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Sample records for 10-fold cross-validation procedure

  1. A cross-validation procedure for stopping the EM algorithm and deconvolution of neutron depth profiling spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Coakley, K.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The iterative EM algorithm is used to deconvolve neutron depth profiling spectra. Because of statistical noise in the data, artifacts in the estimated particle emission rate profile appear after too many iterations of the EM algorithm. To avoid artifacts, the EM algorithm is stopped using a cross-validation procedure. The data are split into two independent halves. The EM algorithm is applied to one half of the data to get an estimate of the emission rates. The algorithm is stopped when the conditional likelihood of the other half of the data passes through its maximum. The roles of the two halves of the data are then switched to get a second estimate of the emission rates. The two estimates are then averaged.

  2. Accuracy of Population Validity and Cross-Validity Estimation: An Empirical Comparison of Formula-Based, Traditional Empirical, and Equal Weights Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, Nambury S.; Bilgic, Reyhan; Edwards, Jack E.; Fleer, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    Performed an empirical Monte Carlo study using predictor and criterion data from 84,808 U.S. Air Force enlistees. Compared formula-based, traditional empirical, and equal-weights procedures. Discusses issues for basic research on validation and cross-validation. (SLD)

  3. Reference measurement procedure for CSF amyloid beta (Aβ)1-42 and the CSF Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-40 ratio - a cross-validation study against amyloid PET.

    PubMed

    Pannee, Josef; Portelius, Erik; Minthon, Lennart; Gobom, Johan; Andreasson, Ulf; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-11-01

    A clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease is currently made on the basis of results from cognitive tests in combination with medical history and general clinical evaluation, but the peptide amyloid-beta (Aβ) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is increasingly used as a biomarker for amyloid pathology in clinical trials and in recently proposed revised clinical criteria for Alzheimer's disease. Recent analytical developments have resulted in mass spectrometry (MS) reference measurement procedures for absolute quantification of Aβ1-42 in CSF. The CSF Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-40 ratio has been suggested to improve the detection of cerebral amyloid deposition, by compensating for inter-individual variations in total Aβ production. Our aim was to cross-validate the reference measurement procedure as well as the Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-38 ratios in CSF, measured by high-resolution MS, with the cortical level of Aβ fibrils as measured by amyloid ((18) F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography (PET). We included 100 non-demented patients with cognitive symptoms from the Swedish BioFINDER study, all of whom had undergone both lumbar puncture and (18) F-flutemetamol PET. Comparing CSF Aβ1-42 concentrations with (18) F-flutemetamol PET showed high concordance with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85 and a sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 81%, respectively. The ratio of Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-40 or Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-38 significantly improved concordance with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.95 and a sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 91%, respectively. These results show that the CSF Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-38 ratios using the described MS method are strongly associated with cortical Aβ fibrils measured by (18) F-flutemetamol PET.

  4. Double Cross-Validation in Multiple Regression: A Method of Estimating the Stability of Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, R. Kevin

    In multiple regression analysis, where resulting predictive equation effectiveness is subject to shrinkage, it is especially important to evaluate result replicability. Double cross-validation is an empirical method by which an estimate of invariance or stability can be obtained from research data. A procedure for double cross-validation is…

  5. FDDS: A Cross Validation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Judy Parsons

    The Family Drawing Depression Scale (FDDS) was created by Wright and McIntyre to provide a clear and reliable scoring method for the Kinetic Family Drawing as a procedure for detecting depression. A study was conducted to confirm the value of the FDDS as a systematic tool for interpreting family drawings with populations of depressed individuals.…

  6. Estimators of the Squared Cross-Validity Coefficient: A Monte Carlo Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Drasgow, Fritz

    1979-01-01

    A Monte Carlo experiment was used to evaluate four procedures for estimating the population squared cross-validity of a sample least squares regression equation. One estimator was particularly recommended. (Author/BH)

  7. Methodology Review: Estimation of Population Validity and Cross-Validity, and the Use of Equal Weights in Prediction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, Nambury S.; Bilgic, Reyhan; Edwards, Jack E.; Fleer, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    This review finds that formula-based procedures can be used in place of empirical validation for estimating population validity or in place of empirical cross-validation for estimating population cross-validity. Discusses conditions under which the equal weights procedure is a viable alternative. (SLD)

  8. Cross-validated detection of crack initiation in aerospace materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanniamparambil, Prashanth A.; Cuadra, Jefferson; Guclu, Utku; Bartoli, Ivan; Kontsos, Antonios

    2014-03-01

    A cross-validated nondestructive evaluation approach was employed to in situ detect the onset of damage in an Aluminum alloy compact tension specimen. The approach consisted of the coordinated use primarily the acoustic emission, combined with the infrared thermography and digital image correlation methods. Both tensile loads were applied and the specimen was continuously monitored using the nondestructive approach. Crack initiation was witnessed visually and was confirmed by the characteristic load drop accompanying the ductile fracture process. The full field deformation map provided by the nondestructive approach validated the formation of a pronounced plasticity zone near the crack tip. At the time of crack initiation, a burst in the temperature field ahead of the crack tip as well as a sudden increase of the acoustic recordings were observed. Although such experiments have been attempted and reported before in the literature, the presented approach provides for the first time a cross-validated nondestructive dataset that can be used for quantitative analyses of the crack initiation information content. It further allows future development of automated procedures for real-time identification of damage precursors including the rarely explored crack incubation stage in fatigue conditions.

  9. Exact Analysis of Squared Cross-Validity Coefficient in Predictive Regression Models.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2009-01-01

    In regression analysis, the notion of population validity is of theoretical interest for describing the usefulness of the underlying regression model, whereas the presumably more important concept of population cross-validity represents the predictive effectiveness for the regression equation in future research. It appears that the inference procedures of the squared multiple correlation coefficient have been extensively developed. In contrast, a full range of statistical methods for the analysis of the squared cross-validity coefficient is considerably far from complete. This article considers a distinct expression for the definition of the squared cross-validity coefficient as the direct connection and monotone transformation to the squared multiple correlation coefficient. Therefore, all the currently available exact methods for interval estimation, power calculation, and sample size determination of the squared multiple correlation coefficient are naturally modified and extended to the analysis of the squared cross-validity coefficient. The adequacies of the existing approximate procedures and the suggested exact method are evaluated through a Monte Carlo study. Furthermore, practical applications in areas of psychology and management are presented to illustrate the essential features of the proposed methodologies. The first empirical example uses 6 control variables related to driver characteristics and traffic congestion and their relation to stress in bus drivers, and the second example relates skills, cognitive performance, and personality to team performance measures. The results in this article can facilitate the recommended practice of cross-validation in psychological and other areas of social science research.

  10. Cross validation in LASSO and its acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchi, Tomoyuki; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    We investigate leave-one-out cross validation (CV) as a determinator of the weight of the penalty term in the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). First, on the basis of the message passing algorithm and a perturbative discussion assuming that the number of observations is sufficiently large, we provide simple formulas for approximately assessing two types of CV errors, which enable us to significantly reduce the necessary cost of computation. These formulas also provide a simple connection of the CV errors to the residual sums of squares between the reconstructed and the given measurements. Second, on the basis of this finding, we analytically evaluate the CV errors when the design matrix is given as a simple random matrix in the large size limit by using the replica method. Finally, these results are compared with those of numerical simulations on finite-size systems and are confirmed to be correct. We also apply the simple formulas of the first type of CV error to an actual dataset of the supernovae.

  11. Robust cross-validation of linear regression QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Konovalov, Dmitry A; Llewellyn, Lyndon E; Vander Heyden, Yvan; Coomans, Danny

    2008-10-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model is typically developed to predict the biochemical activity of untested compounds from the compounds' molecular structures. "The gold standard" of model validation is the blindfold prediction when the model's predictive power is assessed from how well the model predicts the activity values of compounds that were not considered in any way during the model development/calibration. However, during the development of a QSAR model, it is necessary to obtain some indication of the model's predictive power. This is often done by some form of cross-validation (CV). In this study, the concepts of the predictive power and fitting ability of a multiple linear regression (MLR) QSAR model were examined in the CV context allowing for the presence of outliers. Commonly used predictive power and fitting ability statistics were assessed via Monte Carlo cross-validation when applied to percent human intestinal absorption, blood-brain partition coefficient, and toxicity values of saxitoxin QSAR data sets, as well as three known benchmark data sets with known outlier contamination. It was found that (1) a robust version of MLR should always be preferred over the ordinary-least-squares MLR, regardless of the degree of outlier contamination and that (2) the model's predictive power should only be assessed via robust statistics. The Matlab and java source code used in this study is freely available from the QSAR-BENCH section of www.dmitrykonovalov.org for academic use. The Web site also contains the java-based QSAR-BENCH program, which could be run online via java's Web Start technology (supporting Windows, Mac OSX, Linux/Unix) to reproduce most of the reported results or apply the reported procedures to other data sets.

  12. Modified cross-validation as a method for estimating parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chye Rou; Adnan, Robiah

    2014-12-01

    Best subsets regression is an effective approach to distinguish models that can attain objectives with as few predictors as would be prudent. Subset models might really estimate the regression coefficients and predict future responses with smaller variance than the full model using all predictors. The inquiry of how to pick subset size λ depends on the bias and variance. There are various method to pick subset size λ. Regularly pick the smallest model that minimizes an estimate of the expected prediction error. Since data are regularly small, so Repeated K-fold cross-validation method is the most broadly utilized method to estimate prediction error and select model. The data is reshuffled and re-stratified before each round. However, the "one-standard-error" rule of Repeated K-fold cross-validation method always picks the most stingy model. The objective of this research is to modify the existing cross-validation method to avoid overfitting and underfitting model, a modified cross-validation method is proposed. This paper compares existing cross-validation and modified cross-validation. Our results reasoned that the modified cross-validation method is better at submodel selection and evaluation than other methods.

  13. A cross-validation package driving Netica with python

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian networks (BNs) are powerful tools for probabilistically simulating natural systems and emulating process models. Cross validation is a technique to avoid overfitting resulting from overly complex BNs. Overfitting reduces predictive skill. Cross-validation for BNs is known but rarely implemented due partly to a lack of software tools designed to work with available BN packages. CVNetica is open-source, written in Python, and extends the Netica software package to perform cross-validation and read, rebuild, and learn BNs from data. Insights gained from cross-validation and implications on prediction versus description are illustrated with: a data-driven oceanographic application; and a model-emulation application. These examples show that overfitting occurs when BNs become more complex than allowed by supporting data and overfitting incurs computational costs as well as causing a reduction in prediction skill. CVNetica evaluates overfitting using several complexity metrics (we used level of discretization) and its impact on performance metrics (we used skill).

  14. Cross-Validation in Canonical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Dianne L.

    The need for using invariance procedures to establish the external validity or generalizability of statistical results has been well documented. Invariance analysis is a tool that can be used to establish confidence in the replicability of research findings. Several approaches to invariance analysis are available that are broadly applicable across…

  15. Cross-Validation for Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models

    PubMed Central

    Colby, Emily; Bair, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Cross-validation is frequently used for model selection in a variety of applications. However, it is difficult to apply cross-validation to mixed effects models (including nonlinear mixed effects models or NLME models) due to the fact that cross-validation requires “out-of-sample” predictions of the outcome variable, which cannot be easily calculated when random effects are present. We describe two novel variants of cross-validation that can be applied to nonlinear mixed effects models. One variant, where out-of-sample predictions are based on post hoc estimates of the random effects, can be used to select the overall structural model. Another variant, where cross-validation seeks to minimize the estimated random effects rather than the estimated residuals, can be used to select covariates to include in the model. We show that these methods produce accurate results in a variety of simulated data sets and apply them to two publicly available population pharmacokinetic data sets. PMID:23532511

  16. A Cross-Validation Study of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheikh, Alia I.; Marotta, Sylvia A.

    2005-01-01

    This article is a cross-validation of R. G. Tedeschi and L. G. Calhoun's (1996) original study of the development of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI). It describes several psychometric properties of scores on the PTGI in a sample of middle- to old-aged adults with a history of cardiovascular disease. The results did not support the…

  17. Attrition from an Adolescent Addiction Treatment Program: A Cross Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathisen, Kenneth S.; Meyers, Kathleen

    Treatment attrition is a major problem for programs treating adolescent substance abusers. To isolate and cross validate factors which are predictive of addiction treatment attrition among adolescent substance abusers, screening interview and diagnostic variables from 119 adolescent in-patients were submitted to a discriminant equation analysis.…

  18. The Cross Validation of the Attitudes toward Mainstreaming Scale (ATMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Joan D.; Neal, W. R. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Reliability and factorial validity of the Attitudes Toward Mainstreaming Scale was supported in a cross-validation study with teachers. Three factors emerged: learning capability, general mainstreaming, and traditional limiting disabilities. Factor intercorrelations varied from .42 to .55; correlations between total scores and individual factors…

  19. Predicting IQ change from brain structure: A cross-validation study

    PubMed Central

    Price, C.J.; Ramsden, S.; Hope, T.M.H.; Friston, K.J.; Seghier, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Procedures that can predict cognitive abilities from brain imaging data are potentially relevant to educational assessments and studies of functional anatomy in the developing brain. Our aim in this work was to quantify the degree to which IQ change in the teenage years could be predicted from structural brain changes. Two well-known k-fold cross-validation analyses were applied to data acquired from 33 healthy teenagers – each tested at Time 1 and Time 2 with a 3.5 year interval. One approach, a Leave-One-Out procedure, predicted IQ change for each subject on the basis of structural change in a brain region that was identified from all other subjects (i.e., independent data). This approach predicted 53% of verbal IQ change and 14% of performance IQ change. The other approach used half the sample, to identify regions for predicting IQ change in the other half (i.e., a Split half approach); however – unlike the Leave-One-Out procedure – regions identified using half the sample were not significant. We discuss how these out-of-sample estimates compare to in-sample estimates; and draw some recommendations for k-fold cross-validation procedures when dealing with small datasets that are typical in the neuroimaging literature. PMID:23567505

  20. Predicting IQ change from brain structure: a cross-validation study.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Ramsden, S; Hope, T M H; Friston, K J; Seghier, M L

    2013-07-01

    Procedures that can predict cognitive abilities from brain imaging data are potentially relevant to educational assessments and studies of functional anatomy in the developing brain. Our aim in this work was to quantify the degree to which IQ change in the teenage years could be predicted from structural brain changes. Two well-known k-fold cross-validation analyses were applied to data acquired from 33 healthy teenagers - each tested at Time 1 and Time 2 with a 3.5 year interval. One approach, a Leave-One-Out procedure, predicted IQ change for each subject on the basis of structural change in a brain region that was identified from all other subjects (i.e., independent data). This approach predicted 53% of verbal IQ change and 14% of performance IQ change. The other approach used half the sample, to identify regions for predicting IQ change in the other half (i.e., a Split half approach); however--unlike the Leave-One-Out procedure--regions identified using half the sample were not significant. We discuss how these out-of-sample estimates compare to in-sample estimates; and draw some recommendations for k-fold cross-validation procedures when dealing with small datasets that are typical in the neuroimaging literature.

  1. Cross-Validation of Predictor Equations for Armor Crewman Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    assignment rather than specify the contents of the test battery to be used. Eaton, Bessemer , and Kristiansen (1979) evaluated the relationship... Bessemer , & Kristiansen, 1979). Consideration of their results suggested the potential for two cross-validation strategies. The first was to attempt to...formulas and their correlations with the criteria data from Eaton, Bessemer , and Kristiansen (1979) are shown in Table 2. By comparing Tables 1 and 2, one

  2. Free kick instead of cross-validation in maximum-likelihood refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pražnikar, Jure; Turk, Dušan

    2014-12-01

    The maximum-likelihood free-kick target, which calculates model error estimates from the work set and a randomly displaced model, proved superior in the accuracy and consistency of refinement of crystal structures compared with the maximum-likelihood cross-validation target, which calculates error estimates from the test set and the unperturbed model. The refinement of a molecular model is a computational procedure by which the atomic model is fitted to the diffraction data. The commonly used target in the refinement of macromolecular structures is the maximum-likelihood (ML) function, which relies on the assessment of model errors. The current ML functions rely on cross-validation. They utilize phase-error estimates that are calculated from a small fraction of diffraction data, called the test set, that are not used to fit the model. An approach has been developed that uses the work set to calculate the phase-error estimates in the ML refinement from simulating the model errors via the random displacement of atomic coordinates. It is called ML free-kick refinement as it uses the ML formulation of the target function and is based on the idea of freeing the model from the model bias imposed by the chemical energy restraints used in refinement. This approach for the calculation of error estimates is superior to the cross-validation approach: it reduces the phase error and increases the accuracy of molecular models, is more robust, provides clearer maps and may use a smaller portion of data for the test set for the calculation of R{sub free} or may leave it out completely.

  3. The Religious Support Scale: construction, validation, and cross-validation.

    PubMed

    Fiala, William E; Bjorck, Jeffrey P; Gorsuch, Richard

    2002-12-01

    Cutrona and Russell's social support model was used to develop a religious support measure (C. E. Cutrona & D. W. Russell, 1987), including 3 distinct but related subscales respectively measuring support from God, the congregation, and church leadership. Factor analyses with the main sample's data (249 Protestants) and cross-validation (93 additional Protestants) supported the scales' reliability and validity. All 3 types of religious support were related to lower depression and greater life satisfaction. Moreover, several relationships between the 3 subscales and psychological functioning variables remained significant after controlling for variance because of church attendance and social support. Results suggest that religious attendance does not automatically imply religious support, and that religious support can provide unique resources for religious persons, above and beyond those furnished by social support. Findings are discussed regarding relevance to community psychology.

  4. Cross-validating a bidimensional mathematics anxiety scale.

    PubMed

    Haiyan Bai

    2011-03-01

    The psychometric properties of a 14-item bidimensional Mathematics Anxiety Scale-Revised (MAS-R) were empirically cross-validated with two independent samples consisting of 647 secondary school students. An exploratory factor analysis on the scale yielded strong construct validity with a clear two-factor structure. The results from a confirmatory factor analysis indicated an excellent model-fit (χ(2) = 98.32, df = 62; normed fit index = .92, comparative fit index = .97; root mean square error of approximation = .04). The internal consistency (.85), test-retest reliability (.71), interfactor correlation (.26, p < .001), and positive discrimination power indicated that MAS-R is a psychometrically reliable and valid instrument for measuring mathematics anxiety. Math anxiety, as measured by MAS-R, correlated negatively with student achievement scores (r = -.38), suggesting that MAS-R may be a useful tool for classroom teachers and other educational personnel tasked with identifying students at risk of reduced math achievement because of anxiety.

  5. Correcting evaluation bias of relational classifiers with network cross validation

    DOE PAGES

    Neville, Jennifer; Gallagher, Brian; Eliassi-Rad, Tina; ...

    2011-01-04

    Recently, a number of modeling techniques have been developed for data mining and machine learning in relational and network domains where the instances are not independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.). These methods specifically exploit the statistical dependencies among instances in order to improve classification accuracy. However, there has been little focus on how these same dependencies affect our ability to draw accurate conclusions about the performance of the models. More specifically, the complex link structure and attribute dependencies in relational data violate the assumptions of many conventional statistical tests and make it difficult to use these tests to assess themore » models in an unbiased manner. In this work, we examine the task of within-network classification and the question of whether two algorithms will learn models that will result in significantly different levels of performance. We show that the commonly used form of evaluation (paired t-test on overlapping network samples) can result in an unacceptable level of Type I error. Furthermore, we show that Type I error increases as (1) the correlation among instances increases and (2) the size of the evaluation set increases (i.e., the proportion of labeled nodes in the network decreases). Lastly, we propose a method for network cross-validation that combined with paired t-tests produces more acceptable levels of Type I error while still providing reasonable levels of statistical power (i.e., 1–Type II error).« less

  6. Correcting evaluation bias of relational classifiers with network cross validation

    SciTech Connect

    Neville, Jennifer; Gallagher, Brian; Eliassi-Rad, Tina; Wang, Tao

    2011-01-04

    Recently, a number of modeling techniques have been developed for data mining and machine learning in relational and network domains where the instances are not independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.). These methods specifically exploit the statistical dependencies among instances in order to improve classification accuracy. However, there has been little focus on how these same dependencies affect our ability to draw accurate conclusions about the performance of the models. More specifically, the complex link structure and attribute dependencies in relational data violate the assumptions of many conventional statistical tests and make it difficult to use these tests to assess the models in an unbiased manner. In this work, we examine the task of within-network classification and the question of whether two algorithms will learn models that will result in significantly different levels of performance. We show that the commonly used form of evaluation (paired t-test on overlapping network samples) can result in an unacceptable level of Type I error. Furthermore, we show that Type I error increases as (1) the correlation among instances increases and (2) the size of the evaluation set increases (i.e., the proportion of labeled nodes in the network decreases). Lastly, we propose a method for network cross-validation that combined with paired t-tests produces more acceptable levels of Type I error while still providing reasonable levels of statistical power (i.e., 1–Type II error).

  7. Density-preserving sampling: robust and efficient alternative to cross-validation for error estimation.

    PubMed

    Budka, Marcin; Gabrys, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of the generalization ability of a classification or regression model is an important issue, as it indicates the expected performance on previously unseen data and is also used for model selection. Currently used generalization error estimation procedures, such as cross-validation (CV) or bootstrap, are stochastic and, thus, require multiple repetitions in order to produce reliable results, which can be computationally expensive, if not prohibitive. The correntropy-inspired density-preserving sampling (DPS) procedure proposed in this paper eliminates the need for repeating the error estimation procedure by dividing the available data into subsets that are guaranteed to be representative of the input dataset. This allows the production of low-variance error estimates with an accuracy comparable to 10 times repeated CV at a fraction of the computations required by CV. This method can also be used for model ranking and selection. This paper derives the DPS procedure and investigates its usability and performance using a set of public benchmark datasets and standard classifiers.

  8. Cross-validation and Peeling Strategies for Survival Bump Hunting using Recursive Peeling Methods

    PubMed Central

    Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Choe, Michael; LeBlanc, Michael; Rao, J. Sunil

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a framework to build a survival/risk bump hunting model with a censored time-to-event response. Our Survival Bump Hunting (SBH) method is based on a recursive peeling procedure that uses a specific survival peeling criterion derived from non/semi-parametric statistics such as the hazards-ratio, the log-rank test or the Nelson--Aalen estimator. To optimize the tuning parameter of the model and validate it, we introduce an objective function based on survival or prediction-error statistics, such as the log-rank test and the concordance error rate. We also describe two alternative cross-validation techniques adapted to the joint task of decision-rule making by recursive peeling and survival estimation. Numerical analyses show the importance of replicated cross-validation and the differences between criteria and techniques in both low and high-dimensional settings. Although several non-parametric survival models exist, none addresses the problem of directly identifying local extrema. We show how SBH efficiently estimates extreme survival/risk subgroups unlike other models. This provides an insight into the behavior of commonly used models and suggests alternatives to be adopted in practice. Finally, our SBH framework was applied to a clinical dataset. In it, we identified subsets of patients characterized by clinical and demographic covariates with a distinct extreme survival outcome, for which tailored medical interventions could be made. An R package PRIMsrc (Patient Rule Induction Method in Survival, Regression and Classification settings) is available on CRAN (Comprehensive R Archive Network) and GitHub. PMID:27034730

  9. Splenectomy Causes 10-Fold Increased Risk of Portal Venous System Thrombosis in Liver Cirrhosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xingshun; Han, Guohong; Ye, Chun; Zhang, Yongguo; Dai, Junna; Peng, Ying; Deng, Han; Li, Jing; Hou, Feifei; Ning, Zheng; Zhao, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xintong; Wang, Ran; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-07-19

    BACKGROUND Portal venous system thrombosis (PVST) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis. We conducted a retrospective study to comprehensively analyze the prevalence and risk factors of PVST in liver cirrhosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS All cirrhotic patients without malignancy admitted between June 2012 and December 2013 were eligible if they underwent contrast-enhanced CT or MRI scans. Independent predictors of PVST in liver cirrhosis were calculated in multivariate analyses. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the severity of PVST (any PVST, main portal vein [MPV] thrombosis >50%, and clinically significant PVST) and splenectomy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. RESULTS Overall, 113 cirrhotic patients were enrolled. The prevalence of PVST was 16.8% (19/113). Splenectomy (any PVST: OR=11.494, 95%CI=2.152-61.395; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=29.987, 95%CI=3.247-276.949; clinically significant PVST: OR=40.415, 95%CI=3.895-419.295) and higher hemoglobin (any PVST: OR=0.974, 95%CI=0.953-0.996; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=0.936, 95%CI=0.895-0.980; clinically significant PVST: OR=0.935, 95%CI=0.891-0.982) were the independent predictors of PVST. The prevalence of PVST was 13.3% (14/105) after excluding splenectomy. Higher hemoglobin was the only independent predictor of MPV thrombosis >50% (OR=0.952, 95%CI=0.909-0.997). No independent predictors of any PVST or clinically significant PVST were identified in multivariate analyses. Additionally, PVST patients who underwent splenectomy had a significantly higher proportion of clinically significant PVST but lower MELD score than those who did not undergo splenectomy. In all analyses, the in-hospital mortality was not significantly different between cirrhotic patient with and without PVST. CONCLUSIONS Splenectomy may increase by at least 10-fold the risk of PVST in liver cirrhosis independent of severity of liver dysfunction.

  10. Cross-validation pitfalls when selecting and assessing regression and classification models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We address the problem of selecting and assessing classification and regression models using cross-validation. Current state-of-the-art methods can yield models with high variance, rendering them unsuitable for a number of practical applications including QSAR. In this paper we describe and evaluate best practices which improve reliability and increase confidence in selected models. A key operational component of the proposed methods is cloud computing which enables routine use of previously infeasible approaches. Methods We describe in detail an algorithm for repeated grid-search V-fold cross-validation for parameter tuning in classification and regression, and we define a repeated nested cross-validation algorithm for model assessment. As regards variable selection and parameter tuning we define two algorithms (repeated grid-search cross-validation and double cross-validation), and provide arguments for using the repeated grid-search in the general case. Results We show results of our algorithms on seven QSAR datasets. The variation of the prediction performance, which is the result of choosing different splits of the dataset in V-fold cross-validation, needs to be taken into account when selecting and assessing classification and regression models. Conclusions We demonstrate the importance of repeating cross-validation when selecting an optimal model, as well as the importance of repeating nested cross-validation when assessing a prediction error. PMID:24678909

  11. Block-Regularized m × 2 Cross-Validated Estimator of the Generalization Error.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruibo; Wang, Yu; Li, Jihong; Yang, Xingli; Yang, Jing

    2017-02-01

    A cross-validation method based on [Formula: see text] replications of two-fold cross validation is called an [Formula: see text] cross validation. An [Formula: see text] cross validation is used in estimating the generalization error and comparing of algorithms' performance in machine learning. However, the variance of the estimator of the generalization error in [Formula: see text] cross validation is easily affected by random partitions. Poor data partitioning may cause a large fluctuation in the number of overlapping samples between any two training (test) sets in [Formula: see text] cross validation. This fluctuation results in a large variance in the [Formula: see text] cross-validated estimator. The influence of the random partitions on variance becomes serious as [Formula: see text] increases. Thus, in this study, the partitions with a restricted number of overlapping samples between any two training (test) sets are defined as a block-regularized partition set. The corresponding cross validation is called block-regularized [Formula: see text] cross validation ([Formula: see text] BCV). It can effectively reduce the influence of random partitions. We prove that the variance of the [Formula: see text] BCV estimator of the generalization error is smaller than the variance of [Formula: see text] cross-validated estimator and reaches the minimum in a special situation. An analytical expression of the variance can also be derived in this special situation. This conclusion is validated through simulation experiments. Furthermore, a practical construction method of [Formula: see text] BCV by a two-level orthogonal array is provided. Finally, a conservative estimator is proposed for the variance of estimator of the generalization error.

  12. Cross-validation of a Shortened Battery for the Assessment of Dysexecutive Disorders in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, Olivier; Martinaud, Olivier; Verny, Marc; Mosca, Chrystèle; Lenoir, Hermine; Bretault, Eric; Devendeville, Agnès; Diouf, Momar; Pere, Jean-Jacques; Bakchine, Serge; Delabrousse-Mayoux, Jean-Philippe; Roussel, Martine

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of executive disorders in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease (AD) has been demonstrated by the application of a comprehensive battery. The present study analyzed data from 2 recent multicenter studies based on the same executive battery. The objective was to derive a shortened battery by using the GREFEX population as a training dataset and by cross-validating the results in the REFLEX population. A total of 102 AD patients of the GREFEX study (MMSE=23.2±2.9) and 72 patients of the REFLEX study (MMSE=20.8±3.5) were included. Tests were selected and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated relative to the performance of 780 controls from the GREFEX study. Stepwise logistic regression identified 3 cognitive tests (Six Elements Task, categorical fluency and Trail Making Test B error) and behavioral disorders globally referred as global hypoactivity (P=0.0001, all). This shortened battery was as accurate as the entire GREFEX battery in diagnosing dysexecutive disorders in both training group and the validation group. Bootstrap procedure confirmed the stability of AUC. A shortened battery based on 3 cognitive tests and 3 behavioral domains provides a high diagnosis accuracy of executive disorders in mild-to-moderate AD.

  13. Comparison of cross-validation and bootstrap aggregating for building a seasonal streamflow forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Simon; Rössler, Ole; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-10-01

    Based on a hindcast experiment for the period 1982-2013 in 66 sub-catchments of the Swiss Rhine, the present study compares two approaches of building a regression model for seasonal streamflow forecasting. The first approach selects a single "best guess" model, which is tested by leave-one-out cross-validation. The second approach implements the idea of bootstrap aggregating, where bootstrap replicates are employed to select several models, and out-of-bag predictions provide model testing. The target value is mean streamflow for durations of 30, 60 and 90 days, starting with the 1st and 16th day of every month. Compared to the best guess model, bootstrap aggregating reduces the mean squared error of the streamflow forecast by seven percent on average. Thus, if resampling is anyway part of the model building procedure, bootstrap aggregating seems to be a useful strategy in statistical seasonal streamflow forecasting. Since the improved accuracy comes at the cost of a less interpretable model, the approach might be best suited for pure prediction tasks, e.g. as in operational applications.

  14. The Performance of Cross-Validation Indices Used to Select among Competing Covariance Structure Models under Multivariate Nonnormality Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Stapleton, Laura M.

    2006-01-01

    Cudeck and Browne (1983) proposed using cross-validation as a model selection technique in structural equation modeling. The purpose of this study is to examine the performance of eight cross-validation indices under conditions not yet examined in the relevant literature, such as nonnormality and cross-validation design. The performance of each…

  15. Cesarean Delivery Rates Vary 10-Fold Among US Hospitals; Reducing Variation May Address Quality, Cost Issues

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy Backes; Law, Michael R.; Virnig, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean delivery is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the United States, and cesarean rates are increasing. Working with 2009 data from 593 US hospitals nationwide, we found that cesarean rates varied tenfold across hospitals, from 7.1 percent to 69.9 percent. Even for women with lower-risk pregnancies, in which more limited variation might be expected, cesarean rates varied fifteen-fold, from 2.4 percent to 36.5 percent. Thus, vast differences in practice patterns are likely to be driving the costly overuse of cesarean delivery in many US hospitals. Because Medicaid pays for nearly half of US births, government efforts to decrease variation are warranted. We focus on four promising directions for reducing these variations, including better coordination of maternity care, more data collection and measurement, tying Medicaid payment to quality improvement, and enhancing patient-centered decision making through public reporting. PMID:23459732

  16. Fear factors: cross validation of specific phobia domains in a community-based sample of African American adults.

    PubMed

    Chapman, L Kevin; Vines, Lauren; Petrie, Jenny

    2011-05-01

    The current study attempted a cross-validation of specific phobia domains in a community-based sample of African American adults based on a previous model of phobia domains in a college student sample of African Americans. Subjects were 100 African American community-dwelling adults who completed the Fear Survey Schedule-Second Edition (FSS-II). Domains of fear were created using a similar procedure as the original, college sample of African American adults. A model including all of the phobia domains from the FSS-II was initially tested and resulted in poor model fit. Cross-validation was subsequently attempted through examining the original factor pattern of specific phobia domains from the college sample (Chapman, Kertz, Zurlage, & Woodruff-Borden, 2008). Data from the current, community based sample of African American adults provided poor fit to this model. The trimmed model for the current sample included the animal and social anxiety factors as in the original model. The natural environment-type specific phobia factor did not provide adequate fit for the community-based sample of African Americans. Results indicated that although different factor loading patterns of fear may exist among community-based African Americans as compared to African American college students, both animal and social fears are nearly identical in both groups, indicating a possible cultural homogeneity for phobias in African Americans. Potential explanations of these findings and future directions are discussed.

  17. Biased binomial assessment of cross-validated estimation of classification accuracies illustrated in diagnosis predictions.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lesenfants, Damien; Gomez, Francisco; Soddu, Andrea; Schrouff, Jessica; Garraux, Gaëtan; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Laureys, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate classification is used in neuroimaging studies to infer brain activation or in medical applications to infer diagnosis. Their results are often assessed through either a binomial or a permutation test. Here, we simulated classification results of generated random data to assess the influence of the cross-validation scheme on the significance of results. Distributions built from classification of random data with cross-validation did not follow the binomial distribution. The binomial test is therefore not adapted. On the contrary, the permutation test was unaffected by the cross-validation scheme. The influence of the cross-validation was further illustrated on real-data from a brain-computer interface experiment in patients with disorders of consciousness and from an fMRI study on patients with Parkinson disease. Three out of 16 patients with disorders of consciousness had significant accuracy on binomial testing, but only one showed significant accuracy using permutation testing. In the fMRI experiment, the mental imagery of gait could discriminate significantly between idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients and healthy subjects according to the permutation test but not according to the binomial test. Hence, binomial testing could lead to biased estimation of significance and false positive or negative results. In our view, permutation testing is thus recommended for clinical application of classification with cross-validation.

  18. Evaluation and cross-validation of Environmental Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Joseph

    , preliminary analyses should be carried out under the control and authority of an established international professional Organization or Association, before any final political decision is made by ISO to select a specific Environmental Models, like for example IGRF and DGRF. Of course, Commissions responsible for checking the consistency of definitions, methods and algorithms for data processing might consider to delegate specific tasks (e.g. bench-marking the technical tools, the calibration procedures, the methods of data analysis, and the software algorithms employed in building the different types of models, as well as their usage) to private, intergovernmental or international organization/agencies (e.g.: NASA, ESA, AGU, EGU, COSPAR, . . . ); eventually, the latter should report conclusions to the Commissions members appointed by IAGA or any established authority like IUGG.

  19. Airborne environmental endotoxin: a cross-validation of sampling and analysis techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M; Milton, D; Larsson, L; Ford, T

    1994-01-01

    A standard method for measurement of airborne environmental endotoxin was developed and field tested in a fiberglass insulation-manufacturing facility. This method involved sampling with a capillary-pore membrane filter, extraction in buffer using a sonication bath, and analysis by the kinetic-Limulus assay with resistant-parallel-line estimation (KLARE). Cross-validation of the extraction and assay method was performed by comparison with methanolysis of samples followed by 3-hydroxy fatty acid (3-OHFA) analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Direct methanolysis of filter samples and methanolysis of buffer extracts of the filters yielded similar 3-OHFA content (P = 0.72); the average difference was 2.1%. Analysis of buffer extracts for endotoxin content by the KLARE method and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for 3-OHFA content produced similar results (P = 0.23); the average difference was 0.88%. The source of endotoxin was gram-negative bacteria growing in recycled washwater used to clean the insulation-manufacturing equipment. The endotoxin and bacteria become airborne during spray cleaning operations. The types of 3-OHFAs in bacteria cultured from the washwater, present in the washwater and in the air, were similar. Virtually all of the bacteria cultured from air and water were gram negative composed mostly of two species, Deleya aesta and Acinetobacter johnsonii. Airborne countable bacteria correlated well with endotoxin (r2 = 0.64). Replicate sampling showed that results with the standard sampling, extraction, and Limulus assay by the KLARE method were highly reproducible (95% confidence interval for endotoxin measurement +/- 0.28 log10). These results demonstrate the accuracy, precision, and sensitivity of the standard procedure proposed for airborne environmental endotoxin. PMID:8161191

  20. The generalized cross-validation method applied to geophysical linear traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassrei, A.; Oliveira, N. P.

    2009-12-01

    The oil industry is the major user of Applied Geophysics methods for the subsurface imaging. Among different methods, the so-called seismic (or exploration seismology) methods are the most important. Tomography was originally developed for medical imaging and was introduced in exploration seismology in the 1980's. There are two main classes of geophysical tomography: those that use only the traveltimes between sources and receivers, which is a cinematic approach and those that use the wave amplitude itself, being a dynamic approach. Tomography is a kind of inverse problem, and since inverse problems are usually ill-posed, it is necessary to use some method to reduce their deficiencies. These difficulties of the inverse procedure are associated with the fact that the involved matrix is ill-conditioned. To compensate this shortcoming, it is appropriate to use some technique of regularization. In this work we make use of regularization with derivative matrices, also called smoothing. There is a crucial problem in regularization, which is the selection of the regularization parameter lambda. We use generalized cross validation (GCV) as a tool for the selection of lambda. GCV chooses the regularization parameter associated with the best average prediction for all possible omissions of one datum, corresponding to the minimizer of GCV function. GCV is used for an application in traveltime tomography, where the objective is to obtain the 2-D velocity distribution from the measured values of the traveltimes between sources and receivers. We present results with synthetic data, using a geological model that simulates different features, like a fault and a reservoir. The results using GCV are very good, including those contaminated with noise, and also using different regularization orders, attesting the feasibility of this technique.

  1. The female sexual function index (FSFI): cross-validation and development of clinical cutoff scores.

    PubMed

    Wiegel, Markus; Meston, Cindy; Rosen, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    , independently. Discriminant validity testing confirmed the ability of both total and domain scores to differentiate between functional and nondysfunctional women. On the basis of sensitivity and specificity analyses and the CART procedure, we found an FSFI total score of 26.55 to be the optimal cut score for differentiating women with and without sexual dysfunction. On the basis of this cut-off we found 70.7% of women with sexual dysfunction and 88.1% of the sexually functional women in the cross-validation sample to be correctly classified. Addition of the lubrication score in the model resulted in slightly improved specificity (from .707 to .772) at a slight cost of sensitivity (from .881 to .854) for identifying women without sexual dysfunction. We discuss the results in terms of potential strengths and weaknesses of the FSFI, as well in terms of further clinical and research implications.

  2. Cross-Validating Chinese Language Mental Health Recovery Measures in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bola, John; Chan, Tiffany Hill Ching; Chen, Eric HY; Ng, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Promoting recovery in mental health services is hampered by a shortage of reliable and valid measures, particularly in Hong Kong. We seek to cross validate two Chinese language measures of recovery and one of recovery-promoting environments. Method: A cross-sectional survey of people recovering from early episode psychosis (n = 121)…

  3. A Cross-Validation of MMPI Scales of Aggression on Male Criminal Criterion Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deiker, Thomas E.

    1974-01-01

    The 13 basic Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) scales, 21 experimental scales of hostility and control, and four response-bias scales are cross-validated on 168 male criminals assigned to four aggressive criterion groups (nonviolent, threat, battery, and homicide). (Author)

  4. Reliable Digit Span: A Systematic Review and Cross-Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Ryan W.; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Baade, Lyle E.; Marshall, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable Digit Span (RDS) is a heavily researched symptom validity test with a recent literature review yielding more than 20 studies ranging in dates from 1994 to 2011. Unfortunately, limitations within some of the research minimize clinical generalizability. This systematic review and cross-validation study was conducted to address these…

  5. The Employability of Psychologists in Academic Settings: A Cross-Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quereshi, M. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzed the curriculum vitae (CV) of 117 applicants for the position of assistant professor of psychology to yield four cross-validated factors. Comparisons of the results with those of four years ago indicated considerable stability of the factors. Scholarly publications remain an important factor. (JAC)

  6. A Cross-Validation of Sex Differences in the Expression of Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chino, Allan F.; Funabiki, Dean

    1984-01-01

    Presents results of a cross-validational test of previous findings that men and women express depression differently. Reports that when depressed, females are more prone to somatic symptoms, self-deprecating statements, and less selectiveness than males in seeking out others. Qualifies findings, however, by posting a possible gap between reported…

  7. Cross-Validation of the Risk Matrix 2000 Sexual and Violent Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Leam A.; Beech, Anthony; Browne, Kevin D.

    2006-01-01

    The predictive accuracy of the newly developed actuarial risk measures Risk Matrix 2000 Sexual/Violence (RMS, RMV) were cross validated and compared with two risk assessment measures (SVR-20 and Static-99) in a sample of sexual (n = 85) and nonsex violent (n = 46) offenders. The sexual offense reconviction rate for the sex offender group was 18%…

  8. Validity Evidence in Scale Development: The Application of Cross Validation and Classification-Sequencing Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar, Tu¨lin

    2014-01-01

    In literature, it has been observed that many enhanced criteria are limited by factor analysis techniques. Besides examinations of statistical structure and/or psychological structure, such validity studies as cross validation and classification-sequencing studies should be performed frequently. The purpose of this study is to examine cross…

  9. Cross-Validation of FITNESSGRAM® Health-Related Fitness Standards in Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Karsai, István; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to cross-validate FITNESSGRAM® aerobic and body composition standards in a representative sample of Hungarian youth. Method: A nationally representative sample (N = 405) of Hungarian adolescents from the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study (ages 12-18.9 years) participated in an aerobic capacity assessment…

  10. A New Symptom Model for Autism Cross-Validated in an Independent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boomsma, A.; Van Lang, N. D. J.; De Jonge, M. V.; De Bildt, A. A.; Van Engeland, H.; Minderaa, R. B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Results from several studies indicated that a symptom model other than the DSM triad might better describe symptom domains of autism. The present study focused on a) investigating the stability of a new symptom model for autism by cross-validating it in an independent sample and b) examining the invariance of the model regarding three…

  11. Exact Analysis of Squared Cross-Validity Coefficient in Predictive Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2009-01-01

    In regression analysis, the notion of population validity is of theoretical interest for describing the usefulness of the underlying regression model, whereas the presumably more important concept of population cross-validity represents the predictive effectiveness for the regression equation in future research. It appears that the inference…

  12. Cross-Validation of the Quick Word Test as an Estimator of Adult Mental Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotelueschen, Arden; McQuarrie, Duncan

    1970-01-01

    This report provides additional evidence that the Quick Word Test (Level 2, Form AM) is valid for estimating adult mental ability as defined by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. The validation sample is also described to facilitate use of the conversion table developed in the cross-validation analysis. (Author/LY)

  13. Cross-Validation of easyCBM Reading Cut Scores in Oregon: 2009-2010. Technical Report #1108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Irvin, P. Shawn; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical report presents results from a cross-validation study designed to identify optimal cut scores when using easyCBM[R] reading tests in Oregon. The cross-validation study analyzes data from the 2009-2010 academic year for easyCBM[R] reading measures. A sample of approximately 2,000 students per grade, randomly split into two groups of…

  14. Automatic regularization parameter selection by generalized cross-validation for total variational Poisson noise removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiongjun; Javidi, Bahram; Ng, Michael K

    2017-03-20

    In this paper, we propose an alternating minimization algorithm with an automatic selection of the regularization parameter for image reconstruction of photon-counted images. By using the generalized cross-validation technique, the regularization parameter can be updated in the iterations of the alternating minimization algorithm. Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the two existing methods, the maximum likelihood expectation maximization estimator with total variation regularization and the primal dual method, where the parameters must be set in advance.

  15. Application of robust Generalised Cross-Validation to the inverse problem of electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Josef P; Johnston, Peter R

    2016-02-01

    Robust Generalised Cross-Validation was proposed recently as a method for determining near optimal regularisation parameters in inverse problems. It was introduced to overcome a problem with the regular Generalised Cross-Validation method in which the function that is minimised to obtain the regularisation parameter often has a broad, flat minimum, resulting in a poor estimate for the parameter. The robust method defines a new function to be minimised which has a narrower minimum, but at the expense of introducing a new parameter called the robustness parameter. In this study, the Robust Generalised Cross-Validation method is applied to the inverse problem of electrocardiology. It is demonstrated that, for realistic situations, the robustness parameter can be set to zero. With this choice of robustness parameter, it is shown that the robust method is able to obtain estimates of the regularisation parameter in the inverse problem of electrocardiology that are comparable to, or better than, many of the standard methods that are applied to this inverse problem.

  16. Cross-validation of matching correlation analysis by resampling matching weights.

    PubMed

    Shimodaira, Hidetoshi

    2016-03-01

    The strength of association between a pair of data vectors is represented by a nonnegative real number, called matching weight. For dimensionality reduction, we consider a linear transformation of data vectors, and define a matching error as the weighted sum of squared distances between transformed vectors with respect to the matching weights. Given data vectors and matching weights, the optimal linear transformation minimizing the matching error is solved by the spectral graph embedding of Yan et al. (2007). This method is a generalization of the canonical correlation analysis, and will be called as matching correlation analysis (MCA). In this paper, we consider a novel sampling scheme where the observed matching weights are randomly sampled from underlying true matching weights with small probability, whereas the data vectors are treated as constants. We then investigate a cross-validation by resampling the matching weights. Our asymptotic theory shows that the cross-validation, if rescaled properly, computes an unbiased estimate of the matching error with respect to the true matching weights. Existing ideas of cross-validation for resampling data vectors, instead of resampling matching weights, are not applicable here. MCA can be used for data vectors from multiple domains with different dimensions via an embarrassingly simple idea of coding the data vectors. This method will be called as cross-domain matching correlation analysis (CDMCA), and an interesting connection to the classical associative memory model of neural networks is also discussed.

  17. A statistical method (cross-validation) for bone loss region detection after spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Li, Wenjun; Li, Caixia; Chu, Philip W.; Kornak, John; Lang, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Astronauts experience bone loss after the long spaceflight missions. Identifying specific regions that undergo the greatest losses (e.g. the proximal femur) could reveal information about the processes of bone loss in disuse and disease. Methods for detecting such regions, however, remains an open problem. This paper focuses on statistical methods to detect such regions. We perform statistical parametric mapping to get t-maps of changes in images, and propose a new cross-validation method to select an optimum suprathreshold for forming clusters of pixels. Once these candidate clusters are formed, we use permutation testing of longitudinal labels to derive significant changes. PMID:20632144

  18. Actuarial assessment of sex offender recidivism risk: a cross-validation of the RRASOR and the Static-99 in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, G; Långström, N

    2001-12-01

    We cross-validated two actuarial risk assessment tools, the RRASOR (R. K. Hanson, 1997) and the Static-99 (R. K. Hanson & D. Thornton, 1999), in a retrospective follow-up (mean follow-up time = 3.69 years) of all sex offenders released from Swedish prisons during 1993-1997 (N = 1,400, all men, age > or =18 years). File-based data were collected by a researcher blind to the outcome (registered criminal recidivism), and individual risk factors as well as complete instrument characteristics were explored. Both the RRASOR and the Static-99 showed similar and moderate predictive accuracy for sexual reconvictions whereas the Static-99 exhibited a significantly higher accuracy for the prediction of any violent recidivism as compared to the RRASOR. Although particularly the Static-99 proved moderately robust as an actuarial measure of recidivism risk among sexual offenders in Sweden, both procedures may need further evaluation, for example, with sex offender subpopulations differing ethnically or with respect to offense characteristics. The usefulness of actuarial methods for the assessment of sex offender recidivism risk is discussed in the context of current practice.

  19. Crossing the North Sea seems to make DCD disappear: cross-validation of Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 norms.

    PubMed

    Niemeijer, Anuschka S; van Waelvelde, Hilde; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M

    2015-02-01

    The Movement Assessment Battery for Children has been revised as the Movement ABC-2 (Henderson, Sugden, & Barnett, 2007). In Europe, the 15th percentile score on this test is recommended for one of the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). A representative sample of Dutch and Flemish children was tested to cross-validate the UK standard scores, including the 15th percentile score. First, the mean, SD and percentile scores of Dutch children were compared to those of UK normative samples. Item standard scores of Dutch speaking children deviated from the UK reference values suggesting necessary adjustments. Except for very young children, the Dutch-speaking samples performed better. Second, based on the mean and SD and clinical relevant cut-off scores (5th and 15th percentile), norms were adjusted for the Dutch population. For diagnostic use, researchers and clinicians should use the reference norms that are valid for the group of children they are testing. The results indicate that there possibly is an effect of testing procedure in other countries that validated the UK norms and/or cultural influence on the age norms of the Movement ABC-2. It is suggested to formulate criterion-based norms for age groups in addition to statistical norms.

  20. Using cross-validation to evaluate predictive accuracy of survival risk classifiers based on high-dimensional data.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard M; Subramanian, Jyothi; Li, Ming-Chung; Menezes, Supriya

    2011-05-01

    Developments in whole genome biotechnology have stimulated statistical focus on prediction methods. We review here methodology for classifying patients into survival risk groups and for using cross-validation to evaluate such classifications. Measures of discrimination for survival risk models include separation of survival curves, time-dependent ROC curves and Harrell's concordance index. For high-dimensional data applications, however, computing these measures as re-substitution statistics on the same data used for model development results in highly biased estimates. Most developments in methodology for survival risk modeling with high-dimensional data have utilized separate test data sets for model evaluation. Cross-validation has sometimes been used for optimization of tuning parameters. In many applications, however, the data available are too limited for effective division into training and test sets and consequently authors have often either reported re-substitution statistics or analyzed their data using binary classification methods in order to utilize familiar cross-validation. In this article we have tried to indicate how to utilize cross-validation for the evaluation of survival risk models; specifically how to compute cross-validated estimates of survival distributions for predicted risk groups and how to compute cross-validated time-dependent ROC curves. We have also discussed evaluation of the statistical significance of a survival risk model and evaluation of whether high-dimensional genomic data adds predictive accuracy to a model based on standard covariates alone.

  1. Interrelations between temperament, character, and parental rearing among delinquent adolescents: a cross-validation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jörg; Krecklow, Beate; Eisemann, Matrin

    2002-01-01

    We performed a cross-validation of results from investigations in juvenile delinquents in Russia and Germany concerning relationships of personality characteristics in terms of temperament and character with parental rearing. Both studies used the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) based on Cloninger's psychobiological theory, and the Own Memories on Parenting (Egna Minnen Beträffande Uppfostran-Swedish [EMBU]) questionnaire on parental rearing based on Perris' vulnerability model. The inter-relatedness of parental rearing, temperament, and character traits in socially normally integrated adolescents, as well as in delinquent adolescents, implying direct and indirect pathways from personality and parental rearing to delinquency, could be cross-validated. Differences between delinquents and socially normally integrated adolescents are rather based on different levels of expressions of various temperament traits, harm avoidance and novelty seeking in particular, and the character trait self-directedness, as well as on parental rearing behavior (predominantly parental rejection and emotional warmth) than on different structures within related developmental processes.

  2. Evaluation of a cross-validation stopping rule in MLE SPECT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Falcón, C; Juvells, I; Pavía, J; Ros, D

    1998-05-01

    One of the problems in the routine use of the maximum-likelihood estimator method-expectation maximization (MLE-EM) algorithm is to decide when the iterative process should be stopped. We studied a cross-validation stopping rule to assess its usefulness in SPECT. We tested this stopping rule criterion in the MLE-EM algorithm without acceleration as well as in two accelerating algorithms, the successive substitutions algorithm (SSA) and the additive algorithm (AA). Different values of an acceleration factor were tested in SSA and AA. Our results from numerical and physical phantoms show that the stopping rule based on the cross-validation ratio (CVR) takes into account the similarity of the reconstructed image to the ideal image, noise and the contrast of the image. CVR yields reconstructed images with balanced values of the figures of merit (FOM) employed to assess the image quality. The CVR criterion can be used in the original MLE-EM algorithm as well as in SSA and AA. The reconstructed images obtained with SSA and AA showed FOM values that were very similar. These results were justified by considering AA to be an approximate form of SSA. The range of validity for the acceleration factor in SSA and AA was found to be [1, 2]. In this range, an inverse function connects the acceleration factor to the number of iterations needed to attain prefixed values of FOMs.

  3. Cross-validation analysis of bias models in Bayesian multi-model projections of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, J. M. J.; Räisänen, J.; Nissinen, A.; Lipponen, A.; Kolehmainen, V.

    2017-03-01

    Climate change projections are commonly based on multi-model ensembles of climate simulations. In this paper we consider the choice of bias models in Bayesian multimodel predictions. Buser et al. (Clim Res 44(2-3):227-241, 2010a) introduced a hybrid bias model which combines commonly used constant bias and constant relation bias assumptions. The hybrid model includes a weighting parameter which balances these bias models. In this study, we use a cross-validation approach to study which bias model or bias parameter leads to, in a specific sense, optimal climate change projections. The analysis is carried out for summer and winter season means of 2 m-temperatures spatially averaged over the IPCC SREX regions, using 19 model runs from the CMIP5 data set. The cross-validation approach is applied to calculate optimal bias parameters (in the specific sense) for projecting the temperature change from the control period (1961-2005) to the scenario period (2046-2090). The results are compared to the results of the Buser et al. (Clim Res 44(2-3):227-241, 2010a) method which includes the bias parameter as one of the unknown parameters to be estimated from the data.

  4. Variational cross-validation of slow dynamical modes in molecular kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Markov state models are a widely used method for approximating the eigenspectrum of the molecular dynamics propagator, yielding insight into the long-timescale statistical kinetics and slow dynamical modes of biomolecular systems. However, the lack of a unified theoretical framework for choosing between alternative models has hampered progress, especially for non-experts applying these methods to novel biological systems. Here, we consider cross-validation with a new objective function for estimators of these slow dynamical modes, a generalized matrix Rayleigh quotient (GMRQ), which measures the ability of a rank-m projection operator to capture the slow subspace of the system. It is shown that a variational theorem bounds the GMRQ from above by the sum of the first m eigenvalues of the system’s propagator, but that this bound can be violated when the requisite matrix elements are estimated subject to statistical uncertainty. This overfitting can be detected and avoided through cross-validation. These result make it possible to construct Markov state models for protein dynamics in a way that appropriately captures the tradeoff between systematic and statistical errors. PMID:25833563

  5. Assessing the performance of spectroscopic models for cancer diagnostics using cross-validation and permutation testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, G. R.; Hutchings, J.; Almond, L. M.; Barr, H.; Kendall, C.; Stone, N.

    2012-01-01

    Multivariate classifiers (such as Linear Discriminant Analysis, Support Vector Machines etc) are known to be useful tools for making diagnostic decisions based on spectroscopic data. However, robust techniques for assessing their performance (e.g. by sensitivity and specificity) are vital if the application of these methods is to be successful in the clinic. In this work the application of repeated cross-validation for estimating confidence intervals for sensitivity and specificity of multivariate classifiers is presented. Furthermore, permutation testing is presented as a suitable technique for estimating the probability of obtaining the observed sensitivity and specificity by chance. Both approaches are demonstrated through their application to a Raman spectroscopic model of gastrointestinal cancer.

  6. Test, revision, and cross-validation of the Physical Activity Self-Definition Model.

    PubMed

    Kendzierski, Deborah; Morganstein, Mara S

    2009-08-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to test an extended version of the Kendzierski, Furr, and Schiavoni (1998) Physical Activity Self-Definition Model. A revised model using data from 622 runners fit the data well. Cross-validation indices supported the revised model, and this model also provided a good fit to data from 397 cyclists. Partial invariance was found across activities. In both samples, perceived commitment and perceived ability had direct effects on self-definition, and perceived wanting, perceived trying, and enjoyment had indirect effects. The contribution of perceived ability to self-definition did not differ across activities. Implications concerning the original model, indirect effects, skill salience, and the role of context in self-definition are discussed.

  7. Feature selection based on fusing mutual information and cross-validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-wei; Liu, Chun-ping; Chen, Ning-qiang; Wang, Zhao-hui

    2009-10-01

    Many algorithms have been proposed in literature for feature selection; unfortunately, none of them ensures a perfect result. Here we propose an adaptive sequential floating forward feature selection algorithm which achieves accuracy results higher than that of already existing algorithms and naturally adaptive for implementation into the number of best feature subset to be selected. The basic idea of the proposed algorithm is to adopt two relatively well-settled algorithms for the problem at hand and combine mutual information and Cross-Validation through suitable fusion techniques, with the aim of taking advantage of the adopted algorithms' capabilities, at the same time, limiting their deficiencies. This method adaptively obtains the number of features to be selected according to dimensions of original feature set, and Dempster-Shafer Evidential Theory is used to fuse Max-Relevance, Min-Redundancy and CVFS. Extensive experiments show that the higher accuracy of classification and the less redundancy of features could be achieved.

  8. Cross Validation for Selection of Cortical Interaction Models From Scalp EEG or MEG

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Bing Leung Patrick; Nowak, Robert; Lee, Hyong Chol; van Drongelen, Wim; Van Veen, Barry D.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-validation (CV) method based on state-space framework is introduced for comparing the fidelity of different cortical interaction models to the measured scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) data being modeled. A state equation models the cortical interaction dynamics and an observation equation represents the scalp measurement of cortical activity and noise. The measured data are partitioned into training and test sets. The training set is used to estimate model parameters and the model quality is evaluated by computing test data innovations for the estimated model. Two CV metrics normalized mean square error and log-likelihood are estimated by averaging over different training/test partitions of the data. The effectiveness of this method of model selection is illustrated by comparing two linear modeling methods and two nonlinear modeling methods on simulated EEG data derived using both known dynamic systems and measured electrocorticography data from an epilepsy patient. PMID:22084038

  9. SU-E-T-231: Cross-Validation of 3D Gamma Comparison Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, KM; Jechel, C; Pinter, C; Lasso, A; Fichtinger, G; Salomons, G; Schreiner, LJ

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Moving the computational analysis for 3D gel dosimetry into the 3D Slicer (www.slicer.org) environment has made gel dosimetry more clinically accessible. To ensure accuracy, we cross-validate the 3D gamma comparison module in 3D Slicer with an independently developed algorithm using simulated and measured dose distributions. Methods: Two reference dose distributions were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. The first distribution consisted of a four-field box irradiation delivered to a plastic water phantom and the second, a VMAT plan delivered to a gel dosimeter phantom. The first reference distribution was modified within Eclipse to create an evaluated dose distribution by spatially shifting one field by 3mm, increasing the monitor units of the second field, applying a dynamic wedge for the third field, and leaving the fourth field unchanged. The VMAT plan was delivered to a gel dosimeter and the evaluated dose in the gel was calculated from optical CT measurements. Results from the gamma comparison tool built into the SlicerRT toolbox were compared to results from our in-house gamma algorithm implemented in Matlab (via MatlabBridge in 3D Slicer). The effects of noise, resolution and the exchange of reference and evaluated designations on the gamma comparison were also examined. Results: Perfect agreement was found between the gamma results obtained using the SlicerRT tool and our Matlab implementation for both the four-field box and gel datasets. The behaviour of the SlicerRT comparison with respect to changes in noise, resolution and the role of the reference and evaluated dose distributions was consistent with previous findings. Conclusion: Two independently developed gamma comparison tools have been cross-validated and found to be identical. As we transition our gel dosimetry analysis from Matlab to 3D Slicer, this validation serves as an important test towards ensuring the consistency of dose comparisons using the 3D Slicer

  10. Cross-validation of the 20- versus 30-s Wingate anaerobic test.

    PubMed

    Laurent, C Matthew; Meyers, Michael C; Robinson, Clay A; Green, J Matt

    2007-08-01

    The 30-s Wingate anaerobic test (30-WAT) is the most widely accepted protocol for measuring anaerobic response, despite documented physical side effects. Abbreviation of the 30-WAT without loss of data could enhance subject compliance while maintaining test applicability. The intent of this study was to quantify the validity of the 20-s Wingate anaerobic test (20-WAT) versus the traditional 30-WAT. Fifty males (mean +/- SEM; age = 20.5 +/- 0.3 years; Ht = 1.6 +/- 0.01 m; Wt = 75.5 +/- 2.6 kg) were randomly selected to either a validation (N = 35) or cross-validation group (N = 15) and completed a 20-WAT and 30-WAT in double blind, random order on separate days to determine peak power (PP; W kg(-1)), mean power (MP; W kg(-1)), and fatigue index (FI; %). Utilizing power outputs (relative to body mass) recorded during each second of both protocols, a non-linear regression equation (Y (20WAT+10 )= 31.4697 e(-0.5)[ln(X (second)/1174.3961)/2.6369(2)]; r (2) = 0.97; SEE = 0.56 W kg(-1)) successfully predicted (error approximately 10%) the final 10 s of power outputs in the cross-validation population. There were no significant differences between MP and FI between the 20-WAT that included the predicted 10 s of power outputs (20-WAT+10) and the 30-WAT. When derived data were subjected to Bland-Altman analyses, the majority of plots (93%) fell within the limits of agreement (+/-2SD). Therefore, when compared to the 30-WAT, the 20-WAT may be considered a valid alternative when used with the predictive non-linear regression equation to derive the final power output values.

  11. Testing alternative ground water models using cross-validation and other methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.W.; Hill, M.C.; Perona, P.; Burlando, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many methods can be used to test alternative ground water models. Of concern in this work are methods able to (1) rank alternative models (also called model discrimination) and (2) identify observations important to parameter estimates and predictions (equivalent to the purpose served by some types of sensitivity analysis). Some of the measures investigated are computationally efficient; others are computationally demanding. The latter are generally needed to account for model nonlinearity. The efficient model discrimination methods investigated include the information criteria: the corrected Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and generalized cross-validation. The efficient sensitivity analysis measures used are dimensionless scaled sensitivity (DSS), composite scaled sensitivity, and parameter correlation coefficient (PCC); the other statistics are DFBETAS, Cook's D, and observation-prediction statistic. Acronyms are explained in the introduction. Cross-validation (CV) is a computationally intensive nonlinear method that is used for both model discrimination and sensitivity analysis. The methods are tested using up to five alternative parsimoniously constructed models of the ground water system of the Maggia Valley in southern Switzerland. The alternative models differ in their representation of hydraulic conductivity. A new method for graphically representing CV and sensitivity analysis results for complex models is presented and used to evaluate the utility of the efficient statistics. The results indicate that for model selection, the information criteria produce similar results at much smaller computational cost than CV. For identifying important observations, the only obviously inferior linear measure is DSS; the poor performance was expected because DSS does not include the effects of parameter correlation and PCC reveals large parameter correlations. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  12. 8x8 and 10x10 Hyperspace Representations of SU(3) and 10-fold Point-Symmetry Group of Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Animalu, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    In order to further elucidate the unexpected 10-fold point-symmetry group structure of quasi-crystals for which the 2011 Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded to Daniel Shechtman, we explore a correspondence principle between the number of (projective) geometric elements (points[vertices] + lines[edges] + planes[faces]) of primitive cells of periodic or quasi-periodic arrangement of hard or deformable spheres in 3-dimensional space of crystallography and elements of quantum field theory of particle physics [points ( particles, lines ( particles, planes ( currents] and hence construct 8x8 =64 = 28+36 = 26 + 38, and 10x10 =100= 64 + 36 = 74 + 26 hyperspace representations of the SU(3) symmetry of elementary particle physics and quasicrystals of condensed matter (solid state) physics respectively, As a result, we predict the Cabibbo-like angles in leptonic decay of hadrons in elementary-particle physics and the observed 10-fold symmetric diffraction pattern of quasi-crystals.

  13. Cross-validation and hypothesis testing in neuroimaging: an irenic comment on the exchange between Friston and Lindquist et al

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Philip T.

    2016-01-01

    The “ten ironic rules for statistical reviewers” presented by Friston (2012) prompted a rebuttal by Lindquist et al. (2013), which was followed by a rejoinder by Friston (2013). A key issue left unresolved in this discussion is the use of cross-validation to test the significance of predictive analyses. This note discusses the role that cross-validation-based and related hypothesis tests have come to play in modern data analyses, in neuroimaging and other fields. It is shown that such tests need not be suboptimal and can fill otherwise-unmet inferential needs. PMID:25918034

  14. A leave-one-out cross-validation SAS macro for the identification of markers associated with survival.

    PubMed

    Rushing, Christel; Bulusu, Anuradha; Hurwitz, Herbert I; Nixon, Andrew B; Pang, Herbert

    2015-02-01

    A proper internal validation is necessary for the development of a reliable and reproducible prognostic model for external validation. Variable selection is an important step for building prognostic models. However, not many existing approaches couple the ability to specify the number of covariates in the model with a cross-validation algorithm. We describe a user-friendly SAS macro that implements a score selection method and a leave-one-out cross-validation approach. We discuss the method and applications behind this algorithm, as well as details of the SAS macro.

  15. Credible Intervals for Precision and Recall Based on a K-Fold Cross-Validated Beta Distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Jihong

    2016-08-01

    In typical machine learning applications such as information retrieval, precision and recall are two commonly used measures for assessing an algorithm's performance. Symmetrical confidence intervals based on K-fold cross-validated t distributions are widely used for the inference of precision and recall measures. As we confirmed through simulated experiments, however, these confidence intervals often exhibit lower degrees of confidence, which may easily lead to liberal inference results. Thus, it is crucial to construct faithful confidence (credible) intervals for precision and recall with a high degree of confidence and a short interval length. In this study, we propose two posterior credible intervals for precision and recall based on K-fold cross-validated beta distributions. The first credible interval for precision (or recall) is constructed based on the beta posterior distribution inferred by all K data sets corresponding to K confusion matrices from a K-fold cross-validation. Second, considering that each data set corresponding to a confusion matrix from a K-fold cross-validation can be used to infer a beta posterior distribution of precision (or recall), the second proposed credible interval for precision (or recall) is constructed based on the average of K beta posterior distributions. Experimental results on simulated and real data sets demonstrate that the first credible interval proposed in this study almost always resulted in degrees of confidence greater than 95%. With an acceptable degree of confidence, both of our two proposed credible intervals have shorter interval lengths than those based on a corrected K-fold cross-validated t distribution. Meanwhile, the average ranks of these two credible intervals are superior to that of the confidence interval based on a K-fold cross-validated t distribution for the degree of confidence and are superior to that of the confidence interval based on a corrected K-fold cross-validated t distribution for the

  16. Cross-validation and hypothesis testing in neuroimaging: An irenic comment on the exchange between Friston and Lindquist et al.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Philip T

    2015-08-01

    The "ten ironic rules for statistical reviewers" presented by Friston (2012) prompted a rebuttal by Lindquist et al. (2013), which was followed by a rejoinder by Friston (2013). A key issue left unresolved in this discussion is the use of cross-validation to test the significance of predictive analyses. This note discusses the role that cross-validation-based and related hypothesis tests have come to play in modern data analyses, in neuroimaging and other fields. It is shown that such tests need not be suboptimal and can fill otherwise-unmet inferential needs.

  17. A cross-validated cytoarchitectonic atlas of the human ventral visual stream.

    PubMed

    Rosenke, M; Weiner, K S; Barnett, M A; Zilles, K; Amunts, K; Goebel, R; Grill-Spector, K

    2017-02-14

    The human ventral visual stream consists of several areas considered processing stages essential for perception and recognition. A fundamental microanatomical feature differentiating areas is cytoarchitecture, which refers to the distribution, size, and density of cells across cortical layers. Because cytoarchitectonic structure is measured in 20-micron-thick histological slices of postmortem tissue, it is difficult to assess (a) how anatomically consistent these areas are across brains and (b) how they relate to brain parcellations obtained with prevalent neuroimaging methods, acquired at the millimeter and centimeter scale. Therefore, the goal of this study was to (a) generate a cross-validated cytoarchitectonic atlas of the human ventral visual stream on a whole brain template that is commonly used in neuroimaging studies and (b) to compare this atlas to a recently published retinotopic parcellation of visual cortex (Wang, 2014). To achieve this goal, we generated an atlas of eight cytoarchitectonic areas: four areas in the occipital lobe (hOc1-hOc4v) and four in the fusiform gyrus (FG1-FG4) and tested how alignment technique affects the accuracy of the atlas. Results show that both cortex-based alignment (CBA) and nonlinear volumetric alignment (NVA) generate an atlas with better cross-validation performance than affine volumetric alignment (AVA). Additionally, CBA outperformed NVA in 6/8 of the cytoarchitectonic areas. Finally, the comparison of the cytoarchitectonic atlas to a retinotopic atlas shows a clear correspondence between cytoarchitectonic and retinotopic areas in the ventral visual stream. The successful performance of CBA suggests a coupling between cytoarchitectonic areas and macroanatomical landmarks in the human ventral visual stream, and furthermore that this coupling can be utilized towards generating an accurate group atlas. In addition, the coupling between cytoarchitecture and retinotopy highlights the potential use of this atlas in

  18. A Cross-Validation of easyCBM[R] Mathematics Cut Scores in Oregon: 2009-2010. Technical Report #1104

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    In this technical report, we document the results of a cross-validation study designed to identify optimal cut-scores for the use of the easyCBM[R] mathematics test in Oregon. A large sample, randomly split into two groups of roughly equal size, was used for this study. Students' performance classification on the Oregon state test was used as the…

  19. How Nonrecidivism Affects Predictive Accuracy: Evidence from a Cross-Validation of the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, N. Zoe; Harris, Grant T.

    2009-01-01

    Prediction effect sizes such as ROC area are important for demonstrating a risk assessment's generalizability and utility. How a study defines recidivism might affect predictive accuracy. Nonrecidivism is problematic when predicting specialized violence (e.g., domestic violence). The present study cross-validates the ability of the Ontario…

  20. Population Validity and Cross-Validity: Applications of Distribution Theory for Testing Hypotheses, Setting Confidence Intervals, and Determining Sample Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algina, James; Keselman, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Applications of distribution theory for the squared multiple correlation coefficient and the squared cross-validation coefficient are reviewed, and computer programs for these applications are made available. The applications include confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and sample size selection. (Contains 2 tables.)

  1. Approximate l-fold cross-validation with Least Squares SVM and Kernel Ridge Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Richard E; Zhang, Hao; Parker, Lynne Edwards; New, Joshua Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Kernel methods have difficulties scaling to large modern data sets. The scalability issues are based on computational and memory requirements for working with a large matrix. These requirements have been addressed over the years by using low-rank kernel approximations or by improving the solvers scalability. However, Least Squares Support VectorMachines (LS-SVM), a popular SVM variant, and Kernel Ridge Regression still have several scalability issues. In particular, the O(n^3) computational complexity for solving a single model, and the overall computational complexity associated with tuning hyperparameters are still major problems. We address these problems by introducing an O(n log n) approximate l-fold cross-validation method that uses a multi-level circulant matrix to approximate the kernel. In addition, we prove our algorithm s computational complexity and present empirical runtimes on data sets with approximately 1 million data points. We also validate our approximate method s effectiveness at selecting hyperparameters on real world and standard benchmark data sets. Lastly, we provide experimental results on using a multi-level circulant kernel approximation to solve LS-SVM problems with hyperparameters selected using our method.

  2. Sound quality indicators for urban places in Paris cross-validated by Milan data.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Paola; Delaitre, Pauline; Lavandier, Catherine; Torchia, Francesca; Aumond, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    A specific smartphone application was developed to collect perceptive and acoustic data in Paris. About 3400 questionnaires were analyzed, regarding the global sound environment characterization, the perceived loudness of some emergent sources and the presence time ratio of sources that do not emerge from the background. Sound pressure level was recorded each second from the mobile phone's microphone during a 10-min period. The aim of this study is to propose indicators of urban sound quality based on linear regressions with perceptive variables. A cross validation of the quality models extracted from Paris data was carried out by conducting the same survey in Milan. The proposed sound quality general model is correlated with the real perceived sound quality (72%). Another model without visual amenity and familiarity is 58% correlated with perceived sound quality. In order to improve the sound quality indicator, a site classification was performed by Kohonen's Artificial Neural Network algorithm, and seven specific class models were developed. These specific models attribute more importance on source events and are slightly closer to the individual data than the global model. In general, the Parisian models underestimate the sound quality of Milan environments assessed by Italian people.

  3. Cross-validation of Waist-Worn GENEA Accelerometer Cut-Points

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Whitney A.; Bassett, David R.; Freedson, Patty S.; John, Dinesh; Steeves, Jeremy A.; Conger, Scott A.; Ceaser, Tyrone G.; Howe, Cheryl A.; Sasaki, Jeffer E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the classification accuracy of the waist GENEA cut-points developed by Esliger et al. for predicting intensity categories across a range of lifestyle activities. Methods Each participant performed one of two routines, consisting of seven lifestyle activities (home/office, ambulatory, and sport). The GENEA was worn on the right waist and oxygen uptake was continuously measured using the Oxycon mobile. A one-way chi-square was used to determine the classification accuracy of the GENEA cut-points. Cross tabulation tables provided information on under- and over-estimations, and sensitivity and specificity analyses of the waist cut-points were also performed. Results Spearman’s rank order correlation for the GENEA SVMgs and Oxycon mobile MET values was 0.73. For all activities combined, the GENEA accurately predicted intensity classification 55.3% of the time, and increased to 58.3% when stationary cycling was removed from the analysis. The sensitivity of the cut-points for the four intensity categories ranged from 0.244 to 0.958 and the specificity ranged from 0.576 to 0.943. Conclusion In this cross-validation study, the proposed GENEA cut-points had a low overall accuracy rate for classifying intensity (55.3%) when engaging in 14 different lifestyle activities. PMID:24496118

  4. Genomic predictions in Angus cattle: comparisons of sample size, response variables, and clustering methods for cross-validation.

    PubMed

    Boddhireddy, P; Kelly, M J; Northcutt, S; Prayaga, K C; Rumph, J; DeNise, S

    2014-02-01

    Advances in genomics, molecular biology, and statistical genetics have created a paradigm shift in the way livestock producers pursue genetic improvement in their herds. The nexus of these technologies has resulted in combining genotypic and phenotypic information to compute genomically enhanced measures of genetic merit of individual animals. However, large numbers of genotyped and phenotyped animals are required to produce robust estimates of the effects of SNP that are summed together to generate direct genomic breeding values (DGV). Data on 11,756 Angus animals genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 Beadchip were used to develop genomic predictions for 17 traits reported by the American Angus Association through Angus Genetics Inc. in their National Cattle Evaluation program. Marker effects were computed using a 5-fold cross-validation approach and a Bayesian model averaging algorithm. The accuracies were examined with EBV and deregressed EBV (DEBV) response variables and with K-means and identical by state (IBS)-based cross-validation methodologies. The cross-validation accuracies obtained using EBV response variables were consistently greater than those obtained using DEBV (average correlations were 0.64 vs. 0.57). The accuracies obtained using K-means cross-validation were consistently smaller than accuracies obtained with the IBS-based cross-validation approach (average correlations were 0.58 vs. 0.64 with EBV used as a response variable). Comparing the results from the current study with the results from a similar study consisting of only 2,253 records indicated that larger training population size resulted in higher accuracies in validation animals and explained on average 18% (69% improvement) additional genetic variance across all traits.

  5. Body fat measurement by bioelectrical impedance and air displacement plethysmography: a cross-validation study to design bioelectrical impedance equations in Mexican adults

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Nayeli; Alemán-Mateo, Heliodoro; Esparza-Romero, Julián; Valencia, Mauro E

    2007-01-01

    Background The study of body composition in specific populations by techniques such as bio-impedance analysis (BIA) requires validation based on standard reference methods. The aim of this study was to develop and cross-validate a predictive equation for bioelectrical impedance using air displacement plethysmography (ADP) as standard method to measure body composition in Mexican adult men and women. Methods This study included 155 male and female subjects from northern Mexico, 20–50 years of age, from low, middle, and upper income levels. Body composition was measured by ADP. Body weight (BW, kg) and height (Ht, cm) were obtained by standard anthropometric techniques. Resistance, R (ohms) and reactance, Xc (ohms) were also measured. A random-split method was used to obtain two samples: one was used to derive the equation by the "all possible regressions" procedure and was cross-validated in the other sample to test predicted versus measured values of fat-free mass (FFM). Results and Discussion The final model was: FFM (kg) = 0.7374 * (Ht2 /R) + 0.1763 * (BW) - 0.1773 * (Age) + 0.1198 * (Xc) - 2.4658. R2 was 0.97; the square root of the mean square error (SRMSE) was 1.99 kg, and the pure error (PE) was 2.96. There was no difference between FFM predicted by the new equation (48.57 ± 10.9 kg) and that measured by ADP (48.43 ± 11.3 kg). The new equation did not differ from the line of identity, had a high R2 and a low SRMSE, and showed no significant bias (0.87 ± 2.84 kg). Conclusion The new bioelectrical impedance equation based on the two-compartment model (2C) was accurate, precise, and free of bias. This equation can be used to assess body composition and nutritional status in populations similar in anthropometric and physical characteristics to this sample. PMID:17697388

  6. Cross Validation Through Two-dimensional Solution Surface for Cost-Sensitive SVM.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bin; Sheng, Victor; Tay, Keng; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2016-06-08

    Model selection plays an important role in cost-sensitive SVM (CS-SVM). It has been proven that the global minimum cross validation (CV) error can be efficiently computed based on the solution path for one parameter learning problems. However, it is a challenge to obtain the global minimum CV error for CS-SVM based on one-dimensional solution path and traditional grid search, because CS-SVM is with two regularization parameters. In this paper, we propose a solution and error surfaces based CV approach (CV-SES). More specifically, we first compute a two-dimensional solution surface for CS-SVM based on a bi-parameter space partition algorithm, which can fit solutions of CS-SVM for all values of both regularization parameters. Then, we compute a two-dimensional validation error surface for each CV fold, which can fit validation errors of CS-SVM for all values of both regularization parameters. Finally, we obtain the CV error surface by superposing K validation error surfaces, which can find the global minimum CV error of CS-SVM. Experiments are conducted on seven datasets for cost sensitive learning and on four datasets for imbalanced learning. Experimental results not only show that our proposed CV-SES has a better generalization ability than CS-SVM with various hybrids between grid search and solution path methods, and than recent proposed cost-sensitive hinge loss SVM with three-dimensional grid search, but also show that CV-SES uses less running time.

  7. The computation of generalized cross-validation functions through householder tridiagonalization with applications to the fitting of interaction spline models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Chong; Bates, Douglas M.; Chen, Zehua; Wahba, Grace

    1989-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for computing the generalized cross-validation function for the general cross-validated regularization/smoothing problem is provided. This algorithm is appropriate for problems where no natural structure is available, and the regularization/smoothing problem is solved (exactly) in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. It is particularly appropriate for certain multivariate smoothing problems with irregularly spaced data, and certain remote sensing problems, such as those that occur in meteorology, where the sensors are arranged irregularly. The algorithm is applied to the fitting of interaction spline models with irregularly spaced data and two smoothing parameters; favorable timing results are presented. The algorithm may be extended to the computation of certain generalized maximum likelihood (GML) functions. Application of the GML algorithm to a problem in numerical weather forecasting, and to a broad class of hypothesis testing problems, is noted.

  8. Predicting Chinese Children and Youth's Energy Expenditure Using ActiGraph Accelerometers: A Calibration and Cross-Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Zheng; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and cross-validate an equation based on ActiGraph accelerometer GT3X output to predict children and youth's energy expenditure (EE) of physical activity (PA). Method: Participants were 367 Chinese children and youth (179 boys and 188 girls, aged 9 to 17 years old) who wore 1 ActiGraph GT3X…

  9. Quantification of rainfall prediction uncertainties using a cross-validation based technique. Methodology description and experimental validation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Ignacio; Cea, Luis; Puertas, Jerónimo; Salsón, Santiago; Petazzi, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present a new methodology to compute rainfall fields including the quantification of predictions uncertainties using raingauge network data. The proposed methodology comprises two steps. Firstly, the ordinary krigging technique is used to determine the estimated rainfall depth in every point of the study area. Then multiple equi-probable errors fields, which comprise both interpolation and measuring uncertainties, are added to the krigged field resulting in multiple rainfall predictions. To compute these error fields first the standard deviation of the krigging estimation is determined following the cross-validation based procedure described in Delrieu et al. (2014). Then, the standard deviation field is sampled using non-conditioned Gaussian random fields. The proposed methodology was applied to study 7 rain events in a 60x60 km area of the west coast of Galicia, in the Northwest of Spain. Due to its location at the junction between tropical and polar regions, the study area suffers from frequent intense rainfalls characterized by a great variability in terms of both space and time. Rainfall data from the tipping bucket raingauge network operated by MeteoGalicia were used to estimate the rainfall fields using the proposed methodology. The obtained predictions were then validated using rainfall data from 3 additional rain gauges installed within the CAPRI project (Probabilistic flood prediction with high resolution hydrologic models from radar rainfall estimates, funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. Reference CGL2013-46245-R.). Results show that both the mean hyetographs and the peak intensities are correctly predicted. The computed hyetographs present a good fit to the experimental data and most of the measured values fall within the 95% confidence intervals. Also, most of the experimental values outside the confidence bounds correspond to time periods of low rainfall depths, where the inaccuracy of the measuring devices

  10. Classification of technical pitfalls in objective universal hearing screening by otoacoustic emissions, using an ARMA model of the stimulus waveform and bootstrap cross-validation.

    PubMed

    Vannier, E; Avan, P

    2005-10-01

    Transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) are widely used for objective hearing screening in neonates. Their main shortcoming is their sensitivity to adverse conditions for sound transmission through the middle-ear, to and from the cochlea. We study here whether a close examination of the stimulus waveform (SW) recorded in the ear canal in the course of a screening test can pinpoint the most frequent middle-ear dysfunctions, thus allowing screeners to avoid misclassifying the corresponding babies as deaf for lack of TEOAE. Three groups of SWs were defined in infants (6-36 months of age) according to middle-ear impairment as assessed by independent testing procedures, and analyzed in the frequency domain where their properties are more readily interpreted than in the time domain. Synthetic SW parameters were extracted with the help of an autoregressive and moving average (ARMA) model, then classified using a maximum likelihood criterion and a bootstrap cross-validation. The best classification performance was 79% with a lower limit (with 90% confidence) of 60%, showing the results' consistency. We therefore suggest that new parameters and methodology based upon a more thorough analysis of SWs can improve the efficiency of TEOAE-based tests by helping the most frequent technical pitfalls to be identified.

  11. Slips of Action and Sequential Decisions: A Cross-Validation Study of Tasks Assessing Habitual and Goal-Directed Action Control.

    PubMed

    Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; Dietrich, Anja; Deserno, Lorenz; de Wit, Sanne; Villringer, Arno; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Horstmann, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Instrumental learning and decision-making rely on two parallel systems: a goal-directed and a habitual system. In the past decade, several paradigms have been developed to study these systems in animals and humans by means of e.g., overtraining, devaluation procedures and sequential decision-making. These different paradigms are thought to measure the same constructs, but cross-validation has rarely been investigated. In this study we compared two widely used paradigms that assess aspects of goal-directed and habitual behavior. We correlated parameters from a two-step sequential decision-making task that assesses model-based (MB) and model-free (MF) learning with a slips-of-action paradigm that assesses the ability to suppress cue-triggered, learnt responses when the outcome has been devalued and is therefore no longer desirable. MB control during the two-step task showed a very moderately positive correlation with goal-directed devaluation sensitivity, whereas MF control did not show any associations. Interestingly, parameter estimates of MB and goal-directed behavior in the two tasks were positively correlated with higher-order cognitive measures (e.g., visual short-term memory). These cognitive measures seemed to (at least partly) mediate the association between MB control during sequential decision-making and goal-directed behavior after instructed devaluation. This study provides moderate support for a common framework to describe the propensity towards goal-directed behavior as measured with two frequently used tasks. However, we have to caution that the amount of shared variance between the goal-directed and MB system in both tasks was rather low, suggesting that each task does also pick up distinct aspects of goal-directed behavior. Further investigation of the commonalities and differences between the MF and habit systems as measured with these, and other, tasks is needed. Also, a follow-up cross-validation on the neural systems driving these constructs

  12. Slips of Action and Sequential Decisions: A Cross-Validation Study of Tasks Assessing Habitual and Goal-Directed Action Control

    PubMed Central

    Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; Dietrich, Anja; Deserno, Lorenz; de Wit, Sanne; Villringer, Arno; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Horstmann, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Instrumental learning and decision-making rely on two parallel systems: a goal-directed and a habitual system. In the past decade, several paradigms have been developed to study these systems in animals and humans by means of e.g., overtraining, devaluation procedures and sequential decision-making. These different paradigms are thought to measure the same constructs, but cross-validation has rarely been investigated. In this study we compared two widely used paradigms that assess aspects of goal-directed and habitual behavior. We correlated parameters from a two-step sequential decision-making task that assesses model-based (MB) and model-free (MF) learning with a slips-of-action paradigm that assesses the ability to suppress cue-triggered, learnt responses when the outcome has been devalued and is therefore no longer desirable. MB control during the two-step task showed a very moderately positive correlation with goal-directed devaluation sensitivity, whereas MF control did not show any associations. Interestingly, parameter estimates of MB and goal-directed behavior in the two tasks were positively correlated with higher-order cognitive measures (e.g., visual short-term memory). These cognitive measures seemed to (at least partly) mediate the association between MB control during sequential decision-making and goal-directed behavior after instructed devaluation. This study provides moderate support for a common framework to describe the propensity towards goal-directed behavior as measured with two frequently used tasks. However, we have to caution that the amount of shared variance between the goal-directed and MB system in both tasks was rather low, suggesting that each task does also pick up distinct aspects of goal-directed behavior. Further investigation of the commonalities and differences between the MF and habit systems as measured with these, and other, tasks is needed. Also, a follow-up cross-validation on the neural systems driving these constructs

  13. Bias of Exploratory and Cross-Validated DETECT Index under Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Patrick O.; Stump, Timothy E.; Finch, Holmes; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2007-01-01

    DETECT is a nonparametric "full" dimensionality assessment procedure that clusters dichotomously scored items into dimensions and provides a DETECT index of magnitude of multidimensionality. Four factors (test length, sample size, item response theory [IRT] model, and DETECT index) were manipulated in a Monte Carlo study of bias, standard error,…

  14. Boosted leave-many-out cross-validation: the effect of training and test set diversity on PLS statistics.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert D

    2003-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly common in quantitative structure/activity relationship (QSAR) analyses to use external test sets to evaluate the likely stability and predictivity of the models obtained. In some cases, such as those involving variable selection, an internal test set--i.e., a cross-validation set--is also used. Care is sometimes taken to ensure that the subsets used exhibit response and/or property distributions similar to those of the data set as a whole, but more often the individual observations are simply assigned 'at random.' In the special case of MLR without variable selection, it can be analytically demonstrated that this strategy is inferior to others. Most particularly, D-optimal design performs better if the form of the regression equation is known and the variables involved are well behaved. This report introduces an alternative, non-parametric approach termed 'boosted leave-many-out' (boosted LMO) cross-validation. In this method, relatively small training sets are chosen by applying optimizable k-dissimilarity selection (OptiSim) using a small subsample size (k = 4, in this case), with the unselected observations being reserved as a test set for the corresponding reduced model. Predictive errors for the full model are then estimated by aggregating results over several such analyses. The countervailing effects of training and test set size, diversity, and representativeness on PLS model statistics are described for CoMFA analysis of a large data set of COX2 inhibitors.

  15. Bayesian cross-validation for model evaluation and selection, with application to the North American Breeding Bird Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, William; Sauer, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of ecological data has changed in two important ways over the last 15 years. The development and easy availability of Bayesian computational methods has allowed and encouraged the fitting of complex hierarchical models. At the same time, there has been increasing emphasis on acknowledging and accounting for model uncertainty. Unfortunately, the ability to fit complex models has outstripped the development of tools for model selection and model evaluation: familiar model selection tools such as Akaike's information criterion and the deviance information criterion are widely known to be inadequate for hierarchical models. In addition, little attention has been paid to the evaluation of model adequacy in context of hierarchical modeling, i.e., to the evaluation of fit for a single model. In this paper, we describe Bayesian cross-validation, which provides tools for model selection and evaluation. We describe the Bayesian predictive information criterion and a Bayesian approximation to the BPIC known as the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion. We illustrate the use of these tools for model selection, and the use of Bayesian cross-validation as a tool for model evaluation, using three large data sets from the North American Breeding Bird Survey.

  16. Cross-validation of the reduced form of the Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait using confirmatory factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iani, Luca; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Lombardo, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait (FCQ-T) is commonly used to assess habitual food cravings among individuals. Previous studies have shown that a brief version of this instrument (FCQ-T-r) has good reliability and validity. This article is the first to use Confirmatory factor analysis to examine the psychometric properties of the FCQ-T-r in a cross-validation study. Method: Habitual food cravings, as well as emotion regulation strategies, affective states, and disordered eating behaviors, were investigated in two independent samples of non-clinical adult volunteers (Sample 1: N = 368; Sample 2: N = 246). Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to simultaneously test model fit statistics and dimensionality of the instrument. FCQ-T-r reliability was assessed by computing the composite reliability coefficient. Results: Analysis supported the unidimensional structure of the scale and fit indices were acceptable for both samples. The FCQ-T-r showed excellent reliability and moderate to high correlations with negative affect and disordered eating. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the FCQ-T-r scores can be reliably used to assess habitual cravings in an Italian non-clinical sample of adults. The robustness of these results is tested by a cross-validation of the model using two independent samples. Further research is required to expand on these findings, particularly in children and adolescents. PMID:25918510

  17. Bayesian cross-validation for model evaluation and selection, with application to the North American Breeding Bird Survey.

    PubMed

    Link, William A; Sauer, John R

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of ecological data has changed in two important ways over the last 15 years. The development and easy availability of Bayesian computational methods has allowed and encouraged the fitting of complex hierarchical models. At the same time, there has been increasing emphasis on acknowledging and accounting for model uncertainty. Unfortunately, the ability to fit complex models has outstripped the development of tools for model selection and model evaluation: familiar model selection tools such as Akaike's information criterion and the deviance information criterion are widely known to be inadequate for hierarchical models. In addition, little attention has been paid to the evaluation of model adequacy in context of hierarchical modeling, i.e., to the evaluation of fit for a single model. In this paper, we describe Bayesian cross-validation, which provides tools for model selection and evaluation. We describe the Bayesian predictive information criterion and a Bayesian approximation to the BPIC known as the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion. We illustrate the use of these tools for model selection, and the use of Bayesian cross-validation as a tool for model evaluation, using three large data sets from the North American Breeding Bird Survey.

  18. Revealing Latent Value of Clinically Acquired CTs of Traumatic Brain Injury Through Multi-Atlas Segmentation in a Retrospective Study of 1,003 with External Cross-Validation.

    PubMed

    Plassard, Andrew J; Kelly, Patrick D; Asman, Andrew J; Kang, Hakmook; Patel, Mayur B; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-20

    Medical imaging plays a key role in guiding treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and for diagnosing intracranial hemorrhage; most commonly rapid computed tomography (CT) imaging is performed. Outcomes for patients with TBI are variable and difficult to predict upon hospital admission. Quantitative outcome scales (e.g., the Marshall classification) have been proposed to grade TBI severity on CT, but such measures have had relatively low value in staging patients by prognosis. Herein, we examine a cohort of 1,003 subjects admitted for TBI and imaged clinically to identify potential prognostic metrics using a "big data" paradigm. For all patients, a brain scan was segmented with multi-atlas labeling, and intensity/volume/texture features were computed in a localized manner. In a 10-fold cross-validation approach, the explanatory value of the image-derived features is assessed for length of hospital stay (days), discharge disposition (five point scale from death to return home), and the Rancho Los Amigos functional outcome score (Rancho Score). Image-derived features increased the predictive R(2) to 0.38 (from 0.18) for length of stay, to 0.51 (from 0.4) for discharge disposition, and to 0.31 (from 0.16) for Rancho Score (over models consisting only of non-imaging admission metrics, but including positive/negative radiological CT findings). This study demonstrates that high volume retrospective analysis of clinical imaging data can reveal imaging signatures with prognostic value. These targets are suited for follow-up validation and represent targets for future feature selection efforts. Moreover, the increase in prognostic value would improve staging for intervention assessment and provide more reliable guidance for patients.

  19. Potential of cognitive plasticity as a diagnostic instrument: a cross-validation and extension.

    PubMed

    Baltes, M M; Kühl, K P; Gutzmann, H; Sowarka, D

    1995-06-01

    Examination of the range and limits of cognitive developmental reserve capacity (plasticity) by means of cognitive training has been proffered as a promising diagnostic strategy for the early identification of Alzheimer's disease. Previous findings of differential gains after cognitive training for healthy older persons and older persons at risk for dementia were supported, rendering cognitive plasticity a criterion by which the overlap in performance distributions between healthy older persons and older persons at risk can be reduced. Stepwise hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that posttraining scores, which represented developmental reserve capacity, explained significantly more variance in mental health status than pretest or baseline performance. Older persons at risk profited significantly less from training in 2 components of fluid intelligence, figural relations, and inductive reasoning. The authors discuss the possibilities of turning this testing-the-limits procedure into an instrument for screening purposes in clinical practice.

  20. Significant Association of Urinary Toxic Metals and Autism-Related Symptoms—A Nonlinear Statistical Analysis with Cross Validation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, James; Kruger, Uwe; Geis, Elizabeth; Gehn, Eva; Fimbres, Valeria; Pollard, Elena; Mitchell, Jessica; Ingram, Julie; Hellmers, Robert; Quig, David; Hahn, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A number of previous studies examined a possible association of toxic metals and autism, and over half of those studies suggest that toxic metal levels are different in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Additionally, several studies found that those levels correlate with the severity of ASD. Methods In order to further investigate these points, this paper performs the most detailed statistical analysis to date of a data set in this field. First morning urine samples were collected from 67 children and adults with ASD and 50 neurotypical controls of similar age and gender. The samples were analyzed to determine the levels of 10 urinary toxic metals (UTM). Autism-related symptoms were assessed with eleven behavioral measures. Statistical analysis was used to distinguish participants on the ASD spectrum and neurotypical participants based upon the UTM data alone. The analysis also included examining the association of autism severity with toxic metal excretion data using linear and nonlinear analysis. “Leave-one-out” cross-validation was used to ensure statistical independence of results. Results and Discussion Average excretion levels of several toxic metals (lead, tin, thallium, antimony) were significantly higher in the ASD group. However, ASD classification using univariate statistics proved difficult due to large variability, but nonlinear multivariate statistical analysis significantly improved ASD classification with Type I/II errors of 15% and 18%, respectively. These results clearly indicate that the urinary toxic metal excretion profiles of participants in the ASD group were significantly different from those of the neurotypical participants. Similarly, nonlinear methods determined a significantly stronger association between the behavioral measures and toxic metal excretion. The association was strongest for the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (including subscales on Irritability, Stereotypy, Hyperactivity, and Inappropriate

  1. Simulating California Reservoir Operation Using the Classification and Regression Tree Algorithm Combined with a Shuffled Cross-Validation Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    The controlled outflows from a reservoir or dam are highly dependent on the decisions made by the reservoir operators, instead of a natural hydrological process. Difference exists between the natural upstream inflows to reservoirs, and the controlled outflows from reservoirs that supply the downstream users. With the decision maker's awareness of changing climate, reservoir management requires adaptable means to incorporate more information into decision making, such as the consideration of policy and regulation, environmental constraints, dry/wet conditions, etc. In this paper, a reservoir outflow simulation model is presented, which incorporates one of the well-developed data-mining models (Classification and Regression Tree) to predict the complicated human-controlled reservoir outflows and extract the reservoir operation patterns. A shuffled cross-validation approach is further implemented to improve model's predictive performance. An application study of 9 major reservoirs in California is carried out and the simulated results from different decision tree approaches are compared with observation, including original CART and Random Forest. The statistical measurements show that CART combined with the shuffled cross-validation scheme gives a better predictive performance over the other two methods, especially in simulating the peak flows. The results for simulated controlled outflow, storage changes and storage trajectories also show that the proposed model is able to consistently and reasonably predict the human's reservoir operation decisions. In addition, we found that the operation in the Trinity Lake, Oroville Lake and Shasta Lake are greatly influenced by policy and regulation, while low elevation reservoirs are more sensitive to inflow amount than others.

  2. An intercomparison of a large ensemble of statistical downscaling methods for Europe: Overall results from the VALUE perfect predictor cross-validation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Jose Manuel; Maraun, Douglas; Widmann, Martin; Huth, Radan; Hertig, Elke; Benestad, Rasmus; Roessler, Ole; Wibig, Joanna; Wilcke, Renate; Kotlarski, Sven

    2016-04-01

    VALUE is an open European network to validate and compare downscaling methods for climate change research (http://www.value-cost.eu). A key deliverable of VALUE is the development of a systematic validation framework to enable the assessment and comparison of both dynamical and statistical downscaling methods. This framework is based on a user-focused validation tree, guiding the selection of relevant validation indices and performance measures for different aspects of the validation (marginal, temporal, spatial, multi-variable). Moreover, several experiments have been designed to isolate specific points in the downscaling procedure where problems may occur (assessment of intrinsic performance, effect of errors inherited from the global models, effect of non-stationarity, etc.). The list of downscaling experiments includes 1) cross-validation with perfect predictors, 2) GCM predictors -aligned with EURO-CORDEX experiment- and 3) pseudo reality predictors (see Maraun et al. 2015, Earth's Future, 3, doi:10.1002/2014EF000259, for more details). The results of these experiments are gathered, validated and publicly distributed through the VALUE validation portal, allowing for a comprehensive community-open downscaling intercomparison study. In this contribution we describe the overall results from Experiment 1), consisting of a European wide 5-fold cross-validation (with consecutive 6-year periods from 1979 to 2008) using predictors from ERA-Interim to downscale precipitation and temperatures (minimum and maximum) over a set of 86 ECA&D stations representative of the main geographical and climatic regions in Europe. As a result of the open call for contribution to this experiment (closed in Dec. 2015), over 40 methods representative of the main approaches (MOS and Perfect Prognosis, PP) and techniques (linear scaling, quantile mapping, analogs, weather typing, linear and generalized regression, weather generators, etc.) were submitted, including information both data

  3. Assessing genomic prediction accuracy for Holstein sires using bootstrap aggregation sampling and leave-one-out cross validation.

    PubMed

    Mikshowsky, Ashley A; Gianola, Daniel; Weigel, Kent A

    2017-01-01

    Since the introduction of genome-enabled prediction for dairy cattle in 2009, genomic selection has markedly changed many aspects of the dairy genetics industry and enhanced the rate of response to selection for most economically important traits. Young dairy bulls are genotyped to obtain their genomic predicted transmitting ability (GPTA) and reliability (REL) values. These GPTA are a main factor in most purchasing, marketing, and culling decisions until bulls reach 5 yr of age and their milk-recorded offspring become available. At that time, daughter yield deviations (DYD) can be compared with the GPTA computed several years earlier. For most bulls, the DYD align well with the initial predictions. However, for some bulls, the difference between DYD and corresponding GPTA is quite large, and published REL are of limited value in identifying such bulls. A method of bootstrap aggregation sampling (bagging) using genomic BLUP (GBLUP) was applied to predict the GPTA of 2,963, 2,963, and 2,803 young Holstein bulls for protein yield, somatic cell score, and daughter pregnancy rate (DPR), respectively. For each trait, 50 bootstrap samples from a reference population comprising 2011 DYD of 8,610, 8,405, and 7,945 older Holstein bulls were used. Leave-one-out cross validation was also performed to assess prediction accuracy when removing specific bulls from the reference population. The main objectives of this study were (1) to assess the extent to which current REL values and alternative measures of variability, such as the bootstrap standard deviation (SD) of predictions, could detect bulls whose daughter performance deviates significantly from early genomic predictions, and (2) to identify factors associated with the reference population that inform about inaccurate genomic predictions. The SD of bootstrap predictions was a mildly useful metric for identifying bulls whose future daughter performance may deviate significantly from early GPTA for protein and DPR. Leave

  4. Cross-validation of generalised body composition equations with diverse young men and women: the Training Intervention and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Generalised skinfold equations developed in the 1970s are commonly used to estimate laboratory-measured percentage fat (BF%). The equations were developed on predominately white individuals using Siri's two-component percentage fat equation (BF%-GEN). We cross-validated the Jackson-Pollock (JP) gene...

  5. Cross-Validation of a Recently Published Equation Predicting Energy Expenditure to Run or Walk a Mile in Normal-Weight and Overweight Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Cody E.; Owens, Scott G.; Waddell, Dwight E.; Bass, Martha A.; Bentley, John P.; Loftin, Mark

    2014-01-01

    An equation published by Loftin, Waddell, Robinson, and Owens (2010) was cross-validated using ten normal-weight walkers, ten overweight walkers, and ten distance runners. Energy expenditure was measured at preferred walking (normal-weight walker and overweight walkers) or running pace (distance runners) for 5 min and corrected to a mile. Energy…

  6. Applicability of Monte Carlo cross validation technique for model development and validation using generalised least squares regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Khaled; Rahman, Ataur; A Zaman, Mohammad; Shrestha, Surendra

    2013-03-01

    SummaryIn regional hydrologic regression analysis, model selection and validation are regarded as important steps. Here, the model selection is usually based on some measurements of goodness-of-fit between the model prediction and observed data. In Regional Flood Frequency Analysis (RFFA), leave-one-out (LOO) validation or a fixed percentage leave out validation (e.g., 10%) is commonly adopted to assess the predictive ability of regression-based prediction equations. This paper develops a Monte Carlo Cross Validation (MCCV) technique (which has widely been adopted in Chemometrics and Econometrics) in RFFA using Generalised Least Squares Regression (GLSR) and compares it with the most commonly adopted LOO validation approach. The study uses simulated and regional flood data from the state of New South Wales in Australia. It is found that when developing hydrologic regression models, application of the MCCV is likely to result in a more parsimonious model than the LOO. It has also been found that the MCCV can provide a more realistic estimate of a model's predictive ability when compared with the LOO.

  7. Cross-validation and discriminant validity of Adolescent Health Promotion Scale among overweight and nonoverweight adolescents in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Yen; Wang, Edward K; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2006-01-01

    This study used cross-validation and discriminant analysis to evaluate the construct and discriminant validity of Adolescent Health Promotion (AHP) scale between the overweight and nonoverweight adolescents in Taiwan. A cross-sectional survey method was used and 660 adolescents participated in this study. Cluster and discriminant analyses were used to analyze the data. Our findings indicate that the AHP is a valid and reliable scale to discriminate between the health-promoting behaviors of overweight and nonoverweight adolescents. For the total scale, cluster analyses revealed two distinct patterns, which we designated the healthy and unhealthy groups. Discriminate analysis supported this clustering as having good discriminant validity, as nonoverweight adolescents tended to be classified as healthy, while the overweight tended to be in the unhealthy group. In general, overweight adolescents practiced health-related behaviors at a significantly lower frequency than the nonoverweight. These included exercise behavior, stress management, life appreciation, health responsibility, and social support. These findings can be used to further develop and refine knowledge of adolescent overweight and related strategies for intervention.

  8. Simulating California reservoir operation using the classification and regression-tree algorithm combined with a shuffled cross-validation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tiantian; Gao, Xiaogang; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Li, Xin

    2016-03-01

    The controlled outflows from a reservoir or dam are highly dependent on the decisions made by the reservoir operators, instead of a natural hydrological process. Difference exists between the natural upstream inflows to reservoirs and the controlled outflows from reservoirs that supply the downstream users. With the decision maker's awareness of changing climate, reservoir management requires adaptable means to incorporate more information into decision making, such as water delivery requirement, environmental constraints, dry/wet conditions, etc. In this paper, a robust reservoir outflow simulation model is presented, which incorporates one of the well-developed data-mining models (Classification and Regression Tree) to predict the complicated human-controlled reservoir outflows and extract the reservoir operation patterns. A shuffled cross-validation approach is further implemented to improve CART's predictive performance. An application study of nine major reservoirs in California is carried out. Results produced by the enhanced CART, original CART, and random forest are compared with observation. The statistical measurements show that the enhanced CART and random forest overperform the CART control run in general, and the enhanced CART algorithm gives a better predictive performance over random forest in simulating the peak flows. The results also show that the proposed model is able to consistently and reasonably predict the expert release decisions. Experiments indicate that the release operation in the Oroville Lake is significantly dominated by SWP allocation amount and reservoirs with low elevation are more sensitive to inflow amount than others.

  9. An Efficient Leave-One-Out Cross-Validation-Based Extreme Learning Machine (ELOO-ELM) With Minimal User Intervention.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Er, Meng Joo; Wang, Ning

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the architecture of the extreme learning machine (ELM) significantly affects its performance and how to determine a suitable set of hidden neurons is recognized as a key issue to some extent. The leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) is usually used to select a model with good generalization performance among potential candidates. The primary reason for using the LOO-CV is that it is unbiased and reliable as long as similar distribution exists in the training and testing data. However, the LOO-CV has rarely been implemented in practice because of its notorious slow execution speed. In this paper, an efficient LOO-CV formula and an efficient LOO-CV-based ELM (ELOO-ELM) algorithm are proposed. The proposed ELOO-ELM algorithm can achieve fast learning speed similar to the original ELM without compromising the reliability feature of the LOO-CV. Furthermore, minimal user intervention is required for the ELOO-ELM, thus it can be easily adopted by nonexperts and implemented in automation processes. Experimentation studies on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed ELOO-ELM algorithm can achieve good generalization with limited user intervention while retaining the efficiency feature.

  10. Comparison, cross-validation and consolidation of the results from two different geodynamic projects working in the eastern Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosious, B.; Dinter, G.; van der Hoeven, A.; Mocanu, V.; Nutto, M.; Schmitt, G.; Spakman, W.

    2003-04-01

    Since 1995 several projects/programmes are working in the Vrancea-region in Romania with partly different intensions. First of all, the CERGOP project installed the CEGRN-network and performed GPS-measurements ('95,'96,'97,'99,'01), mainly to realise a geodetic reference frame for local geodynamic projects. In the framework of the Collaborative Research Center CRC461 "Strong Earthquakes" the Geodetic Institute of the University Karlsruhe (GIK) Densified the network up to 35 stations and carried out three GPS-campaigns ('97, '98 and '00). First results of this project were presented at the EGS-meeting 2001 in Nice. In 2002 a new geodynamic research project was initiated at the Delft Institute of Earth-Oriented Space Research (DEOS). In the context of this project, 4 permanent stations and 10 new campaign stations were installed, which leads to a common network of about 50 stations. In tight cooperation with the GIK and the University of Bucarest (Departement of Geophysics) the currently last GPS-campaign was successfully carried out in 2002. Now the great challenge and at the same time the great difficulty is a correct combination of all available GPS datasets particularly in consideration of station excentricities and variations of antenna- and receiver-types. Different evalutation strategies and software packages (Bernese-GPS-Software, GIPSY) were used to analyse the GPS data and to estimate the station velocities. Main focus of this joint-presentation is the comparison of the results from the German and Dutch geodynamic projects. The results of the two working groups are cross-validated and finally joined together in a most reasonable solution. Even if three-dimensional analysis is in work, the presentation is limited to the horizontal component.

  11. Prediction of maize single cross hybrids using the total effects of associated markers approach assessed by cross-validation and regional trials.

    PubMed

    Melo, Wagner Mateus Costa; Pinho, Renzo Garcia Von; Balestre, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to predict the performance of maize hybrids and assess whether the total effects of associated markers (TEAM) method can correctly predict hybrids using cross-validation and regional trials. The training was performed in 7 locations of Southern Brazil during the 2010/11 harvest. The regional assays were conducted in 6 different South Brazilian locations during the 2011/12 harvest. In the training trial, 51 lines from different backgrounds were used to create 58 single cross hybrids. Seventy-nine microsatellite markers were used to genotype these 51 lines. In the cross-validation method the predictive accuracy ranged from 0.10 to 0.96, depending on the sample size. Furthermore, the accuracy was 0.30 when the values of hybrids that were not used in the training population (119) were predicted for the regional assays. Regarding selective loss, the TEAM method correctly predicted 50% of the hybrids selected in the regional assays. There was also loss in only 33% of cases; that is, only 33% of the materials predicted to be good in training trial were considered to be bad in regional assays. Our results show that the predictive validation of different crop conditions is possible, and the cross-validation results strikingly represented the field performance.

  12. Anticipating Mathematics Performance: A Cross-Validation Comparison of AID3 and Regression. AIR 1988 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Allan M.; And Others

    In response to the increasing importance of student performance in required classes, research was conducted to compare two prediction procedures, linear modeling using multiple regression and nonlinear modeling using AID3. Performance in the first college math course (College Mathematics, Calculus, or Business Calculus Matrices) was the dependent…

  13. Carboxylation of cytosine (5caC) in the CG dinucleotide in the E-box motif (CGCAG|GTG) increases binding of the Tcf3|Ascl1 helix-loop-helix heterodimer 10-fold.

    PubMed

    Golla, Jaya Prakash; Zhao, Jianfei; Mann, Ishminder K; Sayeed, Syed K; Mandal, Ajeet; Rose, Robert B; Vinson, Charles

    2014-06-27

    Three oxidative products of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) occur in mammalian genomes. We evaluated if these cytosine modifications in a CG dinucleotide altered DNA binding of four B-HLH homodimers and three heterodimers to the E-Box motif CGCAG|GTG. We examined 25 DNA probes containing all combinations of cytosine in a CG dinucleotide and none changed binding except for carboxylation of cytosine (5caC) in the strand CGCAG|GTG. 5caC enhanced binding of all examined B-HLH homodimers and heterodimers, particularly the Tcf3|Ascl1 heterodimer which increased binding ~10-fold. These results highlight a potential function of the oxidative products of 5mC, changing the DNA binding of sequence-specific transcription factors.

  14. Global mapping of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 and H5Nx clade 2.3.4.4 viruses with spatial cross-validation

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Madhur S; Artois, Jean; Robinson, Timothy P; Linard, Catherine; Chaiban, Celia; Xenarios, Ioannis; Engler, Robin; Liechti, Robin; Kuznetsov, Dmitri; Xiao, Xiangming; Dobschuetz, Sophie Von; Claes, Filip; Newman, Scott H; Dauphin, Gwenaëlle; Gilbert, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Global disease suitability models are essential tools to inform surveillance systems and enable early detection. We present the first global suitability model of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and demonstrate that reliable predictions can be obtained at global scale. Best predictions are obtained using spatial predictor variables describing host distributions, rather than land use or eco-climatic spatial predictor variables, with a strong association with domestic duck and extensively raised chicken densities. Our results also support a more systematic use of spatial cross-validation in large-scale disease suitability modelling compared to standard random cross-validation that can lead to unreliable measure of extrapolation accuracy. A global suitability model of the H5 clade 2.3.4.4 viruses, a group of viruses that recently spread extensively in Asia and the US, shows in comparison a lower spatial extrapolation capacity than the HPAI H5N1 models, with a stronger association with intensively raised chicken densities and anthropogenic factors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19571.001 PMID:27885988

  15. Derivation and Cross-Validation of Cutoff Scores for Patients With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders on WAIS-IV Digit Span-Based Performance Validity Measures.

    PubMed

    Glassmire, David M; Toofanian Ross, Parnian; Kinney, Dominique I; Nitch, Stephen R

    2016-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to identify and cross-validate cutoff scores on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition Digit Span-based embedded performance validity (PV) measures for individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In Study 1, normative scores were identified on Digit Span-embedded PV measures among a sample of patients (n = 84) with schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses who had no known incentive to perform poorly and who put forth valid effort on external PV tests. Previously identified cutoff scores resulted in unacceptable false positive rates and lower cutoff scores were adopted to maintain specificity levels ≥90%. In Study 2, the revised cutoff scores were cross-validated within a sample of schizophrenia spectrum patients (n = 96) committed as incompetent to stand trial. Performance on Digit Span PV measures was significantly related to Full Scale IQ in both studies, indicating the need to consider the intellectual functioning of examinees with psychotic spectrum disorders when interpreting scores on Digit Span PV measures.

  16. A self-adaptive genetic algorithm-artificial neural network algorithm with leave-one-out cross validation for descriptor selection in QSAR study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingheng; Mei, Juan; Wen, Sixiang; Liao, Siyan; Chen, Jincan; Shen, Yong

    2010-07-30

    Based on the quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) models developed by artificial neural networks (ANNs), genetic algorithm (GA) was used in the variable-selection approach with molecule descriptors and helped to improve the back-propagation training algorithm as well. The cross validation techniques of leave-one-out investigated the validity of the generated ANN model and preferable variable combinations derived in the GAs. A self-adaptive GA-ANN model was successfully established by using a new estimate function for avoiding over-fitting phenomenon in ANN training. Compared with the variables selected in two recent QSAR studies that were based on stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) models, the variables selected in self-adaptive GA-ANN model are superior in constructing ANN model, as they revealed a higher cross validation (CV) coefficient (Q(2)) and a lower root mean square deviation both in the established model and biological activity prediction. The introduced methods for validation, including leave-multiple-out, Y-randomization, and external validation, proved the superiority of the established GA-ANN models over MLR models in both stability and predictive power. Self-adaptive GA-ANN showed us a prospect of improving QSAR model.

  17. Electrochemical Performance and Stability of the Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. I. Cross Validation of Polarization Measurements by Impedance Spectroscopy and Current-Potential Sweep

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiao Dong; Pederson, Larry R.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-09

    The aim of this paper is to address three issues in solid oxide fuel cells: (1) cross-validation of the polarization of a single cell measured using both dc and ac approaches, (2) the precise determination of the total areal specific resistance (ASR), and (3) understanding cathode polarization with LSCF cathodes. The ASR of a solid oxide fuel cell is a dynamic property, meaning that it changes with current density. The ASR measured using ac impedance spectroscopy (low frequency interception with real Z´ axis of ac impedance spectrum) matches with that measured from a dc IV sweep (the tangent of dc i-V curve). Due to the dynamic nature of ASR, we found that an ac impedance spectrum measured under open circuit voltage or on a half cell may not represent cathode performance under real operating conditions, particularly at high current density. In this work, the electrode polarization was governed by the cathode activation polarization; the anode contribution was negligible.

  18. SILAC-Pulse Proteolysis: A Mass Spectrometry-Based Method for Discovery and Cross-Validation in Proteome-Wide Studies of Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Jagat; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-12-01

    Reported here is the use of stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and pulse proteolysis (PP) for detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions on the proteomic scale. The incorporation of SILAC into PP enables the PP technique to be used for the unbiased detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions in complex biological mixtures (e.g., cell lysates) without the need for prefractionation. The SILAC-PP technique is demonstrated in two proof-of-principle experiments using proteins in a yeast cell lysate and two test ligands including a well-characterized drug, cyclosporine A (CsA), and a non-hydrolyzable adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue, adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). The well-known tight-binding interaction between CsA and cyclophilin A was successfully detected and quantified in replicate analyses, and a total of 33 proteins from a yeast cell lysate were found to have AMP-PNP-induced stability changes. In control experiments, the method's false positive rate of protein target discovery was found to be in the range of 2.1% to 3.6%. SILAC-PP and the previously reported stability of protein from rates of oxidation (SPROX) technique both report on the same thermodynamic properties of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. However, they employ different probes and mass spectrometry-based readouts. This creates the opportunity to cross-validate SPROX results with SILAC-PP results, and vice-versa. As part of this work, the SILAC-PP results obtained here were cross-validated with previously reported SPROX results on the same model systems to help differentiate true positives from false positives in the two experiments.

  19. Remote sensing and GIS-based landslide hazard analysis and cross-validation using multivariate logistic regression model on three test areas in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the cross-validation of a multivariate logistic regression model using remote sensing data and GIS for landslide hazard analysis on the Penang, Cameron, and Selangor areas in Malaysia. Landslide locations in the study areas were identified by interpreting aerial photographs and satellite images, supported by field surveys. SPOT 5 and Landsat TM satellite imagery were used to map landcover and vegetation index, respectively. Maps of topography, soil type, lineaments and land cover were constructed from the spatial datasets. Ten factors which influence landslide occurrence, i.e., slope, aspect, curvature, distance from drainage, lithology, distance from lineaments, soil type, landcover, rainfall precipitation, and normalized difference vegetation index (ndvi), were extracted from the spatial database and the logistic regression coefficient of each factor was computed. Then the landslide hazard was analysed using the multivariate logistic regression coefficients derived not only from the data for the respective area but also using the logistic regression coefficients calculated from each of the other two areas (nine hazard maps in all) as a cross-validation of the model. For verification of the model, the results of the analyses were then compared with the field-verified landslide locations. Among the three cases of the application of logistic regression coefficient in the same study area, the case of Selangor based on the Selangor logistic regression coefficients showed the highest accuracy (94%), where as Penang based on the Penang coefficients showed the lowest accuracy (86%). Similarly, among the six cases from the cross application of logistic regression coefficient in other two areas, the case of Selangor based on logistic coefficient of Cameron showed highest (90%) prediction accuracy where as the case of Penang based on the Selangor logistic regression coefficients showed the lowest accuracy (79%). Qualitatively, the cross

  20. Calibration and Cross-Validation of the ActiGraph wGT3X+ Accelerometer for the Estimation of Physical Activity Intensity in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    McGarty, Arlene M.; Penpraze, Victoria; Melville, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Valid objective measurement is integral to increasing our understanding of physical activity and sedentary behaviours. However, no population-specific cut points have been calibrated for children with intellectual disabilities. Therefore, this study aimed to calibrate and cross-validate the first population-specific accelerometer intensity cut points for children with intellectual disabilities. Methods Fifty children with intellectual disabilities were randomly assigned to the calibration (n = 36; boys = 28, 9.53±1.08yrs) or cross-validation (n = 14; boys = 9, 9.57±1.16yrs) group. Participants completed a semi-structured school-based activity session, which included various activities ranging from sedentary to vigorous intensity. Direct observation (SOFIT tool) was used to calibrate the ActiGraph wGT3X+, which participants wore on the right hip. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses determined the optimal cut points for sedentary, moderate, and vigorous intensity activity for the vertical axis and vector magnitude. Classification agreement was investigated using sensitivity, specificity, total agreement, and Cohen’s kappa scores against the criterion measure of SOFIT. Results The optimal (AUC = .87−.94) vertical axis cut points (cpm) were ≤507 (sedentary), 1008−2300 (moderate), and ≥2301 (vigorous), which demonstrated high sensitivity (81−88%) and specificity (81−85%). The optimal (AUC = .86−.92) vector magnitude cut points (cpm) of ≤1863 (sedentary), 2610−4214 (moderate), and ≥4215 (vigorous) demonstrated comparable, albeit marginally lower, accuracy than the vertical axis cut points (sensitivity = 80−86%; specificity = 77−82%). Classification agreement ranged from moderate to almost perfect (κ = .51−.85) with high sensitivity and specificity, and confirmed the trend that accuracy increased with intensity, and vertical axis cut points provide higher classification agreement than vector magnitude cut points

  1. The joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure: development and cross-validation of a six-factor model of cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, David S; Price, Larry R

    2003-06-01

    During the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (3rd ed.; WMS-III) the participants in the normative study completed both scales. This "co-norming" methodology set the stage for full integration of the 2 tests and the development of an expanded structure of cognitive functioning. Until now, however, the WAIS-III and WMS-III had not been examined together in a factor analytic study. This article presents a series of confirmatory factor analyses to determine the joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure. Using a structural equation modeling approach, a 6-factor model that included verbal, perceptual, processing speed, working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory constructs provided the best model fit to the data. Allowing select subtests to load simultaneously on 2 factors improved model fit and indicated that some subtests are multifaceted. The results were then replicated in a large cross-validation sample (N = 858).

  2. PLS/OPLS models in metabolomics: the impact of permutation of dataset rows on the K-fold cross-validation quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Triba, Mohamed N; Le Moyec, Laurence; Amathieu, Roland; Goossens, Corentine; Bouchemal, Nadia; Nahon, Pierre; Rutledge, Douglas N; Savarin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among all the software packages available for discriminant analyses based on projection to latent structures (PLS-DA) or orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS-DA), SIMCA (Umetrics, Umeå Sweden) is the more widely used in the metabolomics field. SIMCA proposes many parameters or tests to assess the quality of the computed model (the number of significant components, R2, Q2, pCV-ANOVA, and the permutation test). Significance thresholds for these parameters are strongly application-dependent. Concerning the Q2 parameter, a significance threshold of 0.5 is generally admitted. However, during the last few years, many PLS-DA/OPLS-DA models built using SIMCA have been published with Q2 values lower than 0.5. The purpose of this opinion note is to point out that, in some circumstances frequently encountered in metabolomics, the values of these parameters strongly depend on the individuals that constitute the validation subsets. As a result of the way in which the software selects members of the calibration and validation subsets, a simple permutation of dataset rows can, in several cases, lead to contradictory conclusions about the significance of the models when a K-fold cross-validation is used. We believe that, when Q2 values lower than 0.5 are obtained, SIMCA users should at least verify that the quality parameters are stable towards permutation of the rows in their dataset.

  3. Partial cross-validation of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) General Memory-Attention/Concentration Malingering Index in a nonlitigating sample.

    PubMed

    Hilsabeck, Robin C; Thompson, Matthew D; Irby, James W; Adams, Russell L; Scott, James G; Gouvier, Wm Drew

    2003-01-01

    The Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) malingering indices proposed by Mittenberg, Azrin, Millsaps, and Heilbronner [Psychol Assess 5 (1993) 34.] were partially cross-validated in a sample of 200 nonlitigants. Nine diagnostic categories were examined, including participants with traumatic brain injury (TBI), brain tumor, stroke/vascular, senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT), epilepsy, depression/anxiety, medical problems, and no diagnosis. Results showed that the discriminant function using WMS-R subtests misclassified only 6.5% of the sample as malingering, with significantly higher misclassification rates of SDAT and stroke/vascular groups. The General Memory Index-Attention/Concentration Index (GMI-ACI) difference score misclassified only 8.5% of the sample as malingering when a difference score of greater than 25 points was used as the cutoff criterion. No diagnostic group was significantly more likely to be misclassified. Results support the utility of the GMI-ACI difference score, as well as the WMS-R subtest discriminant function score, in detecting malingering.

  4. Estimation of influential points in any data set from coefficient of determination and its leave-one-out cross-validated counterpart.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gergely; Bodai, Zsolt; Héberger, Károly

    2013-10-01

    Coefficient of determination (R (2)) and its leave-one-out cross-validated analogue (denoted by Q (2) or R cv (2) ) are the most frequantly published values to characterize the predictive performance of models. In this article we use R (2) and Q (2) in a reversed aspect to determine uncommon points, i.e. influential points in any data sets. The term (1 - Q (2))/(1 - R (2)) corresponds to the ratio of predictive residual sum of squares and the residual sum of squares. The ratio correlates to the number of influential points in experimental and random data sets. We propose an (approximate) F test on (1 - Q (2))/(1 - R (2)) term to quickly pre-estimate the presence of influential points in training sets of models. The test is founded upon the routinely calculated Q (2) and R (2) values and warns the model builders to verify the training set, to perform influence analysis or even to change to robust modeling.

  5. Shuffling cross-validation-bee algorithm as a new descriptor selection method for retention studies of pesticides in biopartitioning micellar chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Kobra; Atabati, Morteza; Ahmadi, Monire

    2017-02-22

    Bee algorithm (BA) is an optimization algorithm inspired by the natural foraging behaviour of honey bees to find the optimal solution which can be proposed to feature selection. In this paper, shuffling cross-validation-BA (CV-BA) was applied to select the best descriptors that could describe the retention factor (log k) in the biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) of 79 heterogeneous pesticides. Six descriptors were obtained using BA and then the selected descriptors were applied for model development using multiple linear regression (MLR). The descriptor selection was also performed using stepwise, genetic algorithm and simulated annealing methods and MLR was applied to model development and then the results were compared with those obtained from shuffling CV-BA. The results showed that shuffling CV-BA can be applied as a powerful descriptor selection method. Support vector machine (SVM) was also applied for model development using six selected descriptors by BA. The obtained statistical results using SVM were better than those obtained using MLR, as the root mean square error (RMSE) and correlation coefficient (R) for whole data set (training and test), using shuffling CV-BA-MLR, were obtained as 0.1863 and 0.9426, respectively, while these amounts for the shuffling CV-BA-SVM method were obtained as 0.0704 and 0.9922, respectively.

  6. Adaptive smoothing of high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging data by generalized cross-validation improves Q-ball orientation distribution function reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Metwalli, Nader S; Hu, Xiaoping P; Carew, John D

    2010-09-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is a high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) technique for reconstructing the orientation distribution function (ODF). Some form of smoothing or regularization is typically required in the ODF reconstruction from low signal-to-noise ratio HARDI data. The amount of smoothing or regularization is usually set a priori at the discretion of the investigator. In this article, we apply an adaptive and objective means of smoothing the raw HARDI data using the smoothing splines on the sphere method with generalized cross-validation (GCV) to estimate the diffusivity profile in each voxel. Subsequently, we reconstruct the ODF, from the smoothed data, based on the Funk-Radon transform (FRT) used in QBI. The spline method was applied to both simulated data and in vivo human brain data. Simulated data show that the smoothing splines on the sphere method with GCV smoothing reduces the mean squared error in estimates of the ODF as compared with the standard analytical QBI approach. The human data demonstrate the utility of the method for estimating smooth ODFs.

  7. Sediment transport patterns in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System from cross-validation of bedform asymmetry and modeled residual flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Elias, Edwin P.L.; Dartnell, Peter; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of ~ 45,000 bedforms from 13 multibeam bathymetry surveys was used as a proxy for identifying net bedload sediment transport directions and pathways throughout the San Francisco Bay estuary and adjacent outer coast. The spatially-averaged shape asymmetry of the bedforms reveals distinct pathways of ebb and flood transport. Additionally, the region-wide, ebb-oriented asymmetry of 5% suggests net seaward-directed transport within the estuarine-coastal system, with significant seaward asymmetry at the mouth of San Francisco Bay (11%), through the northern reaches of the Bay (7–8%), and among the largest bedforms (21% for λ > 50 m). This general indication for the net transport of sand to the open coast strongly suggests that anthropogenic removal of sediment from the estuary, particularly along clearly defined seaward transport pathways, will limit the supply of sand to chronically eroding, open-coast beaches. The bedform asymmetry measurements significantly agree (up to ~ 76%) with modeled annual residual transport directions derived from a hydrodynamically-calibrated numerical model, and the orientation of adjacent, flow-sculpted seafloor features such as mega-flute structures, providing a comprehensive validation of the technique. The methods described in this paper to determine well-defined, cross-validated sediment transport pathways can be applied to estuarine-coastal systems globally where bedforms are present. The results can inform and improve regional sediment management practices to more efficiently utilize often limited sediment resources and mitigate current and future sediment supply-related impacts.

  8. Sediment transport patterns in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System from cross-validation of bedform asymmetry and modeled residual flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Elias, Edwin P.L.; Dartnell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of ~ 45,000 bedforms from 13 multibeam bathymetry surveys was used as a proxy for identifying net bedload sediment transport directions and pathways throughout the San Francisco Bay estuary and adjacent outer coast. The spatially-averaged shape asymmetry of the bedforms reveals distinct pathways of ebb and flood transport. Additionally, the region-wide, ebb-oriented asymmetry of 5% suggests net seaward-directed transport within the estuarine-coastal system, with significant seaward asymmetry at the mouth of San Francisco Bay (11%), through the northern reaches of the Bay (7-8%), and among the largest bedforms (21% for λ > 50 m). This general indication for the net transport of sand to the open coast strongly suggests that anthropogenic removal of sediment from the estuary, particularly along clearly defined seaward transport pathways, will limit the supply of sand to chronically eroding, open-coast beaches. The bedform asymmetry measurements significantly agree (up to ~ 76%) with modeled annual residual transport directions derived from a hydrodynamically-calibrated numerical model, and the orientation of adjacent, flow-sculpted seafloor features such as mega-flute structures, providing a comprehensive validation of the technique. The methods described in this paper to determine well-defined, cross-validated sediment transport pathways can be applied to estuarine-coastal systems globally where bedforms are present. The results can inform and improve regional sediment management practices to more efficiently utilize often limited sediment resources and mitigate current and future sediment supply-related impacts.

  9. Cross-validation of serial optical coherence scanning and diffusion tensor imaging: a study on neural fiber maps in human medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhu, Junfeng; Reuter, Martin; Vinke, Louis N; Yendiki, Anastasia; Boas, David A; Fischl, Bruce; Akkin, Taner

    2014-10-15

    We established a strategy to perform cross-validation of serial optical coherence scanner imaging (SOCS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on a postmortem human medulla. Following DTI, the sample was serially scanned by SOCS, which integrates a vibratome slicer and a multi-contrast optical coherence tomography rig for large-scale three-dimensional imaging at microscopic resolution. The DTI dataset was registered to the SOCS space. An average correlation coefficient of 0.9 was found between the co-registered fiber maps constructed by fractional anisotropy and retardance contrasts. Pixelwise comparison of fiber orientations demonstrated good agreement between the DTI and SOCS measures. Details of the comparison were studied in regions exhibiting a variety of fiber organizations. DTI estimated the preferential orientation of small fiber tracts; however, it didn't capture their complex patterns as SOCS did. In terms of resolution and imaging depth, SOCS and DTI complement each other, and open new avenues for cross-modality investigations of the brain.

  10. Methane cross-validation between three Fourier transform spectrometers: SCISAT ACE-FTS, GOSAT TANSO-FTS, and ground-based FTS measurements in the Canadian high Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Gerrit; Walker, Kaley A.; Conway, Stephanie; Saitoh, Naoko; Boone, Chris D.; Strong, Kimberly; Drummond, James R.

    2016-05-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing measurements of methane profiles in the Canadian high Arctic. Accurate and precise measurements of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. Here, we show a cross-validation between three data sets: two from spaceborne instruments and one from a ground-based instrument. All are Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs). We consider the Canadian SCISAT Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)-FTS, a solar occultation infrared spectrometer operating since 2004, and the thermal infrared band of the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO)-FTS, a nadir/off-nadir scanning FTS instrument operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) Ridge Laboratory at Eureka, Nunavut (80° N, 86° W) since 2006. For each pair of instruments, measurements are collocated within 500 km and 24 h. An additional collocation criterion based on potential vorticity values was found not to significantly affect differences between measurements. Profiles are regridded to a common vertical grid for each comparison set. To account for differing vertical resolutions, ACE-FTS measurements are smoothed to the resolution of either PEARL-FTS or TANSO-FTS, and PEARL-FTS measurements are smoothed to the TANSO-FTS resolution. Differences for each pair are examined in terms of profile and partial columns. During the period considered, the number of collocations for each pair is large enough to obtain a good sample size (from several hundred to tens of thousands depending on pair and configuration). Considering full profiles, the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are between 0.2 and 0.7 for TANSO-FTS and

  11. Methane cross-validation between three Fourier Transform Spectrometers: SCISAT ACE-FTS, GOSAT TANSO-FTS, and ground-based FTS measurements in the Canadian high Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing measurements of methane profiles in the Canadian high Arctic. Accurate and precise measurements of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. Here, we show a cross-validation between three datasets: two from spaceborne instruments and one from a ground-based instrument. All are Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTSs). We consider the Canadian SCISAT Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)-FTS, a solar occultation infrared spectrometer operating since 2004, and the thermal infrared band of the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO)-FTS, a nadir/off-nadir scanning FTS instrument operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker 125HR Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) Ridge Lab at Eureka, Nunavut (80° N, 86° W) since 2006. For each pair of instruments, measurements are collocated within 500 km and 24 h. An additional criterion based on potential vorticity values was found not to significantly affect differences between measurements. Profiles are regridded to a common vertical grid for each comparison set. To account for differing vertical resolutions, ACE-FTS measurements are smoothed to the resolution of either PEARL-FTS or TANSO-FTS, and PEARL-FTS measurements are smoothed to the TANSO-FTS resolution. Differences for each pair are examined in terms of profile and partial columns. During the period considered, the number of collocations for each pair is large enough to obtain a good sample size (from several hundred to tens of thousands depending on pair and configuration). Considering full profiles, the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are between 0.2 and 0.7 for TANSO-FTS and between 1.5 and 3

  12. Cross-validation of a portable, six-degree-of-freedom load cell for use in lower-limb prosthetics research.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Sara R; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-04-11

    The iPecs load cell is a lightweight, six-degree-of-freedom force transducer designed to fit easily into an endoskeletal prosthesis via a universal mounting interface. Unlike earlier tethered systems, it is capable of wireless data transmission and on-board memory storage, which facilitate its use in both clinical and real-world settings. To date, however, the validity of the iPecs load cell has not been rigorously established, particularly for loading conditions that represent typical prosthesis use. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of an iPecs load cell during in situ human subject testing by cross-validating its force and moment measurements with those of a typical gait analysis laboratory. Specifically, the gait mechanics of a single person with transtibial amputation were simultaneously measured using an iPecs load cell, multiple floor-mounted force platforms, and a three-dimensional motion capture system. Overall, the forces and moments measured by the iPecs were highly correlated with those measured by the gait analysis laboratory (r>0.86) and RMSEs were less than 3.4% and 5.2% full scale output across all force and moment channels, respectively. Despite this favorable comparison, however, the results of a sensitivity analysis suggest that care should be taken to accurately identify the axes and instrumentation center of the load cell in situations where iPecs data will be interpreted in a coordinate system other than its own (e.g., inverse dynamics analysis).

  13. Use of n-fold cross-validation to evaluate three methods to calculate heavy truck annual average daily traffic and vehicle miles traveled.

    PubMed

    Hallmark, Shauna L; Souleyrette, Reginald; Lamptey, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Reliable estimates of heavy-truck volumes in the United States are important in a number of transportation applications including pavement design and management, traffic safety, and traffic operations. Additionally, because heavy vehicles emit pollutants at much higher rates than passenger vehicles, reliable volume estimates are critical to computing accurate inventories of on-road emissions. Accurate baseline inventories are also necessary to forecast future scenarios. The research presented in this paper evaluated three different methods commonly used by transportation agencies to estimate annual average daily traffic (AADT), which is used to determine vehicle miles traveled (VMT). Traffic data from continuous count stations provided by the Iowa Department of Transportation were used to estimate AADT for single-unit and multiunit trucks for rural freeways and rural primary highways using the three methods. The first method developed general expansion factors, which apply to all vehicles. AADT, representing all vehicles, was estimated for short-term counts and was multiplied by statewide average truck volumes for the corresponding roadway type to obtain AADT for each truck category. The second method also developed general expansion factors and AADT estimates. Truck AADT for the second method was calculated by multiplying the general AADT by truck volumes from the short-term counts. The third method developed expansion factors specific to each truck group. AADT estimates for each truck group were estimated from short-term counts using corresponding expansion factors. Accuracy of the three methods was determined by comparing actual AADT from count station data to estimates from the three methods. Accuracy of the three methods was compared using n-fold cross-validation. Mean squared error of prediction was used to estimate the difference between estimated and actual AADT. Prediction error was lowest for the method that developed separate expansion factors for trucks

  14. A cross validation study of deep brain stimulation targeting: from experts to atlas-based, segmentation-based and automatic registration algorithms.

    PubMed

    Castro, F Javier Sanchez; Pollo, Claudio; Meuli, Reto; Maeder, Philippe; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2006-11-01

    Validation of image registration algorithms is a difficult task and open-ended problem, usually application-dependent. In this paper, we focus on deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting for the treatment of movement disorders like Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. DBS involves implantation of an electrode deep inside the brain to electrically stimulate specific areas shutting down the disease's symptoms. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has turned out to be the optimal target for this kind of surgery. Unfortunately, the STN is in general not clearly distinguishable in common medical imaging modalities. Usual techniques to infer its location are the use of anatomical atlases and visible surrounding landmarks. Surgeons have to adjust the electrode intraoperatively using electrophysiological recordings and macrostimulation tests. We constructed a ground truth derived from specific patients whose STNs are clearly visible on magnetic resonance (MR) T2-weighted images. A patient is chosen as atlas both for the right and left sides. Then, by registering each patient with the atlas using different methods, several estimations of the STN location are obtained. Two studies are driven using our proposed validation scheme. First, a comparison between different atlas-based and nonrigid registration algorithms with a evaluation of their performance and usability to locate the STN automatically. Second, a study of which visible surrounding structures influence the STN location. The two studies are cross validated between them and against expert's variability. Using this scheme, we evaluated the expert's ability against the estimation error provided by the tested algorithms and we demonstrated that automatic STN targeting is possible and as accurate as the expert-driven techniques currently used. We also show which structures have to be taken into account to accurately estimate the STN location.

  15. Methane Cross-Validation Between Spaceborne Solar Occultation Observations from ACE-FTS, Spaceborne Nadir Sounding from Gosat, and Ground-Based Solar Absorption Measurements, at a High Arctic Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S. A.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing observations of methane profiles in the Canadian High Arctic. Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas on Earth, and second only to carbon dioxide in its contribution to anthropogenic global warming. Accurate and precise observations of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. The Arctic is a particular region of concern, as melting permafrost and disappearing sea ice might lead to accelerated release of methane into the atmosphere. Global observations require spaceborne instruments, in particular in the Arctic, where surface measurements are sparse and expensive to perform. Satellite-based remote sensing is an underconstrained problem, and specific validation under Arctic circumstances is required. Here, we show a cross-validation between two spaceborne instruments and ground-based measurements, all Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS). We consider the Canadian SCISAT ACE-FTS, a solar occultation spectrometer operating since 2004, and the Japanese GOSAT TANSO-FTS, a nadir-pointing FTS operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environmental and Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W) since 2006. Measurements are collocated considering temporal, spatial, and geophysical criteria and regridded to a common vertical grid. We perform smoothing on the higher-resolution instrument results to account for different vertical resolutions. Then, profiles of differences for each pair of instruments are examined. Any bias between instruments, or any accuracy that is worse than expected, needs to be understood prior to using the data. The results of the study will serve as a guideline on how to use the vertically resolved methane products from ACE and

  16. Cross-Validation of the Spanish HP-Version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy Confirmed with Some Cross-Cultural Differences

    PubMed Central

    Alcorta-Garza, Adelina; San-Martín, Montserrat; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Soler-González, Jorge; Roig, Helena; Vivanco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Context: Medical educators agree that empathy is essential for physicians' professionalism. The Health Professional Version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE-HP) was developed in response to a need for a psychometrically sound instrument to measure empathy in the context of patient care. Although extensive support for its validity and reliability is available, the authors recognize the necessity to examine psychometrics of the JSE-HP in different socio-cultural contexts to assure the psychometric soundness of this instrument. The first aim of this study was to confirm its psychometric properties in the cross-cultural context of Spain and Latin American countries. The second aim was to measure the influence of social and cultural factors on the development of medical empathy in health practitioners. Methods: The original English version of the JSE-HP was translated into International Spanish using back-translation procedures. The Spanish version of the JSE-HP was administered to 896 physicians from Spain and 13 Latin American countries. Data were subjected to exploratory factor analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation (promax) to allow for correlation among the resulting factors, followed by a second analysis, using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Two theoretical models, one based on the English JSE-HP and another on the first Spanish student version of the JSE (JSE-S), were tested. Demographic variables were compared using group comparisons. Results: A total of 715 (80%) surveys were returned fully completed. Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the JSE for the entire sample was 0.84. The psychometric properties of the Spanish JSE-HP matched those of the original English JSE-HP. However, the Spanish JSE-S model proved more appropriate than the original English model for the sample in this study. Group comparisons among physicians classified by gender, medical specialties, cultural and cross-cultural backgrounds yielded

  17. Can lncRNAs be indicators for the diagnosis of early onset or acute schizophrenia and distinguish major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder?-A cross validation analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xuelian; Niu, Wei; Kong, Lingming; He, Mingjun; Jiang, Kunhong; Chen, Shengdong; Zhong, Aifang; Li, Wanshuai; Lu, Jim; Zhang, Liyi

    2017-03-28

    Depression and anxiety are apparent symptoms in the early onset or acute phase of schizophrenia (SZ), which complicate timely diagnosis and treatment. It is imperative to seek an indicator to distinguish schizophrenia from depressive and anxiety disorders. Using lncRNA microarray profiling and RT-PCR, three up-regulated lncRNAs in SZ, six down-regulated lncRNAs in major depressive disorder (MDD), and three up-regulated lncRNAs in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) had been identified as potential biomarkers. All the lncRNAs were, then, cross-validated in 40 SZ patients, 40 MDD patients, 40 GAD patients, and 40 normal controls. Compared with controls, three up-regulated SZ lncRNAs had a significantly down-regulated expression in GAD, and no remarkable differences existed between MDD and the controls. Additionally, the six down-regulated MDD lncRNAs were expressed in an opposite fashion in SZ, and the expression of the three up-regulated GAD lncRNAs were significantly different between SZ and GAD. These results indicate that the expression patterns of the three up-regulated SZ lncRNAs could not be completely replicated in MDD and GAD, and vice versa. Thus, these three SZ lncRNAs seem to be established as potential indicators for diagnosis of schizophrenia and distinguishing it from MDD and GAD.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  19. Revealing latent value of clinically acquired CTs of traumatic brain injury through multi-atlas segmentation in a retrospective study of 1,003 with external cross-validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Kelly, Patrick D.; Asman, Andrew J.; Kang, Hakmook; Patel, Mayur B.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in guiding treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and for diagnosing intracranial hemorrhage; most commonly rapid computed tomography (CT) imaging is performed. Outcomes for patients with TBI are variable and difficult to predict upon hospital admission. Quantitative outcome scales (e.g., the Marshall classification) have been proposed to grade TBI severity on CT, but such measures have had relatively low value in staging patients by prognosis. Herein, we examine a cohort of 1,003 subjects admitted for TBI and imaged clinically to identify potential prognostic metrics using a "big data" paradigm. For all patients, a brain scan was segmented with multi-atlas labeling, and intensity/volume/texture features were computed in a localized manner. In a 10-fold crossvalidation approach, the explanatory value of the image-derived features is assessed for length of hospital stay (days), discharge disposition (five point scale from death to return home), and the Rancho Los Amigos functional outcome score (Rancho Score). Image-derived features increased the predictive R2 to 0.38 (from 0.18) for length of stay, to 0.51 (from 0.4) for discharge disposition, and to 0.31 (from 0.16) for Rancho Score (over models consisting only of non-imaging admission metrics, but including positive/negative radiological CT findings). This study demonstrates that high volume retrospective analysis of clinical imaging data can reveal imaging signatures with prognostic value. These targets are suited for follow-up validation and represent targets for future feature selection efforts. Moreover, the increase in prognostic value would improve staging for intervention assessment and provide more reliable guidance for patients.

  20. Procedural knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgeff, Michael P.; Lansky, Amy L.

    1986-01-01

    Much of commonsense knowledge about the real world is in the form of procedures or sequences of actions for achieving particular goals. In this paper, a formalism is presented for representing such knowledge using the notion of process. A declarative semantics for the representation is given, which allows a user to state facts about the effects of doing things in the problem domain of interest. An operational semantics is also provided, which shows how this knowledge can be used to achieve particular goals or to form intentions regarding their achievement. Given both semantics, the formalism additionally serves as an executable specification language suitable for constructing complex systems. A system based on this formalism is described, and examples involving control of an autonomous robot and fault diagnosis for NASA's Space Shuttle are provided.

  1. Cross-validated stable-isotope dilution GC-MS and LC-MS/MS assays for monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) activity by measuring arachidonic acid released from the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Schauerte, Celina; Kling, Katharina; Herbers, Jan; Beckmann, Bibiana; Engeli, Stefan; Jordan, Jens; Zoerner, Alexander A; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2017-03-15

    2-Arachidonoyl glycerol (2AG) is an endocannabinoid that activates cannabinoid (CB) receptors CB1 and CB2. Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inactivates 2AG through hydrolysis to arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol, thus modulating the activity at CB receptors. In the brain, AA released from 2AG by the action of MAGL serves as a substrate for cyclooxygenases which produce pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Here we report stable-isotope GC-MS and LC-MS/MS assays for the reliable measurement of MAGL activity. The assays utilize deuterium-labeled 2AG (d8-2AG; 10μM) as the MAGL substrate and measure deuterium-labeled AA (d8-AA; range 0-1μM) as the MAGL product. Unlabelled AA (d0-AA, 1μM) serves as the internal standard. d8-AA and d0-AA are extracted from the aqueous buffered incubation mixtures by ethyl acetate. Upon solvent evaporation the residue is reconstituted in the mobile phase prior to LC-MS/MS analysis or in anhydrous acetonitrile for GC-MS analysis. LC-MS/MS analysis is performed in the negative electrospray ionization mode by selected-reaction monitoring the mass transitions [M-H](-)→[M-H - CO2](-), i.e., m/z 311→m/z 267 for d8-AA and m/z 303→m/z 259 for d0-AA. Prior to GC-MS analysis d8-AA and d0-AA were converted to their pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) esters by means of PFB-Br. GC-MS analysis is performed in the electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mode by selected-ion monitoring the ions [M-PFB](-), i.e., m/z 311 for d8-AA and m/z 303 for d0-AA. The GC-MS and LC-MS/MS assays were cross-validated. Linear regression analysis between the concentration (range, 0-1μM) of d8-AA measured by LC-MS/MS (y) and that by GC-MS (x) revealed a straight line (r(2)=0.9848) with the regression equation y=0.003+0.898x, indicating a good agreement. In dog liver, we detected MAGL activity that was inhibitable by the MAGL inhibitor JZL-184. Exogenous eicosatetraynoic acid is suitable as internal standard for the quantitative determination of d8-AA produced from d8

  2. Leave-one-out procedure in the validation of elimination rate constant analysis.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, T; Jaroszewski, J J; Sasinowska-Motyl, M

    2012-12-01

    Many registration agencies and other organizations define how to calculate the elimination rate constant (kel) value. No validation procedures have been introduced to verify the correct selection of the concentration-time (C-T) points used for the kel calculation. The purpose of this paper is to discover whether kel analysis can be subjected to the condensed validation procedure and what acceptance criteria should be adopted for such a procedure. For the analysis, data collected during bioequivalence studies of 4 drugs were selected, including 2 highly lipophilic drugs (itraconazole, atorvastatin) and 2 weakly lipophilic drugs (trimetazidine, perindopril). Pharmacokinetic calculations were performed with the use of WinNonlin Professional v 5.3. Internal validation of the kel analysis using leave-one-out cross-validation was performed. The present analysis proves that the C-T selection process for the kel calculations cannot be automated. In each of the analysed data series there were such C-T sequences that did not meet even one of the validation criteria. This paper proposes 3 validation criteria which need to be met in order to confirm the optimal selection of C-T data to calculate kel: Q 2≥0.6, R2≥ 0.85, Q 2-R2<0.3, were Q 2 - squared cross-validated correlation coefficient, R2 - coefficient of determination). Application of the validation procedure for the kel analysis under discussion proves the accuracy of the calculations, even if repeated kel analysis is based on a different sequence of points in the elimination phase.

  3. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by ... minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic surgery). The most common bariatric surgery procedures are gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric ...

  4. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H.; Mundy, Roger A.; Franusich, Michael D.

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  5. Designing Flightdeck Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Mauro, Robert; Degani, Asaf; Loukopoulou, Loukia

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of this document is to provide guidance on how to design, implement, and evaluate flight deck procedures. It provides a process for developing procedures that meet clear and specific requirements. This document provides a brief overview of: 1) the requirements for procedures, 2) a process for the design of procedures, and 3) a process for the design of checklists. The brief overview is followed by amplified procedures that follow the above steps and provide details for the proper design, implementation and evaluation of good flight deck procedures and checklists.

  6. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... LASIK Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Laser Surgery Recovery Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Dec. 12, 2015 Today's refractive ... that releases controlled amounts of radio frequency (RF) energy, instead of a laser, to apply heat to ...

  7. Cosmetic Procedure Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ...

  8. Crew procedures development techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Hawk, M. L.; Mangiaracina, A. A.; Mcgavern, J. L.; Spangler, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    The study developed requirements, designed, developed, checked out and demonstrated the Procedures Generation Program (PGP). The PGP is a digital computer program which provides a computerized means of developing flight crew procedures based on crew action in the shuttle procedures simulator. In addition, it provides a real time display of procedures, difference procedures, performance data and performance evaluation data. Reconstruction of displays is possible post-run. Data may be copied, stored on magnetic tape and transferred to the document processor for editing and documentation distribution.

  9. Pyroshock prediction procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    2002-05-01

    Given sufficient effort, pyroshock loads can be predicted by direct analytical procedures using Hydrocodes that analytically model the details of the pyrotechnic explosion and its interaction with adjacent structures, including nonlinear effects. However, it is more common to predict pyroshock environments using empirical procedures based upon extensive studies of past pyroshock data. Various empirical pyroshock prediction procedures are discussed, including those developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Lockheed-Martin, and Boeing.

  10. Candidate CDTI procedures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ace, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A concept with potential for increasing airspace capacity by involving the pilot in the separation control loop is discussed. Some candidate options are presented. Both enroute and terminal area procedures are considered and, in many cases, a technologically advanced Air Traffic Control structure is assumed. Minimum display characteristics recommended for each of the described procedures are presented. Recommended sequencing of the operational testing of each of the candidate procedures is presented.

  11. Procedural pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Metz, Brandie J

    2013-04-01

    Due to many factors, including parental anxiety, a child's inability to understand the necessity of a procedure and a child's unwillingness to cooperate, it can be much more challenging to perform dermatologic procedures in children. This article reviews pre-procedural preparation of patients and parents, techniques for minimizing injection-related pain and optimal timing of surgical intervention. The risks and benefits of general anesthesia in the setting of pediatric dermatologic procedures are discussed. Additionally, the surgical approach to a few specific types of birthmarks is addressed.

  12. Modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-09-01

    The open modified Brostrom anatomic repair technique is widely accepted as the reference standard for lateral ankle stabilization. However, there is high incidence of intra-articular pathologies associated with chronic lateral ankle instability which may not be addressed by an isolated open Brostrom procedure. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with suture anchor has been described for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates seemed to be higher than open Brostrom procedure. Modification of the arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with the use of bone tunnel may reduce the risk of certain complications.

  13. Procedural Learning and Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolson, R. I.; Fawcett, A. J.; Brookes, R. L.; Needle, J.

    2010-01-01

    Three major "neural systems", specialized for different types of information processing, are the sensory, declarative, and procedural systems. It has been proposed ("Trends Neurosci.",30(4), 135-141) that dyslexia may be attributable to impaired function in the procedural system together with intact declarative function. We provide a brief…

  14. Enucleation Procedure Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kevin; Poston, George

    This manual provides information on the enucleation procedure (removal of the eyes for organ banks). An introductory section focuses on the anatomy of the eye and defines each of the parts. Diagrams of the eye are provided. A list of enucleation materials follows. Other sections present outlines of (1) a sterile procedure; (2) preparation for eye…

  15. Connectionist Learning Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Geoffrey E.

    A major goal of research on networks of neuron-like processing units is to discover efficient learning procedures that allow these networks to construct complex internal representations of their environment. The learning procedures must be capable of modifying the connection strengths in such a way that internal units which are not part of the…

  16. Microsatellite mutation rates in the eastern tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum) differ 10-fold across loci.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Zafer; McCormick, Cory R; Gopurenko, David; Williams, Rod N; Bos, David H; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Microsatellites are commonly used for mapping and population genetics because of their high heterozygosities and allelic variability (i.e., polymorphism). Microsatellite markers are generally more polymorphic than other types of molecular markers such as allozymes or SNPs because the insertions/deletions that give rise to microsatellite variability are relatively common compared to nucleotide substitutions. Nevertheless, direct evidence of microsatellite mutation rates (MMRs) is lacking in most vertebrate groups despite the importance of such estimates to key population parameters (e.g., genetic differentiation or theta = 4N (e)micro). Herein, we present empirical data on MMRs in eastern tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum). We conducted captive breeding trials and genotyped over 1,000 offspring at a suite of microsatellite loci. These data on 7,906 allele transfers provide the first direct estimates of MMRs in amphibians, and they illustrate that MMRs can vary by more than an order of magnitude across loci within a given species (one locus had ten mutations whereas the others had none).

  17. Linear Models for Field Trials, Smoothing, and Cross-Validation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    in fertility and other environmental factors. Blocking methods are customarily used, even when blocks have no physical meaning in thei% experiment, but... TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU nT STANDARDS 196b3 A . - -. .. .• • ei .. o .’ ’."., " ". " ’ . .J . . .~i• j,... . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .,.. - i...34-""bution/ __Availability Code..""s’’ Technical Summary Report #2779 December 1984 1J ABSTRACT Spatial methods for the analysis of agricultural field

  18. Internet Attack Traceback: Cross-Validation and Pebble-Trace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-28

    of key: a permutation of values in 0— 255 • Entropy verifier: the candidate key with largest entropy drop is the real key Pattern filter...Characteristics of symmetric keys • Randomness of ciphertext mostly from symmetric encryption schemes Pattern filter Entropy filter Verifier...Characteristic verifer + Entropy verifier) Correct keys Candidate key regions Candidate key regions Memory image Network traffic Step 2

  19. Cross Validation of Selection of Variables in Multiple Regression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Bomber IBMNAV * BOMNAV Navigation-Cargo * * CARNAV Sensory-Fighter * SF FGTSEN Sensory - Bomber * SB BOMSEN Communication - Fighter IFGCOM CF FGTCOM...of Variables Variable No. Recode FGTNAV 1 0 LESS THAN 1 1 OR OVER BONNAV 2 0 LESS THAN S1 OR OVER CARNAV 3 0 LESS THAN S1 OR OVER FGTSEN 4 0 LESS THAN...cc x x x x x x x CARNAV X X X X X X x XMTR x X X X X x PD X x X X X X UP x- *Those which AID determined. 44 This value was lowered to 3 in the

  20. Cross-Validation of the Self-Motivation Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiby, Elaine M.; And Others

    Because the literature suggests that aerobic exercise is associated with physical health and psychological well-being, there is a concern with discovering how to improve adherence to such exercise. There is growing evidence that self-motivation, as measured by the Dishman Self-Motivation Inventory (SMI), is a redictor of adherence to regular…

  1. Cross-validation of resting metabolic rate prediction equations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Knowledge of the resting metabolic rate (RMR) is necessary for determining individual total energy requirements. Measurement of RMR is time consuming and requires specialized equipment. Prediction equations provide an easy method to estimate RMR; however, the accuracy of these equations...

  2. Cross-Validation of Experimental USAF Pilot Training Performance Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    BAT) battery Is a computerized test battery designed to measure individual differences In psychomotor skills , information processing abilities...differences In psychomotor skills , information processing abilities, personality and attitudes helped to reduce uncertainty In making pilot candidate

  3. Correcting Evaluation Bias of Relational Classifiers with Network Cross Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Computer Sciences (with a minor in Mathematical Statistics ) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2001. Broadly speaking, Tina’s research interests...These methods specifically exploit the statistical dependencies among instances in order to improve classification accuracy. However, there has been...the complex link structure and attribute dependencies in relational data violate the assumptions of many conventional statistical tests and make it

  4. Cross-Ethnic Cross Validation of Aptitude Batteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Lewis W.; Mahoney, Margaret H.

    How well an aptitude test battery predicts rated job performance for Negroes and whites, and how well a battery selected for one group predicts performance for the other, is examined. Supervisory ratings were used as the criterion of job performance. Tests selected to predict performance in the job of Medical Laboratory technicians were validated…

  5. [Cross validity of the UCLA Loneliness Scale factorization].

    PubMed

    Borges, Africa; Prieto, Pedro; Ricchetti, Giacinto; Hernández-Jorge, Carmen; Rodríguez-Naveiras, Elena

    2008-11-01

    Loneliness is an unpleasant experience that takes place when a person's network of social relationships is significantly deficient in quality and quantity, and it is associated with negative feelings. Loneliness is a fundamental construct that provides information about several psychological processes, especially in the clinical setting. It is well known that this construct is related to isolation and emotional loneliness. One of the most well-known psychometric instruments to measure loneliness is the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, which has been factorized in several populations. A controversial issue related to the UCLA Loneliness Scale is its factor structure, because the test was first created based on a unidimensional structure; however, subsequent research has proved that its structure may be bipolar or even multidimensional. In the present work, the UCLA Loneliness Scale was completed by two populations: Spanish and Italian undergraduate university students. Results show a multifactorial structure in both samples. This research presents a theoretically and analytically coherent bifactorial structure.

  6. AnL1 smoothing spline algorithm with cross validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, Ken W.; Lall, Upmanu

    1993-08-01

    We propose an algorithm for the computation ofL1 (LAD) smoothing splines in the spacesWM(D), with . We assume one is given data of the formyiD(f(ti) +ɛi, iD1,...,N with {itti}iD1N ⊂D, theɛi are errors withE(ɛi)D0, andf is assumed to be inWM. The LAD smoothing spline, for fixed smoothing parameterλ?;0, is defined as the solution,sλ, of the optimization problem (1/N)∑iD1N yi-g(ti +λJM(g), whereJM(g) is the seminorm consisting of the sum of the squaredL2 norms of theMth partial derivatives ofg. Such an LAD smoothing spline,sλ, would be expected to give robust smoothed estimates off in situations where theɛi are from a distribution with heavy tails. The solution to such a problem is a "thin plate spline" of known form. An algorithm for computingsλ is given which is based on considering a sequence of quadratic programming problems whose structure is guided by the optimality conditions for the above convex minimization problem, and which are solved readily, if a good initial point is available. The "data driven" selection of the smoothing parameter is achieved by minimizing aCV(λ) score of the form .The combined LAD-CV smoothing spline algorithm is a continuation scheme in λ↘0 taken on the above SQPs parametrized inλ, with the optimal smoothing parameter taken to be that value ofλ at which theCV(λ) score first begins to increase. The feasibility of constructing the LAD-CV smoothing spline is illustrated by an application to a problem in environment data interpretation.

  7. Minimally invasive procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Michail, Chandrinos; Lazaridis, George; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures, which include laparoscopic surgery, use state-of-the-art technology to reduce the damage to human tissue when performing surgery. Minimally invasive procedures require small “ports” from which the surgeon inserts thin tubes called trocars. Carbon dioxide gas may be used to inflate the area, creating a space between the internal organs and the skin. Then a miniature camera (usually a laparoscope or endoscope) is placed through one of the trocars so the surgical team can view the procedure as a magnified image on video monitors in the operating room. Specialized equipment is inserted through the trocars based on the type of surgery. There are some advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures that can be performed almost exclusively through a single point of entry—meaning only one small incision, like the “uniport” video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Not only do these procedures usually provide equivalent outcomes to traditional “open” surgery (which sometimes require a large incision), but minimally invasive procedures (using small incisions) may offer significant benefits as well: (I) faster recovery; (II) the patient remains for less days hospitalized; (III) less scarring and (IV) less pain. In our current mini review we will present the minimally invasive procedures for thoracic surgery. PMID:25861610

  8. Canalith Repositioning Procedure

    MedlinePlus

    ... repositioning procedure can help relieve benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), a condition in which you have brief, but intense, episodes of dizziness that occur when you move your head. Vertigo ...

  9. Lithotripsy procedure (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a procedure used to shatter simple stones in the kidney or upper urinary tract. Ultrasonic waves are passed through the body until they strike the dense stones. Pulses of ...

  10. Dynamic alarm response procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Gordon, P.; Fitch, K.

    2006-07-01

    The Dynamic Alarm Response Procedure (DARP) system provides a robust, Web-based alternative to existing hard-copy alarm response procedures. This paperless system improves performance by eliminating time wasted looking up paper procedures by number, looking up plant process values and equipment and component status at graphical display or panels, and maintenance of the procedures. Because it is a Web-based system, it is platform independent. DARP's can be served from any Web server that supports CGI scripting, such as Apache{sup R}, IIS{sup R}, TclHTTPD, and others. DARP pages can be viewed in any Web browser that supports Javascript and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), such as Netscape{sup R}, Microsoft Internet Explorer{sup R}, Mozilla Firefox{sup R}, Opera{sup R}, and others. (authors)

  11. Short Nuss bar procedure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Nuss procedure is now the preferred operation for surgical correction of pectus excavatum (PE). It is a minimally invasive technique, whereby one to three curved metal bars are inserted behind the sternum in order to push it into a normal position. The bars are left in situ for three years and then removed. This procedure significantly improves quality of life and, in most cases, also improves cardiac performance. Previously, the modified Ravitch procedure was used with resection of cartilage and the use of posterior support. This article details the new modified Nuss procedure, which requires the use of shorter bars than specified by the original technique. This technique facilitates the operation as the bar may be guided manually through the chest wall and no additional stabilizing sutures are necessary. PMID:27747185

  12. [The EXIT procedure].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, S; Blödow, A; Flügel, W; Renner-Lützkendorf, H; Isbruch, A; Siegling, F; Untch, M; Strauß, J; Bloching, M B

    2013-08-01

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure is used for unborn fetuses in cases of predictable complications of postpartum airway obstruction. Indications for the EXIT procedure are fetal neck tumors, obstruction of the trachea, hiatus hernia of the diaphragm and congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS). Large cervical tumors prevent normal delivery of a fetus due to reclination of the head with airway obstruction. Therefore, a primary caesarean section or the EXIT procedure has to be considered. The EXIT procedure has time limitations as the blood supply by the placenta only lasts for 30-60 min. Airway protection has to be ensured during parturition.This article reports the case of an unborn fetus with a large cervical teratoma where an obstruction of the cervical airway was detected and monitored by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during pregnancy. The EXIT procedure was therefore used and successfully accomplished. The features of the interdisciplinary aspects of the EXIT procedure are described with the special aspects of each medical discipline.

  13. Procedural learning and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, R I; Fawcett, A J; Brookes, R L; Needle, J

    2010-08-01

    Three major 'neural systems', specialized for different types of information processing, are the sensory, declarative, and procedural systems. It has been proposed (Trends Neurosci., 30(4), 135-141) that dyslexia may be attributable to impaired function in the procedural system together with intact declarative function. We provide a brief overview of the increasing evidence relating to the hypothesis, noting that the framework involves two main claims: first that 'neural systems' provides a productive level of description avoiding the underspecificity of cognitive descriptions and the overspecificity of brain structural accounts; and second that a distinctive feature of procedural learning is its extended time course, covering from minutes to months. In this article, we focus on the second claim. Three studies-speeded single word reading, long-term response learning, and overnight skill consolidation-are reviewed which together provide clear evidence of difficulties in procedural learning for individuals with dyslexia, even when the tasks are outside the literacy domain. The educational implications of the results are then discussed, and in particular the potential difficulties that impaired overnight procedural consolidation would entail. It is proposed that response to intervention could be better predicted if diagnostic tests on the different forms of learning were first undertaken.

  14. Procedural sedation analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheta, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades.Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA). The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interventions. The goals of PSA in four different multidisciplinary practices namely; emergency, dentistry, radiology and gastrointestinal endoscopy are discussed in this review article. Some procedures are painful, others painless. Therefore, goals of PSA vary widely. Sedation management can range from minimal sedation, to the extent of minimal anesthesia. Procedural sedation in emergency department (ED) usually requires combinations of multiple agents to reach desired effects of analgesia plus anxiolysis. However, in dental practice, moderate sedation analgesia (known to the dentists as conscious sedation) is usually what is required. It is usually most effective with the combined use of local anesthesia. The mainstay of success for painless imaging is absolute immobility. Immobility can be achieved by deep sedation or minimal anesthesia. On the other hand, moderate sedation, deep sedation, minimal anesthesia and conventional general anesthesia can be all utilized for management of gastrointestinal endoscopy. PMID:20668560

  15. Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

  16. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interaction Sites with Machine-Learning-Based Data-Cleaning and Post-Filtering Procedures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-Hui; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Accurately predicting protein-protein interaction sites (PPIs) is currently a hot topic because it has been demonstrated to be very useful for understanding disease mechanisms and designing drugs. Machine-learning-based computational approaches have been broadly utilized and demonstrated to be useful for PPI prediction. However, directly applying traditional machine learning algorithms, which often assume that samples in different classes are balanced, often leads to poor performance because of the severe class imbalance that exists in the PPI prediction problem. In this study, we propose a novel method for improving PPI prediction performance by relieving the severity of class imbalance using a data-cleaning procedure and reducing predicted false positives with a post-filtering procedure: First, a machine-learning-based data-cleaning procedure is applied to remove those marginal targets, which may potentially have a negative effect on training a model with a clear classification boundary, from the majority samples to relieve the severity of class imbalance in the original training dataset; then, a prediction model is trained on the cleaned dataset; finally, an effective post-filtering procedure is further used to reduce potential false positive predictions. Stringent cross-validation and independent validation tests on benchmark datasets demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed method, which exhibits highly competitive performance compared with existing state-of-the-art sequence-based PPIs predictors and should supplement existing PPI prediction methods.

  17. Computerized operating procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, E.; Teigen, J.

    1994-12-31

    A number of observed and potential problems in the nuclear industry are related to the quality of operating procedures. Many of the problems identified in operating procedure preparation, implementation, and maintenance have a technical nature, which can be directly addressed by developing computerized procedure handling tools. The Halden Reactor Project (HRP) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has since 1985 performed research work within this field. A product of this effort is the development of a second version of the computerized operation manuals (COPMA) system. This paper summarizes the most important characteristics of the COPMA-II system and discusses some of the experiences in using a system like COPMA-II.

  18. Reasoning about procedural knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgeff, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    A crucial aspect of automated reasoning about space operations is that knowledge of the problem domain is often procedural in nature - that is, the knowledge is often in the form of sequences of actions or procedures for achieving given goals or reacting to certain situations. In this paper a system is described that explicitly represents and reasons about procedural knowledge. The knowledge representation used is sufficiently rich to describe the effects of arbitrary sequences of tests and actions, and the inference mechanism provides a means for directly using this knowledge to reach desired operational goals. Furthermore, the representation has a declarative semantics that provides for incremental changes to the system, rich explanatory capabilities, and verifiability. The approach also provides a mechanism for reasoning about the use of this knowledge, thus enabling the system to choose effectively between alternative courses of action.

  19. Environmental Test Screening Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeidler, Janet

    2000-01-01

    This procedure describes the methods to be used for environmental stress screening (ESS) of the Lightning Mapper Sensor (LMS) lens assembly. Unless otherwise specified, the procedures shall be completed in the order listed, prior to performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP). The first unit, S/N 001, will be subjected to the Qualification Vibration Levels, while the remainder will be tested at the Operational Level. Prior to ESS, all units will undergo Pre-ESS Functional Testing that includes measuring the on-axis and plus or minus 0.95 full field Modulation Transfer Function and Back Focal Length. Next, all units will undergo ESS testing, and then Acceptance testing per PR 460.

  20. Procedure and Program Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    Here some modules, procedures and whole programs are described, that may be useful to the reader, as they have been, to the author. They are all in Fortran 90/95 and start with a generally useful module, that will be used in most procedures and programs in the examples, and another module useful for programs using a Rosenbrock variant. The source texts (except for the two modules) are not reproduced here, but can be downloaded from the web site www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=issue &issn=1616-6361&volume=666 (the two lines form one contiguous URL!).

  1. Toddler test or procedure preparation

    MedlinePlus

    Preparing toddler for test/procedure; Test/procedure preparation - toddler; Preparing for a medical test or procedure - toddler ... Before the test, know that your child will probably cry. Even if you prepare, your child may feel some discomfort or ...

  2. Preschooler test or procedure preparation

    MedlinePlus

    Preparing preschoolers for test/procedure; Test/procedure preparation - preschooler ... Preparing children for medical tests can reduce their anxiety. It can also make them less likely to cry and resist the procedure. Research shows that ...

  3. Protein fold class prediction: new methods of statistical classification.

    PubMed

    Grassmann, J; Reczko, M; Suhai, S; Edler, L

    1999-01-01

    Feed forward neural networks are compared with standard and new statistical classification procedures for the classification of proteins. We applied logistic regression, an additive model and projection pursuit regression from the methods based on a posterior probabilities; linear, quadratic and a flexible discriminant analysis from the methods based on class conditional probabilities, and the K-nearest-neighbors classification rule. Both, the apparent error rate obtained with the training sample (n = 143) and the test error rate obtained with the test sample (n = 125) and the 10-fold cross validation error were calculated. We conclude that some of the standard statistical methods are potent competitors to the more flexible tools of machine learning.

  4. An adaptive deep learning approach for PPG-based identification.

    PubMed

    Jindal, V; Birjandtalab, J; Pouyan, M Baran; Nourani, M

    2016-08-01

    Wearable biosensors have become increasingly popular in healthcare due to their capabilities for low cost and long term biosignal monitoring. This paper presents a novel two-stage technique to offer biometric identification using these biosensors through Deep Belief Networks and Restricted Boltzman Machines. Our identification approach improves robustness in current monitoring procedures within clinical, e-health and fitness environments using Photoplethysmography (PPG) signals through deep learning classification models. The approach is tested on TROIKA dataset using 10-fold cross validation and achieved an accuracy of 96.1%.

  5. Evaluation Perspectives and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriven, Michael

    This article on evaluation perspectives and procedures is divided into six sections. The first section briefly discusses qualitative and quantitative research and evaluation. In the second section there is an exploration of the utility and validity of a checklist that can be used to evaluate products, as an instrument for evaluating producers, for…

  6. Numerical Boundary Condition Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Topics include numerical procedures for treating inflow and outflow boundaries, steady and unsteady discontinuous surfaces, far field boundaries, and multiblock grids. In addition, the effects of numerical boundary approximations on stability, accuracy, and convergence rate of the numerical solution are discussed.

  7. Educational Accounting Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidwell, Sam B.

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" reviews the functions, procedures, and reports with which school business officials must be familiar in order to interpret and make decisions regarding the school district's financial position. Among the accounting functions discussed are financial management, internal auditing,…

  8. Student Loan Collection Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This manual on the collection of student loans is intended for the use of business officers and loan collection personnel of colleges and universities of all sizes. The introductory chapter is an overview of sound collection practices and procedures. It discusses the making of a loan, in-school servicing of the accounts, the exit interview, the…

  9. Write Procedures That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubberley, Carol W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses written procedures that explain library tasks and describes methods for writing them clearly and coherently. The use of appropriate terminology and vocabulary is discussed; the value of illustrations, typography, and format to enhance the visual effect is explained; the intended audience is considered; and examples are given. (seven…

  10. Simulating Laboratory Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of computer assisted instruction in a medical microbiology course. Presents examples of how computer assisted instruction can present case histories in which the laboratory procedures are simulated. Discusses an authoring system used to prepare computer simulations and provides one example of a case history dealing with fractured…

  11. Pediatric Procedural Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Ronald L.; Piira, Tiina; Cohen, Lindsey L.; Cheng, Patricia S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the various settings in which infants, children, and adolescents experience pain during acute medical procedures and issues related to referral of children to pain management teams. In addition, self-report, reports by others, physiological monitoring, and direct observation methods of assessment of pain and related constructs…

  12. Visual Screening: A Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert T.

    Vision is a complex process involving three phases: physical (acuity), physiological (integrative), and psychological (perceptual). Although these phases cannot be considered discrete, they provide the basis for the visual screening procedure used by the Reading Services of Colorado State University and described in this document. Ten tests are…

  13. Special Education: Procedural Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The guide is intended to provide information to administrators and regional and local case study committees on special education procedures within Department of Defense Dependents Schools (DoDDS). The manual addresses a step-by step approach from referral to the implementation of individualized education programs (IEP). The following topics are…

  14. Subsea HIPPS design procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Aaroe, R.; Lund, B.F.; Onshus, T.

    1995-12-31

    The paper is based on a feasibility study investigating the possibilities of using a HIPPS (High Integrity Pressure Protection System) to protect a subsea pipeline that is not rated for full wellhead shut-in pressure. The study was called the Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study, and was performed by SINTEF, Norway. Here, OPPS is an acronym for Overpressure Pipeline Protection System. A design procedure for a subsea HIPPS is described, based on the experience and knowledge gained through the ``Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study``. Before a subsea HIPPS can be applied, its technical feasibility, reliability and profitability must be demonstrated. The subsea HIPPS design procedure will help to organize and plan the design activities both with respect to development and verification of a subsea HIPPS. The paper also gives examples of how some of the discussed design steps were performed in the Subsea OPPS Feasibility Study. Finally, further work required to apply a subsea HIPPS is discussed.

  15. Inverse procedure for high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics: Analysis of satellite-borne magnetometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Tomoko; Knipp, Delores J.; Richmond, Arthur D.; Kilcommons, Liam; Anderson, Brian J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of data from the magnetometers on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-15, F-16, F-17, and F-18 satellites and the Iridium satellite constellation, using an inverse procedure for high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics, during the period of 29-30 May 2010. The Iridium magnetometer data are made available through the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) program. The method presented here is built upon the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics procedure but with a more complete treatment of the prior model uncertainty to facilitate an optimal inference of complete polar maps of electrodynamic variables from irregularly distributed observational data. The procedure can provide an objective measure of uncertainty associated with the analysis. The cross-validation analysis, in which the DMSP data are used as independent validation data sets, suggests that the procedure yields the spatial prediction of DMSP perturbation magnetic fields from AMPERE data alone with a median discrepancy of 30-50 nT. Discrepancies larger than 100 nT are seen in about 20% of total samples, whose location and magnitude are generally consistent with the previously identified discrepancy between DMSP and AMPERE data sets. Resulting field-aligned current (FAC) patterns exhibit more distinct spatial patterns without spurious high-frequency oscillatory features in comparison to the FAC products provided by AMPERE. Maps of the toroidal magnetic potential and FAC estimated from both AMPERE and DMSP data under four distinctive interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions during a magnetic cloud event demonstrate the IMF control of high-latitude electrodynamics and the opportunity for future scientific investigation.

  16. The calcaneo-stop procedure.

    PubMed

    Usuelli, F G; Montrasio, U Alfieri

    2012-06-01

    Flexible flatfoot is one of the most common deformities. Arthroereisis procedures are designed to correct this deformity. Among them, the calcaneo-stop is a procedure with both biomechanical and proprioceptive properties. It is designed for pediatric treatment. Results similar to endorthesis procedure are reported. Theoretically the procedure can be applied to adults if combined with other procedures to obtain a stable plantigrade foot, but medium-term follow up studies are missing.

  17. Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarria, D.E.; Davidson, J.R.; Espegren, M.L.; Kearl, P.M.; Knott, R.R.; Pierce, G.A.; Retolaza, C.D.; Smuin, D.R.; Wilson, M.J.; Witt, D.A. ); Conklin, N.G.; Egidi, P.V.; Ertel, D.B.; Foster, D.S.; Krall, B.J.; Meredith, R.L.; Rice, J.A.; Roemer, E.K. )

    1991-02-01

    This procedures manual combines the existing procedures for radiological and chemical assessment of hazardous wastes used by the Pollutant Assessments Group at the time of manuscript completion (October 1, 1990). These procedures will be revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy and support procedures. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures.

  18. Pipe Cleaning Operating Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.; Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-01-24

    This cleaning procedure outlines the steps involved in cleaning the high purity argon lines associated with the DO calorimeters. The procedure is broken down into 7 cycles: system setup, initial flush, wash, first rinse, second rinse, final rinse and drying. The system setup involves preparing the pump cart, line to be cleaned, distilled water, and interconnecting hoses and fittings. The initial flush is an off-line flush of the pump cart and its plumbing in order to preclude contaminating the line. The wash cycle circulates the detergent solution (Micro) at 180 degrees Fahrenheit through the line to be cleaned. The first rinse is then intended to rid the line of the majority of detergent and only needs to run for 30 minutes and at ambient temperature. The second rinse (if necessary) should eliminate the remaining soap residue. The final rinse is then intended to be a check that there is no remaining soap or other foreign particles in the line, particularly metal 'chips.' The final rinse should be run at 180 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 90 minutes. The filters should be changed after each cycle, paying particular attention to the wash cycle and the final rinse cycle return filters. These filters, which should be bagged and labeled, prove that the pipeline is clean. Only distilled water should be used for all cycles, especially rinsing. The level in the tank need not be excessive, merely enough to cover the heater float switch. The final rinse, however, may require a full 50 gallons. Note that most of the details of the procedure are included in the initial flush description. This section should be referred to if problems arise in the wash or rinse cycles.

  19. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  20. Radiometric correction procedure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colby, C.; Sands, R.; Murphrey, S.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of MSS radiometric processing techniques identified as a preferred radiometric processing technique a procedure which equalizes the mean and standard deviation of detector-specific histograms of uncalibrated scene data. Evaluation of MSS calibration data demonstrated that the relationship between detector responses is essentially linear over the range of intensities typically observed in MSS data, and that the calibration wedge data possess a high degree of temporal stability. An analysis of the preferred radiometric processing technique showed that it could be incorporated into the MDP-MSS system without a major redesign of the system, and with minimal impact on system throughput.

  1. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation.

  2. Advanced crew procedures development techniques: Procedures and performance program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Mangiaracina, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Procedures and Performance Program (PPP) for operation in conjunction with the Shuttle Procedures Simulator (SPS) is described. The PPP user interface, the SPS/PPP interface, and the PPP applications software are discussed.

  3. Regulations and Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lydia J.

    2011-07-25

    The purpose of the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM) is to provide LBNL personnel with a reference to University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Laboratory) policies and regulations by outlining normal practices and answering most policy questions that arise in the day-to-day operations of Laboratory organizations. Much of the information in this manual has been condensed from detail provided in LBNL procedure manuals, Department of Energy (DOE) directives, and Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This manual is not intended, however, to replace any of those documents. RPM sections on personnel apply only to employees who are not represented by unions. Personnel policies pertaining to employees represented by unions may be found in their labor agreements. Questions concerning policy interpretation should be directed to the LBNL organization responsible for the particular policy. A link to the Managers Responsible for RPM Sections is available on the RPM home page. If it is not clear which organization is responsible for a policy, please contact Requirements Manager Lydia Young or the RPM Editor.

  4. Designing Flight Deck Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl

    2005-01-01

    Three reports address the design of flight-deck procedures and various aspects of human interaction with cockpit systems that have direct impact on flight safety. One report, On the Typography of Flight- Deck Documentation, discusses basic research about typography and the kind of information needed by designers of flight deck documentation. Flight crews reading poorly designed documentation may easily overlook a crucial item on the checklist. The report surveys and summarizes the available literature regarding the design and typographical aspects of printed material. It focuses on typographical factors such as proper typefaces, character height, use of lower- and upper-case characters, line length, and spacing. Graphical aspects such as layout, color coding, fonts, and character contrast are discussed; and several cockpit conditions such as lighting levels and glare are addressed, as well as usage factors such as angular alignment, paper quality, and colors. Most of the insights and recommendations discussed in this report are transferable to paperless cockpit systems of the future and computer-based procedure displays (e.g., "electronic flight bag") in aerospace systems and similar systems that are used in other industries such as medical, nuclear systems, maritime operations, and military systems.

  5. Regulations and Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lydia

    2010-09-30

    The purpose of the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM) is to provide Laboratory personnel with a reference to University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory policies and regulations by outlining the normal practices and answering most policy questions that arise in the day-to-day operations of Laboratory departments. Much of the information in this manual has been condensed from detail provided in Laboratory procedure manuals, Department of Energy (DOE) directives, and Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This manual is not intended, however, to replace any of those documents. The sections on personnel apply only to employees who are not represented by unions. Personnel policies pertaining to employees represented by unions may be found in their labor agreements. Questions concerning policy interpretation should be directed to the department responsible for the particular policy. A link to the Managers Responsible for RPM Sections is available on the RPM home page. If it is not clear which department should be called, please contact the Associate Laboratory Director of Operations.

  6. Group Syntality and Parliamentary Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Larry James; Kell, Carl L.

    The group syntality concept of Raymond B. Cattell furnishes a useful framework for teaching parliamentary procedure. Although there are contrasts between the histories, subject matters, and perspectives of the areas of parliamentary procedure and group dynamics, teachers and students of parliamentary procedure might profitably draw from some of…

  7. Policy and Procedures Manual. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior Colleges, Jackson.

    The Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior College Policy and Procedures Manual has been established by the State Board to govern its actions and activities and those of the staff. It describes polices and procedures regarding board operations, staff employment, staff workplace, employee performance/grievance procedure, staff positions,…

  8. Advanced crew procedures development techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Mangiaracina, A. A.; Mcgavern, J. L.; Spangler, M. C.; Tatum, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    The development of an operational computer program, the Procedures and Performance Program (PPP), is reported which provides a procedures recording and crew/vehicle performance monitoring capability. The PPP provides real time CRT displays and postrun hardcopy of procedures, difference procedures, performance, performance evaluation, and training script/training status data. During post-run, the program is designed to support evaluation through the reconstruction of displays to any point in time. A permanent record of the simulation exercise can be obtained via hardcopy output of the display data, and via magnetic tape transfer to the Generalized Documentation Processor (GDP). Reference procedures data may be transferred from the GDP to the PPP.

  9. Development of preventive maintenance procedures.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, S

    1984-01-01

    A large number of in-house preventive maintenance (PM) programs, which call for varying degrees of thoroughness in the checkout of patient care instrumentation, are currently in existence throughout the country. This paper discusses the types of preventive maintenance, or PM procedures, which can be used by a clinical engineering department; the rationale for drafting different types of PM procedures in-house; and some long-term considerations affecting hospital-based inspection programs. Three types of PM procedures are described and compared: general checks; generic procedures; and, specific procedures. An outline is provided for writing a PM procedure; and, a call is made for a national guideline for writing preventive maintenance procedures.

  10. Combined procedures in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Atul; Chowbey, Pradeep K; Sharma, Anil; Khullar, Rajesh; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2003-12-01

    With advancements in minimal access surgery, combined laparoscopic procedures are now being performed for treating coexisting abdominal pathologies at the same surgery. In our center, we performed 145 combined surgical procedures from January 1999 to December 2002. Of the 145 procedures, 130 were combined laparoscopic/endoscopic procedures and 15 were open procedures combined with endoscopic procedures. The combination included laparoscopic cholecystectomy, various hernia repairs, and gynecological procedures like hysterectomy, salpingectomy, ovarian cystectomy, tubal ligation, urological procedures, fundoplication, splenectomy, hemicolectomy, and cystogastrostomy. In the same period, 40 patients who had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy and 40 patients who had undergone ventral hernia repair were randomly selected for comparison of intraoperative outcomes with a combined procedure group. All the combined surgical procedures were performed successfully. The most common procedure was laparoscopic cholecystectomy with another endoscopic procedure in 129 patients. The mean operative time was 100 minutes (range 30-280 minutes). The longest time was taken for the patient who had undergone laparoscopic splenectomy with renal transplant (280 minutes). The mean hospital stay was 3.2 days (range 1-21 days). The pain experienced in the postoperative period measured on the visual analogue scale ranged from 2 to 5 with a mean of 3.1. Of 145 patients who underwent combined surgical procedures, 5 patients developed fever in the immediate postoperative period, 7 patients had port site hematoma, 5 patients developed wound sepsis, and 10 patients had urinary retention. As long as the basic surgical principles and indications for combined procedures are adhered to, more patients with concomitant pathologies can enjoy the benefit of minimal access surgery. Minimal access surgery is feasible and appears to have several advantages in simultaneous management of two different

  11. NASA trend analysis procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is primarily intended for use by NASA personnel engaged in managing or implementing trend analysis programs. 'Trend analysis' refers to the observation of current activity in the context of the past in order to infer the expected level of future activity. NASA trend analysis was divided into 5 categories: problem, performance, supportability, programmatic, and reliability. Problem trend analysis uncovers multiple occurrences of historical hardware or software problems or failures in order to focus future corrective action. Performance trend analysis observes changing levels of real-time or historical flight vehicle performance parameters such as temperatures, pressures, and flow rates as compared to specification or 'safe' limits. Supportability trend analysis assesses the adequacy of the spaceflight logistics system; example indicators are repair-turn-around time and parts stockage levels. Programmatic trend analysis uses quantitative indicators to evaluate the 'health' of NASA programs of all types. Finally, reliability trend analysis attempts to evaluate the growth of system reliability based on a decreasing rate of occurrence of hardware problems over time. Procedures for conducting all five types of trend analysis are provided in this publication, prepared through the joint efforts of the NASA Trend Analysis Working Group.

  12. Safeguards management inspection procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, M.J.; Dunn, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this inspection module is to independently assess the contributions of licensee management to overall safeguards systems performance. The inspector accomplishes this objective by comparing the licensee's safeguards management to both the 10 CFR, parts 70 and 73, requirements and to generally accepted management practices. The vehicle by which this comparison is to be made consists of assessment questions and key issues which point the inspector to areas of primary concern to the NRC and which raise additional issues for the purpose of exposing management ineffectiveness. Further insight into management effectiveness is obtained through those assessment questions specifically directed toward the licensee's safeguards system performance. If the quality of the safeguards is poor, then the inspector should strongly suspect that management's role is ineffective and should attempt to determine management's influence (or lack thereof) on the underlying safeguards deficiencies. (The converse is not necessarily true, however.) The assessment questions in essence provide an opportunity for the inspector to identify, to single out, and to probe further, questionable management practices. Specific issues, circumstances, and concerns which point to questionable or inappropriate practices should be explicitly identified and referenced against the CFR and the assessment questions. The inspection report should also explain why the inspector feels certain management practices are poor, counter to the CFR, and/or point to ineffecive management. Concurrent with documenting the inspection results, the inspector should provide recommendations for alleviating observed management practices that are detrimental to effective safeguards. The recommendations could include: specific changes in the practices of the licensee, followup procedures on the part of NRC, and proposed license changes.

  13. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  14. Documenting Laboratory Procedures with Video

    PubMed Central

    Wyttenbach, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Demonstrating laboratory procedures in person during class time can be time-consuming. When procedures are done under a microscope, live demonstration is also impractical because of the limited number of students who can view the demonstration at once. Creating videos beforehand, which students can watch before class and review during lab sessions, solves both of these problems. This article suggests ways to make and distribute high quality video of microscopic procedures. PMID:26240520

  15. Coding for urologic office procedures.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Robert A; Painter, Mark

    2013-11-01

    This article summarizes current best practices for documenting, coding, and billing common office-based urologic procedures. Topics covered include general principles, basic and advanced urologic coding, creation of medical records that support compliant coding practices, bundled codes and unbundling, global periods, modifiers for procedure codes, when to bill for evaluation and management services during the same visit, coding for supplies, and laboratory and radiology procedures pertinent to urology practice. Detailed information is included for the most common urology office procedures, and suggested resources and references are provided. This information is of value to physicians, office managers, and their coding staff.

  16. Training for advanced endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Feurer, Matthew E; Draganov, Peter V

    2016-06-01

    Advanced endoscopy has evolved from diagnostic ERCP to an ever-increasing array of therapeutic procedures including EUS with FNA, ablative therapies, deep enteroscopy, luminal stenting, endoscopic suturing and endoscopic mucosal resection among others. As these procedures have become increasingly more complex, the risk of potential complications has also risen. Training in advanced endoscopy involves more than obtaining a minimum number of therapeutic procedures. The means of assessing a trainee's competence level and ability to practice independently continues to be a matter of debate. The use of quality indicators to measure performance levels may be beneficial as more advanced techniques and procedures become available.

  17. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Electronic procedures are replacing text-based documents for recording the steps in performing medical operations aboard the International Space Station. S&K Aerospace, LLC, has developed a content-based electronic system-based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) standard-that separates text from formatting standards and tags items contained in procedures so they can be recognized by other electronic systems. For example, to change a standard format, electronic procedures are changed in a single batch process, and the entire body of procedures will have the new format. Procedures can be quickly searched to determine which are affected by software and hardware changes. Similarly, procedures are easily shared with other electronic systems. The system also enables real-time data capture and automatic bookmarking of current procedure steps. In Phase II of the project, S&K Aerospace developed a Procedure Representation Language (PRL) and tools to support the creation and maintenance of electronic procedures for medical operations. The goal is to develop these tools in such a way that new advances can be inserted easily, leading to an eventual medical decision support system.

  18. Laboratory Procedures for Medical Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Pauline

    The purpose of the manual is to provide the medical assisting student a text which presents the common laboratory procedures in use today in physician's offices. The procedures for performing a complete urinalysis are outlined, along with those for carrying out various hematological tests. Information is also presented to help the student learn to…

  19. Research Commentary: Reconceptualizing Procedural Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Jon R.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, I argue for a renewed focus in mathematics education research on procedural knowledge. I make three main points: (1) The development of students' procedural knowledge has not received a great deal of attention in recent research; (2) one possible explanation for this deficiency is that current characterizations of conceptual and…

  20. 76 FR 62092 - Filing Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE... issuing a Handbook on Filing Procedures to replace its Handbook on Electronic Filing Procedures. The revision is necessary to implement a new Commission requirement for electronic filing of most...

  1. Intranasal ethmoidectomy and concurrent procedures.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J S; Crocker, P V; Keebler, J S

    1982-07-01

    In this review of 526 intranasal ethmoidectomy procedures, there was a complication rate of 2.5% with no blindness, meningitis, or deaths. The rationale for associated concurrent procedures is presented. The use of an absorbable hemostatic sinus sponge and an easily removable Telfa nasal packing made possible just a two-night hospital stay in over 90% of these patients.

  2. 22 CFR 217.61 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures § 217.61 Procedures. The procedural provisons applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 apply to this part. These procedures are found...

  3. 45 CFR 84.61 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures § 84.61 Procedures. The procedural provisions applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 apply to this part. These procedures...

  4. A study of methyl bromide emissions from automobiles burning leaded gasoline using standardized vehicle testing procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Frank J.; Kolowich, J. Bruce

    2000-05-01

    This study measured CH3Br emissions directly from vehicular exhaust while operating under standardized dynamometer conditions, and generated response curves to see if the bromine content of the fuel could be correlated to and used as a predictor for tailpipe emissions. Four lead and bromine fuel concentrations were run in two non-catalyst automobiles using the standard Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle and exhaust samples were analyzed for CH3Br using Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detection (GC-ECD). Total FTP exhaust emissions of CH3Br produced a range of average values from below detection to 26 mg (kg fuel burned)-1. Total FTP Emission Rates were plotted and response curves demonstrated that fuel bromine content was indeed predictive of CH3Br emission rates. Overall average CH3Br mass emission factor was 2.4% (2.1 - 2.7%) which was lower than previous work. Emission results of this study were found to be about 10-fold lower than indirect methods.

  5. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  6. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that acts like a scalpel (surgical knife). An electric current is passed through the loop, which cuts away ... A procedure in which an instrument works with electric current to destroy tissue. Local Anesthesia: The use of ...

  7. Quarantine document system indexing procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Quarantine Document System (QDS) is described including the indexing procedures and thesaurus of indexing terms. The QDS consists of these functional elements: acquisition, cataloging, indexing, storage, and retrieval. A complete listing of the collection, and the thesaurus are included.

  8. Surface Environmental Surveillance Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, RW; Dirkes, RL

    1990-02-01

    This manual establishes the procedures for the collection of environmental samples and the performance of radiation surveys and other field measurements. Responsibilities are defined for those personnel directly involved in the collection of samples and the performance of field measurements.

  9. Interventional procedures in the chest.

    PubMed

    Vollmer Torrubiano, I; Sánchez González, M

    2016-05-01

    Many thoracic conditions will require an interventional procedure for diagnosis and/or treatment. For this reason, radiologists need to know the indications and the technique for each procedure. In this article, we review the various interventional procedures that radiologists should know and the indications for each procedure. We place special emphasis on the potential differences in the diagnostic results and complications between fine-needle aspiration and biopsy. We also discuss the indications for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumors and review the concepts related to the drainage of pulmonary abscesses. We devote special attention to the management of pleural effusion, covering the indications for thoracocentesis and when to use imaging guidance, and to the protocol for pleural drainage. We also discuss the indications for percutaneous treatment of pericardial effusion and the possible complications of this treatment. Finally, we discuss the interventional management of mediastinal lesions and provide practical advice about how to approach these lesions to avoid serious complications.

  10. [Euthanasia: medications and medical procedures].

    PubMed

    Lossignol, D

    2008-09-01

    The Belgian law relative to euthanasia has been published in 2002. A physician is allowed to help a patient with intractable suffering (physical or psychological). Legal conditions are clear. However, nothing is said about medical procedures or medications to be used. The present paper will present specific clinical situations at the end of life, practical procedures and medications. A special focus is made on psychological impact of euthanasia.

  11. Establishment of new asylum procedures.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    As of May 1988, the Austrian Government instituted new accelerated asylum procedures which enable applicants to know within a short time whether they are granted refugee status. Those who are not granted such status are refused further government assistance and asked to leave the country. This change in procedures was undertaken in part because of the increased number of applicants resulting from the abolishment of the visa requirement for citizens of Hungary and Poland travelling to Austria.

  12. The H50Q Mutation Induces a 10-fold Decrease in the Solubility of α-Synuclein*

    PubMed Central

    Porcari, Riccardo; Proukakis, Christos; Waudby, Christopher A.; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Mangione, P. Patrizia; Paton, Jack F. S.; Mullin, Stephen; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; Verona, Guglielmo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Stoppini, Monica; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Camilloni, Carlo; Christodoulou, John; Schapira, Anthony H. V.; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of α-synuclein from its intrinsically disordered monomeric state into the fibrillar cross-β aggregates characteristically present in Lewy bodies is largely unknown. The investigation of α-synuclein variants causative of familial forms of Parkinson disease can provide unique insights into the conditions that promote or inhibit aggregate formation. It has been shown recently that a newly identified pathogenic mutation of α-synuclein, H50Q, aggregates faster than the wild-type. We investigate here its aggregation propensity by using a sequence-based prediction algorithm, NMR chemical shift analysis of secondary structure populations in the monomeric state, and determination of thermodynamic stability of the fibrils. Our data show that the H50Q mutation induces only a small increment in polyproline II structure around the site of the mutation and a slight increase in the overall aggregation propensity. We also find, however, that the H50Q mutation strongly stabilizes α-synuclein fibrils by 5.0 ± 1.0 kJ mol−1, thus increasing the supersaturation of monomeric α-synuclein within the cell, and strongly favors its aggregation process. We further show that wild-type α-synuclein can decelerate the aggregation kinetics of the H50Q variant in a dose-dependent manner when coaggregating with it. These last findings suggest that the precise balance of α-synuclein synthesized from the wild-type and mutant alleles may influence the natural history and heterogeneous clinical phenotype of Parkinson disease. PMID:25505181

  13. Prediction of 10-fold coordinated TiO2 and SiO2 structures at multimegabar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Matthew J.; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We predict by first-principles methods a phase transition in TiO2 at 6.5 Mbar from the Fe2P-type polymorph to a ten-coordinated structure with space group I4/mmm. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of the pressure-induced phase transition to the I4/mmm structure among all dioxide compounds. The I4/mmm structure was found to be up to 3.3% denser across all pressures investigated. Significant differences were found in the electronic properties of the two structures, and the metallization of TiO2 was calculated to occur concomitantly with the phase transition to I4/mmm. The implications of our findings were extended to SiO2, and an analogous Fe2P-type to I4/mmm transition was found to occur at 10 TPa. This is consistent with the lower-pressure phase transitions of TiO2, which are well-established models for the phase transitions in other AX2 compounds, including SiO2. As in TiO2, the transition to I4/mmm corresponds to the metallization of SiO2. This transformation is in the pressure range reached in the interiors of recently discovered extrasolar planets and calls for a reformulation of the equations of state used to model them. PMID:25991859

  14. 13 Years of TOPEX/POSEIDON Precision Orbit Determination and the 10-fold Improvement in Expected Orbit Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Klosko, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Launched in the summer of 1992, TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) was a joint mission between NASA and the Centre National d Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French Space Agency, to make precise radar altimeter measurements of the ocean surface. After the remarkably successful 13-years of mapping the ocean surface T/P lost its ability to maneuver and was de-commissioned January 2006. T/P revolutionized the study of the Earth s oceans by vastly exceeding pre-launch estimates of surface height accuracy recoverable from radar altimeter measurements. The precision orbit lies at the heart of the altimeter measurement providing the reference frame from which the radar altimeter measurements are made. The expected quality of orbit knowledge had limited the measurement accuracy expectations of past altimeter missions, and still remains a major component in the error budget of all altimeter missions. This paper describes critical improvements made to the T/P orbit time series over the 13-years of precise orbit determination (POD) provided by the GSFC Space Geodesy Laboratory. The POD improvements from the pre-launch T/P expectation of radial orbit accuracy and Mission requirement of 13-cm to an expected accuracy of about 1.5-cm with today s latest orbits will be discussed. The latest orbits with 1.5 cm RMS radial accuracy represent a significant improvement to the 2.0-cm accuracy orbits currently available on the T/P Geophysical Data Record (GDR) altimeter product.

  15. Certification procedure of building thermographers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Timo T.; Paloniitty, Sauli; Krankka, Juha

    2005-03-01

    Thermography has been used in Finland in building survey from the late 70s. The service has been provided by consultants, whose background is varied. When technology and devices have improved and the prices have increased, more and more doers have come into the market. At the same time, building developers and contractors have begun to use thermography for quality control in new building. Thermography has also been used in renovation planning. The problem is, that there are no procedures for building thermography, no guidelines to order the thermography services, no instructions how to scan, how to report and most important -- how to interpret the results. That fact has caused a lot of problems and also damaged the reputation and reliability of the method. In this year 2004 the various organizations in building trade launched a pilot project to certificate building thermographers. The procedure is divided into two parts: Part 1 is Level I (the basis of thermography) and Part II (divided into two periods) thermography applications of buildings, including also information on building physics, heat and mass transfer and structures. Both parts will take a week, two weeks in total with the examinations. The procedure follows moisture measurement procedure -- certification of building moisture measurements started a couple of years ago. In the paper the procedure, problems and the future plans are introduced. The following big issue is to develop and improve the interpretation procedure for reporting the results of thermography.

  16. Collected radiochemical and geochemical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberg, J

    1990-05-01

    This revision of LA-1721, 4th Ed., Collected Radiochemical Procedures, reflects the activities of two groups in the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory: INC-11, Nuclear and radiochemistry; and INC-7, Isotope Geochemistry. The procedures fall into five categories: I. Separation of Radionuclides from Uranium, Fission-Product Solutions, and Nuclear Debris; II. Separation of Products from Irradiated Targets; III. Preparation of Samples for Mass Spectrometric Analysis; IV. Dissolution Procedures; and V. Geochemical Procedures. With one exception, the first category of procedures is ordered by the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table, with separate parts on the Representative Elements (the A groups); the d-Transition Elements (the B groups and the Transition Triads); and the Lanthanides (Rare Earths) and Actinides (the 4f- and 5f-Transition Elements). The members of Group IIIB-- scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum--are included with the lanthanides, elements they resemble closely in chemistry and with which they occur in nature. The procedures dealing with the isolation of products from irradiated targets are arranged by target element.

  17. Consent procedures in pediatric biobanks

    PubMed Central

    Giesbertz, Noor AA; Bredenoord, Annelien L; van Delden, Johannes JM

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of children's samples in biobanks brings forward specific ethical issues. Guidelines indicate that children should be involved in the consent procedure. It is, however, unclear how to allocate an appropriate role for children. Knowledge of current practice will be helpful in addressing this issue. Therefore, we conducted an international multiple-case study on the child's role in consent procedures in pediatric biobanks. Four biobanks were included: (1) LifeLines, (2) Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA), (3) Young-HUNT3 and (4) the Oxford Radcliffe Biobank contribution to the Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group tissue bank (ORB/CCLG). Four themes linked to the child's role in the consent procedure emerged from the multiple-case study: (1) motives to involve the child, (2) informing the child, (3) the role of dissent, assent and consent and (4) voluntariness of children to participate. We conclude that biobank characteristics influence the biobank's motives to include children in the consent procedure. Moreover, the motives to include children influence how the children are involved in the consent procedure, and the extent to which children are able to make voluntary decisions as part of the consent procedure. This insight is valuable when designing pediatric biobank governance. PMID:25537361

  18. 21 CFR 1270.31 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Written procedures. 1270.31 Section 1270.31 Food... FOR TRANSPLANTATION Procedures and Records § 1270.31 Written procedures. (a) There shall be written... the procedures are performed unless impractical. Any deviation from the written procedures shall...

  19. 21 CFR 1270.31 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Written procedures. 1270.31 Section 1270.31 Food... FOR TRANSPLANTATION Procedures and Records § 1270.31 Written procedures. (a) There shall be written... the procedures are performed unless impractical. Any deviation from the written procedures shall...

  20. 21 CFR 1270.31 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Written procedures. 1270.31 Section 1270.31 Food... FOR TRANSPLANTATION Procedures and Records § 1270.31 Written procedures. (a) There shall be written... the procedures are performed unless impractical. Any deviation from the written procedures shall...

  1. 21 CFR 1270.31 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Written procedures. 1270.31 Section 1270.31 Food... FOR TRANSPLANTATION Procedures and Records § 1270.31 Written procedures. (a) There shall be written... the procedures are performed unless impractical. Any deviation from the written procedures shall...

  2. 21 CFR 1270.31 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Written procedures. 1270.31 Section 1270.31 Food... FOR TRANSPLANTATION Procedures and Records § 1270.31 Written procedures. (a) There shall be written... the procedures are performed unless impractical. Any deviation from the written procedures shall...

  3. 40 CFR 1033.315 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test procedures. 1033.315 Section 1033... Programs § 1033.315 Test procedures. (a) Test procedures. Use the test procedures described in subpart F of this part, except as specified in this section. (1) You may ask to use other test procedures. We...

  4. 40 CFR 1033.315 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test procedures. 1033.315 Section 1033... Programs § 1033.315 Test procedures. (a) Test procedures. Use the test procedures described in subpart F of this part, except as specified in this section. (1) You may ask to use other test procedures. We...

  5. 40 CFR 1033.315 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test procedures. 1033.315 Section 1033... Programs § 1033.315 Test procedures. (a) Test procedures. Use the test procedures described in subpart F of this part, except as specified in this section. (1) You may ask to use other test procedures. We...

  6. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James F.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The advantages of dye tracing are (1) low detection and measurement limits and (2) simplicity and accuracy in measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section on aerial photography is included because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry.

  7. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James E.; Cobb, E.D.; Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The outstanding characteristics of dye tracing are: (1) the low detection and measurement limits, and (2) the simplicity and accuracy of measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a general guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section is included on aerial photography because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry. (USGS)

  8. Fluorometric procedures for dye tracing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, James F.; Cobb, Ernest D.; Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    This manual describes the current fluorometric procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey in dye tracer studies such as time of travel, dispersion, reaeration, and dilution-type discharge measurements. The advantages of dye tracing are (1) low detection and measurement limits and (2) simplicity and accuracy in measuring dye tracer concentrations using fluorometric techniques. The manual contains necessary background information about fluorescence, dyes, and fluorometers and a description of fluorometric operation and calibration procedures as a guide for laboratory and field use. The background information should be useful to anyone wishing to experiment with dyes, fluorometer components, or procedures different from those described. In addition, a brief section on aerial photography is included because of its possible use to supplement ground-level fluorometry.

  9. Designing Flight-Deck Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, L.; Shafto, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A complex human-machine system consists of more than merely one or more human operators and a collection of hardware components. In order to operate a complex system successfully, the human-machine system must be supported by an organizational infrastructure of operating concepts, rules, guidelines, and documents. The coherency of such operating concepts, in terms of consistency and logic, is vitally important for the efficiency and safety of any complex system. In high-risk endeavors such as aircraft operations, space flight, nuclear power production, manufacturing process control, and military operations, it is essential that such support be flawless, as the price of operational error can be high. When operating rules are not adhered to, or the rules are inadequate for the task at hand, not only will the system's goals be thwarted, but there may also be tragic human and material consequences. To ensure safe and predictable operations, support to the operators, in this case flight crews, often comes in the form of standard operating procedures. These provide the crew with step-by-step guidance for carrying out their operations. Standard procedures do indeed promote uniformity, but they do so at the risk of reducing the role of human operators to a lower level. Management, however, must recognize the danger of over-procedurization, which fails to exploit one of the most valuable assets in the system, the intelligent operator who is "on the scene." The alert system designer and operations manager recognize that there cannot be a procedure for everything, and the time will come in which the operators of a complex system will face a situation for which there is no written procedure. Procedures, whether executed by humans or machines, have their place, but so does human cognition.

  10. 13 CFR 113.605 - Enforcement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures § 113.605 Enforcement procedures. The investigative, compliance, and enforcement procedural provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d) (“Title VI”) are hereby adopted...

  11. Falsification Procedures for Behavioral Research in Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frentz, Thomas S.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that reliance upon verification procedures has inhibited theory building in communication. Advances four falsification procedures and presents examples from communication studies. Offers several implications these procedures have for empirical research in communication. (PD)

  12. 14 CFR 217.8 - Reporting procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REPORTING TRAFFIC STATISTICS BY FOREIGN AIR CARRIERS IN CIVILIAN SCHEDULED, CHARTER, AND NONSCHEDULED SERVICES § 217.8 Reporting procedures. Reporting guidelines and procedures for Schedule...

  13. Illustration of a Learning Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borghouts-van Erp, J. W. M.

    The paper describes evolution of an approach to teaching mathematically disabled and slow learning students through a Piagetian framework. It is explained that a step-by-step procedure is used to internalize material actions into mental actions via perception and verbalization. Formulae are introduced early, and emphasis is placed on promoting…

  14. 78 FR 22546 - Hearing Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... explanation of the basis of the proposed determination. 12 U.S.C. 5323(e)(1) and 12 C.F.R. 1310.21(b). However... comments were submitted.\\3\\ \\1\\ 12 U.S.C. 5321, 5323, 5463, and 5469. \\2\\ Hearing Procedures; Notice of... institution engaged in a payment, clearing, or settlement activity that requests a hearing. \\4\\ 12......

  15. Arkansas' Office Procedures Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Dean

    This curriculum guide provides teachers of office procedures classes with unit lesson plans and information about resource materials that can be examined, selected, and integrated into the instructional program. Contents are mainly established for the following two types of secondary-level programs: cooperative office education and intensive…

  16. Manual of General Searching Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Univ. Libraries

    A training and reference tool for searchers in the Preorder Section of Cornell's Olin Library Acquisitions Department, this manual establishes the rationale for searching operations and includes illustrations as well as detailed explanations of searching procedures and problems. The information given applies only to the searching of monographs,…

  17. Software Verification and Validation Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Olund, Thomas S.

    2008-09-15

    This Software Verification and Validation procedure provides the action steps for the Tank Waste Information Network System (TWINS) testing process. The primary objective of the testing process is to provide assurance that the software functions as intended, and meets the requirements specified by the client. Verification and validation establish the primary basis for TWINS software product acceptance.

  18. Rules of Procedure for Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Commission on Professional Rights and Responsibilities.

    Among the functions of the Commission on Professional Rights and Responsibilities of the NEA is the investigation of cases of alleged unethical conduct by members of the teaching profession. The rules of procedure for investigations presented in this document are intended to assure all parties in a conflict of their individual rights of procedural…

  19. Procedural learning during declarative control.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Matthew J; Ashby, F Gregory

    2015-09-01

    There is now abundant evidence that human learning and memory are governed by multiple systems. As a result, research is now turning to the next question of how these putative systems interact. For instance, how is overall control of behavior coordinated, and does learning occur independently within systems regardless of what system is in control? Behavioral, neuroimaging, and neuroscience data are somewhat mixed with respect to these questions. Human neuroimaging and animal lesion studies suggest independent learning and are mostly agnostic with respect to control. Human behavioral studies suggest active inhibition of behavioral output but have little to say regarding learning. The results of two perceptual category-learning experiments are described that strongly suggest that procedural learning does occur while the explicit system is in control of behavior and that this learning might be just as good as if the procedural system was controlling the response. These results are consistent with the idea that declarative memory systems inhibit the ability of the procedural system to access motor output systems but do not prevent procedural learning.

  20. The Maryland Refutation Proof Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minker, Jack; And Others

    The Maryland Refutation Proof Procedure System (MRPPS) is an interactive experimental system intended for studying deductive search methods. Although the work is oriented towards question-answering, MRPPS provides a general problem solving capability. There are three major components within MRPPS. These are: (1) an inference system, (2) a search…

  1. Network-Based Management Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckner, Allen L.

    Network-based management procedures serve as valuable aids in organizational management, achievement of objectives, problem solving, and decisionmaking. Network techniques especially applicable to educational management systems are the program evaluation and review technique (PERT) and the critical path method (CPM). Other network charting…

  2. The transfer of analytical procedures.

    PubMed

    Ermer, J; Limberger, M; Lis, K; Wätzig, H

    2013-11-01

    Analytical method transfers are certainly among the most discussed topics in the GMP regulated sector. However, they are surprisingly little regulated in detail. General information is provided by USP, WHO, and ISPE in particular. Most recently, the EU emphasized the importance of analytical transfer by including it in their draft of the revised GMP Guideline. In this article, an overview and comparison of these guidelines is provided. The key to success for method transfers is the excellent communication between sending and receiving unit. In order to facilitate this communication, procedures, flow charts and checklists for responsibilities, success factors, transfer categories, the transfer plan and report, strategies in case of failed transfers, tables with acceptance limits are provided here, together with a comprehensive glossary. Potential pitfalls are described such that they can be avoided. In order to assure an efficient and sustainable transfer of analytical procedures, a practically relevant and scientifically sound evaluation with corresponding acceptance criteria is crucial. Various strategies and statistical tools such as significance tests, absolute acceptance criteria, and equivalence tests are thoroughly descibed and compared in detail giving examples. Significance tests should be avoided. The success criterion is not statistical significance, but rather analytical relevance. Depending on a risk assessment of the analytical procedure in question, statistical equivalence tests are recommended, because they include both, a practically relevant acceptance limit and a direct control of the statistical risks. However, for lower risk procedures, a simple comparison of the transfer performance parameters to absolute limits is also regarded as sufficient.

  3. Grievance Procedures. SPEC Kit 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    This collection of grievance procedures from member libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) contains: (1) documents on committee approaches to grievances from University of British Columbia, Center for Research Libraries, University of Connecticut, Harvard University, Michigan State University, and University of Nebraska; (2)…

  4. Environmental Impact Assessment: A Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Lloyd V.

    Prepared by a firm of consulting engineers, this booklet outlines the procedural "whys and hows" of assessing environmental impact, particularly for the construction industry. Section I explores the need for environmental assessment and evaluation to determine environmental impact. It utilizes a review of the National Environmental Policy Act and…

  5. Procedure for dispersing fiber bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, D.

    1974-01-01

    Fiber bundles are dispersed and fibers are cleaned within enclosed container; therefore, safety clothing, masks, and eye protection are not required. Procedure also could be used wherever materials, such as fiberglass or insulation, require dispersion, fluffing, or cleaning. Process could be automated into continuous operation for handling large quantities of fiber.

  6. Concepts & Procedures. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarner, Ronald, Ed.; Mullick, Rosemary J., Ed.; Bauder, Deborah Y., Ed.

    This document contains the following full and short papers on concepts and procedures from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: "Exploring Minds Network" (Marino C. Alvarez and others); "Learning Communities: A Kaleidoscope of Ecological Designs" (Alain Breuleux and others);…

  7. Concepts & Procedures. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauder, Deborah Y., Ed.; Mullick, Rosemary, Ed.; Sarner, Ronald, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on concepts and procedures from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: "Using School District Standards To Develop Thematic Lessons for Electronic Portfolios" (Cindy L. Anderson and others); "Using Adobe Acrobat for Electronic Portfolio…

  8. Budgetary Control Procedures for Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Ray M.

    Budgetary control procedures for not-for-profit institutions are presented in this compilation of budgetary materials and ideas gathered at the Program for Institutional Administrators at the University of Notre Dame. Budgetary reporting and control are suggested as the most effective tools for coordinating and controlling the acquisition and use…

  9. International Studies Program Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelston, Theodore

    This eleven-part procedures manual provides information on the operations of the International Studies Program (ISP) at St. Louis Community College. After introductory material on the program, which provides off-campus credit courses involving travel and field study of life and the cultures in foreign countries, Section I presents the philosophy…

  10. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Antonio; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2014-12-01

    Reestablishing continuity after a Hartmann's procedure is considered a major surgical procedure with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the short-/long-term outcome of laparoscopic restoration of bowel continuity after HP. A prospectively collected database of colorectal laparoscopic procedures (>800) performed between June 2005 and June 2013 was used to identify 20 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure (LHR). Median age was 65.4. Ten patients (50 %) had undergone surgery for perforated diverticulitis, 3 (15 %) for cancer, and 7 (35 %) for other reasons (volvulus, posttraumatic perforation, and sigmoid perforation from foreign body). Previous HP had been performed laparoscopically in only 3 patients. Median operative time was 162.5 min. All the procedures were completed laparoscopically. Intraoperative complication rate was nil. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were respectively 0 and 10 % (1 pneumonia, 1 bowel obstruction from post-anastomotic stenosis which required resection and redo of the anastomosis). Median time to first flatus was 3 days, to normal diet 5 days. Median hospital stay was 9 days without readmissions. We followed up the patients for a median of 44 months: when asked, all 20 (100 %) said they would undergo the operation (LHR) again; 3 (15 %) had been re-operated of laparoscopic mesh repair for incisional hernia. When performed by experienced surgeons, LHR is a feasible, safe, reproducible operation, which allows early return of bowel function, early discharge and fast return to work for the patient. It has a low morbidity rate.

  11. Estimation of uncertainties in geological 3D raster layer models as integral part of modelling procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljers, Denise; den Dulk, Maryke; ten Veen, Johan; Hummelman, Jan; Gunnink, Jan; van Gessel, Serge

    2016-04-01

    applied for DGM Deep proves to be an effective way to (graphically) represent the reliability of the DGM Deep model, although the relative contribution of the various error sources needs further attention. For the DGM Shallow model a cross-validation procedure in a moving window environment has been used to calculate mean deviations and standard errors on a sub-regional scale. Subsequently, these cross validation standard errors have been rescaled to account for local data configuration and clustering. This resulted in standard deviations expressing both regional and local uncertainties. Both workflows are state-of-the-art, form an integral part of the geological modelling and result in reproducible uncertainty values. They can be considered a good starting point for incorporating other errors that contribute to uncertainties of geological 3D raster layer models. For example, the mis-positioning of data used or the error underlying mis-ties at well locations. An additional, perhaps more easy-to-read, parameter that can be calculated to visualize these uncertainties would be the information entropy, as proposed by Wellmann & Regenauer-Lieb (2012). Where a value of 0 means there is no uncertainty, and a value of 1 means there is a high uncertainty. At the moment depth uncertainty information is disseminated through our webportals (www.dinoloket.nl and www.nlog.nl) in an on-line map viewer and as downloadable GIS products.

  12. 29 CFR 2200.120 - Settlement procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... procedure, such procedure shall not be imposed. (2) Length of voluntary settlement procedures. The settlement procedures under this section shall be for a period not to exceed 45 days. (b) Mandatory... aggregate amount of the penalties sought by the Secretary is $100,000 or greater. (2) Proceedings under...

  13. 29 CFR 2200.120 - Settlement procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... procedure, such procedure shall not be imposed. (2) Length of voluntary settlement procedures. The settlement procedures under this section shall be for a period not to exceed 45 days. (b) Mandatory... aggregate amount of the penalties sought by the Secretary is $100,000 or greater. (2) Proceedings under...

  14. 29 CFR 2200.120 - Settlement procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... procedure, such procedure shall not be imposed. (2) Length of voluntary settlement procedures. The settlement procedures under this section shall be for a period not to exceed 45 days. (b) Mandatory... aggregate amount of the penalties sought by the Secretary is $100,000 or greater. (2) Proceedings under...

  15. 29 CFR 2200.120 - Settlement procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... procedure, such procedure shall not be imposed. (2) Length of voluntary settlement procedures. The settlement procedures under this section shall be for a period not to exceed 45 days. (b) Mandatory... aggregate amount of the penalties sought by the Secretary is $100,000 or greater. (2) Proceedings under...

  16. 29 CFR 2200.120 - Settlement procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... procedure, such procedure shall not be imposed. (2) Length of voluntary settlement procedures. The settlement procedures under this section shall be for a period not to exceed 45 days. (b) Mandatory... aggregate amount of the penalties sought by the Secretary is $100,000 or greater. (2) Proceedings under...

  17. 12 CFR 303.121 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing procedures. 303.121 Section 303.121 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE FILING PROCEDURES Activities of Insured State Banks § 303.121 Filing procedures. (a) Where to file. A notice...

  18. 12 CFR 303.201 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing procedures. 303.201 Section 303.201 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE FILING PROCEDURES Prompt Corrective Action § 303.201 Filing procedures. Applications shall be filed with...

  19. 22 CFR 142.70 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures § 142.70 Procedures. The procedural provisions applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 apply to this part. These procedures are found in...

  20. 40 CFR 92.506 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test procedures. 92.506 Section 92.506... and Audit Programs § 92.506 Test procedures. (a)(1) For locomotives and locomotive engines subject to the provisions of this subpart, the prescribed test procedures are those procedures described...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2903 - Security procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security procedures. 193.2903 Section 193.2903...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2903 Security procedures. Each operator shall prepare and follow one or more manuals of written procedures to provide security for each LNG plant. The procedures...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2903 - Security procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security procedures. 193.2903 Section 193.2903...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2903 Security procedures. Each operator shall prepare and follow one or more manuals of written procedures to provide security for each LNG plant. The procedures...

  3. 40 CFR 90.508 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Test procedures. 90.508 Section 90.508....508 Test procedures. (a) For nonroad engines subject to the provisions of this subpart, the prescribed test procedures are the appropriate small SI engine test procedures as described in subpart E of...

  4. 10 CFR 431.154 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test procedures. 431.154 Section 431.154 Energy DEPARTMENT... EQUIPMENT Commercial Clothers Washers Test Procedures § 431.154 Test procedures. The test procedures for residential clothes washers in Appendix J1 to subpart B of part 430 of this title shall be used to...

  5. 40 CFR 89.508 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test procedures. 89.508 Section 89.508... Test procedures. (a)(1) For nonroad engines subject to the provisions of this subpart, the prescribed test procedures are the nonroad engine 8-mode test procedure as described in subpart E of this...

  6. 40 CFR 154.34 - Expedited procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Expedited procedures. 154.34 Section 154.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS SPECIAL REVIEW PROCEDURES Procedures § 154.34 Expedited procedures. (a) The Agency may elect to issue...

  7. 47 CFR 1.1121 - Billing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Billing procedures. 1.1121 Section 1.1121 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Schedule of Statutory Charges and Procedures for Payment § 1.1121 Billing procedures. (a) The fees required for the...

  8. 47 CFR 1.1121 - Billing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Billing procedures. 1.1121 Section 1.1121 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Schedule of Statutory Charges and Procedures for Payment § 1.1121 Billing procedures. (a) The fees required for the...

  9. 40 CFR 154.34 - Expedited procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited procedures. 154.34 Section 154.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS SPECIAL REVIEW PROCEDURES Procedures § 154.34 Expedited procedures. (a) The Agency may elect to issue...

  10. A systematic approach to upgrading operating procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Solne, B.J. III; Richardson, C.E. ); Corson, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Some utilities emphasize Operations Department procedure content details without an overall philosophy of operation. A methodology has been formulated to produce high-quality operating procedures by establishing a logical, hierarchical structure of procedure types and identifying procedure interfaces and development and implementation sequences and schedules.

  11. Structured programming: Principles, notation, procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    JOST

    1978-01-01

    Structured programs are best represented using a notation which gives a clear representation of the block encapsulation. In this report, a set of symbols which can be used until binding directives are republished is suggested. Structured programming also allows a new method of procedure for design and testing. Programs can be designed top down, that is, they can start at the highest program plane and can penetrate to the lowest plane by step-wise refinements. The testing methodology also is adapted to this procedure. First, the highest program plane is tested, and the programs which are not yet finished in the next lower plane are represented by so-called dummies. They are gradually replaced by the real programs.

  12. Surface Environmental Surveillance Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    RW Hanf; TM Poston

    2000-09-20

    Environmental surveillance data are used in assessing the impact of current and past site operations on human health and the environment, demonstrating compliance with applicable local, state, and federal environmental regulations, and verifying the adequacy of containment and effluent controls. SESP sampling schedules are reviewed, revised, and published each calendar year in the Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule. Environmental samples are collected by SESP staff in accordance with the approved sample collection procedures documented in this manual.

  13. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Pablo Santos; Chiarelli, Fabio; Rodrigues, José A.; Shibli, Jamil A.; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey), crown lengthening is the most habitual surgical periodontal treatment. PMID:26609452

  14. Feline onychectomy and elective procedures.

    PubMed

    Young, William Phillip

    2002-05-01

    The development of the carbon dioxide (CO2) surgical laser has given veterinarians a new perspective in the field of surgery. Recently developed techniques and improvisations of established procedures have opened the field of surgery to infinite applications never before dreamed of as little as 10 years ago. Today's CO2 surgical laser is an adaptable, indispensable tool for the everyday veterinary practitioner. Its use is becoming a common occurrence in offices of veterinarians around the world.

  15. Radiation injuries after fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Fred A; Koenig, Titus R; Wagner, Louis K; Kelsey, Charles A

    2002-10-01

    Fluoroscopically guided diagnostic and interventional procedures have become much more commonplace over the last decade. Current fluoroscopes are easily capable of producing dose rates in the range of 0.2 Gy (20 rads) per minute. The dose rate often changes dramatically with patient positioning and size. Most machines currently in use have no method to display approximate patient dose other than the rough surrogate of total fluoroscopy time. This does not include patient dose incurred during fluorography (serial imaging or cine runs), which can be considerably greater than dose during fluoroscopy. There have been over 100 cases of documented radiation skin and underlying tissue injury, a large portion of which resulted in dermal necrosis. The true number of injuries is undoubtedly much higher. The highest dose procedures are complex interventions such as those involving percutaneous angioplasties, stent placements, embolizations, and TIPS. In some cases skin doses have been in excess of 60 Gy (6000 rads). In many instances the procedures have been performed by physicians with little training in radiation effects, little appreciation of the radiation injuries that are possible or the strategies that could have been used to reduce both patient and staff doses. Almost all of the severe injuries that have occurred were avoidable.

  16. National Ignition Facility (NIF) operations procedures plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mantrom, D.

    1998-05-06

    The purpose of this Operations Procedures Plan is to establish a standard procedure which outlines how NIF Operations procedures will be developed (i.e , written, edited, reviewed, approved, published, revised) and accessed by the NIF Operations staff who must use procedures in order to accomplish their tasks. In addition, this Plan is designed to provide a guide to the NIF Project staff to assist them in planning and writing procedures. Also, resource and scheduling information is provided.

  17. Revised Unfilling Procedure for Solid Lithium Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Leveling, A.; /Fermilab

    2003-06-03

    A procedure for unfilling used lithium lenses to has been described in Pbar Note 664. To date, the procedure has been used to disassemble lenses 20, 21, 17, 18, and 16. As a result of this work, some parts of the original procedure were found to be time consuming and ineffective. Modifications to the original procedure have been made to streamline the process and are discussed in this note. The revised procedure is included in this note.

  18. Procedures for precap visual inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Screening procedures for the final precap visual inspection of microcircuits used in electronic system components are described as an aid in training personnel unfamiliar with microcircuits. Processing techniques used in industry for the manufacture of monolithic and hybrid components are presented and imperfections that may be encountered during this inspection are discussed. Problem areas such as scratches, voids, adhesions, and wire bonding are illustrated by photomicrographs. This guide can serve as an effective tool in training personnel to perform precap visual inspections efficiently and reliably.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Elbow Procedures.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Walter I; Williams, Christopher J; Mautner, Ken

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography can help clinicians visualize key anatomic structures of the elbow and guide periarticular and intra-articular injections. Historically, most procedures done around the elbow have been done using landmark guidance, and few studies have reported the accuracy of ultrasonography-guided injections in the elbow region. This article reviews common musculoskeletal disorders about the elbow that can be evaluated with ultrasonography, reviews the literature on ultrasonography-guided injections of the elbow region, and describes the senior author's preferred approach for the most commonly performed elbow region injections.

  20. Instrument Calibration and Certification Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. Wesley

    2016-05-31

    The Amptec 640SL-2 is a 4-wire Kelvin failsafe resistance meter, designed to reliably use very low-test currents for its resistance measurements. The 640SL-1 is a 2-wire version, designed to support customers using the Reynolds Industries type 311 connector. For both versions, a passive (analog) dual function DC Milliameter/Voltmeter allows the user to verify the actual 640SL output current level and the open circuit voltage on the test leads. This procedure includes tests of essential performance parameters. Any malfunction noticed during calibration, whether specifically tested for or not, shall be corrected before calibration continues or is completed.

  1. Procedures for computing site seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferritto, John

    1994-02-01

    This report was prepared as part of the Navy's Seismic Hazard Mitigation Program. The Navy has numerous bases located in seismically active regions throughout the world. Safe effective design of waterfront structures requires determining expected earthquake ground motion. The Navy's problem is further complicated by the presence of soft saturated marginal soils that can significantly amplify the levels of seismic shaking as evidenced in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command's seismic design manual, NAVFAC P355.l, requires a probabilistic assessment of ground motion for design of essential structures. This report presents the basis for the Navy's Seismic Hazard Analysis procedure that was developed and is intended to be used with the Seismic Hazard Analysis computer program and user's manual. This report also presents data on geology and seismology to establish the background for the seismic hazard model developed. The procedure uses the historical epicenter data base and available geologic data, together with source models, recurrence models, and attenuation relationships to compute the probability distribution of site acceleration and an appropriate spectra. This report discusses the developed stochastic model for seismic hazard evaluation and the associated research.

  2. Interventional MSK procedures: the hip

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Guillaume; Cockenpot, Eric; Chastanet, Patrick; Cotten, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous musculoskeletal procedures are widely accepted as low invasive, highly effective, efficient and safe methods in a vast amount of hip pathologies either in diagnostic or in therapeutic management. Hip intra-articular injections are used for the symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis. Peritendinous or intrabursal corticosteroid injections can be used for the symptomatic treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and anterior iliopsoas impingement. In past decades, the role of interventional radiology has rapidly increased in metastatic disease, thanks to the development of many ablative techniques. Image-guided percutaneous ablation of skeletal metastases provides a minimally invasive treatment option that appears to be a safe and effective palliative treatment for localized painful lytic lesion. Methods of tumour destruction based on temperature, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryotherapy, are performed for the management of musculoskeletal metastases. MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery provides a non-invasive alternative to these ablative methods. Cementoplasty is now widely used for pain management and consolidation of acetabular metastases and can be combined with RFA. RFA is also used to treat benign tumours, namely osteoid osteomas. New interventional procedures such as percutaneous screw fixation are also proposed to treat non-displaced or minimally displaced acetabular roof fractures. PMID:26317896

  3. Esophageal Carcinoma Following Bariatric Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Matthew F.; Richardson, J. David

    2004-01-01

    Background: The long-term success of bariatric operations for weight reduction has been well documented, but their potential effects on the risk of esophageal cancer have not been evaluated. Methods: We performed operations on 3 patients for esophageal cancer following bariatric operations: 2 had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and 1 underwent vertical banded gastroplasty. All of these patients had adenocarcinoma at the gastroesophageal junction; 1 involved the entire intrathoracic esophagus. Results: The intervals between the weight-loss operations and cancer diagnoses were 21, 16, and 14 years. All 3 patients had symptoms of reflux for many years before dysphagia developed and cancer was diagnosed. We performed a limited esophagogastrectomy, a classic IvorLewis procedure, and a total esophagectomy with jejunal free-tissue transfer from stomach to cervical esophagus. Two patients had positive lymph nodes. One patient is alive at 6 years; 2 died at 13 and 15 months after undergoing operation for recurrent cancer. Conclusion: The effect of bariatric operations on gastroesophageal reflux is not known, although gastric bypass has been advocated as the “ultimate antireflux procedure.” The presence of esophageal cancer in these 3 patients years after the weight loss operation is worrisome. We believe that patients who develop new symptoms should have endoscopic evaluation and that epidemiologic studies on the incidence of esophageal cancer occurring years after bariatric operation should be performed. PMID:15554284

  4. Cardiovascular procedures/diagnostic techniques and therapeutic procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Tilkian, A.G.; Daily, E.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book covers the technical and therapeutic aspects of cardiovascular procedures in immense detail. There are large and appropriate diagrams and tables. The topics of the chapters are tools for catheterization, venous access, arterial access, hemodynamic monitoring, cardiac catheterization and coronary arteriography, ergonovine provocation testing for coronary artery spasm, pulmonary angiography, endomyocredial biopsy, electrophysiologic studies, pericardiocentesis and drainage, intraaortic balloon pumping, direct current cardioversion and defibrilaltion, pacemaker implantation of the automatic implantable cardioverter/defibrillator, coronary angioplasty, thrombolytic therapy, transluminal catheter extraction and resolution of intracardiac catheter knots, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, contrast media toxicity and allergic reactions, radiation hazards, and medicolegal concerns. An appendix and index follow these chapters. In general, each chapter covers historical aspects, indications, complications, techniques, and preoperative and postoperative care.

  5. 40 CFR 307.31 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Procedures for Filing and Processing Response Claims § 307.31... under section 107 of CERCLA....

  6. 40 CFR 307.31 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Procedures for Filing and Processing Response Claims § 307.31... under section 107 of CERCLA....

  7. 40 CFR 307.31 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Procedures for Filing and Processing Response Claims § 307.31... under section 107 of CERCLA....

  8. 40 CFR 307.31 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Procedures for Filing and Processing Response Claims § 307.31... under section 107 of CERCLA....

  9. 40 CFR 307.31 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) CLAIMS PROCEDURES Procedures for Filing and Processing Response Claims § 307.31... under section 107 of CERCLA....

  10. 23 CFR 630.803 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PROCEDURES Bridges on Federal Dams § 630.803 Procedures. A State's application to qualify a project under... part of the agency constructing the dam to provide such bridge or approach roads to satisfy a...

  11. 23 CFR 630.803 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... PROCEDURES Bridges on Federal Dams § 630.803 Procedures. A State's application to qualify a project under... part of the agency constructing the dam to provide such bridge or approach roads to satisfy a...

  12. 23 CFR 630.803 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... PROCEDURES Bridges on Federal Dams § 630.803 Procedures. A State's application to qualify a project under... part of the agency constructing the dam to provide such bridge or approach roads to satisfy a...

  13. 23 CFR 630.803 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... PROCEDURES Bridges on Federal Dams § 630.803 Procedures. A State's application to qualify a project under... part of the agency constructing the dam to provide such bridge or approach roads to satisfy a...

  14. 23 CFR 630.803 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PROCEDURES Bridges on Federal Dams § 630.803 Procedures. A State's application to qualify a project under... part of the agency constructing the dam to provide such bridge or approach roads to satisfy a...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1585 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Airplane Flight Manual and Approved Manual Material § 23.1585 Operating procedures. (a) For all airplanes, information concerning normal, abnormal (if applicable), and emergency procedures and...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1585 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Airplane Flight Manual and Approved Manual Material § 23.1585 Operating procedures. (a) For all airplanes, information concerning normal, abnormal (if applicable), and emergency procedures and...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1585 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Airplane Flight Manual and Approved Manual Material § 23.1585 Operating procedures. (a) For all airplanes, information concerning normal, abnormal (if applicable), and emergency procedures and...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1585 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Airplane Flight Manual and Approved Manual Material § 23.1585 Operating procedures. (a) For all airplanes, information concerning normal, abnormal (if applicable), and emergency procedures and...

  19. 48 CFR 919.805-2 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BUSINESS PROGRAMS Contracting With the Small Business Administration (The 8(a) Program) 919.805-2 Procedures. Acquisitions involving section 8(a) competition must comply with source selection procedures...

  20. Procedures For Microbial-Ecology Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1993-01-01

    Microbial Ecology Laboratory Procedures Manual provides concise and well-defined instructions on routine technical procedures to be followed in microbiological laboratory to ensure safety, analytical control, and validity of results.

  1. 12 CFR 303.221 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PROCEDURES Section 19 of the FDI Act (Consent to Service of Persons Convicted of Certain Criminal Offenses) § 303.221 Filing procedures. (a) Where to file. An application under section 19 of the FDI Act shall...

  2. 12 CFR 303.221 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PROCEDURES Section 19 of the FDI Act (Consent to Service of Persons Convicted of Certain Criminal Offenses) § 303.221 Filing procedures. (a) Where to file. An application under section 19 of the FDI Act shall...

  3. 12 CFR 303.221 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PROCEDURES Section 19 of the FDI Act (Consent to Service of Persons Convicted of Certain Criminal Offenses) § 303.221 Filing procedures. (a) Where to file. An application under section 19 of the FDI Act shall...

  4. 12 CFR 303.221 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PROCEDURES Section 19 of the FDI Act (Consent to Service of Persons Convicted of Certain Criminal Offenses) § 303.221 Filing procedures. (a) Where to file. An application under section 19 of the FDI Act shall...

  5. 23 CFR 650.313 - Inspection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS National Bridge Inspection Standards § 650.313 Inspection procedures. (a) Inspect each bridge in accordance with the inspection procedures in the AASHTO Manual (incorporated...

  6. 23 CFR 650.313 - Inspection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS National Bridge Inspection Standards § 650.313 Inspection procedures. (a) Inspect each bridge in accordance with the inspection procedures in the AASHTO Manual (incorporated...

  7. 16 CFR 1610.6 - Test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.6 Test procedure. The test procedure is divided into two... (k) and (l). There are some fabrics that require extra attention when preparing test...

  8. 16 CFR 1610.6 - Test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.6 Test procedure. The test procedure is divided into two... (k) and (l). There are some fabrics that require extra attention when preparing test...

  9. 40 CFR 96.308 - Appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.308 Appeal procedures. The appeal procedures for decisions of the Administrator under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program are set forth in part 78...

  10. 40 CFR 96.308 - Appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.308 Appeal procedures. The appeal procedures for decisions of the Administrator under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program are set forth in part 78...

  11. 40 CFR 96.308 - Appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.308 Appeal procedures. The appeal procedures for decisions of the Administrator under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program are set forth in part 78...

  12. 40 CFR 96.308 - Appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.308 Appeal procedures. The appeal procedures for decisions of the Administrator under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program are set forth in part 78...

  13. 40 CFR 96.308 - Appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.308 Appeal procedures. The appeal procedures for decisions of the Administrator under the CAIR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program are set forth in part 78...

  14. 48 CFR 225.7502 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Balance of Payments Program 225.7502 Procedures. If the Balance of Payments Program applies to the acquisition, follow the procedures at PGI 225.7502....

  15. 48 CFR 225.7502 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Balance of Payments Program 225.7502 Procedures. If the Balance of Payments Program applies to the acquisition, follow the procedures at PGI 225.7502....

  16. 48 CFR 225.7502 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Balance of Payments Program 225.7502 Procedures. If the Balance of Payments Program applies to the acquisition, follow the procedures at PGI 225.7502....

  17. 48 CFR 225.7502 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Balance of Payments Program 225.7502 Procedures. If the Balance of Payments Program applies to the acquisition, follow the procedures at PGI 225.7502....

  18. 48 CFR 225.7502 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Balance of Payments Program 225.7502 Procedures. If the Balance of Payments Program applies to the acquisition, follow the procedures at PGI 225.7502....

  19. 49 CFR 1180.20 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... railroads under a plan of reorganization are governed by the following procedures: (1) If the buyer or...) If the buyer or operator is a carrier, either: (i) The application procedures in subpart A of...

  20. 10 CFR 2.1304 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... for Hearings on License Transfer Applications § 2.1304 Hearing procedures. The procedures in this subpart will constitute the exclusive basis for hearings on license transfer applications for all...

  1. 10 CFR 2.1304 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for Hearings on License Transfer Applications § 2.1304 Hearing procedures. The procedures in this subpart will constitute the exclusive basis for hearings on license transfer applications for all...

  2. Sandia Satellite Program summary of operational procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    Operational procedures for the Space Systems Department and Space Sensors Department are described. Departmental policies and procedures from design of systems for space applications through qualification for spaceflight are summarized. 1 fig.

  3. 40 CFR 140.5 - Analytical procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MARINE SANITATION DEVICE STANDARD § 140.5 Analytical procedures. In determining the composition and quality of effluent discharge from marine sanitation devices, the procedures contained in 40 CFR part...

  4. 40 CFR 140.5 - Analytical procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MARINE SANITATION DEVICE STANDARD § 140.5 Analytical procedures. In determining the composition and quality of effluent discharge from marine sanitation devices, the procedures contained in 40 CFR part...

  5. 40 CFR 140.5 - Analytical procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE SANITATION DEVICE STANDARD § 140.5 Analytical procedures. In determining the composition and quality of effluent discharge from marine sanitation devices, the procedures contained in 40 CFR part...

  6. 40 CFR 140.5 - Analytical procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MARINE SANITATION DEVICE STANDARD § 140.5 Analytical procedures. In determining the composition and quality of effluent discharge from marine sanitation devices, the procedures contained in 40 CFR part...

  7. 40 CFR 140.5 - Analytical procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MARINE SANITATION DEVICE STANDARD § 140.5 Analytical procedures. In determining the composition and quality of effluent discharge from marine sanitation devices, the procedures contained in 40 CFR part...

  8. 40 CFR 89.508 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... procedure as adopted in the California Regulations for New 1996 and Later Heavy-Duty Off-Road Diesel Cycle... exhaust emission standard (or applicable FEL) for oxides of nitrogen. If alternate procedures were used...

  9. 40 CFR 89.508 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... procedure as adopted in the California Regulations for New 1996 and Later Heavy-Duty Off-Road Diesel Cycle... exhaust emission standard (or applicable FEL) for oxides of nitrogen. If alternate procedures were used...

  10. 40 CFR 89.508 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... procedure as adopted in the California Regulations for New 1996 and Later Heavy-Duty Off-Road Diesel Cycle... exhaust emission standard (or applicable FEL) for oxides of nitrogen. If alternate procedures were used...

  11. Physiotherapy following elective orthopaedic procedures.

    PubMed

    De Kleijn, P; Blamey, G; Zourikian, N; Dalzell, R; Lobet, S

    2006-07-01

    As haemophilic arthropathy and chronic synovitis are still the most important clinical features in people with haemophilia, different kinds of invasive and orthopaedic procedures have become more common during the last decades. The availability of clotting factor has made arthroplasty of one, or even multiple joints possible. This article highlights the role of physiotherapy before and after such procedures. Synovectomies are sometimes advocated in people with haemophilia to stop repetitive cycles of intra-articular bleeds and/or chronic synovitis. The synovectomy itself, however, does not solve the muscle atrophy, loss of range of motion (ROM), instability and poor propriocepsis, often developed during many years. The key is in taking advantage of the subsequent, relatively safe, bleed-free period to address these important issues. Although the preoperative ROM is the most important variable influencing the postoperative ROM after total knee arthroplasty, there are a few key points that should be considered to improve the outcome. Early mobilization, either manual or by means of a continuous passive mobilization machine, can be an optimal solution during the very first postoperative days. Muscle isometric contractions and light open kinetic chain exercises should also be started in order to restore the quadriceps control. Partial weight bearing can be started shortly after, because of quadriceps inhibition and to avoid excessive swelling. The use of continuous clotting factor replacement permits earlier and intensive rehabilitation during the postoperative period. During the rehabilitation of shoulder arthroplasty restoring the function of the rotator cuff is of utmost importance. Often the rotator cuff muscles are inhibited in the presence of pain and loss of ROM. Physiotherapy also assists in improving pain and maintaining ROM and strength. Functional weight-bearing tasks, such as using the upper limbs to sit and stand, are often discouraged during the first 6

  12. XML syntax for clinical laboratory procedure manuals.

    PubMed

    Saadawi, Gilan; Harrison, James H

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a document type description (DTD) in Extensable Markup Language (XML) for clinical laboratory procedures. Our XML syntax can adequately structure a variety of procedure types across different laboratories and is compatible with current procedure standards. The combination of this format with an XML content management system and appropriate style sheets will allow efficient procedure maintenance, distributed access, customized display and effective searching across a large body of test information.

  13. Design procedure for effervescent atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, J. S.; Lefebvre, A. H.

    1995-04-01

    A methodology for the design of effervescent atomizers is described. The objective is to achieve sprays of minimum mean drop size for any stipulated values of liquid flow rate, air supply pressure, and air/liquid ratio. Application of the method leads to optimum values for all the key atomizer dimensions, including the number and size of the air injection holes, and the diameters of the mixing chamber and discharge orifice. It also enables optimum dimensions to be determined for a convergent-divergent nozzle should such a device be fitted to the nozzle exit to improve atomization performance. Examples are provided to demonstrate the application of the recommended design procedure and to illustrate the relative importance of various flow and geometric parameters in regard to their effects on atomization quality.

  14. Pattern recognition systems and procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. D.; Serreyn, D. V.

    1972-01-01

    The objectives of the pattern recognition tasks are to develop (1) a man-machine interactive data processing system; and (2) procedures to determine effective features as a function of time for crops and soils. The signal analysis and dissemination equipment, SADE, is being developed as a man-machine interactive data processing system. SADE will provide imagery and multi-channel analog tape inputs for digitation and a color display of the data. SADE is an essential tool to aid in the investigation to determine useful features as a function of time for crops and soils. Four related studies are: (1) reliability of the multivariate Gaussian assumption; (2) usefulness of transforming features with regard to the classifier probability of error; (3) advantage of selecting quantizer parameters to minimize the classifier probability of error; and (4) advantage of using contextual data. The study of transformation of variables (features), especially those experimental studies which can be completed with the SADE system, will be done.

  15. Automated Product Test Wafer Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrew; Minvielle, Anna; Salugsugan, Anita

    1987-04-01

    An automated test wafer procedure has been developed using the KLA 2020 wafer inspector to measure registration and critical dimensions on production wafers. The procedure reduces operator interactions to loading the wafer and entering information for wafer identification. The analysis of the registration data is performed on a PC using the methods established by Perloff to determine both intrafield and grid errors. These results are then used to correct the stepper. CD data is also analyzed by the program and corrections to the exposure time are calculated. It was found that the KLA 2020 is as much as 10 times faster and 4 times more precise in obtaining registration data then an operator reading optical verniers on a microscope. Due to the high precision of the reading, the analysis does not need a large number of readings to obtain precise and accurate stepper corrections. Further, significant improvements can be obtained by adding registration targets to measure the intrafield errors. Using the KLA 2020 and computer analysis we have demonstrated an ability to reduce the errors for a manually aligned run to a one sigma distribution of 0.09 um for x and y translation, 0.4 PPM for scaling and orthogonality, and 2.3 PPM for rotation from the first test wafer for a GCA 6100. Nearly all of this variation is due to operator misalignment or the inability of the stepper to correct the errors. The corrections with this technique measuring the same wafer are precise to + 0.01 um in translation and + 0.5 PPM for rotation, scaling, and orthogonality. It has also been shown that a simple linear equation can be used to correct exposure time, even when a process is not tightly controlled.

  16. Advances in Procedural Techniques - Antegrade

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, William; Spratt, James C.

    2014-01-01

    There have been many technological advances in antegrade CTO PCI, but perhaps most importantly has been the evolution of the “hybrid’ approach where ideally there exists a seamless interplay of antegrade wiring, antegrade dissection re-entry and retrograde approaches as dictated by procedural factors. Antegrade wire escalation with intimal tracking remains the preferred initial strategy in short CTOs without proximal cap ambiguity. More complex CTOs, however, usually require either a retrograde or an antegrade dissection re-entry approach, or both. Antegrade dissection re-entry is well suited to long occlusions where there is a healthy distal vessel and limited “interventional” collaterals. Early use of a dissection re-entry strategy will increase success rates, reduce complications, and minimise radiation exposure, contrast use as well as procedural times. Antegrade dissection can be achieved with a knuckle wire technique or the CrossBoss catheter whilst re-entry will be achieved in the most reproducible and reliable fashion by the Stingray balloon/wire. It should be avoided where there is potential for loss of large side branches. It remains to be seen whether use of newer dissection re-entry strategies will be associated with lower restenosis rates compared with the more uncontrolled subintimal tracking strategies such as STAR and whether stent insertion in the subintimal space is associated with higher rates of late stent malapposition and stent thrombosis. It is to be hoped that the algorithms, which have been developed to guide CTO operators, allow for a better transfer of knowledge and skills to increase uptake and acceptance of CTO PCI as a whole. PMID:24694104

  17. TMACS Test Procedure TP007: System administration

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, P.; Washburn, S.; Seghers, R.

    1994-05-24

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS System Administration functions.

  18. 4 CFR 28.9 - Procedures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures; general. 28.9 Section 28.9 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL APPEALS BOARD; PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO CLAIMS CONCERNING EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES AT THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY...

  19. 7 CFR 356.8 - Return procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Return procedure. 356.8 Section 356.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FORFEITURE PROCEDURES § 356.8 Return procedure. If, at the conclusion...

  20. 46 CFR 272.14 - Survey procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Survey procedures. 272.14 Section 272.14 Shipping... OPERATORS REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING CONDITION SURVEYS AND ADMINISTERING MAINTENANCE AND... Survey procedures. (a) Prior to survey. Unless otherwise directed by MARAD, the Operator of a...

  1. 46 CFR 272.14 - Survey procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survey procedures. 272.14 Section 272.14 Shipping... OPERATORS REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING CONDITION SURVEYS AND ADMINISTERING MAINTENANCE AND... Survey procedures. (a) Prior to survey. Unless otherwise directed by MARAD, the Operator of a...

  2. 46 CFR 272.14 - Survey procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Survey procedures. 272.14 Section 272.14 Shipping... OPERATORS REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING CONDITION SURVEYS AND ADMINISTERING MAINTENANCE AND... Survey procedures. (a) Prior to survey. Unless otherwise directed by MARAD, the Operator of a...

  3. 46 CFR 272.14 - Survey procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Survey procedures. 272.14 Section 272.14 Shipping... OPERATORS REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING CONDITION SURVEYS AND ADMINISTERING MAINTENANCE AND... Survey procedures. (a) Prior to survey. Unless otherwise directed by MARAD, the Operator of a...

  4. 46 CFR 272.14 - Survey procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Survey procedures. 272.14 Section 272.14 Shipping... OPERATORS REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING CONDITION SURVEYS AND ADMINISTERING MAINTENANCE AND... Survey procedures. (a) Prior to survey. Unless otherwise directed by MARAD, the Operator of a...

  5. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design...

  6. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design...

  7. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design...

  8. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler...

  9. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler...

  10. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler...

  11. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler...

  12. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design...

  13. 47 CFR 15.313 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.313 Section 15.313... Communications Service Devices § 15.313 Measurement procedures. Measurements must be made in accordance with... measurement procedure must be in accordance with good engineering practice....

  14. 47 CFR 15.523 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.523 Section 15.523 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.523 Measurement procedures. Measurements shall be made in accordance with the procedures specified...

  15. 47 CFR 15.313 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.313 Section 15.313... Communications Service Devices § 15.313 Measurement procedures. Measurements must be made in accordance with... measurement procedure must be in accordance with good engineering practice....

  16. 47 CFR 15.313 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.313 Section 15.313... Communications Service Devices § 15.313 Measurement procedures. Measurements must be made in accordance with... measurement procedure must be in accordance with good engineering practice....

  17. 47 CFR 15.523 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.523 Section 15.523 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.523 Measurement procedures. Measurements shall be made in accordance with the procedures specified...

  18. 47 CFR 15.523 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.523 Section 15.523 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.523 Measurement procedures. Measurements shall be made in accordance with the procedures specified...

  19. 47 CFR 15.523 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.523 Section 15.523 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.523 Measurement procedures. Measurements shall be made in accordance with the procedures specified...

  20. 47 CFR 15.313 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.313 Section 15.313... Communications Service Devices § 15.313 Measurement procedures. Measurements must be made in accordance with... measurement procedure must be in accordance with good engineering practice....

  1. 47 CFR 15.523 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.523 Section 15.523 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.523 Measurement procedures. Measurements shall be made in accordance with the procedures specified...

  2. 47 CFR 15.313 - Measurement procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measurement procedures. 15.313 Section 15.313... Communications Service Devices § 15.313 Measurement procedures. Measurements must be made in accordance with... measurement procedure must be in accordance with good engineering practice....

  3. 8 CFR 1101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Registration procedure. 1101.4 Section 1101... REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 1101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an application... a person eligible for presumption of lawful admission for permanent residence under § 1101.1...

  4. 8 CFR 1101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Registration procedure. 1101.4 Section 1101.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 1101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an...

  5. 8 CFR 1101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Registration procedure. 1101.4 Section 1101.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 1101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an...

  6. 8 CFR 101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Registration procedure. 101.4 Section 101.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an application for creation of a record...

  7. 8 CFR 101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Registration procedure. 101.4 Section 101.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an application for creation of a record...

  8. 8 CFR 1101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Registration procedure. 1101.4 Section 1101.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 1101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an...

  9. 8 CFR 101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Registration procedure. 101.4 Section 101.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an application for creation of a record...

  10. 8 CFR 101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Registration procedure. 101.4 Section 101.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an application for creation of a record...

  11. 8 CFR 101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Registration procedure. 101.4 Section 101.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an application for creation of a record...

  12. 8 CFR 1101.4 - Registration procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Registration procedure. 1101.4 Section 1101.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PRESUMPTION OF LAWFUL ADMISSION § 1101.4 Registration procedure. The procedure for an...

  13. 36 CFR 14.77 - Procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures. 14.77 Section 14.77 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RIGHTS-OF-WAY Principles and Procedures, Power Transmission Lines § 14.77 Procedures....

  14. 12 CFR 303.21 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing procedures. 303.21 Section 303.21 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE FILING PROCEDURES... solely as a vehicle to accomplish a merger transaction. (c) A request for continuation of...

  15. 12 CFR 303.63 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing procedures. 303.63 Section 303.63 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE FILING PROCEDURES... the merger transaction and any other information requested by the FDIC. (c) Interim...

  16. 12 CFR 303.221 - Filing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing procedures. 303.221 Section 303.221 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE FILING PROCEDURES Section 19 of the FDI Act (Consent to Service of Persons Convicted of Certain Criminal...

  17. Administrative Procedures for Small Institutions. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Keith W., Ed.

    This guide offers sample administrative procedures and policies that can be used by small colleges and universities to prepare or revise administrative procedures manuals. The sample procedures and policies offered here have been compiled from a review of many manuals from many different institutions, and vary from the general to the specific.…

  18. 7 CFR 15a.71 - Interim procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interim procedures. 15a.71 Section 15a.71 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures (Interim) § 15a.71 Interim procedures. For the purposes...

  19. 7 CFR 15a.71 - Interim procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interim procedures. 15a.71 Section 15a.71 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures (Interim) § 15a.71 Interim procedures. For the purposes...

  20. 7 CFR 15a.71 - Interim procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interim procedures. 15a.71 Section 15a.71 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures (Interim) § 15a.71 Interim procedures. For the purposes...

  1. 7 CFR 15a.71 - Interim procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interim procedures. 15a.71 Section 15a.71 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures (Interim) § 15a.71 Interim procedures. For the purposes...

  2. 40 CFR 231.7 - Emergency procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emergency procedure. 231.7 Section 231.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(c) PROCEDURES § 231.7 Emergency procedure. Where a permit has already been issued, and the Administrator...

  3. 21 CFR 16.60 - Hearing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hearing procedure. 16.60 Section 16.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL REGULATORY HEARING BEFORE THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION Procedures for Regulatory Hearing § 16.60 Hearing procedure....

  4. 21 CFR 16.60 - Hearing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hearing procedure. 16.60 Section 16.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL REGULATORY HEARING BEFORE THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION Procedures for Regulatory Hearing § 16.60 Hearing procedure....

  5. 21 CFR 16.60 - Hearing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearing procedure. 16.60 Section 16.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL REGULATORY HEARING BEFORE THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION Procedures for Regulatory Hearing § 16.60 Hearing procedure....

  6. 21 CFR 16.60 - Hearing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hearing procedure. 16.60 Section 16.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL REGULATORY HEARING BEFORE THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION Procedures for Regulatory Hearing § 16.60 Hearing procedure....

  7. TMACS Test Procedure TP002: Trending

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-08-29

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Trending functions.

  8. 48 CFR 1503.500-71 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Business Practices 1503.500-71 Procedures. (a) A contractor's system of management controls should provide... employees; (2) Periodic reviews of company business practices, procedures, policies and internal controls... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Procedures....

  9. 21 CFR 211.150 - Distribution procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution procedures. 211.150 Section 211.150...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Holding and Distribution § 211.150 Distribution procedures. Written procedures shall be established, and followed, describing...

  10. 7 CFR 15a.71 - Interim procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interim procedures. 15a.71 Section 15a.71 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Procedures (Interim) § 15a.71 Interim procedures. For the purposes...

  11. 40 CFR 1066.10 - Other procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Other procedures. 1066.10 Section 1066.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General Provisions § 1066.10 Other procedures. (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 1066.10 - Other procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Other procedures. 1066.10 Section 1066.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General Provisions § 1066.10 Other procedures. (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 1066.10 - Other procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Other procedures. 1066.10 Section 1066.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General Provisions § 1066.10 Other procedures. (a)...

  14. 40 CFR 90.707 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test procedures. 90.707 Section 90.707... Program § 90.707 Test procedures. (a)(1) For small SI engines subject to the provisions of this subpart, the prescribed test procedures are specified in subpart E of this part. (2) The Administrator may,...

  15. 49 CFR 581.7 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Test procedures. 581.7 Section 581.7... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) BUMPER STANDARD § 581.7 Test procedures. (a) Longitudinal impact test procedures. (1) Impact the vehicle's front surface and its rear surface two times...

  16. 40 CFR 205.54 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test procedures. 205.54 Section 205.54... EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.54 Test procedures. The procedures described in this and subsequent sections will be the test program to determine the conformity of vehicles...

  17. 40 CFR 205.54 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test procedures. 205.54 Section 205.54... EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.54 Test procedures. The procedures described in this and subsequent sections will be the test program to determine the conformity of vehicles...

  18. 45 CFR 1623.4 - Suspension procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension procedures. 1623.4 Section 1623.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION SUSPENSION PROCEDURES § 1623.4 Suspension procedures. (a) When the Corporation has made a proposed determination,...

  19. 39 CFR 776.9 - Review procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review procedures. 776.9 Section 776.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND PROCEDURES Wetlands Protection § 776.9 Review procedures. (a) Early public notice. If a facility action at the contending...

  20. 39 CFR 776.9 - Review procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Review procedures. 776.9 Section 776.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND PROCEDURES Wetlands Protection § 776.9 Review procedures. (a) Early public notice. If a facility action at the contending...

  1. 39 CFR 776.9 - Review procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Review procedures. 776.9 Section 776.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND PROCEDURES Wetlands Protection § 776.9 Review procedures. (a) Early public notice. If a facility action at the contending...

  2. 39 CFR 776.9 - Review procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Review procedures. 776.9 Section 776.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND PROCEDURES Wetlands Protection § 776.9 Review procedures. (a) Early public notice. If a facility action at the contending...

  3. 39 CFR 776.9 - Review procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Review procedures. 776.9 Section 776.9 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND PROCEDURES Wetlands Protection § 776.9 Review procedures. (a) Early public notice. If a facility action at the contending...

  4. 28 CFR 902.5 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearing procedures. 902.5 Section 902.5 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.5 Hearing procedures. (a) The hearing shall be open to the public pursuant to Article VI...

  5. 28 CFR 902.5 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hearing procedures. 902.5 Section 902.5 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.5 Hearing procedures. (a) The hearing shall be open to the public pursuant to Article VI...

  6. 28 CFR 902.5 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearing procedures. 902.5 Section 902.5 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.5 Hearing procedures. (a) The hearing shall be open to the public pursuant to Article VI...

  7. 28 CFR 902.5 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hearing procedures. 902.5 Section 902.5 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.5 Hearing procedures. (a) The hearing shall be open to the public pursuant to Article VI...

  8. 28 CFR 902.5 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hearing procedures. 902.5 Section 902.5 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.5 Hearing procedures. (a) The hearing shall be open to the public pursuant to Article VI...

  9. Procedural Learning and Individual Differences in Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joanna C.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine different aspects of procedural memory in young adults who varied with regard to their language abilities. We selected a sample of procedural memory tasks, each of which represented a unique type of procedural learning, and has been linked, at least partially, to the functionality of the corticostriatal…

  10. 75 FR 32273 - Representation Election Procedure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... 29 CFR Parts 1202 and 1206 RIN 3140-ZA00 Representation Election Procedure AGENCY: National Mediation... delaying the effective date of its rule regarding representation election procedures from June 10, 2010 to... Representation Election Procedure Rule have been made. The NMB will notify participants if there are any...

  11. 10 CFR 835.104 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Written procedures. 835.104 Section 835.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Management and Administrative Requirements § 835.104 Written procedures. Written procedures shall be developed and implemented as necessary to...

  12. 10 CFR 835.104 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Written procedures. 835.104 Section 835.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Management and Administrative Requirements § 835.104 Written procedures. Written procedures shall be developed and implemented as necessary to...

  13. 10 CFR 835.104 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Written procedures. 835.104 Section 835.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Management and Administrative Requirements § 835.104 Written procedures. Written procedures shall be developed and implemented as necessary to...

  14. 10 CFR 835.104 - Written procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Written procedures. 835.104 Section 835.104 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Management and Administrative Requirements § 835.104 Written procedures. Written procedures shall be developed and implemented as necessary to...

  15. 49 CFR 581.7 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test procedures. 581.7 Section 581.7... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) BUMPER STANDARD § 581.7 Test procedures. (a) Longitudinal impact test procedures. (1) Impact the vehicle's front surface and its rear surface two times...

  16. 49 CFR 581.7 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Test procedures. 581.7 Section 581.7... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) BUMPER STANDARD § 581.7 Test procedures. (a) Longitudinal impact test procedures. (1) Impact the vehicle's front surface and its rear surface two times...

  17. 16 CFR 1610.6 - Test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test procedure. 1610.6 Section 1610.6... FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.6 Test procedure. The test procedure is divided into two... according to paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (a) Step 1—Testing in the original state. (1) Tests shall...

  18. 40 CFR 90.707 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Test procedures. 90.707 Section 90.707... Program § 90.707 Test procedures. (a)(1) For small SI engines subject to the provisions of this subpart, the prescribed test procedures are specified in subpart E of this part. (2) The Administrator may,...

  19. Developing Flexible Procedural Knowledge in Undergraduate Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maciejewski, Wes; Star, Jon R.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematics experts often choose appropriate procedures to produce an efficient or elegant solution to a mathematical task. This "flexible procedural knowledge" distinguishes novice and expert procedural performances. This article reports on an intervention intended to aid the development of undergraduate calculus students' flexible use…

  20. 34 CFR 674.43 - Billing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Billing procedures. 674.43 Section 674.43 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Due Diligence § 674.43 Billing procedures. (a) The term billing procedures, as used in this subpart, includes that series of actions routinely performed to...

  1. 34 CFR 674.43 - Billing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Billing procedures. 674.43 Section 674.43 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Due Diligence § 674.43 Billing procedures. (a) The term billing procedures, as used in this subpart, includes that series of actions routinely performed to...

  2. 22 CFR 305.5 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Procedures. 305.5 Section 305.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.5 Procedures. Procedures for filing, investigating, and determining allegations of discrimination on the basis of...

  3. 22 CFR 305.5 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Procedures. 305.5 Section 305.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.5 Procedures. Procedures for filing, investigating, and determining allegations of discrimination on the basis of...

  4. 22 CFR 305.5 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedures. 305.5 Section 305.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.5 Procedures. Procedures for filing, investigating, and determining allegations of discrimination on the basis of...

  5. 22 CFR 305.5 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Procedures. 305.5 Section 305.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.5 Procedures. Procedures for filing, investigating, and determining allegations of discrimination on the basis of...

  6. 22 CFR 305.5 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Procedures. 305.5 Section 305.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.5 Procedures. Procedures for filing, investigating, and determining allegations of discrimination on the basis of...

  7. 10 CFR 26.127 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures. 26.127 Section 26.127 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.127 Procedures. (a) Licensee testing facilities shall develop, implement, and maintain clear and well-documented procedures...

  8. 10 CFR 26.127 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures. 26.127 Section 26.127 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.127 Procedures. (a) Licensee testing facilities shall develop, implement, and maintain clear and well-documented procedures...

  9. 10 CFR 26.127 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures. 26.127 Section 26.127 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.127 Procedures. (a) Licensee testing facilities shall develop, implement, and maintain clear and well-documented procedures...

  10. 10 CFR 26.127 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures. 26.127 Section 26.127 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.127 Procedures. (a) Licensee testing facilities shall develop, implement, and maintain clear and well-documented procedures...

  11. 10 CFR 26.127 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures. 26.127 Section 26.127 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.127 Procedures. (a) Licensee testing facilities shall develop, implement, and maintain clear and well-documented procedures...

  12. 22 CFR 911.3 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Procedure. 911.3 Section 911.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.3 Procedure. Implementation disputes shall be handled by the Board in accordance with the procedures set forth in parts 901-910 of this chapter....

  13. 22 CFR 911.3 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Procedure. 911.3 Section 911.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.3 Procedure. Implementation disputes shall be handled by the Board in accordance with the procedures set forth in parts 901-910 of this chapter....

  14. 22 CFR 911.3 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedure. 911.3 Section 911.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.3 Procedure. Implementation disputes shall be handled by the Board in accordance with the procedures set forth in parts 901-910 of...

  15. 22 CFR 911.3 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Procedure. 911.3 Section 911.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.3 Procedure. Implementation disputes shall be handled by the Board in accordance with the procedures set forth in parts 901-910 of this chapter....

  16. 22 CFR 911.3 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Procedure. 911.3 Section 911.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD IMPLEMENTATION DISPUTES § 911.3 Procedure. Implementation disputes shall be handled by the Board in accordance with the procedures set forth in parts 901-910 of this chapter....

  17. 10 CFR 824.14 - Special procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedures. 824.14 Section 824.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY VIOLATIONS § 824.14 Special procedures. A person receiving a final notice of violation under §...

  18. 10 CFR 824.14 - Special procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special procedures. 824.14 Section 824.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY VIOLATIONS § 824.14 Special procedures. A person receiving a final notice of violation under §...

  19. 10 CFR 824.14 - Special procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special procedures. 824.14 Section 824.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY VIOLATIONS § 824.14 Special procedures. A person receiving a final notice of violation under §...

  20. 10 CFR 2.1304 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hearing procedures. 2.1304 Section 2.1304 Energy NUCLEAR... for Hearings on License Transfer Applications § 2.1304 Hearing procedures. The procedures in this subpart will constitute the exclusive basis for hearings on license transfer applications for all...

  1. 34 CFR 76.674 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearing procedures. 76.674 Section 76.674 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE-ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Procedures for Bypass § 76.674 Hearing procedures. (a)...

  2. 34 CFR 76.674 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearing procedures. 76.674 Section 76.674 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE-ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by the State and Its Subgrantees? Procedures for Bypass § 76.674 Hearing procedures. (a)...

  3. 7 CFR 1250.508 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure. 1250.508 Section 1250.508 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Regulations General § 1250.508 Procedure. The organization of the Egg Board and the procedure for...

  4. 7 CFR 1250.508 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedure. 1250.508 Section 1250.508 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Regulations General § 1250.508 Procedure. The organization of the Egg Board and the procedure for...

  5. 7 CFR 1250.508 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedure. 1250.508 Section 1250.508 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Regulations General § 1250.508 Procedure. The organization of the Egg Board and the procedure for...

  6. 34 CFR 106.71 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Procedures § 106.71 Procedures. The procedural provisions applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of... 100.6-100.11 and 34 CFR, part 101. (Authority: Secs. 901, 902, Education Amendments of 1972, 86...

  7. 50 CFR 697.11 - Civil procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil procedures. 697.11 Section 697.11 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION....11 Civil procedures. The civil procedure regulations at 15 CFR part 904 apply to civil...

  8. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler...

  9. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design...

  10. 40 CFR 231.7 - Emergency procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency procedure. 231.7 Section 231.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(c) PROCEDURES § 231.7 Emergency procedure. Where a permit has already been issued, and the Administrator...

  11. 18 CFR 401.23 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Procedure. 401.23 Section 401.23 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Water Resources Program § 401.23 Procedure. Each project...

  12. 18 CFR 401.23 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedure. 401.23 Section 401.23 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Water Resources Program § 401.23 Procedure. Each project...

  13. 18 CFR 401.23 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure. 401.23 Section 401.23 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Water Resources Program § 401.23 Procedure. Each project...

  14. 18 CFR 401.23 - Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure. 401.23 Section 401.23 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Water Resources Program § 401.23 Procedure. Each project...

  15. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedures--Bacteriology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This manual presents laboratory procedures for the differentiation and identification of disease agents from clinical materials. Included are procedures for the collection of specimens, preparation of culture media, pure culture methods, cultivation of the microorganisms in natural and simulated natural environments, and procedures in…

  16. WSSDA's Guide to Parliamentary Procedures. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This guide to parliamentary procedures is presented by the Washington State School Directors' Association (WSSDA) for use by local school boards within the State of Washington. Parliamentary law and parliamentary procedure is the key to order and to provide justice and fairness to all. Through both formal and informal parliamentary procedures,…

  17. The Cloze Procedure: Latest Research and Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Phyllis C.

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the development of the cloze procedure, to introduce the most recent work done, and to project the implications for further research in the cloze procedure. The cloze procedure was derived from the Gestalt theory of closure whereby a subject has a tendency to fill in the gaps of an uncompleted visual or…

  18. Cloze Procedure and the Teaching of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, James

    By examining the full range of uses of the cloze procedure, this book intends to help teachers use the procedure to better understand the reading behavior of their students and to assist their students in making reading progress. Chapter 1 defines the cloze procedure and discusses the similarities and differences in reading processes when using…

  19. 10 CFR 765.22 - Appeals procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appeals procedures. 765.22 Section 765.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REIMBURSEMENT FOR COSTS OF REMEDIAL ACTION AT ACTIVE URANIUM AND THORIUM PROCESSING SITES Procedures for Submitting and Processing Reimbursement Claims § 765.22 Appeals procedures. (a)...

  20. 10 CFR 26.157 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of standard operating procedures for each assay performed for licensees and other entities for drug... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures. 26.157 Section 26.157 Energy NUCLEAR... Services § 26.157 Procedures. (a) HHS-certified laboratories shall develop, implement, and maintain...

  1. 10 CFR 26.157 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of standard operating procedures for each assay performed for licensees and other entities for drug... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures. 26.157 Section 26.157 Energy NUCLEAR... Services § 26.157 Procedures. (a) HHS-certified laboratories shall develop, implement, and maintain...

  2. 10 CFR 26.157 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of standard operating procedures for each assay performed for licensees and other entities for drug... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures. 26.157 Section 26.157 Energy NUCLEAR... Services § 26.157 Procedures. (a) HHS-certified laboratories shall develop, implement, and maintain...

  3. 40 CFR 791.30 - Hearing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Hearing procedures. 791.30 Section 791.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Hearing Procedures § 791.30 Hearing procedures. (a) Representation by...

  4. 40 CFR 791.31 - Expedited procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Expedited procedures. 791.31 Section 791.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Hearing Procedures § 791.31 Expedited procedures. Unless...

  5. 20 CFR 633.316 - Closeout procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Closeout procedures. 633.316 Section 633.316 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.316 Closeout procedures....

  6. 31 CFR 4.1 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures. 4.1 Section 4.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury EMPLOYEES' PERSONAL PROPERTY CLAIMS § 4.1 Procedures. The procedures for filing a claim with the Treasury Department for personal property that is...

  7. ICan: an optimized ion-current-based quantification procedure with enhanced quantitative accuracy and sensitivity in biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Sheng, Quanhu; Li, Jun; Shen, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Ming; Shyr, Yu; Qu, Jun

    2014-12-05

    The rapidly expanding availability of high-resolution mass spectrometry has substantially enhanced the ion-current-based relative quantification techniques. Despite the increasing interest in ion-current-based methods, quantitative sensitivity, accuracy, and false discovery rate remain the major concerns; consequently, comprehensive evaluation and development in these regards are urgently needed. Here we describe an integrated, new procedure for data normalization and protein ratio estimation, termed ICan, for improved ion-current-based analysis of data generated by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). ICan achieved significantly better accuracy and precision, and lower false-positive rate for discovering altered proteins, over current popular pipelines. A spiked-in experiment was used to evaluate the performance of ICan to detect small changes. In this study E. coli extracts were spiked with moderate-abundance proteins from human plasma (MAP, enriched by IgY14-SuperMix procedure) at two different levels to set a small change of 1.5-fold. Forty-five (92%, with an average ratio of 1.71 ± 0.13) of 49 identified MAP protein (i.e., the true positives) and none of the reference proteins (1.0-fold) were determined as significantly altered proteins, with cutoff thresholds of ≥ 1.3-fold change and p ≤ 0.05. This is the first study to evaluate and prove competitive performance of the ion-current-based approach for assigning significance to proteins with small changes. By comparison, other methods showed remarkably inferior performance. ICan can be broadly applicable to reliable and sensitive proteomic survey of multiple biological samples with the use of high-resolution MS. Moreover, many key features evaluated and optimized here such as normalization, protein ratio determination, and statistical analyses are also valuable for data analysis by isotope-labeling methods.

  8. Using scanning contactless conductivity to optimise photografting procedures and capacity in the production of polymer ion-exchange monoliths.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Eoin; Connolly, Damian; Paull, Brett

    2009-07-01

    Capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D) is utilised as a simple, rapid and non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of the ion-exchange capacity of charged polymer monoliths in capillary format. A charged monomer, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) was photografted onto a 100 microm i.d. butyl methacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate monolith in a number of discrete 10 mm zones. By varying the energy dose (J/cm2) during grafting of each zone, the grafting density and thus ion-exchange capacity could be precisely controlled. Ion-exchange capacity could be correlated with energy dose by measuring the conductive response of each grafted region using scanning C4D techniques. Repeatability of the scanning C4D method was excellent with % RSD values of 0.7% and 2.4% obtained for three replicate scans of the ungrafted and grafted regions of a single monolith, respectively. Repeatability of the photografting process on separate monoliths was also examined by comparison of C4D profiles. The spatial accuracy of photografting was probed using scanning C4D which could measure the conductive response of the monolith at measurement intervals as low as 1 mm along its entire length. Scanning C4D was also used for the real time visualisation of the equilibration of grafted zones to permit the optimisation of monolith washing procedures. Finally, scanning C4D was applied to the measurement of the ion-exchange capacity of butyl methacrylate-co-AMPS-co-ethylenedimethacrylate copolymers with a direct correlation between monolith conductive response and concentration of charged monomer in the polymerisation mixture. The longitudinal homogeneity of charge along the monolith was 0.3% RSD, demonstrating that the charged functional monomer was evenly dispersed throughout the bulk of the monolith. Ion-exchange capacity was cross validated chromatographically using breakthrough studies and found to closely correlate to within 1% of the

  9. Physiological and biochemical changes with Vamana procedure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bharti; Mahapatra, Sushil C.; Makhija, Renu; Kumar, Adarsh; Jirankalgikar, Nikhil M.; Padhi, Madan M.; Devalla, Ramesh Babu

    2012-01-01

    Vamana Karma (therapeutic emesis) primarily a Samshodhana Karma (purification procedure) is one of the five Pradhana Karmas (chief procedures) of Panchakarma. It is mentioned in Ayurvedic texts that a person after Samyak Vamana (proper Vamana) experiences lightness of the body, Hrit (precordium), Kantha (throat/voice), and Shirah (head) and weakness. This procedure is effectively used in healthy and ailing persons for purification of body and extraction of Doshas (especially Kapha) in Ayurvedic system. It has been found worth to observe the physiological and biochemical changes during Vamana and after the procedure to understand the effect/safety margins of the procedure in healthy volunteers. PMID:23723640

  10. Modified Arthroscopic Brostrom Procedure With Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-08-01

    The open anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments (modified Brostrom procedure) is widely accepted as the standard surgical stabilization procedure for lateral ankle instability that does not respond to conservative measures. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedures with a suture anchor have been reported to achieve both anatomic repair of the lateral ankle ligaments and management of the associated intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates are higher than open Brostom procedures. Many of these complications are associated with the use of a suture anchor. We report a modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure in which the anterolateral ankle capsule is anchored to the lateral malleolus through small bone tunnels instead of suture anchors.

  11. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 (Tab. 1) and 2 (Tab. 2)). Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease). Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely. In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine). In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy) as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve). In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers). In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of

  12. Writer`s guide for technical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    A primary objective of operations conducted in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex is safety. Procedures are a critical element of maintaining a safety envelope to ensure safe facility operation. This DOE Writer`s Guide for Technical Procedures addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities. The DOE Writer`s Guide for Management Control Procedures and DOE Writer`s Guide for Emergency and Alarm Response Procedures are being developed to assist writers in developing nontechnical procedures. DOE is providing this guide to assist writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations that comply with DOE orders, including DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities, and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors.

  13. HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Katya Le Blanc

    2011-09-01

    This paper provides a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures in nuclear power plant control rooms. It is beyond the scope of this paper to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper provides a review of HRA as applied to traditional paper-based procedures, followed by a discussion of what specific factors should additionally be considered in HRAs for computerized procedures. Performance shaping factors and failure modes unique to computerized procedures are highlighted. Since there is no definitive guide to HRA for paper-based procedures, this paper also serves to clarify the existing guidance on paper-based procedures before delving into the unique aspects of computerized procedures.

  14. Photogrammetry procedures applied to anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Okimoto, Maria Lúcialeite Ribeiro; Klein, Alison Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the reliability and establish procedures for the use of digital photogrammetry in anthropometric measurements of the human hand. The methodology included the construction of a platform to allow the placement of the hand always equivalent to a distance of the camera lens and to annul the effects of parallax. We developed a software to perform the measurements from the images and built up a subject of proof in a cast from a negative mold, this object was subjected to measurements with digital photogrammetry using the data collection platform in caliper and the Coordinate Measuring Machine (MMC). The results of the application of photogrammetry in the data collection segment hand, allow us to conclude that photogrammetry is an effective presenting precision coefficient below 0.940. Within normal and acceptable values, given the magnitude of the data used in anthropometry. It was concluded photogrammetry then be reliable, accurate and efficient for carrying out anthropometric surveys of population, and presents less difficulty to collect in-place.

  15. STANDARD EVALUATION PROCEDURES FOR SUBMITTED ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As a NAFTA-inspired multi-governmental initiative, experts from the US EPA (Office of Research and Development, Office of Pesticide Program, or OPP) and the PMRA (Pest Management Regulatory Agency) of Health Canada formed a working group to create a document that would serve as an internal guidance document for regulatory evaluators. The resulting standard evaluation procedures address each of the neurobehavioral endpoints in developmental neurotoxicology studies conducted according to US EPA and OECD test guidelines. For each, there is a description of the behavior itself followed by pragmatic explanations of what to look for and what it can mean. The information is meant to inform interpretation by the reviewer which may influence policy, but not to dictate policy itself. While this was initially termed an internal guidance document for regulatory evaluators, it has since become apparent that it may be made publicly available by Health Canada, NAFTA, and/or OPP. To assist regulatory evaluators in their interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity data.

  16. DACS upgrade acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-09-28

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the mixer pump, directional drive system, and the instrumentation associated with the SY-101 tank and support systems, and the proper functioning of the DACS with new Model 984-785 Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), new MODBUS PLUS version 2.01 software for the PLCs, and version 3.72 of the GENESIS software will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tanks. These sensors provide information such as: tank vapor space and ventilation system H{sub 2} concentration; tank waste temperature; tank pressure; waste density; operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; strain (for major equipment); and waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations.

  17. [Procedure optimization in hospital management].

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Hanss, R; Schleppers, A; Steinfath, M; Tonner, P H; Martin, J

    2004-05-01

    Starting January 1st 2004 the German diagnosis-related group (DRG) system was established for in-patient cases. Consequently, the detection and realization of cost-saving potentials are becoming more and more important. For a successful future, efficient allocation of resources is essential. Economically, anaesthesia-related time delays during perioperative work-flow should be minimized. Since numerous entities contribute to perioperative care, it is extremely complex to analyze and optimize this process flow. In this publication single steps leading to an optimized perioperative process flow will be presented: documentation of predefined time points, calculation of relevant time intervals and analysis of key numbers for complex settings. Single steps of the given process analysis will be demonstrated using data from surgical patients at the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel. The attached data collection sheets can be used by interested hospital departments and are meant to serve as a template for further process analyses. Based on the shown analysis, an example will be given to develop an optimized work-flow as a standard operating procedure (SOP). The implementation of the SOP module in an interdisciplinary clinical pathway (CP), which defines efficient medical care from admission to discharge, is mainly responsible for decreased process costs but increased quality of care.

  18. New material for Nuss procedure.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Hisayoshi; Mawatari, Tohru; Watanabe, Atsushi; Abe, Tomio

    2004-10-01

    The Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum repair has been considered an acceptable method in terms of its decreased invasiveness and excellent cosmetic results. Although a steel bar is usually used for elevating the sternum, we used a titanium alloy plate for pectus excavatum repair for the first time. The characteristics of this plate are that 1) it comes out translucently on X-rays, 2) MRI examination is possible because titanium will not be magnetized, and 3) it is possible to go through the security checkpoint at the airport without setting off the metal detector. Furthermore, the titanium alloy is highly elastic, which reduces complications such as dislocation, and it excels in the conformity to organization. Patients who have received the Nuss operation are forced to somewhat limit their daily life for two or three years until the bar is removed. A plate made from titanium alloy resolves this problem because of its material and it is thought to be an ideal candidate for elevating the sternum during the Nuss operation.

  19. Augmented reality in surgical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, Ø.; Gersak, B.

    2008-02-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers substantially improved cost-effectiveness for the hospital and the society. However, the introduction of MIT has also led to new problems. The manipulation of structures within the body through small incisions reduces dexterity and tactile feedback. It requires a different approach than conventional surgical procedures, since eye-hand co-ordination is not based on direct vision, but more predominantly on image guidance via endoscopes or radiological imaging modalities. ARIS*ER is a multidisciplinary consortium developing a new generation of decision support tools for MIT by augmenting visual and sensorial feedback. We will present tools based on novel concepts in visualization, robotics and haptics providing tailored solutions for a range of clinical applications. Examples from radio-frequency ablation of liver-tumors, laparoscopic liver surgery and minimally invasive cardiac surgery will be presented. Demonstrators were developed with the aim to provide a seamless workflow for the clinical user conducting image-guided therapy.

  20. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.