of offering either a 10 day or 30 day peaking service in addition to the existing 110 day base load service. Initial results have shown that peaking services can be provided through remediation of well damage and by drilling either several new vertical wells or one new horizontal well. The geologic modeling for the Northern Indiana Public Service Company CRADA was completed in November 1996 with a horizontal well being completed in January 1997. Based on well test results, the well will significantly enhance gas deliverability from the field and will allow the utilization of gas from an area of the storage field that was not accessible from their existing vertical wells. Results are presented from these three case studies.

  3. Storage and conservation of bagasse

    SciTech Connect

    Cusi, D.S.

    1980-08-01

    Storage of bagasse produced at harvest time becomes necessary when it is used for operations that are carried out continuously throughout the year, such as pulp and paper production. The sugar cane tissues suffer severe mechanical treatment in the sugar mills crushers, are further damaged in depithers and in many cases degraded while in storage. The processes of degradation are examined and handling and storage procedures are discussed which will minimize the quality and material losses.

  4. Aquifer thermal energy storage program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Demonstration Program is to stimulate the interest of industry by demonstrating the feasibility of using a geological formation for seasonal thermal energy storage, thereby, reducing crude oil consumption, minimizing thermal pollution, and significantly reducing utility capital investments required to account for peak power requirements. This purpose will be served if several diverse projects can be operated which will demonstrate the technical, economic, environmental, and institutional feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage systems.

  5. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    2000-06-27

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  6. Survey of Mass Storage Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    software that Pre- cision Instruments can provide. System Name: IBM 3850 Mass Storage System Manufacturer and Location: International Business Machines...34 Datamation, pp. 52-58, October 1973. 15 17. International Business Machines, IBM 3850 Mass Storage System Facts Folder, White Plains, NY, n.d. 18... International Business Machines, Introduction to the IBM 3850 Mass Storage System (MSS), White Plains, NY, n.d. 19. International Business Machines

  7. Variation of Nephrotoxicity Biomarkers by Urinary Storage Condition in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Le, Jung-Min; Han, Young-Hwan; Choi, Su-Jeong; Park, Ju-seong; Jang, Jeong-Jun; Bae, Re-Ji-Na; Lee, Mi Ju; Kim, Myoung Jun; Lee, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Duyeol; Lee, Hye-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Park, Cheol-Beom

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the use of several nephrotoxicity biomarkers in preclinical experiments. In addition, it has been indicated that the result may have been influenced by secondary factors, such as sample storage condition or storage period. In this study, we have assessed the variation in urinary nephrotoxicity biomarkers as a result of urine storage conditions and storage period of the urine. Urine was sampled from specific pathogen-free Sprague-Dawley rats (19 weeks old), which were housed individually in hanged stainless steel wire mesh cages. Urine was stored at 20℃, at 4℃, or at −70℃ after sampling. The levels of the biomarkers such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M), cystatin-C (Cys-C), N-acetyl-β- D-glucosaminidase (NAG), micro albumin (MA), micro protein (MP) were measured at 6, 24, 48 and 144 hr after sampling. The B2M level was significantly decreased at 6, 24, 48, and 144 hr compared to 0 hr at −70℃ (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, and p < 0.05, respectively) and 24 and 144 hr at 20℃ (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively). The Cys-C level was significantly decreased at 144 hr compared to 0 hr at 4℃ (p < 0.01), at 20℃ (p < 0.05) and at 70℃ (p < 0.01). MP and MA levels were not different for 144 hr in all storage conditions. Taken together, B2M and Cys-C levels were modulated by storage temperature and period. For the enhancement of test accuracy, it is suggested that strict protocols be established for samples to minimize the effects of the storage conditions on the detected levels of biomarkers. PMID:25584151

  8. Recovery of Escherichia coli Biotype I and Enterococcus spp. during refrigerated storage of beef carcasses inoculated with a fecal slurry.

    PubMed

    Calicioglu, M; Buege, D R; Ingham, S C; Luchansky, J B

    1999-08-01

    (average of 1.26 log10 CFU/cm2, range = 1.06 to 1.45 log10 CFU/cm2) in the numbers of enterococci occurred during the first 24 h of storage. Because of higher initial numbers and a slightly slower rate of decrease, the numbers of Enterococcus spp. were significantly higher (P < 0.017) than the numbers of E. coli Biotype I after 3, 7, and 10 days of storage. These results suggest that enterococci may be useful as an indicator of fecal contamination of beef carcasses.

  9. Effect of amurca on olive oil quality during storage.

    PubMed

    Janakat, Sana; Al-Nabulsi, Anas; Hammad, Fwzieh; Holley, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Total phenolic compounds (TPC), antioxidant activity (AA), lipid peroxidation inhibition (percent) (LPOIP), free fatty acid and peroxide values were measured in olive oil samples over the period of 12 months in comparison with oil samples extracted from amurca (olive oil lees) and olive oil samples taken from the bottom of the canister (near amurca) after 12 months of storage. Olive oil samples taken over the period of 12 months possessed decreasing amounts of TPC, AA and LPOIP, which led to increased peroxide and free fatty acid values. In contrast, oil extracted from amurca and olive oil samples taken from the bottom of the container after 12 months of storage possessed significantly higher TPC, AA, LPOIP and consequently lower free fatty acid and peroxide values. These results show that the presence of naturally occurring amurca (sediment) in stored olive oil stabilizes olive oil quality during storage.

  10. Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, C. E.; Larson, R. W.

    1980-06-01

    On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program and to discuss issues in implementing it. Summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element are presented.

  11. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Garth; Long, Darrell; Honeyman, Peter; Grider, Gary; Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Roth, Philip; Felix, Evan; Ward, Lee

    2013-07-01

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability.The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools.The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  12. Advanced materials for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Li, Feng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-02-23

    Popularization of portable electronics and electric vehicles worldwide stimulates the development of energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, toward higher power density and energy density, which significantly depends upon the advancement of new materials used in these devices. Moreover, energy storage materials play a key role in efficient, clean, and versatile use of energy, and are crucial for the exploitation of renewable energy. Therefore, energy storage materials cover a wide range of materials and have been receiving intensive attention from research and development to industrialization. In this Review, firstly a general introduction is given to several typical energy storage systems, including thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic, hydrogen, and electrochemical energy storage. Then the current status of high-performance hydrogen storage materials for on-board applications and electrochemical energy storage materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors is introduced in detail. The strategies for developing these advanced energy storage materials, including nanostructuring, nano-/microcombination, hybridization, pore-structure control, configuration design, surface modification, and composition optimization, are discussed. Finally, the future trends and prospects in the development of advanced energy storage materials are highlighted.

  13. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Jon A Bakken et al.

    2003-02-06

    Fermilab, in collaboration with the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, has created a petabyte scale data storage infrastructure to meet the requirements of experiments to store and access large data sets. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure consists of the following major storage and data transfer components: Enstore mass storage system, DCache distributed data cache, ftp and Grid ftp for primarily external data transfers. This infrastructure provides a data throughput sufficient for transferring data from experiments' data acquisition systems. It also allows access to data in the Grid framework.

  14. Experimental investigation on performance of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Guiyin; Liu, Xu; Wu, Shuangmao

    2009-11-15

    An experimental study on operation performance of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe is conducted in this paper. The experimental system of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate heat pipe is set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure and the condensation pressure of refrigeration system, the refrigeration capacity and the COP (coefficient of performance) of the system, the IPF (ice packing factor) and the cool storage capacity in the cool storage tank during charging period, and the cool discharge rate and the cool discharge capacity in the cool storage tank, the outlet water temperature in the cool storage tank and the outlet air temperature in room unit during discharging period are investigated. The experimental results show that the ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe can stably work during charging and discharging period. This indicates that the ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe is well adapted to cool storage air-conditioning systems in building. (author)

  15. 41 CFR 128-50.102 - Periodic reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Periodic reviews. 128-50.102 Section 128-50.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 50-SEIZED PERSONAL PROPERTY 50.1-Storage and Care...

  16. 41 CFR 128-50.102 - Periodic reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Periodic reviews. 128-50.102 Section 128-50.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 50-SEIZED PERSONAL PROPERTY 50.1-Storage and Care...

  17. 41 CFR 128-50.102 - Periodic reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Periodic reviews. 128-50.102 Section 128-50.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 50-SEIZED PERSONAL PROPERTY 50.1-Storage and Care...

  18. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Apart from the hydrogeological conditions, high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. After one year of planning, construction, and the successful drilling of a research well to 495 m b.s.l. the first large scale heat storage test in the Malm aquifer was finished just before Christmas 2014. An enormous technical challenge was the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10-50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. About 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary to achieve the desired water temperatures. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for the analysis of the concentration of the tracers and the cation concentrations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analyzed for major ions and trace elements in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger proved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating

  19. VIEW OF SOUTH STORAGE BASIN NUMBER 1 OF FUEL STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTH STORAGE BASIN NUMBER 1 OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORTHEAST. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-18-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. VIEW OF MIDDLE STORAGE BASIN NUMBER 2 OF FUEL STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MIDDLE STORAGE BASIN NUMBER 2 OF FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORTHEAST. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-17-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Longterm solar heat storage in an underground water cistern retrofitted with thermal insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, W. L.

    1980-10-01

    The performance of the cistern was tested by measuring storage and surrounding soil temperatures over extended periods of time as heat was added from a solar collector (summer, fall, and winter) or environmental coolness was added (via cold air blown into the cistern) in winter. From these measurements, storage time-constants of the order of 6 months were inferred and verified.

  2. Effect of storage of pheromone lures for Amyelois transitella: field performance and compound ratios

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments during the flight of the overwintering generation of navel orangeworm revealed that Suterra NOW Biolure pheromone lures held in storage at -20°C increased significantly in field effectiveness with time in storage over a period of 0-2 years. This increase in field effectiveness coincided ...

  3. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the Period December 1, 2002-November 30, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States, entered in 1954, established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 50th Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2003 River Master report year; that is, the period from December 1, 2002 to November 30, 2003. During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 13.40 inches (131 percent) greater than the long-term average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs was above the long-term median on December 1, 2002. Reservoir storage increased rapidly in mid-March 2003 and all the reservoirs filled and spilled. The reservoirs remained nearly full for the remainder of the report year. Delaware River operations throughout the report year were conducted as stipulated by the Decree. Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in compliance with the Decree. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 10 days during the report year. Releases were made at experimental conservation rates - or rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs - on all other days. During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and directives and requests of the River Master. As part of a long-term program, the quality of water in the Delaware Estuary between Trenton, New Jersey, and Reedy Island

  4. Lake Michigan sediment lead storage and history of loads

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dated sediment box cores collected in 1994-1996 from 52 locations in Lake Michigan were analyzed for to access storage, trends, and loading history of lead. The results of this study provide information of historic lead loads to the lake for a time period for which no other info...

  5. 40 CFR 63.646 - Storage vessel provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... apply in lieu of the Group 1 storage vessel definitions presented in tables 5 and 6 of § 63.119 of... Status required by § 63.655(f). (k) References to the Periodic Reports in § 63.152(c) mean the...

  6. Precipitation Storage Efficiency During Fallow in Wheat-Fallow Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat-fallow production systems arose in order to stabilize widely ranging wheat yields that resulted from highly variable precipitation in the Great Plains. Historically, precipitation storage efficiency (PSE) over the fallow period increased over time as inversion tillage systems used for weed con...

  7. Energy: Systems for Control, Maintenance, and Storage. A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gerald, Comp.; McKane, Irving, Comp.

    This publication is a bibliography of available periodical literature on specific aspects of energy and today's technology. The Applied Science and Technology Indexes were searched for articles that related to these specific areas: (1) Energy control systems; (2) Maintenance of Energy Systems; and (3) Energy storage. The articles and papers…

  8. 18 CFR 157.214 - Increase in storage capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... injected into and withdrawn from the storage reservoir. (2) The volume of natural gas in the reservoir at... inventory of gas in the reservoir at the end of the reporting period. (5) Any surveys of pressures in gas wells, water levels in observation wells, pump test results for the aquifer-type reservoirs, and...

  9. Analysis of Terrestrial Water Storage Changes from GRACE and GLDAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Tajdarul H.; Famiglietti, James S.; Rodell, Matthew; Chen, Jianli; Wilson, Clark R.

    2008-01-01

    Since March 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has provided first estimates of land water storage variations by monitoring the time-variable component of Earth's gravity field. Here we characterize spatial-temporal variations in terrestrial water storage changes (TWSC) from GRACE and compare them to those simulated with the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). Additionally, we use GLDAS simulations to infer how TWSC is partitioned into snow, canopy water and soil water components, and to understand how variations in the hydrologic fluxes act to enhance or dissipate the stores. Results quantify the range of GRACE-derived storage changes during the studied period and place them in the context of seasonal variations in global climate and hydrologic extremes including drought and flood, by impacting land memory processes. The role of the largest continental river basins as major locations for freshwater redistribution is highlighted. GRACE-based storage changes are in good agreement with those obtained from GLDAS simulations. Analysis of GLDAS-simulated TWSC illustrates several key characteristics of spatial and temporal land water storage variations. Global averages of TWSC were partitioned nearly equally between soil moisture and snow water equivalent, while zonal averages of TWSC revealed the importance of soil moisture storage at low latitudes and snow storage at high latitudes. Evapotranspiration plays a key role in dissipating globally averaged terrestrial water storage. Latitudinal averages showed how precipitation dominates TWSC variations in the tropics, evapotranspiration is most effective in the midlatitudes, and snowmelt runoff is a key dissipating flux at high latitudes. Results have implications for monitoring water storage response to climate variability and change, and for constraining land model hydrology simulations.

  10. Cryogenic reactant storage for lunar base regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.

    1989-02-01

    There are major advantages to be gained by integrating a cryogenic reactant storage system with a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC) to provide on-site electrical power during the lunar night. Although applicable to any power system using hydrogen-oxygen RFC's for energy storage, cryogenic reactant storage offers a significant benefit whenever the sun/shade cycle and energy storage period approach hundreds of hours. For solar power installations on the moon, cryogenic reactant storage reduces overall specific mass and meteoroid vulnerability of the system. In addition, it offers synergistic benefits to on-site users, such as availability of primary fuel cell reactants for surface rover vehicles and cryogenic propellants for OTV's. The integration involves processing and storing the RFC reactant streams as cryogenic liquids rather than pressurized gases, so that reactant containment (tankage per unit mass of reactants) can be greatly reduced. Hydrogen-oxygen alkaline RFC's, GaAs photovoltaic (PV) arrays, and space cryogenic processing/refrigeration technologies are assumed to be available for the conceptual system design. Advantages are demonstrated by comparing the characteristics of two power system concepts: a conventional lunar surface PV/RFC power system using pressurized gas storage in SOA filament wound pressure vessels and, that same system with gas liquefaction and storage replacing the pressurized storage. Comparisons are made at 20 and 250 kWe. Although cryogenic storage adds a processing plant (drying and liquefaction) to the system plus 30 percent more solar array to provide processing power, the approximate order of magnitude reduction in tankage mass, confirmed by this analysis, results in a reduction in overall total system mass of approximately 50 percent.

  11. Cryogenic reactant storage for lunar base regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.

    There are major advantages to be gained by integrating a cryogenic reactant storage system with a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC) to provide on-site electrical power during the lunar night. Although applicable to any power system using hydrogen-oxygen RFC's for energy storage, cryogenic reactant storage offers a significant benefit whenever the sun/shade cycle and energy storage period approach hundreds of hours. For solar power installations on the moon, cryogenic reactant storage reduces overall specific mass and meteoroid vulnerability of the system. In addition, it offers synergistic benefits to on-site users, such as availability of primary fuel cell reactants for surface rover vehicles and cryogenic propellants for OTV's. The integration involves processing and storing the RFC reactant streams as cryogenic liquids rather than pressurized gases, so that reactant containment (tankage per unit mass of reactants) can be greatly reduced. Hydrogen-oxygen alkaline RFC's, GaAs photovoltaic (PV) arrays, and space cryogenic processing/refrigeration technologies are assumed to be available for the conceptual system design. Advantages are demonstrated by comparing the characteristics of two power system concepts: a conventional lunar surface PV/RFC power system using pressurized gas storage in SOA filament wound pressure vessels and, that same system with gas liquefaction and storage replacing the pressurized storage. Comparisons are made at 20 and 250 kWe. Although cryogenic storage adds a processing plant (drying and liquefaction) to the system plus 30 percent more solar array to provide processing power, the approximate order of magnitude reduction in tankage mass, confirmed by this analysis, results in a reduction in overall total system mass of approximately 50 percent.

  12. Cryogenic reactant storage for lunar base regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, Lisa L.

    1989-01-01

    There are major advantages to be gained by integrating a cryogenic reactant storage system with a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC) to provide on-site electrical power during the lunar night. Although applicable to any power system using hydrogen-oxygen RFC's for energy storage, cryogenic reactant storage offers a significant benefit whenever the sun/shade cycle and energy storage period approach hundreds of hours. For solar power installations on the moon, cryogenic reactant storage reduces overall specific mass and meteoroid vulnerability of the system. In addition, it offers synergistic benefits to on-site users, such as availability of primary fuel cell reactants for surface rover vehicles and cryogenic propellants for OTV's. The integration involves processing and storing the RFC reactant streams as cryogenic liquids rather than pressurized gases, so that reactant containment (tankage per unit mass of reactants) can be greatly reduced. Hydrogen-oxygen alkaline RFC's, GaAs photovoltaic (PV) arrays, and space cryogenic processing/refrigeration technologies are assumed to be available for the conceptual system design. Advantages are demonstrated by comparing the characteristics of two power system concepts: a conventional lunar surface PV/RFC power system using pressurized gas storage in SOA filament wound pressure vessels and, that same system with gas liquefaction and storage replacing the pressurized storage. Comparisons are made at 20 and 250 kWe. Although cryogenic storage adds a processing plant (drying and liquefaction) to the system plus 30 percent more solar array to provide processing power, the approximate order of magnitude reduction in tankage mass, confirmed by this analysis, results in a reduction in overall total system mass of approximately 50 percent.

  13. Electrochemical storage cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, B.; Kleinschmager, H.

    1980-12-16

    An electrochemical storage cell or battery with an anode space for an alkali metal as the anolyte and with a cathode space for a sulfur-containing catholyte substance, which are separated from each other by an alkali-ion-conducting solid electrolyte and are confined by a cell wall of metal, particularly of a light metal or steel is described. Long-life corrosion protection of the metal cell wall is provided by a protective layer by applying to at least that part of the metal cell wall in contact with the catholyte substance, a foil of corrosion-resistant material 0.01 to 0.2 mm thick by means of a conductive adhesive which retains its adhesive properties at operating temperatures.

  14. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Wang, Tao [Columbia, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  15. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  16. Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, M.; Chambers, D. P.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    During 2014 dryness continued in the Northern Hemisphere and relative wetness continued in the Southern Hemisphere (Fig. 2.21; Plate 2.1g). These largely canceled out such that the global land surface began and ended the year with a terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomaly slightly below 0 cm (equivalent height of water; Fig. 2.22). TWS is the sum of groundwater, soil moisture, surface water, snow, and ice. Groundwater responds more slowly to meteorological phenomena than the other components because the overlying soil acts as a low pass filter, but often it has a larger range of variability on multiannual timescales (Rodell and Famiglietti 2001; Alley et al. 2002).In situ groundwater data are only archived and made and Tanzania. The rest of the continent experienced mixed to dry conditions. Significant reductions in TWS in Greenland, Antarctica, and southern coastal Alaska reflect ongoing ice sheet and glacier ablation, not groundwater depletion.

  17. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  18. Cryopreservation for corneal storage.

    PubMed

    Armitage, W John

    2009-01-01

    Currently, cryopreservation is the only method that offers the prospect of truly long-term storage of living cells and tissues. Despite some successful cryopreserved corneal grafts, freezing has been shown to damage the endothelium. When isolated cells are frozen, there are two principal mechanisms of damage: intracellular freezing, which occurs at high cooling rates, and solution effect injury at low cooling rates. When tissues are frozen, there are additional factors that appear to render cells more susceptible to intracellular freezing. Lower cooling rates appear to overcome this when freezing cornea. Vitrification is a way of achieving ice-free cryopreservation, but it also poses considerable challenges owing to the very high solute concentrations required to achieve vitrification at practicable cooling rates. Encouraging results have also been reported for cornea frozen using non-permeating cryoprotectants, which could lead to simpler methods of corneal cryopreservation.

  19. Heat storage module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staehle, H. J.; Lindner, F.

    1993-02-01

    Experiments performed on TEXUS 27 sounding rocket to investigate the thermal energy storage module of solar dynamic systems are reported. One of the most suitable energy storage materials for the desired temperature range of 800 to 900 C is lithium fluoride (LiF). Due to the large volume increase during melting of approximately 22% and the corrosivity in the molten state, a canister made of graphite or glass carbon was developed for space use. The heat exchanging wall is equipped with channels and the canister is filled in such a way that molten LiF occupies the whole volume except the channels. In the discharge model, the crystallization of LiF starts at the outer wall and continues towards the center of the canister. There, a void forms due to the volume contraction. The next melting cycle starts again at the heat exchanging wall, and the surplus of volume, due to the pressure of the central void, is able to penetrate the channels against the capillary forces. As soon as the melting front reaches the void, the capillary forces drive the melt out of the channels and a new cycle can start. Tests under terrestrial conditions revealed that the melt did not penetrate the channels as long as the gravity dependent pressure did not exceed the capillary pressure. The TEXUS experiments reported were performed to clarify the following points under microgravity: the melting/freezing behavior of LiF; the formation of the void(s) (Does one void form or several voids? Where is the void located? If several voids are generated, how is their distribution?); and the predicted function of the volume compensation.

  20. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the Initial Blood Storage Experiment (IBSE) was based upon a carefully controlled comparison between identical sets of human blood cell suspensions - red cells, white cell, and platelets - one set of which was transported aboard the Columbia on a 6 day 11 hour mission, and the other held on the ground. Both sets were carried inside stainless steel dewars within specially fabricated flight hardware. Individual bags of cell suspensions were randomly assigned with respect to ground vs orbit status, dewar chamber, and specific location within the dewar. To foster optimal preservation, each cell type was held under specific optimal conditions of pH, ionic strength, solute concentration, gas tension, and temperature. An added variable in this initial experiment was provided by the use of three different polymer/plasticizer formulations for the sealed bags which held the blood cells. At termination of the experiment, aliquots of the suspensions, identified only by code, were distributed to be assayed. Assays were selected to constitute a broad survey of cellular properties and thereby maximize the chances of detection of gravitational effects. A total of 74 different outcome measurements were reported for statistical analysis. When the measurements were completed, the results were entered into the IBSE data base, at which time the data were matched with the original blood bag numbers to determine their status with respect to polymer/plasticizer type, orbit status (orbit or ground), and storage position within the experimental hardware. The data were studied by analysis of variance. Initially, type of bag and orbital status were main factors; later more detailed analyses were made on specific issues such as position in the hardware and specific plastic. If the analysis of variance indicated a statistical significance at the 5 percent level the corresponding p-value was reported.

  1. AN INTERPRETATION OF THE ORBITAL PERIOD DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HOT JUPITERS AND GIANT PLANETS ON LONG-PERIOD ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Liping

    2010-09-10

    It is believed that a hot Jupiter (giant planet with a short period less than 10 days) forms in the outer region of a protoplanetary disk, then migrates inward to an orbit with a short period around 3 days, and stops there by a final stopping mechanism. The prominent problem is why hot Jupiters migrate inward to short-period orbits, while other extrasolar giant planets and Jovian planets in our solar system exist on long-period orbits. Here we show that this difference in orbital periods is caused by two populations of protoplanetary disks. One population experiences gravitational instability during some periods of their lifetime (GI disks), while the other does not (No-GI disks). In GI disks, planets can quickly migrate inward to short-period orbits to become hot Jupiters. In No-GI disks, the migration is so slow that planets can exist on long-period orbits. Protoplanetary disks are classified into the two populations because of the differences in properties of molecular cloud cores, from which disks from. We specifically compare our theory with observations. Our theory is supported by observations of extrasolar planets. We analyze the current status of our solar system and find that our solar nebula belongs to the population with a low migration rate. This is consistent with the observation that Jupiter and Saturn are indeed on long-period orbits. Our results further suggest that, in the future observations, a hot Jupiter cannot be found around a star with mass below a critical mass (0.14-0.28 M {sub sun}).

  2. Hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Neki, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) is a rare life threatening complication of hyperthyroidism commonly occurring in young Asian males but sporadically found in other races. It is characterised by hypokalemia and acute onset paraparesis with prevalence of one in one hundred thousand (1 in 100000). The symptoms resolve promptly with potassium supplementation. Nonselective beta blockers like propranol can also be used to ameliorate and prevent subsequent paralytic attack. We report a case of 22 year old male presenting with hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) having very low serum potassium level. PMID:27648066

  3. A periodically active pulsar giving insight into magnetospheric physics.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; O'Brien, J T; Jordan, C A; Lorimer, D R

    2006-04-28

    PSR B1931+24 (J1933+2421) behaves as an ordinary isolated radio pulsar during active phases that are 5 to 10 days long. However, when the radio emission ceases, it switches off in less than 10 seconds and remains undetectable for the next 25 to 35 days, then switches on again. This pattern repeats quasi-periodically. The origin of this behavior is unclear. Even more remarkably, the pulsar rotation slows down 50% faster when it is on than when it is off. This indicates a massive increase in magnetospheric currents when the pulsar switches on, proving that pulsar wind plays a substantial role in pulsar spin-down. This allows us, for the first time, to estimate the magnetospheric currents in a pulsar magnetosphere during the occurrence of radio emission.

  4. Effect of pasteurization of shell egg on its quality characteristics under ambient storage.

    PubMed

    Shenga, E; Singh, R P; Yadav, A S

    2010-08-01

    Three thermal processes viz. dry (55°C, 2 h), moist (57°C, 5 min) and microwave (power 9, 20 sec) were studied to determine their efficacy for the pasteurization of intact chicken eggs based on the extent of inactivation of artificially inoculated Salmonella typhimurium (ST) in the yolk of shell eggs and alteration in albumen protein solubility (APS). Moist heat treatment was superior to others as it brought about 2 log cfu/ml reduction of inoculated ST in much less time than dry heating but changes in APS were not significant. Subsequent quality evaluation of normal (uninoculated) eggs subjected to moist heat pasteurization during 15 days of ambient (35°C, 36% RH) (35 ± 0.5°C, 36 ± 2% RH)storage revealed no significant effect on percent loss in egg weight, albumen pH, viscosity of albumen and yolk and thiobarbituric acid values between pasteurized and unpasteurized eggs. Pasteurization had no adverse effect on foam volume and foam stability of albumen during storage in comparison to those of raw eggs. Naturally occurring aerobic mesophilic bacteria, coliforms, staphylococci, yeast and moulds on the egg shell surface and in egg contents got markedly reduced by pasteurization of shell eggs and their multiplication also retarded during storage. Both pasteurized and raw eggs remained fairly acceptable sensorily up to 10 days of storage at ambient conditions.

  5. Storage time of red blood cells and mortality of transfusion recipients.

    PubMed

    Middelburg, Rutger A; van de Watering, Leo M G; Briët, Ernest; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-01-01

    Storage of red cells and the associated storage lesion have been suggested to contribute to adverse clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increasing storage time of red cells is associated with mortality of recipients. From all patients who received red cell transfusions between January 2005 and May 2009, in the Leiden University Medical Center, we selected those who received only-young or only-old red cells, defined as below or above the median storage time. Mortality was compared in a Cox regression model. Subsequently, similar comparisons were made between subgroups with increasing contrast between old and young red cells. Among adult patients, after correction for potential confounders, the hazard ratio of death within 1 year after receiving red cells stored for more than 17 days compared with 17 days or less was 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.2). With increasing contrast, the hazard ratio decreased to 0.56 (95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.97) for red cells stored for more than 24 days compared with less than 10 days. In contrast to what has previously been suggested, we find an almost 2-fold increase in mortality rate after the transfusion of fresh red cells compared with old red cells. Results dependent on analyses chosen and previous studies may not have used optimal analyses. The tendency to demand ever-fresher blood could actually be detrimental for at least some patient groups.

  6. Southern company energy storage study :

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Black, Clifton; Jenkins, Kip

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluates the business case for additional bulk electric energy storage in the Southern Company service territory for the year 2020. The model was used to examine how system operations are likely to change as additional storage is added. The storage resources were allowed to provide energy time shift, regulation reserve, and spinning reserve services. Several storage facilities, including pumped hydroelectric systems, flywheels, and bulk-scale batteries, were considered. These scenarios were tested against a range of sensitivities: three different natural gas price assumptions, a 15% decrease in coal-fired generation capacity, and a high renewable penetration (10% of total generation from wind energy). Only in the elevated natural gas price sensitivities did some of the additional bulk-scale storage projects appear justifiable on the basis of projected production cost savings. Enabling existing peak shaving hydroelectric plants to provide regulation and spinning reserve, however, is likely to provide savings that justify the project cost even at anticipated natural gas price levels. Transmission and distribution applications of storage were not examined in this study. Allowing new storage facilities to serve both bulk grid and transmission/distribution-level needs may provide for increased benefit streams, and thus make a stronger business case for additional storage.

  7. Tribology of magnetic storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, Bharat

    1992-01-01

    The construction and the materials used in different magnetic storage devices are defined. The theories of friction and adhesion, interface temperatures, wear, and solid-liquid lubrication relevant to magnetic storage systems are presented. Experimental data are presented wherever possible to support the relevant theories advanced.

  8. Neuroimaging of Lipid Storage Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Deborah; Auerbach, Sarah; Robinson, Paul; Gropman, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly…

  9. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  10. Storage Technology: Present and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Charles M.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews terminology inherent in discussing microcomputer storage technologies and addresses aspects of magnetic storage and present and near-future technologies, including floppy disks, Winchester and removable hard disks, optical digital disks, optical video disks, (audio) compact disks, perpendicular magnetic recording, and erasable optical…

  11. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  12. Optical Storage Performance Modeling and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behera, Bailochan; Singh, Harpreet

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates different types of storage media for long-term archival storage of large amounts of data. Existing storage media are reviewed, including optical disks, optical tape, magnetic storage, and microfilm; three models are proposed based on document storage requirements; performance analysis is considered; and cost effectiveness is discussed.…

  13. Paper Document Storage: A Summary of Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Ross

    1995-01-01

    Discusses problems with paper storage; considers organizational requirements for storage, including access, cost, and security; describes storage options, including filing cabinets, open shelving, cabinets, carousels, mobile racking, and rotary storage; and examines paper storage as part of a records management strategy. (LRW)

  14. Thermal and mechanical energy-storage program: project summary data, FY 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) is supporting a broad range of projects to conserve energy and to make possible shifting away from oil and natural gas by developing new and/or improved energy-storage systems applicable to central power generation, dispersed power generation, solar and waste heat utilization, and vehicle propulsion. These programs include: Thermal Energy Storage; Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Storage; Mechanical and Magnetic Energy Storage; and Underground Energy Storage. Technical and Economic Analysis is supported concurrently to evaluate competitive energy storage options. This summary report addresses the above categories except for Technical and Economic Analysis. Thermal and Chemical/Hydrdogen Energy Storage technologies offer the greatest potential for near-term impact of all the storage technologies under development. During FY 80, STOR will commit nearly $32 million to the Thermal and Mechanical Energy Storage Program. The breakdown of budget authorized funding for FY 1979 and Fy 1980 is shown. This publication consists principally of summary sheets for each active project in the Thermal, Chemical/Hydrogen, and Mechanical Energy Storage Program for FY 1979. Each summary includes: project title, principal investigator, organization, project goals, project status, contract number, contract period, funding level and funding source. An overview section is given before each set of project summaries.

  15. Textural and sensory characteristics of whole and skimmed flavored set-type yogurt during long storage.

    PubMed

    Salvador, A; Fiszman, S M

    2004-12-01

    A study of refrigerated storage (10 degrees C for 91 d) of whole and skimmed flavored set-type yogurt was made. Comparison with storage at 20 degrees C for 21 d and 30 degrees C for 3 d (accelerated) was also carried out. Refrigerated storage yogurts were assessed by a trained panel and by a consumer panel. Trained-panel scores were correlated to instrumental data, and the acceptability data for long storage were studied using consumer criteria. In all cases, after-storage pH values barely changed over storage time, indicating that the yogurt samples did not develop much acidity under any of the storage conditions studied. The profile of the instrumental texture curves obtained corresponded to a firm gel, which broke after a plunger penetrated the sample, and the firmness values of the whole yogurt were lower than for the skimmed yogurt under all the storage conditions studied. From a microbiological point of view, the viability of the yogurts was adequate at the different storage times and temperatures studied, although those stored at 10 degrees C for long periods would not comply with some countries' minimum requirements. Logistic regression of the data from a 50-consumer sensory evaluation showed that the probability of the whole yogurt being accepted after 91 d storage at 10 degrees C was around 40%, whereas for the skimmed yogurt it was only 15%, largely because the skimmed yogurt developed certain negative attributes at an earlier stage of storage than the whole yogurt.

  16. Lunox storage and transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This semester, efforts were concentrated on the design of the Lunox transfer line from the storage area to the launch site. Emphasis was placed on flow and heat transfer problems and their remedies by reducing the effect of radiation by selecting materials for storage tanks, transfer lines and insulation. The design for the storage tank was based on a medium sized Lunox production facility of 6,000 metric tons per year and the frequency of transportation of Lunox from lunar launch site to lower lunar orbit of four launches per month. The design included the selection of materials for cryogenic storage, insulation and radiation shielding. Lunox was pumped to the storage area near the launch site through a piping network designed for maximum mass flow rate with a minimum boil off. The entire network incorporated specially designed radiation shields made of material which was lightweight and low in secondary radiation.

  17. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1981-03-01

    During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling system are also being evaluated.

  18. Robust holographic storage system design.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Watanabe, Minoru

    2011-11-21

    Demand is increasing daily for large data storage systems that are useful for applications in spacecraft, space satellites, and space robots, which are all exposed to radiation-rich space environment. As candidates for use in space embedded systems, holographic storage systems are promising because they can easily provided the demanded large-storage capability. Particularly, holographic storage systems, which have no rotation mechanism, are demanded because they are virtually maintenance-free. Although a holographic memory itself is an extremely robust device even in a space radiation environment, its associated lasers and drive circuit devices are vulnerable. Such vulnerabilities sometimes engendered severe problems that prevent reading of all contents of the holographic memory, which is a turn-off failure mode of a laser array. This paper therefore presents a proposal for a recovery method for the turn-off failure mode of a laser array on a holographic storage system, and describes results of an experimental demonstration.

  19. Spent-fuel storage requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    Spent fuel storage requirements, as projected through the year 2000 for U.S. LWRs, were calculated using information supplied by the utilities reflecting plant status as of December 31, 1981. Projections through the year 2000 combined fuel discharge projections of the utilities with the assumed discharges of typical reactors required to meet the nuclear capacity of 165 GWe projected by the Energy Information Administration for the year 2000. Three cases were developed and are summarized. A reference case, or maximum at-reactor capacity case, assumes that all reactor storage pools are increased to their maximum capacities as estimated by the utilities for spent fuel storage utilizing currently licensed technologies. The reference case assumes no transshipments between pools except as current licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This case identifies an initial requirement for 13 MTU of additional storage in 1984, and a cumulative requirement for 14,490 MTU additional storage in the year 2000.

  20. Benefits from energy storage technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R J; Kannberg, L D; O'Connell, L G; Eisenhaure, D; Hoppie, L O; Barlow, T M; Steele, R S; Strauch, S; Lawson, L J; Sapowith, A P

    1983-11-01

    The United States is continuing to rely upon nondomestic and nonsecure sources of energy. Large quantities of energy are lost as a result of time mismatches between the supply and the demand for power. Substantial improvements in energy efficiency are possible through the use of improved energy storage; advanced energy storage can also improve the utilization of domestic energy resources (coal, geothermal, solar, wind, and nuclear) by providing energy in accordance with a user's time-varying needs. Advanced storage technologies offer potentially substantial cost and performance advantages but also have significant technical risk. If even a fraction of the proposed technologies reach fruition, they will make an important contribution to better use of our domestic energy resources. The Energy Storage and Transport Technologies Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers encourages research, development, and application of energy storage technologies to reduce imports and energy costs.

  1. A Modern Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrenden-Harker, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modern Periodic Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)

  2. Periodic Table of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  3. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  4. Oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Machado, Armando

    2009-06-01

    Three experiments examined behavior in extinction following periodic reinforcement. During the first phase of Experiment 1, four groups of pigeons were exposed to fixed interval (FI 16s or FI 48s) or variable interval (VI 16s or VI 48s) reinforcement schedules. Next, during the second phase, each session started with reinforcement trials and ended with an extinction segment. Experiment 2 was similar except that the extinction segment was considerably longer. Experiment 3 replaced the FI schedules with a peak procedure, with FI trials interspersed with non-food peak interval (PI) trials that were four times longer. One group of pigeons was exposed to FI 20s PI 80s trials, and another to FI 40s PI 160s trials. Results showed that, during the extinction segment, most pigeons trained with FI schedules, but not with VI schedules, displayed pause-peck oscillations with a period close to, but slightly greater than the FI parameter. These oscillations did not start immediately after the onset of extinction. Comparing the oscillations from Experiments 1 and 2 suggested that the alternation of reconditioning and re-extinction increases the reliability and earlier onset of the oscillations. In Experiment 3 the pigeons exhibited well-defined pause-peck cycles since the onset of extinction. These cycles had periods close to twice the value of the FI and lasted for long intervals of time. We discuss some hypotheses concerning the processes underlying behavioral oscillations following periodic reinforcement.

  5. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.

  6. Periodically structured plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saj, W. M.; Foteinopoulou, S.; Kafesaki, M.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Economou, E. N.

    2008-04-01

    We study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) guiding structures, which are a modification of the Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) waveguide. The designs are constructed by introducing a periodic modulation in a MIM waveguide, with a glass core and silver claddings. This periodic modulation is created either by causing periodic indentations in the silver slabs encompassing the glass core, or by increasing the glass spacer material in certain periodic locations. Our objective is to achieve long range sub-wavelength waveguiding with vast dispersion engineering capabilities. We employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) with the Auxiliary Differential Equation method (ADE) for the calculation of the dispersion relation of the guided modes, as well as the real time propagation suggests that the guiding mechnism in the examined structures is based on the electromagnetic (EM) couping between the slit plasmon modes. These - depending on the design - exist in the grooves between the silver plates or in the larger areas of the glass core spacer. Put it different, the guiding mechanism in the examined SPP waveguide designs is analogous to the EM energy transfer along metallic nanoparticle chains.

  7. Getting Your Period

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a woman to have a baby. During sexual intercourse, the egg can get fertilized by a male’s sperm and then attach to the lining of the uterus ( endometrium ) and grow into a baby. ( Read more about reproduction. ) Does your period come each month? top Menstrual ...

  8. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  9. Nanotechnology for Data Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Jabbour, Ghassan

    This chapter considers atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an enabling technology for data storage applications, considering already existing technologies such as hard disk drives (HDD), optical disk drives (ODD) and flash memories that currently dominate the nonvolatile data storage market, together with future devices based on magnetoresistive and phase change effects. The issue at hand is the question of whether the novel AFM-based storage, dubbed probe storage, can offer a competing approach to the currently available technologies by playing the role of a disruptive technology. Probe storage will be contrasted to HDD and ODD, which are purely mechanical as they are based on a rotating disk that uses just a single probe to address billions of bits of data, and nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) that has no moving parts yet requires billions of interconnects. In particular, capacity, areal density, transfer rate, form factor and the cost of various data storage devices will be discussed and the unique opportunity offered by probe storage in employing massive parallelism will be outlined. It will be shown that probe storage bridges the gap between HDD, ODD and other nonvolatile RAM, drawing from the strength of each one of these and adding a significant attribute neither of these has; namely, the possibility of addressing a very large number of nanoscale bits of data in parallel. This chapter differs from the other chapters in this book in that it addresses the important issue of whether a given scientific effort, namely, probe storage, is mature enough to evolve into a commercially viable technology. The answer seems to indicate that there is indeed a huge niche in the data storage arena that such a technology is uniquely qualified to fill, which is large enough to justify a major investment in research and development. Indeed, as other chapters indicate, such an effort is developing at a rapid pace, with hopes of having a viable product within a few years.

  10. Nanotechnology for Data Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    This chapter considers atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an enabling technology for data storage applications, considering already existing technologies such as hard disk drives (HDD), optical disk drives (ODD) and Flash Memories that currently dominate the nonvolatile data storage market, together with future devices based on magnetoresistive and phase change effects. The issue at hand is the question of whether the novel AFM-based storage, dubbed "Probe Storage", can offer a competing approach to the currently available technologies by playing the role of a disruptive technology. Probe Storage will be contrasted to HDD and ODD who are purely mechanical, as they are based on a rotating disk that uses just a single probe to address billions of bits of data, and nonvolatile RAM that has no moving parts yet requires billions of interconnects. In particular, capacity, areal density, transfer rate, form factor and cost of various data storage devices will be discussed and the unique opportunity offered by Probe Storage in employing massive parallelism will be outlined. It will be shown that Probe Storage bridges the gap between HDD, ODD and other nonvolatile RAM, drawing from the strength of each one of these and adding a significant attribute neither of these has; namely, the possibility of addressing a very large number of nanoscale bits of data in parallel. This chapter differs from the other chapters in this book in that it addresses the important issue of whether a given scientific effort, namely, Probe Storage, is mature enough to evolve into a commercially viable technology. The answer seems to indicate that there indeed is a huge niche in the data storage arena that such a technology is uniquely qualified to fill, which is large enough to justify a major investment in research and development. Indeed, as other chapters indicate, such an effort is developing at a rapid pace, with hopes of having a viable product within a few years.

  11. Storage-ring Electron Cooler for Relativistic Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fanglei; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Douglas, David R.; Guo, Jiquan; Johnson, Rolland P.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    Application of electron cooling at ion energies above a few GeV has been limited due to reduction of electron cooling efficiency with energy and difficulty in producing and accelerating a high-current high-quality electron beam. A high-current storage-ring electron cooler offers a solution to both of these problems by maintaining high cooling beam quality through naturally-occurring synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. However, the range of ion energies where storage-ring electron cooling can be used has been limited by low electron beam damping rates at low ion energies and high equilibrium electron energy spread at high ion energies. This paper reports a development of a storage ring based cooler consisting of two sections with significantly different energies: the cooling and damping sections. The electron energy and other parameters in the cooling section are adjusted for optimum cooling of a stored ion beam. The beam parameters in the damping section are adjusted for optimum damping of the electron beam. The necessary energy difference is provided by an energy recovering SRF structure. A prototype linear optics of such storage-ring cooler is presented.

  12. Terrestrial water storage and polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehne, John; Wilson, Clark R.

    1991-01-01

    This study compares observed polar motion for the period 1900-1985 with meteorologic and hydrologic data for the world over the same period, in an effort to determine whether water storage, in combination with air mass redistribution, can account for the observed variance of polar motion. Monthly time series of estimated continental water storage and air mass excitation functions have been compared at the annual frequency and at the Chandler frequency using power, coherence, multiple coherence, and phase spectra. There is a discrepancy in accounting for more than half the variance of polar motion across a broad range of frequencies. Similar results have been obtained in recent studies of polar motion at frequencies above 1 cycle per year using modem space geodetic determinations of polar motion. The persistence of the discrepancey at the annual frequency and its broadband nature suggest a source of polar motion excitation due to air and water motion which has either not been correctly estimated or not yet identified.

  13. Microbial dynamics of commercial makgeolli depending on the storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Ae Ran; Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Hak

    2012-08-01

    Market fresh makgeolli was stored at different temperatures of 4°C and 25°C to assess the change of the microbial diversity according to the storage temperature and period. Yeast counts increased until day 3 of storage and decreased thereafter. General and lactic acid bacterial counts continuously increased during storage. The data indicated that the control of growth of microorganisms, particularly general bacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), is essential. Total acid levels started to decrease in the makgeolli stored at 4°C, and increased from day 6 of storage in the makgeolli stored at 25°C. The increase of total acid in the non-refrigerated condition greatly affected the quality of makgeolli. In both the fresh makgeolli samples stored at 4°C and 25°C, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and molds (Aspergillus tubingensis, Candida glaebosa, and Aspergillus niger) were noted. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band patterns were almost constant regardless of the storage period. As for bacteria, Lactobacillus crustorum, L. brevis, and Microlaena stipoides were found in the makgeolli stored at 4°C, and L. crustorum, Lactobacillus sp., L. plantarum, L. brevis, L. rhamnosus, and L. similis were found in the makgeolli stored at 25°C. In particular, in the makgeolli stored at 25°C, L. crustorum and L. plantarum presented dark bands and were identified as the primary microorganisms that affected spoilage of fresh makgeolli.

  14. Estimation of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity for Depleted Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yen Ting; Shen, Chien-Hao; Tseng, Chi-Chung; Fan, Chen-Hui; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    A depleted gas reservoir is one of the best options for CO2 storage for many reasons. First of all, the storage safety or the caprock integrity has been proven because the natural gas was trapped in the formation for a very long period of time. Also the formation properties and fluid flow characteristics for the reservoir have been well studied since the discovery of the gas reservoir. Finally the surface constructions and facilities are very useful and relatively easy to convert for the use of CO2 storage. The purpose of this study was to apply an analytical approach to estimate CO2 storage capacity in a depleted gas reservoir. The analytical method we used is the material balance equation (MBE), which have been widely used in natural gas storage. We proposed a modified MBE for CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir by introducing the z-factors of gas, CO2 and the mixture of the two. The MBE can be derived to a linear relationship between the ratio of pressure to gas z-factor (p/z) and the cumulative term (Gp-Ginj, where Gp is the cumulative gas production and Ginj is the cumulative CO2 injection). The CO2 storage capacity can be calculated when constraints of reservoir recovery pressure are adopted. The numerical simulation was also used for the validation of the theoretical estimation of CO2 storage capacity from the MBE. We found that the quantity of CO2 stored is more than that of gas produced when the reservoir pressure is recovered from the abandon pressure to the initial pressure. This result was basically from the fact that the gas- CO2 mixture z-factors are lower than the natural gas z-factors in reservoir conditions. We also established a useful p/z plot to easily observe the pressure behavior of CO2 storage and efficiently calculate the CO2 storage capacity. The application of the MBE we proposed was demonstrated by a case study of a depleted gas reservoir in northwestern Taiwan. The estimated CO2 storage capacities from conducting reservoir simulation

  15. Transient Storage in Zero-Order Channels Draining Arctic Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, C. L.; Harms, T.; Wlostowski, A. N.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Water tracks are linear regions of preferential hydrologic flow on arctic hillslopes that discharge to lakes and higher-order streams. In comparison to headwater streams, which encompass flow velocities of 0.1 - 1.0 + m/s, water velocity in water tracks ranges 0.001 - 0.1 m/s, suggesting the potential for significant interaction of water and solutes with transient storage zones in hillslopes compared to streams. Transient storage, the temporary retention of water and solutes in slow-flowing water, contributes to increased water residence time and thus the exposure of water and associated solutes to biochemically reactive substrates. Seasonal patterns in thaw depth of hillslope soils and discharge from hillslopes in the Arctic suggest that the relative contribution of transient storage zones might show predictable seasonal- and event-scale patterns. We conducted slug injections of a conservative solute (NaCl) in two water tracks in the Kuparuk River watershed, Alaska, during two summers to characterize how transient storage varied with thaw depth and discharge. The resulting break-through curves were separated into three dominant processes using an analytical advection-dispersion model: 1) salt mass primarily moved by advection and dispersion, 2) salt mass experiencing transient storage, and 3) a mass loss term. Across all tracer experiments, the mean percentage of total injected tracer mass associated with transient storage was 54%. This is comparable to a peat-bottomed stream but greater than a cobble-lined channel in a nearby catchment. However, transient storage was variable among experiments (1.3 - 72%). Discharge was also variable across experiments, ranging 0.05 - 3.5 L/s, and there was a negative correlation between transient storage and discharge. Thus, we expect significant interaction of solutes with soils in water tracks during inter-storm periods, when the majority of water moving through water tracks enters transient storage zones. We did not see a

  16. Hydrogen storage methods.

    PubMed

    Züttel, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at T<100 K), (4) absorbed on interstitial sites in a host metal (at ambient pressure and temperature), (5) chemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m(-3), approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen

  17. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  18. Hydrogen storage methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Züttel, Andreas

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at T<100 K), (4) absorbed on interstitial sites in a host metal (at ambient pressure and temperature), (5) chemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m-3, approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is

  19. An Energy Storage Assessment: Using Optimal Control Strategies to Capture Multiple Services

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for evaluating benefits of battery storage for multiple grid applications, including energy arbitrage, balancing service, capacity value, distribution system equipment deferral, and outage mitigation. In the proposed method, at each hour, a look-ahead optimization is first formulated and solved to determine battery base operating point. The minute by minute simulation is then performed to simulate the actual battery operation. This methodology is used to assess energy storage alternatives in Puget Sound Energy System. Different battery storage candidates are simulated for a period of one year to assess different value streams and overall benefits, as part of a financial feasibility evaluation of battery storage projects.

  20. Overview of Energy Storage Technologies for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao

    2006-01-01

    This presentations gives an overview of the energy storage technologies that are being used in space applications. Energy storage systems have been used in 99% of the robotic and human space missions launched since 1960. Energy storage is used in space missions to provide primary electrical power to launch vehicles, crew exploration vehicles, planetary probes, and astronaut equipment; store electrical energy in solar powered orbital and surface missions and provide electrical energy during eclipse periods; and, to meet peak power demands in nuclear powered rovers, landers, and planetary orbiters. The power source service life (discharge hours) dictates the choice of energy storage technology (capacitors, primary batteries, rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, regenerative fuel cells, flywheels). NASA is planning a number of robotic and human space exploration missions for the exploration of space. These missions will require energy storage devices with mass and volume efficiency, long life capability, an the ability to operate safely in extreme environments. Advanced energy storage technologies continue to be developed to meet future space mission needs.

  1. Economic performance of water storage capacity expansion for food security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Abdelaziz A.; Ward, Frank A.; Amer, Saud A.

    2013-03-01

    SummaryContinued climate variability, population growth, and rising food prices present ongoing challenges for achieving food and water security in poor countries that lack adequate water infrastructure. Undeveloped storage infrastructure presents a special challenge in northern Afghanistan, where food security is undermined by highly variable water supplies, inefficient water allocation rules, and a damaged irrigation system due three decades of war and conflict. Little peer-reviewed research to date has analyzed the economic benefits of water storage capacity expansions as a mechanism to sustain food security over long periods of variable climate and growing food demands needed to feed growing populations. This paper develops and applies an integrated water resources management framework that analyzes impacts of storage capacity expansions for sustaining farm income and food security in the face of highly fluctuating water supplies. Findings illustrate that in Afghanistan's Balkh Basin, total farm income and food security from crop irrigation increase, but at a declining rate as water storage capacity increases from zero to an amount equal to six times the basin's long term water supply. Total farm income increases by 21%, 41%, and 42% for small, medium, and large reservoir capacity, respectively, compared to the existing irrigation system unassisted by reservoir storage capacity. Results provide a framework to target water infrastructure investments that improve food security for river basins in the world's dry regions with low existing storage capacity that face ongoing climate variability and increased demands for food security for growing populations.

  2. Characterization of Microbial Population Shifts during Sample Storage.

    PubMed

    Mills, Heath J; Reese, Brandi Kiel; Peter, Cruz St

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine shifts in the microbial community structure and potential function based on standard Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) storage procedures for sediment cores. Standard long-term storage protocols maintain sediment temperature at 4°C for mineralogy, geochemical, and/or geotechnical analysis whereas standard microbiological sampling immediately preserves sediments at -80°C. Storage at 4°C does not take into account populations may remain active over geologic time scales at temperatures similar to storage conditions. Identification of active populations within the stored core would suggest geochemical and geophysical conditions within the core change over time. To test this potential, the metabolically active fraction of the total microbial community was characterized from IODP Expedition 325 Great Barrier Reef sediment cores prior to and following a 3-month storage period. Total RNA was extracted from complementary 2, 20, and 40 m below sea floor sediment samples, reverse transcribed to complementary DNA and then sequenced using 454 FLX sequencing technology, yielding over 14,800 sequences from the six samples. Interestingly, 97.3% of the sequences detected were associated with lineages that changed in detection frequency during the storage period including key biogeochemically relevant lineages associated with nitrogen, iron, and sulfur cycling. These lineages have the potential to permanently alter the physical and chemical characteristics of the sediment promoting misleading conclusions about the in situ biogeochemical environment. In addition, the detection of new lineages after storage increases the potential for a wider range of viable lineages within the subsurface that may be underestimated during standard community characterizations.

  3. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several

  4. Bacteriological and biochemical assessment of marinating cephalopods, crustaceans and gastropoda during 24 weeks of storage.

    PubMed

    Ozogul, Yesim; Ozogul, Fatih; Olgunoglu, Ilkan A; Kuley, Esmeray

    2008-09-01

    The quality and safety parameters of mixed marinated seafood salad containing common octopus (Octopus vulgaris), shrimp (Parapenaeus longirostris), European squid (Loligo vulgaris), sea snail (Rapana thomasiana) and common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) at 4 degrees C during storage of 24 weeks were investigated. In addition, the nutritional value in terms of proximate and fatty acid composition of seafood salad was also determined. Sensory scores of seafood salad in terms of appearance, odour, flavour and texture slightly decreased throughout the storage period. However, at the end of the storage period (5 months), the marinated seafood salad was still acceptable by the panellist. At the beginning of storage the total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) value was 6.05 mg/100 g flesh, and the TVB-N values rose to 11.19 mg TVB-N/flesh by the end of the storage period. The pH value of the marinated seafood salad showed fluctuations, ranging from 3.57 to 3.65, and did not change significantly during the storage period. The concentrations of the biogenic amines in both the muscle of all species and in the solution of salad were also investigated. Among the biogenic amines, histamine was not detected in all samples throughout the storage period. The putrescine and cadaverine levels increased throughout the storage period, with a lower increase in the solution of seafood salad. Salmonella, coliform, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were not detected while the total viable count remained low (3 log CFU/g) after 3 months of storage.

  5. 21 CFR 864.9700 - Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9700 Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer. (a) Identification. A blood storage refrigerator and a blood storage freezer are devices...

  6. 21 CFR 864.9700 - Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9700 Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer. (a) Identification. A blood storage refrigerator and a blood storage freezer are devices...

  7. 21 CFR 864.9700 - Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9700 Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer. (a) Identification. A blood storage refrigerator and a blood storage freezer are devices...

  8. 21 CFR 864.9700 - Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9700 Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer. (a) Identification. A blood storage refrigerator and a blood storage freezer are devices...

  9. 21 CFR 864.9700 - Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9700 Blood storage refrigerator and blood storage freezer. (a) Identification. A blood storage refrigerator and a blood storage freezer are devices...

  10. The SERI solar energy storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Wright, J. D.; Wyman, C. E.

    1980-03-01

    In support of the DOE thermal and chemical energy storage program, the solar energy storage program (SERI) provides research on advanced technologies, systems analyses, and assessments of thermal energy storage for solar applications in support of the Thermal and Chemical Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems. Currently, research is in progress on direct contact latent heat storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Systems analyses are being performed of thermal energy storage for solar thermal applications, and surveys and assessments are being prepared of thermal energy storage in solar applications. A ranking methodology for comparing thermal storage systems (performance and cost) is presented. Research in latent heat storage and thermochemical storage and transport is reported.

  11. Optical Storage Developments--Write-Once Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Ian C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the user benefits of write-once optical storage devices; describes typical applications in archival storage, one-off complex instruction sets, and information storage and retrieval systems; and identifies current trends toward standardization of equipment. (CLB)

  12. The SERI solar energy storage program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, R. J.; Wright, J. D.; Wyman, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    In support of the DOE thermal and chemical energy storage program, the solar energy storage program (SERI) provides research on advanced technologies, systems analyses, and assessments of thermal energy storage for solar applications in support of the Thermal and Chemical Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems. Currently, research is in progress on direct contact latent heat storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Systems analyses are being performed of thermal energy storage for solar thermal applications, and surveys and assessments are being prepared of thermal energy storage in solar applications. A ranking methodology for comparing thermal storage systems (performance and cost) is presented. Research in latent heat storage and thermochemical storage and transport is reported.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: sialic acid storage disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions sialic acid storage disease sialic acid storage disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Sialic acid storage disease is an inherited disorder that primarily ...

  14. Cells anticipate periodic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  15. Neuropathic Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pastores, Gregory M.; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.

    2014-01-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of inborn errors of metabolism, associated with the accumulation of incompletely degraded macromolecules within several cellular sites. Affected individuals present with a broad range of clinical problems, including hepatosplenomegaly and skeletal dysplasia. Onset of symptoms may range from birth to adulthood. The majority are associated with neurological features, including developmental delay, behavioral/psychiatric disturbances, seizures, acroparesthesia, motor weakness, cerebrovascular ischemic events and extra-pyramidal signs. It should be noted that later-onset forms are often misdiagnosed as symptoms, which might include psychiatric manifestations, are slowly progressive and may precede other neurologic or systemic features. Inheritance is primarily autosomal recessive. For all subtypes, diagnosis can be confirmed using a combination of biochemical and/or molecular assays. In a few LSDs, treatment with either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, enzyme replacement or substrate reduction therapy is available. Genetic counseling is important, so patients and their families can be informed of reproductive risks, disease prognosis and therapeutic options. Investigations of disease mechanisms are providing insights into potential therapeutic approaches. Symptomatic care, which remains the mainstay for most subtypes, can lead to significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24176423

  16. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T; Andersson, Anna M

    2014-10-07

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries.

  17. Tritium Storage Material

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.; Luo, Weifang; Smugeresky, John E.; Robinson, David B.; Fares, Stephen James; Ong, Markus D.; Arslan, Ilke; Tran, Kim L.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Sartor, George B.; Clift, W. Miles

    2008-09-01

    Nano-structured palladium is examined as a tritium storage material with the potential to release beta-decay-generated helium at the generation rate, thereby mitigating the aging effects produced by enlarging He bubbles. Helium retention in proposed structures is modeled by adapting the Sandia Bubble Evolution model to nano-dimensional material. The model shows that even with ligament dimensions of 6-12 nm, elevated temperatures will be required for low He retention. Two nanomaterial synthesis pathways were explored: de-alloying and surfactant templating. For de-alloying, PdAg alloys with piranha etchants appeared likely to generate the desired morphology with some additional development effort. Nano-structured 50 nm Pd particles with 2-3 nm pores were successfully produced by surfactant templating using PdCl salts and an oligo(ethylene oxide) hexadecyl ether surfactant. Tests were performed on this material to investigate processes for removing residual pore fluids and to examine the thermal stability of pores. A tritium manifold was fabricated to measure the early He release behavior of this and Pd black material and is installed in the Tritium Science Station glove box at LLNL. Pressure-composition isotherms and particle sizes of a commercial Pd black were measured.

  18. Superconducting energy storage magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, Roger W. (Inventor); Eyssa, Yehia M. (Inventor); Abdelsalam, Mostafa K. (Inventor); Huang, Xianrui (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting magnet is formed having composite conductors arrayed in coils having turns which lie on a surface defining substantially a frustum of a cone. The conical angle with respect to the central axis is preferably selected such that the magnetic pressure on the coil at the widest portion of the cone is substantially zero. The magnet structure is adapted for use as an energy storage magnet mounted in an earthen trench or tunnel where the strength the surrounding soil is lower at the top of the trench or tunnel than at the bottom. The composite conductor may be formed having a ripple shape to minimize stresses during charge up and discharge and has a shape for each ripple selected such that the conductor undergoes a minimum amount of bending during the charge and discharge cycle. By minimizing bending, the working of the normal conductor in the composite conductor is minimized, thereby reducing the increase in resistance of the normal conductor that occurs over time as the conductor undergoes bending during numerous charge and discharge cycles.

  19. Commercially available blood storage containers.

    PubMed

    Prowse, C V; de Korte, D; Hess, J R; van der Meer, P F

    2014-01-01

    Plastic blood bags improve the safety and effectiveness of blood component separation and storage. Progress towards optimal storage systems is driven by medical, scientific, business and environmental concerns and is limited by available materials, consumer acceptance and manufacturing and regulatory concerns. Blood bag manufacturers were invited to submit lists of the bags they manufacture. The lists were combined and sorted by planned use. The lists were analysed by experts to assess the degree to which the products attend to scientific problems. Specific issues addressed included the use of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) as plasticizer for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood bags, the size, material and thickness of platelet bags, and the fracture resistance of plasma bags. Alternatives to DEHP for red blood cell (RBC) storage exist, but are mostly in a developmental stage. Plastic bags (DEHP-free, PVC-free) for platelet storage with better gas diffusion capabilities are widely available. Alternatives for plasma storage with better fracture resistance at low temperatures exist. Most RBC products are stored in DEHP-plasticized PVC as no fully satisfactory alternative exists that ensures adequate storage with low haemolysis. A variety of alternative platelet storage systems are available, but their significance - other than improved oxygen transport - is poorly understood. The necessity to remove DEHP from blood bags still needs to be determined.

  20. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  1. Effects of Data Scrubbing on Reliability in Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Junkil; Park, Chanik

    Silent data corruptions, which are induced by latent sector errors, phantom writes, DMA parity errors and so on, can be detected by explicitly issuing a read command to a disk controller and comparing the corresponding data with their checksums. Because some of the data stored in a storage system may not be accessed for a long time, there is a high chance of silent data corruption occurring undetected, resulting in data loss. Therefore, periodic checking of the entire data in a storage system, known as data scrubbing, is essential to detect such silent data corruptions in time. The errors detected by data scrubbing will be recovered by the replica or the redundant information maintained to protect against permanent data loss. The longer the period between data scrubbings, the higher the probability of a permanent data loss. This paper proposes a Markov failure and repair model to conservatively analyze the effect of data scrubbing on the reliability of a storage system. We show the relationship between the period of a data scrubbing operation and the number of data replicas to manage the reliability of a storage system by using the proposed model.

  2. Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

  3. Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

  4. Energy storage in ultrathin solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Van Overmeere, Quentin; Kerman, Kian; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2012-07-11

    The power output of hydrogen fuel cells quickly decreases to zero if the fuel supply is interrupted. We demonstrate thin film solid oxide fuel cells with nanostructured vanadium oxide anodes that generate power for significantly longer time than reference porous platinum anode thin film solid oxide fuel cells when the fuel supply is interrupted. The charge storage mechanism was investigated quantitatively with likely identified contributions from the oxidation of the vanadium oxide anode, its hydrogen storage properties, and different oxygen concentration at the electrodes. Fuel cells capable of storing charge even for short periods of time could contribute to ultraminiaturization of power sources for mobile energy.

  5. ICI optical data storage tape: An archival mass storage media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruddick, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    At the 1991 Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, ICI Imagedata presented a paper which introduced ICI Optical Data Storage Tape. This paper placed specific emphasis on the media characteristics and initial data was presented which illustrated the archival stability of the media. More exhaustive analysis that was carried out on the chemical stability of the media is covered. Equally important, it also addresses archive management issues associated with, for example, the benefits of reduced rewind requirements to accommodate tape relaxation effects that result from careful tribology control in ICI Optical Tape media. ICI Optical Tape media was designed to meet the most demanding requirements of archival mass storage. It is envisaged that the volumetric data capacity, long term stability and low maintenance characteristics demonstrated will have major benefits in increasing reliability and reducing the costs associated with archival storage of large data volumes.

  6. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  7. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered

  8. Boundary element solution for periodic acoustic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, M.; Croaker, P.; Kessissoglou, N.

    2016-01-01

    This work shows when using the boundary element method to solve 3D acoustic scattering problems from periodic structures, the coefficient matrix can be represented as a block Toeplitz matrix. By exploiting the Toeplitz structure, the computational time and storage requirements to construct the coefficient matrix are significantly reduced. To solve the linear system of equations, the original matrix is embedded into a larger and more structured matrix called the block circulant matrix. Discrete Fourier transform is then employed in an iterative algorithm to solve the block Toeplitz system. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the formulation for periodic acoustic problems, two exterior acoustic case studies are considered. The first case study examines a continuous structure to predict the noise generated by a sharp-edged flat plate under quadrupole excitation. Directivity plots obtained using the periodic boundary element method technique are compared with numerical results obtained using a conventional boundary element model. The second case study examines a discrete periodic structure to predict the acoustic performance of a sonic crystal noise barrier. Results for the barrier insertion loss are compared with both finite element results and available data in the literature.

  9. Energy conversion and storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemical and chemical engineering principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels; (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy storage; (4) characterization of complex chemical processes; and (5) the application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, and advanced methods of analysis. The following five areas are discussed: electrochemical energy storage and conversion; microstructured materials; biotechnology; fossil fuels; and high temperature superconducting processing. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Carbon material for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bourlinos, Athanasios; Steriotis, Theodore; Stubos, Athanasios; Miller, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to carbon based materials that are employed for hydrogen storage applications. The material may be described as the pyrolysis product of a molecular precursor such as a cyclic quinone compound. The pyrolysis product may then be combined with selected transition metal atoms which may be in nanoparticulate form, where the metals may be dispersed on the material surface. Such product may then provide for the reversible storage of hydrogen. The metallic nanoparticles may also be combined with a second metal as an alloy to further improve hydrogen storage performance.

  11. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

    1980-07-31

    A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

  12. Realization of the German Concept for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel - Current Situation and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Thomauske, B. R.

    2003-02-25

    The German government has determined a phase out of nuclear power. With respect to the management of spent fuel it was decided to terminate transports to reprocessing plants by 2005 and to set up interim storage facilities on power plant sites. This paper gives an overview of the German concept for spent fuel management focused on the new on-site interim storage concept and the applied interim storage facilities. Since the end of the year 1998, the utilities have applied for permission of on-site interim storage in 13 storage facilities and 5 storage areas; one application for the interim storage facility Stade was withdrawn due to the planned final shut down of Stade nuclear power plant in autumn 2003. In 2001 and 2002, 3 on-site storage areas and 2 on-site storage facilities for spent fuel were licensed by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). A main task in 2002 and 2003 has been the examination of the safety and security of the planned interim storage facilities and the verification of the licensing prerequisites. In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, BfS has also examined the attack with a big passenger airplane. Up to now, these aircraft crash analyses have been performed for three on-site interim storage facilities; the fundamental results will be presented. It is the objective of BfS to conclude the licensing procedures for the applied on-site interim storage facilities in 2003. With an assumed construction period for the storage buildings of about two years, the on-site interim storage facilities could then be available in the year 2005.

  13. Watershed storage and riverine particulate organic radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, N. E.; Leithold, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Lateral movement of carbon and other materials across landscapes is punctuated with periods of storage and reaction. Though we understand basic principles concerning transport and storage effects on the nature of some materials, an adequate understanding is lacking of the cumulative impacts of those processes as material migrates across the biogeochemical landscape. This is essential to the interpretation of geochemical soil and sedimentary records of the past as well as to predicting future responses of systems to perturbations in climate or landuse. Sources of organic carbon exported from watersheds can be broadly defined as those recently derived for extant ecosystems, those derived from materials aged and altered in storage (aged soil OC), and fossil material associated with sedimentary bedrock. Separately, these materials are easy to recognize based on isotopic and molecular compositions and each could in principle be linked to specific mass transport processes such as sheet wash, shallow landsliding or gullying. The blending and alteration of original source signatures during storage appear to attenuate the variability of the exported signal within a system and complicate source identification. Riverine particulate organic carbon 14C-compositions reveal robust relationships between radiocarbon content, suspended load concentrations and % organic C. These are explained as a result of mixing of the 14C-free fossil C from sedimentary rocks with 14C-containing material derived from extant ecosystems and soils. In essence, the 14C-content of riverine POC inversely correlates with the muddiness of the system. Whereas one might predict that POC radiocarbon content might decrease with increased storage or residence time in watersheds, no obvious relationship exists between bulk 14C-content observations and watershed size. Instead, the hypothetical watershed size effect is obscured by precipitation- and discharge-driven variations in the mixture of the fossil and non

  14. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  15. Photostimulable Storage Phosphor Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Douglas Mahaffey Danks

    The feasibility of employing alkaline earth sulfide based photostimulable storage phosphors for relative dosimetry in radiation oncology has been investigated. The dosimetric characteristics, radiologic characteristics, and spacial sensitivity of calcium sulfide and strontium sulfide based phosphors were determined. Dosimetric characteristics were explored by cavity theory calculation, Monte Carlo simulation, and physical measurement. Dosimetric characteristics obtained with cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulations agree well. The dose perturbation of the phosphor base materials were comparable to those produced by clinical dosimeter materials over the energy region employed in radiation oncology. Dose perturbation in regions downstream of the phosphor were measured with a variety of clinical dosimeters and compared with simulation results. The results of the measurements and simulations agreed within the uncertainty levels of the simulations and the measurements. Radiological characteristics of sensitivity, fading, dose response, dose rate response, and energy dependence of response were studied with an experimental phosphor output reader. Relative sensitivity was found to be dependent upon the mass thickness of phosphor layer. Fading was quantified for the calcium sulfide phosphor, with a half time of 2300 minutes. The strontium sulfide sample exhibited some fading, however, the regression lines yielded low correlation coefficients. A linear dose response over the range of doses employed in radiation oncology was obtained for both phosphors. No significant dose rate dependence of response was measured for the phosphors. The phosphor's energy dependence of response paralleled the dose perturbation relative to water predicted by cavity theory and simulations. Spatial sensitivity was demonstrated with an experimental phosphor scanner. The phosphors exhibited spatial sensitivity, however, infrared scattering/piping in the transparent substrate appeared to cause

  16. DISK-PLANETS INTERACTIONS AND THE DIVERSITY OF PERIOD RATIOS IN KEPLER'S MULTI-PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Baruteau, Clement; Papaloizou, John C. B. E-mail: J.C.B.Papaloizou@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2013-11-20

    The Kepler mission is dramatically increasing the number of planets known in multi-planetary systems. Many adjacent planets have orbital period ratios near resonant values, with a tendency to be larger than required for exact first-order mean-motion resonances. This feature has been shown to be a natural outcome of orbital circularization of resonant planetary pairs due to star-planet tidal interactions. However, this feature holds in multi-planetary systems with periods longer than 10 days, in which tidal circularization is unlikely to provide efficient divergent evolution of the planets' orbits to explain these orbital period ratios. Gravitational interactions between planets and their parent protoplanetary disk may instead provide efficient divergent evolution. For a planet pair embedded in a disk, we show that interactions between a planet and the wake of its companion can reverse convergent migration and significantly increase the period ratio from a near-resonant value. Divergent evolution due to wake-planet interactions is particularly efficient when at least one of the planets opens a partial gap around its orbit. This mechanism could help account for the diversity of period ratios in Kepler's multiple systems from super-Earth to sub-Jovian planets with periods greater than about 10 days. Diversity is also expected for pairs of planets massive enough to merge their gap. The efficiency of wake-planet interactions is then much reduced, but convergent migration may stall with a variety of period ratios depending on the density structure in the common gap. This is illustrated for the Kepler-46 system, for which we reproduce the period ratio of Kepler-46b and c.

  17. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  18. Controls on geyser periodicity.

    PubMed

    Ingebritsen, S E; Rojstaczer, S A

    1993-11-05

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates.

  19. Controls on geyser periodicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Rojstaczer, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (???10-6) strains induced by seismic events, atmospheric loading, and Earth tides. The geyser system is approximated as a permeable conduit of intensely fractured rock surrounded by a less permeable rock matrix. Numerical simulation of this conceptual model yields a set of parameters that controls geyser existence and periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates.

  20. Systematic shifts in Budyko relationships caused by groundwater storage changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, Laura E.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2017-02-01

    Traditional Budyko analysis is predicated on the assumption that the watershed of interest is in dynamic equilibrium over the period of study, and thus surface water partitioning will not be influenced by changes in storage. However, previous work has demonstrated that groundwater-surface water interactions will shift Budyko relationships. While modified Budyko approaches have been proposed to account for storage changes, given the limited ability to quantify groundwater fluxes and storage across spatial scales, additional research is needed to understand the implications of these approximations. This study evaluates the impact of storage changes on Budyko relationships given three common approaches to estimating evapotranspiration fractions: (1) determining evapotranspiration from observations, (2) calculating evapotranspiration from precipitation and surface water outflow, and (3) adjusting precipitation to account for storage changes. We show conceptually that groundwater storage changes will shift the Budyko relationship differently depending on the way evapotranspiration is estimated. A 1-year transient simulation is used to mimic all three approaches within a numerical framework in which groundwater-surface water exchanges are prevalent and can be fully quantified. The model domain spans the majority of the continental US and encompasses 25 000 nested watersheds ranging in size from 100 km2 to over 3 000 000 km2. Model results illustrate that storage changes can generate different spatial patterns in Budyko relationships depending on the approach used. This shows the potential for systematic bias when comparing studies that use different approaches to estimating evapotranspiration. Comparisons between watersheds are also relevant for studies that seek to characterize variability in the Budyko space using other watershed characteristics. Our results demonstrate that within large complex domains the correlation between storage changes and other relevant

  1. Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Production Reactors at the US DOE Hanford Site - 13438

    SciTech Connect

    Schilperoort, Daryl L.; Faulk, Darrin

    2013-07-01

    Nine plutonium production reactors located on DOE's Hanford Site are being placed into an Interim Safe Storage (ISS) period that extends to 2068. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for ISS [1] was completed in 1993 and proposed a 75-year storage period that began when the EIS was finalized. Remote electronic monitoring of the temperature and water level alarms inside the safe storage enclosure (SSE) with visual inspection inside the SSE every 5 years are the only planned operational activities during this ISS period. At the end of the ISS period, the reactor cores will be removed intact and buried in a landfill on the Hanford Site. The ISS period allows for radioactive decay of isotopes, primarily Co-60 and Cs-137, to reduce the dose exposure during disposal of the reactor cores. Six of the nine reactors have been placed into ISS by having an SSE constructed around the reactor core. (authors)

  2. Storage characteristics of sweet sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Eiland, B.R.; Clayton, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Weight loss, percent extraction, and juice Brix were determined in stored sweet sorghum harvested as billets and stalks. Stalks lost less weight and maintained juice quality longer than billets. Storage requirements after harvest should determine the harvesting method.

  3. Nanomaterials for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Zhang, Qiming; Lamon, Simone

    2016-12-01

    The growing amount of data that is generated every year creates an urgent need for new and improved data storage methods. Nanomaterials, which have unique mechanical, electronic and optical properties owing to the strong confinement of electrons, photons and phonons at the nanoscale, are enabling the development of disruptive methods for optical data storage with ultra-high capacity, ultra-long lifetime and ultra-low energy consumption. In this Review, we survey recent advancements in nanomaterials technology towards the next generation of optical data storage systems, focusing on metallic nanoparticles, graphene and graphene oxide, semiconductor quantum dots and rare-earth-doped nanocrystals. We conclude by discussing the use of nanomaterials in data storage systems that do not rely on optical mechanisms and by surveying the future prospects for the field.

  4. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis on the Performance of Medium Deep Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storages using arrays of medium deep (400 m - 1500 m) borehole heat exchangers (BHE) have two main advantages over near surface (< 400 m) BHE storages. Medium deep borehole thermal energy storages (MD-BTES) have a lower thermal impact on shallow groundwater resources and require less surface area. However, the storage performance indicators like the efficiency, the storage capacity and the supplied fluid temperature of MD-BTES are unknown as such system has not been put into practice so far. To study the influence of various design and operation parameters on the storage performance, more than 240 numerical models of different MD-BTES systems were compared in a sensitivity analysis. Most importantly, the BHE length, the number of BHEs, the spacing between the BHEs, the inlet temperatures of the heat transfer fluid into the BHEs and the underground properties were varied. A simplified underground model was used and also a simplified operation procedure was applied for a period of 30 years of storage operation. The results show a strong dependency of the storage performance on the studied design and operation parameters as well as on the underground properties. In the best case, storage efficiency reaches over 80 % in the 30th year of operation, whereas poorly designed storage systems show efficiencies of less than 20 %.

  6. Dynamic storage expansion in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, E. N.

    1978-01-01

    Some functions of NASTRAN require a large block of working computer storage to execute. The method of meeting this requirement, because of insufficient data, was to specify in advance an excessive amount of data to avoid a fatal exit. A method was developed to calculate the amount of working space needed for the analysis and to inform the analyst of this data or, in the case of Univac computers, to acquire this extra storage and continue the analysis.

  7. Thermal energy storage test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal behavior of prototype thermal energy storage units (TES) in both heating and cooling modes is determined. Improved and advanced storage systems are developed and performance standards are proposed. The design and construction of a thermal cycling facility for determining the thermal behavior of full scale TES units is described. The facility has the capability for testing with both liquid and air heat transport, at variable heat input/extraction rates, over a temperature range of 0 to 280 F.

  8. Storage and feeding of coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenike, A. W.; Carson, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Reliable feeding of coal from storage bins to process requires the knowledge of the behavior of coal during flow. The study of the flow of bulk solids was undertaken in the 1950's and led to the development of flow ability testing equipment and of the Mass Flow concept of design for reliable flow. The theory has since been expanded to two-phase, solids-gas system, and has found world wide application in the design of storage and feeding systems.

  9. Energy storage-boiler tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, T. A.; Nemecek, J. J.; Simmons, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Activities performed in an effort to demonstrate heat of fusion energy storage in containerized salts are reported. The properties and cycle life characteristics of a eutectic salt having a boiling point of about 385 C (NaCl, KCl, Mg Cl2) were determined. M-terphenyl was chosen as the heat transfer fluid. Compatibility studies were conducted and mild steel containers were selected. The design and fabrication of a 2MWh storage boiler tank are discussed.

  10. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOEpatents

    Olszewski, Mitchell; Morris, David G.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  11. Multifunctional periodic cellular metals.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Haydn N G

    2006-01-15

    Periodic cellular metals with honeycomb and corrugated topologies are widely used for the cores of light weight sandwich panel structures. Honeycombs have closed cell pores and are well suited for thermal protection while also providing efficient load support. Corrugated core structures provide less efficient and highly anisotropic load support, but enable cross flow heat exchange opportunities because their pores are continuous in one direction. Recent advances in topology design and fabrication have led to the emergence of lattice truss structures with open cell structures. These three classes of periodic cellular metals can now be fabricated from a wide variety of structural alloys. Many topologies are found to provide adequate stiffness and strength for structural load support when configured as the cores of sandwich panels. Sandwich panels with core relative densities of 2-10% and cell sizes in the millimetre range are being assessed for use as multifunctional structures. The open, three-dimensional interconnected pore networks of lattice truss topologies provide opportunities for simultaneously supporting high stresses while also enabling cross flow heat exchange. These highly compressible structures also provide opportunities for the mitigation of high intensity dynamic loads created by impacts and shock waves in air or water. By filling the voids with polymers and hard ceramics, these structures have also been found to offer significant resistance to penetration by projectiles.

  12. Periodic truss structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zok, Frank W.; Latture, Ryan M.; Begley, Matthew R.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the recognition of the enormous potential of periodic trusses for use in a broad range of technologies, there are no widely-accepted descriptors of their structure. The terminology has been based loosely either on geometry of polyhedra or of point lattices: neither of which, on its own, has an appropriate structure to fully define periodic trusses. The present article lays out a system for classification of truss structure types. The system employs concepts from crystallography and geometry to describe nodal locations and connectivity of struts. Through a series of illustrative examples of progressively increasing complexity, a rational taxonomy of truss structure is developed. Its conceptual evolution begins with elementary cubic trusses, increasing in complexity with non-cubic and compound trusses as well as supertrusses, and, finally, with complex trusses. The conventions and terminology adopted to define truss structure yield concise yet unambiguous descriptions of structure types and of specific (finite) trusses. The utility of the taxonomy is demonstrated by bringing into alignment a disparate set of ad hoc and incomplete truss designations previously employed in a broad range of science and engineering fields. Additionally, the merits of a particular compound truss (comprising two interpenetrating elementary trusses) is shown to be superior to the octet truss for applications requiring high stiffness and elastic isotropy. By systematically stepping through and analyzing the finite number of structure types identified through the present classification system, optimal structures for prescribed mechanical and functional requirements are expected to be ascertained in an expeditious manner.

  13. NV energy electricity storage valuation :

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-06-01

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benefit the operations of NV Energy, and assesses whether those benefits are likely to justify the cost of the storage system. To determine the impact of grid-level storage, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority ("BA") as projected for 2020 was created. Storage was found to add value primarily through the provision of regulating reserve. Certain storage resources were found likely to be cost-effective even without considering their capacity value, as long as their effectiveness in providing regulating reserve was taken into account. Giving fast resources credit for their ability to provide regulating reserve is reasonable, given the adoption of FERC Order 755 ("Pay-for-performance"). Using a traditional five-minute test to determine how much a resource can contribute to regulating reserve does not adequately value fast-ramping resources, as the regulating reserve these resources can provide is constrained by their installed capacity. While an approximation was made to consider the additional value provided by a fast-ramping resource, a more precise valuation requires an alternate regulating reserve methodology. Developing and modeling a new regulating reserve methodology for NV Energy was beyond the scope of this study, as was assessing the incremental value of distributed storage.

  14. The High Performance Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, R.A.; Hulen, H.; Watson, R.

    1993-09-01

    The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) was organized to develop, demonstrate and commercialize technology for the storage system that will be the future repositories for our national information assets. Within the NSL four Department of Energy laboratories and IBM Federal System Company have pooled their resources to develop an entirely new High Performance Storage System (HPSS). The HPSS project concentrates on scalable parallel storage system for highly parallel computers as well as traditional supercomputers and workstation clusters. Concentrating on meeting the high end of storage system and data management requirements, HPSS is designed using network-connected storage devices to transfer data at rates of 100 million bytes per second and beyond. The resulting products will be portable to many vendor`s platforms. The three year project is targeted to be complete in 1995. This paper provides an overview of the requirements, design issues, and architecture of HPSS, as well as a description of the distributed, multi-organization industry and national laboratory HPSS project.

  15. Alkaline regenerative fuel cell systems for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Reid, M. A.; Martin, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of a preliminary design study of a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for application to future low-earth orbit space missions. The high energy density storage system is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte cell technology and incorporates dedicated fuel cell and electrolysis cell modules. In addition to providing energy storage, the system can provide hydrogen and oxygen for attitude control of the satellite and for life support. During the daylight portion of the orbit the electrolysis module uses power provided by the solar array to generate H2 and O2 from the product water produced by the fuel cell module. The fuel cell module supplies electrical power during the dark period of the orbit.

  16. Langley Storage facility which houses remains of Apollo 204 craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Apollo 204 command module is seen in storage at Langley Research Center in Virginia. The command module, damaged in the 1967 Apollo fire, its heat shield, booster protective cover and 81 cartons of related hardware and investigative data occupy 3,300 cubic feet of warehouse storage space. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Roger B. Chaffee and Edward H. White II perished in the Apollo 204 spacecraft fire on Jan. 27, 1967 on Launch Complex 34 at Cape Canaveral. The hardware has been stored at Langley since 1967. PLEASE NOTE UPDATE: In early May of 1990, NASA announced plans to move the hardware and related data to permanent storage with the Challenger debris in an abandoned missile silo at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. However, at month's end, NASA announced it had decided to keep the capsule at Langley for an indefinite period of time.

  17. Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1992 to March 1993 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, thermal energy storage water heater, latent heat storage wallboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

  18. DNA quantification of basidiomycetous fungi during storage of logging residues

    PubMed Central

    Alfredsen, Gry; Filbakk, Tore; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The demand for bioenergy caused an increased use of logging residues, branches and treetops that were previously left on the ground after harvesting. Residues are stored outdoors in piles and it is unclear to what extent fungi transform this material. Our objective was to quantify the amount of wood degrading fungi during storage using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to detect basidiomycetous DNA in logging residues, a novel approach in this field. We found that the qPCR method was accurate in quantifying the fungal DNA during storage. As the moisture content of the piled logging residues decreased during the storage period, the fungal DNA content also decreased. Scots pine residues contained more fungal DNA than residues from Norway spruce. Loose piles had generally more fungal DNA than bundled ones. PMID:25870777

  19. DNA quantification of basidiomycetous fungi during storage of logging residues.

    PubMed

    Børja, Isabella; Alfredsen, Gry; Filbakk, Tore; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The demand for bioenergy caused an increased use of logging residues, branches and treetops that were previously left on the ground after harvesting. Residues are stored outdoors in piles and it is unclear to what extent fungi transform this material. Our objective was to quantify the amount of wood degrading fungi during storage using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to detect basidiomycetous DNA in logging residues, a novel approach in this field. We found that the qPCR method was accurate in quantifying the fungal DNA during storage. As the moisture content of the piled logging residues decreased during the storage period, the fungal DNA content also decreased. Scots pine residues contained more fungal DNA than residues from Norway spruce. Loose piles had generally more fungal DNA than bundled ones.

  20. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T.; Andersson, Anna M.

    2008-03-18

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.