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Sample records for 10-fold higher potency

  1. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum. PMID:25162606

  2. Splenectomy Causes 10-Fold Increased Risk of Portal Venous System Thrombosis in Liver Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xingshun; Han, Guohong; Ye, Chun; Zhang, Yongguo; Dai, Junna; Peng, Ying; Deng, Han; Li, Jing; Hou, Feifei; Ning, Zheng; Zhao, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xintong; Wang, Ran; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Portal venous system thrombosis (PVST) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis. We conducted a retrospective study to comprehensively analyze the prevalence and risk factors of PVST in liver cirrhosis. Material/Methods All cirrhotic patients without malignancy admitted between June 2012 and December 2013 were eligible if they underwent contrast-enhanced CT or MRI scans. Independent predictors of PVST in liver cirrhosis were calculated in multivariate analyses. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the severity of PVST (any PVST, main portal vein [MPV] thrombosis >50%, and clinically significant PVST) and splenectomy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. Results Overall, 113 cirrhotic patients were enrolled. The prevalence of PVST was 16.8% (19/113). Splenectomy (any PVST: OR=11.494, 95%CI=2.152–61.395; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=29.987, 95%CI=3.247–276.949; clinically significant PVST: OR=40.415, 95%CI=3.895–419.295) and higher hemoglobin (any PVST: OR=0.974, 95%CI=0.953–0.996; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=0.936, 95%CI=0.895–0.980; clinically significant PVST: OR=0.935, 95%CI=0.891–0.982) were the independent predictors of PVST. The prevalence of PVST was 13.3% (14/105) after excluding splenectomy. Higher hemoglobin was the only independent predictor of MPV thrombosis >50% (OR=0.952, 95%CI=0.909–0.997). No independent predictors of any PVST or clinically significant PVST were identified in multivariate analyses. Additionally, PVST patients who underwent splenectomy had a significantly higher proportion of clinically significant PVST but lower MELD score than those who did not undergo splenectomy. In all analyses, the in-hospital mortality was not significantly different between cirrhotic patient with and without PVST. Conclusions Splenectomy may increase by at least 10-fold the risk of PVST in liver cirrhosis independent of severity of liver dysfunction. PMID:27432511

  3. Novel method for quantifying radiation-induced single-strand-break yields in plasmid DNA highlights 10-fold discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Balagurumoorthy, Pichumani; Adelstein, S James; Kassis, Amin I

    2011-10-15

    The widely used agarose gel electrophoresis method for assessing radiation-induced single-strand-break (SSB) yield in plasmid DNA involves measurement of the fraction of relaxed-circular (C) form that migrates independently from the intact supercoiled (SC) form. We rationalized that this method may underestimate the SSB yield since the position of the relaxed-circular form is not altered when the number of SSB per DNA molecule is >1. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a novel method that directly probes and quantifies SSBs. Supercoiled (3)H-pUC19 plasmid samples were irradiated with γ-rays, alkali-denatured, dephosphorylated, and kinated with γ-[(32)P]ATP, and the DNA-incorporated (32)P activities were used to quantify the SSB yields per DNA molecule, employing a standard curve generated using DNA molecules containing a known number of SSBs. The same irradiated samples were analyzed by agarose gel and SSB yields were determined by conventional methods. Comparison of the data demonstrated that the mean SSB yield per plasmid DNA molecule of [21.2±0.59]×10(-2)Gy(-1) as measured by direct probing is ~10-fold higher than that obtained from conventional gel-based methods. These findings imply that the SSB yields inferred from agarose gels need reevaluation, especially when they were utilized in the determination of radiation risk. PMID:21741945

  4. Relative glucocorticoid potency revisited.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Hirano, F; Nomura, Y; Miura, T; Makino, Y; Fukawa, E; Makino, I

    1994-01-01

    To determine the relative potency of synthetic glucocorticoids, glucocorticoid receptor expressing cells were transfected with a hormone-inducible reporter gene, and were cultured in the presence of various glucocorticoid ligands. Hormonal inducibility was determined by means of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Dexamethasone and prednisolone, as well as cortisol, induced the expression of the reporter gene in a dose-dependent fashion. The relative potency of each ligand was in this order when inducibility was quantitatively assessed. In conclusion, the transcription assay described here may be a convenient and alternative method to evaluate the relative potency of given glucocorticoids. PMID:7939139

  5. Potency in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, A A

    1976-06-01

    This paper defines therapeutic potency in terms of constructive as opposed to destructive intervention. In judging the degree of success in psychotherapy we may use either a medical or a growth model. Whichever criterion is adopted the conclusion stands that potency will be at a maximum whenever the therapist selects the most efficient technique for working with his client regardless of the school which gave birth to it. An eclectic approach views the differences between schools as exaggerated by the use of divergent psychological models and terminology, and sees value in various explanatory concepts such as 'reinforcement' 'conditioning', 'insight' and 'cognitive restructuring'. PMID:1067838

  6. CPDB: Carcinogenic Potency Database.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2008-01-01

    The Carcinogenic Potency Database reports analyses of animal cancer tests on 1,547 chemicals. These tests are used in support of cancer risk assessments for humans. Results are searchable and are made available via the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) TOXNET system. This column will provide background information on the database, as well as present search basics. PMID:19042710

  7. Exploration of Dimensions of Estrogen Potency

    PubMed Central

    Jeyakumar, M.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Gunther, Jillian R.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  8. Potency disorder among Pathans.

    PubMed

    Khan, M F; Ahmed, S H

    1990-01-01

    In a working class industrial area of Karachi hundred consecutive Pathans presenting to a family physician with potency disorder were examined. After exclusion of those with structural or drug related conditions, a structured proforma was introduced. Their presentation, associated symptoms and background pointed to masked depression and lack of sex education. Symptoms of anxiety were noticed in 49% and depressive features in 43%. The guilt feelings were reinforced by Hakims and lay literature which stress more on masturbation (79%) and spermatorrhoea (60%) and not extra-marital intercourse (52%) or bestiality (39%). PMID:2109124

  9. Ratcheting up cancer potency estimates

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Edmund A.C.; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-01-01

    Summary The current paradigm for cancer risk assessment in the United States (U.S.) typically requires selection of representative rodent bioassay dose-response data for extrapolation to a single cancer potency estimate for humans. In the absence of extensive further information, the chosen bioassay result generally is taken to be that which gives the highest extrapolated result from the “most sensitive” species or strain. The estimated human cancer potency is thus derived from an upper-bound value on animal cancer potency that is technically similar to an extreme value statistic. Thus additional information from further bioassays can only lead to equal or larger cancer potency estimates. We here calculate the size of this effect using the collected results of a large number of bioassays. Since many standards are predicated on the value of the cancer potency, this effect is undesirable in producing a strong counter-incentive to performing further bioassays. PMID:22296526

  10. RELATIVE POTENCY RANKING FOR CHLOROPHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently the National Center for Environmental Assessment-Cincinnati completed a feasibility study for developing a toxicity related relative potency ranking scheme for chlorophenols. In this study it was concluded that a large data base exists pertaining to the relative toxicity...

  11. Inhaled corticosteroids: potency, dose equivalence and therapeutic index

    PubMed Central

    Daley-Yates, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are a group of structurally related molecules that includes natural hormones and synthetic drugs with a wide range of anti-inflammatory potencies. For synthetic corticosteroid analogues it is commonly assumed that the therapeutic index cannot be improved by increasing their glucocorticoid receptor binding affinity. The validity of this assumption, particularly for inhaled corticosteroids, has not been fully explored. Inhaled corticosteroids exert their anti-inflammatory activity locally in the airways, and hence this can be dissociated from their potential to cause systemic adverse effects. The molecular structural features that increase glucocorticoid receptor binding affinity and selectivity drive topical anti-inflammatory activity. However, in addition, these structural modifications also result in physicochemical and pharmacokinetic changes that can enhance targeting to the airways and reduce systemic exposure. As a consequence, potency and therapeutic index can be correlated. However, this consideration is not reflected in asthma treatment guidelines that classify inhaled corticosteroid formulations as low-, mid- and high dose, and imbed a simple dose equivalence approach where potency is not considered to affect the therapeutic index. This article describes the relationship between potency and therapeutic index, and concludes that higher potency can potentially improve the therapeutic index. Therefore, both efficacy and safety should be considered when classifying inhaled corticosteroid regimens in terms of dose equivalence. The historical approach to dose equivalence in asthma treatment guidelines is not appropriate for the wider range of molecules, potencies and device/formulations now available. A more robust method is needed that incorporates pharmacological principles. PMID:25808113

  12. The Effects of Medical Marijuana Laws on Potency

    PubMed Central

    Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Heaton, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Marijuana potency has risen dramatically over the past two decades. In the United States, it is unclear whether state medical marijuana policies have contributed to this increase. Methods Employing a differences-in-differences model within a mediation framework, we analyzed data on n = 39,157 marijuana samples seized by law enforcement in 51 U.S. jurisdictions between 1990-2010, producing estimates of the direct and indirect effects of state medical marijuana laws on potency, as measured by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol content. Results We found evidence that potency increased by a half percentage point on average after legalization of medical marijuana, although this result was not significant. When we examined specific medical marijuana supply provisions, results suggest that legal allowances for retail dispensaries had the strongest influence, significantly increasing potency by about one percentage point on average. Our mediation analyses examining the mechanisms through which medical marijuana laws influence potency found no evidence of direct regulatory impact. Rather, the results suggest that the impact of these laws occurs predominantly through a compositional shift in the share of the market captured by high-potency sinsemilla. Conclusion Our findings have important implications for policymakers and those in the scientific community trying to understand the extent to which greater availability of higher potency marijuana increases the risk of negative public health outcomes, such as drugged driving and drug-induced psychoses. Future work should reconsider the impact of medical marijuana laws on health outcomes in light of dramatic and ongoing shifts in both marijuana potency and the medical marijuana policy environment. PMID:24502887

  13. Detergents profoundly affect inhibitor potencies against both cyclo-oxygenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Marc; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Percival, M David

    2004-02-01

    The sensitivity of Coxs (cyclo-oxygenases) to inhibition is known to be highly dependent on assay conditions. In the present study, the inhibitor sensitivities of purified Cox-1 and -2 were determined in a colorimetric assay using the reducing agent N, N, N ', N '-tetramethyl- p -phenylenediamine. With the detergent genapol X-100 (2 mM) present, the potencies of nimesulide, ibuprofen, flufenamic acid, niflumic acid and naproxen were increased over 100-fold against Cox-2 and titration curve shapes changed, so that maximal inhibition now approached 100%. Indomethacin, diclofenac and flosulide were not changed in potency. Similar effects of genapol were observed with inhibitors of Cox-1. DuP-697 and two analogues became more than 10-fold less potent against Cox-2 with genapol present. Tween-20, Triton X-100 and phosphatidylcholine, but not octylglucoside, gave qualitatively similar effects as genapol. Similar detergent-dependent changes in inhibitor potency were also observed using a [(14)C]arachidonic acid HPLC assay. The increases in potency of ibuprofen, flufenamic acid, isoxicam and niflumic acid towards Cox-2 and ibuprofen towards Cox-1 were accompanied by a change from time-independent to time-dependent inhibition. The interactions of Cox inhibitors has been described in terms of multiple binding step mechanisms. The genapol-dependent increase in inhibitor potency for ketoprofen was associated with an increase in the rate constant for the conversion of the initial enzyme-inhibitor complex to a second, more tightly bound form. The loss of potency for some inhibitors is probably due to inhibitor partitioning into detergent micelles. The present study identifies detergents as another factor that must be considered when determining inhibitor potencies against both Cox isoforms. PMID:14510637

  14. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  15. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  16. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  17. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  18. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  19. Fate and antibacterial potency of anticoccidial drugs and their main abiotic degradation products.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Martin; Krogh, Kristine A; Brandt, Asbjørn; Christensen, Jan H; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2009-02-01

    The antibacterial potency of eight anticoccidial drugs was tested in a soil bacteria bioassay (pour plate method), EC(50)-values between 2.4 and 19.6 microM were obtained; however, one compound, nicarbazin exhibited an EC(50)-value above the maximum tested concentration (21 microM, 9.1 mg L(-1)). The potency of mixtures of two of the compounds, narasin and nicarbazin, was synergistic (more than additive) with 10-fold greater antibacterial potency of the mixture than can be explained by their individual EC(50)-values. The influence of pH, temperature, oxygen concentration and light on the transformation of robenidine and salinomycin was investigated. Robenidine was transformed by photolysis (DT(50) of 4.1 days) and was unstable at low pH (DT(50) of approximately 4 days); salinomycin was merely transformed at low pH, the latter into an unknown number of products. The antibacterial potency of the mixtures of transformation products of robenidine after photolysis and at low pH was comparable with that of the parent compound. Finally five photo-transformation products of robenidine were structural elucidated by accurate mass measurements, i-FIT values (isotopic pattern fit) and MS/MS fragmentation patterns. PMID:18976841

  20. A Review of OIE Country Status Recovery Using Vaccinate-to-Live Versus Vaccinate-to-Die Foot-and-Mouth Disease Response Policies I: Benefits of Higher Potency Vaccines and Associated NSP DIVA Test Systems in Post-Outbreak Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Barnett, P V; Geale, D W; Clarke, G; Davis, J; Kasari, T R

    2015-08-01

    To rapidly return to trade, countries with OIE status, FMD-free country where vaccination is not practised, have destroyed emergency vaccinated animals, raising ethical concerns with respect to social values, the environment, animal welfare and global food security. This two-part review explores whether science could support eligibility to return to previous OIE status in 3 months irrespective of vaccinate-to-live or vaccinate-to-die policies. Here, we examine the benefits of higher potency (≥ 6 PD50 ), high-purity vaccines formulated from antigen banks for emergency use, their efficacy and performance in differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) assays for post-outbreak surveillance. From an intensive programme of research, we conclude that high-quality, higher potency vaccines are proven to reduce FMD virus (FMDV) subclinical circulation and the risk of carriers. Broader coverage than predicted by serology suggests the potential to hold a few 'key' vaccine strains improving logistics and reducing the financial burden of antigen banks. The OIE should adopt formal definitions for emergency vaccination and emergency vaccines. In terms of supportive tools, we consider that the lack of OIE recognition of DIVA tests other than those of PANAFTOSA in cattle is a shortcoming. There is need for research on maternal antibody interference with DIVA tests and on the use of such tests to establish whether greater purification of vaccines improves performance. We consider that alignment of waiting periods for vaccinate-to-live and vaccinate-to-die in OIE Code Article 8.5.9 1 b. and c. is feasible until an acceptable level of statistical certainty for surveillance or target probability of freedom is established to substantiate the absence of FMDV infection or circulation. It is surveillance intensity rather than waiting periods that establishes the risk of residual FMDV. EU Directive 2003/85/EC implicitly recognizes this, permitting derogation of the OIE waiting

  1. Increasing the potency of neutralizing single-domain antibodies by functionalization with a CD11b/CD18 binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Rossotti, Martin A; González-Techera, Andrés; Guarnaschelli, Julio; Yim, Lucia; Camacho, Ximena; Fernández, Marcelo; Cabral, Pablo; Leizagoyen, Carmen; Chabalgoity, José A; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant single domain antibodies (nanobodies) constitute an attractive alternative for the production of neutralizing therapeutic agents. Their small size warrants rapid bioavailability and fast penetration to sites of toxin uptake, but also rapid renal clearance, which negatively affects their performance. In this work, we present a new strategy to drastically improve the neutralizing potency of single domain antibodies based on their fusion to a second nanobody specific for the complement receptor CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1). These bispecific antibodies retain a small size (˜30 kDa), but acquire effector functions that promote the elimination of the toxin-immunocomplexes. The principle was demonstrated in a mouse model of lethal toxicity with tetanus toxin. Three anti-tetanus toxin nanobodies were selected and characterized in terms of overlapping epitopes and inhibition of toxin binding to neuron gangliosides. Bispecific constructs of the most promising monodomain antibodies were built using anti Mac-1, CD45 and MHC II nanobodies. When co-administered with the toxin, all bispecific antibodies showed higher toxin-neutralizing capacity than the monomeric ones, but only their fusion to the anti-endocytic receptor Mac-1 nanobody allowed the mice to survive a 10-fold lethal dose. In a model of delayed neutralization of the toxin, the anti- Mac-1 bispecific antibodies outperformed a sheep anti-toxin polyclonal IgG that had shown similar neutralization potency in the co-administration experiments. This strategy should have widespread application in the development of nanobody-based neutralizing therapeutics, which can be produced economically and more safely than conventional antisera. PMID:26192995

  2. Newcastle disease virus vaccine potency determination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potency of inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines is determined using vaccination and challenge. If the minimum killed viral antigen necessary for clinical protection can be determined, vaccines meeting or exceeding this dose might be considered of adequate potency. In these studies, c...

  3. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency test. 660.4 Section 660.4 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface...

  4. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency test. 660.43 Section 660.43 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test... antibody in the appropriate sera of the reference panel by all test methods recommended by the...

  5. Rainbow trout cell bioassay-derived relative potencies for halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons: Comparison and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, D.L.; Blankenship, A.L.; Giesy, J.P.; Richter, C.A.

    1999-05-01

    Rainbow trout hepatoma cells, stably transfected with a luciferase reporter gene under control of dioxin-responsive elements (RLT 2.0 cells) were used to derive relative potencies (RPs) for a variety of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) that are structurally similar to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). This in vitro bioassay utilizes 96-well microplates, which provide high sample throughput and assay efficiency without affecting sensitivity. The RLT 2.0-derived potencies for dioxin and furan congeners, relative to 2,3,7,8-TCDD, ranged from 0.917 for 1,2,3,4,7,8-hexachlorodibenzofuran to 0.208 or 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran. All mono- and di-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) tested had RPs that were orders of magnitude less than TCDD, but point estimates could not be determined. The RLT 2.0-derived RPs were found to be comparable to both other rainbow trout-specific RPs and RPs based on mammalian bioassays. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the range of uncertainty associated with TCDD equivalent (TEQ) estimates based on RLT 2.0-derived RPs is approximately 10-fold. Within this degree of uncertainty and the context of this study, the RLT 2.0 bioassay showed no definitive biases or inaccuracies relative to similar mammalian- or fish-specific in vitro bioassays. Thus, the RLT 2.0 bioassay appears to be a useful tool for evaluating dioxin-like potency of HAHs to fish.

  6. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jonas; Tvedesøe, Claus; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Lysdahl, Helle; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Chen, Muwan; Baas, Jorgen; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. Methods: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone marrow and the molar teeth of each pig, respectively. BMSCs and DPSCs were cultured in monolayer and on a three-dimensional (3D) polycaprolactone (PCL) – hyaluronic acid – tricalcium phosphate (HT-PCL) scaffold. Population doubling (PD), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and calcium deposition were measured in monolayer. In the 3D culture ALP activity, DNA content, and calcium deposition were evaluated. Six non-penetrating critical-size defects were made in each calvarium of 14 pigs. Three paired sub-studies were conducted: (1) empty defects vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; (2) PCL scaffolds vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; and (3) autologous BMSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds vs. autologous DPSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds. The observation time was five weeks. Bone volume fractions (BV/TV) were assessed with micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. Results and discussion: The results from the in vitro study revealed a higher ALP activity and calcium deposition of the DPSC cultures compared with BMSC cultures. Significantly more bone was present in the HT-PCL group than in both the pure PCL scaffold group and the empty defect group in vivo. DPSCs generated more bone than BMSCs when seeded on HT-PCL. In conclusion, DPSCs exhibited a higher osteogenic potential compared with BMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, making it a potential cell source for future bone tissue engineering. PMID:27163105

  7. High-potency cannabis and the risk of psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Forti, Marta; Morgan, Craig; Dazzan, Paola; Pariante, Carmine; Mondelli, Valeria; Marques, Tiago Reis; Handley, Rowena; Luzi, Sonija; Russo, Manuela; Paparelli, Alessandra; Butt, Alexander; Stilo, Simona A.; Wiffen, Ben; Powell, John; Murray, Robin M.

    2009-01-01

    Background People who use cannabis have an increased risk of psychosis, an effect attributed to the active ingredient Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). There has recently been concern over an increase in the concentration of Δ9-THC in the cannabis available in many countries. Aims To investigate whether people with a first episode of psychosis were particularly likely to use high-potency cannabis. Method We collected information on cannabis use from 280 cases presenting with a first episode of psychosis to the South London & Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, and from 174 healthy controls recruited from the local population. Results There was no significant difference between cases and controls in whether they had ever taken cannabis, or age at first use. However, those in the cases group were more likely to be current daily users (OR = 6.4) and to have smoked cannabis for more than 5 years (OR = 2.1). Among those who used cannabis, 78% of the cases group used high-potency cannabis (sinsemilla, ‘skunk’) compared with 37% of the control group (OR 6.8). Conclusions The finding that people with a first episode of psychosis had smoked higher-potency cannabis, for longer and with greater frequency, than a healthy control group is consistent with the hypothesis that Δ9-THC is the active ingredient increasing risk of psychosis. This has important public health implications, given the increased availability and use of high-potency cannabis. PMID:19949195

  8. Engineering High-Potency R-spondin Adult Stem Cell Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Margaret L.; Bell, Tufica

    2015-01-01

    Secreted R-spondin proteins (RSPOs1–4) function as adult stem cell growth factors by potentiating Wnt signaling. Simultaneous binding of distinct regions of the RSPO Fu1–Fu2 domain module to the extracellular domains (ECDs) of the LGR4 G protein–coupled receptor and the ZNRF3 transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates Wnt receptor availability. Here, we examine the molecular basis for the differing signaling strengths of RSPOs1–4 using purified RSPO Fu1–Fu2, LGR4 ECD, and ZNRF3 ECD proteins in Wnt signaling and receptor binding assays, and we engineer novel high-potency RSPOs. RSPO2/3/4 had similar signaling potencies that were stronger than that of RSPO1, whereas RSPO1/2/3 had similar efficacies that were greater than that of RSPO4. The RSPOs bound LGR4 with affinity rank order RSPO4 > RSPO2/3 > RSPO1 and ZNRF3 with affinity rank order RSPO2/3 > > RSPO1 > RSPO4. An RSPO2–4 chimera combining RSPO2 ZNRF3 binding with RSPO4 LGR4 binding was a “Superspondin” that exhibited enhanced ternary complex formation and 10-fold stronger signaling potency than RSPO2 and efficacy equivalent to RSPO2. An RSPO4–1 chimera combining RSPO4 ZNRF3 binding with RSPO1 LGR4 binding was a “Poorspondin” that exhibited signaling potency similar to RSPO1 and efficacy equivalent to RSPO4. Conferring increased ZNRF3 binding upon RSPO4 with amino acid substitutions L56F, I58L, and I63M enhanced its signaling potency and efficacy. Our results reveal the molecular basis for RSPOs1–4 activity differences and suggest that signaling potency is determined by ternary complex formation ability, whereas efficacy depends on ZNRF3 recruitment. High-potency RSPOs may be of value for regenerative medicine and/or therapeutic applications. PMID:25504990

  9. VARIATIONS IN THE NEUROTOXIC POTENCY OF TRIMETHYLTIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven samples of trimethyltin obtained from three commercial sources were evaluated for neurotoxic potency in the rat. Hippocampus weight, histology and assays of the astrocyte protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, were used as indices of neurotoxicity. A single administratio...

  10. Potency classification of topical corticosteroids: modern perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of topical corticosteroid therapy upon human epidermal Langerhans cell surface markers were studied. The reduction in numbers of human leukocyte antigen-DR+/T6+ Langerhands cells proved to be a potency-related effect and Langerhans cell enumeration may therefore have some use as an adjunct in the assessment of steroid potency. Further studies showed that corticosteroid therapy also reduced the function of Langerhans cells in terms of epidermal cell alloantigen-presenting capacity. However, experimental variation and the high antigen-presenting potency of residual flow cytomterically sorted human leukocyte antigen-DR+/T6+ Langerhans cells following steroid application (1) mean that such functional assessments of epidermal cell alloantigen-presenting capacity cannot be recommended as an easily reproducible method for measuring steroid potency. PMID:2696307

  11. Agmatine enhances antidepressant potency of MK-801 and conventional antidepressants in mice.

    PubMed

    Neis, Vivian Binder; Moretti, Morgana; Manosso, Luana Meller; Lopes, Mark W; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-03-01

    Agmatine, an endogenous guanidine amine, has been shown to produce antidepressant-like effects in animal studies. This study investigated the effects of the combined administration of agmatine with either conventional monoaminergic antidepressants or the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 in the tail suspension test (TST) in mice. The aim was to evaluate the extent of the antidepressant synergism by examining the ability of a fixed dose of agmatine to shift the antidepressant potency of fluoxetine, imipramine, bupropion and MK-801. A sub-effective dose of agmatine (0.0001 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased the potency by which fluoxetine, imipramine, bupropion and MK-801 decreased immobility time in the TST by 2-fold (fluoxetine), 10-fold (imipramine and bupropion) and 100-fold (MK-801). Combined with previous evidence indicating a role of monoaminergic systems in the effect of agmatine, the current data suggest that agmatine may modulate monoaminergic neurotransmission and augment the activity of conventional antidepressants. Moreover, this study found that agmatine substantially augmented the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801, reinforcing the notion that this compound modulates NMDA receptor activation. These preclinical data may stimulate future clinical studies testing the effects of augmentation therapy with agmatine for the management of depressive disorders. PMID:25553821

  12. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  13. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  14. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  15. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  16. RELATIVE POTENCIES OF MINERAL AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a summary of the present need for the NHEERL data set, how the data are being recovered and entered into spreadsheets for analysis and modeling, and the potential for improved risk models that include consideration of differences in relative potencies based on...

  17. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  18. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  19. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  20. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  1. Exploration of dimensions of estrogen potency: parsing ligand binding and coactivator binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Carlson, Kathryn E; Gunther, Jillian R; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2011-04-15

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  2. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quality control test for potency. 640.56 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.56 Quality control test for potency. (a) Quality control tests for potency of antihemophilic factor shall be...

  3. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Quality control test for potency. 640.56 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.56 Quality control test for potency. (a) Quality control tests for potency of antihemophilic factor shall be...

  4. In vitro profiling of the endocrine-disrupting potency of brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Hamers, Timo; Kamstra, Jorke H; Sonneveld, Edwin; Murk, Albertinka J; Kester, Monique H A; Andersson, Patrik L; Legler, Juliette; Brouwer, Abraham

    2006-07-01

    Over the last few years, increasing evidence has become available that some brominated flame retardants (BFRs) may have endocrine-disrupting (ED) potencies. The goal of the current study was to perform a systematic in vitro screening of the ED potencies of BFRs (1) to elucidate possible modes of action of BFRs in man and wildlife and (2) to classify BFRs with similar profiles of ED potencies. A test set of 27 individual BFRs were selected, consisting of 19 polybrominated diphenyl ether congeners, tetrabromobisphenol-A, hexabromocyclododecane, 2,4,6-tribromophenol, ortho-hydroxylated brominated diphenyl ether 47, and tetrabromobisphenol-A-bis(2,3)dibromopropyl ether. All BFRs were tested for their potency to interact with the arylhydrocarbon receptor, androgen receptor (AR), progesterone receptor (PR), and estrogen receptor. In addition, all BFRs were tested for their potency to inhibit estradiol (sulfation by estradiol sulfotransferase (E2SULT), to interfere with thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3)-mediated cell proliferation, and to compete with T3-precursor thyroxine for binding to the plasma transport protein transthyretin (TTR). The results of the in vitro screening indicated that BFRs have ED potencies, some of which had not or only marginally been described before (AR antagonism, PR antagonism, E2SULT inhibition, and potentiation of T3-mediated effects). For some BFRs, the potency to induce AR antagonism, E2SULT inhibition, and TTR competition was higher than for natural ligands or clinical drugs used as positive controls. Based on their similarity in ED profiles, BFRs were classified into five different clusters. These findings support further investigation of the potential ED effects of these environmentally relevant BFRs in man and wildlife. PMID:16601080

  5. Summary of carcinogenic potency and positivity for 492 rodent carcinogens in the carcinogenic potency database.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, L S; Slone, T H; Bernstein, L

    1989-01-01

    A tabulation of carcinogenic potency (TD50) by species for 492 chemicals that induce tumors in rats or mice is presented. With the use of the Carcinogenic Potency Database, experimental results are summarized by indicating in which sex-species groups the chemical was tested and the respective evaluations of carcinogenicity. A comparison of three summary measures of TD50 for chemicals with more than one positive experiment per species shows that the most potent TD50 value is similar to measures that average values or functions of values. This tabulation can be used to investigate associations between rodent potency and other factors such as mutagenicity, teratogenicity, chemical structure, and human exposure. PMID:2707207

  6. Relative potencies of aroclor mixtures derived from avian in vitro bioassays: comparisons with calculated toxic equivalents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Manning, Gillian E; Farmahin, Reza; Crump, Doug; Zhang, Xiaowei; Kennedy, Sean W

    2013-08-01

    The World Health Organization toxic equivalency factors (WHO-TEFs) for birds were developed to simplify risk assessments of environmental mixtures of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Under this framework, toxic equivalents (TEQs) are used to represent the toxic potency of DLC mixtures as an equivalent concentration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. Recently, a luciferase reporter gene (LRG) assay, measuring aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1)-mediated gene expression, accurately predicted the relative potency of individual polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in different avian species. The study presented here used the LRG assay to predict the relative potency of Aroclors 1016, 1221, 1242, 1248, 1254, and 1260 on induction of LRG activity in cells transfected with chicken, ring-necked pheasant, or Japanese quail AHR1 constructs. LRG assay results were compared to (1) results of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assays conducted in chicken hepatocytes and (2) calculated TEQs from the literature. The relative potencies of Aroclors were similar between the LRG and EROD assays, and bioassay-derived TEQs for the chicken closely resembled calculated TEQs. However, LRG assay-derived TEQs for the Japanese quail construct were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than calculated TEQs for Aroclors 1254 and 1016. These results suggest that the WHO-TEFs are not representative of relative PCB potency for all avian species. PMID:23815337

  7. A new lymphocyte proliferation assay for potency determination of bovine tuberculin PPDs.

    PubMed

    Spohr, Christina; Kaufmann, Eva; Battenfeld, Sibylle; Duchow, Karin; Cussler, Klaus; Balks, Elisabeth; Bastian, Max

    2015-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test is the method of choice for tuberculosis surveillance in livestock ruminants. The exact definition of the biological activity of bovine tuberculin purified protein derivatives (bovine tuberculin PPDs) is essential for the reliability of a test system. PPDs consist of heterogeneous mixtures of mycobacterial antigens, making it difficult to determine their potency in vitro. The commonly used batch potency test is therefore based on the evaluation of skin reactions in mycobacteria-sensitized guinea pigs. Aim of the present study was to test an alternative in vitro method that reliably quantifies tuberculin PPD potency. This novel approach may prevent animal distress in the future. To this end a flow cytometry-based lymphocyte proliferation assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from sensitized guinea pigs was established. Potency estimates for individual PPD preparations were calculated in comparison to an international standard. The comparison with results obtained from the guinea pig skin test revealed that the lymphocyte proliferation assay is more precise but results in systematically higher potency estimates. However, with a manufacturer specific correction factor a correlation of over 85% was achieved, highlighting the potential of this in vitro method to replace the current guinea pig skin test. PMID:25935213

  8. Evaluation of an in vitro cell culture assay for the potency assessment of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Machado, Francine T; Maldaner, Fernanda P S; Perobelli, Rafaela F; Xavier, Bruna; da Silva, Francielle S; de Freitas, Guilherme W; Bartolini, Paolo; Ribela, M Tereza C P; Dalmora, Sérgio L

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin is a sialoglycoprotein that stimulates erythropoiesis. To assess potency of human erythropoietin produced by recombinant technology, we investigated an in vitro TF-1 cell proliferation assay, which was applied in conjunction with a reversed-phase liquid chromatography method for the determination of the content of sialic acids. The results obtained, which were higher than 126.8ng/μg, were compared with those obtained with the in vivo normocythaemic mouse bioassay. The in vitro assay resulted in a non-significant lower mean difference of the estimated potencies (0.61% ± 0.026, p > 0.05). The use of this combination of methods represents an advance toward the establishment of alternative in vitro approaches, in the context of the Three Rs, for the potency assessment of biotechnology-derived medicines. PMID:27256453

  9. Potency of Animal Models in KANSEI Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Hisano, Setsuji; Iwamoto, Yoshiki

    Various species of animals have been used as animal models for neuroscience and provided critical information about the brain functions. Although it seems difficult to elucidate a highly advanced function of the human brain, animal models have potency to clarify the fundamental mechanisms of emotion, decision-making and social behavior. In this review, we will pick up common animal models and point to both the merits and demerits caused by the characteristics. We will also mention that wide-ranging approaches from animal models are advantageous to understand KANSEI as well as mind in humans.

  10. The efflux pump inhibitor timcodar improves the potency of antimycobacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H; Shoen, Carolyn M; Jones, Steven M; Jones, Peter L; Cynamon, Michael H; Locher, Christopher P

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies indicated that inhibition of efflux pumps augments tuberculosis therapy. In this study, we used timcodar (formerly VX-853) to determine if this efflux pump inhibitor could increase the potency of antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in in vitro and in vivo combination studies. When used alone, timcodar weakly inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in broth culture (MIC, 19 μg/ml); however, it demonstrated synergism in drug combination studies with rifampin, bedaquiline, and clofazimine but not with other anti-TB agents. When M. tuberculosis was cultured in host macrophage cells, timcodar had about a 10-fold increase (50% inhibitory concentration, 1.9 μg/ml) in the growth inhibition of M. tuberculosis and demonstrated synergy with rifampin, moxifloxacin, and bedaquiline. In a mouse model of tuberculosis lung infection, timcodar potentiated the efficacies of rifampin and isoniazid, conferring 1.0 and 0.4 log10 reductions in bacterial burden in lung, respectively, compared to the efficacy of each drug alone. Furthermore, timcodar reduced the likelihood of a relapse infection when evaluated in a mouse model of long-term, chronic infection with treatment with a combination of rifampin, isoniazid, and timcodar. Although timcodar had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of rifampin in plasma and lung, it did increase the plasma exposure of bedaquiline. These data suggest that the antimycobacterial drug-potentiating activity of timcodar is complex and drug dependent and involves both bacterial and host-targeted mechanisms. Further study of the improvement of the potency of antimycobacterial drugs and drug candidates when used in combination with timcodar is warranted. PMID:25534740

  11. Inhaled Anesthetic Potency in Aged Alzheimer Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Shannon L.; Caltagarone, Breanna M.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Kelz, Max B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The number of elderly patients with frank or incipient Alzheimer’s disease (AD) requiring surgery is growing as the population ages. General anesthesia may exacerbate symptoms of and the pathology underlying AD, so minimizing anesthetic exposure may be important. This requires knowledge of whether the continuing AD pathogenesis alters anesthetic potency. METHODS We determined the induction potency and emergence time for isoflurane, halothane, and sevoflurane using the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration for loss of righting reflex as an end point in 12- to 14-mo-old triple transgenic Alzheimer (3xTgAD) mice and wild type C57BL6 controls. 3xTgAD mice model AD by harboring three distinct mutations: the APPSwe, Tau, and PS1 human transgenes, each of which has been associated with familial forms of human AD. RESULTS The 3xTgAD mice exhibited mild resistance (from 8% to 30%) to volatile anesthetics but displayed indistinguishable emergence patterns from all three inhaled anesthetics. CONCLUSIONS These results show that the genetic vulnerabilities and neuropathology associated with AD produce a small but significant decrease in sensitivity to the hypnotic actions of three inhaled anesthetics. Emergence times were not altered. PMID:19820240

  12. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  13. Dose-response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Montefiori, David C; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose-response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120-gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations. PMID:26416571

  14. Dose–response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Nicholas E.; Montefiori, David C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose–response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120–gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations. PMID:26416571

  15. [Immune stimulative potency of milk proteins].

    PubMed

    Ambroziak, Adam; Cichosz, Grazyna

    2014-02-01

    Milk proteins are characterized by the highest immune stimulative potency from among all the proteins present in human diet. Whey proteins and numerous growth factors that regulate insulin secretion, differentiation of intestine epithelium cells, and also tissue restoration, are priceless in stimulation the immune system. Lactoferrin shows the most comprehensive pro-health properties: antioxidative, anticancer, immune stimulative and even chemopreventive. Also peptides and amino acids formed from casein and whey proteins possess immune stimulative activity. The most valuable proteins, i.e. lactoferrin, immune globulins, lactoperoxidase and lisozyme, together with bioactive peptides, are resistant to pepsin and trypsin activity. This is why they maintain their exceptional biological activity within human organism. Properly high consumption of milk proteins conditions correct function of immune system, especially at children and elderly persons. PMID:24720113

  16. Functional potencies of dopamine agonists and antagonists at human dopamine D₂ and D₃ receptors.

    PubMed

    Tadori, Yoshihiro; Forbes, Robert A; McQuade, Robert D; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2011-09-01

    We measured the functional agonist potencies of dopamine agonists including antiparkinson drugs, and functional antagonist potencies of antipsychotics at human dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptors. In vitro pharmacological assessment included inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and the reversal of dopamine-induced inhibition in clonal Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing low and high densities of human dopamine D(2L) and D(2S) receptors (hD(2L)-Low, hD(2L)-High, hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High, respectively) and human dopamine D(3) Ser-9 and D(3) Gly-9 receptors (hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9, respectively). Cabergoline, bromocriptine, pergolide, (±)-7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT), talipexole, pramipexole, R-(+)-trans-3,4,4a,10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano[4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin-9-olhydrochloride (PD128907) and ropinirole behaved as dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptor full agonists and showed higher potencies in hD(2L)-High and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low. In hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9 compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low, dopamine, ropinirole, PD128907, and pramipexole potencies were clearly higher; talipexole and 7-OH-DPAT showed slightly higher potencies; pergolide showed slightly lower potency; and, cabergoline and bromocriptine potencies were lower. Aripiprazole acted as an antagonist in hD(2L)-Low; a low intrinsic activity partial agonist in hD(2S)-Low; a moderate partial agonist in hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9; a robust partial agonist in hD(2L)-High; and a full agonist in hD(2S)-High. Amisulpride, sulpiride and perphenazine behaved as preferential antagonists; and chlorpromazine and asenapine behaved as modest preferential antagonists; whereas fluphenazine, haloperidol, and blonanserin behaved as non-preferential antagonists in hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9. These findings may help to elucidate the basis of therapeutic benefit observed with these drugs, with

  17. ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO ESTIMATING CANCER POTENCY FOR ASBESTOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alternative approach for estimating cancer potency from inhalation exposure to asbestos seeks to improve the methods developed by USEPA (1986). This efforts seeks to modify the the current approach for estimating cancer potency for lung cancer and mesothelioma to account fo...

  18. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potency tests without reference preparations. 660.25 Section 660.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.25 Potency tests...

  19. 21 CFR 610.21 - Limits of potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limits of potency. 610.21 Section 610.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Standard Preparations and Limits of Potency § 610.21 Limits...

  20. 21 CFR 610.21 - Limits of potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limits of potency. 610.21 Section 610.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Standard Preparations and Limits of Potency § 610.21 Limits...

  1. Modulation of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Potency by Endocannabinoid-like Lipids Represents a Novel Mode of Regulating GLP-1 Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Ho, Mei-Shang; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chou, Ying-Ting; King, Klim

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are in clinical trials for disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many peripheral and neuronal tissues and is activated by circulating GLP-1. Other than food intake, little is known about factors regulating GLP-1 secretion. Given a normally basal circulating level of GLP-1, knowledge of mechanisms regulating GLP-1R signaling, which has diverse functions in extrapancreatic tissues, remains elusive. In this study, we found that the potency of GLP-1, not exendin 4, is specifically enhanced by the endocannabinoid-like lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol but not by stearoylethanolamide (SEA) or palmitoylethanolamide. 9.2 μm OEA enhances the potency of GLP-1 in stimulating cAMP production by 10-fold but does not affect its receptor binding affinity. OEA and 2-oleoylglycerol, but not SEA, bind to GLP-1 in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. OEA but not SEA promoted GLP-1(7–36) amide to trypsin inactivation in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Susceptibility of GLP-1(7–36) amide to trypsin inactivation is increased 40-fold upon binding to OEA but not to SEA. Our findings indicate that OEA binds to GLP-1(7–36) amide and enhances the potency that may result from a conformational change of the peptide. In conclusion, modulating potency of GLP-1 by physiologically regulated endocannabinoid-like lipids allows GLP-1R signaling to be regulated spatiotemporally at a constant basal GLP-1 level. PMID:25903129

  2. Modulation of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Potency by Endocannabinoid-like Lipids Represents a Novel Mode of Regulating GLP-1 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Ho, Mei-Shang; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chou, Ying-Ting; King, Klim

    2015-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are in clinical trials for disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many peripheral and neuronal tissues and is activated by circulating GLP-1. Other than food intake, little is known about factors regulating GLP-1 secretion. Given a normally basal circulating level of GLP-1, knowledge of mechanisms regulating GLP-1R signaling, which has diverse functions in extrapancreatic tissues, remains elusive. In this study, we found that the potency of GLP-1, not exendin 4, is specifically enhanced by the endocannabinoid-like lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol but not by stearoylethanolamide (SEA) or palmitoylethanolamide. 9.2 μM OEA enhances the potency of GLP-1 in stimulating cAMP production by 10-fold but does not affect its receptor binding affinity. OEA and 2-oleoylglycerol, but not SEA, bind to GLP-1 in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. OEA but not SEA promoted GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Susceptibility of GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation is increased 40-fold upon binding to OEA but not to SEA. Our findings indicate that OEA binds to GLP-1(7-36) amide and enhances the potency that may result from a conformational change of the peptide. In conclusion, modulating potency of GLP-1 by physiologically regulated endocannabinoid-like lipids allows GLP-1R signaling to be regulated spatiotemporally at a constant basal GLP-1 level. PMID:25903129

  3. New Member of the V1V2-Directed CAP256-VRC26 Lineage That Shows Increased Breadth and Exceptional Potency

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Bhiman, Jinal N.; Roark, Ryan S.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Gorman, Jason; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Pancera, Marie; Cale, Evan M.; Ernandes, Michael J.; Louder, Mark K.; Asokan, Mangaiarkarasi; Bailer, Robert T.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Fraschilla, Isabella R.; Garrett, Nigel J.; Jarosinski, Marissa; Lynch, Rebecca M.; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Pegu, Amarendra; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Sutton, Matthew S.; Wang, Keyun; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Haynes, Barton F.; Abdool-Karim, Salim; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Moore, Penny L.; Morris, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epitopes defined by HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are valuable templates for vaccine design, and studies of the immunological development of these antibodies are providing insights for vaccination strategies. In addition, the most potent and broadly reactive of these bNAbs have potential for clinical use. We previously described a family of 12 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies, CAP256-VRC26, isolated from an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor at years 1, 2, and 4 of infection (N. A. Doria-Rose et al., Nature 509:55–62, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13036). Here, we report on the isolation and characterization of new members of the family mostly obtained at time points of peak serum neutralization breadth and potency. Thirteen antibodies were isolated from B cell culture, and eight were isolated using trimeric envelope probes for differential single B cell sorting. One of the new antibodies displayed a 10-fold greater neutralization potency than previously published lineage members. This antibody, CAP256-VRC26.25, neutralized 57% of diverse clade viral isolates and 70% of clade C isolates with remarkable potency. Among the viruses neutralized, the median 50% inhibitory concentration was 0.001 μg/ml. All 33 lineage members targeted a quaternary epitope focused on V2. While all known bNAbs targeting the V1V2 region interact with the N160 glycan, the CAP256-VRC26 antibodies showed an inverse correlation of neutralization potency with dependence on this glycan. Overall, our results highlight the ongoing evolution within a single antibody lineage and describe more potent and broadly neutralizing members with potential clinical utility, particularly in areas where clade C is prevalent. IMPORTANCE Studies of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) provide valuable information for vaccine design, and the most potent and broadly reactive of these bNAbs have potential for clinical use. We previously described a family of V1V2

  4. Solvatochromic dyes detect the presence of homeopathic potencies.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    A systematic approach to the design of simple, chemical systems for investigating the nature of homeopathic medicines has led to the development of an experimental protocol in which solvatochromic dyes are used as molecular probes of serially diluted and agitated solutions. Electronic spectroscopy has been used to follow changes in the absorbance of this class of dyes across the visible spectrum in the presence of homeopathic potencies. Evidence is presented using six different solvatochromic dyes in three different solvent systems. In all cases homeopathic potencies produce consistent and reproducible changes in the spectra of the dyes. Results suggest that potencies influence the supramolecular chemistry of solvatochromic dyes, enhancing either dye aggregation or disaggregation, depending upon dye structure. Comparable dyes lacking the intramolecular charge transfer feature of solvatochromic dyes are unaffected by homeopathic potencies, suggesting potencies require the oscillating dipole of solvatochromic dyes for effective interaction. The implications of the results presented, both for an eventual understanding of the nature of homeopathic medicines and their mode of action, together with future directions for research in this area, are discussed. PMID:26827998

  5. Potency Determination of Antidandruff Shampoos in Nystatin International Unit Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Anusha Hewage, D. B. G.; Pathirana, W.; Pinnawela, Amara

    2008-01-01

    A convenient standard microbiological potency determination test for the antidandruff shampoos was developed by adopting the pharmacopoeial microbiological assay procedure of the drug nystatin. A standard curve was drawn consisting of the inhibition zone diameters vs. logarithm of nystatin concentrations in international units using the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) strain National Collection of Type Culture (NCTC) 1071606 as the test organism. From the standard curve the yeast inhibitory potencies of the shampoos in nystatin international unit equivalents were determined from the respective inhibition zones of the test samples of the shampoos. Under test conditions four shampoo samples showed remarkable fungal inhibitory potencies of 10227, 10731, 12396 and 18211 nystatin international unit equivalents/ml while two shampoo samples had extremely feeble inhibitory potencies 4.07 and 4.37 nystatin international unit equivalents/ml although the latter two products claimed antifungal activity. The potency determination method could be applied to any antidandruff shampoo with any one or a combination of active ingredients. PMID:21394271

  6. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  7. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-03-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  8. Emergency planning and the acute toxic potency of inhaled ammonia.

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, R A

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia is present in agriculture and commerce in many if not most communities. This report evaluates the toxic potency of ammonia, based on three types of data: anecdotal data, in some cases predating World War 1, reconstructions of contemporary industrial accidents, and animal bioassays. Standards and guidelines for human exposure have been driven largely by the anecdotal data, suggesting that ammonia at 5,000-10,000 parts per million, volume/volume (ppm-v), might be lethal within 5-10 min. However, contemporary accident reconstructions suggest that ammonia lethality requires higher concentrations. For example, 33,737 ppm-v was a 5-min zero-mortality value in a major ammonia release in 1973 in South Africa. Comparisons of secondary reports of ammonia lethality with original sources revealed discrepancies in contemporary sources, apparently resulting from failure to examine old documents or accurately translate foreign documents. The present investigation revealed that contemporary accident reconstructions yield ammonia lethality levels comparable to those in dozens of reports of animal bioassays, after adjustment of concentrations to human equivalent concentrations via U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) procedures. Ammonia levels potentially causing irreversible injury or impairing the ability of exposed people to escape from further exposure or from coincident perils similarly have been biased downwardly in contemporary sources. The EPA has identified ammonia as one of 366 extremely hazardous substances subject to community right-to-know provisions of the Superfund Act and emergency planning provisions of the Clean Air Act. The Clean Air Act defines emergency planning zones (EPZs) around industrial facilities exceeding a threshold quantity of ammonia on-site. This study suggests that EPZ areas around ammonia facilities can be reduced, thereby also reducing emergency planning costs, which will vary roughly with the EPZ radius squared. Images Figure 1

  9. Roles of participation and feedback in group potency.

    PubMed

    Gamero, Nuria; Peiró, José M; Zornoza, Ana; Picazo, Carmen

    2009-08-01

    The roles of group participation and group performance feedback were examined as antecedents of group potency, i.e., beliefs shared among a work group's members about the general effectiveness of the work group. Also examined were how group participation and the congruence of the feedback received from different sources about performance predicted convergence in members' beliefs about group effectiveness. The sample comprised 61 work groups of professionals involved in Master in Business Administration (MBA) programs (284 participants). Mean group size was 4.6 members (SD = .58). 65% of participants were male, and 51% were between 30 and 40 years of age. Data were gathered at two measurement times. Increases in group participation were positively related to increases in group potency and the convergence in beliefs about group effectiveness among group members over time. Results supported the premise that group performance feedback is an antecedent of changes in group potency over time. PMID:19810455

  10. Mutagenic Potency of Food-Derived Heterocyclic Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, J S; Knize, M G; Wu, R W; Colvin, M E; Hatch, F T; Malfatti, M A

    2006-10-26

    The understanding of mutagenic potency has been primarily approached using ''quantitative structure activity relationships'' (QSAR). Often this method allows the prediction of mutagenic potency of the compound based on its structure. But it does not give the underlying reason why the mutagenic activities differ. We have taken a set of heterocyclic amine structures and used molecular dynamic calculations to dock these molecules into the active site of a computational model of the cytochrome P-450 1A1 enzyme. The calculated binding strength using Boltzman distribution constants was then compared to the QSAR value (HF/6-31G* optimized structures) and the Ames/Salmonella mutagenic potency. Further understanding will only come from knowing the complete set of mutagenic determinants. These include the nitrenium ion half-life, DNA adduct half-life, efficiency of repair of the adduct, and ultimately fixation of the mutation through cellular processes. For two isomers, PhIP and 3-Me-PhIP, we showed that for the 100-fold difference in the mutagenic potency a 5-fold difference can be accounted for by differences in the P450 oxidation. The other factor of 20 is not clearly understood but is downstream from the oxidation step. The application of QSAR (chemical characteristics) to biological principles related to mutagenesis is explored in this report.

  11. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  12. High Potency and Other Alcoholic Beverage Consumption among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobli, Edessa C.; Dore, Heather S.; Werch, Chudley E.; Moore, Michele J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high potency (liquor, malt liquor, fortified wine) and other alcoholic beverage consumption (beer, wine/wine coolers) among adolescents, the impact of gender and ethnicity, and the risk and protective factors that predicted consumption. A confidential survey revealed that, among eighth grade students,…

  13. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  14. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  15. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  16. Essential Oil from Berries of Lebanese Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb Displays Similar Antibacterial Activity to Chlorhexidine but Higher Cytocompatibility with Human Oral Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Cochis, Andrea; Beyrouthy, Marc El; Iriti, Marcello; Uberti, Francesca; Sorrentino, Rita; Landini, Manuela Miriam; Rimondini, Lia; Varoni, Elena Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), one of the most effective drugs administered for periodontal treatment, presents collateral effects including toxicity when used for prolonged periods; here, we have evaluated the bactericidal potency and the cytocompatibility of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb essential oil (EO) in comparison with 0.05% CHX. The EO was extracted from berries by hydrodistillation and components identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Bacterial inhibition halo analysis, quantitative cell viability 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide assay (XTT), and colony forming unit (CFU) count were evaluated against the two biofilm formers Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans. Finally, cytocompatibility was assessed with human primary gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and mucosal keratinocytes (HK). The resulting EO was mainly composed of monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes. An inhibition halo test demonstrated that both bacteria were sensitive to the EO; XTT analysis and CFU counts confirmed that 10-fold-diluted EO determined a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in bacteria count and viability towards both biofilm and planktonic forms in a comparable manner to those obtained with CHX. Moreover, EO displayed higher cytocompatibility than CHX (p < 0.05). In conclusion, EO exhibited bactericidal activity similar to CHX, but a superior cytocompatibility, making it a promising antiseptic alternative to CHX. PMID:26007187

  17. Toxic potencies of lipophilic extracts from sediments and settling particulate matter (SPM) collected in a PCB-contaminated river system

    SciTech Connect

    Engwall, M.; Brunstroem, B.; Broman, D.; Ishaq, R.; Naef, C.; Zebuehr, Y.

    1996-02-01

    Sediments and settling particulate matter (SPM) were sampled in a PCB-contaminated lake, Lake Jaernsjoen, and in lakes located up- and downstream from Lake Jaernsjoen. The 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD)-inducing potencies of lipophilic extracts from sediment and SPM were investigated in organ cultures of chicken embryo livers (denoted in vitro chicken embryo liver bioassay). The extract from sediments collected in Lake Jaernsjoen had the greatest EROD-inducing potency of the extracts studied, and it also contained the highest concentrations of PCBs, PAHs, and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDDs/Fs). The non-ortho-chlorinated PCBs in the extracts were probably major contributors to the EROD induction noted. The EROD-inducing potency of sediment extract from the lake downstream Lake Jaernsjoen was higher than that of extract from the upstream lake. This indicates that EROD-inducing substances were transported from Lake Jaernsjoen sediment to the lake downstream. The extracts from Lake Jaernsjoen sediment and SPM were separated into three fractions containing aliphatic/monoaromatic, diaromatic, and polyaromatic compounds, respectively, which were tested in the in vitro chicken embryo liver bioassay. In all extracts, the aliphatic/monoaromatic fractions were low in EROD-inducing potency, while the polyaromatic fractions from SPM were more potent than their corresponding diaromatic fractions, indicating that they contained high concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor ligands. Only a small part of the EROD induction caused by the polyaromatic fractions could be attributed to the 15 analyzed PAHs in the samples. The EROD-inducing potencies of the diaromatic fractions correlated quite well with their concentrations of PCDDs/Fs and PCBs. The in vitro chicken embryo liver bioassay detected low concentrations of EROD inducers in the extracts and therefore proved useful for estimating the contents of Ah receptor ligands in environmental shapes.

  18. Aligning Potency and Pharmacokinetic Properties for Pyridine-Based NCINIs.

    PubMed

    Fader, Lee D; Bailey, Murray; Beaulieu, Eric; Bilodeau, François; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousquet, Yves; Carson, Rebekah J; Chabot, Catherine; Coulombe, René; Duan, Jianmin; Fenwick, Craig; Garneau, Michel; Halmos, Ted; Jakalian, Araz; James, Clint; Kawai, Stephen H; Landry, Serge; LaPlante, Steven R; Mason, Stephen W; Morin, Sebastien; Rioux, Nathalie; Simoneau, Bruno; Surprenant, Simon; Thavonekham, Bounkham; Thibeault, Carl; Trinh, Thao; Tsantrizos, Youla; Tsoung, Jennifer; Yoakim, Christiane; Wernic, Dominik

    2016-08-11

    Optimization of pyridine-based noncatalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs) based on compound 2 has led to the discovery of molecules capable of inhibiting virus harboring N124 variants of HIV integrase (IN) while maintaining minimal contribution of enterohepatic recirculation to clearance in rat. Structure-activity relationships at the C6 position established chemical space where the extent of enterohepatic recirculation in the rat is minimized. Desymmetrization of the C4 substituent allowed for potency optimization against virus having the N124 variant of integrase. Combination of these lessons led to the discovery of compound 20, having balanced serum-shifted antiviral potency and minimized excretion in to the biliary tract in rat, potentially representing a clinically viable starting point for a new treatment option for individuals infected with HIV. PMID:27563405

  19. Enhanced potency of a fucose-free monoclonal antibody being developed as an Ebola virus immunoprotectant

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Larry; Pettitt, James; Scully, Corinne; Bohorova, Natasha; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Hiatt, Andrew; Ngo, Long; Steinkellner, Herta; Whaley, Kevin J.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2011-01-01

    No countermeasures currently exist for the prevention or treatment of the severe sequelae of Filovirus (such as Ebola virus; EBOV) infection. To overcome this limitation in our biodefense preparedness, we have designed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which could be used in humans as immunoprotectants for EBOV, starting with a murine mAb (13F6) that recognizes the heavily glycosylated mucin-like domain of the virion-attached glycoprotein (GP). Point mutations were introduced into the variable region of the murine mAb to remove predicted human T-cell epitopes, and the variable regions joined to human constant regions to generate a mAb (h-13F6) appropriate for development for human use. We have evaluated the efficacy of three variants of h-13F6 carrying different glycosylation patterns in a lethal mouse EBOV challenge model. The pattern of glycosylation of the various mAbs was found to correlate to level of protection, with aglycosylated h-13F6 providing the least potent efficacy (ED50 = 33 μg). A version with typical heterogenous mammalian glycoforms (ED50 = 11 μg) had similar potency to the original murine mAb. However, h-13F6 carrying complex N-glycosylation lacking core fucose exhibited superior potency (ED50 = 3 μg). Binding studies using Fcγ receptors revealed enhanced binding of nonfucosylated h-13F6 to mouse and human FcγRIII. Together the results indicate the presence of Fc N-glycans enhances the protective efficacy of h-13F6, and that mAbs manufactured with uniform glycosylation and a higher potency glycoform offer promise as biodefense therapeutics. PMID:22143789

  20. Redesigned HIV antibodies exhibit enhanced neutralizing potency and breadth.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Sapparapu, Gopal; Murrell, Sasha; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Singh, Vidisha; King, Hannah G; Xia, Yan; Pickens, Jennifer A; LaBranche, Celia C; Slaughter, James C; Montefiori, David C; Wilson, Ian A; Meiler, Jens; Crowe, James E

    2015-06-01

    Several HIV envelope-targeting (Env-targeting) antibodies with broad and potent neutralizing activity have been identified and shown to have unusual features. Of these, the PG9 antibody has a long heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) and possesses unique structural elements that interact with protein and glycan features of the HIV Env glycoprotein. Here, we used the Rosetta software suite to design variants of the PG9 antibody HCDR3 loop with the goal of identifying variants with increased potency and breadth of neutralization for diverse HIV strains. One variant, designated PG9_N100(F)Y, possessed increased potency and was able to neutralize a diverse set of PG9-resistant HIV strains, including those lacking the Env N160 glycan, which is critical for PG9 binding. An atomic resolution structure of the PG9_N100(F)Y fragment antigen binding (Fab) confirmed that the mutated residue retains the paratope surface when compared with WT PG9. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments revealed that the mutation caused a modest increase in thermodynamic stability of the Fab, a feature predicted by the computational model. Our findings suggest that thermodynamic stabilization of the long HCDR3 in its active conformation is responsible for the increased potency of PG9_N100(F)Y, and strategies aimed at stabilizing this region in other HIV antibodies could become an important approach to in silico optimization of antibodies. PMID:25985274

  1. Characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells: potency assay development.

    PubMed

    Hematti, Peiman

    2016-04-01

    Based on their many different mechanisms of action, presumed immune-privileged status, and relative ease of production, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are under intensive clinical investigation for treating a wide range of degenerative, inflammatory, and immunologic disorders. Identification of relevant and robust potency assays is not only a regulatory requirement, but it is also the basis for producing and delivering a product that is consistent, safe, and ultimately an effective therapy. Although development of an appropriate potency assay is one of the most challenging issues in cell-based therapies, it is of paramount importance in the process of developing and testing cellular products. Regardless of the many different tissue sources and methods used in culture expansion of MSCs, they possess many of the same morphologic, cell surface markers, and differentiation characteristics. However, MSC products with similar phenotypic characteristics could still have major differences in their biologic and functional attributes. Understanding the different mechanisms of action and establishment of relevant potency assays is of pivotal importance in allowing investigators and regulatory agencies to compare MSCs used in different clinical trials. PMID:27079322

  2. A novel antilithiatic protein from Tribulus terrestris having cytoprotective potency.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Anshu; Tandon, Simran; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2012-08-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals to kidney cells is a key event in kidney stones associated with marked hyperoxaluria. As the propensity of stone recurrence and persistent side effects are not altered by surgical techniques available, phytotherapeutic agents could be useful as an adjuvant therapy. The present study is aimed at examining the antilithiatic potency of the protein biomolecules of Tribulus terrestris, a plant which is a common constituent of herbal marketed preparations to treat urolithiasis. Various biochemical methods with mass spectrometry were used to purify and characterize the purified protein. The protective potency of the protein was tested on the oxalate induced injury on renal epithelial cell lines (NRK 52E). An antilithiatic protein having molecular weight of ~ 60kDa was purified. This purified protein showed similarities with Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 7 (CCD7) of Arabidopsis thaliana after matching peptide mass fingerprints in MASCOT search engine. An EF hand domain was identified in CCD7 by SCAN PROSITE. Presence of an EF hand domain, a characteristic feature of calcium binding proteins and a role in the synthesis of retinol which is transported by retinol binding protein, a protein found in kidney stone matrix; of CCD7 support the role of TTP as an antilithiatic protein. The protective potency of TTP on NRK 52E was quite comparable to the aqueous extract of cystone. Our findings suggest that this purified protein biomolecule from Tribulus terrestris could open new vista in medical management of urolithiasis. PMID:22702898

  3. Rapid infrared determination of the potency of chlorinated bactericides.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, F; Cestaro, J P

    1971-06-01

    A rapid infrared reflectance method for evaluating the germicidal potency of synthetic materials containing various amounts of two chlorinated bactericides was developed. The dimeric product 2,2'-methylenebis (4,6-dichlorophenol) exhibited a characteristic C=C skeletal inplane stretching infrared absorption band at 1,640 cm(-1). The monomeric 2,4-dichlorophenol precursor showed a characteristic absorption band at 1,579 cm(-1). These characteristic infrared absorptions may be used for analysis of the potency of the manufactured chlorinated bactericide. For a series of samples known to vary in dimer content, the micrograms per milliliter required for a 100% bacterial kill is first determined by a standard American Petroleum Institute method. Then the area ratio of the infrared absorption bands characteristic of the chlorinated bactericides is measured for each sample and plotted versus the microgram per milliliter required for 100% bacterial kill. The potency of subsequent samples is simply and rapidly determined by measuring this ratio from the infrared absorption curve and calculating micrograms per milliliter required for 100% kill from the calibration curve. Analysis time is approximately 1 hr compared to biocidal tests in current use requiring approximately a 1-month incubation period. PMID:5564677

  4. Potency of Transgenic Effectors for Neurogenetic Manipulation in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, Dennis; von Essen, Alina; Lyutova, Radostina; van Giesen, Lena; Rosner, Ronny; Wegener, Christian; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulations of neuronal activity are a cornerstone of studies aimed to identify the functional impact of defined neurons for animal behavior. With its small nervous system, rapid life cycle, and genetic amenability, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides an attractive model system to study neuronal circuit function. In the past two decades, a large repertoire of elegant genetic tools has been developed to manipulate and study neural circuits in the fruit fly. Current techniques allow genetic ablation, constitutive silencing, or hyperactivation of neuronal activity and also include conditional thermogenetic or optogenetic activation or inhibition. As for all genetic techniques, the choice of the proper transgenic tool is essential for behavioral studies. Potency and impact of effectors may vary in distinct neuron types or distinct types of behavior. We here systematically test genetic effectors for their potency to alter the behavior of Drosophila larvae, using two distinct behavioral paradigms: general locomotor activity and directed, visually guided navigation. Our results show largely similar but not equal effects with different effector lines in both assays. Interestingly, differences in the magnitude of induced behavioral alterations between different effector lines remain largely consistent between the two behavioral assays. The observed potencies of the effector lines in aminergic and cholinergic neurons assessed here may help researchers to choose the best-suited genetic tools to dissect neuronal networks underlying the behavior of larval fruit flies. PMID:25359929

  5. BI 1002494, a Novel Potent and Selective Oral Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, Displays Differential Potency in Human Basophils and B Cells.

    PubMed

    Lamb, David J; Wollin, Stefan Lutz; Schnapp, Andreas; Bischoff, Daniel; Erb, Klaus J; Bouyssou, Thierry; Guilliard, Bernd; Strasser, Christine; Wex, Eva; Blum, Sylvia; Thaler, Eva; Nickel, Helga; Radmacher, Oliver; Haas, Hannah; Swantek, Jennifer L; Souza, Don; Canfield, Melissa; White, Della; Panzenbeck, Mark; Kashem, Mohammed A; Sanville-Ross, Mary; Kono, Takeshi; Sewald, Katherina; Braun, Armin; Obernolte, Helena; Danov, Olga; Schaenzle, Gerhard; Rast, Georg; Maier, Gerd-Michael; Hoffmann, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    BI 1002494 [(R)-4-{(R)-1-[7-(3,4,5-trimethoxy-phenyl)-[1,6]napthyridin-5-yloxy]-ethyl}pyrrolidin-2-one] is a novel, potent, and selective spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) inhibitor with sustained plasma exposure after oral administration in rats, which qualifies this molecule as a good in vitro and in vivo tool compound. BI 1002494 exhibits higher potency in inhibiting high-affinity IgE receptor-mediated mast cell and basophil degranulation (IC50 = 115 nM) compared with B-cell receptor-mediated activation of B cells (IC50 = 810 nM). This may be explained by lower kinase potency when the physiologic ligand B-cell linker was used, suggesting that SYK inhibitors may exhibit differential potency depending on the cell type and the respective signal transduction ligand. A 3-fold decrease in potency was observed in rat basophils (IC50 = 323 nM) compared with human basophils, but a similar species potency shift was not observed in B cells. The lower potency in rat basophils was confirmed in both ex vivo inhibition of bronchoconstriction in precision-cut rat lung slices and in reversal of anaphylaxis-driven airway resistance in rats. The different cellular potencies translated into different in vivo efficacy; full efficacy in a rat ovalbumin model (that contains an element of mast cell dependence) was achieved with a trough plasma concentration of 340 nM, whereas full efficacy in a rat collagen-induced arthritis model (that contains an element of B-cell dependence) was achieved with a trough plasma concentration of 1400 nM. Taken together, these data provide a platform from which different estimates of human efficacious exposures can be made according to the relevant cell type for the indication intended to be treated. PMID:27048659

  6. Resveratrol derivatives as promising chemopreventive agents with improved potency and selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Park, Eun-Jung; Marler, Laura E.; Ahn, Soyoun; Yuan, Yang; Choi, Yongsoo; Yu, Rui; van Breemen, Richard B.; Sun, Bin; Hoshino, Juma; Cushman, Mark; Jermihov, Katherine C.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Grubbs, Clinton J.; Pezzuto, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite scores of investigations, the actual impact of resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) on human health, as a dietary component or supplement, remains moot. This is due to many factors, such as relatively low potency, pleiotropic mechanisms, and rapid metabolism. Nonetheless, as a promiscuous molecule that interacts with numerous targets, resveratrol can be viewed as a scaffold for designing structural relatives potentially capable of mediating more intense responses with greater mechanistic stringency. We currently report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 92 stilbene analogs. The compounds were tested with in vitro assays for activation of quinone reductase 1, inhibition of QR2, nitric oxide production, aromatase, NFκB, TPA-induced ornithine decarboxylase, or cyclooxygenase-1 and -2, quenching of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical, interaction with estrogen receptors, and as antiproliferative agents. Several compounds were found to mediate responses with much greater potency than resveratrol; some mediated pleiotropic responses, as is the case with the parent molecule, but others were highly specific or totally inactive. When administered to rats, higher serum concentrations and greater stability was demonstrated with prototype lead molecules. Due to structural simplicity, facile syntheses are available for large-scale production. These data support the promise of more advanced development of novel resveratrol derivatives as drug entities. PMID:21714126

  7. Elemental composition and radical formation potency of PM10 at an urban background station in Germany in relation to origin of air masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellack, Bryan; Quass, Ulrich; Beuck, Henning; Wick, Gabriele; Kuttler, Wilhelm; Schins, Roel P. F.; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.

    2015-03-01

    At an urban background station in Mülheim-Styrum, North Rhine Westphalia, Germany, a set of 75 PM10 samples was collected over a one year period, followed by analyses for mass, chemical composition and hydroxyl radical (OHrad) formation potency. Additionally, the origin of air masses for the sampling days was calculated by 48-h backward trajectories, subdivided into the four cardinal sectors. Significant lower PM10 mass concentrations were observed for summertime air masses from the west compared to the other seasons and cardinal sectors. For the OHrad formation potency higher values were detected if air masses originate from east and south, thus predominantly being of continental origin. From the elevated OHrad formation potencies in fall and winter a seasonal trend with low potencies in summers is assumed. Furthermore, source apportionment was performed by a positive matrix factor analysis, separating seven plausible factors which could be attributed to mineral dust, secondary nitrate, industry, non-exhaust traffic, fossil fuel combustion, marine aerosol and secondary aerosol factors. The intrinsic OHrad formation potency was found to be associated mainly with the fossil fuel combustion factor (45%) and industry factor (22%).

  8. Establishing criteria for human mesenchymal stem cell potency.

    PubMed

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M; Rai, Bina; Sathiyanathan, Padmapriya; Puan, Kia Joo; Rötzschke, Olaf; Hui, James H; Raghunath, Michael; Stanton, Lawrence W; Nurcombe, Victor; Cool, Simon M

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to identify critical determinants of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) potency using in vitro and in vivo attributes of cells isolated from the bone marrow of age- and sex-matched donors. Adherence to plastic was not indicative of potency, yet capacity for long-term expansion in vitro varied considerably between donors, allowing the grouping of MSCs from the donors into either those with high-growth capacity or low-growth capacity. Using this grouping strategy, high-growth capacity MSCs were smaller in size, had greater colony-forming efficiency, and had longer telomeres. Cell-surface biomarker analysis revealed that the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) criteria did not distinguish between high-growth capacity and low-growth capacity MSCs, whereas STRO-1 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha were preferentially expressed on high-growth capacity MSCs. These cells also had the highest mean expression of the mRNA transcripts TWIST-1 and DERMO-1. Irrespective of these differences, both groups of donor MSCs produced similar levels of key growth factors and cytokines involved in tissue regeneration and were capable of multilineage differentiation. However, high-growth capacity MSCs produced approximately double the volume of mineralized tissue compared to low-growth capacity MSCs when assessed for ectopic bone-forming ability. The additional phenotypic criteria presented in this study when combined with the existing ISCT minimum criteria and working proposal will permit an improved assessment of MSC potency and provide a basis for establishing the quality of MSCs prior to their therapeutic application. PMID:25752682

  9. A recent evaluation of the lethal potencies of ammodytoxins.

    PubMed

    Prijatelj-Žnidaršič, Petra; Pungerčar, Jože

    2012-05-01

    Ammodytoxin A (AtxA) is the most toxic secreted phospholipase A(2) of the three isotoxins with presynaptic neurotoxicity, isolated from the venom of the nose-horned viper (Vipera ammodytes ammodytes), with an LD(50) of 21 μg/kg in mice. The toxic potencies of two other isoforms have been re-evaluated using highly purified recombinant proteins, with their intraperitoneal LD(50)s determined as 960 μg/kg for AtxB and 310 μg/kg for AtxC. AtxB and AtxC differ from AtxA in only three and two amino acid residues, respectively. PMID:22406514

  10. Cannabis-induced psychosis associated with high potency "wax dabs".

    PubMed

    Pierre, Joseph M; Gandal, Michael; Son, Maya

    2016-04-01

    With mounting evidence that the risk of cannabis-induced psychosis may be related to both dose and potency of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), increasing reports of psychosis associated with cannabinoids containing greater amounts of THC are anticipated. We report two cases of emergent psychosis after using a concentrated THC extract known as cannabis "wax," "oil," or "dabs" raising serious concerns about its psychotic liability. Although "dabbing" with cannabis wax is becoming increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and "medicinal" intentions, our cases raise serious concerns about its psychotic liability and highlight the importance of understanding this risk by physicians recommending cannabinoids for purported medicinal purposes. PMID:26876313

  11. Number of nitrate groups determines reactivity and potency of organic nitrates: a proof of concept study in ALDH-2−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, P; Hink, U; Oelze, M; Seeling, A; Isse, T; Bruns, K; Steinhoff, L; Brandt, M; Kleschyov, A L; Schulz, E; Lange, K; Weiner, H; Lehmann, J; Lackner, K J; Kawamoto, T; Münzel, T; Daiber, A

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) has been shown to provide a pathway for bioactivation of organic nitrates and to be prone to desensitization in response to highly potent, but not to less potent, nitrates. We therefore sought to support the hypothesis that bioactivation by ALDH-2 critically depends on the number of nitrate groups within the nitrovasodilator. Experimental approach: Nitrates with one (PEMN), two (PEDN; GDN), three (PETriN; glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) and four (pentaerithrityl tetranitrate, PETN) nitrate groups were investigated. Vasodilatory potency was measured in isometric tension studies using isolated aortic segments of wild type (WT) and ALDH-2−/− mice. Activity of the cGMP-dependent kinase-I (reflected by levels of phosphorylated VAsodilator Stimulated Phosphoprotein, P-VASP) was quantified by Western blot analysis, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity by HPLC. Following incubation of isolated mitochondria with PETN, PETriN-chromophore and PEDN, metabolites were quantified using chemiluminescence nitrogen detection and mass spectrometry. Key results: Compared to WT, vasorelaxation in response to PETN, PETriN and GTN was attenuated about 10fold in ALDH-2−/− mice, identical to WT vessels preincubated with inhibitors of ALDH-2. Reduced vasodilator potency correlated with reduced P-VASP formation and diminished biotransformation of the tetranitrate- and trinitrate-compounds. None of these findings were observed for PEDN, GDN and PEMN. Conclusions and implications: Our results support the crucial role of ALDH-2 in bioactivating highly reactive nitrates like GTN, PETN and PETriN. ALDH-2-mediated relaxation by organic nitrates therefore depends mainly on the number of nitrate groups. Less potent nitrates like PEDN, GDN and PEMN are apparently biotransformed by other pathways. PMID:17220910

  12. Antibody engineering for increased potency, breadth and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Scharf, Louise; West, Anthony P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights recent developments in HIV-1 antibody engineering and discusses the effects of increased polyreactivity on serum half-lives of engineered antibodies. Recent findings Recent studies have uncovered a wealth of information about the relationship between the sequences and efficacies of anti-HIV-1 antibodies through a combination of bioinformatics, structural characterization and in vivo studies. This knowledge has stimulated efforts to enhance antibody breadth and potency for therapeutic use. Although some engineered antibodies have shown increased polyreactivity and short half-lives, promising efforts are circumventing these problems. Summary Antibodies are desirable as therapeutics due to their ability to recognize targets with both specificity and high affinity. Furthermore, the ability of antibodies to stimulate Fc-mediated effector functions can increase their utility. Thus, mAbs have become central to strategies for the treatment of various diseases. Using both targeted and library-based approaches, antibodies can be engineered to improve their therapeutic properties. This article will discuss recent antibody engineering efforts to improve the breadth and potency of anti-HIV-1 antibodies. The polyreactivity of engineered HIV-1 bNAbs and the effect on serum half-life will be explored along with strategies to overcome problems introduced by engineering antibodies. Finally, advances in creating bispecific anti-HIV-1 reagents are discussed. PMID:25760931

  13. A comparison of the potencies of several diluted and undiluted corticosteroid preparations using the vasoconstrictor assay.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, J; Gibson, J R; Darley, C R; Burke, C A

    1983-01-01

    10 subjects were assessed using the vasoconstrictor assay technique in a double-blind study in order to evaluate the relative potencies of several diluted and undiluted proprietary corticosteroid preparations. Dermovate ointment achieved a significantly higher score than any other preparation but there was no significant difference between the scores for Betnovate ointment (betamethasone valerate 0.1%), Propaderm Forte cream (beclomethasone dipropionate 0.5%), Propaderm ointment (beclomethasone dipropionate 0.025%), Nerisone Forte ointment (diflucortolone valerate 0.3%), and Nerisone ointment (diflucortolone valerate 0.1%). Furthermore, no significant difference in scores could be demonstrated between Adcortyl ointment (triamcinolone acetonide 0.1%), Ledercort ointment (triamcinolone acetonide 0.1%) and extemporaneous dilutions of these ointments 1 part in 4 in their recommended diluents (triamcinolone acetonide 0.025%). The relevance of these findings to clinical practice is discussed. PMID:6195026

  14. Evaluation of tumour promoting potency of fish borne toxaphene residues, as compared to technical toxaphene and UV-irradiated toxaphene.

    PubMed

    Besselink, H; Nixon, E; McHugh, B; Rimkus, G; Klungsøyr, J; Leonards, P; De Boer, J; Brouwer, A

    2008-08-01

    In this study the potential impact of food chain-based biotransformation and physico-chemical weathering of toxaphene on its tumour promoting potential was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human exposure to toxaphene is mainly through consumption of contaminated fish, therefore fish-borne residues of toxaphene (cod liver extract, CLE) were prepared by exposing cod to technical toxaphene (TT) for 63 days. UV-irradiated toxaphene (uvT) was included to represent a physico-chemical weathered toxaphene mixture. In vitro, TT, uvT and CLE all showed a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) with a relative potency of CLE>TT=uvT. Tumour promoting potency was further studied in vivo in a medium term two-stage initiation/promotion bioassay in female Sprague-Dawley rats, using an increase in altered hepatic foci positive for glutathione-S-transferase-P (AHF-GST-P) as read out. No increase in AHF-GST-P occurred following exposure to either TT, uvT, or CLE, except for the positive control group (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Based on this study the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for tumour promoting potency is at least 12.5mg/kg/week, or higher for CLE. Considering current human exposure levels in Europe it is doubtful that consumption of fish at current levels of toxaphene contamination give rise to human health risk. PMID:18558458

  15. The role of peer respect in linking abusive supervision to follower outcomes: Dual moderation of group potency.

    PubMed

    Schaubroeck, John M; Peng, Ann C; Hannah, Sean T

    2016-02-01

    We develop a model in which abusive supervision undermines individuals' perceptions of the level of respect they are accorded by their group peers, which in turn reduces their performance and disconnects them psychologically from the organization. High group potency strengthens each of these connections. We studied the theorized relationships across 3 periods during a 10-week residential organizational entry program. Group potency, representing shared group perceptions, moderated relationships at the individual level. These included the negative relationship between abusive supervision (Time 1) and perceived peer respect (Time 2) and the relationship between perceived peer respect and organizational commitment, organizational identification, and turnover intention (Time 3). We found stronger relationships between abusive supervision and perceived peer respect--and between peer respect and the attitudinal outcomes and turnover intention--among groups with higher potency. Perceived peer respect was also positively related to followers' task performance. We discuss implications of the conceptual framework and findings for future research and theory development concerning how groups and individuals respond to abusive supervision and to treatment by their peers. PMID:26348478

  16. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Michael S.; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Bradley S.; McCarter, Martin D.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  17. Synthetic inhibitors of endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.15: potency and stability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Lew, R. A.; Tomoda, F.; Evans, R. G.; Lakat, L.; Boublik, J. H.; Pipolo, L. A.; Smith, A. I.

    1996-01-01

    1. The role of the metalloendopeptidase EC 3.4.24.15 (EP 24.15) in peptide metabolism in vivo is unknown, in part reflecting the lack of a stable enzyme inhibitor. The most commonly used inhibitor, N-[1-(R,S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Tyr-p-aminobenzoate (cFP-AAY-pAB, Ki = 16 nM), although selective in vitro, is rapidly degraded in the circulation to cFP-Ala-Ala, an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. This metabolite is thought to be generated by neutral endopeptidase (NEP; EC 3.4.24.11), as the Ala-Tyr bond of cFP-AAY-pAB is cleaved by NEP in vitro. In the present study, we have examined the role of NEP in the metabolism of cFP-AAY-pAB in vivo, and have tested a series of inhibitor analogues, substituted at the second alanine, for both potency and stability relative to the parent compound. 2. Analogues were screened for inhibition of fluorescent substrate cleavage by recombinant rat testes EP 24.15. D-Ala or Asp substitution abolished inhibitory activity, while Val-, Ser- and Leu-substituted analogues retained activity, albeit at a reduced potency. A relative potency order of Ala (1) > Val (0.3) > Ser (0.16) > Leu (0.06) was observed. Resistance to cleavage by NEP was assessed by incubation of the analogues with rabbit kidney membranes. The parent compound was readily degraded, but the analogues were twice (Ser) and greater than 10 fold (Leu and Val) more resistant to cleavage. 3. Metabolism of cFP-AAY-pAB and the Val-substituted analogue was also examined in conscious rabbits. A bolus injection of cFP-AAY-pAB (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) significantly reduced the blood pressure response to angiotensin I, indicating ACE inhibition. Pretreatment with NEP inhibitors, SCH 39370 or phosphoramidon, slowed the loss of cFP-AAY-pAB from the plasma, but did not prevent inhibition of ACE. Injection of 1 mg kg-1 inhibitor resulted in plasma concentrations at 10 s of 23.5 microM (cFP-AAY-pAB) and 18.0 microM (cFP-AVY-pAB), which fell 100 fold over 5 min. Co-injection of

  18. Potency testing of inactivated rabies vaccines using a serological method.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, E; Krämer, B; Schildger, H; Duchow, K

    2012-01-01

    Batch potency testing of rabies vaccines could be done by challenge, measurement of serum response or antigen quantification. Here, we show the development of a serological test that was successfully validated for use in batch release. The serological test is based on serum neutralization (SNT). The correlation to the NIH challenge was demonstrated by batches passing respectively failing equivalently in the NIH and SNT. The SNT provides information on immunogenicity and exhibits several advantages to the NIH: 1) SNT uses many fewer animals for batch release. 2) SNT allows quantitative information on the individual serum response, in contrast to the "dead"/"alive" interpretation of the NIH. 3) SNT is quicker than the NIH and needs fewer working hours. 4) SNT avoids the highly disturbing intra-cerebral injection and suffering from rabies for mice and spares the staff the emotional stress of massively harming animals. PMID:22888591

  19. Antibacterial potency of methanol extracts of lower plants

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, O.O.; Ajayi, A.O.; Anibijuwon, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    Antibacterial potency of methanol extracts of three green lower plants, Pneumatopteris afra, Platycerium bifurcatum and Nephrolepsis bisserata was determined using agar dilution method on clinical strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Salmomelia typhi. Antibacterial activities were observed at concentrations of 12.5, 25.0, 50.0 and 100.0 µg/ml. Their minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from 12.5~100 μg/ml. Extracts of P. afra and P. bifurcatum were most active. Antibacterial activities observed with N. bisserata were less pronounced with no detectable activity at extract concentrations of 12.5 and 25.0 µg/ml. E. coli, together with S. aureus appeared to be the most susceptible of the test bacteria while Klebsiella spp. was least sensitive. The significance of our findings is discussed. PMID:17323431

  20. Antibacterial potency of methanol extracts of lower plants.

    PubMed

    Ojo, O O; Ajayi, A O; Anibijuwon, I I

    2007-03-01

    Antibacterial potency of methanol extracts of three green lower plants, Pneumatopteris afra, Platycerium bifurcatum and Nephrolepsis bisserata was determined using agar dilution method on clinical strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Salmomelia typhi. Antibacterial activities were observed at concentrations of 12.5, 25.0, 50.0 and 100.0 microg/ml. Their minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from 12.5approximately 100 microg/ml. Extracts of P. afra and P. bifurcatum were most active. Antibacterial activities observed with N. bisserata were less pronounced with no detectable activity at extract concentrations of 12.5 and 25.0 microg/ml. E. coli, together with S. aureus appeared to be the most susceptible of the test bacteria while Klebsiella spp. was least sensitive. The significance of our findings is discussed. PMID:17323431

  1. Biologically Active Cannabinoids from High-Potency Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Mohamed M.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Slade, Desmond; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    Nine new cannabinoids (1–9) were isolated from a high-potency variety of Cannabis sativa. Their structures were identified as (±)-4-acetoxycannabichromene (1), (±)-3″-hydroxy-Δ(4″,5″)-cannabichromene (2), (−)-7-hydroxycannabichromane (3), (−)-7R-cannabicoumarononic acid A (4), 5-acetyl-4-hydroxycannabigerol (5), 4-acetoxy-2-geranyl-5-hydroxy-3-n-pentylphenol (6), 8-hydroxycannabinol (7), 8-hydroxycannabinolic acid A (8), and 2-geranyl-5-hydroxy-3-n-pentyl-1,4-benzoquinone (9) through 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, GC-MS, and HRESIMS. The known sterol β-sitosterol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-6′-acetate was isolated for the first time from cannabis. Compounds 6 and 7 displayed significant antibacterial and antifungal activities, respectively, while 5 displayed strong antileishmanial activity. PMID:19344127

  2. Channel Activity of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors (RyR2) Determines Potency and Efficacy of Flecainide and R-Propafenone against Arrhythmogenic Calcium Waves in Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Knollmann, Björn C.

    2015-01-01

    Flecainide blocks ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) channels in the open state, suppresses arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves and prevents catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) in mice and humans. We hypothesized that differences in RyR2 activity induced by CPVT mutations determines the potency of open-state RyR2 blockers like flecainide (FLEC) and R-propafenone (RPROP) against Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy, we studied Ca2+ sparks and waves in isolated saponin-permeabilized ventricular myocytes from two CPVT mouse models (Casq2-/-, RyR2-R4496C+/-), wild-type (c57bl/6, WT) mice, and WT rabbits (New Zealand white rabbits). Consistent with increased RyR2 activity, Ca2+ spark and wave frequencies were significantly higher in CPVT compared to WT mouse myocytes. We next obtained concentration-response curves of Ca2+ wave inhibition for FLEC, RPROP (another open-state RyR2 blocker), and tetracaine (TET) (a state-independent RyR2 blocker). Both FLEC and RPROP inhibited Ca2+ waves with significantly higher potency (lower IC50) and efficacy in CPVT compared to WT. In contrast, TET had similar potency in all groups studied. Increasing RyR2 activity of permeabilized WT myocytes by exposure to caffeine (150 µM) increased the potency of FLEC and RPROP but not of TET. RPROP and FLEC were also significantly more potent in rabbit ventricular myocytes that intrinsically exhibit higher Ca2+ spark rates than WT mouse ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, RyR2 activity determines the potency of open-state blockers FLEC and RPROP for suppressing arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes, a mechanism likely relevant to antiarrhythmic drug efficacy in CPVT. PMID:26121139

  3. Channel Activity of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors (RyR2) Determines Potency and Efficacy of Flecainide and R-Propafenone against Arrhythmogenic Calcium Waves in Ventricular Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Knollmann, Björn C

    2015-01-01

    Flecainide blocks ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) channels in the open state, suppresses arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves and prevents catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) in mice and humans. We hypothesized that differences in RyR2 activity induced by CPVT mutations determines the potency of open-state RyR2 blockers like flecainide (FLEC) and R-propafenone (RPROP) against Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy, we studied Ca2+ sparks and waves in isolated saponin-permeabilized ventricular myocytes from two CPVT mouse models (Casq2-/-, RyR2-R4496C+/-), wild-type (c57bl/6, WT) mice, and WT rabbits (New Zealand white rabbits). Consistent with increased RyR2 activity, Ca2+ spark and wave frequencies were significantly higher in CPVT compared to WT mouse myocytes. We next obtained concentration-response curves of Ca2+ wave inhibition for FLEC, RPROP (another open-state RyR2 blocker), and tetracaine (TET) (a state-independent RyR2 blocker). Both FLEC and RPROP inhibited Ca2+ waves with significantly higher potency (lower IC50) and efficacy in CPVT compared to WT. In contrast, TET had similar potency in all groups studied. Increasing RyR2 activity of permeabilized WT myocytes by exposure to caffeine (150 µM) increased the potency of FLEC and RPROP but not of TET. RPROP and FLEC were also significantly more potent in rabbit ventricular myocytes that intrinsically exhibit higher Ca2+ spark rates than WT mouse ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, RyR2 activity determines the potency of open-state blockers FLEC and RPROP for suppressing arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes, a mechanism likely relevant to antiarrhythmic drug efficacy in CPVT. PMID:26121139

  4. Sexual Function and the Use of Medical Devices or Drugs to Optimize Potency After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J. Taylor; Levy, Lawrence B.; Swanson, David A.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Frank, Steven J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of sexual outcomes after prostate brachytherapy with iodine-125 seeds as monotherapy at a tertiary cancer care center. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 129 men with prostate cancer with I-125 seed implants (prescribed dose, 145 Gy) without supplemental hormonal or external beam radiation therapy. Sexual function, potency, and bother were prospectively assessed at baseline and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months using validated quality-of-life self-assessment surveys. Postimplant dosimetry values, including dose to 10% of the penile bulb (D10), D20, D33, D50, D75, D90, and penile volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) were calculated. Results: At baseline, 56% of patients recorded having optimal erections; at 1 year, 62% of patients with baseline erectile function maintained optimal potency, 58% of whom with medically prescribed sexual aids or drugs. Variables associated with pretreatment-to-posttreatment decline in potency were time after implant (p = 0.04) and age (p = 0.01). Decline in urinary function may have been related to decline in potency. At 1 year, 69% of potent patients younger than 70 years maintained optimal potency, whereas 31% of patients older than 70 maintained optimal potency (p = 0.02). Diabetes was related to a decline in potency (p = 0.05), but neither smoking nor hypertension were. For patients with optimal potency at baseline, mean sexual bother scores had declined significantly at 1 year (p < 0.01). Sexual potency, sexual function, and sexual bother scores failed to correlate with any dosimetric variable tested. Conclusions: Erections firm enough for intercourse can be achieved at 1 year after treatment, but most men will require medical aids to optimize potency. Although younger men were better able to maintain erections firm enough for intercourse than older men, there was no correlation between potency, sexual function, or sexual bother and penile bulb dosimetry.

  5. Effects of Pomegranate Seed Oil on the Fertilization Potency of Rat’s Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Nikseresht, Mohsen; Fallahzadeh, Ali Reza; Toori, Mehdi Akbartabar

    2015-01-01

    Background Pomegranate has been taken great scientific attention in recent years due to its health benefits. Pomegranate seed oil is a rich source of 9-cis, and 11-trans conjugate linolenic acid. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary pomegranate seed oil on the fertilization potency of rat’s sperm. Materials and Methods Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. The first group, which served as the control group, received 1 mL of corn oil for seven weeks. Groups II, III, IV served as the experimental groups received 200, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of pomegranate seed oil, for the same period of time respectively. After seven weeks, all of the rats were sacrificed, and their epididymis sperm was collected and added to IVF medium (T6) containing metaphase II oocytes. Almost 21 oocytes had been removed from every female rat oviduct. In this medium, oocyte fertilization, cleavage rates, and embryo development into blastocysts, were evaluated by inverted microscopy. Results Levels of LD50 in the oral route in male rats were more than 5000 mg/kg body weight. Our data showed that the rates of fertilization, cleavage and embryo development into blastocysts were higher in the groups that had received 500 and 1000 mg/kg body weight of pomegranate seed oil. Conclusion This study demonstrated that pomegranate seed oil had a positive effect on the fertilization potency of male rats. These beneficial effects may be useful in assisted reproductive technology. PMID:26816914

  6. In vitro studies with five quinolones: evidence for changes in relative potency as quinolone resistance rises.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, K S; Sanders, C C; Hayden, M E

    1991-01-01

    A panel of 203 staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and miscellaneous nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli were chosen for their various susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin. On the basis of agar dilution susceptibilities, each of the four taxonomic groups was divided into ciprofloxacin-susceptible, moderately resistant, and highly resistant subgroups, and each subgroup was then further analyzed for its susceptibility to the fluoroquinolones CI-960, CI-990, sparfloxacin, and ofloxacin. Although the MICs of each quinolone increased as ciprofloxacin resistance increased, the potency of CI-960 appeared to increase relative to the potencies of the other quinolones. Similarly, the MICs of sparfloxacin and ofloxacin appeared to be less affected by ciprofloxacin resistance than were the MICs of ciprofloxacin or CI-990. Single-step mutants of representative clinical isolates with different levels of ciprofloxacin resistance were selected to determine whether the study quinolones differed in their propensity to select resistant mutants and whether the presence of preexisting ciprofloxacin resistance influenced the subsequent development of resistance. Each of the five fluoroquinolones and nalidixic acid selected mutants that exhibited generally modest decreases in quinolone susceptibility (4- to 16-fold). However, CI-960 inhibited significantly more mutants (80%) than did the other quinolones (39 to 59%) at a concentration of 1 microgram/ml. The presence of preexisting ciprofloxacin resistance appeared to be associated with higher mutational frequencies in coagulase-negative staphylococci exposed to each of the fluoroquinolones and in Serratia marcescens exposed to nalidixic acid. Preexisting ciprofloxacin resistance did not influence the development of resistance in the strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were studied. The results of this study suggest that quinolones are not affected

  7. Cold chain monitoring of OPV at transit levels in India: correlation of VVM and potency status.

    PubMed

    Jain, R; Sahu, A K; Tewari, S; Malik, N; Singh, S; Khare, S; Bhatia, R

    2003-12-01

    We have conducted a study to analyze monitoring of the cold chain of 674 OPV field samples collected at four different levels of vaccine distribution viz., immunization clinics, district stores, hospitals and Primary Health Centers (PHC) from states of Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, and Delhi. The study design included: collection and scoring of vaccine vial monitor (VVM) status of the samples and testing for total oral polio virus concentration (TOPV) by standard WHO protocol. Ten samples each were exposed to 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C, and 10 samples as controls were kept at -20 degrees C. VVM were scored daily till they attained grade 4 and each sample was subsequently subjected to potency testing for individual polio serotypes 1, 2 and 3, and TOPV. Of the 674 samples tested it was observed that: samples from immunization clinics and district stores had an acceptable VVM score of grade 1 and 2; however the probable risk that a sub potent vaccine could have been administered was 2.15%. In 2.5% samples received from district stores vaccine had a VVM score of grade 3 (i.e., discard point), although vaccine when tested was found to be potent (i.e., leading to the vaccine wastage). With exposure to higher temperatures, VVM changed score to grade 2 and 3 when the vaccine was kept at 25 degrees C/37 degrees C, and the titres of individual serotypes 1, 2 and 3 and TOPV were beyond the acceptable limits. Important observations at the different levels of vaccine distribution network and correlation of VVM and potency status of OPV are discussed in the paper which will be of help to the EPI program managers at different transit levels. PMID:14624793

  8. Conformational Fine-Tuning of Pore-Forming Peptide Potency and Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Krauson, Aram J; Hall, O Morgan; Fuselier, Taylor; Starr, Charles G; Kauffman, W Berkeley; Wimley, William C

    2015-12-30

    To better understand the sequence-structure-function relationships that control the activity and selectivity of membrane-permeabilizing peptides, we screened a peptide library, based on the archetypal pore-former melittin, for loss-of-function variants. This was accomplished by assaying library members for failure to cause leakage of entrapped contents from synthetic lipid vesicles at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:20, 10-fold higher than the concentration at which melittin efficiently permeabilizes the same vesicles. Surprisingly, about one-third of the library members are inactive under these conditions. In the negative peptides, two changes of hydrophobic residues to glycine were especially abundant. We show that loss-of-function activity can be completely recapitulated by a single-residue change of the leucine at position 16 to glycine. Unlike the potently cytolytic melittin, the loss-of-function peptides, including the single-site variant, are essentially inactive against phosphatidylcholine vesicles and multiple types of eukaryotic cells. Loss of function is shown to result from a shift in the binding-folding equilibrium away from the active, bound, α-helical state toward the inactive, unbound, random-coil state. Accordingly, the addition of anionic lipids to synthetic lipid vesicles restored binding, α-helical secondary structure, and potent activity of the "negative" peptides. While nontoxic to mammalian cells, the single-site variant has potent bactericidal activity, consistent with the anionic nature of bacterial membranes. The results show that conformational fine-tuning of helical pore-forming peptides is a powerful way to modulate their activity and selectivity. PMID:26632653

  9. Conformational Fine-Tuning of Pore-Forming Peptide Potency and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the sequence–structure–function relationships that control the activity and selectivity of membrane-permeabilizing peptides, we screened a peptide library, based on the archetypal pore-former melittin, for loss-of-function variants. This was accomplished by assaying library members for failure to cause leakage of entrapped contents from synthetic lipid vesicles at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:20, 10-fold higher than the concentration at which melittin efficiently permeabilizes the same vesicles. Surprisingly, about one-third of the library members are inactive under these conditions. In the negative peptides, two changes of hydrophobic residues to glycine were especially abundant. We show that loss-of-function activity can be completely recapitulated by a single-residue change of the leucine at position 16 to glycine. Unlike the potently cytolytic melittin, the loss-of-function peptides, including the single-site variant, are essentially inactive against phosphatidylcholine vesicles and multiple types of eukaryotic cells. Loss of function is shown to result from a shift in the binding–folding equilibrium away from the active, bound, α-helical state toward the inactive, unbound, random-coil state. Accordingly, the addition of anionic lipids to synthetic lipid vesicles restored binding, α-helical secondary structure, and potent activity of the “negative” peptides. While nontoxic to mammalian cells, the single-site variant has potent bactericidal activity, consistent with the anionic nature of bacterial membranes. The results show that conformational fine-tuning of helical pore-forming peptides is a powerful way to modulate their activity and selectivity. PMID:26632653

  10. 75 FR 8937 - Development of a Relative Potency Factor (RPF) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... AGENCY Development of a Relative Potency Factor (RPF) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH...) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Mixtures'' (EPA/635/R-08/012A). The draft document was... of a Relative Potency Factor (RPF) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Mixtures''...

  11. COMPARATIVE POTENCY METHOD FOR CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT: APPLICATION TO DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An estimation of the human lung cancer 'unit risk' from diesel engine particulate emissions has been made using a comparative potency approach. This approach involves evaluating the tumorigenic and mutagenic potencies of the particlates from four diesel and one gasoline engine in...

  12. 76 FR 9028 - Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ..., 2008 (73 FR 59635), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance of the same title. FDA... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene... Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated January 2011. The guidance...

  13. Deletion Genotypes Reduce Occlusion Body Potency but Increase Occlusion Body Production in a Colombian Spodoptera frugiperda Nucleopolyhedrovirus Population

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Gloria; Williams, Trevor; Villamizar, Laura; Caballero, Primitivo; Simón, Oihane

    2013-01-01

    A Colombian field isolate (SfCOL-wt) of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) is a mixture of different genotypes. To evaluate the insecticidal properties of the different genotypic variants, 83 plaque purified virus were characterized. Ten distinct genotypes were identified (named A through J). SfCOL-A was the most prevalent (71±2%; mean ± SE) showing a PstI restriction profile indistinguishable to that of SfCOL-wt. The remaining nine genotypes presented genomic deletions of 3.8 - 21.8 Kb located mainly between nucleotides 11,436 and 33,883 in the reference genome SfMNPV-B, affecting the region between open reading frames (ORFs) sf20 and sf33. The insecticidal activity of each genotype from SfCOL-wt and several mixtures of genotypes was compared to that of SfCOL-wt. The potency of SfCOL-A occlusion bodies (OBs) was 4.4-fold higher than SfCOL-wt OBs, whereas the speed of kill of SfCOL-A was similar to that of SfCOL-wt. Deletion genotype OBs were similarly or less potent than SfCOL-wt but six deletion genotypes were faster killing than SfCOL-wt. The potency of genotype mixtures co-occluded within OBs were consistently reduced in two-genotype mixtures involving equal proportions of SfCOL-A and one of three deletion genotypes (SfCOL-C, -D or -F). Speed of kill and OB production were improved only when the certain genotype mixtures were co-occluded, although OB production was higher in the SfCOL-wt isolate than in any of the component genotypes, or mixtures thereof. Deleted genotypes reduced OB potency but increased OB production of the SfCOL-wt population, which is structured to maximize the production of OBs in each infected host. PMID:24116220

  14. Determination of H5N1 vaccine potency using reference antisera from heterologous strains of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Vodeiko, Galina M.; Weir, Jerry P.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Vodeiko and Weir (2011). Determination of H5N1 vaccine potency using reference antisera from heterologous strains of influenza. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), 176–187. Background  Standardization of inactivated influenza vaccines by hemagglutinin (HA) content is performed by the single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) method. Regulatory agencies prepare, calibrate, and distribute SRID reagent standards necessary for testing of seasonal influenza vaccines, and a similar process is used to produce potency reagents for candidate pandemic influenza vaccines that are manufactured for emergency stockpiles. Objectives  Because of the concerns in generating a timely strain‐specific potency antiserum for an emerging pandemic virus, we evaluated the feasibility of using heterologous potency reference antiserum as a replacement for a strain‐specific (homologous) antiserum in the SRID potency assay for stockpiled H5N1 vaccines. Results  The results indicate that a heterologous H5N1 antiserum can be used to determine the accurate potency of inactivated H5N1 influenza vaccines. Additionally, when H5N1 vaccine was subjected to an accelerated stability protocol, both homologous and heterologous antisera provided similar measurements of vaccine potency decline. Limitations to the heterologous antiserum approach to potency determination were shown by the inability of antiserum to recent seasonal H1N1 viruses to work in an SRID assay with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 A/California/07/2009 antigen. Conclusions  The data demonstrate the feasibility of using heterologous antiserum for potency determination of at least some candidate vaccines in case of a shortage or delay of homologous antiserum. Further, the results suggest the prudence of stockpiling a broad library of potency reagents including many strains of influenza viruses with pandemic potential to provide an added measure of assurance that reagent production would not be a

  15. Cytoplasmic Dynein Antagonists with Improved Potency and Isoform Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins 1 and 2 are related members of the AAA+ superfamily (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) that function as the predominant minus-end-directed microtubule motors in eukaryotic cells. Dynein 1 controls mitotic spindle assembly, organelle movement, axonal transport, and other cytosolic, microtubule-guided processes, whereas dynein 2 mediates retrograde trafficking within motile and primary cilia. Small-molecule inhibitors are important tools for investigating motor protein-dependent mechanisms, and ciliobrevins were recently discovered as the first dynein-specific chemical antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that ciliobrevins directly target the heavy chains of both dynein isoforms and explore the structure–activity landscape of these inhibitors in vitro and in cells. In addition to identifying chemical motifs that are essential for dynein blockade, we have discovered analogs with increased potency and dynein 2 selectivity. These antagonists effectively disrupt Hedgehog signaling, intraflagellar transport, and ciliogenesis, making them useful probes of these and other cytoplasmic dynein 2-dependent cellular processes. PMID:26555042

  16. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  17. Cannabinoid Ester Constituents from High-Potency Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Safwat A.; Ross, Samir A.; Slade, Desmond; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Zulfiqar, Fazila; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    Eleven new cannabinoid esters, together with three known cannabinoid acids and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), were isolated from a high-potency variety of Cannabis sativa. The structures were determined by extensive spectroscopic analyses to be β-fenchyl Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolate (1), epi-bornyl Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolate (2), α-terpenyl Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolate (3), 4-terpenyl Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolate (4), α-cadinyl Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolate (5), γ-eudesmyl Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolate (6), γ-eudesmyl cannabigerolate (7), 4-terpenyl cannabinolate (8), bornyl Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolate (9), α-fenchyl Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolate (10), α-cadinyl cannabigerolate (11), Δ9-tetrahydro-cannabinol (Δ9-THC), Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (Δ9-THCA), cannabinolic acid A (CBNA), and cannabigerolic acid (CBGA). Compound 8 showed moderate antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans ATCC 90028 with an IC50 value of 8.5 μg/mL. CB-1 receptor assay indicated that the esters, as well as the parent acids, are not active. PMID:18303850

  18. Minor oxygenated cannabinoids from high potency Cannabis sativa L

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Safwat A.; Ross, Samir A.; Slade, Desmond; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    Nine oxygenated cannabinoids were isolated from a high potency Cannabis sativa L. variety. Structure elucidation was achieved using spectroscopic techniques, including 1D and 2D NMR, HRMS and GC–MS. These minor compounds include four hexahydrocannabinols, four tetrahydrocannabinols, and one hydroxylated cannabinol, namely 9α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 7-oxo-9α-hydroxyhexa-hydrocannabinol, 10α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 10aR-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC aldehyde A, 8-oxo-Δ9-THC, 10aα-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ8-THC, 9α-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ6a,10a-THC, and 1′S-hydroxycannabinol, respectively. The latter compound showed moderate anti-MRSa (IC50 10.0 μg/mL), moderate antileishmanial (IC50 14.0 μg/mL) and mild antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum (D6 clone) and P. falciparum (W2 clone) with IC50 values of 3.4 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:26093324

  19. Minor oxygenated cannabinoids from high potency Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Safwat A; Ross, Samir A; Slade, Desmond; Radwan, Mohamed M; Khan, Ikhlas A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2015-09-01

    Nine oxygenated cannabinoids were isolated from a high potency Cannabis sativa L. variety. Structure elucidation was achieved using spectroscopic techniques, including 1D and 2D NMR, HRMS and GC-MS. These minor compounds include four hexahydrocannabinols, four tetrahydrocannabinols, and one hydroxylated cannabinol, namely 9α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 7-oxo-9α-hydroxyhexa-hydrocannabinol, 10α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 10aR-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, Δ(9)-THC aldehyde A, 8-oxo-Δ(9)-THC, 10aα-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ(8)-THC, 9α-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ(6a,10a)-THC, and 1'S-hydroxycannabinol, respectively. The latter compound showed moderate anti-MRSa (IC50 10.0 μg/mL), moderate antileishmanial (IC50 14.0 μg/mL) and mild antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum (D6 clone) and P. falciparum (W2 clone) with IC50 values of 3.4 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:26093324

  20. Bioluminescence for assessing drug potency against nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vocat, Anthony; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Lechartier, Benoit; Zhang, Ming; Dhar, Neeraj; Cole, Stewart T; Sala, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis represents a challenge to antituberculosis drug discovery programs. We previously reported and validated the use of the streptomycin (STR)-dependent M. tuberculosis 18b strain as a tool for assessing drug potency against nonreplicating bacteria both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we generated a luminescent 18b strain, named 18b-Lux, by transforming the bacteria with a vector expressing the luxCDABE operon from Photorhabdus luminescens. Luciferase expression was demonstrated under replicating conditions, and, more importantly, luminescence levels significantly above background were detected following STR removal. The sensitivity of STR-starved 18b-Lux to approved and candidate antituberculosis therapeutic agents was evaluated by means of a luciferase assay in a 96-well format. Results mirrored the data obtained with the standard resazurin reduction microplate assay, and the luminescence readout allowed time course assessments of drug efficacy in vitro. Specifically, we proved that bedaquiline, the rifamycins, and sutezolid displayed time-dependent activity against dormant bacteria, while pyrazinamide and SQ109 showed bactericidal effects at the highest concentrations tested. Overall, we established the optimal conditions for an inexpensive, simple, and very sensitive assay with great potential for future applications. PMID:25896710

  1. Bioluminescence for Assessing Drug Potency against Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vocat, Anthony; Hartkoorn, Ruben C.; Lechartier, Benoit; Zhang, Ming; Dhar, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis represents a challenge to antituberculosis drug discovery programs. We previously reported and validated the use of the streptomycin (STR)-dependent M. tuberculosis 18b strain as a tool for assessing drug potency against nonreplicating bacteria both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we generated a luminescent 18b strain, named 18b-Lux, by transforming the bacteria with a vector expressing the luxCDABE operon from Photorhabdus luminescens. Luciferase expression was demonstrated under replicating conditions, and, more importantly, luminescence levels significantly above background were detected following STR removal. The sensitivity of STR-starved 18b-Lux to approved and candidate antituberculosis therapeutic agents was evaluated by means of a luciferase assay in a 96-well format. Results mirrored the data obtained with the standard resazurin reduction microplate assay, and the luminescence readout allowed time course assessments of drug efficacy in vitro. Specifically, we proved that bedaquiline, the rifamycins, and sutezolid displayed time-dependent activity against dormant bacteria, while pyrazinamide and SQ109 showed bactericidal effects at the highest concentrations tested. Overall, we established the optimal conditions for an inexpensive, simple, and very sensitive assay with great potential for future applications. PMID:25896710

  2. Reevaluating the potency of the memory conformity effect.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Glen E; Musch, Elisabeth; Azad, Tanjeem

    2009-12-01

    Witnesses sometimes report event details that are acquired solely from another witness. We reevaluated the potency of this memory conformity effect. After viewing a crime video, some participants learned about nonwitnessed details via discussion (dyad group), reading another participant's report (read group), or watching another version of the video (both-video group). In Experiment 1, these participants often reported nonwitnessed details, but on a source-judgment test most details were attributed primarily to the actual source rather than to the video. In addition, the dyad group was not more likely than the read or both-video groups to report nonwitnessed details. Participants in Experiment 2 were explicitly discouraged from providing details that were remembered from the secondary source only. These postwarning instructions substantially reduced the memory conformity effect, and a dyad group was not more likely than a read group to report nonwitnessed details. Encouraging source monitoring at test can reduce the negative consequences of co-witness collaboration. PMID:19933452

  3. Potency of Fish Collagen as a Scaffold for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Yanagiguchi, Kajiro

    2014-01-01

    Cells, growth factors, and scaffold are the crucial factors for tissue engineering. Recently, scaffolds consisting of natural polymers, such as collagen and gelatin, bioabsorbable synthetic polymers, such as polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid, and inorganic materials, such as hydroxyapatite, as well as composite materials have been rapidly developed. In particular, collagen is the most promising material for tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. Collagen contains specific cell adhesion domains, including the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif. After the integrin receptor on the cell surface binds to the RGD motif on the collagen molecule, cell adhesion is actively induced. This interaction contributes to the promotion of cell growth and differentiation and the regulation of various cell functions. However, it is difficult to use a pure collagen scaffold as a tissue engineering material due to its low mechanical strength. In order to make up for this disadvantage, collagen scaffolds are often modified using a cross-linker, such as gamma irradiation and carbodiimide. Taking into account the possibility of zoonosis, a variety of recent reports have been documented using fish collagen scaffolds. We herein review the potency of fish collagen scaffolds as well as associated problems to be addressed for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:24982861

  4. Cutoff in potency implicates alcohol inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed Central

    Peoples, R W; Weight, F F

    1995-01-01

    As the number of carbon atoms in an aliphatic n-alcohol is increased from one to five, intoxicating potency, lipid solubility, and membrane lipid disordering potency all increase in a similar exponential manner. However, the potency of aliphatic n-alcohols for producing intoxication reaches a maximum at six to eight carbon atoms and then decreases. The molecular basis of this "cutoff" effect is not understood, as it is not correlated with either the lipid solubility or the membrane disordering potency of the alcohols, which continue to increase exponentially. Since it has been suggested that inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by alcohols may play a role in alcohol intoxication, we investigated whether a series of aliphatic n-alcohols would exhibit a cutoff in potency for inhibition of NMDA receptors. We found that although potency for inhibition of NMDA receptors increased exponentially for alcohols with one to five carbon atoms, potency for inhibition of NMDA receptors reached a maximum at six to eight carbon atoms and then abruptly disappeared. This cutoff for alcohol inhibition of NMDA receptors is consistent with an interaction of the alcohols with a hydrophobic pocket on the receptor protein. In addition, the similarity of the cutoffs for alcohol inhibition of NMDA receptors and alcohol intoxication suggests that the cutoff for NMDA receptor inhibition may contribute to the cutoff for alcohol intoxication, which is consistent with an important role of NMDA receptors in alcohol intoxication. PMID:7708732

  5. Chromatographic method for quick estimation of DNA interaction potency of environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong-Lai; Lian, Hong-Zhen; Liao, Xiang-Jun; Zhu, Ji-Ping

    2009-10-01

    The DNA interaction potency of a chemical has been defined in the present study as the degree of a chemical's ability to interact with DNA. An estimation method of such a potency has been established based on the peak reduction of an oligonucleotide probe resulting from its interaction with chemicals based on high-performance liquid chromatography. A DNA interaction potency equivalency (PEQ) also has been proposed to evaluate the relative interaction potency of test chemicals against benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE). Five known direct DNA interaction chemicals were employed to demonstrate the method. Two known inactive chemicals were used as negative controls. Both the potency and PEQ(50) values (PEQ of testing chemical at 50% of the probe peak reduction) of these five chemicals were determined as BPDE > phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) > tetrachlorohydroquinone (Cl4HQ) > methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) > styrene-7,8-oxide (SO). Among the reactive chemicals, MMS was found to break the oligonucleotide into smaller fragments, whereas BPDE, PGE, and SO form covalent adducts with the oligonucleotide. In the latter case, the formation of multi-chemical-oligonucleotide adducts also was observed by mass spectrometry. The method was employed to estimate the DNA interaction potency equivalency of diesel vehicle exhaust gas to demonstrate the applicability of this approach in evaluating the interaction potency of environmental pollutants in both gas and liquid phases. PMID:19432508

  6. Development of a flow cytometric bead immunoassay and its assessment as a possible aid to potency evaluation of enterotoxaemia vaccines.

    PubMed

    Buys, Angela; Macdonald, Raynard; Crafford, Jannie; Theron, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxaemia, an economically important disease of sheep, goats and calves, is caused by systemic effects of the epsilon toxin produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens type D. The only practical means of controlling the occurrence of enterotoxaemia is to immunise animals by vaccination. The vaccine is prepared by deriving a toxoid from the bacterial culture filtrate and the potency of the vaccine is tested with the in vivo mouse neutralisation test (MNT). Due to ethical, economic and technical reasons, alternative in vitro assays are needed. In this study an indirect cytometric bead immunoassay (I-CBA) was developed for use in vaccine potency testing and the results were compared with those obtained using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA) and the MNT. Sera were collected from guinea pigs immunised with three different production batches of enterotoxaemia vaccine and the levels of anti-epsilon toxin antibodies were determined. Although the intra- and inter-assay variability was satisfactory, epsilon antitoxin levels determined by both the I-ELISA and indirect cytometric bead immunoassay (I-CBA) tests were higher than those of the MNT assay. In contrast to the MNT, all of the serum samples were identified as having antitoxin levels above the required minimum (not less than 5 U/mL). These results indicate that the respective in vitro tests in their current formats are not yet suitable alternatives to the in vivo MNT. The growing demand for a more humane, cost-effective and efficient method for testing the potency of enterotoxaemia vaccines, however, provides a strong impetus for further optimisation and standardisation of the I-CBA assay but further analytical research is required. PMID:24832497

  7. Evaluation of the embryotoxic potency of compounds in a newly revised high throughput embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Peters, Annelieke K; Steemans, Margino; Hansen, Erik; Mesens, Natalie; Verheyen, Geert R; Vanparys, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The ability of murine-derived embryonic stem cells (D3) to differentiate into cardiomyocytes is the basis of the embryonic stem cell test (EST). With the EST, chemicals and pharmaceuticals can be assessed for their embryotoxic potency early on in the development process. In order to come to a higher throughput EST, a 96-well based method was developed based on low attachment well plates that allow for the formation of embryonic bodies from which the stem cells can differentiate. Twelve test compounds were selected based on their reported in vitro and in vivo embryotoxic potency. In the 96-well based EST, reportedly strong embryotoxic compounds 5-fluorouracil, 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN), methylmercury chloride, and hydroxyurea were correctly ranked with corresponding Relative Embryotoxic Potency values (REP, based on the EC(50) (microM) value of 6AN) of 2.6 +/- 2.9, 1, 2.0 +/- 3.1, and 0.07 +/- 0.05, respectively. Moderately embryotoxic compounds valproic acid, boric acid, methoxyacetic acid, and lithium chloride resulted in a correct ranking with REP values of 0.01 +/- 0.003, 0.001 +/- 0.001, 0.0007 +/- 0.001, and 0.0006 +/- 0.0004, respectively. The included nonembryotoxic compounds Penicillin G, acrylamide, and saccharin did not result in an inhibition of D3 cells to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, other than related to cytotoxicity (REP value of 0.00001). However, diphenhydramine resulted in an inhibitory effect similarly to the strong embryotoxic compound hydroxyurea, with a REP value of 0.40 +/- 0.36. However, further evaluation suggested this was due to direct inhibition of the contractile capacity of the D3 cardiomyocytes, rather than an embryotoxic mechanism. The 96-well based EST is a promising addition to the screening process of newly developed chemicals and pharmaceuticals. PMID:18593728

  8. Human Cardiosphere-Derived Cells From Advanced Heart Failure Patients Exhibit Augmented Functional Potency in Myocardial Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Deliang; Sun, Baiming; Blusztajn, Agnieszka; Xie, Yucai; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Aminzadeh, Mohammad Amin; Liu, Weixin; Li, Tao-Sheng; De Robertis, Michele A.; Marbán, Linda; Czer, Lawrence S. C.; Trento, Alfredo; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to compare the regenerative potency of cells derived from healthy and diseased human hearts. Background Results from pre-clinical studies and the CADUCEUS (CArdiosphere-Derived aUtologous stem CElls to reverse ventricUlar dySfunction) trial support the notion that cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) from normal and recently infarcted hearts are capable of regenerating healthy heart tissue after myocardial infarction (MI). It is unknown whether CDCs derived from advanced heart failure (HF) patients retain the same regenerative potency. Methods In a mouse model of acute MI, we compared the regenerative potential and functional benefits of CDCs derived from 3 groups: 1) non-failing (NF) donor: healthy donor hearts post-transplantation; 2) MI: patients who had an MI 9 to 35 days before biopsy; and 3) HF: advanced cardiomyopathy tissue explanted at cardiac transplantation. Results Cell growth and phenotype were identical in all 3 groups. Injection of HF CDCs led to the greatest therapeutic benefit in mice, with the highest left ventricular ejection fraction, thickest infarct wall, most viable tissue, and least scar 3 weeks after treatment. In vitro assays revealed that HF CDCs secreted higher levels of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), which may contribute to the cells’ augmented resistance to oxidative stress, enhanced angiogenesis, and improved myocyte survival. Histological analysis indicated that HF CDCs engrafted better, recruited more endogenous stem cells, and induced greater angiogenesis and cardiomyocyte cell-cycle re-entry. CDC-secreted SDF-1 levels correlated with decreases in scar mass over time in CADUCEUS patients treated with autologous CDCs. Conclusions CDCs from advanced HF patients exhibit augmented potency in ameliorating ventricular dysfunction post-MI, possibly through SDF-1–mediated mechanisms. PMID:24511463

  9. Relative antidipsogenic potencies of six homologous natriuretic peptides in eels.

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Hiroshi; Nobata, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) exhibits a potent antidipsogenic effect in seawater (SW) eels to limit excess Na(+) uptake, thereby effectively promoting SW adaptation. Recently, cardiac ANP, BNP and VNP and brain CNP1, 3 and 4, have been identified in eels. We examined the antidipsogenic effect of all homologous NPs using conscious, cannulated eels in both FW and SW together with parameters that affect drinking. A dose-response study (0.01-1 nmol/kg) in SW eels showed the relative potency of the antidipsogenic effect was in the order ANP ≥ VNP > BNP = CNP3 > CNP1 ≥ CNP4, while the order was ANP = VNP = BNP > CNP3 = CNP1 = CNP4 for the vasodepressor effect. The minimum effective dose of ANP for the antidipsogenic effect is much lower than that in mammals. ANP, BNP and VNP at 0.3 nmol/kg decreased drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and aortic pressure and increased hematocrit in SW eels. The cardiac NPs induced similar changes in drinking, aortic pressure and hematocrit in FW eels, but aside from BNP no change in plasma Na(+) concentration. CNPs had no effect on drinking, plasma Na(+) concentration and hematocrit but induced mild hypotension in both FW and SW eels, except for CNP3 that inhibited drinking in SW eels. These results show that ANP, BNP and VNP are potent antidipsogenic hormones in eels in spite of other regulatory factors working to induce drinking, and that CNPs are without effects on drinking except for the ancestor of the cardiac NPs, CNP3. PMID:21967218

  10. Pyridalyl, a novel insecticide: potency and insecticidal selectivity.

    PubMed

    Isayama, S; Saito, S; Kuroda, K; Umeda, K; Kasamatsu, K

    2005-04-01

    Pyridalyl is an insecticide of a novel chemical class (unclassified insecticides). Toxicity of pyridalyl to two insect pest species, Spodoptera litura and Frankliniella occidentalis, an insect predator, Orius stringicollis, and a pollinator, Bombus terrestris, was evaluated in the laboratory. The insecticidal activity of pyridalyl against S. litura was evaluated using the leaf-dipping method. The potency of pyridalyl was highly effective against all development stages (2nd to 6th instar larvae) of S. litura. This compound was also evaluated against F. occidentalis using the direct spray method. For F. occidentalis, toxicity of pyridalyl was almost similar to that of acrinathrin, but greater than acrinathrin for adults. Then the toxicity of this product to the natural enemies, Orius stringicollis and the pollinating insect Bombus terrestris, was evaluated using the body-dipping method or direct spray method. No acute toxicity of this product was observed on these non-target insects. Moreover, the influence of pyridalyl to the nest of Bombus terrestris was evaluated using the direct spray to the inside of the nest. No apparent influence of this compound was observed by 21 days after treatment. The cytotoxicity of pyridalyl to the Sf9 insect cell line and the CHO-K1 mammalian cell line was evaluated using the trypan-blue exclusion method. High toxicity to the insect cell line, but almost no toxicity to the mammalian cell line, was observed. Thus, pyridalyl exhibited high selectivity in cytotoxicity between the insect and mammalian cell line as well as in insecticidal activity among insect species. We infer pyridalyl may be useful for IPM programs of greenhouse cultivation system. PMID:15756699

  11. Osteogenic Potency of Nacre on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Green, David W.; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Nacre seashell is a natural osteoinductive biomaterial with strong effects on osteoprogenitors, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts during bone tissue formation and morphogenesis. Although nacre has shown, in one study, to induce bridging of new bone across large non-union bone defects in 8 individual human patients, there have been no succeeding human surgical studies to confirm this outstanding potency. But the molecular mechanisms associated with nacre osteoinduction and the influence on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC’s), skeletal stem cells or bone marrow stromal cells remain elusive. In this study we highlight the phenotypic and biochemical effects of Pinctada maxima nacre chips and the global nacre soluble protein matrix (SPM) on primary human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. In static co-culture with nacre chips, the hBMSCs secreted Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) at levels that exceeded bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) treatment. Concentrated preparation of SPM applied to Stro-1 selected hBMSC’s led to rapid ALP secretions, at concentrations exceeding the untreated controls even in osteogenic conditions. Within 21 days the same population of Stro-1 selected hBMSCs proliferated and secreted collagens I–IV, indicating the premature onset of an osteoblast phenotype. The same SPM was found to promote unselected hBMSC differentiation with osteocalcin detected at 7 days, and proliferation increased at 7 days in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, nacre particles and nacre SPM induced the early stages of human bone cell differentiation, indicating that they may be promising soluble factors with osteoinductive capacity in primary human bone cell progenitors such as, hBMSC’s. PMID:25666352

  12. Persistent Pain Model Reveals Sex Difference in Morphine Potency

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoya; Traub, Richard J.; Murphy, Anne Z.

    2010-01-01

    Central or systemic administration of agonists directed at the mu or delta opiate receptors generally produce a greater degree of analgesia in males than in females. To date, the majority of studies examining sex based differences in opioid analgesia have employed acute noxious stimuli (i.e. tail-flick and hot plate test); thus, the potential dimorphic response of centrally acting opiates in the alleviation of persistent inflammatory pain is not well established. In the present study, right hindpaw withdrawal latency (PWL) to radiant thermal stimuli was measured in intact male and cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats before and after unilateral hindpaw injection of the inflammatory agent complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA). Control animals received intraplantar injection of saline. Twenty four hours after CFA or saline injection, animals received either saline or morphine bisulfate (0.5 – 15 mg/kg; s.c.). Separate groups of control or inflamed animals were tested on their responsiveness to morphine at 7, 14 and 21 days post-CFA or saline. No sex differences were noted for baseline PWLs, and females displayed slightly less thermal hyperalgesia at 24 hrs post-CFA. At all morphine doses administered, both the antihyperalgesic effects of morphine in the inflamed animals, and the antinociceptive effects of morphine in control animals, were significantly greater in males in comparison to females. Similarly, in males, the antihyperalgesic effects of morphine increased significantly at 7–21 days post-CFA; no significant shift in morphine potency was noted for females. These studies demonstrate sex-based differences in the effects of morphine on thermal hyperalgesia in a model of persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:16497818

  13. Strategies to generate high-titer, high-potency recombinant AAV3 serotype vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Yin, Zifei; Li, Jun; Zhang, Daniel; Aslanidi, George; Srivastava, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Although recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 3 (AAV3) vectors were largely ignored previously, owing to their poor transduction efficiency in most cells and tissues examined, our initial observation of the selective tropism of AAV3 serotype vectors for human liver cancer cell lines and primary human hepatocytes has led to renewed interest in this serotype. AAV3 vectors and their variants have recently proven to be extremely efficient in targeting human and nonhuman primate hepatocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. In the present studies, we wished to evaluate the relative contributions of the cis-acting inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) from AAV3 (ITR3), as well as the trans-acting Rep proteins from AAV3 (Rep3) in the AAV3 vector production and transduction. To this end, we utilized two helper plasmids: pAAVr2c3, which carries rep2 and cap3 genes, and pAAVr3c3, which carries rep3 and cap3 genes. The combined use of AAV3 ITRs, AAV3 Rep proteins, and AAV3 capsids led to the production of recombinant vectors, AAV3-Rep3/ITR3, with up to approximately two to fourfold higher titers than AAV3-Rep2/ITR2 vectors produced using AAV2 ITRs, AAV2 Rep proteins, and AAV3 capsids. We also observed that the transduction efficiency of Rep3/ITR3 AAV3 vectors was approximately fourfold higher than that of Rep2/ITR2 AAV3 vectors in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines in vitro. The transduction efficiency of Rep3/ITR3 vectors was increased by ~10-fold, when AAV3 capsids containing mutations in two surface-exposed residues (serine 663 and threonine 492) were used to generate a S663V+T492V double-mutant AAV3 vector. The Rep3/ITR3 AAV3 vectors also transduced human liver tumors in vivo approximately twofold more efficiently than those generated with Rep2/ITR2. Our data suggest that the transduction efficiency of AAV3 vectors can be significantly improved both using homologous Rep proteins and ITRs as well as by capsid optimization. Thus, the combined use of homologous Rep

  14. The Incidence of Kidney Injury for Patients Treated With a High‐Potency Versus Moderate‐Potency Statin Regimen After an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Amy; Cannon, Christopher P.; de Lemos, James; Rouleau, Jean L.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Guo, Jianping; Mega, Jessica L.; Sabatine, Marc S.; O'Donoghue, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have raised concerns that high‐potency statins increase the risk of acute kidney injury. We therefore examined the incidence of kidney injury across 2 randomized trials of statin therapy. Methods and Results PROVE IT‐TIMI 22 enrolled 4162 subjects after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and randomized them to atorvastatin 80 mg/day versus pravastatin 40 mg/day. A‐to‐Z enrolled 4497 subjects after ACS and randomized them to a high‐potency (simvastatin 40 mg/day×1 months, then simvastatin 80 mg/day) versus a delayed moderate‐potency statin strategy (placebo×4 months, then simvastatin 20 mg/day). Serum creatinine was assessed centrally at serial time points. Adverse events (AEs) relating to kidney injury were identified through database review. Across both trials, mean serum creatinine was similar between treatment arms at baseline and throughout follow‐up. In A‐to‐Z, the incidence of a 1.5‐fold or ≥0.3 mg/dL rise in serum creatinine was 11.4% for subjects randomized to a high‐potency statin regimen versus 12.4% for those on a delayed moderate‐potency regimen (odds ratio [OR], 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 1.10; P=0.33). In PROVE IT‐TIMI 22, the incidence was 9.4% for subjects randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/day and 10.6% for subjects randomized to pravastatin 40 mg/day (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.09; P=0.25). Consistent results were observed for different kidney injury thresholds and in individuals with diabetes mellitus or with moderate renal dysfunction. The incidence of kidney injury‐related adverse events (AEs) was not statistically different for patients on a high‐potency versus moderate‐potency statin regimen (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.68 to 1.67; P=0.78). Conclusions For patients enrolled in 2 large randomized trials of statin therapy after ACS, the use of a high‐potency statin regimen did not increase the risk of kidney injury. PMID:24786143

  15. THE VALENCE AND METHYLATION STATE OF ARSENIC DETERMINES ITS POTENCY IN INTERACTION WITH THE MITOTIC APPARATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the cytotoxic and genotoxic potency of arsenicals is dependent upon their valence and methylation state. Trivalent methylated arsenicals are much more potent DNA damaging agents than are their inorganic and pentavalent counterparts. Furthermore, thei...

  16. Quantitative structure - mesothelioma Potency Model Optimization for Complex Mixtures of Elongated Particles in Rat Pleura

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer potencies of mineral and synthetic elongated particle (EP) mixtures, including fibers from asbestos, are influenced by changes in fiber dose composition, bioavailability and biodurability in combination with relevant cytotoxic dose-response relationships. A unique and com...

  17. Comptational comparison of asbestos fibers: Dosimetry model simulations to characterize variabilty and potency (Presentation poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled asbestos fibers result in respiratory diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma, but different asbestos fibers exhibit different potency. We applied a recently developed dosimetry model (Asgharian et al., Poster # 104) that describes th...

  18. Toxico-Cheminformatics and QSPR Modeling of the Carcinogenic Potency Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    Report on the development of a tiered, confirmatory scheme for prediction of chemical carcinogenicity based on QSAR studies of compounds with available mutagenic and carcinogenic data. For 693 such compounds from the Carcinogenic Potency Database characterized molecular topologic...

  19. Short-term study investigating the estrogenic potency of diethylstilbesterol in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Adedeji, Olufemi B; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Kahl, Michael D; Jensen, Kathleen M; Lalone, Carlie A; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Perkins, Edward J; Thomas, Linnea; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T

    2012-07-17

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen that has been banned for use in humans, but still is employed in livestock and aquaculture operations in some parts of the world. Detectable concentrations of DES in effluent and surface waters have been reported to range from slightly below 1 to greater than 10 ng/L. Little is known, however, concerning the toxicological potency of DES in fish. In this study, sexually mature fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) of both sexes were exposed to 1, 10, or 100 ng of DES/L of water in a flow-through system. Tissue concentrations of DES and changes in a number of estrogen-responsive end points were measured in the fish at the end of a 4 d exposure and after a 4 d depuration/recovery period in clean water. Accumulation of DES was sex-dependent, with females exhibiting higher tissue residues than males after the 4 d exposure. The observed bioconcentration of DES in the fish was about 1 order of magnitude lower than that predicted on the basis of the octanol-water partition coefficient of the chemical, suggesting relatively efficient metabolic clearance by the fish. Exposure to 1, 10, or 100 ng of DES/L caused decreased testis weight and morphological demasculinization of males (regression of dorsal nuptial tubercles). Diethylstilbesterol induced plasma vitellogenin (VTG) in both sexes at water concentrations ≥10 ng/L; this response (especially in males) persisted through the end of the 4 d recovery period. Hepatic transcripts of VTG and estrogen receptor-α also were affected at DES concentrations ≥10 ng/L. Evaluation of transcript profiles in the liver of females using a 15K-gene fathead minnow microarray revealed a concentration-dependent change in gene expression, with mostly up-regulated transcripts after the exposure and substantial numbers of down-regulated gene products after depuration. Genes previously identified as vitellogenesis-related and regulated by 17β-estradiol were significantly enriched among those

  20. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Michael A; Schuh, Christopher A

    2016-03-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  1. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Michael A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  2. Preventive Effects of Multi-Lamellar Emulsion on Low Potency Topical Steroid Induced Local Adverse Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Geun Dong; Park, Hyun Jung; Bae, Jong Hwan; Hong, Keum Duck; Park, Byeong Deog; Chun, Jaesun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun; Ahn, Sung Ku

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical steroid treatment induces diverse local Wand systemic adverse effects. Several approaches have been tried to reduce the steroid-induced adverse effects. Simultaneous application of physiological lipid mixture is also suggested. Objective Novel vehicles for topical glucocorticoids formulation were evaluated for the efficacy of reducing side-effects and the drug delivery properties of desonide, a low potency topical steroid. Methods Transcutaneous permeation and skin residual amount of desonide were measured using Franz diffusion cells. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using murine model. Results Topical steroids formulation containing desonide, in either cream or lotion form, were prepared using multi-lamellar emulsion (MLE), and conventional desonide formulations were employed for comparison. MLE formulations did not affect the anti-inflammatory activity of the desonide in phobol ester-induced skin inflammation model, compared with conventional formulations. While the penetrated amounts of desonide were similar for all the tested formulations at 24 hours after application, the increased lag time was observed for the MLE formulations. Interestingly, residual amount of desonide in epidermis was significantly higher in lotion type MLE formulation. Steroid-induced adverse effects, including permeability barrier function impairment, were partially prevented by MLE formulation. Conclusion Topical desonide formulation using MLE as a vehicle showed a better drug delivery with increased epidermal retention. MLE also partially prevented the steroid-induced side effects, such as skin barrier impairment. PMID:23467730

  3. Potency of Massoia Bark in Combating Immunosuppressed-related Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hertiani, Triana; Pratiwi, Sylvia Utami Tunjung; Yuswanto, Agustinus; Permanasari, Prisci

    2016-01-01

    Background: As part of our search for new potential natural resources to eradicate infection, we have revealed the prominent potency of massoia bark (Massoia aromatica Becc, Lauraceae) in combating immunosuppressed-related infection. Materials and Methods: The extract was prepared by macerating the pulverized dried bark in ethanol 95%, followed by solvent evaporation. The oil was extracted from the dried bark by steam-hydrodistillation of which preparative thin-layer chromatography was performed on the oil to isolate the active constituent, C-10 massoia lactone (ML). Anti-biofilm assay against Candida albicans was conducted on polystyrene 96 wells microtiter plates, followed by a confocal laser scanning microscope observation to get three-dimensional profiles of the affected biofilms. Effects on the hyphae development inoculated on RPMI-1640 agar plates were observed for 7 days. Influences of samples on mice macrophage phagocytosis were examined by an in vitro technique. Samples concentration tested were in the range of 2.0–0.0625 mg/mL and done in triplicate. Results: Massoia bark extracts (oil and solid phase) and ML exhibited promising activities as anti-biofilm against C. albicans at IC50 0.074% v/v, 271 μg/mL and 0.026 μg/mL, respectively. The ML did not inhibit the hyphae development at the concentration tested; however, the extracts showed inhibition at 62.5 μg/mL. Macrophage phagocytosis stimulation was correlated to the ML content. Conclusion: Massoia bark is potential to be developed as anti-infective in immunosuppressed condition of which the C10 ML (C10H16O2) plays a major role in exerting activity. SUMMARY Massoia bark extracts (oily and solid phase) and C-10 Massoia lactone exhibited promising activities as antibiofilm against Candida albicans at IC50 are 0.074 %v/v, 271 μg/mL and 0.026 μg/mL respectively. The major constituent, C-10 Massoia lactone (C10H16O2) plays major role in exerting anticandida activity and potentially acts as an

  4. The octave potencies convention: a mathematical model of dilution and succussion.

    PubMed

    Anick, David J

    2007-07-01

    Several hypothesized explanations for homeopathy posit that remedies contain a concentration of discrete information-carrying units, such as water clusters, nano-bubbles, or silicates. For any such explanation to be sustainable, dilution must reduce and succussion must restore the concentration of these units. Succussion can be modeled by a logistic equation, which leads to mathematical relationships involving the maximum concentration, the average growth of information-carrying units rate per succussion stroke, the number of succussion strokes, and the dilution factor (x, c, or LM). When multiple species of information-carrying units are present, the fastest-growing species will eventually come to dominate, as the potency is increased. An analogy is explored between iterated cycles dilution and succussion, in making homeopathic remedies, and iterated cycles of reseeding and growth, in bacterial cultures. Drawing on this analogy, the active ingredients in low and medium potency remedies may be present at early dilutions but only gradually come to 'dominate', while high potencies may develop from the occurrence of low-probability but faster-growing 'mutations.' Conclusions from this model include: 'x' and 'c' potencies are best compared by the amount of dilution, not the amount of succussion; the minimum number of succussion strokes needed per cycle is proportional to the logarithm of the dilution factor; and a plausible interpretation of why potencies at approximately regular ratios are traditionally used (the octave potencies convention). PMID:17678818

  5. Kinetic microplate bioassays for relative potency of antibiotics improved by partial Least Square (PLS) regression.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Fabiane Lacerda; Saviano, Alessandro Morais; Almeida, Túlia de Souza Botelho; Lourenço, Felipe Rebello

    2016-05-01

    Microbiological assays are widely used to estimate the relative potencies of antibiotics in order to guarantee the efficacy, safety, and quality of drug products. Despite of the advantages of turbidimetric bioassays when compared to other methods, it has limitations concerning the linearity and range of the dose-response curve determination. Here, we proposed to use partial least squares (PLS) regression to solve these limitations and to improve the prediction of relative potencies of antibiotics. Kinetic-reading microplate turbidimetric bioassays for apramacyin and vancomycin were performed using Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) and Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), respectively. Microbial growths were measured as absorbance up to 180 and 300min for apramycin and vancomycin turbidimetric bioassays, respectively. Conventional dose-response curves (absorbances or area under the microbial growth curve vs. log of antibiotic concentration) showed significant regression, however there were significant deviation of linearity. Thus, they could not be used for relative potency estimations. PLS regression allowed us to construct a predictive model for estimating the relative potencies of apramycin and vancomycin without over-fitting and it improved the linear range of turbidimetric bioassay. In addition, PLS regression provided predictions of relative potencies equivalent to those obtained from agar diffusion official methods. Therefore, we conclude that PLS regression may be used to estimate the relative potencies of antibiotics with significant advantages when compared to conventional dose-response curve determination. PMID:26971814

  6. Development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the carcinogenic potency of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatapathy, Raghuraman Wang Chingyi; Bruce, Robert Mark; Moudgal, Chandrika

    2009-01-15

    Determining the carcinogenicity and carcinogenic potency of new chemicals is both a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In order to expedite the screening process, there is a need to identify alternative toxicity measures that may be used as surrogates for carcinogenic potency. Alternative toxicity measures for carcinogenic potency currently being used in the literature include lethal dose (dose that kills 50% of a study population [LD{sub 50}]), lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between tumor dose (TD{sub 50}) and three alternative toxicity measures as an estimator of carcinogenic potency. A second aim of this study was to develop a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) between TD{sub 50} and estimated/experimental predictor variables to predict the carcinogenic potency of new chemicals. Rat TD{sub 50}s of 590 structurally diverse chemicals were obtained from the Cancer Potency Database, and the three alternative toxicity measures considered in this study were estimated using TOPKAT, a toxicity estimation software. Though poor correlations were obtained between carcinogenic potency and the three alternative toxicity (both experimental and TOPKAT) measures for the CPDB chemicals, a CART developed using experimental data with no missing values as predictor variables provided reasonable estimates of TD{sub 50} for nine chemicals that were part of an external validation set. However, if experimental values for the three alternative measures, mutagenicity and logP are not available in the literature, then either the CART developed using missing experimental values or estimated values may be used for making a prediction.

  7. Potency assay development for cellular therapy products: an ISCT review of the requirements and experiences in the industry.

    PubMed

    Bravery, Christopher A; Carmen, Jessica; Fong, Timothy; Oprea, Wanda; Hoogendoorn, Karin H; Woda, Juliana; Burger, Scott R; Rowley, Jon A; Bonyhadi, Mark L; Van't Hof, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of potency plays a key role in defining the quality of cellular therapy products (CTPs). Potency can be defined as a quantitative measure of relevant biologic function based on the attributes that are linked to relevant biologic properties. To achieve an adequate assessment of CTP potency, appropriate in vitro or in vivo laboratory assays and properly controlled clinical data need to be created. The primary objective of a potency assay is to provide a mechanism by which the manufacturing process and the final product for batch release are scrutinized for quality, consistency and stability. A potency assay also provides the basis for comparability assessment after process changes, such as scale-up, site transfer and new starting materials (e.g., a new donor). Potency assays should be in place for early clinical development, and validated assays are required for pivotal clinical trials. Potency is based on the individual characteristics of each individual CTP, and the adequacy of potency assays will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by regulatory agencies. We provide an overview of the expectations and challenges in development of potency assays specific for CTPs; several real-life experiences from the cellular therapy industry are presented as illustrations. The key observation and message is that aggressive early investment in a solid potency evaluation strategy can greatly enhance eventual CTP deployment because it can mitigate the risk of costly product failure in late-stage development. PMID:23260082

  8. Enhancement of the antiparakeratotic potency of calcitriol and tacalcitol in liposomal preparations in the mouse tail test.

    PubMed

    Körbel, J N; Sebök, B; Kerényi, M; Mahrle, G

    2001-01-01

    In order to test the advantage of vitamin D(3) preparations in liposomal form, calcitriol, the natural activated form of vitamin D(3), and tacalcitol, a vitamin D(3) analogue, were employed in various concentrations and using different vehicles in the mouse tail test, an animal model for testing the antiparakeratotic efficacy of topical medications. The optimal concentration in petrolatum turned out to be similar to that in commercial preparations. The liposomal preparations were superior to those in petrolatum and to those in nonliposomal phospholipids. The antiparakeratotic potency (drug activity) of liposomal tacalcitol in a concentration of 2 microg/g was twice that of the commercial preparation with a higher concentration of 4 microg/g. These results suggest that the use of liposomal vitamin D(3) preparations can achieve a given antipsoriatic effect with a reduced concentration of the active substance thereby reducing the risk of skin irritation and of hypercalcemia. PMID:11586070

  9. Causes of endocrine disrupting potencies in surface water in East China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Deng, Dongyang; Wang, Yuting; Hu, Guanjiu; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Xinru; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hongxia; Wang, Ziheng

    2016-02-01

    Surface water is essential for human health and ecological diversity, but some endocrine disrupting chemicals are detectable. Both thyroid receptor (TR) and androgen receptor (AR) agonistic/antagonistic potencies in grade II surface water in East China were investigated using reporter gene assays. While none of the water exhibited agonistic potency, significant AR and TR antagonistic potencies were detectable. TR antagonistic equivalents (TR-AntEQ) and AR antagonistic equivalents (AR-AntEQ) ranged from 3.6 to 76.1 μg dibutyl phthalate/L and from 2.3 to 242.6 μg flutamide/L, respectively. The TR and AR antagonistic potencies in the Yangtze River watershed were highlighted, with equivalents greater than the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of dibutyl phthalate and flutamide, respectively. Phthalate esters (PAEs) being the most abundant explained most of the TR antagonistic potency, contributing more than 65% of the TR-AntEQ and diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) was the major contributor. In most surface waters studied, PAEs contributed little of the AR-AntEQ, but the frequently detected octylphenol, nonylphenol and benzo[a]pyrene might be responsible. PMID:26495828

  10. International ring trial of the epidermal equivalent sensitizer potency assay: reproducibility and predictive-capacity.

    PubMed

    Teunis, Marc A T; Spiekstra, Sander W; Smits, Mieke; Adriaens, Els; Eltze, Tobias; Galbiati, Valentina; Krul, Cyrille; Landsiedel, Robert; Pieters, Raymond; Reinders, Judith; Roggen, Erwin; Corsini, Emanuela; Gibbs, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the international ring trial of the epidermal-equivalent (EE) sensitizer potency assay. This assay does not distinguish a sensitizer from a non-sensitizer, but may classify known skin sensitizers according to their potency. It assesses the chemical concentration resulting in 50% cytotoxicity (EE-EC50) or the 2-fold increase in IL-1α (IL-1α2x). Four laboratories received 13 coded sensitizers. Reproducible results were obtained in each laboratory. A binary prediction model, EC50≥7 mg/ml=weak to moderate sensitizer and EC50<7 mg/ml=strong to extreme sensitizer had an accuracy of 77%. A superior EE (EC50 and IL-1α2x) correlation was observed with human in vivo DSA05 data compared to LLNA-EC3 data. Human in vivo NOEL and LLNA-EC3 data correlated to a similar extent to in vitro EE data. Our results indicate that this easily transferable EE potency assay is suitable for testing chemical allergens of unknown potencies and may now be ready for further validation, providing complementary potency information to other assays already undergoing validation for assessing skin sensitization potential. PMID:24535238

  11. Enhancement of DNA vaccine potency through coadministration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines via gene gun.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daejin; Hoory, Talia; Monie, Archana; Ting, Jenny Pan-Yun; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-05-15

    Administration of DNA vaccines via gene gun has emerged as an important form of Ag-specific immunotherapy. The MHC CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and also induces expression of class I molecules. We reasoned that the gene gun administration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines employing different strategies to improve MHC I and II processing could enhance DNA vaccine potency. We observed that DC-1 cells transfected with CIITA DNA lead to higher expression of MHC I and II molecules, leading to enhanced Ag presentation through the MHC I/II pathways. Furthermore, our data suggested that coadministration of DNA-encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 Ag (CRT/E6) with CIITA DNA leads to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. In addition, coadministration of the combination of CRT/E6 DNA with CIITA DNA and DNA encoding the invariant chain (Ii) linked to the pan HLA-DR-reactive epitope (Ii-PADRE) further enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. Treatment with the combination vaccine was also shown to enhance the antitumor effects and to prolong survival in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice. Vaccination with the combination vaccine also led to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) memory T cells and to long-term protection against TC-1 tumors and prolonged survival in vaccinated mice. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of CIITA DNA with CRT/E6 and Ii-PADRE DNA vaccines represents a potentially effective means to combat tumors in the clinical setting. PMID:18453624

  12. USDA regulatory guidelines and practices for veterinary Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, G B; Walker, A; Rippke, B

    2013-09-01

    Batch-release potency testing of leptospiral vaccines licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) historically was conducted through animal vaccination-challenge models. The hamster vaccination-challenge assay was Codified in 1974 for bacterins containing Leptospira pomona, Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae, and Leptospira canicola, and in 1975 for bacterins containing Leptospira grippotyphosa. In brief, 10 hamsters are vaccinated with a specified dilution of bacterin. After a holding period, the vaccinated hamsters, as well as nonvaccinated controls, are challenged with virulent Leptospira and observed for mortality. Eighty percent of vaccinated hamsters must survive in the face of a valid challenge. The high cost of the Codified tests, in terms of monetary expense and animal welfare, prompted the Center for Veterinary Biologics (CVB) to develop ELISA alternatives for them. Potency tests for other serogroups, such as Leptospira hardjo-bovis, that do not have Codified requirements for potency testing continue to be examined on a case-by-case basis. PMID:23838570

  13. Potency prediction of β-secretase (BACE-1) inhibitors using density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Roos, Katarina; Viklund, Jenny; Meuller, Johan; Kaspersson, Karin; Svensson, Mats

    2014-03-24

    Scoring potency is a main challenge for structure based drug design. Inductive effects of subtle variations in the ligand are not possible to accurately predict by classical computational chemistry methods. In this study, the problem of predicting potency of ligands with electronic variations participating in key interactions with the protein was addressed. The potency was predicted for a large set of cyclic amidine and guanidine cores extracted from β-secretase (BACE-1) inhibitors. All cores were of similar size and had equal interaction motifs but were diverse with respect to electronic substitutions. A density functional theory approach, in combination with a representation of the active site of a protein using only key residues, was shown to be predictive. This computational approach was used to guide and support drug design, within the time frame of a normal drug discovery design cycle. PMID:24456077

  14. Augmentation by calcium channel antagonists of general anaesthetic potency in mice.

    PubMed

    Dolin, S J; Little, H J

    1986-08-01

    The effects of three kinds of calcium channel antagonists on the anaesthetic potencies of ethanol, pentobarbitone and argon were examined in mice. Ethanol and pentobarbitone anaesthetic potencies in mice were significantly increased by verapamil 10 mg kg-1, flunarizine 40 mg kg-1 and nitrendipine 100 mg kg-1. Argon anaesthetic potency was significantly increased by nitrendipine 50 mg kg-1 and 100 mg kg-1 in a dose-related fashion. Even at very high doses the calcium channel antagonists did not produce anaesthesia by themselves. At the doses used the calcium channel antagonists did not affect the blood concentrations of ethanol, 2 h, or pentobarbitone, 15 min, after anaesthetic administration. PMID:2943355

  15. Peptide length and prime-side sterics influence potency of peptide phosphonate protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher M.; Ray, Manisha; Eroy-Reveles, Aura A.; Egea, Pascal; Tajon, Cheryl; Craik, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The ability to follow enzyme activity in a cellular context represents a challenging technological frontier that impacts fields ranging from disease pathogenesis to epigenetics. Activity-based probes (ABPs) label the active form of an enzyme via covalent modification of catalytic residues. Here we present an analysis of parameters influencing potency of peptide phosphonate ABPs for trypsin-fold S1A proteases, an abundant and important class of enzymes with similar substrate specificities. We find that peptide length and stability influence potency more than sequence composition and present structural evidence that steric interactions at the prime-side of the substrate-binding cleft affect potency in a protease-dependent manner. We introduce guidelines for the design of peptide phosphonate ABPs and demonstrate their utility in a live-cell labeling application that specifically targets active S1A proteases at the cell surface of cancer cells. PMID:21276938

  16. Hydraphiles enhance antimicrobial potency against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit B; Garrad, Evan C; Stavri, Ariel; Gokel, Michael R; Negin, Saeedeh; Meisel, Joseph W; Cusumano, Zachary; Gokel, George W

    2016-06-15

    Hydraphiles are synthetic amphiphiles that form ion-conducting pores in liposomal membranes. These pores exhibit open-close behavior when studied by planar bilayer conductance techniques. In previous work, we showed that when co-administered with various antibiotics to the DH5α strain of Escherichia coli, they enhanced the drug's potency. We report here potency enhancements at low concentrations of hydraphiles for the structurally and mechanistically unrelated antibiotics erythromycin, kanamycin, rifampicin, and tetracycline against Gram negative E. coli (DH5α and K-12) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as Gram positive Bacillus subtilis. Earlier work suggested that potency increases correlated to ion transport function. The data presented here comport with the function of hydraphiles to enhance membrane permeability in addition to, or instead of, their known function as ion conductors. PMID:27166575

  17. Rationale for Further Medical and Health Research on High-Potency Sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High-potency or artificial sweeteners have historically been considered inert compounds without physiological consequences other than taste sensations. However, recent data suggest that some of these sweeteners have biological effects that may impact human health. Furthermore, there are significant gaps in our current knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of these sweeteners, their potential for “sweetener–drug interactions” and their impact on appetite and body weight regulation. Nine research needs are described that address some of the major unknown issues associated with ingestion of high-potency sweeteners. PMID:22539626

  18. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Gregory, Dennis E.

    Decisions made by federal and state courts during 1983 concerning higher education are reported in this chapter. Issues of employment and the treatment of students underlay the bulk of the litigation. Specific topics addressed in these and other cases included federal authority to enforce regulations against age discrimination and to revoke an…

  19. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    Litigation in 1987 was very brisk with an increase in the number of higher education cases reviewed. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under four major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining and denial of employee benefits; (3)…

  20. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Finnegan, Dorothy E.

    The higher education case law in 1988 is extensive. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under five major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining, and denial of employee benefits; (3) students, involving admissions, financial aid, First…

  1. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    This eighth chapter of "The Yearbook of School Law, 1986" summarizes and analyzes over 330 state and federal court cases litigated in 1985 in which institutions of higher education were involved. Among the topics examined were relationships between postsecondary institutions and various governmental agencies; discrimination in the employment of…

  2. PAHs, PAH-induced carcinogenic potency, and particle-extract-Induced cytotoxicity of traffic-related nano/ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Wen-Yinn; Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chaung, Hso-Chi

    2008-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) bound in nano/ ultrafine particles from vehicle emissions may cause adverse health effects. However, little is known about the characteristics of the nanoparticle-bound PAHs and the PAH-associated carcinogenic potency/cytotoxicity; therefore, traffic-related nano/ultrafine particles were collected in this study using a microorifice uniform deposition impactor(MOUDI) and a nano-MOUDI. For PM0.056--18, the difference in size-distribution of particulate total-PAHs between non-after-rain and after-rain samples was statistically significant at alpha = 0.05; however, this difference was not significant for PM0.01--0.056. The PAH correlation between PM0.01--0.1 and PM0.1--1.8 was lower for the after-rain samples than forthe non-after-rain samples. The average particulate total-PAHs in five samplings displayed a trimodal distribution with a major peak in the Aitken mode (0.032--0.056 microm). About half of the particulate total-PAHs were in the ultrafine size range. The BaPeq sums of BaP, IND, and DBA (with toxic equivalence factors > or = 0.1) accounted for approximately 90% of the total-BaPeq in the nano/ultrafine particles, although these three compounds contributed little to the mass of the sampled particles. The mean content of the particle-bound total-PAHs/-BaPeqs and the PAH/BaPeq-derived carcinogenic potency followed the order nano > ultrafine > fine > coarse. For a sunny day sample, the cytotoxicity of particle extracts (using 1:1 (v/v) n-hexane/dichloromethane) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) for the nano (particularly the 10-18 nm)/ultrafine particles than for the coarser particles and bleomycin. Therefore, traffic-related nano and ultrafine particles are possibly cytotoxic. PMID:18589992

  3. Development of Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) Models to Predict the Carcinogenic Potency of Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining the carcinogenicity and carcinogenic potency of new chemicals is both a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In order to expedite the screening process, there is a need to either: (1) identify alternative toxicity measures (shorter duration) that may be used as...

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype a Specific Cell-Based Potency Assay to Replace the Mouse Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Salas, Ester; Wang, Joanne; Molina, Yanira; Nelson, Jeremy B.; Jacky, Birgitte P. S.; Aoki, K. Roger

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A), a potent therapeutic used to treat various disorders, inhibits vesicular neurotransmitter exocytosis by cleaving SNAP25. Development of cell-based potency assays (CBPAs) to assess the biological function of BoNT/A have been challenging because of its potency. CBPAs can evaluate the key steps of BoNT action: receptor binding, internalization-translocation, and catalytic activity; and therefore could replace the current mouse bioassay. Primary neurons possess appropriate sensitivity to develop potential replacement assays but those potency assays are difficult to perform and validate. This report describes a CBPA utilizing differentiated human neuroblastoma SiMa cells and a sandwich ELISA that measures BoNT/A-dependent intracellular increase of cleaved SNAP25. Assay sensitivity is similar to the mouse bioassay and measures neurotoxin biological activity in bulk drug substance and BOTOX® product (onabotulinumtoxinA). Validation of a version of this CBPA in a Quality Control laboratory has led to FDA, Health Canada, and European Union approval for potency testing of BOTOX®, BOTOX® Cosmetic, and Vistabel®. Moreover, we also developed and optimized a BoNT/A CBPA screening assay that can be used for the discovery of novel BoNT/A inhibitors to treat human disease. PMID:23185348

  5. Stereoselective potencies and relative toxicities of y-Coniceine and N-Methylconiine enantiomers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    '-Coniceine, coniine, and N-methylconiine are toxic alkaloids present in poison hemlock (Conium maculatum). We previously reported the comparison of the relative potencies of (+)- and (-)-coniine enantiomers. In this study, we synthesized '-coniceine and the enantiomers of N-methylconiine and dete...

  6. A Luciferase-Based Quick Potency Assay to Predict Chondrogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Oberbauer, Eleni; Steffenhagen, Carolin; Feichtinger, Georg; Hildner, Florian; Hacobian, Ara; Danzer, Martin; Gabriel, Christian; Redl, Heinz; Wolbank, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) is challenging but highly promising for cartilage repair. Large donor variability of chondrogenic differentiation potential raises the risk for transplantation of cells with reduced efficacy and a low chondrogenic potential. Therefore, quick potency assays are required to control the potency of the isolated cells before cell transplantation. Current in vitro methods to analyze the differentiation capacity are time-consuming, and thus, a novel enhancer and tissue-specific promoter combination was used for the detection of chondrogenic differentiation of ASC in a novel quick potency bioassay. Human primary ASC were cotransfected with the Metridia luciferase-based collagen type II reporter gene pCMVE_ACDCII-MetLuc together with a Renilla control plasmid and analyzed for their chondrogenic potential. On day 3 after chondrogenic induction, the luciferase activity was induced in all tested donors under three-dimensional culture conditions and, in a second approach, also under two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions. With our newly developed quick potency bioassay, we can determine chondrogenic potential already after 3 days of chondrogenic induction and under 2D culture conditions. This will enhance the efficiency of testing cell functionality, which should allow in the future to predict the suitability of cells derived from individual patients for cell therapies in a very short time and at low costs. PMID:27019357

  7. Relative potency of culture supernatants of Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus spp. on growth of some fungal phytopathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the potency of 10% v/v cell-free culture supernatants of cultures of the bacteria X. bovienii, X. nematophila, X. cabanillasii, X. szentirmaii, P. temperata, P. luminescens (VS) and P. luminescens (K22) against Fusicladium carpophilum (peach scab), Fusicladium effusum (pecan scab), Moni...

  8. Beyond arousal: valence and potency/control cues in the vocal expression of emotion.

    PubMed

    Goudbeek, Martijn; Scherer, Klaus

    2010-09-01

    The important role of arousal in determining vocal parameters in the expression of emotion is well established. There is less evidence for the contribution of emotion dimensions such as valence and potency/control to vocal emotion expression. Here, an acoustic analysis of the newly developed Geneva Multimodal Emotional Portrayals corpus, is presented to examine the role of dimensions other than arousal. This corpus contains twelve emotions that systematically vary with respect to valence, arousal, and potency/control. The emotions were portrayed by professional actors coached by a stage director. The extracted acoustic parameters were first compared with those obtained from a similar corpus [Banse and Scherer (1996). J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 70, 614-636] and shown to largely replicate the earlier findings. Based on a principal component analysis, seven composite scores were calculated and were used to determine the relative contribution of the respective vocal parameters to the emotional dimensions arousal, valence, and potency/control. The results show that although arousal dominates for many vocal parameters, it is possible to identify parameters, in particular spectral balance and spectral noise, that are specifically related to valence and potency/control. PMID:20815467

  9. A carcinogenic potency database of the standardized results of animal bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Lois Swirsky; Sawyer, Charles B.; Magaw, Renae; Backman, Georganne M.; De Veciana, Margarita; Levinson, Robert; Hooper, N. Kim; Havender, William R.; Bernstein, Leslie; Peto, Richard; Pike, Malcolm C.; Ames, Bruce N.

    1984-01-01

    The preceding paper described our numerical index of carcinogenic potency, the TD50 and the statistical procedures adopted for estimating it from experimental data. This paper presents the Carcinogenic Potency Database, which includes results of about 3000 long-term, chronic experiments of 770 test compounds. Part II is a discussion of the sources of our data, the rationale for the inclusion of particular experiments and particular target sites, and the conventions adopted in summarizing the literature. Part III is a guide to the plot of results presented in Part IV. A number of appendices are provided to facilitate use of the database. The plot includes information about chronic cancer tests in mammals, such as dose and other aspects of experimental protocol, histopathology and tumor incidence, TD50 and its statistical significance, dose response, author's opinion and literature reference. The plot readily permits comparisons of carcinogenic potency and many other aspects of cancer tests; it also provides quantitative information about negative tests. The range of carcinogenic potency is over 10 million-fold. PMID:6525996

  10. A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR EVALUATING RELATIVE POTENCY DATA FOR USE IN ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For chemicals with a common mechanism of toxicity, relative potency factors (RPFs) allow dose and exposure measures to be normalized to an equivalent toxicity amount of a model chemical... In ecological risk assessments the large number of possible target species, variety of expo...

  11. The botulinum toxin LD50 potency assay - another chapter, another mystery.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Andy

    2012-09-01

    Observers of the potency assay used for botulinum toxin were greeted last year with the news that one company had an alternative, non-animal alternative in place. But all was not as it seemed from the press release, and over a year later, information is still lacking. PMID:23067303

  12. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 2: Improvements in kinase selectivity and cell potency

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, David R.; Meyers, Marvin J.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I.; Long, Scott A.; Pierce, Betsy S.; Mahoney, Matthew W.; Mourey, Robert J.; Parikh, Mihir D.; Pfizer

    2010-10-01

    Optimization of kinase selectivity for a set of benzothiophene MK2 inhibitors provided analogs with potencies of less than 500 nM in a cell based assay. The selectivity of the inhibitors can be rationalized by examination of X-ray crystal structures of inhibitors bound to MK2.

  13. Development of Leptospira in vitro potency assays: EU/industry experience and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, H L B M; van der Veen, M; Molkenboer, M J C H; Bruderer, U

    2013-09-01

    Nobivac® Lepto (MSD Animal Health) is a non-adjuvanted canine leptospirosis vaccine containing inactivated whole cells of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Canicola serovar Portlandvere and L. interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Copenhageni. The current standard in vivo potency test is a hamster challenge test associated with major drawbacks such as animal suffering and poor reproducibility. Here, the quantification of antigenic mass by ELISA as a new in vitro potency test is described, supporting the 3Rs concept (replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal tests) and in accordance with European Pharmacopoeia Monograph 0447 (Canine Leptospirosis Vaccine [Inactivated]). The two corresponding sandwich ELISAs are based on monoclonal antibodies specific for immunodominant leptospiral lipopolysaccharide epitopes. Protection in passive immunization experiments demonstrate that these monoclonal antibodies recognize key protective antigens in currently licensed human and veterinary whole cell Leptospira vaccines. The high precision and robustness renders the two ELISAs much more reliable correlates of potency in dogs than the hamster potency test. The recent approval of these assays for a new canine leptospirosis vaccine is an important contribution to the 3Rs in quality control testing of Leptospira vaccines. PMID:23867758

  14. Opportunities and strategies to further reduce animal use for Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Walker, A; Srinivas, G B

    2013-09-01

    Hamsters are routinely infected with virulent Leptospira for two purposes in the regulation of biologics: the performance of Codified potency tests and maintenance of challenge culture for the Codified potency tests. Options for reducing animal use in these processes were explored in a plenary lecture at the "International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Leptospira Vaccine Potency Testing: State of the Science and the Way Forward" held at the Center for Veterinary Biologics in September 2012. The use of validated in vitro potency assays such as those developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for Leptospira (L.) canicola, Leptospira grippotyphosa, Leptospira pomona, and Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae rather than the Codified hamster vaccination-challenge assay was encouraged. Alternatives such as reduced animal numbers in the hamster vaccination-challenge testing were considered for problematic situations. Specifically, the merits of sharing challenge controls, reducing group sizes, and eliminating animals for concurrent challenge dose titration were assessed. Options for maintaining virulent, stable cultures without serial passage through hamsters or with decreased hamster use were also discussed. The maintenance of virulent Leptospira without the use of live animals is especially difficult since a reliable means to maintain virulence after multiple in vitro passages has not yet been identified. PMID:23891496

  15. Social Capital, Team Efficacy and Team Potency: The Mediating Role of Team Learning Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Emmerik, Hetty; Jawahar, I. M.; Schreurs, Bert; de Cuyper, Nele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Drawing on social capital theory and self-identification theory, this study aims to examine the associations of two indicators of social capital, personal networks and deep-level similarity, with team capability measures of team efficacy and team potency. The central focus of the study is to be the hypothesized mediating role of team…

  16. Comparative Elongated Mineral Particle Toxicology & Erionite’s Apparent  High Potency for Inducing Mesothelioma

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent NHEERL research under EPA's Libby Action Plan has determined that elongated particle relative potency for rat pleural mesothelioma is best predicted on the basis of total external surface area (TSA) of slightly acid leached test samples which simulate particle bio-durabili...

  17. Use of pulsed ultraviolet light to reduce the allergenic potency of soybean extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a non-thermal food processing technology, is reported to be able to inactivate enzymes and reduce allergen levels from peanut extracts. The objective of this study was to determine if PUV would reduce the allergen levels and allergenic potency of soy extracts. Soy ext...

  18. RELTIVE POTENCIES OF SELECTED DIHALOACETATES AND THEIR MAJOR METABOLITES IN RODENT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relative potencies of selected dihaloacetic acids and their major metabolites in rodent whole embryo culture.

    S. Hunter, M. Blanton, E. Rogers
    RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711

    Haloacetic acids (HAA) are produced by disinfection and present in tap water. S...

  19. MULTI-FACTOR POTENCY SCHEME FOR COMPARING THE CARCINOGENIC ACTIVITY OF CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A scheme for ranking the quantitative activity `of chemical carcinogens is described. his activity scheme uses as its base, dose potency measured as TD50, which after conversion into an inverse log scale, a decile scale, is adjusted by weighing factors that describe other paramet...

  20. A QSAR for the Mutagenic Potencies of Twelve 2-Amino-trimethylimidazopyridine Isomers: Structural, Quantum Chemical,and Hydropathic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, M G; Hatch, F T; Tanga, M J; Lau, E V; Colvin, M E

    2005-04-23

    An isomeric series of heterocyclic amines related to one found in heated muscle meats was investigated for properties that predict their measured mutagenic potency. Eleven of the 12 possible 2-amino-trimethylimidazopyridine (TMIP) isomers were tested for mutagenic potency in the Ames/Salmonella test with bacterial strain TA98, and resulted in a 600-fold range in potency. Structural, quantum chemical and hydropathic data were calculated on the parent molecules and the corresponding nitrenium ions of all of the tested isomers to establish models for predicting the potency of the unknown isomer. The regression model accounting for the largest fraction of the total variance in mutagenic potency contains four predictor variables: dipole moment, a measure of the gap between amine LUMO and HOMO energies, percent hydrophilic surface, and energy of amine LUMO. The most important determinants of high mutagenic potency in these amines are: (1) a small dipole moment, (2) the combination of b-face ring fusion and N3-methyl group, and (3) a lower calculated energy of the {pi} electron system. Based on predicted potency from the average of five models, the isomer not yet synthesized and tested is expected to have a mutagenic potency of 0.84 revertants/{micro}g in test strain TA98.

  1. RELATIVE POTENCY OF FUNGAL EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. However, relative potency of molds in the induction of allergic asthma is not clear. In this study, we tested the relative potency of fungal extracts (Metarizium anisophilae [MACA], Stachybotrys ...

  2. Determination of relative potencies for chemical inhibition of spontaneous neuronal activity using a four amplifier MEA system.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potency determination is important to identify the most promising drug candidates as well as identification of and ranking of compound toxicity. In our laboratory, we have utilized MEA recording techniques to determine the relative potency of 11 insecticidal compounds and rank th...

  3. Effect of sugar positions in ginsenosides and their inhibitory potency on Na+/K+-ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ronald JY; Chung, Tse-yu; Li, Feng-yin; Lin, Nan-hei; Tzen, Jason TC

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether ginsenosides with various sugar attachments may act as active components responsible for the cardiac therapeutic effects of ginseng and sanqi (the roots of Panax ginseng and Panax notoginseng) via the same molecular mechanism triggered by cardiac glycosides, such as ouabain and digoxin. Methods: The structural similarity between ginsenosides and ouabain was analyzed. The inhibitory potency of ginsenosides and ouabain on Na+/K+-ATPase activity was examined and compared. Molecular modeling was exhibited for the docking of ginsenosides to Na+/K+-ATPase. Results: Ginsenosides with sugar moieties attached only to the C-3 position of the steroid-like structure, equivalent to the sugar position in cardiac glycosides, and possessed inhibitory potency on Na+/K+-ATPase activity. However, their inhibitory potency was significantly reduced or completely abolished when a monosaccharide was linked to the C-6 or C-20 position of the steroid-like structure; replacement of the monosaccharide with a disaccharide molecule at either of these positions caused the disappearance of the inhibitory potency. Molecular modeling and docking confirmed that the difference in Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitory potency among ginsenosides was due to the steric hindrance of sugar attachment at the C-6 and C-20 positions of the steroid-like structure. Conclusion: The cardiac therapeutic effects of ginseng and sanqi should be at least partly attributed to the effective inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase by their metabolized ginsenosides with sugar moieties attached only to the C-3 position of the steroid-like structure. PMID:19060914

  4. Covalent EGFR inhibitor analysis reveals importance of reversible interactions to potency and mechanisms of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Phillip A; Kuzmic, Petr; Solowiej, James; Bergqvist, Simon; Bolanos, Ben; Almaden, Chau; Nagata, Asako; Ryan, Kevin; Feng, Junli; Dalvie, Deepak; Kath, John C; Xu, Meirong; Wani, Revati; Murray, Brion William

    2014-01-01

    Covalent inhibition is a reemerging paradigm in kinase drug design, but the roles of inhibitor binding affinity and chemical reactivity in overall potency are not well-understood. To characterize the underlying molecular processes at a microscopic level and determine the appropriate kinetic constants, specialized experimental design and advanced numerical integration of differential equations are developed. Previously uncharacterized investigational covalent drugs reported here are shown to be extremely effective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (kinact/Ki in the range 10(5)-10(7) M(-1)s(-1)), despite their low specific reactivity (kinact ≤ 2.1 × 10(-3) s(-1)), which is compensated for by high binding affinities (Ki < 1 nM). For inhibitors relying on reactivity to achieve potency, noncovalent enzyme-inhibitor complex partitioning between inhibitor dissociation and bond formation is central. Interestingly, reversible binding affinity of EGFR covalent inhibitors is highly correlated with antitumor cell potency. Furthermore, cellular potency for a subset of covalent inhibitors can be accounted for solely through reversible interactions. One reversible interaction is between EGFR-Cys797 nucleophile and the inhibitor's reactive group, which may also contribute to drug resistance. Because covalent inhibitors target a cysteine residue, the effects of its oxidation on enzyme catalysis and inhibitor pharmacology are characterized. Oxidation of the EGFR cysteine nucleophile does not alter catalysis but has widely varied effects on inhibitor potency depending on the EGFR context (e.g., oncogenic mutations), type of oxidation (sulfinylation or glutathiolation), and inhibitor architecture. These methods, parameters, and insights provide a rational framework for assessing and designing effective covalent inhibitors. PMID:24347635

  5. Multiplex Assay for Protein Profiling and Potency Measurement of German Cockroach Allergen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Taruna; Dobrovolskaia, Ekaterina; Shartouny, Jessica R.; Slater, Jay E.

    2015-01-01

    Background German cockroach (GCr) allergens induce IgE responses and may cause asthma. Commercial GCr allergen extracts are variable and existing assays may not be appropriate for determining extract composition and potency. Objective Our aim was to develop a multiplex antibody/bead-based assay for assessment of GCr allergen extracts. Methods Single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies against GCr were obtained by screening libraries derived from naïve human lymphocytes and hyperimmunized chicken splenocytes and bone marrow. Selected clones were sequenced and characterized by immunoblotting. Eighteen scFv antibodies (17 chicken, 1 human) coupled to polystyrene beads were used in this suspension assay; binding of targeted GCr allergens to antibody-coated beads was detected using rabbit antisera against GCr, and against specific allergens rBla g 1, rBla g 2, and rBla g 4. The assay was tested for specificity, accuracy, and precision. Extracts were also compared by IgE competition ELISA. Results Chicken scFv’s generated eight different binding patterns to GCr proteins from 14 to 150 kDa molecular weight. Human scFv’s recognized a 100 kDa GCr protein. The multiplex assay was found to be specific and reproducible with intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.64% and inter-assay CV of 10.0%. Overall potencies of various GCr extracts were calculated using mean logEC50s for eight selected scFvs. Overall potency measures were also analyzed by assessing the contributions to potency of each target. Conclusions An scFv antibody-based multiplex assay has been developed capable of simultaneously measuring different proteins in a complex mixture, and to determine the potencies and compositions of allergen extracts. PMID:26444288

  6. Estimating the carcinogenic potency of chemicals from the in vivo micronucleus test.

    PubMed

    Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; Johnson, George E; Slob, Wout

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the applicability of using in vivo mouse micronucleus (MN) data to derive cancer potency information. We also present a new statistical methodology for correlating estimated potencies between in vivo MN tests and cancer studies, which could similarly be used for other systems (e.g. in vitro vs. in vivo genotoxicity tests). The dose-response modelling program PROAST was used to calculate benchmark doses (BMDs) for estimating the genotoxic and carcinogenic potency for 48 compounds in mice; most of the data were retrieved from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) database, while some additional data were retrieved from the Carcinogenic Potency Database and published studies. BMD05s (doses with 5% increase in MN frequency) were derived from MN data, and BMD10s (doses with 10% extra cancer risk) were derived from carcinogenicity data, along with their respective lower (BMDL) and upper (BMDU) confidence bounds. A clear correlation between the in vivo MN BMD05s and the cancer BMD10s was observed when the lowest BMD05 from the in vivo MN was plotted against the lowest BMD10 from the carcinogenicity data for each individual compound. By making a further selection of BMDs related to more or less equally severe cancer lesions, the correlation was considerably improved. Getting a general scientific consensus on how we can quantitatively compare different tumour lesion types and investigating the impact of MN study duration are needed to refine this correlation analysis. Nevertheless, our results suggest that a BMD derived from genotoxicity data might provide a prediction of the tumour potency (BMD10) with an uncertainty range spanning roughly a factor of 100. PMID:26163673

  7. Evaluation of residual antibacterial potency in antibiotic production wastewater using a real-time quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Liu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    While antibiotic pollution has attracted considerable attention due to its potential in promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, the antibiotic activity of their related substances has been neglected, which may underestimate the environmental impacts of antibiotic wastewater discharge. In this study, a real-time quantitative approach was established to evaluate the residual antibacterial potency of antibiotics and related substances in antibiotic production wastewater (APW) by comparing the growth of a standard bacterial strain (Staphylococcus aureus) in tested water samples with a standard reference substance (e.g. oxytetracycline). Antibiotic equivalent quantity (EQ) was used to express antibacterial potency, which made it possible to assess the contribution of each compound to the antibiotic activity in APW. The real-time quantitative method showed better repeatability (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 1.08%) compared with the conventional fixed growth time method (RSD 5.62-11.29%). And its quantification limits ranged from 0.20 to 24.00 μg L(-1), depending on the antibiotic. We applied the developed method to analyze the residual potency of water samples from four APW treatment systems, and confirmed a significant contribution from antibiotic transformation products to potent antibacterial activity. Specifically, neospiramycin, a major transformation product of spiramycin, was found to contribute 13.15-22.89% of residual potency in spiramycin production wastewater. In addition, some unknown related substances with antimicrobial activity were indicated in the effluent. This developed approach will be effective for the management of antibacterial potency discharge from antibiotic wastewater and other waste streams. PMID:26395288

  8. Differential influence of dopamine transport rate on the potencies of cocaine, amphetamine, and methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Siciliano, Cody A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-21

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) levels vary across brain regions and individuals, and are altered by drug history and disease states; however, the impact of altered DAT expression on psychostimulant effects in brain has not been systematically explored. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we measured the effects of elevated DAT levels on presynaptic dopamine parameters as well as the uptake inhibition potency of the blockers cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) and the releaser amphetamine (AMPH) in the nucleus accumbens core. Here we found that increases in DAT levels, resulting from either genetic overexpression or MPH self-administration, caused markedly increased maximal rates of uptake (Vmax) that were positively correlated with the uptake inhibition potency of AMPH and MPH, but not cocaine. AMPH and MPH were particularly sensitive to DAT changes, with a 100% increase in Vmax resulting in a 200% increase in potency. The relationship between Vmax and MPH potency was the same as that for AMPH, but was different from that for cocaine, indicating that MPH more closely resembles a releaser with regard to uptake inhibition. Conversely, the effects of MPH on stimulated dopamine release were similar to those of cocaine, with inverted U-shaped increases in release over a concentration-response curve. This was strikingly different from the release profile of AMPH, which showed only reductions at high concentrations, indicating that MPH is not a pure releaser. These data indicate that although MPH is a DAT blocker, its uptake-inhibitory actions are affected by DAT changes in a similar manner to releasers. Together, these data show that fluctuations in DAT levels alter the potency of releasers and MPH but not blockers and suggest an integral role of the DAT in the addictive potential of AMPH and related compounds. PMID:25474655

  9. Effect of chemical modifications on allergenic potency of peanut proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bencharitiwong, Ramon; van der Kleij, Hanneke P.M.; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modification of native peanut extracts could reduce adverse effects of peanut immunotherapy. Objective: We sought to compare native and chemically modified crude peanut extract (CPE) and major peanut allergens Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 in a mediator-release assay based on the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell line transfected with human Fcε receptor. Methods: Native Ara h 2/6 was reduced and alkylated (RA), with or without additional glutaraldehyde treatment (RAGA). CPE was reduced and alkylated. Sera of subjects with peanut allergy (16 males; median age 7 years) were used for overnight RBL-passive sensitization. Cells were stimulated with 0.1 pg/mL to 10 μg/mL of peanut. β-N-acetylhexosaminidase release (NHR) was used as a marker of RBL degranulation, expressed as a percentage of total degranulation caused by Triton X. Results: Median peanut-specific immunoglobulin E was 233 kUA/L. Nineteen subjects were responders, NHR ≥ 10% in the mediator release assay. Responders had reduced NHR by RA and RAGA compared with the native Ara h 2/6. Modification resulted in a later onset of activation by 10- to 100-fold in concentration and a lowering of the maximum release. Modified RA-Ara h 2/6 and RAGA-Ara h 2/6 caused significantly lower maximum mediator release than native Ara h 2/6, at protein concentrations 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/mL (p < 0.001, < 0.001, and < 0.001, respectively, for RA; and < 0.001, 0.026, and 0.041, respectively, for RAGA). RA-CPE caused significantly lower maximum NHR than native CPE, at protein concentration 1 ng/mL (p < 0.001) and 10 ng/mL (p < 0.002). Responders had high rAra h 2 immunoglobulin E (mean, 61.1 kUA/L; p < 0.001) and higher NHR in mediator release assay to native Ara h 2/6 than CPE, which indicates that Ara h 2/6 were the most relevant peanut allergens in these responders. Conclusions: Chemical modification of purified native Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 reduced mediator release in an in vitro assay ∼100-fold, which indicates decreased

  10. Characterization of a novel high-potency positive modulator of K(v)7 channels.

    PubMed

    Dalby-Brown, William; Jessen, Carsten; Hougaard, Charlotte; Jensen, Marianne L; Jacobsen, Thomas A; Nielsen, Karin S; Erichsen, Helle K; Grunnet, Morten; Ahring, Philip K; Christophersen, Palle; Strøbæk, Dorte; Jørgensen, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    K(v)7 channel activators decrease neuronal excitability and might potentially treat neuronal hyperexcitability disorders like epilepsy and mania. Here we introduce NS15370 ((2-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-N-[6-[(4-fluorophenyl)methylamino]-2-morpholino-3-pyridyl]acetamide)hydrochloride, an in vitro high-potency chemical analogue of retigabine, without effects on GABA(A) receptors. NS15370 activates recombinant homo- and heteromeric K(v)7.2-K(v)7.5 channels in HEK293 cells at sub-micromolar concentrations (EC₅₀~100 nM, as quantified by a fluorescence based Tl⁺-influx assay). In voltage clamp experiments NS15370 exhibits a complex, concentration-dependent mode-of-action: At low concentrations it accelerates voltage-dependent activation rates, slows deactivations, and increases steady-state current amplitudes. Quantified by the peak-tail current method, the V½ value of the steady-state activation curve is shifted towards hyperpolarized potentials at concentrations ~100 times lower than retigabine. However, in contrast to retigabine, NS15370 also introduces a distinct time-dependent current decrease, which eventually, at higher concentrations, causes suppression of the current at depolarized potentials, and an apparent "cross-over" of the voltage-activation curve. In brain slices, NS15370 hyperpolarizes and increases spike frequency adaptation of hippocampal CA1 neurons and the compound reduces the autonomous firing of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia-nigra pars compacta. NS15370 is effective in rodent models of hyperexcitability: (i) it yields full protection against mouse 6 Hz seizures and rat amygdala kindling discharges, two models of partial epilepsia; (ii) it reduces (+)-MK-801 hydrogen maleate (MK-801)-induced hyperactivity as well as chlordiazepoxide (CDP)+d-amphetamine (AMP)-induced hyperactivity, models sensitive to classic anti-psychotic and anti-manic treatments, respectively. Our findings with NS15370 consolidate neuronal K(v)7 channels as targets for

  11. ECETOC Florence workshop on risk assessment of endocrine substances, including the potency concept.

    PubMed

    Fegert, Ivana

    2013-12-16

    The European regulation on plant protection products (1107/2009) and the Biocidal Products Regulation (EC Regulation 528/2012) only support the marketing and use of chemicals if they do not cause endocrine disruption in humans or wildlife species. Also, substances with endocrine properties are subject to authorization under the European regulation on the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH; 1907/2006). Therefore, the regulatory consequences of identifying a substance as an endocrine disrupting chemical are severe. In contrast to that, basic scientific criteria, necessary to define endocrine disrupting properties, are not described in any of these legislative documents. Thus, the European Center for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) established a task force to provide scientific criteria for the identification and assessment of chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties that may be used within the context of these three legislative texts (ECETOC, 2009a). In 2009, ECETOC introduced a scientific framework as a possible concept for identifying endocrine disrupting properties within a regulatory context (ECETOC, 2009b; Bars et al., 2011a,b). The proposed scientific criteria integrated, in a weight of evidence approach, information from regulatory (eco)toxicity studies and mechanistic/screening studies by combining evidence for adverse effects detected in apical whole-organism studies with an understanding of the mode of action (MoA) of endocrine toxicity. However, since not all chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties are of equal hazard, an adequate concept should also be able to differentiate between chemicals with endocrine properties of low concern from those of higher concern (for regulatory purposes). For this purpose, the task force refined this part of their concept. Following an investigation of the key factors at a second workshop of invited regulatory, academic and industry scientists, the

  12. Enhanced bactericidal potency of nanoliposomes by modification of the fusion activity between liposomes and bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Wen; Lu, Tingli; Wang, Rutao; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a good model of antibiotic resistance. These organisms have an outer membrane with a low level of permeability to drugs that is often combined with multidrug efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of the drug, or alteration of its molecular target. The acute and growing problem of antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas to conventional antibiotics made it imperative to develop new liposome formulations to overcome these mechanisms, and investigate the fusion between liposome and bacterium. Methods The rigidity, stability and charge properties of phospholipid vesicles were modified by varying the cholesterol, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and negatively charged lipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol sodium salt (DMPG), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phopho-L-serine sodium salt (DMPS), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), nature phosphatidylserine sodium salt from brain and nature phosphatidylinositol sodium salt from soybean concentrations in liposomes. Liposomal fusion with intact bacteria was monitored using a lipid-mixing assay. Results It was discovered that the fluid liposomes-bacterium fusion is not dependent on liposomal size and lamellarity. A similar degree of fusion was observed for liposomes with a particle size from 100 to 800 nm. The fluidity of liposomes is an essential pre-request for liposomes fusion with bacteria. Fusion was almost completely inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol into fluid liposomes. The increase in the amount of negative charges in fluid liposomes reduces fluid liposomes-bacteria fusion when tested without calcium cations due to electric repulsion, but addition of calcium cations brings the fusion level of fluid liposomes to similar or higher levels. Among the negative phospholipids examined, DMPA gave the highest degree of fusion, DMPS and DMPG had intermediate fusion levels, and PI resulted in the lowest degree of fusion

  13. Potency assessment of topical corticoids in the vasoconstrictor assay and on tuberculin-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schalla, W; Schorning, S

    1991-01-01

    The topical anti-inflammatory activity of potent and very potent corticoids was studied in normal and inflamed skin using the vasoconstriction assay and tuberculin-induced inflammation in four double-blind intraindividual comparison trials. Instrumental techniques in addition to visual scores and several time points were applied to get better insight into the reliability of the models and the sensitivity of the different variables. Beta-methasone-17-valerate and two concentrations of prednicarbate were used as potent corticoids, clobetasol-17-propionate, betamethasone-17,21-dipropionate and different biopharmaceutical forms of desoximetasone (DOM) as very potent corticoids. Visual scores, the reactive skin hyperemia after arterial occlusion and skin colorimetry were used to quantify vasoconstriction; erythema scores, surface area of infiltration and changes in skin colorimetry, skin blood flow and skin temperature for the tuberculin reaction. The time courses of blanching (n = 20) and of the tuberculin reaction (n = 10) were described by orthogonal polynomials and the coefficients were statistically analyzed by nonparametric tests, the discriminative variables in tuberculin inflammation in addition by the parametric multiple analysis of variance. Important differences in the release rates of corticoids demand several assessment times and not just one as often used. The potency ranking may otherwise be misleading. In general, ointments released corticoids slowlier than the cream which in turn liberated slowlier than the gels. The DOM gel declined rapidly after an apparent peak at 5.5 h in terms of its blanching effect, but was nevertheless comparable after once-daily application to other very potent corticoids in its activity against delayed-type inflammation. Such differences may explain discrepancies found for some corticoid preparations between their blanching response and clinical efficacy. The more potent a corticoid the more the erythema is reduced, the less

  14. Hydrophobic substituents increase the potency of salacinol, a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor from Ayurvedic traditional medicine 'Salacia'.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Genzoh; Xie, Weijia; Balakishan, Gorre; Amer, Mumen F A; Tsutsui, Nozomi; Takemura, Haruka; Nakamura, Shinya; Akaki, Junji; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Morikawa, Toshio; Nakanishi, Isao; Muraoka, Osamu

    2016-08-15

    Using an in silico method, seven analogs bearing hydrophobic substituents (8a: Me, 8b: Et, 8c: n-Pent, 8d: n-Hept, 8e: n-Tridec, 8f: isoBu and 8g: neoPent) at the 3'-O-position in salacinol (1), a highly potent natural α-glucosidase inhibitor from Ayurvedic traditional medicine 'Salacia', were designed and synthesized. In order to verify the computational SAR assessments, their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated in vitro. All analogs (8a-8g) exhibited an equal or considerably higher level of inhibitory activity against rat small intestinal α-glucosidases compared with the original sulfonate (1), and were as potent as or higher in potency than the clinically used anti-diabetics, voglibose, acarbose or miglitol. Their activities against human maltase exhibited good relationships to the results obtained with enzymes of rat origin. Among the designed compounds, the one with a 3'-O-neopentyl moiety (8g) was most potent, with an approximately ten fold increase in activity against human maltase compared to 1. PMID:27325449

  15. Potency trends of Δ9-THC and other cannabinoids in confiscated cannabis preparations from 1993 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Mehmedic, Zlatko; Chandra, Suman; Slade, Desmond; Denham, Heather; Foster, Susan; Patel, Amit S; Ross, Samir A; Khan, Ikhlas A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2010-09-01

    The University of Mississippi has a contract with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to carry out a variety of research activities dealing with cannabis, including the Potency Monitoring (PM) program, which provides analytical potency data on cannabis preparations confiscated in the United States. This report provides data on 46,211 samples seized and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) during 1993-2008. The data showed an upward trend in the mean Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) content of all confiscated cannabis preparations, which increased from 3.4% in 1993 to 8.8% in 2008. Hashish potencies did not increase consistently during this period; however, the mean yearly potency varied from 2.5-9.2% (1993-2003) to 12.0-29.3% (2004-2008). Hash oil potencies also varied considerably during this period (16.8 ± 16.3%). The increase in cannabis preparation potency is mainly due to the increase in the potency of nondomestic versus domestic samples. PMID:20487147

  16. Estimating Potency in High-Throughput Screening Experiments by Maximizing the Rate of Change in Weighted Shannon Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Shockley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput in vitro screening experiments can be used to generate concentration-response data for large chemical libraries. It is often desirable to estimate the concentration needed to achieve a particular effect, or potency, for each chemical tested in an assay. Potency estimates can be used to directly compare chemical profiles and prioritize compounds for confirmation studies, or employed as input data for prediction modeling and association mapping. The concentration for half-maximal activity derived from the Hill equation model (i.e., AC50) is the most common potency measure applied in pharmacological research and toxicity testing. However, the AC50 parameter is subject to large uncertainty for many concentration-response relationships. In this study we introduce a new measure of potency based on a weighted Shannon entropy measure termed the weighted entropy score (WES). Our potency estimator (Point of Departure, PODWES) is defined as the concentration producing the maximum rate of change in weighted entropy along a concentration-response profile. This approach provides a new tool for potency estimation that does not depend on the assumption of monotonicity or any other pre-specified concentration-response relationship. PODWES estimates potency with greater precision and less bias compared to the conventional AC50 assessed across a range of simulated conditions. PMID:27302286

  17. Estimating Potency in High-Throughput Screening Experiments by Maximizing the Rate of Change in Weighted Shannon Entropy.

    PubMed

    Shockley, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput in vitro screening experiments can be used to generate concentration-response data for large chemical libraries. It is often desirable to estimate the concentration needed to achieve a particular effect, or potency, for each chemical tested in an assay. Potency estimates can be used to directly compare chemical profiles and prioritize compounds for confirmation studies, or employed as input data for prediction modeling and association mapping. The concentration for half-maximal activity derived from the Hill equation model (i.e., AC50) is the most common potency measure applied in pharmacological research and toxicity testing. However, the AC50 parameter is subject to large uncertainty for many concentration-response relationships. In this study we introduce a new measure of potency based on a weighted Shannon entropy measure termed the weighted entropy score (WES). Our potency estimator (Point of Departure, PODWES) is defined as the concentration producing the maximum rate of change in weighted entropy along a concentration-response profile. This approach provides a new tool for potency estimation that does not depend on the assumption of monotonicity or any other pre-specified concentration-response relationship. PODWES estimates potency with greater precision and less bias compared to the conventional AC50 assessed across a range of simulated conditions. PMID:27302286

  18. Successful development and validation of an in vitro replacement assay for Leptospira vaccine potency tests.

    PubMed

    Kulpa-Eddy, J

    2012-01-01

    The standard requirement for serial release potency testing of Leptospira bacterins in the United States is the hamster vaccination challenge test. It is a test that uses a large number of animals experiencing pain or distress, takes weeks to conduct, can be expensive and requires that laboratory personnel handle a viable zoonotic pathogen. In an effort to address these concerns, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) developed an in vitro method for potency testing of four Leptospira serovars. This enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was subsequently validated in the target species. USDA informed their biologics licensees, permittees and applicants of the availability of reference bacterins and the regulatory acceptance regarding this alternative test method in notices issued in 2007 and 2009. This presentation describes how the initial research and subsequent development and validation work were accomplished. PMID:22888601

  19. An evolved oxazolidinone with selective potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Amit; Heuer, Abigail M; Bell, Drew T; Culhane, Jeffrey C; Ebner, David C; Parrish, Nicole; Ippoliti, J Thomas; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2016-08-01

    Innovation of new antibacterials that are effective against strains that have developed resistance to existing drugs would strengthen our ability to treat and subsequently control spread of pathogenic bacteria. Increasing incidence of infections with drug resistant bacteria has become a common occurrence in recent times. We have developed an evolved oxazolidinone, T145, which inhibits growth of Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) with sub μg/ml potencies that are potentially therapeutically valuable. The oxazolidinone is bactericidal against Mtb but bacteriostatic against E. faecalis and S. aureus. In addition to therapeutically valuable potency and bactericidal activity against Mtb, T145 minimizes selection of spontaneous resistant mutants, a trait that prolongs longevity of a drug in clinical use. PMID:27329794

  20. Assessment of mosquito larvicidal potency of cyclic lipopeptides produced by Bacillus subtilis strains.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2006-02-01

    In this study, mosquito larvicidal potency of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) secreted by two Bacillus subtilis strains were determined. LC50 of the crude CLPs secreted by B. subtilis DM-03 and DM-04 strains against third instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus was 120.0+/-5.0 and 300.0+/-8.0mg/l respectively post 24 h of treatment. Physico-chemical factors such as pH of water, incubation temperature, heating and exposure to sunlight hardly influenced the larvicidal potency of these CLPs. Present study provided the evidence that B. subtilis lipopeptides were safe to Indian major carp Labeo rohita, a non-target aquatic organism. These properties of B. subtilis CLPs can be exploited for the formulation of a safer, novel biopesticide for effective control of mosquito larvae. PMID:16316617

  1. A Pentacyclic Aurora Kinase Inhibitor (AKI-001) With High in Vivo Potency And Oral Bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Rawson, T.E.; Ruth, M.; Blackwood, E.; Burdick, D.; Corson, L.; Dotson, J.; Drummond, J.; Fields, C.; Georges, G.J.; Goller, B.; Halladay, J.; Hunsaker, T.; Kleinheinz, T.; Krell, H.-W.; Li, J.; Liang, J.; Limberg, A.; McNutt, A.; Moffat, J.; Phillips, G.; Ran, Y.

    2009-05-21

    Aurora kinase inhibitors have attracted a great deal of interest as a new class of antimitotic agents. We report a novel class of Aurora inhibitors based on a pentacyclic scaffold. A prototype pentacyclic inhibitor 32 (AKI-001) derived from two early lead structures improves upon the best properties of each parent and compares favorably to a previously reported Aurora inhibitor, 39 (VX-680). The inhibitor exhibits low nanomolar potency against both Aurora A and Aurora B enzymes, excellent cellular potency (IC{sub 50} < 100 nM), and good oral bioavailability. Phenotypic cellular assays show that both Aurora A and Aurora B are inhibited at inhibitor concentrations sufficient to block proliferation. Importantly, the cellular activity translates to potent inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. An oral dose of 5 mg/kg QD is well tolerated and results in near stasis (92% TGI) in an HCT116 mouse xenograft model.

  2. N-Aryl-oxazolidin-2-imine Muscle Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators Enhance Potency through Pharmacophore Reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    Nirschl, Alexandra A.; Zou, Yan; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Sutton, James C.; Simpkins, Ligaya M.; Lupisella, John A.; Kuhns, Joyce E.; Seethala, Ramakrishna; Golla, Rajasree; Sleph, Paul G.; Beehler, Blake C.; Grover, Gary J.; Egan, Donald; Fura, Aberra; Vyas, Viral P.; Li, Yi-Xin; Sack, John S.; Kish, Kevin F.; An, Yongmi; Bryson, James A.; Gougoutas, Jack Z.; DiMarco, John; Zahler, Robert; Ostrowski, Jacek; Hamann, Lawrence G.

    2010-11-09

    A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) scaffold was discovered as a byproduct obtained during synthesis of our earlier series of imidazolidin-2-ones. The resulting oxazolidin-2-imines are among the most potent SARMs known, with many analogues exhibiting sub-nM in vitro potency in binding and functional assays. Despite the potential for hydrolytic instability at gut pH, compounds of the present class showed good oral bioavailability and were highly active in a standard rodent pharmacological model.

  3. In vivo potency of different ligands on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Safrany-Fark, Arpad; Petrovszki, Zita; Kekesi, Gabriella; Liszli, Peter; Benedek, Gyorgy; Keresztes, Csilla; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2015-09-01

    The Ranvier nodes of thick myelinated nerve fibers contain almost exclusively voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs), while the unmyelinated fibers have several receptors (e.g., cannabinoid, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1), too. Therefore, a nerve which contains only motor fibers can be an appropriate in vivo model for selective influence of Navs. The goals were to evaluate the potency of local anesthetic drugs on such a nerve in vivo; furthermore, to investigate the effects of ligands with different structures (arachidonic acid, anandamide, capsaicin and nisoxetine) that were proved to inhibit Navs in vitro with antinociceptive properties. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was explored in anesthetized Wistar rats; after its stimulation, the electrical activity of the vibrissae muscles was registered following the perineural injection of different drugs. Lidocaine, bupivacaine and ropivacaine evoked dose-dependent decrease in electromyographic activity, i.e., lidocaine had lower potency than bupivacaine or ropivacaine. QX-314 did not cause any effect by itself, but its co-application with lidocaine produced a prolonged inhibition. Nisoxetine had a very low potency. While anandamide and capsaicin in high doses caused about 50% decrease in the amplitude of action potential, arachidonic acid did not influence the responses. We proved that the classical local anesthetics have high potency on motor nerves, suggesting that this method might be a reliable model for selective targeting of Navs in vivo circumstances. It is proposed that the effects of these endogenous lipids and capsaicin on sensory fibers are not primarily mediated by Navs. PMID:26033207

  4. Anaesthetic potencies of primary alkanols: implications for the molecular dimensions of the anaesthetic site.

    PubMed Central

    Alifimoff, J. K.; Firestone, L. L.; Miller, K. W.

    1989-01-01

    1. We have redetermined the anaesthetic potencies (EC50S) for a series of primary alkanols, to resolve uncertainties about the molecular dimensions of the anaesthetic site resulting from the use of data from different laboratories. 2. For each alkanol, concentration-response relationships for loss of righting reflex (LRR) were plotted for over one hundred tadpoles, and the median effective concentrations determined. Aqueous concentrations present during potency assays were determined independently, and for alkanols with chain length greater than nonanol, correction was made for depletion from the aqueous phase. 3. The EC50S were found to decrease logarithmically with increasing number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon chain of the alkanol (CN), such that, on average, each additional methylene group was associated with an approximately four fold increase in potency. 4. The relationship between log EC50 and CN was best described by the quadratic equation, log EC50 = 0.022 (+/- 0.0038) CN2 + 0.76 (+/- 0.051) CN + 3.7 (+/- 0.14) (r2 = 0.9951). 5. A previously described correlation between the apparent changes in the free energy of binding of an additional methylene group both to luciferase and to the sites for LRR in tadpoles was not confirmed. 6. A cut-off in potency beyond dodecanol was established in experiments where tadpoles were maintained in supersaturated solutions of tridecanol for 20 h without demonstrable LRR. 7. These findings indicate that the soluble enzyme firefly luciferase does not adequately model the anaesthetic site. Specifically, there are discrepancies in the position of cut-off, and the apparent changes in the free energy of binding, per methylene group, of an alkanol to luciferase do not parallel that for tadpoles. PMID:2784337

  5. Mechanism of multivalent nanoparticle encounter with HIV-1 for potency enhancement of peptide triazole virus inactivation.

    PubMed

    Rosemary Bastian, Arangassery; Nangarlia, Aakansha; Bailey, Lauren D; Holmes, Andrew; Kalyana Sundaram, R Venkat; Ang, Charles; Moreira, Diogo R M; Freedman, Kevin; Duffy, Caitlin; Contarino, Mark; Abrams, Cameron; Root, Michael; Chaiken, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into host cells remains a compelling yet elusive target for developing agents to prevent infection. A peptide triazole (PT) class of entry inhibitor has previously been shown to bind to HIV-1 gp120, suppress interactions of the Env protein at host cell receptor binding sites, inhibit cell infection, and cause envelope spike protein breakdown, including gp120 shedding and, for some variants, virus membrane lysis. We found that gold nanoparticle-conjugated forms of peptide triazoles (AuNP-PT) exhibit substantially more potent antiviral effects against HIV-1 than corresponding peptide triazoles alone. Here, we sought to reveal the mechanism of potency enhancement underlying nanoparticle conjugate function. We found that altering the physical properties of the nanoparticle conjugate, by increasing the AuNP diameter and/or the density of PT conjugated on the AuNP surface, enhanced potency of infection inhibition to impressive picomolar levels. Further, compared with unconjugated PT, AuNP-PT was less susceptible to reduction of antiviral potency when the density of PT-competent Env spikes on the virus was reduced by incorporating a peptide-resistant mutant gp120. We conclude that potency enhancement of virolytic activity and corresponding irreversible HIV-1 inactivation of PTs upon AuNP conjugation derives from multivalent contact between the nanoconjugates and metastable Env spikes on the HIV-1 virus. The findings reveal that multispike engagement can exploit the metastability built into virus the envelope to irreversibly inactivate HIV-1 and provide a conceptual platform to design nanoparticle-based antiviral agents for HIV-1 specifically and putatively for metastable enveloped viruses generally. PMID:25371202

  6. Development of an ELISA to assess the potency of horse therapeutic antivenom against Thai cobra venom.

    PubMed

    Rungsiwongse, J; Ratanabanangkoon, K

    1991-01-24

    An ELISA for the quantitation of antibodies against Naja naja siamensis venom proteins has been developed for use as a possible replacement for the in vivo neutralization assay of antivenom potency. Comparison was made with three preparations of venom proteins as antigens of ELISA: these were the crude venom, a toxin fraction and the purified principle postsynaptic neurotoxin of the Thai cobra. Eight batches of horse monovalent therapeutic anti-cobra antivenom, one of which served as positive reference, were assayed by the ELISAs and also by the in vivo neutralization assay using mice. When crude venom, the toxin fraction and the pure neurotoxin were used as antigens in the ELISAs, the correlation coefficients between the ELISA antibody titers and in vivo neutralization of the antivenoms were 0.82 (P less than 0.005), 0.94 (P less than 0.001) and 0.95 (P less than 0.001), respectively. Thus, the ELISA which measures only the antibody against the principle toxin of the snake venom should be most suitable for use as an in vitro assay of antivenom potency. The ELISA should also be useful for potency assessment and standardization of antivenoms against other elapid snake venoms whose lethal components are small, poorly immunogenic peptides. PMID:1995711

  7. In silico approaches to predicting cancer potency for risk assessment of genotoxic impurities in drug substances.

    PubMed

    Bercu, Joel P; Morton, Stuart M; Deahl, J Thom; Gombar, Vijay K; Callis, Courtney M; van Lier, Robert B L

    2010-01-01

    The current risk assessment approach for addressing the safety of very small concentrations of genotoxic impurities (GTIs) in drug substances is the threshold of toxicological concern (TTC). The TTC is based on several conservative assumptions because of the uncertainty associated with deriving an excess cancer risk when no carcinogenicity data are available for the impurity. It is a default approach derived from a distribution of carcinogens and does not take into account the properties of a specific chemical. The purpose of the study was to use in silico tools to predict the cancer potency (TD(50)) of a compound based on its structure. Structure activity relationship (SAR) models (classification/regression) were developed from the carcinogenicity potency database using MultiCASE and VISDOM. The MultiCASE classification models allowed the prediction of carcinogenic potency class, while the VISDOM regression models predicted a numerical TD(50). A step-wise approach is proposed to calculate predicted numerical TD(50) values for compounds categorized as not potent. This approach for non-potent compounds can be used to establish safe levels greater than the TTC for GTIs in a drug substance. PMID:20363275

  8. Performance and potency of tetanus toxoid: implications for eliminating neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, V.; Milstien, J. B.; van Loon, F.; Cochi, S.; Bennett, J.

    1996-01-01

    Neonatal tetanus (NT) is a major cause of mortality in developing countries, with over 400,000 deaths estimated to occur annually. WHO has adopted the goal of eliminating NT worldwide, and a major strategy for its prevention is the administration of at least two properly spaced doses of tetanus toxoid (TT) to women of childbearing age in high-risk areas to protect passively their newborns at birth. In certain countries the locally produced TT vaccine has been shown to be subpotent, while other countries have reported NT among infants born to vaccinated women. An extensive review of production and quality control procedures was carried out between 1993 and 1995 in 8 of 22 TT-producing countries that also report NT cases, with a more superficial assessment being carried out in the remaining 14 countries. Only 4 of the 22 countries have a functioning national control authority to monitor TT production and vaccine quality. A total of 80 TT lots from 21 manufacturers in 14 of the 22 NT-reporting countries were tested for potency. Of these, 15 lots from eight manufacturers in seven countries had potency values below WHO requirements. TT potency can also be compromised by improper vaccine handling. To eliminate neonatal tetanus worldwide requires assurance that all doses of TT meet WHO production and quality requirements and that the field effectiveness of TT is monitored through systematic NT case investigations and assessment of coverage. PMID:9060223

  9. A common genetic influence on human intensity ratings of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Zhu, Gu; Breslin, Paul A S; Reed, Danielle R; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    The perception of sweetness varies among individuals but the sources of this variation are not fully understood. Here, in a sample of 1,901 adolescent and young adults (53.8% female; 243 MZ and 452 DZ twin pairs, 511 unpaired individuals; mean age 16.2±2.8, range 12–26 years), we studied the variation in the perception of sweetness intensity of two monosaccharides and two high-potency sweeteners: glucose, fructose, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone (NHDC), and aspartame. Perceived intensity for all sweeteners decreased with age (2–5% per year) and increased with the history of otitis media (6–9%). Males rated aspartame slightly stronger than females (7%). We found similar heritabilities for sugars (glucose: h2=0.31, fructose: h2=0.34) and high-potency sweeteners (NHDC: h2=0.31, aspartame: h2=0.30); all were in the modest range. Multivariate modeling showed that a common genetic factor accounted for >75% of the genetic variance in the four sweeteners, suggesting that individual differences in perceived sweet intensity, which are partly due to genetic factors, may be attributed to a single set of genes. This study provided evidence of the shared genetic pathways between the perception of sugars and high-potency sweeteners. PMID:26181574

  10. The potency-insolubility conundrum in pharmaceuticals: Mechanism and solution for hepatitis C protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Patrick R; Snyder, Phillip W; Zhang, Yuegang; McClain, Brian; Quinn, Brian P; Johnston, Steve; Medek, Ales; Tanoury, Jerry; Griffith, James; Patrick Walters, W; Dokou, Eleni; Knezic, Dragutin; Bransford, Philip

    2015-01-01

    As compounds are optimized for greater potency during pharmaceutical discovery, their aqueous solubility often decreases, making them less viable as orally-administered drugs. To investigate whether potency and insolubility share a common origin, we examined the structural and thermodynamic properties of telaprevir, a sparingly soluble inhibitor of hepatitis C virus protease. Comparison of the hydrogen bond motifs in crystalline telaprevir with those present in the protease-telaprevir complex revealed striking similarities. Additionally, the thermodynamics of telaprevir dissolution closely resembles those of protein-ligand dissociation. Together, these findings point to a common origin of potency and insolubility rooted in particular amide-amide hydrogen bond patterns. The insolubility of telaprevir is shown by computational analysis to be caused by interactions in the crystal, not unfavorable hydrophobic hydration. Accordingly, competing out the particular amide-amide hydrogen bond motifs in crystalline telaprevir with 4-hydroxybenzoic acid yielded a co-crystalline solid with excellent aqueous dissolution and oral absorption. The analysis suggests a generalizable approach for identifying drug candidate compounds that either can or cannot be rendered orally bioavailable by alteration of their crystalline solid phases, in an approach that provides a pragmatic way to attain substantial enhancements in the success rate of drug discovery and development. PMID:25451684

  11. α-Conotoxin dendrimers have enhanced potency and selectivity for homomeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jingjing; Huang, Johnny X; Vetter, Irina; Mobli, Mehdi; Lawson, Joshua; Tae, Han-Shen; Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Cooper, Matthew A; Adams, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F

    2015-03-11

    Covalently attached peptide dendrimers can enhance binding affinity and functional activity. Homogenous di- and tetravalent dendrimers incorporating the α7-nicotinic receptor blocker α-conotoxin ImI (α-ImI) with polyethylene glycol spacers were designed and synthesized via a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition of azide-modified α-ImI to an alkyne-modified polylysine dendron. NMR and CD structural analysis confirmed that each α-ImI moiety in the dendrimers had the same 3D structure as native α-ImI. The binding of the α-ImI dendrimers to binding protein Ac-AChBP was measured by surface plasmon resonance and revealed enhanced affinity. Quantitative electrophysiology showed that α-ImI dendrimers had ∼100-fold enhanced potency at hα7 nAChRs (IC50 = 4 nM) compared to native α-ImI (IC50 = 440 nM). In contrast, no significant potency enhancement was observed at heteromeric hα3β2 and hα9α10 nAChRs. These findings indicate that multimeric ligands can significantly enhance conotoxin potency and selectivity at homomeric nicotinic ion channels. PMID:25710197

  12. Modulating potency: Physicochemical characteristics are a determining factor of TLR4-agonist nanosuspension activity.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Quinton M; Sivananthan, Sandra J; Guderian, Jeff A; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Chesko, James D; Fox, Christopher B; Vedvick, Thomas S; Kramer, Ryan M

    2014-03-01

    Activity of adjuvanted vaccines is difficult to predict in vitro and in vivo. The wide compositional and conformational range of formulated adjuvants, from aluminum salts to oil-in-water emulsions, makes comparisons between physicochemical and immunological properties difficult. Even within a formulated adjuvant class, excipient selection and concentration can alter potency and physicochemical properties of the mixture. Complete characterization of physicochemical properties of adjuvanted vaccine formulations and relationship to biological response is necessary to move beyond a guess-and-check paradigm toward directed development. Here we present a careful physicochemical characterization of a two-component nanosuspension containing synthetic TLR-4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) at various molar ratios. Physicochemical properties were compared with potency, as measured by stimulation of cytokine production in human whole blood. We found a surprising, nonlinear relationship between physicochemical properties and GLA-DPPC ratios that corresponded well with changes in biological activity. We discuss these data in light of the current understanding of TLR4 activation and the conformation-potency relationship in development of adjuvanted vaccines. PMID:24464844

  13. Pertussis serological potency test as an alternatively to the intracerebral mouse protection test.

    PubMed

    van der Ark, A; van Straaten-van de Kappelle, I; Hendriksen, C; van de Donk, H

    1996-01-01

    The current potency test for pertussis vaccines, the intracerebral protection test (MPT), is still the only mandatory laboratory model available. This test, however, is a valid, but inhumane and imprecise test and therefore a good candidate for replacement. Recently we have developed the Pertussis Serological Potency Test (PSPT) as an alternative for the MPT. The PSPT is based on in vitro assessment of the humoral immune response against the whole range of surface -antigens of B. pertussis in mice after immunisation with Whole Cell Vaccine (WCV). We have demonstrated a relationship between the mean pertussis antibody concentration at the day of challenge and the proportion of surviving mice at each vaccine dose in the MPT (R = 0.91). The PSPT is a model in which mice (20-24 g) are immunised i.p. with graded doses of vaccine and bled after four weeks. Sera are titrated in a whole cell ELISA and potency based on the vaccine dose-dependent antibody response is estimated by means of a parallel line analysis. In an in-house validation study 13 WCVs were tested in the PSPT and MPT. Homogeneity of both tests was proven by means of the chi-square test; potencies were significantly similar (p = 0.95). Compared to the MPT, the PSPT is more reproducible as is indicated by its smaller 95% confidence intervals. Moreover, by using the PSPT the animal distress can be reduced to an acceptable level and the PSPT also results in a reduction of more than 25% in use of mice. Additional experiments showed that estimation of WCV-potency in the PSPT based on specific antibody responses against protective antigens (PT, FHA, 69- and 92-kDa OMPS) was not possible or did not correlate with protection in MPT. Sera obtained from the PSPT showed a correlation between pertussis antibody levels and complement-mediated killing by pertussis antibodies in in vitro assays. In conclusion, the PSPT is a promising substitute for the MPT though further validation and additional studies on functional

  14. Relative embryotoxic potency of p-substituted phenols in the embryonic stem cell test (EST) and comparison to their toxic potency in vivo and in the whole embryo culture (WEC) assay.

    PubMed

    Strikwold, Marije; Woutersen, Ruud A; Spenkelink, Bert; Punt, Ans; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-09-01

    The applicability of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) as an alternative for in vivo embryotoxicity testing was evaluated for a series of five p-substituted phenols. To this purpose, the potency ranking for this class of compounds derived from the inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation in the EST was compared to in vivo embryotoxic potency data obtained from literature and to the potency ranking defined in the in vitro whole embryo culture (WEC) assay. From the results obtained it appears that the EST was able to identify the embryotoxic potential for p-substituted phenols, providing an identical potency ranking compared to the WEC assay. However, the EST was not able to predict an accurate ranking for the phenols compared to their potency observed in vivo. Only phenol, the least potent compound within this series, was correctly ranked. Furthermore, p-mercaptophenol was correctly identified as a relative potent congener of the phenols tested, but its ranking was distorted by p-heptyloxyphenol, of which the toxicity was overestimated in the EST. It is concluded that when attempting to explain the observed disparity in potency rankings between in vitro and in vivo embryotoxicity, the in vitro models should be combined with a kinetic model describing in vivo absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion processes of the compounds. PMID:22820428

  15. Antecedents of team potency and team effectiveness: an examination of goal and process clarity and servant leadership.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Liden, Robert C

    2011-07-01

    Integrating theories of self-regulation with team and leadership literatures, this study investigated goal and process clarity and servant leadership as 3 antecedents of team potency and subsequent team effectiveness, operationalized as team performance and organizational citizenship behavior. Our sample of 304 employees represented 71 teams in 5 banks. Results showed that team-level goal and process clarity as well as team servant leadership served as 3 antecedents of team potency and subsequent team performance and team organizational citizenship behavior. Furthermore, we found that servant leadership moderated the relationships between both goal and process clarity and team potency, such that the positive relationships between both goal and process clarity and team potency were stronger in the presence of servant leadership. PMID:21319877

  16. Comparative carcinogenic potencies of particulates from diesel engine exhausts, coke oven emissions, roofing tar aerosols and cigarette smoke.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, R E

    1983-01-01

    Mammalian cell mutagenesis, transformation and skin tumorigenesis assays show similar results in comparing the potencies of diesel, coke oven, roofing tar and cigarette smoke particulates. These assay results are reasonably consistent with the comparative carcinogenic potencies of coke oven and roofing tar emissions as determined by epidemiological studies. The bacterial mutagenesis assay tends to show disproportionately high potencies, particularly with diesel particulates. Results to date encourage the approach to the assessment for carcinogenic risks from diesel emissions based on the use of epidemiological data on cancer induced by coke oven emissions, roofing tar particulates and cigarette smoke with the comparative potencies of these materials determined by in vivo and in vitro bioassays. PMID:6186481

  17. Homeopathic Individualized Q-Potencies versus Fluoxetine for Moderate to Severe Depression: Double-Blind, Randomized Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Adler, U. C.; Paiva, N. M. P.; Cesar, A. T.; Adler, M. S.; Molina, A.; Padula, A. E.; Calil, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Homeopathy is a complementary and integrative medicine used in depression, The aim of this study is to investigate the non-inferiority and tolerability of individualized homeopathic medicines [Quinquagintamillesmial (Q-potencies)] in acute depression, using fluoxetine as active control. Ninety-one outpatients with moderate to severe depression were assigned to receive an individualized homeopathic medicine or fluoxetine 20 mg day−1 (up to 40 mg day−1) in a prospective, randomized, double-blind double-dummy 8-week, single-center trial. Primary efficacy measure was the analysis of the mean change in the Montgomery & Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) depression scores, using a non-inferiority test with margin of 1.45. Secondary efficacy outcomes were response and remission rates. Tolerability was assessed with the side effect rating scale of the Scandinavian Society of Psychopharmacology. Mean MADRS scores differences were not significant at the 4th (P = .654) and 8th weeks (P = .965) of treatment. Non-inferiority of homeopathy was indicated because the upper limit of the confidence interval (CI) for mean difference in MADRS change was less than the non-inferiority margin: mean differences (homeopathy-fluoxetine) were −3.04 (95% CI −6.95, 0.86) and −2.4 (95% CI −6.05, 0.77) at 4th and 8th week, respectively. There were no significant differences between the percentages of response or remission rates in both groups. Tolerability: there were no significant differences between the side effects rates, although a higher percentage of patients treated with fluoxetine reported troublesome side effects and there was a trend toward greater treatment interruption for adverse effects in the fluoxetine group. This study illustrates the feasibility of randomized controlled double-blind trials of homeopathy in depression and indicates the non-inferiority of individualized homeopathic Q-potencies as compared to fluoxetine in acute treatment of outpatients

  18. A monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay for measuring the potency of 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Falko; Vasudevan, Anupama; Soto, Jackeline; Kumar, Arunima; Williams, Ollie; Weir, Jerry P

    2014-01-01

    Background The potency of inactivated influenza vaccines is determined using a single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) assay. This assay is relatively easy to standardize, it is not technically demanding, and it is capable of measuring the potency of several vaccine strain subtypes in a multivalent vaccine. Nevertheless, alternative methods that retain the major advantages of the SRID, but with a greater dynamic range of measurement and with reduced reagent requirements, are needed. Objectives The feasibility of an ELISA-based assay format was explored as an alternative potency assay for inactivated influenza vaccines. Methods Several murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), specific for the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), were evaluated for their potential to capture and quantify HA antigen. Vaccine samples, obtained from four licensed influenza vaccine manufacturers, included monovalent bulk vaccine, monovalent vaccine, and trivalent vaccine. Traditional SRID potency assays were run in parallel with the mAb–ELISA potency assay using the reference antigen standard appropriate for the vaccine samples being tested. Results The results indicated that the ELISA potency assay can quantify HA over a wide range of concentrations, including vaccine at subpotent doses, and the ELISA and SRID potency values correlated well for most vaccine samples. Importantly, the assay was capable of quantifying A/California HA in a trivalent formulation. Conclusions This study demonstrates the general feasibility of the mAb approach and strongly suggests that such ELISAs have potential for continued development as an alternative method to assay the potency of inactivated influenza vaccines. PMID:25087462

  19. Development and validation of a serological potency test for the release of Leptospira vaccines--requirements in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Balks, Elisabeth; Gyra, Heike; Kobe, Babett; Cussler, Klaus; Werner, Esther

    2013-09-01

    Both European Pharmacopoeia Monograph 01/2008:0447 "Canine Leptospirosis vaccine (inactivated)" and the more recent Monograph 01/2008:1939 "Bovine Leptospirosis vaccine (inactivated)" explicitly allow for a sero-response test to assess batch potency. Test setup and requirements for in vivo and in vitro validation are described. Furthermore, the two main strategies to assess batch potency and their specific demands are addressed. PMID:23911253

  20. Lipid modification of GRN163, an N3'-->P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide, enhances the potency of telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Brittney-Shea; Gellert, Ginelle C; Hochreiter, Amelia; Pongracz, Krisztina; Wright, Woodring E; Zielinska, Daria; Chin, Allison C; Harley, Calvin B; Shay, Jerry W; Gryaznov, Sergei M

    2005-08-01

    The vast majority of human cancers express telomerase activity, while most human somatic cells do not have detectable telomerase activity. Since telomerase plays a critical role in cell immortality, it is an attractive target for a selective cancer therapy. Oligonucleotides complementary to the RNA template region of human telomerase (hTR) have been shown to be effective inhibitors of telomerase and, subsequently, cancer cell growth in vitro. We show here that a lipid-modified N3'-->P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide (GRN163L) inhibits telomerase more potently than its parental nonconjugated thio-phosphoramidate sequence (GRN163). Cells were treated with both the first- (GRN163) and second-generation (GRN163L) oligonucleotides, including a mismatch control, with or without a transfection enhancer reagent. GRN163L inhibited telomerase activity effectively in a dose-dependent manner, even without the use of a transfection reagent. The IC50 values for GRN163 in various cell lines were on average sevenfold higher than for GRN163L. GRN163L inhibition of telomerase activity resulted in a more rapid loss of telomeres and cell growth than GRN163. This report is the first to show that lipid modification enhanced the potency of the novel GRN163 telomerase inhibitor. These results suggest that the lipid-conjugated thio-phosphoramidates could be important for improved pharmacodynamics of telomerase inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:15940257

  1. High potency olfactory receptor agonists discovered by virtual high-throughput screening: molecular probes for receptor structure and olfactory function

    PubMed Central

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Van Name, Eric; Laslier, Guillaume; Cai, Diana; Paillard, Guillaume; Sorensen, Peter W.; Hoffmann, Rémy; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Ngai, John; Acher, Francine C.

    2008-01-01

    The detection and discrimination of diverse chemical structures by the vertebrate olfactory system is accomplished by the recognition of odorous ligands by their cognate receptors. In the present study we used a computational high-throughput screening strategy to discover novel high affinity agonists of an olfactory G protein-coupled receptor tuned to recognize amino acid ligands. Functional testing of the top candidates validated several agonists with potencies higher than any of the receptor’s known natural ligands. Computational modeling revealed molecular interactions involved in ligand recognition by this receptor, and further highlighted interactions that have been conserved in evolutionarily divergent amino acid receptors. Significantly, the top compounds display robust activities as odorants in vivo, and include a natural product that may be used to signal the presence of bacteria in the aquatic environment. Our virtual screening approach should be applicable to the identification of new bioactive molecules for probing the structure of chemosensory receptors and the function of chemosensory systems in vivo. PMID:19081373

  2. Potency and selectivity of inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus protease by a small nonpeptide cyclic urea, DMP 323.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson-Viitanen, S; Klabe, R M; Cawood, P G; O'Neal, P L; Meek, J L

    1994-01-01

    DMP 323 is a potent inhibitor of the protease of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), with antiviral activity against both HIV type 1 and HIV type 2. This compound is representative of a class of small, novel, nonpeptide cyclic urea inhibitors of HIV protease that were designed on the basis of three-dimensional structural information and three-dimensional database searching. We report here studies of the kinetics of DMP 323 inhibition of the cleavage of peptide and HIV-1 gag polyprotein substrates. DMP 323 acts as a rapidly binding, competitive inhibitor of HIV protease. DMP 323 is as potent against both peptide and viral polyprotein substrates as A-80987, Q8024, and Ro-31-8959, which are among the most potent inhibitors of HIV protease described in the literature to date. Incubation with human plasma or serum did not decrease the effective potency of DMP 323 for HIV protease, suggesting that plasma protein binding is of a low affinity relative to that of HIV protease. DMP 323 was also assessed for its ability to inhibit the mammalian proteases renin, pepsin, cathepsin D, cathepsin G, and chymotrypsin. No inhibition of greater than 12% was observed for any of these enzymes at concentrations of DMP 323 that were 350 to 40,000 times higher than that required to inhibit the viral protease 50%. Images PMID:7979296

  3. Potency determination of factor VIII and factor IX for new product labelling and postinfusion testing: challenges for caregivers and regulators.

    PubMed

    Dodt, J; Hubbard, A R; Wicks, S J; Gray, E; Neugebauer, B; Charton, E; Silvester, G

    2015-07-01

    A workshop organized by the European Medicines Agency and the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and HealthCare was held in London, UK on November 28-29, 2013, to provide an overview of the current knowledge of the characterization of new factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) concentrates with respect to potency assays and testing of postinfusion material. The objective was to set the basis for regulatory authorities' discussion on the most appropriate potency assay for the individual products, and European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) discussion on whether to propose revision of the Ph. Eur. monographs with respect to potency assays in the light of information on new FVIII and FIX concentrates. The workshop showed that for all products valid assays vs. the international concentrate standards were obtained and potency could be expressed in International Units. The Ph. Eur. chromogenic potency assay gave valid assay results which correlate with in vivo functionality of rFVIII products. For some modified rFVIII products and all modified rFIX products, one-stage clotting assay methods result in different potencies depending on the activated partial thromboplastin time reagent. As a consequence, monitoring of patients' postinfusion levels is challenging but it was pointed out that manufacturers are responsible for providing the users with appropriate information for use and laboratory testing of their product. Strategies to avoid misleading determination of patents' plasma levels, e.g. information on suitable assays, laboratory standards or correction factors were discussed. PMID:25623631

  4. Role of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 δ Endotoxin Binding in Determining Potency during Lepidopteran Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Androulla; Chambers, Catherine E.; Bone, Eileen J.; Ellar, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Five economically important crop pests, Manduca sexta, Pieris brassicae, Mamestra brassicae, Spodoptera exigua, and Agrotis ipsilon, were tested at two stages of larval development for susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac, Cry1Ca, Cry1J, and Cry1Ba. Bioassay results for M. sexta showed that resistance to all four Cry toxins increased from the neonate stage to the third-instar stage; the increase in resistance was most dramatic for Cry1Ac, the potency of which decreased 37-fold. More subtle increases in resistance during larval development were seen in M. brassicae for Cry1Ca and in P. brassicae for Cry1Ac and Cry1J. By contrast, the sensitivity of S. exigua did not change during development. At both larval stages, A. ipsilon was resistant to all four toxins. Because aminopeptidase N (APN) is a putative Cry1 toxin binding protein, APN activity was measured in neonate and third-instar brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). With the exception of S. exigua, APN activity was found to be significantly lower in neonates than in third-instar larvae and thus inversely correlated with increased resistance during larval development. The binding characteristics of iodinated Cry1 toxins were determined for neonate and third-instar BBMV. In M. sexta, the increased resistance to Cry1Ac and Cry1Ba during larval development was positively correlated with fewer binding sites in third-instar BBMV than in neonate BBMV. The other species-instar-toxin combinations did not reveal positive correlations between potency and binding characteristics. The correlation between binding and potency was inconsistent for the species-instar-toxin combinations used in this study, reaffirming the complex mode of action of Cry1 toxins. PMID:11916662

  5. Standard Preparations, Limits of Potency, and Dating Period Limitations for Biological Products. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency or we) is amending the general biological products standards relating to dating periods and also removing certain standards relating to standard preparations and limits of potency. FDA is taking this action to update outdated requirements, and accommodate new and evolving technology and testing capabilities, without diminishing public health protections. This action is part of FDA's retrospective review of its regulations in response to an Executive order. FDA is issuing these amendments directly as a final rule because the Agency believes they are noncontroversial and FDA anticipates no significant adverse comments. PMID:27192727

  6. Isolation and Characterization of New Cannabis Constituents from a High Potency Variety

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Mohamed M.; Ross, Samir A.; Slade, Desmond; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Zulfiqar, Fazila; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of a high potency variety of Cannabis sativa L. resulted in the isolation of six new metabolites, (±)-6,7-trans-epoxycannabigerolic acid (2), (±)-6,7-cis-epoxycannabigerolic acid (3), (±)-6,7-cis-epoxycannabigerol (4), (±)-6,7-trans-epoxycannabigerol (5), 5′-methyl-4-pentylbiphenyl-2,2′,6-triol (7), and 7-methoxycannabispirone (8), along with seven known compounds namely, cannabigerolic acid (1), 5′-methoxycannabigerolic acid (6), cannabispirone (9), β-cannabispiranol (10), dehydrocannabifuran (11), cannflavin B (12) and cannabigerol (13). The antimicrobial as well as the antileishmanial activities were investigated. PMID:18283614

  7. An epidermal equivalent assay for identification and ranking potency of contact sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Susan; Corsini, Emanuela; Spiekstra, Sander W.; Galbiati, Valentina; Fuchs, Horst W.; DeGeorge, George; Troese, Matthew; Hayden, Patrick; Deng, Wei; Roggen, Erwin

    2013-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of combining the epidermal equivalent (EE) potency assay with the assay which assesses release of interleukin-18 (IL-18) to provide a single test for identification and classification of skin sensitizing chemicals, including chemicals of low water solubility or stability. A protocol was developed using different 3D-epidermal models including in house VUMC model, epiCS® (previously EST1000™), MatTek EpiDerm™ and SkinEthic™ RHE and also the impact of different vehicles (acetone:olive oil 4:1, 1% DMSO, ethanol, water) was investigated. Following topical exposure for 24 h to 17 contact allergens and 13 non-sensitizers a robust increase in IL-18 release was observed only after exposure to contact allergens. A putative prediction model is proposed from data obtained from two laboratories yielding 95% accuracy. Correlating the in vitro EE sensitizer potency data, which assesses the chemical concentration which results in 50% cytotoxicity (EE-EC{sub 50}) with human and animal data showed a superior correlation with human DSA{sub 05} (μg/cm{sup 2}) data (Spearman r = 0.8500; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0061) compared to LLNA data (Spearman r = 0.5968; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0542). DSA{sub 05} = induction dose per skin area that produces a positive response in 5% of the tested population Also a good correlation was observed for release of IL-18 (SI-2) into culture supernatants with human DSA{sub 05} data (Spearman r = 0.8333; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0154). This easily transferable human in vitro assay appears to be very promising, but additional testing of a larger chemical set with the different EE models is required to fully evaluate the utility of this assay and to establish a definitive prediction model. - Highlights: • A potential epidermal equivalent assay to label and classify sensitizers • Il-18 release distinguishes sensitizers from non sensitizers • IL-18 release can rank sensitizer potency

  8. Inhibitors of the Cysteine Synthase CysM with Antibacterial Potency against Dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Katharina; Maric, Selma; Reshma, Rudraraju Srilakshmi; Almqvist, Helena; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Gustavsson, Anna-Lena; Poyraz, Ömer; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Lundbäck, Thomas; Vallin, Michaela; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2016-07-28

    Cysteine is an important amino acid in the redox defense of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily as a building block of mycothiol. Genetic studies have implicated de novo cysteine biosynthesis in pathogen survival in infected macrophages, in particular for persistent M. tuberculosis. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of potent inhibitors of CysM, a critical enzyme in cysteine biosynthesis during dormancy. A screening campaign of 17 312 compounds identified ligands that bind to the active site with micromolar affinity. These were characterized in terms of their inhibitory potencies and structure-activity relationships through hit expansion guided by three-dimensional structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes. The top compound binds to CysM with 300 nM affinity and displays selectivity over the mycobacterial homologues CysK1 and CysK2. Notably, two inhibitors show significant potency in a nutrient-starvation model of dormancy of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with little or no cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. PMID:27379713

  9. Relative potency as a means of evaluating ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) health risks

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, C.E.; Glass, L.R.

    1990-09-01

    In the 1970's, a variety of developments took place to heightened public and scientific interest in electromagnetic fields. During this time, biological studies of nonionizing electromagnetic fields were taking place, but no clear evidence of risks to public health was identified. Then came the surprising epidemiological finding suggesting that 60 Hz magnetic fields may be related to some childhood leukemias. Our particular interest at ORNL was how to interpret the available data with respect to human exposures to the nearly ubiquitous fields. A review of the available data showed that consistent biological effects were difficult to identify. Classical toxicological tests used in chemical risk assessment had not been performed with Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) fields but rather a wide range of mechanistic studies had been pursued. To evaluate the level of anticipated hazard or risk there was neither a mechanistic understanding nor a consistent phenomenological outcome. A risk evaluation normally requires one or the other of these two types of information. Two quite different approaches were pursued: meta-analysis and relative potency. The first of these is a method to combine data from similar experiments to enhance the relative statistical power of a collection of small sample size studies, and will not be discussed further. The second, relative potency, will be the focus of this paper. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  10. In vitro potency of doripenem tested against an international collection of rarely isolated bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Bell, Jan M; Sader, Helio S; Turnidge, John D; Stilwell, Matthew G

    2009-04-01

    Doripenem, a new 1beta-methyl parenteral carbapenem, has very broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic bacteria. As noted here, the spectrum and potency extended to many rarely isolated species sampled by the Doripenem Global Surveillance Program. Among the species or species groups with 0.25 microg/mL for all tested species except Lactococcus garvieae, Listeria monocytogenes, and Micrococcus spp. In conclusion, doripenem exhibited a very wide spectrum but variable potencies against uncommonly cultured aerobic bacterial pathogens isolated in 2003 to 2007. These results confirm the potential use of this new carbapenem for broad-spectrum empiric or directed antimicrobial therapy. PMID:19302927

  11. Bispecific Anti-HIV-1 Antibodies with Enhanced Breadth and Potency.

    PubMed

    Bournazos, Stylianos; Gazumyan, Anna; Seaman, Michael S; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2016-06-16

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) suppress viremia in animal models of HIV-1 and humans. To achieve potent activity without the emergence of viral escape mutants, co-administration of different bNAbs is necessary to target distinct epitopes essential for viral fitness. Here, we report the development of bispecific anti-Env neutralizing antibodies (biNAbs) with potent activity. Synergistic activity of biNAbs was achieved by combining an engineered hinge domain of IgG3 to increase Fab domain flexibility necessary for hetero-bivalent binding to the Env trimer while retaining the functional properties of the IgG1-Fc. Compared to unmodified biNAbs, hinge domain variants exhibited substantially improved neutralization activity, with particular combinations showing evidence of synergistic neutralization potency in vitro and enhanced in vivo therapeutic activity in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. These findings suggest innovative strategies for generating biNAbs with enhanced neutralization breadth and potency, representing ideal candidate molecules for the control of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27315478

  12. A collaborative study of an alternative in vitro potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Kim, Do-Keun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Yeonhee; Lim, Jong-Mi; Hong, JiYoung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Park, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jaeok

    2016-09-01

    The use of inactivated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines has been ongoing in East Asia for 40 years. A mouse immunogenicity assay followed by a Plaque Reduction Neutralization (PRN) Test (PRNTest) is currently recommended for each lot release of the vaccine by many national authorities. We developed an alternative in vitro ELISA to determine the E antigen content of the Japanese encephalitis virus to observe the 3Rs strategy. A collaborative study for replacing the in vivo potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine with the in vitro ELISA assay was confirmed comparability between these two methods. The study demonstrated that an in vitro assay could perform faster and was more convenient than the established in vivo PRNTest. Moreover, this assay had better precision and reproducibility compared with the conventional in vivo assay. Additionally, the content of antigen determined using the in vitro ELISA correlated well with the potency of the in vivo assay. Furthermore, this method allowed discrimination between individual lots. Thus, we propose a progressive switch from the in vivo assay to the in vitro ELISA for JE vaccine quality control. PMID:27497622

  13. International regulatory requirements for Leptospira vaccine potency testing. Roundtable: current requirements and opportunity for harmonization.

    PubMed

    Draayer, Hans A; Bruckner, Lukas; Peña-Moctezuma, Alejandro de la; Srinivas, Geetha

    2013-09-01

    Progress continues to be made in the ongoing efforts to replace, reduce, or refine the use of laboratory animals for Leptospira vaccine potency testing in certain markets/regions. Leptospira-containing vaccines, as with many veterinary vaccines, are manufactured and distributed both on a regional basis by local manufacturers and internationally by large multinational firms. Three general scenarios exist for the international testing and distribution of veterinary vaccines including: 1) the importing country recognizes the country of origin's testing and batch release data with no additional testing; 2) the importing country requires the manufacturer to conduct a specific potency assay based on the current importing market's regulations for the importing country or 3) the importing country requires retesting of the product in country prior to distribution. Scenarios 2 and 3 both have the potential to significantly increase the usage of laboratory animals for what may be considered redundant testing. Specific requirements for the importation of Leptospira vaccines in the United States, Europe, and Mexico were presented as well as efforts to reduce the use of laboratory animal testing through the availability of internationally recognized tests. PMID:23890730

  14. Antibacterial and antioxidant potency of floral honeys from different botanical and geographical origins.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Hasan A; Alsabehi, Rashid; Boukraâ, Laïd; Abdellah, Fatiha; Bellik, Yuva; Bakhotmah, Balkees A

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess their physicochemical and antioxidant properties as well as their antimicrobial potency, four varieties of honey from different botanical and geographical origins were used. The agar incorporation method was used to determine the antimicrobial potency of honeys. The total phenol content was determined by a modified Folin-Ciocalteu method and the free radical scavenging activity by the Fe(3+)reducing power (FRAP) assay. Manuka honey was the most effective against Staphylococcus aureus Oxa R and S. aureus Oxa S with a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of 6% and 7%, respectively, whereas wild carrot honey was the most effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with a MIC of 12%. Lavender honey was the least effective against all tested strains, even though was found to have the lowest pH and water content. Manuka honey had the highest content of polyphenols, with 899.09 ± 11.75 mg gallic acid/kg, whereas lavender honey had the lowest, with 111.42 ± 3.54 mg gallic acid/kg. A very significant correlation (r value was 0.9079 at P < 0.05) was observed between the total polyphenolic content and the Fe(2+) content formed in the presence of the honey antioxidants. The differences between honey samples in terms of antibacterial and antioxidant activity could be attributed to the natural variations in floral sources of nectar and the different locations. PMID:22948516

  15. Specific increase in potency via structure-based design of a T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malecek, Karolina; Grigoryan, Arsen; Zhong, Shi; Gu, Wei Jun; Johnson, Laura A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Cardozo, Timothy; Krogsgaard, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific T lymphocytes is a powerful strategy for cancer treatment. However, most tumor antigens are non-reactive “self” proteins, which presents an immunotherapy design challenge. Recent studies have shown that tumor-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) can be transduced into normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, which persist after transfer in about 30% of patients and effectively destroy tumor cells in vivo. Although encouraging, the limited clinical responses underscore the need for enrichment of T cells with desirable anti-tumor capabilities prior to patient transfer. In this study, we used structure-based design to predict point mutations of a TCR (DMF5) that enhance its binding affinity for an agonist tumor antigen-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC), Mart-1(27L)-HLA-A2, which elicits full T cell activation to trigger immune responses. We analyzed the effects of selected TCR point mutations on T cell activation potency and analyzed cross-reactivity with related antigens. Our results showed that the mutated TCRs had improved T cell activation potency, while retaining a high degree of specificity. Such affinity-optimized TCRs have demonstrated to be very specific for Mart-1 (27L), the epitope for which they were structurally designed. And even though of limited clinical relevance, these studies open the possibility for future structural-based studies that could potentially be used in adoptive immunotherapy to treat melanoma while avoiding adverse autoimmunity-derived effects. PMID:25070852

  16. Concise review: culture mediated changes in fate and/or potency of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roobrouck, Valerie D; Vanuytsel, Kim; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2011-04-01

    Although Gurdon demonstrated already in 1958 that the nucleus of intestinal epithelial cells could be reprogrammed to give rise to adult frogs, the field of cellular reprogramming has only recently come of age with the description by Takahashi and Yamanaka in 2006, which defined transcription factors can reprogram fibroblasts to an embryonic stem cell-like fate. With the mounting interest in the use of human pluripotent stem cells and culture-expanded somatic stem/progenitor cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, increasing attention has been given to the effect of changes in the in vitro microenvironment on the fate of stem cells. These studies have demonstrated that changes in culture conditions may change the potency of pluripotent stem cells or reprogram adult stem/progenitor cells to endow them with a broader differentiation potential. The mechanisms underlying these fate and potency changes by ex vivo culture should be further investigated and considered when designing clinical therapies with stem/progenitor cells. PMID:21305670

  17. Anti-hepatitis C virus potency of a new autophagy inhibitor using human liver slices model

    PubMed Central

    Lagaye, Sylvie; Brun, Sonia; Gaston, Jesintha; Shen, Hong; Stranska, Ruzena; Camus, Claire; Dubray, Clarisse; Rousseau, Géraldine; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Courcambeck, Jerôme; Bassisi, Firas; Halfon, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral potency of a new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral agent targeting the cellular autophagy machinery. METHODS: Non-infected liver slices, obtained from human liver resection and cut in 350 μm-thick slices (2.7 × 106 cells per slice) were infected with cell culture-grown HCV Con1b/C3 supernatant (multiplicity of infection = 0.1) cultivated for up to ten days. HCV infected slices were treated at day 4 post-infection with GNS-396 for 6 d at different concentrations. HCV replication was evaluated by strand-specific real-time quantitative reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. The infectivity titers of supernatants were evaluated by foci formation upon inoculation into naive Huh-7.5.1 cells. The cytotoxic effect of the drugs was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assays. RESULTS: The antiviral efficacy of a new antiviral drug, GNS-396, an autophagy inhibitor, on HCV infection of adult human liver slices was evidenced in a dose-dependent manner. At day 6 post-treatment, GNS-396 EC50 was 158 nmol/L without cytotoxic effect (compared to hydroxychloroquine EC50 = 1.17 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that our ex vivo model is efficient for evaluation the potency of autophagy inhibitors, in particular a new quinoline derivative GNS-396 as antiviral could inhibit HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. PMID:27478540

  18. Potential for Improving Potency and Specificity of Reovirus Oncolysis with Next-Generation Reovirus Variants

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Adil; Johnston, Randal N.; Shmulevitz, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that specifically replicate in tumor over normal cells offer promising cancer therapies. Oncolytic viruses (OV) not only kill the tumor cells directly; they also promote anti-tumor immunotherapeutic responses. Other major advantages of OVs are that they dose-escalate in tumors and can be genetically engineered to enhance potency and specificity. Unmodified wild type reovirus is a propitious OV currently in phase I–III clinical trials. This review summarizes modifications to reovirus that may improve potency and/or specificity during oncolysis. Classical genetics approaches have revealed reovirus variants with improved adaptation towards tumors or with enhanced ability to establish specific steps of virus replication and cell killing among transformed cells. The recent emergence of a reverse genetics system for reovirus has provided novel strategies to fine-tune reovirus proteins or introduce exogenous genes that could promote oncolytic activity. Over the next decade, these findings are likely to generate better-optimized second-generation reovirus vectors and improve the efficacy of oncolytic reotherapy. PMID:26633466

  19. Metrics other than potency reveal systematic variation in responses to cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Honarnejad, Saman; Heiser, Laura M.; Gray, Joe W.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale analysis of cellular response to anti-cancer drugs typically focuses on variation in potency (IC50) assuming that it is the most important difference between effective/ineffective drugs or sensitive/resistant cells. We took a multi-parametric approach involving analysis of the slope of the dose-response curve (HS), the area under the curve (AUC) and the maximum effect (Emax). We found that some of these parameters vary systematically with cell line and others with drug class. For cell-cycle inhibitors, Emax often but not always correlated with cell proliferation rate. For drugs targeting the Akt/PI3K/mTOR pathway dose-response curves were unusually shallow. Classical pharmacology has no ready explanation for this phenomenon but single-cell analysis showed that it correlated with significant and heritable cell-to-cell variability in the extent of target inhibition. We conclude that parameters other than potency should be considered in the comparative analysis of drug response, particularly at clinically relevant concentrations near and above IC50. PMID:24013279

  20. Metrics other than potency reveal systematic variation in responses to cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Honarnejad, Saman; Heiser, Laura M; Gray, Joe W; Sorger, Peter K

    2013-11-01

    Large-scale analysis of cellular response to anticancer drugs typically focuses on variation in potency (half-maximum inhibitory concentration, (IC50)), assuming that it is the most important difference between effective and ineffective drugs or sensitive and resistant cells. We took a multiparametric approach involving analysis of the slope of the dose-response curve, the area under the curve and the maximum effect (Emax). We found that some of these parameters vary systematically with cell line and others with drug class. For cell-cycle inhibitors, Emax often but not always correlated with cell proliferation rate. For drugs targeting the Akt/PI3K/mTOR pathway, dose-response curves were unusually shallow. Classical pharmacology has no ready explanation for this phenomenon, but single-cell analysis showed that it correlated with significant and heritable cell-to-cell variability in the extent of target inhibition. We conclude that parameters other than potency should be considered in the comparative analysis of drug response, particularly at clinically relevant concentrations near and above the IC50. PMID:24013279

  1. Immunosuppressive potency of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors in solid-organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José A

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin, also known as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that belongs to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, which is involved in several fundamental cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, and survival. This protein and its associated pathway have been implicated in cancer development and the regulation of immune responses, including the rejection response generated following allograft transplantation. Inhibitors of mTOR (mTORi) such as rapamycin and its derivative everolimus are potent immunosuppressive drugs that both maintain similar rates of efficacy and could optimize the renal function and diminish the side effects compared with calcineurin inhibitors. These drugs are used in solid-organ transplantationtoinduceimmunosuppression while also promoting the expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells that could favor a scenery of immunological tolerance. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which inhibitors of mTOR induce suppression by regulation of these pathways at different levels of the immune response. In addition, we particularly emphasize about the main methods that are used to assess the potency of immunosuppressive drugs, highlighting the studies carried out about immunosuppressive potency of inhibitors of mTOR. PMID:27011916

  2. Potency against enterotoxemia of a recombinant Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxoid in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lobato, Francisco C F; Lima, Catarina G R D; Assis, Ronnie A; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Salvarani, Felipe M; Carmo, Anderson O; Contigli, Christiane; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2010-08-31

    Enterotoxemia, a disease that affects domestic ruminants, is caused mainly by the epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens type D. Its eradication is virtually impossible, control and prophylaxis are based on systematic vaccination of herds with epsilon toxoids that are efficient in inducing protective antibody production. The use of recombinant toxins is one of the most promising of these strategies. This work evaluates the potency of a Cl. perfringens type D epsilon toxoid expressed by Escherichia coli administered to goats, sheep, and cattle. The etx gene was cloned into the pET-11a plasmid of E. coli strain BL21 to produce the recombinant toxin. Rabbits (n=8), goats, sheep, and cattle (n=5 for each species) were immunized with 0.2mg of the insoluble recombinant protein fraction to evaluate vaccine potency of the epsilon toxoid studied. Antibody titers were 40, 14.3, 26, and 13.1 IU/mL in the rabbit, goat, sheep, and cattle serum pools, respectively. The epsilon toxoid produced and tested in this work is adequate for immunization of ruminants against enterotoxemia. PMID:20670910

  3. European regulatory framework and practices for veterinary Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Lukas

    2013-09-01

    In Europe, the legal basis for requirements for medicinal products is described in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) In the European Union, the Ph. Eur. is supplemented by several guidelines issued by the European Medicines Agency. Immunological veterinary products must comply with the Ph. Eur. monograph on veterinary vaccines and the accompanying texts, as well as specific monographs. The Ph. Eur. includes monographs on canine leptospirosis and bovine leptospirosis vaccines (inactivated). Both monographs require that an immunogenicity test be performed once in the target species during the life of a vaccine. The hamster challenge test is applied for batch potency testing of canine vaccines. Alternatively, serological tests or suitable validated in vitro tests to determine the content of one or more antigenic components indicative of protection may be performed. Vaccines for use in cattle are tested in a serological test in guinea pigs. The acceptance criteria in alternative tests are set with reference to a batch of vaccine that has given satisfactory results in the immunogenicity test. At a January 2012 European workshop, the suitability of the hamster potency test was questioned and unanimous agreement was reached that moving toward complete in vitro testing is possible and should be promoted. PMID:23886926

  4. Conformational Flexibility Determines Selectivity and Antibacterial, Antiplasmodial, and Anticancer Potency of Cationic α-Helical Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Louic S.; Lan, Yun; Abbate, Vincenzo; Ruh, Emrah; Bui, Tam T.; Wilkinson, Louise J.; Kanno, Tokuwa; Jumagulova, Elmira; Kozlowska, Justyna; Patel, Jayneil; McIntyre, Caitlin A.; Yam, W. C.; Siu, Gilman; Atkinson, R. Andrew; Lam, Jenny K. W.; Bansal, Sukhvinder S.; Drake, Alex F.; Mitchell, Graham H.; Mason, A. James

    2012-01-01

    We used a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopies in conjunction with size exclusion chromatography to help rationalize the relative antibacterial, antiplasmodial, and cytotoxic activities of a series of proline-free and proline-containing model antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in terms of their structural properties. When compared with proline-free analogs, proline-containing peptides had greater activity against Gram-negative bacteria, two mammalian cancer cell lines, and intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum, which they were capable of killing without causing hemolysis. In contrast, incorporation of proline did not have a consistent effect on peptide activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In membrane-mimicking environments, structures with high α-helix content were adopted by both proline-free and proline-containing peptides. In solution, AMPs generally adopted disordered structures unless their sequences comprised more hydrophobic amino acids or until coordinating phosphate ions were added. Proline-containing peptides resisted ordering induced by either method. The roles of the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids and the positioning of the proline residues were also investigated. Careful positioning of proline residues in AMP sequences is required to enable the peptide to resist ordering and maintain optimal antibacterial activity, whereas varying the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids can attenuate hemolytic potential albeit with a modest reduction in potency. Maintaining conformational flexibility improves AMP potency and selectivity toward bacterial, plasmodial, and cancerous cells while enabling the targeting of intracellular pathogens. PMID:22869378

  5. Steroidogenic and maturation-inducing potency of native gonadotropic hormones in female chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The gonadotropins (GtHs), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are produced in the pituitary gland and regulates gametogenesis through production of gonadal steroids. However, respective roles of two GtHs in the teleosts are still incompletely characterized due to technical difficulties in the purification of native GtHs. Methods Native FSH and LH were purified from the pituitaries of adult chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus by anion-exchange chromatography and immunoblotting using specific antisera. The steroidogenic potency of the intact chub mackerel FSH (cmFSH) and LH (cmLH) were evaluated in mid- and late-vitellogenic stage follicles by measuring the level of gonadal steroids, estradiol-17beta (Ε2) and 17,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta-P). In addition, we evaluated the maturation-inducing potency of the GtHs on same stage follicles. Results Both cmFSH and cmLH significantly stimulated E2 production in mid-vitellogenic stage follicles. In contrast, only LH significantly stimulated the production of 17,20beta-P in late-vitellogenic stage follicles. Similarly, cmLH induced final oocyte maturation (FOM) in late-vitellogenic stage follicles. Conclusions Present results indicate that both FSH and LH may regulate vitellogenic processes, whereas only LH initiates FOM in chub mackerel. PMID:22950645

  6. Discovery of triazolopyridinone GS-462808, a late sodium current inhibitor (Late INai) of the cardiac Nav1.5 channel with improved efficacy and potency relative to ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Elzein, Elfatih; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Jiang, Robert H; Li, Xiaofen; Perry, Thao D; Avila, Belem; Wang, Wei-Qun; Hirakawa, Ryoko; Smith-Maxwell, Catherine; Wu, Lin; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Mollova, Nevena; Stafford, Brian; Tang, Jennifer; Belardinelli, Luiz; Zablocki, Jeff A

    2016-07-01

    Previously we disclosed the discovery of potent Late INa current inhibitor 2 (GS-458967, IC50 of 333nM) that has a good separation of late versus peak Nav1.5 current, but did not have a favorable CNS safety window due to high brain penetration (3-fold higher partitioning into brain vs plasma) coupled with potent inhibition of brain sodium channel isoforms (Nav1.1, 1.2, 1.3). We increased the polar surface area from 50 to 84Å(2) by adding a carbonyl to the core and an oxadiazole ring resulting in 3 GS-462808 that had lower brain penetration and serendipitously lower activity at the brain isoforms. Compound 3 has an improved CNS window (>20 rat and dog) relative to 2, and improved anti-ischemic potency relative to ranolazine. The development of 3 was not pursued due to liver lesions in 7day rat toxicology studies. PMID:27038498

  7. (-)-Meptazinol-melatonin hybrids as novel dual inhibitors of cholinesterases and amyloid-β aggregation with high antioxidant potency for Alzheimer's therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaobing; Zheng, Wei; Gong, Ping; Zhou, Qiang; Xie, Qiong; Yu, Lining; Zhang, Peiyi; Chen, Liangkang; Li, Juan; Chen, Jianxing; Chen, Hailin; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2015-07-01

    The multifactorial pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) implicates that multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs) intervention may represent a promising therapy for AD. Amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation and oxidative stress, two prominent neuropathological hallmarks in patients, play crucial roles in the neurotoxic cascade of this disease. In the present study, a series of novel (-)-meptazinol-melatonin hybrids were designed, synthesized and biologically characterized as potential MTDLs against AD. Among them, hybrids 7-7c displayed higher dual inhibitory potency toward cholinesterases (ChEs) and better oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) than the parental drugs. Furthermore, compound 7c could effectively inhibit Aβ self-aggregation, showed favorable safety and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Therefore, 7c may serve as a valuable candidate that is worthy of further investigations in the treatment of AD. PMID:26025073

  8. Caffeine's antioxidant potency optically sensed with double-stranded DNA-encased single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Edward H; Ergul, Busra; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-12

    There is great interest in developing a sensitive method being able to quantitatively measure and compare antioxidant potencies of samples of interest against multiple reactive oxygen species (ROS) whose imbalance could cause oxidative stress. Here, a sensitive nanoprobe, double-stranded DNA encased single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed to determine antioxidant potencies of selected samples (caffeine, regular coffee, and decaffeinated coffee) against ROS, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals. Antioxidant vitamin C and uric acid are used as standards. The method focuses on unique dual optical sensing capability of SWNTs, the rate of spectral suppression when exposed to ROS, and the magnitude of spectral recovery of the ROS-suppressed SWNTs when an antioxidant is added. It is found that the dual sensing capability of SWNTs is still sustained when reacting with the reactive hydroxyl radicals. The results show that caffeine's antioxidant potency is weak, about one millionth of those of vitamin C and uric acid. It is a better scavenger of hydrogen peroxide and a little less effective for hydroxyl radicals. In comparison, coffee, regardless of regular or decaffeinated, is a more efficient antioxidant than caffeine, having an antioxidant potency about ten thousand times stronger. This work provides a versatile detection method for evaluating the antioxidant potencies of samples of interest against various ROS for chemical, biological, and medical applications. PMID:25714428

  9. A multi-dose serological assay suitable to quantify the potency of inactivated rabies vaccines for veterinary use.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Beate; Kamphuis, Elisabeth; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Milne, Catherine; Daas, Arnold; Duchow, Karin

    2013-11-01

    The mouse vaccination-challenge test, which is the most widely used method for determining the potency of inactivated rabies vaccines, is imprecise, time-consuming, and causes severe distress to the test animals. An alternative single-dose serological method has been implemented in the European Pharmacopoeia Monograph 0451 to replace the mouse challenge test for batch release. This single-dose limit method provides semi-quantitative results, but is not suitable for quantifying potency. We have now extended this serological method to a multi-dose format which allows a quantification of vaccine potency. In studies including all rabies vaccine strains relevant for Europe, we found dose-dependency for all vaccines and standard preparations. We have demonstrated that the multi-dose serological approach provides reliable quantitative potency results and is more precise than the mouse vaccination-challenge test. We have shown that adjuvanted vaccines can be calibrated against non-adjuvanted material, and that reference material can be calibrated against the International Standard. The method is therefore capable of assigning potency with the additional advantage of requiring fewer animals and reducing distress. Once the applicability of the method has been further verified in a collaborative study, it can complement the single-dose assay and eventually eliminate the need for the mouse challenge test. PMID:24144483

  10. DeoxyArbutin: a novel reversible tyrosinase inhibitor with effective in vivo skin lightening potency.

    PubMed

    Boissy, Raymond E; Visscher, Marty; DeLong, Mitchell A

    2005-08-01

    Modulation of melanogenesis in the melanocytes can be achieved using chemicals that share structural homologies with the substrate tyrosine and as thus competitively inhibit the catalytic function of tyrosinase. We have developed a new tyrosinase inhibitor, deoxyArbutin (dA), based on this premise. DeoxyArbutin demonstrates effective inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase in vitro with a Ki that is 10-fold lower that hydroquinone (HQ) and 350-fold lower than arbutin. In a hairless, pigmented guinea pig model, dA demonstrated rapid and sustained skin lightening that was completely reversible within 8 weeks after halt in topical application. In contrast, HQ induced a short but unsustained skin lightening effect whereas kojic acid and arbutin exhibit no skin lightening effect. Results from a panel of safety tests supported the overall establishment of dA as an actionable molecule. In a human clinical trial, topical treatment of dA for 12 weeks resulted in a significant or slight reduction in overall skin lightness and improvement of solar lentigines in a population of light skin or dark skin individuals, respectively. These data demonstrate that dA has potential tyrosinase inhibitory activity that can result in skin lightening and may be used to ameliorate hyperpigmentary lesions. PMID:16026582

  11. Maintained cocaine self-administration is determined by quantal responses: implications for the measurement of antagonist potency.

    PubMed

    Norman, Andrew B; Tabet, Michael R; Norman, Mantana K; Tsibulsky, Vladimir L

    2014-02-01

    The change in frequency of cocaine self-administration as a function of the unit dose is widely assumed to represent a graded pharmacodynamic response. Alternatively, a pharmacological theory states that during maintained self-administration, a quantal response occurs at a minimum maintained cocaine concentration (satiety threshold). Rats self-administered cocaine at unit doses spanning an 8-fold range from 0.75 to 6 µmol/kg. Despite an approximately 7-fold difference in the interinjection intervals, there were no differences in the plasma cocaine concentration at the time of lever press across this range of unit doses, consistent with the satiety threshold representing an equiactive cocaine concentration. Because self-administration always occurs when cocaine concentrations decline back to the satiety threshold, this behavior represents a process of automatic back titration of equiactive agonist concentrations. Therefore, the lower frequency of self-administration at higher unit doses is caused by an increase in the duration of the cocaine-induced satiety response, and the graded dose-frequency relationship is due to cocaine pharmacokinetics. After the interinjection intervals at a particular unit dose were stable, rats were injected with the competitive D₁-like dopamine receptor antagonist R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH23390; 15 nmol/kg intravenously) and the session continued. At all cocaine unit doses, SCH23390 accelerated self-administration with a concomitant increase in the calculated satiety threshold, and these equiactive cocaine concentration ratios were independent of the cocaine unit dose. Therefore, the measurement of antagonist potency requires only a single unit dose of cocaine, selected on the basis of convenience, and using multiple cocaine unit doses is redundant. PMID:24307200

  12. Acylation of SC4 dodecapeptide increases bactericidal potency against Gram-positive bacteria, including drug-resistant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Nathan A; Haseman, Judith R; Tirrell, Matthew V; Mayo, Kevin H

    2004-01-01

    We have conjugated dodecyl and octadecyl fatty acids to the N-terminus of SC4, a potently bactericidal, helix-forming peptide 12-mer (KLFKRHLKWKII), and examined the bactericidal activities of the resultant SC4 'peptide-amphiphile' molecules. SC4 peptide-amphiphiles showed up to a 30-fold increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-positive strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus anthracis), including S. aureus strains resistant to conventional antibiotics, but little or no increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Fatty acid conjugation improved endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) neutralization by 3- to 6-fold. Although acylation somewhat increased lysis of human erythrocytes, it did not increase lysis of endothelial cells, and the haemolytic effects occurred at concentrations 10- to 100-fold higher than those required for bacterial cell lysis. For insight into the mechanism of action of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles, CD, NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy studies were performed in micelle and liposome models of eukaryotic and bacterial cell membranes. CD indicated that SC4 peptide-amphiphiles had the strongest helical tendencies in liposomes mimicking bacterial membranes, and strong membrane integration of the SC4 peptide-amphiphiles was observed using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy under these conditions; results that correlated with the increased bactericidal activities of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles. NMR structural analysis in micelles demonstrated that the two-thirds of the peptide closest to the fatty acid tail exhibited a helical conformation, with the positively-charged side of the amphipathic helix interacting more with the model membrane surface. These results indicate that conjugation of a fatty acid chain to the SC4 peptide enhances membrane interactions, stabilizes helical structure in the membrane-bound state and increases bactericidal potency. PMID:14609430

  13. Comparative potency approach based on H2AX assay for estimating the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Audebert, M.; Zeman, F.; Beaudoin, R.; Péry, A.; Cravedi, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) constitute a family of over one hundred compounds and can generally be found in complex mixtures. PAHs metabolites cause DNA damage which can lead to the development of carcinogenesis. Toxicity assessment of PAH complex mixtures is currently expressed in terms of toxic equivalents, based on Toxicity Equivalent Factors (TEFs). However, the definition of new TEFs for a large number of PAH could overcome some limitations of the current method and improve cancer risk assessment. The current investigation aimed at deriving the relative potency factors of PAHs, based on their genotoxic effect measured in vitro and analyzed with mathematical models. For this purpose, we used a new genotoxic assay (γH2AX) with two human cell lines (HepG2 and LS-174T) to analyze the genotoxic properties of 13 selected PAHs at low doses after 24 h treatment. The dose–response for genotoxic effects was modeled with a Hill model; equivalency between PAHs at low dose was assessed by applying constraints to the model parameters. In the two cell lines tested, we observed a clear dose–response for genotoxic effects for 11 tested compounds. LS-174T was on average ten times more sensitive than HepG2 towards PAHs regarding genotoxicity. We developed new TEFs, which we named Genotoxic Equivalent Factor (GEF). Calculated GEF for the tested PAHs were generally higher than the TEF usually used. Our study proposed a new in vitro based method for the establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment. -- Highlights: ► Examination of the genotoxic properties of 13 PAHs on two human cell lines. ► Modelization with a Hill model of the genotoxic dose–response. ► First investigation of the genotoxicity of benzo[c]fluorene on human cell lines. ► Establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment.

  14. Sources of variation in the mutagenic potency of complex chemical mixtures based on the salmonella/microsome assay

    SciTech Connect

    Krewski, D.; Leroux, B.G.; Creason, J.; Claxton, L.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty laboratories worldwide participated in a collaborative trial sponsored by the International Program on Chemical Safety on the mutagenicity of complex mixtures as expressed in the Salmonella/microsome assay. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology provided homogeneous reference samples of urban air and diesel particles and a coal tar solution to each participating laboratory, along with samples of benzo(a)pyrene and 1-nitropyrene which served as positive controls. Mutagenic potency was characterized by the slope of the initial linear component of the dose response curve. Analysis of variance revealed significant interlaboratory variation in mutagenic potency, which accounted for 57-96% of the total variance on a logarithmic scale, depending on the sample, strain and activation conditions. No significant differences were noted in the average potency reported for air and diesel particles between laboratories using soxhlet extracts and those using sonication, although there was larger interlaboratory variation for the soxhlet method.

  15. Effects of alcohols on murine preimplantation development: relationship to relative membrane disordering potency.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, C L; Stachecki, J J; Schultz, J F; Leach, R E; Armant, D R

    1996-05-01

    During in vitro culture of murine preimplantation embryos, we have observed that exposure to 0.1% ethanol induces an immediate increase in intracellular calcium levels and subsequently accelerates embryogenesis. If the observed effects of ethanol on developing embryos is mediated by its membrane disordering potency, we hypothesized that the relative membrane disordering potencies of related alcohols would correspondingly effect embryonic intracellular calcium levels and developmental rates. Two-cell embryos were exposed to 0.1% ethanol or 0.05 to 1.0% (w/v) n-butanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, 1,2-propanediol, glycerol, or methanol for 24 hr at 37 degrees C, and development to the blastocyst stage was monitored after 5 days. n-Butanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, and methanol treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition (p < 0.01) of development to the blastocyst stage, whereas 1,2-propanediol or glycerol neither accelerated nor inhibited development. In a second experiment, 8-cell morulae were treated with 1,2-propanediol or glycerol, and cavitation rates were examined. There was no significant difference from control embryos in the onset of cavitation or the blastocoel expansion rate of 1,2-propanediol- or glycerol-exposed embryos, whereas exposure to 0.1% ethanol accelerate cavitation (p > 0.05). In a third experiment, morulae were exposed to 0.1% or 1.0% of each alcohol and were monitored for changes in intracellular calcium levels using the fluorescent indicator, fluo-3-acetoxymethyl ester. There was an immediate increase in intracellular calcium levels when morulae were treated with 1.0% ethanol or n-butanol, but only ethanol induced an increase (p < 0.05) in the level of intracellular calcium at 0.1%. These data suggest that ethanol is unique in its ability to accelerate embryogenesis and that the membrane disordering potency of ethanol does not directly underlie its effects on intracellular calcium release and the acceleration of preimplantation development

  16. Comparison of in vivo genotoxic and carcinogenic potency to augment mode of action analysis: Case study with hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Bichteler, Anne; Rager, Julia E; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Recent analyses-highlighted by the International Workshops on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group on Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Toxicology Risk Assessment-have identified a correlation between (log) estimates of a carcinogen's in vivo genotoxic potency and in vivo carcinogenic potency in typical laboratory animal models, even when the underlying data have not been matched for tissue, species, or strain. Such a correlation could have important implications for risk assessment, including informing the mode of action (MOA) of specific carcinogens. When in vivo genotoxic potency is weak relative to carcinogenic potency, MOAs other than genotoxicity (e.g., endocrine disruption or regenerative hyperplasia) may be operational. Herein, we review recent in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), following oral ingestion, in relevant tissues and species in the context of the aforementioned correlation. Potency estimates were generated using benchmark doses, or no-observable-adverse-effect-levels when data were not amenable to dose-response modeling. While the ratio between log values for carcinogenic and genotoxic potency was ≥1 for many compounds, the ratios for several Cr(VI) datasets (including in target tissue) were less than unity. In fact, the ratios for Cr(VI) clustered closely with ratios for chloroform and diethanolamine, two chemicals posited to have non-genotoxic MOAs. These findings suggest that genotoxicity may not play a major role in the cancers observed in rodents following exposure to high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking water-a finding consistent with recent MOA and adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses concerning Cr(VI). This semi-quantitative analysis, therefore, may be useful to augment traditional MOA and AOP analyses. More case examples will be needed to further explore the general applicability and validity of this approach for human health risk assessment. PMID:27085472

  17. Potency testing of veterinary rabies vaccines: replacement of challenge by in vitro testing: considerations for development of alternative assays.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C E; Fry, A M; Hermann, J R; Siev, D; Dusek, D M; Gatewood, D M

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination of domestic animals against rabies creates a critical barrier between wildlife reservoirs and the human population. Ensuring these vaccines are potent and effective is paramount in preventing human exposure to this deadly and costly disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) test is, at present, the most widely used and internationally recommended potency assay for batch testing inactivated rabies vaccines. This test has numerous inherent limitations and disadvantages, including a lack of precision. The NIH test requires a large number of animals and involves unrelieved pain and suffering. A relevant in vitro assay should provide a more accurate, reproducible, rapid, safe, and humane rabies vaccine potency test. PMID:22888592

  18. Structure-guided optimization of estrogen receptor binding affinity and antagonist potency of pyrazolopyrimidines with basic side chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.; Sheng, S.; Compton, D.; Kim, Y.; Joachimiak, A.; Sharma, S.; Carlson, K.; Katzenellenbogen, B.; Nettles, K.; Greene, G.; Katzenellenbogen, J.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Chicago; The Scripps Research Inst.

    2007-01-01

    2,3-Diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines are estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists of modest potency that we have described previously. Guided by the crystal structure of an ER-ligand complex that we have obtained with one of these compounds, we prepared analogs that contain a basic side chain at the 2- or 3-aryl group and quickly found one that, according to the structure-based prediction, shows an increase in binding affinity and antagonist potency and a loss of residual agonist activity.

  19. Synthesis, protein kinase inhibitory potencies, and in vitro antiproliferative activities of meridianin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Francis; Alves, Georges; Debiton, Eric; Nauton, Lionel; Théry, Vincent; Durieu, Emilie; Ferandin, Yoan; Lozach, Olivier; Meijer, Laurent; Anizon, Fabrice; Pereira, Elisabeth; Moreau, Pascale

    2011-07-14

    The synthesis of new meridianin derivatives is described. The indolic ring system was substituted at the C-4 to C-7 positions either by a bromine atom or by nitro or amino groups. Additionally, an iodine atom or various aryl groups were introduced at the C-5 position of the 2-aminopyrimidine ring. These compounds as well as some of their synthetic intermediates were tested for their kinase inhibitory potencies and for their in vitro antiproliferative activities. We found that this series of compounds is particularly interesting in the development of new inhibitors of DYRK1A and CLK1 kinases. The most effective compounds toward these two kinase families are the 6- and 7-bromo derivatives 30, 33, and 34 that showed more than 45-fold selectivity toward DYRK1A/CLK1 kinases over the other kinases tested. Meridianin derivatives could thus be developed toward potent and selective inhibitors of key RNA splicing regulators and potential therapeutic agents. PMID:21623630

  20. Discovery and computer aided potency optimization of a novel class of small molecule CXCR4 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Vinader, Victoria; Ahmet, Djevdet S; Ahmed, Mohaned S; Patterson, Laurence H; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the chemokine signalling axes involved in cancer, chemokine CXCL12 acting on chemokine receptor CXCR4 is particularly significant since it orchestrates migration of cancer cells in a tissue-specific metastatic process. High CXCR4 tumour expression is associated with poor prognosis of lung, brain, CNS, blood and breast cancers. We have identified a new class of small molecule CXCR4 antagonists based on the use of computational modelling studies in concert with experimental determination of in vitro activity against CXCL12-induced intracellular calcium mobilisation, proliferation and chemotaxis. Molecular modelling proved to be a useful tool in rationalising our observed potencies, as well as informing the direction of the synthetic efforts aimed at producing more potent compounds. PMID:24205302

  1. Discovery and Computer Aided Potency Optimization of a Novel Class of Small Molecule CXCR4 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Vinader, Victoria; Ahmet, Djevdet S.; Ahmed, Mohaned S.; Patterson, Laurence H.; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the chemokine signalling axes involved in cancer, chemokine CXCL12 acting on chemokine receptor CXCR4 is particularly significant since it orchestrates migration of cancer cells in a tissue-specific metastatic process. High CXCR4 tumour expression is associated with poor prognosis of lung, brain, CNS, blood and breast cancers. We have identified a new class of small molecule CXCR4 antagonists based on the use of computational modelling studies in concert with experimental determination of in vitro activity against CXCL12-induced intracellular calcium mobilisation, proliferation and chemotaxis. Molecular modelling proved to be a useful tool in rationalising our observed potencies, as well as informing the direction of the synthetic efforts aimed at producing more potent compounds. PMID:24205302

  2. Potency of a thermostabilised chimpanzee adenovirus Rift Valley Fever vaccine in cattle.

    PubMed

    Dulal, Pawan; Wright, Daniel; Ashfield, Rebecca; Hill, Adrian V S; Charleston, Bryan; Warimwe, George M

    2016-04-29

    Development of safe and efficacious vaccines whose potency is unaffected by long-term storage at ambient temperature would obviate major vaccine deployment hurdles and limit wastage associated with breaks in the vaccine cold chain. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of a novel chimpanzee adenovirus vectored Rift Valley Fever vaccine (ChAdOx1-GnGc) in cattle, following its thermostabilisation by slow desiccation on glass fiber membranes in the non-reducing sugars trehalose and sucrose. Thermostabilised ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine stored for 6 months at 25, 37 or 45 ° C elicited comparable Rift Valley Fever virus neutralising antibody titres to those elicited by the 'cold chain' vaccine (stored at -80 ° C throughout) at the same dose, and these were within the range associated with protection against Rift Valley Fever in cattle. The results support the use of sugar-membrane thermostabilised vaccines in target livestock species. PMID:27020712

  3. Non-cannabinoid constituents from a high potency Cannabis sativa variety

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Mohamed M.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Slade, Desmond; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Wilson, Lisa; El-Alfy, Abir T.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    Six new non-cannabinoid constituents were isolated from a high potency Cannabis sativa L. variety, namely 5-acetoxy-6-geranyl-3-n-pentyl-1,4-benzoquinone (1), 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3,6-trimethoxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (2), 4-hydroxy-2,3,6,7-tetramethoxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3), 4,7-dimethoxy-1,2,5-trihydroxyphenanthrene (4), cannflavin C (5) and β-sitosteryl-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-2'-O-palmitate (6). In addition, five known compounds, α-cannabispiranol (7), chrysoeriol (8), 6-prenylapigenin (9), cannflavin A (10) and β-acetyl cannabispiranol (11) were identified, with 8 and 9 being reported for the first time from cannabis. Some isolates displayed weak to strong antimicrobial, antileishmanial, antimalarial and anti-oxidant activities. Compounds 2–4 were inactive as analgesics. PMID:18774146

  4. Evaluation of models for predicting the phototoxicity potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.J.; Ankley, G.T.; Sheedy, B.R.; Kosian, P.A.; Mattson, V.R.; Cox, J.S.; Defoe, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    The acute phototoxicities of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus were investigated in order to evaluate a predictive structure/activity relationship (SAR) for the phototoxic potential of PAHs and to determine the relationship of phototoxicity to PAH accumulation, light intensity, and exposure duration. Test organisms were exposed to multiple concentrations of anthracene, pyrene, fluorene, and fluoranthene in water for 96 h and then to various intensities of ultraviolet light for 96 h in clean water. In agreement with the SAR model, fluorene was not phototoxic while pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene were. Based upon measured accumulations of PAHs, anthracene and pyrene had similar potencies, and both were 3--4 fold more toxic than fluoranthene. Time-to-death was found to adhere well to a model based on damage accumulating as a function of the product of chemical accumulation and light intensity. Additivity of PAH phototoxicity was evaluated in exposures using mixtures of these chemicals.

  5. Combination strategies to enhance the potency of monocyte-derived dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fecek, Ronald J; Storkus, Walter J

    2016-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent inducers of adaptive immunity and their clinical use in cancer vaccine formulations remains an area of active translational and clinical investigation. Although cancer vaccines applied as monotherapies have had a modest history of clinical success, there is great enthusiasm for novel therapeutic strategies combining DC-based cancer vaccines with agents that 'normalize' immune function in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Broadly, these combination vaccines are designed to antagonize/remove immunosuppressive networks within the TME that serve to limit the antitumor action of vaccine-induced T cells and/or to condition the TME to facilitate the recruitment and optimal function and durability of vaccine-induced T cells. Such combination regimens are expected to dramatically enhance the clinical potency of DC-based cancer vaccine platforms. PMID:27605069

  6. Thioamide Hydroxypyrothiones Supersede Amide Hydroxypyrothiones in Potency Against Anthrax Lethal Factor

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpita; de Oliveira, César Augusto F.; Cheng, Yuhui; Jacobsen, Jennifer A.; McCammon, J. Andrew; Cohen, Seth M.

    2009-01-01

    Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of anthrax. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) of potential lethal factor inhibitors (LFi) is presented in which the zinc-binding group (ZBG), linker, and backbone moieties for a series of hydroxypyrone-based compounds were systematically varied. It was found that hydroxypyrothione ZBGs generate more potent inhibitors than hydroxypyrone ZBGs. Furthermore, coupling the hydroxypyrothione to a backbone group via a thioamide bond improves potency when compared to an amide linker. QM/MM studies show that the thioamide bond in these inhibitors allows for the formation of two additional hydrogen bonds with the protein active site. In both types of hydroxypyrothione compounds, ligand efficiencies of 0.29-0.54 kcal mol-1 per heavy atom were achieved. The results highlight the need for a better understanding to optimize the interplay between the ZBG, linker, and backbone to get improved LFi. PMID:19170530

  7. A Cusp Catastrophe Model for Team Learning, Team Potency and Team Culture.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Teresa; Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Lourenco, Paulo Renato; Dimas, Isabel; Pinheiro, Margarida

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines team learning behaviors within a nonlinear dynamical system (NDS) perspective. The present research is based on a sample of 36 project workgroups, where data were collected at two moments of their life cycle, with visual analogue scales. Using both the least squares method and maximum likelihood, it proposes a cusp catastrophe model for explaining team learning. The cusp model is superior to its linear alternatives and implements team culture as the asymmetry variable and team potency as bifurcation. The findings of cusp structure in the data support the existence of discontinuous shifts in learning behavior and furthermore a proposition that the punctuated equilibrium model (PEM) might be a reasonable model for describing group functioning, since it encompasses such sudden changes between distinct stages (attractors). A discussion on small group research is also provided by highlighting the nonlinear dynamics of team processes, along with further implications for research and practice. PMID:27550707

  8. Treatment of thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) with high-potency vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Gallo, David; Albarrán-Planelles, Cristina; Arjona-Aguilera, Cintia; Blanco-Sánchez, German; Rodríguez-Mateos, María Eugenia; Linares-Barrios, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO) or Buerger's disease is a vascular inflammatory thrombotic occlusive and segmental disease affecting distal small and medium-sized arteries of the limbs. Tobacco is the main trigger factor and avoiding it is the main treatment. Frequently, it is necessary to use high-potency vasodilators, such as iloprost, bosentan, sildenafil, or alprostadil, to relieve symptoms and reduce the risk of amputation. Iloprost is the only one that has been shown to be effective in randomized clinical trials. We report the third case of TAO treated with sildenafil and a new case treated with bosentan. This condition can be diagnosed and treated by a dermatologist. We would like to highlight the excellent clinical response despite the fact that patients continued to smoke. This finding may have important therapeutic implications because early treatment may prevent amputation and can be effective even during the process of giving up smoking. PMID:25649782

  9. Inositol 1,3,4,6-tetrakisphosphate mobilizes calcium in Xenopus oocytes with high potency.

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra, I; Gigg, R; Irvine, R F; Parker, I

    1991-01-01

    Injection of Ins(1,3,4,6)P4 into Xenopus oocytes evoked Ca2(+)-dependent membrane currents with a potency 5-10 times less than Ins(1,4,5)P3, whereas Ins(1,3,4)P3 and Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5 were almost ineffective. Responses to Ins(1,3,4,6)P4 arose through liberation of intracellular Ca2+ and through entry of extracellular Ca2+. These results, together with the observation that Ins(1,3,4,6)P4 facilitated responses to Ins(1,4,5)P3, suggests that both of these compounds may act on the same intracellular receptors. PMID:1991032

  10. Bridging the Gap Between Validation and Implementation of Non-Animal Veterinary Vaccine Potency Testing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, Samantha; Brown, Jeffrey; Currie, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary Many vaccines are tested for quality in experiments that require the use of large numbers of animals in procedures that often cause significant pain and distress. Newer technologies have fostered the development of vaccine quality control tests that reduce or eliminate the use of animals, but the availability of these newer methods has not guaranteed their acceptance by regulators or use by manufacturers. We discuss a strategic approach that has been used to assess and ultimately increase the use of non-animal vaccine quality tests in the U.S. and U.K. Abstract In recent years, technologically advanced high-throughput techniques have been developed that replace, reduce or refine animal use in vaccine quality control tests. Following validation, these tests are slowly being accepted for use by international regulatory authorities. Because regulatory acceptance itself has not guaranteed that approved humane methods are adopted by manufacturers, various organizations have sought to foster the preferential use of validated non-animal methods by interfacing with industry and regulatory authorities. After noticing this gap between regulation and uptake by industry, we began developing a paradigm that seeks to narrow the gap and quicken implementation of new replacement, refinement or reduction guidance. A systematic analysis of our experience in promoting the transparent implementation of validated non-animal vaccine potency assays has led to the refinement of our paradigmatic process, presented here, by which interested parties can assess the local regulatory acceptance of methods that reduce animal use and integrate them into quality control testing protocols, or ensure the elimination of peripheral barriers to their use, particularly for potency and other tests carried out on production batches. PMID:26486625

  11. Structural Reevaluation of Streptococcus pneumoniae Lipoteichoic Acid and New Insights into Its Immunostimulatory Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Gisch, Nicolas; Kohler, Thomas; Ulmer, Artur J.; Müthing, Johannes; Pribyl, Thomas; Fischer, Kathleen; Lindner, Buko; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Zähringer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive human pathogen with a complex lipoteichoic acid (pnLTA) structure. Because the current structural model for pnLTA shows substantial inconsistencies, we reinvestigated purified and, more importantly, O-deacylated pnLTA, which is most suitable for NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization-MS spectrometry. We analyzed pnLTA of nonencapsulated pneumococcal strains D39Δcps and TIGR4Δcps, respectively. The data obtained allowed us to (re)define (i) the position and linkage of the repeating unit, (ii) the putative α-GalpNAc substitution at the ribitiol 5-phosphate (Rib-ol-5-P), and (iii) the length of (i.e. the number of repeating units in) the pnLTA chain. We here also describe for the first time that the terminal sugar residues in the pnLTA (Forssman disaccharide; α-d-GalpNAc-(1→3)-β-d-GalpNAc-(1→)), responsible for the cross-reactivity with anti-Forssman antigen antibodies, can be heterogeneous with respect to its degree of phosphorylcholine substitution in both O-6-positions. To assess the proinflammatory potency of pnLTA, we generated a (lipopeptide-free) Δlgt mutant of strain D39Δcps, isolated its pnLTA, and showed that it is capable of inducing IL-6 release in human mononuclear cells, independent of TLR2 activation. This finding was quite in contrast to LTA of the Staphylococcus aureus SA113Δlgt mutant, which did not activate human mononuclear cells in our experiments. Remarkably, this is also contrary to various other reports showing a proinflammatory potency of S. aureus LTA. Taken together, our study refines the structure of pnLTA and indicates that pneumococcal and S. aureus LTAs differ not only in their structure but also in their bioactivity. PMID:23603911

  12. Microwave assisted synthesis and biomedical potency of salicyloyloxy and 2-methoxybenzoyloxy androstane and stigmastane derivatives.

    PubMed

    Penov Gaši, Katarina M; Djurendić, Evgenija A; Szécsi, Mihály; Gardi, János; Csanádi, János J; Klisurić, Olivera R; Dojčinović-Vujašković, Sanja V; Nikolić, Andrea R; Savić, Marina P; Ajduković, Jovana J; Oklješa, Aleksandar M; Kojić, Vesna V; Sakač, Marija N; Jovanović-Šanta, Suzana S

    2015-02-01

    A convenient microwave assisted solvent free synthesis as well as conventional synthesis of salicyloyloxy and 2-methoxybenzoyloxy androstane and stigmastane derivatives 7-19 from appropriate steroidal precursors 1-6 and methyl salicylate is reported. The microwave assisted synthesis in most cases was more successful regarding reaction time and product yields. It was more environmentally friendly too, compared to the conventional method. The antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity of the synthesized derivatives were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests, as well as their inhibition potency exerted on hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (Δ(5)-3βHSD, 17βHSD2 and 17βHSD3). All of the tested compounds were effective in OH radical neutralization, particularly compounds 9, 11 and 14, which exhibited about 100-fold stronger activity than commercial antioxidants BHT and BHA. In DPPH radical scavenging new compounds were effective, but less than reference compounds. 2-Methoxybenzoyl ester 10 exhibited strong cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 cells. Most compounds inhibited growth of PC-3 cells, where salicyloyloxy stigmastane derivative 15 showed the best inhibition potency. Compounds 9, 10 and 11 were the best inhibitors of 17βHSD2 enzyme. X-ray structure analysis and molecular mechanics calculations (MMC) were performed for the best cytotoxic agents, compounds 10 and 15. A comparison of crystal and MMC structures of compounds 10 and 15 revealed that their molecules conformations are stable even after releasing of the influence of crystalline field and that the influence of crystal packing on molecular conformation is not predominant. PMID:25541058

  13. (/sup 125/I)diiodoinsulins. Binding affinities, biologic potencies, and properties of their decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Maceda, B.; Linde, S.; Sonne, O.; Gliemann, J.

    1982-07-01

    Insulin was iodinated with 0.3-0.4 mol /sup 125/I/mol insulin using the lactoperoxidase method. About one-third of the radioactivity incorporated into insulin was in diiodoinsulins and about 40% of these molecules contained diiodotyrosine in residue 14 of the A chain. Most of the remaining molecules contained one A14-monoiodotyrosine and one monoiodotyrosine in either position A19, B16, or B26. The binding affinity and biologic potency of this heterogeneous diiodoinsulin preparation was not significantly different from that of A14-(/sup 125/I)monoiodoinsulin in rat adipocytes, whereas it was slightly reduced in hepatocytes and IM-9 lymphocytes. From the iodine distribution and previous data on the binding affinity of each of the four monoiodoinsulin isomers it was calculated that A14-diiodotyrosine-insulin possesses full binding affinity and biologic potency in adipocytes. Diiodoinsulins isolated from another iodoinsulin preparation (iodate method) contained 58% A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin, and most remaining molecules contained one A19-monoiodotyrosine. The binding affinity of this mixed diiodoinsulin preparation was approximately one-fourth of that of A14-monoiodoinsulin in adipocytes, IM-9 lymphocytes, and hepatocytes. It was calculated that A19-diiodotyrosine-insulin is nearly devoid of binding affinity. The diiodoinsulins (lactoperoxidase method) decayed to iodide (probably from diiodotyrosine-insulin) or to polymers with little specific but a markedly increased nonspecific binding. In addition, the polymers had a marked tendency to adsorb to cellulose acetate filters. Conclusions: 1. The binding affinities of diiodoinsulins range from very low values to values at least as high as that of insulin depending on the positions of the iodine moieties. 2. The relative binding affinities vary among tissues. 3. Polymeric decay products give high nonspecific binding.

  14. Chronological supplement to the Carcinogenic Potency Database: standardized results of animal bioassays published through December 1982.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, L S; de Veciana, M; Backman, G M; Magaw, R; Lopipero, P; Smith, M; Blumenthal, M; Levinson, R; Bernstein, L; Ames, B N

    1986-01-01

    This paper is a chronological supplement to our earlier publication, "A Carcinogenic Potency Database of the Standardized Results of Animal Bioassays.¿ We report here results of carcinogenesis bioassays published in Technical Reports of the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program between July 1980 and December 1982, and the general literature between July 1981 and December 1982. This supplement includes results of 280 long-term, chronic experiments of 114 test compounds, and reports the same information about each experiment in the same plot format as the earlier paper: e.g., the species and strain of test animal, the route and duration of compound administration, dose level and other aspects of experimental protocol, histopathology and tumor incidence, TD50 and its statistical significance, dose response, author's opinion about carcinogenicity, and literature reference. While a number of appendices are provided to facilitate use of this supplement, we have not duplicated here the material published earlier. Instead, we refer the reader to the earlier publications (Peto et al. and Gold et al.) for a thorough description of the numerical index of carcinogenic potency (TD50), a guide to the plot of the database, and a discussion of the sources of data, the rationale for the inclusion of particular experiments and particular target sites, and the conventions adopted in summarizing the literature. For 44 of the 114 chemicals reported in this second plot, results of earlier experiments are also given in the first plot; since only 1981-1982 results are reported here, the first plot is required for these repeated compounds. In this paper we also give corrections for errors that appeared in the earlier publication. PMID:3530736

  15. Carbon nanotubes' surface chemistry determines their potency as vaccine nanocarriers in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hatem A.F.M.; Smyth, Lesley; Rubio, Noelia; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Wang, Julie T.-W.; Bansal, Sukhvinder S.; Summers, Huw D.; Diebold, Sandra S.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown marked capabilities in enhancing antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells. However, proper understanding of how altering the physical properties of CNTs may influence antigen uptake by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), has not been established yet. We hypothesized that altering the physical properties of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs)-antigen conjugates, e.g. length and surface charge, can affect the internalization of MWNT-antigen by DCs, hence the induced immune response potency. For this purpose, pristine MWNTs (p-MWNTs) were exposed to various chemical reactions to modify their physical properties then conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA), a model antigen. The yielded MWNTs-OVA conjugates were long MWNT-OVA (~ 386 nm), bearing net positive charge (5.8 mV), or short MWNTs-OVA (~ 122 nm) of increasing negative charges (− 23.4, − 35.8 or − 39 mV). Compared to the short MWNTs-OVA bearing high negative charges, short MWNT-OVA with the lowest negative charge demonstrated better cellular uptake and OVA-specific immune response both in vitro and in vivo. However, long positively-charged MWNT-OVA showed limited cellular uptake and OVA specific immune response in contrast to short MWNT-OVA displaying the least negative charge. We suggest that reduction in charge negativity of MWNT-antigen conjugate enhances cellular uptake and thus the elicited immune response intensity. Nevertheless, length of MWNT-antigen conjugate might also affect the cellular uptake and immune response potency; highlighting the importance of physical properties as a consideration in designing a MWNT-based vaccine delivery system. PMID:26802552

  16. Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Jenny; Vare, Daniel; Motwani, Hitesh V; Jenssen, Dag; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration-time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration×cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at a rate of 0.08±0.01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study. PMID:27402481

  17. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities. PMID:26627251

  18. Reassessment of MTBE cancer potency considering modes of action for MTBE and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T; Heilman, Jacqueline M

    2015-01-01

    A 1999 California state agency cancer potency (CP) evaluation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) assumed linear risk extrapolations from tumor data were plausible because of limited evidence that MTBE or its metabolites could damage DNA, and based such extrapolations on data from rat gavage and rat and mouse inhalation studies indicating elevated tumor rates in male rat kidney, male rat Leydig interstitial cells, and female rat leukemia/lymphomas. More recent data bearing on MTBE cancer potency include a rodent cancer bioassay of MTBE in drinking water; several new studies of MTBE genotoxicity; several similar evaluations of MTBE metabolites, formaldehyde, and tert-butyl alcohol or TBA; and updated evaluations of carcinogenic mode(s) of action (MOAs) of MTBE and MTBE metabolite's. The lymphoma/leukemia data used in the California assessment were recently declared unreliable by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Updated characterizations of MTBE CP, and its uncertainty, are currently needed to address a variety of decision goals concerning historical and current MTBE contamination. To this end, an extensive review of data sets bearing on MTBE and metabolite genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and tumorigenicity was applied to reassess MTBE CP and related uncertainty in view of MOA considerations. Adopting the traditional approach that cytotoxicity-driven cancer MOAs are inoperative at very low, non-cytotoxic dose levels, it was determined that MTBE most likely does not increase cancer risk unless chronic exposures induce target-tissue toxicity, including in sensitive individuals. However, the corresponding expected (or plausible upper bound) CP for MTBE conditional on a hypothetical linear (e.g., genotoxic) MOA was estimated to be ∼2 × 10(-5) (or 0.003) per mg MTBE per kg body weight per day for adults exposed chronically over a lifetime. Based on this conservative estimate of CP, if MTBE is carcinogenic to humans, it is among the weakest 10% of chemical

  19. Searching for Drug Synergy in Complex Dose–Response Landscapes Using an Interaction Potency Model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhagwan; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of multi-targeted drug combinations is a promising strategy to tackle the drug resistance problem for many complex disorders. A drug combination is usually classified as synergistic or antagonistic, depending on the deviation of the observed combination response from the expected effect calculated based on a reference model of non-interaction. The existing reference models were proposed originally for low-throughput drug combination experiments, which make the model assumptions often incompatible with the complex drug interaction patterns across various dose pairs that are typically observed in large-scale dose–response matrix experiments. To address these limitations, we proposed a novel reference model, named zero interaction potency (ZIP), which captures the drug interaction relationships by comparing the change in the potency of the dose–response curves between individual drugs and their combinations. We utilized a delta score to quantify the deviation from the expectation of zero interaction, and proved that a delta score value of zero implies both probabilistic independence and dose additivity. Using data from a large-scale anticancer drug combination experiment, we demonstrated empirically how the ZIP scoring approach captures the experimentally confirmed drug synergy while keeping the false positive rate at a low level. Further, rather than relying on a single parameter to assess drug interaction, we proposed the use of an interaction landscape over the full dose–response matrix to identify and quantify synergistic and antagonistic dose regions. The interaction landscape offers an increased power to differentiate between various classes of drug combinations, and may therefore provide an improved means for understanding their mechanisms of action toward clinical translation. PMID:26949479

  20. Studies with bioengineered Nisin peptides highlight the broad-spectrum potency of Nisin V.

    PubMed

    Field, Des; Quigley, Lisa; O'Connor, Paula M; Rea, Mary C; Daly, Karen; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2010-07-01

    Nisin A is the most thoroughly investigated member of the lantibiotic family of antimicrobial peptides. In addition to a long history of safe use as a food antimicrobial, its activity against multi-drug resistant pathogens has resulted in a renewed interest in applying nisin as a chemotherapeutic to treat bacterial infections. The wealth of Nisin-related information that has been generated has also led to the development of the biotechnological capacity to engineer novel Nisin variants with a view to improving the function and physicochemical properties of this already potent peptide. However, the identification of bioengineered Nisin derivatives with enhanced antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive targets is a recent event. In this study, we created stable producers of the most promising derivatives of Nisin A generated to date [M21V (hereafter Nisin V) and K22T (hereafter Nisin T)] and assessed their potency against a range of drug-resistant clinical, veterinary and food pathogens. Nisin T exhibited increased activity against all veterinary isolates, including streptococci and staphylococci, and against a number of multi-drug resistant clinical isolates including MRSA, but not vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In contrast, Nisin V displayed increased potency against all targets tested including hVISA strains and the hyper-virulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 and against important food pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus. Significantly, this enhanced activity was validated in a model food system against L. monocytogenes. We conclude that Nisin V possesses significant potential as a novel preservative or chemotherapeutic compound. PMID:21255345

  1. Studies with bioengineered Nisin peptides highlight the broad‐spectrum potency of Nisin V

    PubMed Central

    Field, Des; Quigley, Lisa; O'Connor, Paula M.; Rea, Mary C.; Daly, Karen; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Nisin A is the most thoroughly investigated member of the lantibiotic family of antimicrobial peptides. In addition to a long history of safe use as a food antimicrobial, its activity against multi‐drug resistant pathogens has resulted in a renewed interest in applying nisin as a chemotherapeutic to treat bacterial infections. The wealth of Nisin‐related information that has been generated has also led to the development of the biotechnological capacity to engineer novel Nisin variants with a view to improving the function and physicochemical properties of this already potent peptide. However, the identification of bioengineered Nisin derivatives with enhanced antimicrobial activity against Gram‐positive targets is a recent event. In this study, we created stable producers of the most promising derivatives of Nisin A generated to date [M21V (hereafter Nisin V) and K22T (hereafter Nisin T)] and assessed their potency against a range of drug‐resistant clinical, veterinary and food pathogens. Nisin T exhibited increased activity against all veterinary isolates, including streptococci and staphylococci, and against a number of multi‐drug resistant clinical isolates including MRSA, but not vancomycin‐resistant enterococci. In contrast, Nisin V displayed increased potency against all targets tested including hVISA strains and the hyper‐virulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 and against important food pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus. Significantly, this enhanced activity was validated in a model food system against L. monocytogenes. We conclude that Nisin V possesses significant potential as a novel preservative or chemotherapeutic compound. PMID:21255345

  2. Analysis of cannabis seizures in NSW, Australia: cannabis potency and cannabinoid profile.

    PubMed

    Swift, Wendy; Wong, Alex; Li, Kong M; Arnold, Jonathon C; McGregor, Iain S

    2013-01-01

    Recent analysis of the cannabinoid content of cannabis plants suggests a shift towards use of high potency plant material with high levels of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and low levels of other phytocannabinoids, particularly cannabidiol (CBD). Use of this type of cannabis is thought by some to predispose to greater adverse outcomes on mental health and fewer therapeutic benefits. Australia has one of the highest per capita rates of cannabis use in the world yet there has been no previous systematic analysis of the cannabis being used. In the present study we examined the cannabinoid content of 206 cannabis samples that had been confiscated by police from recreational users holding 15 g of cannabis or less, under the New South Wales "Cannabis Cautioning" scheme. A further 26 "Known Provenance" samples were analysed that had been seized by police from larger indoor or outdoor cultivation sites rather than from street level users. An HPLC method was used to determine the content of 9 cannabinoids: THC, CBD, cannabigerol (CBG), and their plant-based carboxylic acid precursors THC-A, CBD-A and CBG-A, as well as cannabichromene (CBC), cannabinol (CBN) and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THC-V). The "Cannabis Cautioning" samples showed high mean THC content (THC+THC-A = 14.88%) and low mean CBD content (CBD+CBD-A = 0.14%). A modest level of CBG was detected (CBG+CBG-A = 1.18%) and very low levels of CBC, CBN and THC-V (<0.1%). "Known Provenance" samples showed no significant differences in THC content between those seized from indoor versus outdoor cultivation sites. The present analysis echoes trends reported in other countries towards the use of high potency cannabis with very low CBD content. The implications for public health outcomes and harm reduction strategies are discussed. PMID:23894589

  3. Analysis of Cannabis Seizures in NSW, Australia: Cannabis Potency and Cannabinoid Profile

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kong M.; Arnold, Jonathon C.; McGregor, Iain S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent analysis of the cannabinoid content of cannabis plants suggests a shift towards use of high potency plant material with high levels of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and low levels of other phytocannabinoids, particularly cannabidiol (CBD). Use of this type of cannabis is thought by some to predispose to greater adverse outcomes on mental health and fewer therapeutic benefits. Australia has one of the highest per capita rates of cannabis use in the world yet there has been no previous systematic analysis of the cannabis being used. In the present study we examined the cannabinoid content of 206 cannabis samples that had been confiscated by police from recreational users holding 15 g of cannabis or less, under the New South Wales “Cannabis Cautioning” scheme. A further 26 “Known Provenance” samples were analysed that had been seized by police from larger indoor or outdoor cultivation sites rather than from street level users. An HPLC method was used to determine the content of 9 cannabinoids: THC, CBD, cannabigerol (CBG), and their plant-based carboxylic acid precursors THC-A, CBD-A and CBG-A, as well as cannabichromene (CBC), cannabinol (CBN) and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THC-V). The “Cannabis Cautioning” samples showed high mean THC content (THC+THC-A = 14.88%) and low mean CBD content (CBD+CBD-A = 0.14%). A modest level of CBG was detected (CBG+CBG-A = 1.18%) and very low levels of CBC, CBN and THC-V (<0.1%). “Known Provenance” samples showed no significant differences in THC content between those seized from indoor versus outdoor cultivation sites. The present analysis echoes trends reported in other countries towards the use of high potency cannabis with very low CBD content. The implications for public health outcomes and harm reduction strategies are discussed. PMID:23894589

  4. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T.; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities. PMID:26627251

  5. Cross-species comparison of relative potencies and relative sensitivities of fishes to dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls in vitro.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Bryanna K; Doering, Jon A; Beitel, Shawn C; Wiseman, Steve; Raine, Jason C; Hecker, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Dioxin-like compounds of varying toxicities are found in complex mixtures. The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach was developed based on the potency of a dioxin-like compound relative to the potency of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to streamline risk assessment. One limitation of the TEF approach is uncertainty regarding differences in the relative potency of dioxin-like compounds among different species. Relative potencies among fishes are limited, relative to relative potencies among birds and mammals, and TEFs for fishes are based entirely on the model species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). An in vitro liver explant assay was used to characterize species-specific responses with regard to up-regulation of CYP1A transcript after exposure to 6 dioxin-like compounds in rainbow trout, white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), and northern pike (Esox lucius). Differences in sensitivities were observed among species after exposure to dioxin-like compounds. The relative potencies developed from liver explants of rainbow trout were comparable to relative potencies developed from embryo toxicity assays. Differences in relative potencies between species with the least and greatest relative potencies were up to 40-fold. To compare relative potencies among species, concentrations of dioxin-like compounds in fish eggs in the Fraser River and in Lake Ontario were used to calculate toxic equivalency quotients (TEQs) determined from TEFs or TCDD equivalents determined from relative potencies. The TEQs underestimated TCDD equivalents for white sturgeon, lake sturgeon, and northern pike, indicating uncertainty in application of TEFs to diverse fishes. PMID:26202062

  6. Potency of SMP-601, a Novel Carbapenem, in Hematogenous Murine Bronchopneumonia Caused by Methicillin-Resistant and Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Rie; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Araki, Nobuko; Nakamura, Shigeki; Seki, Masafumi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Tsukamoto, Kazuhiro; Kamihira, Shimeru; Kohno, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    We compared the potency of SMP-601, a novel carbapenem, with that of vancomycin in a murine model of hematogenous bronchopneumonia infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA). The MICs of SMP-601 and vancomycin against MRSA were 2 and 1 μg/ml, respectively, while those against VISA were 2 and 8 μg/ml, respectively. Treatment with SMP-601 resulted in a significant decrease in the number of viable bacteria in the MRSA infection model (control, 100 mg/kg vancomycin, and 100 mg/kg SMP-601, 8.42 ± 0.50, 5.29 ± 0.71, and 5.50 ± 0.58 log CFU/lung, respectively,) and in the VISA infection model (control, 100 mg/kg vancomycin, and 100 mg/kg SMP-601, 9.64 ± 0.63, 8.72 ± 0.45, 7.42 ± 0.14 log CFU/lung) (mean ± standard error of the mean). The survival rate in the VISA infection model treated with SMP-601 (70%) was significantly higher than those in the other two groups (20% for vancomycin and 0% for control; P < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that inflammatory changes in the SMP-601-treated group were less marked than in the other two groups. The results of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis supported the results of the bacteriological, histopathological and survival studies. Our results demonstrate the potency of SMP-601 against MRSA and VISA in murine hematogenous pulmonary infection. PMID:18391033

  7. A novel variable antibody fragment dimerized by leucine zippers with enhanced neutralizing potency against rabies virus G protein compared to its corresponding single-chain variable antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuang; Cheng, Yue; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2015-12-01

    Fatal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragments (scFv), which are composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and a variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, can potentially be used to replace RIG. However, in our previous study, a scFv (scFV57S) specific for the rabies virus (RV) G protein showed a lower neutralizing potency than that of its parent IgG due to lower stability and altered peptide assembly pattern. In monoclonal antibodies, the VH and VL interact non-covalently, while in scFvs the VH is connected covalently with the VL by the artificial linker. In this study, we constructed and expressed two peptides 57VL-JUN-HIS and 57VH-FOS-HA in Escherichia coli. The well-known Fos and Jun leucine zippers were utilized to dimerize VH and VL similarly to the IgG counterpart. The two peptides assembled to form zipFv57S in vitro. Due to the greater similarity in structure with IgG, the zipFv57S protein showed a higher binding ability and affinity resulting in notable improvement of in vitro neutralizing activity over its corresponding scFv. The zipFv57S protein was also found to be more stable and showed similar protective rate as RIG in mice challenged with a lethal dose of RV. Our results not only indicated zipFv57S as an ideal alternative for RIG in PEP but also offered a novel and efficient hetero-dimerization pattern of VH and VL leading to enhanced neutralizing potency. PMID:26325475

  8. Influence of particle size on the in vivo potency of lipid nanoparticle formulations of siRNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sam; Tam, Yuen Yi C; Lin, Paulo J C; Sung, Molly M H; Tam, Ying K; Cullis, Pieter R

    2016-08-10

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNP) can provide a clinically effective method for delivering small interfering RNA (siRNA) to silence pathological genes in hepatocytes. The gene silencing potency of these LNP-siRNA systems has been shown to depend on a variety of factors including association with serum factors such as ApoE and the pKa of component ionizable lipids. Here we investigate the influence of LNP size, an important parameter affecting tissue penetration of LNP systems, on the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and hepatic gene silencing potency of LNP-siRNA systems following intravenous administration. For LNP systems stabilized by a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid that can dissociate from the LNP following injection, it is shown that small (diameter≤30nm) systems are considerably less potent than their larger counterparts. This is attributed in part to the ability of other lipid components, particularly the ionizable amino-lipid, to dissociate from the LNP following dissociation of the PEG-lipid. Small LNP stabilized by PEG-lipids with slow dissociation rates exhibited much reduced amino-lipid dissociation rates, however such systems are relatively impotent due to the continued presence of the PEG coating. These results demonstrate the delicate balance between the in vivo potency of LNP-siRNA systems and the residence times of component lipids in the LNP particle itself and suggest new directions to optimize the in vivo gene silencing potency of small LNP-siRNA systems. PMID:27238441

  9. Expansion of the in vitro assay for Leptospira potency testing to other Serovars: Case study with Leptospira hardjo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Code for Federal Regulations (9 CFR 113:101-104) specifies how vaccine potency is evaluated in a hamster model for evaluation of leptospiral vaccines against pomona, icterohaemorrhagiae, canicola, and grippotyphosa serotypes of Leptospira interrogans. There are several issues which complicate th...

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF SERUM BINDING PROTEINS AND CLEARANCE ON THE COMPARATIVE RECEPTOR BINDING POTENCY OF ENDOCRINE ACTIVE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF SERUM BINDING PROTEINS AND CLEARANCE ON THE COMPARATIVE RECEPTOR BINDING POTENCY OF ENDOCRINE ACTIVE COMPOUNDS. JG Teeguarden1 and HA Barton2. 1ENVIRON International, Ruston LA; 2US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Pharmacokinetics Branch, RTP, NC.

    One measure of th...

  11. CYTOTOXICITY AND CELL SIGNALING IN MH-S CELLS: RELATIVE POTENCY OF DIESEL AND COAL COMBUSTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxicity and Cell Signaling in MH-S Cells: Relative Potency of Diesel and Coal Combustion Particles P. Singh1, Y. Kostetski2, M. Daniels1, T. Stevens3 and MI Gilmour 1USEPA, RTP, NC, 2National University of Singapore, Singapore, 3University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC<...

  12. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  13. RELATIVE POTENCY OF MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Mold has been associated with the exacerbation of allergic asthma. However, its role in induction of allergic asthma is not clear. Using a previously developed mouse model for allergic asthma, we compared potencies of two fungal extracts (Metarhizium anisop...

  14. Collaborative studies on the development of national reference standards for potency determination of H7N9 influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changgui; Xu, Kangwei; Hashem, Anwar; Shao, Ming; Liu, Shuzhen; Zou, Yong; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Yongchao; Yuan, Liyong; Xu, Miao; Li, Xuguang; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of human infections of a novel avian influenza virus A (H7N9) prompted the development of the vaccines against this virus. Like all types of influenza vaccines, H7N9 vaccine must be tested for its potency prior to being used in humans. However, the unavailability of international reference reagents for the potency determination of H7N9 vaccines substantially hinders the progress in vaccine development. To facilitate clinical development, we enlisted 5 participants in a collaborative study to develop critical reagents used in Single Radial Immunodiffusion (SRID), the currently acceptable assay for potency determination of influenza vaccine. Specifically, the hemagglutinin (HA) content of one vaccine bulk for influenza A (H7N9), herein designated as Primary Liquid Standard (PLS), was determined by SDS-PAGE. In addition, the freeze-dried antigen references derived from PLS were prepared to enhance the stability for long term storage. The final HA content of lyophilized antigen references were calibrated against PLS by SRID assay in a collaborative study. Importantly, application of these national reference standards to potency analyses greatly facilitated the development of H7N9 vaccines in China. PMID:25970793

  15. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in vitro and irritation potency in vivo of two red phosphorus-based pyrotechnic smokes.

    PubMed

    Hemmilä, Matti; Hihkiö, Maija; Kasanen, Jukka-Pekka; Turunen, Mari; Järvelä, Merja; Suhonen, Satu; Pasanen, Anna-Liisa; Norppa, Hannu

    2010-08-30

    Two red phosphorus (RP)-based smokes (P60 and RPB), differing from each other mainly in RP content and in type of additive, were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity (cell viability by the trypan-blue exclusion method) and genotoxicity (comet assay) by exposing BEAS 2B human bronchial epithelial cells to the smokes in a laboratory-scale chamber for 5 min. The irritation potency of RPB smoke was studied in mice. A hexachloroethane-based smoke (HC/Zn/TNT) was used as a reference in the studies. A 5-min exposure of BEAS 2B cells to P60 smoke (1.1, 2.2 and 4.4 g/m(3), measured as H(3)PO(4)) did not induce any cytotoxic effects, while RPB smoke (1.3, 2.6 and 5.1g/m(3), measured as H(3)PO(4)) caused a mild decrease in cell viability at higher concentrations, without a clear dose-dependent effect. Neither of the RP smokes showed a genotoxic response in the comet assay with BEAS 2B cells, while HC/Zn/TNT was clearly genotoxic (0.9-3.5 g/m(3) as ZnCl(2)). In the mouse bioassay, head-only exposure to RPB smoke (20-450 mg/m(3) for 30 min as a single exposure, or 65-90 and 25-110 mg/m(3) - measured as H(3)PO(4) - for 30 min/day during 5 days) caused a concentration-dependent sensory irritation, which was evident as a decrease in respiratory rate and an increase in time-of-pause after inspiration, in a similar manner as with HC/Zn/TNT smoke. The concentration that caused a 50% decrease in respiratory frequency (RD(max)50) was calculated to be 1140 mg/m(3) for the RPB smoke and 145 mg/m(3) for the HC/Zn/TNT smoke. No pulmonary irritation was observed. PMID:20601099

  16. Verification of Potency of Aerial Digital Oblique Cameras for Aerial Photogrammetry in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Ryuji; Takigawa, Masanori; Ohga, Tomowo; Fujii, Noritsuna

    2016-06-01

    Digital oblique aerial camera (hereinafter called "oblique cameras") is an assembly of medium format digital cameras capable of shooting digital aerial photographs in five directions i.e. nadir view and oblique views (forward and backward, left and right views) simultaneously and it is used for shooting digital aerial photographs efficiently for generating 3D models in a wide area. For aerial photogrammetry of public survey in Japan, it is required to use large format cameras, like DMC and UltraCam series, to ensure aerial photogrammetric accuracy. Although oblique cameras are intended to generate 3D models, digital aerial photographs in 5 directions taken with them should not be limited to 3D model production but they may also be allowed for digital mapping and photomaps of required public survey accuracy in Japan. In order to verify the potency of using oblique cameras for aerial photogrammetry (simultaneous adjustment, digital mapping and photomaps), (1) a viewer was developed to interpret digital aerial photographs taken with oblique cameras, (2) digital aerial photographs were shot with an oblique camera owned by us, a Penta DigiCAM of IGI mbH, and (3) accuracy of 3D measurements was verified.

  17. Expression, immunogenicity, histopathology, and potency of a mosquito-based malaria transmission-blocking recombinant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mathias, D K; Plieskatt, J L; Armistead, J S; Bethony, J M; Abdul-Majid, K B; McMillan, A; Angov, E; Aryee, M J; Zhan, B; Gillespie, P; Keegan, B; Jariwala, A R; Rezende, W; Bottazzi, M E; Scorpio, D G; Hotez, P J; Dinglasan, R R

    2012-04-01

    Vaccines have been at the forefront of global research efforts to combat malaria, yet despite several vaccine candidates, this goal has yet to be realized. A potentially effective approach to disrupting the spread of malaria is the use of transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV), which prevent the development of malarial parasites within their mosquito vector, thereby abrogating the cascade of secondary infections in humans. Since malaria is transmitted to human hosts by the bite of an obligate insect vector, mosquito species in the genus Anopheles, targeting mosquito midgut antigens that serve as ligands for Plasmodium parasites represents a promising approach to breaking the transmission cycle. The midgut-specific anopheline alanyl aminopeptidase N (AnAPN1) is highly conserved across Anopheles vectors and is a putative ligand for Plasmodium ookinete invasion. We have developed a scalable, high-yield Escherichia coli expression and purification platform for the recombinant AnAPN1 TBV antigen and report on its marked vaccine potency and immunogenicity, its capacity for eliciting transmission-blocking antibodies, and its apparent lack of immunization-associated histopathologies in a small-animal model. PMID:22311924

  18. Human mesenchymal stromal cells: identifying assays to predict potency for therapeutic selection.

    PubMed

    Deskins, Desirae L; Bastakoty, Dikshya; Saraswati, Sarika; Shinar, Andrew; Holt, Ginger E; Young, Pampee P

    2013-02-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to repair and regenerate damaged tissues, making them attractive candidates for cell-based therapies. To maximize efficacy of MSCs, prediction of their therapeutic abilities must be made so that only the best cells will be used. Our goal was to identify feasible and reproducible in vitro assays to predict MSC potency. We generated cell lines from 10 normal human bone marrow samples and used the International Society for Cellular Therapy's minimal criteria to define them as MSCs: plastic adherence, appropriate surface marker expression, and trilineage differentiation. Each MSC line was further characterized by its growth, proliferation, and viability as determined by cell count, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and cellular ATP levels, respectively. To determine whether these tests reliably predict the therapeutic aptitude of the MSCs, several lines were implanted in vivo to examine their capacity to engraft and form granulation tissue in a well-established murine wound model using polyvinyl alcohol sponges. Long-term engraftment of MSCs in the sponges was quantified through the presence of the human-specific Alu gene in sponge sections. Sections were also stained for proliferating cells, vascularity, and granulation tissue formation to determine successful engraftment and repair. We found that high performance in a combination of the in vitro tests accurately predicted which lines functioned well in vivo. These findings suggest that reliable and reproducible in vitro assays may be used to measure the functional potential of MSCs for therapeutic use. PMID:23362238

  19. Enhanced Delivery and Potency of Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines by Electroporation in Situ.

    PubMed

    Cu, Yen; Broderick, Kate E; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Hickman, Julie; Otten, Gillis; Barnett, Susan; Kichaev, Gleb; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines such as viral vectors, plasmid DNA (pDNA), and mRNA are being developed as a means to address limitations of both live-attenuated and subunit vaccines. DNA vaccines have been shown to be potent in a wide variety of animal species and several products are now licensed for commercial veterinary but not human use. Electroporation delivery technologies have been shown to improve the generation of T and B cell responses from synthetic DNA vaccines in many animal species and now in humans. However, parallel RNA approaches have lagged due to potential issues of potency and production. Many of the obstacles to mRNA vaccine development have recently been addressed, resulting in a revival in the use of non-amplifying and self-amplifying mRNA for vaccine and gene therapy applications. In this paper, we explore the utility of EP for the in vivo delivery of large, self-amplifying mRNA, as measured by reporter gene expression and immunogenicity of genes encoding HIV envelope protein. These studies demonstrated that EP delivery of self-amplifying mRNA elicited strong and broad immune responses in mice, which were comparable to those induced by EP delivery of pDNA. PMID:26344119

  20. Enhanced Delivery and Potency of Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines by Electroporation in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Cu, Yen; Broderick, Kate E.; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Hickman, Julie; Otten, Gillis; Barnett, Susan; Kichaev, Gleb; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Geall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines such as viral vectors, plasmid DNA (pDNA), and mRNA are being developed as a means to address limitations of both live-attenuated and subunit vaccines. DNA vaccines have been shown to be potent in a wide variety of animal species and several products are now licensed for commercial veterinary but not human use. Electroporation delivery technologies have been shown to improve the generation of T and B cell responses from synthetic DNA vaccines in many animal species and now in humans. However, parallel RNA approaches have lagged due to potential issues of potency and production. Many of the obstacles to mRNA vaccine development have recently been addressed, resulting in a revival in the use of non-amplifying and self-amplifying mRNA for vaccine and gene therapy applications. In this paper, we explore the utility of EP for the in vivo delivery of large, self-amplifying mRNA, as measured by reporter gene expression and immunogenicity of genes encoding HIV envelope protein. These studies demonstrated that EP delivery of self-amplifying mRNA elicited strong and broad immune responses in mice, which were comparable to those induced by EP delivery of pDNA. PMID:26344119

  1. Embryonic Stem Cell Culture Conditions Support Distinct States Associated with Different Developmental Stages and Potency.

    PubMed

    Martin Gonzalez, Javier; Morgani, Sophie M; Bone, Robert A; Bonderup, Kasper; Abelchian, Sahar; Brakebusch, Cord; Brickman, Joshua M

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are cell lines derived from the mammalian pre-implantation embryo. Here we assess the impact of derivation and culture conditions on both functional potency and ESC transcriptional identity. Individual ESCs cultured in either two small-molecule inhibitors (2i) or with knockout serum replacement (KOSR), but not serum, can generate high-level chimeras regardless of how these cells were derived. ESCs cultured in these conditions showed a transcriptional correlation with early pre-implantation embryos (E1.5-E3.5) and contributed to development from the 2-cell stage. Conversely, the transcriptome of serum-cultured ESCs correlated with later stages of development (E4.5), at which point embryonic cells are more restricted in their developmental potential. Thus, ESC culture systems are not equivalent, but support cell types that resemble distinct developmental stages. Cells derived in one condition can be reprogrammed to another developmental state merely by adaptation to another culture condition. PMID:27509134

  2. Composition and Potency Characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Purified Protein Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Capsel, Randal T; Thoen, Charles O; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Lippolis, John D; Olsen, Renee; Stabel, Judith R; Bannantine, John P

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37°C, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtration, and protein precipitation. Three traditional production PPDs were used in this study including lot 9801, which served as a reference and has been used in the field for decades. Alternative production PPDs (0902A and 0902B), in which the autoclaving step was removed, were also analyzed in this study. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed protein smearing in traditional PPDs, but distinct bands were observed in the alternative PPD preparations. Antibody bound distinct protein bands in the alternative PPDs by immunoblot analysis, whereas an immunoreactive smear was observed with the traditional PPDs. Mass spectrometry identified 194 proteins among three PPD lots representing the two different production methods, ten of which were present in all PPDs examined. Selected proteins identified by mass spectrometry were recombinantly expressed and purified from E. coli and evaluated by the guinea pig potency test. Seven recombinant proteins showed greater erythema as compared to the reference PPD lot 9801 in paired guinea pigs and were able to stimulate interferon-gamma production in blood from Johne's positive animals. These results suggest that autoclaving culture suspensions is not a necessary step in PPD production and specific proteins could supplant the PPD antigen for intradermal skin testing procedures and for use as in-vitro assay reagents. PMID:27136199

  3. Structural determinants of resveratrol for cell proliferation inhibition potency: experimental and docking studies of new analogs.

    PubMed

    Mazué, Frédéric; Colin, Didier; Gobbo, Jessica; Wegner, Maria; Rescifina, Antonio; Spatafora, Carmela; Fasseur, Dominique; Delmas, Dominique; Meunier, Philippe; Tringali, Corrado; Latruffe, Norbert

    2010-07-01

    Resveratrol is the subject of intense research because of the abundance of this compound in the human diet and as one of the most valuable natural chemopreventive agents. Further advances require new resveratrol analogs be used to identify the structural determinants of resveratrol for the inhibition potency of cell proliferation by comparing experimental and docking studies. Therefore, we synthesized new trans/(E)- and cis/(Z)-resveratrol - analogs not reported to date - by modifying the hydroxylation pattern of resveratrol and a double bond geometry. We included them in a larger panel of 14 molecules, including (Z)-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene, the most powerful molecule that is used as reference. Using a docking model complementary to experimental studies on the proliferation inhibition of the human colorectal tumor SW480 cell line, we show that methylation is the determinant substitution in inhibition efficacy, but only in molecules bearing a Z configuration. Most of the synthetic methylated derivatives (E or Z) stop mitosis at the M phase and lead to polyploid cells, while (E)-resveratrol inhibits cells at the S phase. Docking studies show that almost all of the docked structures of (Z)-polymethoxy isomers, but not most of the (E)-polymethoxy isomers substantially overlap the docked structure of combretastatin A-4, taken as reference ligand at the colchicine-tubulin binding site. PMID:20395019

  4. Tetraploid Embryonic Stem Cells Maintain Pluripotency and Differentiation Potency into Three Germ Layers

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Hiroyuki; Kano, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Wataru; Takasawa, Ken; Wakitani, Shoichi; Hiyama, Masato; Nishino, Koichiro; Kusakabe, Ken Takeshi; Kiso, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Polyploid amphibians and fishes occur naturally in nature, while polyploid mammals do not. For example, tetraploid mouse embryos normally develop into blastocysts, but exhibit abnormalities and die soon after implantation. Thus, polyploidization is thought to be harmful during early mammalian development. However, the mechanisms through which polyploidization disrupts development are still poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to elucidate how genome duplication affects early mammalian development. To this end, we established tetraploid embryonic stem cells (TESCs) produced from the inner cell masses of tetraploid blastocysts using electrofusion of two-cell embryos in mice and studied the developmental potential of TESCs. We demonstrated that TESCs possessed essential pluripotency and differentiation potency to form teratomas, which differentiated into the three germ layers, including diploid embryonic stem cells. TESCs also contributed to the inner cell masses in aggregated chimeric blastocysts, despite the observation that tetraploid embryos fail in normal development soon after implantation in mice. In TESCs, stability after several passages, colony morphology, and alkaline phosphatase activity were similar to those of diploid ESCs. TESCs also exhibited sufficient expression and localization of pluripotent markers and retained the normal epigenetic status of relevant reprogramming factors. TESCs proliferated at a slower rate than ESCs, indicating that the difference in genomic dosage was responsible for the different growth rates. Thus, our findings suggested that mouse ESCs maintained intrinsic pluripotency and differentiation potential despite tetraploidization, providing insights into our understanding of developmental elimination in polyploid mammals. PMID:26091100

  5. Modeling the emetic potencies of food-borne trichothecenes by benchmark dose methodology.

    PubMed

    Male, Denis; Wu, Wenda; Mitchell, Nicole J; Bursian, Steven; Pestka, James J; Wu, Felicia

    2016-08-01

    Trichothecene mycotoxins commonly co-contaminate cereal products. They cause immunosuppression, anorexia, and emesis in multiple species. Dietary exposure to such toxins often occurs in mixtures. Hence, if it were possible to determine their relative toxicities and assign toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) to each trichothecene, risk management and regulation of these mycotoxins could become more comprehensive and simple. We used a mink emesis model to compare the toxicities of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, HT-2 toxin, and T-2 toxin. These toxins were administered to mink via gavage and intraperitoneal injection. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) benchmark dose software was used to determine benchmark doses for each trichothecene. The relative potencies of each of these toxins were calculated as the ratios of their benchmark doses to that of DON. Our results showed that mink were more sensitive to orally administered toxins than to toxins administered by IP. T-2 and HT-2 toxins caused the greatest emetic responses, followed by FX, and then by DON, its acetylated derivatives, and NIV. Although these results provide key information on comparative toxicities, there is still a need for more animal based studies focusing on various endpoints and combined effects of trichothecenes before TEFs can be established. PMID:27292944

  6. The human relevant potency threshold: reducing uncertainty by human calibration of cumulative risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Borgert, C J; Sargent, E V; Casella, G; Dietrich, D R; McCarty, L S; Golden, R J

    2012-03-01

    The 2008 National Research Council report "Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment: Tasks Ahead," rejected the underlying premises of TEQ-like approaches - e.g., chemicals are true congeners; are metabolized and detoxified similarly; produce the same biological effects by the same mode of action; exhibit parallel dose response curves - instead asserting that cumulative risk assessment should apply dose addition (DA) to all chemicals that produce "common adverse outcomes" (CAOS). Published mixtures data and a human health risk assessment for phthalates and anti-androgens were evaluated to determine how firmly the DA-CAOS concept is supported and with what level of statistical certainty the results may be extrapolated to lower doses in humans. Underlying assumptions of the DA-CAOS concept were tested for accuracy and consistency against data for two human pharmaceuticals and its logical predictions were compared to human clinical and epidemiological experience. Those analyses revealed that DA-CAOS is scientifically untenable. Therefore, an alternative approach was developed - the Human-Relevant Potency-Threshold (HRPT) - that appears to fit the data better and avoids the contradictions inherent in the DA-CAOS concept. The proposed approach recommends application of independent action for phthalates and other chemicals with potential anti-androgenic properties at current human exposure levels. PMID:22057094

  7. First systematic evaluation of the potency of Cannabis sativa plants grown in Albania.

    PubMed

    Bruci, Zana; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Athanaselis, Sotirios; Nikolaou, Panagiota; Pazari, Ermira; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Vyshka, Gentian

    2012-10-10

    Cannabis products (marijuana, hashish, cannabis oil) are the most frequently abused illegal substances worldwide. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive component of Cannabis sativa plant, whereas cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) are other major but no psychoactive constituents. Many studies have already been carried out on these compounds and chemical research was encouraged due to the legal implications concerning the misuse of marijuana. The aim of this study was to determine THC, CBD and CBN in a significant number of cannabis samples of Albanian origin, where cannabis is the most frequently used drug of abuse, in order to evaluate and classify them according to their cannabinoid composition. A GC-MS method was used, in order to assay cannabinoid content of hemp samples harvested at different maturation degree levels during the summer months and grown in different areas of Albania. This method can also be used for the determination of plant phenotype, the evaluation of psychoactive potency and the control of material quality. The highest cannabinoid concentrations were found in the flowers of cannabis. The THC concentrations in different locations of Albania ranged from 1.07 to 12.13%. The influence of environmental conditions on cannabinoid content is discussed. The cannabinoid content of cannabis plants were used for their profiling, and it was used for their classification, according to their geographical origin. The determined concentrations justify the fact that Albania is an area where cannabis is extensively cultivated for illegal purposes. PMID:22608266

  8. The influence of professional expertise and task complexity upon the potency of the contextual interference effect.

    PubMed

    Ollis, Stewart; Button, Chris; Fairweather, Malcolm

    2005-03-01

    The contextual interference (CI) effect has been investigated through practice schedule manipulations within both basic and applied studies. Despite extensive research activity there is little conclusive evidence regarding the optimal practice structure of real world manipulative tasks in professional training settings. The present study therefore assessed the efficacy of practising simple and complex knot-tying skills in professional fire-fighters training. Forty-eight participants were quasi-randomly assigned to various practice schedules along the CI continuum. Twenty-four participants were students selected for their novice knot-tying capabilities and 24 were experienced fire-fighters who were more 'experienced knot-tiers'. They were assessed for skill acquisition, retention and transfer effects having practiced tying knots classified as simple or complex. Surprisingly, high levels of CI scheduling enhance learning for novices even when practising a complex task. The findings also revealed that CI benefits are most apparent as learners engage in tasks high in transfer distality. In conclusion, complexity and experience are mediating factors influencing the potency of the CI training effect in real-world settings. PMID:15698822

  9. Relative potency estimates of acceptable residues and reentry intervals after nerve agent release.

    PubMed

    Watson, A P; Jones, T D; Adams, J D

    1992-06-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of a chemical warfare agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, the potential exists for off-post contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. The more persistent agents, such as the organophosphate nerve agent VX, pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. A relative potency approach comparing the toxicity of VX to organophosphate insecticide analogues is developed and used to estimate allowable residues for VX in agricultural products and reentry intervals for public access to contaminated areas. Analysis of mammalian LD50 data by all exposure routes indicates that VX is 10(3) to 10(4) times more toxic than most commercially available organophosphate insecticides. Thus, allowable residues of VX could be considered at concentration levels 10(3) to 10(4) lower than those established for certain insecticides by the U.S. EPA. Evaluation of reentry intervals developed for these organophosphate analogues indicate that, if environmental monitoring cannot reliably demonstrate acceptable levels of VX, restricted access to suspect or contaminated areas may be on the order of weeks to months following agent release. Planning for relocation, mass care centers, and quarantine should take this time period into account. PMID:1376237

  10. A General Strategy to Enhance the Potency of Chimeric Transcriptional Activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natesan, Sridaran; Molinari, Elizabeth; Rivera, Victor M.; Rickles, Richard J.; Gilman, Michael

    1999-11-01

    Efforts to increase the potency of transcriptional activators are generally unsuccessful because poor expression of activators in mammalian cells limits their delivery to target promoters. Here we report that the effectiveness of chimeric activators can be dramatically improved by expressing them as noncovalent tetrameric bundles. Bundled activation domains are much more effective at activating a reporter gene than simple monomeric activators, presumably because, at similar expression levels, up to 4 times as many the activation domains are delivered to the target promoter. These bundled activation domains are also more effective than proteins in which activation domains are tandemly reiterated in the same polypeptide chain, because such proteins are very poorly expressed and therefore not delivered effectively. These observations suggest that there is a threshold number of activation domains that must be bound to a promoter for activation, above which promoter activity is simply a function of the number of activators bound. We show that bundling can be exploited practically to enhance the sensitivity of mammalian two-hybrid assays, enabling detection of weak interactions or those between poorly expressed proteins. Bundling also dramatically improves the performance of a small-molecule-regulated gene expression system when the expression level of regulatory protein is limiting, a situation that may be encountered in gene therapy applications.

  11. A new carbohydrate-based wound dressing fibre with superior absorption and antimicrobial potency.

    PubMed

    Miraftab, M; Masood, R; Edward-Jones, V

    2014-01-30

    Heavily exudating wounds can lead to infection and unnecessary trauma if they are not adequately managed. Manufacturers involved in production and marketing of high absorption silver dressings, besides emphasising high absorptions of their dressings are keen to highlight potent antimicrobial abilities of their products against all kinds of pathogens including MRSA. However, there are little or no credible reports on minimal but potent quantities of silver needed in a dressing to eliminate bacteria spread and growth or how effectively the silver within a dressing is released over time. This paper introduces a new hybrid biomaterial fibre made from polysaccharide-based polymers with inbuilt ability to gel and absorb large quantities of pseudo exudates. Furthermore, it will be reported that the new fibre carries up to six times less silver than it is conventionally used in silver dressings and displays a very slow rate of release whilst maintaining full potency over time against known Gram positive, Gram negative micro-organisms including MRSA. The paper concludes that the developed hybrid fibre has long lasting antimicrobial and gelling properties comparable, if not better, than Acticoat AA and Aquacel Ag, two commercially available silver dressings. PMID:24299890

  12. Novel analogues of the therapeutic complement inhibitor compstatin with significantly improved affinity and potency1

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hongchang; Magotti, Paola; Ricklin, Daniel; Wu, Emilia L.; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Wu, You-Qiang; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.; Lambris, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Compstatin is a 13-residue disulfide-bridged peptide that inhibits a key step in the activation of the human complement system. Compstatin and its derivatives have shown great promise for the treatment of many clinical disorders associated with unbalanced complement activity. To obtain more potent compstatin analogues, we have now performed an N-methylation scan of the peptide backbone and amino acid substitutions at position 13. One analogue (Ac-I[CVW(Me)QDW-Sar-AHRC](NMe)I-NH2) displayed a 1,000-fold increase in both potency (IC50=62 nM) and binding affinity for C3b (KD=2.3 nM) over that of the original compstatin. Biophysical analysis using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry suggests that the improved binding originates from more favorable free conformation and stronger hydrophobic interactions. This study provides a series of significantly improved drug leads for therapeutic applications in complement-related diseases, and offers new insights into the structure-activity relationships of compstatin analogues. PMID:21067811

  13. Development of a Sweetness Sensor for Aspartame, a Positively Charged High-Potency Sweetener

    PubMed Central

    Yasuura, Masato; Tahara, Yusuke; Ikezaki, Hidekazu; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration of aspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame. PMID:24763213

  14. Quantification of antibiotic drug potency by a two-compartment radioassay of bacterial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boonkitticharoen, V.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Kirchner, P.T. )

    1990-06-01

    The two-compartment radioassay for microbial kinetics based on continuous measurement of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} released by bacterial metabolism of 14C-labeled substrate offers a valuable approach to testing the potency of antimicrobial drugs. By using a previously validated radioassay with gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, a group of protein synthesis inhibitors was evaluated for their effect on microbial growth kinetics. All tested drugs induced changes in both the slopes and intercepts of the growth curves. An exponential growth model was applied to quantify the drug effect on the processes of bacterial {sup 14}CO{sub 2} liberation and cell generation. The response was measured in terms of a generation rate constant. A linear dependence of the generation rate constant on the dose of spectinomycin was observed with Escherichia coli. Sigmoidal-shaped curves were found in the assays of chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The implications of dose-response curves are discussed on the basis of the receptor site concept for drug action. The assay sensitivities for chloramphenicol and tetracycline were similar to those obtained by the cell counting method, but the sensitivity of the radioassay was at least 10 times greater for spectinomycin.

  15. The human skin/chick chorioallantoic membrane model accurately predicts the potency of cosmetic allergens.

    PubMed

    Slodownik, Dan; Grinberg, Igor; Spira, Ram M; Skornik, Yehuda; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2009-04-01

    The current standard method for predicting contact allergenicity is the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Public objection to the use of animals in testing of cosmetics makes the development of a system that does not use sentient animals highly desirable. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chick egg has been extensively used for the growth of normal and transformed mammalian tissues. The CAM is not innervated, and embryos are sacrificed before the development of pain perception. The aim of this study was to determine whether the sensitization phase of contact dermatitis to known cosmetic allergens can be quantified using CAM-engrafted human skin and how these results compare with published EC3 data obtained with the LLNA. We studied six common molecules used in allergen testing and quantified migration of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) as a measure of their allergic potency. All agents with known allergic potential induced statistically significant migration of LC. The data obtained correlated well with published data for these allergens generated using the LLNA test. The human-skin CAM model therefore has great potential as an inexpensive, non-radioactive, in vivo alternative to the LLNA, which does not require the use of sentient animals. In addition, this system has the advantage of testing the allergic response of human, rather than animal skin. PMID:19054059

  16. Human serum albumin reduces the potency of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor based drugs for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Gurung, Arun Bahadur; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Aguan, Kripamoy; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) induced modulation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition activity of four well-known cholinergic inhibitors like tacrine hydrochloride (TAC), donepezil hydrochloride monohydrate (DON), (-) Huperzine A (HuPA), eserine (ESE) was monitored quantitatively by Ellman's method. Kinetic analysis of enzyme hydrolysis reaction revealed that while the mechanism of inhibition does not change significantly, the inhibition efficiency changes drastically in presence of HSA, particularly for DON and TAC. However, interestingly, no notable difference was observed in the cases of HuPA and/or ESE. For example, the IC50 value of AChE inhibition increases by almost 135% in presence of ∼250 μM HSA (IC50 = 159 ± 8 nM) while comparing with aqueous buffer solution of pH 8.0 (IC50 = 68 ± 4 nM) in DON. On the other hand, the change is almost insignificant (<10%) in case of HuPA under the similar condition. The experimentally observed difference in the extent of modulatory effect was correlated with the sequestration ability of HSA towards different drugs predicted from molecular docking calculations. The result in this study demonstrates the importance to consider the plasma protein binding tendency of a newly synthesized AD drug before claiming its potency over the existing one. Further, development of new and intelligent delivery medium that shields the administered drugs from serum adsorption may reduce the optimal drug dose requirement. PMID:26902639

  17. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  18. Potency of a thermostabilised chimpanzee adenovirus Rift Valley Fever vaccine in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Dulal, Pawan; Wright, Daniel; Ashfield, Rebecca; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Charleston, Bryan; Warimwe, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Development of safe and efficacious vaccines whose potency is unaffected by long-term storage at ambient temperature would obviate major vaccine deployment hurdles and limit wastage associated with breaks in the vaccine cold chain. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of a novel chimpanzee adenovirus vectored Rift Valley Fever vaccine (ChAdOx1-GnGc) in cattle, following its thermostabilisation by slow desiccation on glass fiber membranes in the non-reducing sugars trehalose and sucrose. Thermostabilised ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine stored for 6 months at 25, 37 or 45 °C elicited comparable Rift Valley Fever virus neutralising antibody titres to those elicited by the ‘cold chain’ vaccine (stored at −80 °C throughout) at the same dose, and these were within the range associated with protection against Rift Valley Fever in cattle. The results support the use of sugar-membrane thermostabilised vaccines in target livestock species. PMID:27020712

  19. Accessible Chiral Linker to Enhance Potency and Selectivity of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The three important mammalian isozymes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS). Inhibitors of nNOS show promise as treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Eight easily synthesized compounds containing either one (20a,b) or two (9a–d; 15a,b) 2-amino-4-methylpyridine groups with a chiral pyrrolidine linker were designed as selective nNOS inhibitors. Inhibitor 9c is the best of these compounds, having a potency of 9.7 nM and dual selectivity of 693 and 295 against eNOS and iNOS, respectively. Crystal structures of nNOS complexed with either 9a or 9c show a double-headed binding mode, where each 2-aminopyridine headgroup interacts with either a nNOS active site Glu residue or a heme propionate. In addition, the pyrrolidine nitrogen of 9c contributes additional hydrogen bonds to the heme propionate, resulting in a unique binding orientation. In contrast, the lack of hydrogen bonds from the pyrrolidine of 9a to the heme propionate allows the inhibitor to adopt two different binding orientations. Both 9a and 9c bind to eNOS in a single-headed mode, which is the structural basis for the isozyme selectivity. PMID:24660051

  20. Antileukemic potency of CD19-specific T cells against chemoresistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dolnikov, Alla; Shen, Sylvie; Klamer, Guy; Joshi, Swapna; Xu, Ning; Yang, Lu; Micklethwaite, Kenneth; O'Brien, Tracey A

    2015-12-01

    Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells (CART cells) has exhibited great promise in clinical trials, with efficient response correlated with CART-cell expansion and persistence. Despite extensive clinical use, the mechanisms regulating CART-cell expansion and persistence have not been completely elucidated. We have examined the antileukemia potency of CART cells targeting CD19 antigen using second-generation CAR containing a CD28 co-stimulatory domain cloned into piggyBac-transposon vector and patient-derived chemoresistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples. In the presence of large numbers of target cells characteristic of patients with high leukemia burden, excessive proliferation of CART cells leads to differentiation into short-lived effector cells. Transient leukemia growth delay was induced by CART-cell infusion in mice xenografted with rapidly growing CD19+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and was followed by rapid CART-cell extinction. Conditioning with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-activating caspase 3 and promotion of apoptosis in leukemia cells maximized the effect of CART cells and improved CART-cell persistence. These data suggest that the clinical use of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine before CART cells could be considered. Coculture of leukemia cells with bone marrow stroma cells reduced target cell loss, suggesting that leukemia cell mobilization into circulation may help to remove the protective effect of bone marrow stroma and increase the efficacy of CART-cell therapy. PMID:26384559

  1. In vitro potency and mode of action of ANQ9040: a novel fast acting muscle relaxant.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, G; Munday, I T; Edwards, M D; Jones, R M

    1994-01-01

    1. The in vitro potency and mode of action of the novel, rapid-onset steroidal relaxant ANQ9040 were characterized in the rat isolated phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm. 2. At 32 degrees C, ANQ9040 antagonized neurally evoked contractures with EC50s of 21.5 microM for unitary twitches; 14.4 microM for 2 Hz 'trains of four'; and 7.5 microM for 50 Hz (2 s) tetanic stimulus trains. 3. (+)-Tubocurarine was 22-24 times more potent than ANQ9040 in comparative organ bath experiments. 4. Intracellular recording from endplates revealed that ANQ9040 (0.53-10.0 microM) dose-dependently and reversibly decreased the amplitude of miniature-endplate potentials (IC50 of circa 0.95 microM) without changing transmembrane potential. 5. Surmountable antagonism of subthreshold responses to exogenous (ionophoretic) acetylcholine provided evidence for a non-depolarizing and competitive blockade of post-junctional nicotinic receptors. 6. Sucrose gap recordings of phrenic nerve action potentials revealed that, at concentrations up to 32 microM, ANQ9040 produced no tonic or frequency-dependent antagonism of axonic Na+ channels. 7. We conclude that ANQ9040 is a relatively low-affinity, non-depolarizing, nicotinic antagonist. The in vitro results are discussed in relation to factors impinging on relaxant kinetics and current models for frequency-dependent fade. PMID:7834218

  2. Application of the concept of relative photomutagenic potencies to selected furocoumarins in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Christiane; Raquet, Nicole; Schrenk, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Furocoumarins are phototoxic and photomutagenic natural plant constituents found in many medicinal plants and food items. Since plants contain mixtures of several furocoumarins, there is a need for a comparative risk assessment of a large number of furocoumarins. Previously, we have introduced the concept of relative Photomutagenicity Equivalency Factors (PMEFs) derived from the slope of the concentration-response curve of photomutagenicity of individual furocoumarins in V79 cells using the HPRT mutation assay in the presence of UVA irradiation at 125mJ/cm(2). Here we have applied this method to the furocoumarins bergamottin, isopimpinellin and psoralen using 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) as a reference compound with a PMEF of 1.0. We found that neither bergamottin nor isopimpinellin, two furocoumarins abundant in plants, food etc., exerted any significant photomutagenicity while psoralen was clearly photomutagenic with a PMEF of 0.36. Similarly, isopimpinellin was not phototoxic in V79 cells, while bergamottin showed some cytotoxicity which, however, was completely independent of UVA irradiation. Only psoralen was photocytotoxic showing a similar concentration-response relationship for photomutagenicity, and for photocytotoxicity (at 72h after irradiation). Data from the micronucleus assay for DNA damage at 20h after irradiation were in complete agreement with the HPRT mutation data. Our findings indicate that individual furocoumarins differ enormously in their photomutagenic potency, and that a specific toxicological risk assessment is required for each furocoumarin instead of an assessment based on the sum of furocoumarins in a given sample. PMID:19883747

  3. Relative potency estimates of acceptable residues and reentry intervals after nerve agent release

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Jones, T.D.; Adams, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of a chemical warfare agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, the potential exists for off-post contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. The more persistent agents, such as the organophosphate nerve agent VX, pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. A relative potency approach comparing the toxicity of VX to organophosphate insecticide analogues is developed and used to estimate allowable residues for VX in agricultural products and reentry intervals for public access to contaminated areas. Analysis of mammalian LD50 data by all exposure routes indicates that VX is 10(3) to 10(4) times more toxic than most commercially available organophosphate insecticides. Thus, allowable residues of VX could be considered at concentration levels 10(3) to 10(4) lower than those established for certain insecticides by the U.S. EPA. Evaluation of reentry intervals developed for these organophosphate analogues indicate that, if environmental monitoring cannot reliably demonstrate acceptable levels of VX, restricted access to suspect or contaminated areas may be on the order of weeks to months following agent release. Planning for relocation, mass care centers, and quarantine should take this time period into account.

  4. Vitamin and mineral status in physically active men: effects of a high-potency supplement.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Moses, F M; Deuster, P A

    1992-01-01

    Changes in nutritional status during supplementation with a high-potency multivitamin-mineral supplement were examined in 22 physically active men randomly assigned to take a supplement (n = 11) or placebo (n = 11) for approximately 12 wk. Four-day dietary intakes, blood concentrations, and urinary excretions of selected vitamins and minerals were measured before, during (approximately 6 and 12 wk), and after supplementation. No changes were observed in blood concentrations of vitamins A and C and measures of zinc, magnesium, and calcium status; the supplement provided less than 300% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of these nutrients. In contrast, blood concentrations of thiamin, riboflavin, vitamins B-6 and B-12, pantothenate, and biotin increased significantly (P less than 0.05) by 6 wk to values that were maintained until the end of the supplementation. These vitamins were provided in amounts that ranged from 396% (biotin) to 6250% (vitamin B-6) of the RDA. Urinary excretions of these vitamins also increased during supplementation and both blood and urine values returned to presupplementation concentrations at approximately 13.5 wk postsupplementation. PMID:1728807

  5. Review of the spectrum and potency of orally administered cephalosporins and amoxicillin/clavulanate.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Jacobs, Michael R; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2007-03-01

    The antimicrobial spectrum and in vitro potency of the most frequently prescribed orally administered cephalosporins (cefaclor, cefdinir, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, cefuroxime axetil, cephalexin) and amoxicillin/clavulanate are reviewed. These beta-lactam agents have been widely used in the outpatient arena for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract and other mild-to-moderate infections. The data presented here were obtained from critical review articles on each of these compounds. Cephalexin and cefaclor were among the least potent and had the narrowest antimicrobial spectrums against the pathogens evaluated. In contrast, cefdinir, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, and cefuroxime were highly active against penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae and retained some activity against penicillin-intermediate strains, whereas amoxicillin/clavulanate was the most active against S. pneumoniae, including most penicillin nonsusceptible strains. Amoxicillin/clavulanate and cefdinir were the most potent compounds against methicillin (oxacillin)-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, whereas cefpodoxime was the most potent compound against Haemophilus influenzae. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefdinir, and cefpodoxime were also active against Moraxella catarrhalis, including beta-lactamase-producing strains. In summary, orally administered "3rd-generation" or extended spectrum cephalosporins exhibited more balanced spectrums of activity against the principal bacterial pathogens responsible for outpatient respiratory tract and other infections when compared with other widely used oral cephalosporins of earlier generations or amoxicillin alone. PMID:17292577

  6. Effect of mixing conditions on irritant potency of zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide. [Guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, M.O.; McCarthy, J.F.; Gill, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement of mechanics of respiration in guinea pigs was used to assess the irritant potency of zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide mixed under different conditions of temperature and humidity. Concentrations were 1-2 mg/m/sup 3/ zinc oxide and 1 ppm sulfur dioxide. Dry conditions of mixing (Chamber RH 30%) either at 24/sup 0/C in the exposure chamber or at 480/sup 0/C in a dry furnace gave a biological response which could be completely accounted for by responses to zinc oxide and/or sulfur dioxide alone. Chemical examination of the aerosols did not indicate the formation of particulate sulfur species. Zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide mixed dry at 480/sup 0/C and fed into the exposure chamber at 80% RH reacted to produce an irritant aerosol as evidenced by a rapid increase in resistance to levels 29% above control; reversal was rapid when exposure ended. Chemical studies indicated the presence of sulfite on these aerosols. Addition of water vapor to the furnace during mixing at 480/sup 0/C produced a different irritant aerosol. The resistance rose slowly to 19% above control values and remained elevated during the post-exposure hour. Chemical studies indicated the presence of sulfate, sulfite, and adsorbed sulfur trioxide on these aerosols.

  7. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  8. Isolation and Pharmacological Evaluation of Minor Cannabinoids from High-Potency Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Mohamed M; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; El-Alfy, Abir T; Ahmed, Safwat A; Slade, Desmond; Husni, Afeef S; Manly, Susan P; Wilson, Lisa; Seale, Suzanne; Cutler, Stephen J; Ross, Samir A

    2015-06-26

    Seven new naturally occurring hydroxylated cannabinoids (1-7), along with the known cannabiripsol (8), have been isolated from the aerial parts of high-potency Cannabis sativa. The structures of the new compounds were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, GC-MS, and HRESIMS as 8α-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (1), 8β-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (2), 10α-hydroxy-Δ(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (3), 10β-hydroxy-Δ(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (4), 10α-hydroxy-Δ(9,11)-hexahydrocannabinol (5), 9β,10β-epoxyhexahydrocannabinol (6), and 11-acetoxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (7). The binding affinity of isolated compounds 1-8, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and Δ(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol toward CB1 and CB2 receptors as well as their behavioral effects in a mouse tetrad assay were studied. The results indicated that compound 3, with the highest affinity to the CB1 receptors, exerted the most potent cannabimimetic-like actions in the tetrad assay, while compound 4 showed partial cannabimimetic actions. Compound 2, on the other hand, displayed a dose-dependent hypolocomotive effect only. PMID:26000707

  9. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease. PMID:27045658

  10. Increasing the Potency of an Alhydrogel-Formulated Anthrax Vaccine by Minimizing Antigen-Adjuvant Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Watkinson, Allan; Soliakov, Andrei; Ganesan, Ashok; Hirst, Karie; LeButt, Chris; Fleetwood, Kelly; Fusco, Peter C.; Fuerst, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum salts are the most widely used vaccine adjuvants, and phosphate is known to modulate antigen-adjuvant interactions. Here we report an unexpected role for phosphate buffer in an anthrax vaccine (SparVax) containing recombinant protective antigen (rPA) and aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOH) adjuvant (Alhydrogel). Phosphate ions bind to AlOH to produce an aluminum phosphate surface with a reduced rPA adsorption coefficient and binding capacity. However, these effects continued to increase as the free phosphate concentration increased, and the binding of rPA changed from endothermic to exothermic. Crucially, phosphate restored the thermostability of bound rPA so that it resembled the soluble form, even though it remained tightly bound to the surface. Batches of vaccine with either 0.25 mM (subsaturated) or 4 mM (saturated) phosphate were tested in a disease model at batch release, which showed that the latter was significantly more potent. Both formulations retained their potency for 3 years. The strongest aluminum adjuvant effects are thus likely to be via weakly attached or easily released native-state antigen proteins. PMID:23986317

  11. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease. PMID:27045658

  12. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., "FKK", "LKL", "KKLL", "KWK", "VLK", "CYCR", "CRR", "RFC", "RRR", "LKKL") are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  13. Cytotoxic potency of cardiotoxin from Naja sputatrix: development of a new cytolytic assay.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Donghui; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2002-01-01

    The possible involvement of specific regions/loops of cardiotoxin from Naja sputatrix venom in mediating its cytolytic activity is evaluated using a new cytolytic assay. In this assay, the amount of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) that is released upon lysis of the cellular membranes by the cytotoxin has been measured as an index of cytolysis. This newly developed CAT system is more sensitive than the traditional haemolysis method utilizing red blood cells or the lactate dehydrogenase assay for cytolysis. Series of chimaeric toxin molecules have been constructed by swapping the loops between highly hydrophilic neurotoxin and highly hydrophobic cardiotoxin molecules from Naja sputatrix, which are known to exhibit structural similarity (three-finger conformation) but to have different functional properties. Comparison of the cytolytic activities of the recombinant chimaeric toxins demonstrated the possible involvement of all three loops of cardiotoxin in its cytolytic potency. However, the first two loops of the protein appear to make the major contribution to its lytic activity. cDNAs encoding cardiotoxin and the chimaeric toxins, when expressed in transfected cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, resulted in cell lysis, indicating that these cDNAs can be developed as useful cytolytic agents. PMID:12027804

  14. Methyl substitution of a rexinoid agonist improves potency and reveals site of lipid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Atigadda, Venkatram R; Xia, Gang; Desphande, Anil; Boerma, LeeAnn J; Lobo-Ruppert, Susan; Grubbs, Clinton J; Smith, Craig D; Brouillette, Wayne J; Muccio, Donald D

    2014-06-26

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3',4'-Dihydro-1'(2'H)-naphthalen-1'-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  15. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  16. [In vitro dissolution rate of Liuwei Wuling tablet based on biological potency and integrated dissolution].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan; Cheng, Ling; Shen, Cheng-ying; Li, Juan-juan; Qiu, Ling; Shen, Gang; Han, Jin; Yuan, Hai-long

    2015-11-01

    To explore the feasibility of chemical and biological method in evaluation of the in vitro dissolution rate of Liuwei Wuling tablet (LWT), this experiment investigated the inhibitory effect of LWT dissolving solutions on LX-2 hepatic stellate cells in 0.1% SDS dissolution medium in different dissolving periods. From these results, the cumulative dissolution rate of LWT was obtained based on the cell inhibitory rate. The dissolution rates of deoxyschizandrin, phillyrin, and Specnuezhenide were determined by HPLC method. A novel approach of self-defined weighting coefficient had been created to establish the integrated dissolution rate model. Then f2 similar factor method was used to evaluate the relevance of these two methods. The results showed that f2 values for deoxyschizandrin, phillyrin, Specnuezhenide, and the integrated dissolution were 61, 43, 61 and 75 respectively, indicating that the dissolution of multi-component integration could fully reflect the biological potency of the whole recipe. The dissolution evaluation method for multicomponent integration based on biological activity is expected to be one of the effective means for in vitro dissolution test of LWT. PMID:27097413

  17. Low-Pressure Gas Effects on the Potency of an Electron Beam Against Ceramic Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    An 8-kv electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 mA from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" (UHT) burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1,427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 scc at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6-24 in. At both closer (2 in.) and farther (48 in.) standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high-voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  18. Sideromimic Modification of Lactivicin Dramatically Increases Potency against Extensively Drug-Resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Karina; Umland, Klaus-Daniel; Rydzik, Anna M; Hinchliffe, Philip; Brem, Jürgen; Spencer, James; Schofield, Christopher J; Avison, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Acetamido derivatives of the naturally antibacterial non-β-lactam lactivicin (LTV) have improved activity against their penicillin binding protein targets and reduced hydrolysis by β-lactamases, but penetration into Gram-negative bacteria is still relatively poor. Here we report that modification of the LTV lactone with a catechol-type siderophore increases potency 1,000-fold against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a species renowned for its insusceptibility to antimicrobials. The MIC90 of modified lactone compound 17 (LTV17) against a global collection of extensively drug-resistant clinical S. maltophilia isolates was 0.063 μg · ml(-1) Sideromimic modification does not reduce the ability of LTVs to induce production of the L1 and L2 β-lactamases in S. maltophilia and does not reduce the rate at which LTVs are hydrolyzed by L1 or L2. We conclude, therefore, that lactivicin modification with a siderophore known to be preferentially used by S. maltophilia substantially increases penetration via siderophore uptake. LTV17 has the potential to be developed as a novel antimicrobial for treatment of infections by S. maltophilia More generally, our work shows that sideromimic modification in a species-targeted manner might prove useful for the development of narrow-spectrum antimicrobials that have reduced collateral effects. PMID:27139464

  19. A Simple Method for Labeling Human Embryonic Stem Cells Destined to Lose Undifferentiated Potency.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Ayako; Suga, Mika; Yanagihara, Kana; Itoh, Yumi; Takemori, Hiroshi; Furue, Miho K

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is a major source of cellular ATP. Its usage as an energy source varies, not only according to the extracellular environment, but also during development and differentiation, as indicated by the reported changes in the flux ratio of glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. The fluorescent probe JC-1 allows visualization of changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Strong JC-1 signals were localized in the differentiated cells located at the edge of H9 ES colonies that expressed vimentin, an early differentiation maker. The JC-1 signals were further intensified when individual adjacent colonies were in contact with each other. Time-lapse analyses revealed that JC-1-labeled H9 cells under an overconfluent condition were highly differentiated after subculture, suggesting that monitoring oxidative phosphorylation in live cells might facilitate the prediction of induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as ES cells, that are destined to lose their undifferentiated potency. PMID:26819254

  20. Composition and Potency Characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Purified Protein Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Capsel, Randal T.; Thoen, Charles O.; Reinhardt, Timothy A.; Lippolis, John D.; Olsen, Renee; Stabel, Judith R.; Bannantine, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37°C, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtration, and protein precipitation. Three traditional production PPDs were used in this study including lot 9801, which served as a reference and has been used in the field for decades. Alternative production PPDs (0902A and 0902B), in which the autoclaving step was removed, were also analyzed in this study. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed protein smearing in traditional PPDs, but distinct bands were observed in the alternative PPD preparations. Antibody bound distinct protein bands in the alternative PPDs by immunoblot analysis, whereas an immunoreactive smear was observed with the traditional PPDs. Mass spectrometry identified 194 proteins among three PPD lots representing the two different production methods, ten of which were present in all PPDs examined. Selected proteins identified by mass spectrometry were recombinantly expressed and purified from E. coli and evaluated by the guinea pig potency test. Seven recombinant proteins showed greater erythema as compared to the reference PPD lot 9801 in paired guinea pigs and were able to stimulate interferon-gamma production in blood from Johne’s positive animals. These results suggest that autoclaving culture suspensions is not a necessary step in PPD production and specific proteins could supplant the PPD antigen for intradermal skin testing procedures and for use as in-vitro assay reagents. PMID:27136199

  1. Immunomodulatory Potency of Microcystin, an Important Water-Polluting Cyanobacterial Toxin.

    PubMed

    Adamovsky, Ondrej; Moosova, Zdena; Pekarova, Michaela; Basu, Amrita; Babica, Pavel; Svihalkova Sindlerova, Lenka; Kubala, Lukas; Blaha, Ludek

    2015-10-20

    Microcystins (MCs) are primarily hepatotoxins produced by cyanobacteria and are responsible for intoxication in humans and animals. There are many incidents of chronic exposure to MCs, which have been attributed to the inappropriate treatment of water supplies or contaminated food. Using RAW 264.7 macrophages, we showed the potency of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) to stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-6) as a consequence of fast nuclear factor κB and nitrogen-activated protein kinase activation. In contrast to other studies, the observed effects were not attributed to the intracellular inhibition of protein phosphatases 1/2A due to lack of specific transmembrane transporters for MCs. However, the MC-LR-induced activation of macrophages was effectively inhibited by a specific peptide that blocks signaling of receptors, which play a pivotal role in the innate immune responses. Taken together, we showed for the first time that MC-LR could interfere with macrophage receptors that are responsible for triggering the above-mentioned signaling pathways. These findings provide an interesting mechanistic explanation of some adverse health outcomes associated with toxic cyanobacteria and MCs. PMID:26380879

  2. Report on the international workshop on alternative methods for Leptospira vaccine potency testing: state of the science and the way forward.

    PubMed

    Stokes, William; Srinivas, Geetha; McFarland, Richard; Kulpa-Eddy, Jodie; Casey, Warren; Walker, Angela; Draayer, Hans; Sebring, Randy; Brown, Karen; Balks, Elisabeth; Stirling, Catrina; Klaasen, Eric; Hill, Richard; Rippke, Byron; Ruby, Kevin; Alt, David; Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Kojima, Hajime; Johnson, Nelson; Rinckel, Lori; Doelling, Vivian; Jones, Brett

    2013-09-01

    Routine potency testing of Leptospira vaccines is mostly conducted using a vaccination-challenge test that involves large numbers of hamsters and unrelieved pain and distress. NICEATM, ICCVAM, and their international partners organized a workshop to review the state of the science of alternative methods that might replace, reduce, and refine the use of animals for veterinary Leptospira vaccine potency testing and to identify ways to advance improved alternative methods. Vaccine manufacturers were encouraged to initiate or continue product-specific validation using in vitro enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays as replacements for potency testing of four common Leptospira serogroups. Participants discussed the potential for eliminating the back-titration procedure in the hamster challenge assay, which could reduce animal use by 50% for each individual potency test. Further animal reduction may also be possible by using cryopreserved Leptospira stock to replace continual passaging through hamsters. Serology assays were identified as a way to further reduce and refine animal use but should be considered only after attempting in vitro assays. Workshop participants encouraged consideration of analgesics and use of earlier humane endpoints when the hamster vaccination-challenge potency assay is used. International harmonization of alternative potency methods was recommended to avoid duplicative potency testing to meet regionally different requirements. PMID:23890729

  3. Bayesian integrated testing strategy (ITS) for skin sensitization potency assessment: a decision support system for quantitative weight of evidence and adaptive testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy; Strickland, Judy; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The presented Bayesian network Integrated Testing Strategy (ITS-3) for skin sensitization potency assessment is a decision support system for a risk assessor that provides quantitative weight of evidence, leading to a mechanistically interpretable potency hypothesis, and formulates adaptive testing strategy for a chemical. The system was constructed with an aim to improve precision and accuracy for predicting LLNA potency beyond ITS-2 (Jaworska et al., J Appl Toxicol 33(11):1353-1364, 2013) by improving representation of chemistry and biology. Among novel elements are corrections for bioavailability both in vivo and in vitro as well as consideration of the individual assays' applicability domains in the prediction process. In ITS-3 structure, three validated alternative assays, DPRA, KeratinoSens and h-CLAT, represent first three key events of the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization. The skin sensitization potency prediction is provided as a probability distribution over four potency classes. The probability distribution is converted to Bayes factors to: 1) remove prediction bias introduced by the training set potency distribution and 2) express uncertainty in a quantitative manner, allowing transparent and consistent criteria to accept a prediction. The novel ITS-3 database includes 207 chemicals with a full set of in vivo and in vitro data. The accuracy for predicting LLNA outcomes on the external test set (n = 60) was as follows: hazard (two classes)-100 %, GHS potency classification (three classes)-96 %, potency (four classes)-89 %. This work demonstrates that skin sensitization potency prediction based on data from three key events, and often less, is possible, reliable over broad chemical classes and ready for practical applications. PMID:26612363

  4. High Efficacy but Low Potency of δ-Opioid Receptor-G Protein Coupling in Brij-58-Treated, Low-Density Plasma Membrane Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Roubalova, Lenka; Vosahlikova, Miroslava; Brejchova, Jana; Sykora, Jan; Rudajev, Vladimir; Svoboda, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Principal Findings HEK293 cells stably expressing PTX-insensitive δ-opioid receptor-Gi1α (C351I) fusion protein were homogenized, treated with low concentrations of non-ionic detergent Brij-58 at 0°C and fractionated by flotation in sucrose density gradient. In optimum range of detergent concentrations (0.025–0.05% w/v), Brij-58-treated, low-density membranes exhibited 2-3-fold higher efficacy of DADLE-stimulated, high-affinity [32P]GTPase and [35S]GTPγS binding than membranes of the same density prepared in the absence of detergent. The potency of agonist DADLE response was significantly decreased. At high detergent concentrations (>0.1%), the functional coupling between δ-opioid receptors and G proteins was completely diminished. The same detergent effects were measured in plasma membranes isolated from PTX-treated cells. Therefore, the effect of Brij-58 on δ-opioid receptor-G protein coupling was not restricted to the covalently bound Gi1α within δ-opioid receptor-Gi1α fusion protein, but it was also valid for PTX-sensitive G proteins of Gi/Go family endogenously expressed in HEK293 cells. Characterization of the direct effect of Brij-58 on the hydrophobic interior of isolated plasma membranes by steady-state anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) fluorescence indicated a marked increase of membrane fluidity. The time-resolved analysis of decay of DPH fluorescence by the “wobble in cone” model of DPH motion in the membrane indicated that the exposure to the increasing concentrations of Brij-58 led to a decreased order and higher motional freedom of the dye. Summary Limited perturbation of plasma membrane integrity by low concentrations of non-ionic detergent Brij-58 results in alteration of δ-OR-G protein coupling. Maximum G protein-response to agonist stimulation (efficacy) is increased; affinity of response (potency) is decreased. The total degradation plasma membrane structure at high detergent concentrations results in diminution of

  5. Synthesis and inhibition potency of novel ureido benzenesulfonamides incorporating GABA as tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase IX and XII inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ceruso, Mariangela; Antel, Sabrina; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    New ureido benzenesulfonamides incorporating a GABA moiety as a linker between the ureido and the sulfonamide functionalities were synthesized and their inhibition potency determined against both the predominant cytosolic (hCA I and II) and the transmembrane tumor-associated (hCA IX and XII) isoforms of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The majority of these compounds were medium potency inhibitors of the cytosolic isoform hCA I and effective hCA II inhibitors, whereas they showed strong inhibition of the two transmembrane tumor-associated isoforms hCA IX and XII, with KIs in nanomolar range. Only one derivative had a good selectivity for inhibition of the tumor-associated hCA IX target isoform over the cytosolic and physiologically dominant off-target hCA I and II, being thus a potential tool to develop new anticancer agents. PMID:25792500

  6. CNS depressants accelerate the dissociation of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding and GABA enhances their displacing potencies

    SciTech Connect

    Maksay, G.; Ticku, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    The specific binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) was studied in synaptosomal membranes of rat cerebral cortex. The displacing potencies of eleven CNS depressants and three convulsants were determined in the presence of 1 /sup +/M GABA and 10 nM R 5135. GABA enhanced the displacing potencies of depressants of most diverse chemical structures: diaryltriazine (LY 81067), pyrazolopyridine (etazolate), cinnamide, glutarimide, 2,3-benzodiazepine (tofizopam) and alcohol derivatives, barbiturates, (+)etomidate, methaqualone and meprobamate. In contrast, the IC/sub 50/ values of convulsants (picrotoxinin, pentetrazol and the barbiturate enantiomer S(+)MPPB) were not significantly affected. The depressants accelerated either basal or GABA-augmented dissociation of /sup 35/-TBPS mainly by increasing the contribution of its rapid first phase.

  7. Product-specific validation of a serological potency test for release of Leptospira vaccines in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Catrina; Novokova, Viera

    2013-09-01

    Historically in the European Union, all Leptospira vaccines were released using the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) hamster potency assay. Recently, there has been a shift toward alternatives that offer either refinement of testing or replacement of animals for product release. This is being driven by animal welfare concerns but also by a drive to have more consistent, cheaper, and faster batch release tests. This publication discusses one such example of a multicomponent canine vaccine that includes three Leptospira serovars and has recently been registered in the European Union. The potency release test is a refinement because it uses rabbit serology rather than hamster challenge. This publication covers the principles of the test method, challenges faced during its development and registration, and discussion about benefits and limitations of this method. It concludes with a view of how the use of serology testing could fit into an overall strategy to move to fully in vitro testing by adopting a consistency approach. PMID:23849308

  8. Collaborative study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of diphtheria toxoid vaccines-part 1.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, R; Sesardic, D; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study on the evaluation of an alternative functional assay, the Vero cell method, to the Ph. Eur. in vivo challenge procedures for potency determination of diphtheria toxoid in 6 different combined vaccines was initiated in January 2001. The study was an extension of a previous study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of tetanus toxoid vaccines for human use. To allow interim evaluation of test results and to monitor study progress, the project was divided into three consecutive phases. The results of Phase I and II studies are presented in this report. Pre-validation (Phase I) study, performed in two laboratories, indicated that comparable diphtheria potency estimates were obtained in the Ph. Eur. direct intradermal challenge assay in guinea pigs, in Vero cell assay and in indirect ELISA for five vaccines of different potencies (range of estimates: ca. 20-200 IU/ml). The correlation coefficients between the challenge assay and the Vero cell assay corresponded to those between the challenge assay and ELISA, confirming that the antibodies play an important role in protection and that predominantly protective/neutralising antibodies are present in guinea pigs, at the time point investigated. It was observed, for Vero cell assays, that about 16-35 (9-28 in Phase II study) fold lower titre of individual serum samples were obtained when using equine, rather than guinea pig reference serum. The study also provided preliminary information that sera from the same guinea pigs may be used for potency determination of both diphtheria and tetanus toxoid components of vaccines. In Phase II, another five laboratories analysed a subset of the vaccines included in Phase I study plus an additional vaccine. Four laboratories performed the lethal challenge assay and one laboratory carried out the intradermal challenge assay. All laboratories also performed the Vero cell assay and both ELISA for diphtheria antitoxin and ELISA for tetanus

  9. P4 capped amides and lactams as HCV NS3 protease inhibitors with improved potency and DMPK profile.

    PubMed

    Nair, Latha G; Sannigrahi, Mousumi; Bogen, Stephane; Pinto, Patrick; Chen, Kevin X; Prongay, Andrew; Tong, Xiao; Cheng, K-C; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; George Njoroge, F

    2010-01-15

    SAR studies on the extension of P3 unit of Boceprevir (1, SCH 503034) with amides and lactams and their synthesis is described. Extensive SAR studies resulted in the identification of 36 bearing 4, 4-dimethyl lactam as the new P4 cap unit with improved potency (K(i)( *)=15nM, EC 90=70nM) and pharmacokinetic properties (Rat AUC (PO)=3.52microMh) compared to 1. PMID:20004570

  10. P4 capped amides and lactams as HCV NS3 protease inhibitors with improved potency and DMPK profile

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Latha G.; Sannigrahi, Mousumi; Bogen, Stephane; Pinto, Patrick; Chen, Kevin X.; Prongay, Andrew; Tong, Xiao; Cheng, K.-C.; Girijavallabhann, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F. George

    2010-09-03

    SAR studies on the extension of P3 unit of Boceprevir (1, SCH 503034) with amides and lactams and their synthesis is described. Extensive SAR studies resulted in the identification of 36 bearing 4,4-dimethyl lactam as the new P4 cap unit with improved potency (K*{sub i}, EC 90 = 70 nM) and pharmacokinetic properties (Rat AUC (PO) = 3.52 {micro}M h) compared to 1.

  11. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  12. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  13. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  14. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  15. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  16. Potencies and unblocking kinetic properties of antagonists at recombinant human NMDA receptors in a Xenopus oocytes model.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Tourette, Amélie; Cussac, Didier

    2015-05-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels are implicated in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, and a large number of pharmacological agents have been introduced that target the receptor via diverse mechanisms of action. Amongst others, subunit selectivity (in particular for the NR2B receptor subunit) and rapid unblocking kinetics have been put forward as favourable pharmacological properties of NMDA receptor-targeting drugs. Here, we describe a pharmacological characterization of human recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes in an electrophysiological set-up. Using this approach, we compare inhibitor potencies of several known NMDA receptor ligands as well as unblocking kinetic properties of selected compounds. All compounds tested had similar potencies at receptors containing NR2A or NR2B receptors with the exception of traxoprodil, which was selective for NR2B. The rank order of potency was (+)MK-801 > phencyclidine (PCP) ≈ traxoprodil > memantine ≈ ketamine > duloxetine. In line with its proposed rapid dissociation properties, the relatively well-tolerated drug memantine exhibits markedly faster unblocking than ketamine and PCP, similar to the low-affinity compound, duloxetine. Electrophysiological recording in Xenopus oocytes thus allows a relatively convenient comparison of key pharmacological parameters at recombinant human NMDA receptors. PMID:25604077

  17. Quantitative in vivo islet potency assay in normoglycemic nude mice correlates with primary graft function after clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Robert; Gmyr, Valery; Kremer, Bertrand; Hubert, Thomas; Soudan, Benoit; Lukowiak, Bruno; Vandewalle, Brigitte; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Pattou, Francois; Kerr-Conte, Julie

    2008-07-27

    Reliable assays are critically needed to monitor graft potency in islet transplantation (IT). We tested a quantitative in vivo islet potency assay (QIVIPA) based on human C-peptide (hCP) measurements in normoglycemic nude mice after IT under the kidney capsule. QIVIPA was initially tested by transplanting incremental doses of human islets. hCP levels in mice were correlated with the number of transplanted islet equivalents (r(2) = 0.6, P<0.01). We subsequently evaluated QIVIPA in eight islet preparations transplanted in type 1 diabetic patients. Conversely to standard criteria including islet mass, viability, purity, adenosine triphosphate content, or glucose stimulated insulin secretion, hCP in mice receiving 1% of the final islet product was correlated to primary graft function (hCP increase) after IT (r(2)=0.85, P<0.01). QIVIPA appears as a reliable test to monitor islet graft potency, applicable to validate new methods to produce primary islets or other human insulin secreting cells. PMID:18645503

  18. The rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test is a suitable method for batch potency testing of inactivated rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Krämer, B; Schildger, H; Behrensdorf-Nicol, H A; Hanschmann, K M; Duchow, K

    2009-04-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia proposes two methods for potency determination of inactivated rabies vaccines for veterinary use: The first one is a classical mouse challenge test, which is imprecise, time-consuming, and causes severe distress to the test animals. Alternatively, the potency may be determined serologically by measuring the neutralizing antibody titers induced after vaccination of mice by using a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Although this method is faster and less painful for the animals, it is not widely used yet, and only little data exist concerning the comparability of both methods. We have therefore performed a comparative study, in which we demonstrated a good correlation between the challenge test results and the mean titers determined by RFFIT. Furthermore, all vaccine batches failing the challenge test were also recognized as insufficient in the serological assay. This publication further describes the influence of different vaccine administration routes on the resulting antibody titers, and it proposes various modifications to the serological assay protocol which could improve its overall practicability. Finally, we recommend that the serological assay be used for the potency testing of inactivated rabies vaccines. PMID:19181541

  19. Inhibitory effects of herbal extracts on breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and structure-inhibitory potency relationship of isoflavonoids.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hirofumi; Satoh, Hiroki; Hori, Satoko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2010-01-01

    The inhibition of intestinal breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), which restricts the absorption of xenobiotics, may increase the systemic availability of its substrates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of herbal extracts and their constituents on BCRP-mediated transport. The inhibitory effects of 9 herbal extracts and 23 isoflavonoids, including soybean-derived isoflavones, on BCRP-mediated methotrexate (MTX) transport were evaluated using BCRP-expressing membrane vesicles. The structure-inhibitory potency relationship was investigated by multiple factor analysis. Extracts of soybean, Gymnema sylvestre, black cohosh and passion flower and rutin strongly inhibited BCRP-mediated transport of MTX at 1 mg/ml, while inhibition by chlorella, milk thistle and Siberian ginseng extracts was weak. Among the 23 isoflavonoids examined, all of which inhibited BCRP-mediated transport, coumestrol showed the most potent inhibition (IC(50)=63 nM). The inhibitory potencies of 6 isoflavonoid glucosides were 10- to 100-fold lower than those of the corresponding aglycones. The addition of a 5-hydroxyl or 6-methoxyl moiety tended to potentiate the inhibition. The inhibitory potency of daidzein was decreased 100-fold by 7-glucuronidation, but was virtually unaffected by 4'-sulfation. Thus, some herbal and dietary supplements and isoflavonoids may increase the systemic availability of BCRP substrates when concomitantly given orally. PMID:20460823

  20. Evaluating p97 Inhibitor Analogues for Potency against p97-p37 and p97-Npl4-Ufd1 Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gui, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Li, Shan; Wong, Daniel E; Moen, Derek R; Porubsky, Patrick R; Lin, Henry J; Schoenen, Frank J; Chou, Tsui-Fen

    2016-05-01

    We previously found that the p97 cofactor, p47, significantly decreased the potency of some ATP-competitive p97 inhibitors such as ML240 [2-(2-amino-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-1-yl)-N-benzyl-8-methoxyquinazolin-4-amine] and ML241 [2-(2H-benzo[b][1,4]oxazin-4(3H)-yl)-N-benzyl-5,6,7,8 tetrahydroquinazolin-4-amine]. In this study, we aimed to evaluate inhibitor potencies against two additional p97 cofactor complexes, p97-p37 and p97-Npl4-Ufd1. We focused on these two cofactor complexes, because the protein sequence of p37 is 50 % identical to that of p47, and the Npl4-Ufd1 heterodimer (NU) is the most-studied p97 cofactor complex. We screened 200 p97 inhibitor analogues for their ability to inhibit the ATPase activity of p97 alone and of p97-p37 and p97-NU complexes. In contrast to the effect of p47, p37 and NU did not significantly change the potencies of most of the compounds. These results highlight differences among p97 cofactors in influencing p97 conformation and effects of inhibitors on p97 complexes, as compared to p97 alone. Continued efforts are needed to advance the development of complex-specific p97 inhibitors. PMID:27043824

  1. Systematic Artifacts in Support Vector Regression-Based Compound Potency Prediction Revealed by Statistical and Activity Landscape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balfer, Jenny; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Support vector machines are a popular machine learning method for many classification tasks in biology and chemistry. In addition, the support vector regression (SVR) variant is widely used for numerical property predictions. In chemoinformatics and pharmaceutical research, SVR has become the probably most popular approach for modeling of non-linear structure-activity relationships (SARs) and predicting compound potency values. Herein, we have systematically generated and analyzed SVR prediction models for a variety of compound data sets with different SAR characteristics. Although these SVR models were accurate on the basis of global prediction statistics and not prone to overfitting, they were found to consistently mispredict highly potent compounds. Hence, in regions of local SAR discontinuity, SVR prediction models displayed clear limitations. Compared to observed activity landscapes of compound data sets, landscapes generated on the basis of SVR potency predictions were partly flattened and activity cliff information was lost. Taken together, these findings have implications for practical SVR applications. In particular, prospective SVR-based potency predictions should be considered with caution because artificially low predictions are very likely for highly potent candidate compounds, the most important prediction targets. PMID:25742011

  2. Anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane in goats: comparison with isoflurane and halothane.

    PubMed Central

    Hikasa, Y; Okuyama, K; Kakuta, T; Takase, K; Ogasawara, S

    1998-01-01

    The anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane were compared with those of isoflurane and halothane in goats. The (mean +/- SD) minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) was 0.96 +/- 0.12% for halothane, 1.29 +/- 0.11% for isoflurane, and 2.33 +/- 0.15% for sevoflurane. Cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane were examined at end-tidal concentrations equivalent to 1, 1.5 and 2 MAC during either spontaneous or controlled ventilation (SV or CV). During SV, there were no significant differences in respiration rate, tidal volume and minute ventilation between anesthetics. Dose-dependent decreases in both tidal volume and minute ventilation induced by halothane were greater than those by either sevoflurane or isoflurane. Hypercapnia and acidosis induced by sevoflurane were not significantly different from those by either isoflurane or halothane at 1 and 1.5 MAC, but were less than those by halothane at 2 MAC. There was no significant difference in heart rate between anesthetics during SV and CV. During SV, all anesthetics induced dose-dependent decreases in arterial pressure, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and left ventricular stroke work index. Systemic vascular resistance with isoflurane at 2 MAC was lower than that with sevoflurane. During CV, sevoflurane induced dose-dependent circulatory depression (decreases in arterial pressure, cardiac index, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and right ventricular minute work index), similar to isoflurane. Halothane did not significantly alter systemic vascular resistance from 1 to 2 MAC. PMID:9798097

  3. Nucleoside transporter subtype expression: effects on potency of adenosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, C J D; Powell, A E; Xiong, W; LaRivière, C G; Baldwin, S A; Cass, C E; Young, J D; Parkinson, F E

    2001-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (AK) inhibitors can enhance adenosine levels and potentiate adenosine receptor activation. As the AK inhibitors 5′ iodotubercidin (ITU) and 5-amino-5′-deoxyadenosine (NH2dAdo) are nucleoside analogues, we hypothesized that nucleoside transporter subtype expression can affect the potency of these inhibitors in intact cells.Three nucleoside transporter subtypes that mediate adenosine permeation of rat cells have been characterized and cloned: equilibrative transporters rENT1 and rENT2 and concentrative transporter rCNT2. We stably transfected rat C6 glioma cells, which express rENT2 nucleoside transporters, with rENT1 (rENT1-C6 cells) or rCNT2 (rCNT2-C6 cells) nucleoside transporters.We tested the effects of ITU and NH2dAdo on [3H]-adenosine uptake and conversion to [3H]-adenine nucleotides in the three cell types. NH2dAdo did not show any cell type selectivity. In contrast, ITU showed significant inhibition of [3H]-adenosine uptake and [3H]-adenine nucleotide formation at concentrations ⩽100 nM in rENT1-C6 cells, while concentrations ⩾3 μM were required for C6 or rCNT2-C6 cells.Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR; 100 nM), a selective inhibitor of rENT1, abolished the effects of nanomolar concentrations of ITU in rENT1-C6 cells.This study demonstrates that the effects of ITU, but not NH2dAdo, in whole cell assays are dependent upon nucleoside transporter subtype expression. Thus, cellular and tissue differences in expression of nucleoside transporter subtypes may affect the pharmacological actions of some AK inhibitors. PMID:11682452

  4. Affinity Maturation to Improve Human Monoclonal Antibody Neutralization Potency and Breadth against Hepatitis C Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Keck, Zhen-yong; Saha, Anasuya; Xia, Jinming; Conrad, Fraser; Lou, Jianlong; Eckart, Michael; Marks, James D.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2011-01-01

    A potent neutralizing antibody to a conserved hepatitis C virus (HCV) epitope might overcome its extreme variability, allowing immunotherapy. The human monoclonal antibody HC-1 recognizes a conformational epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein. Previous studies showed that HC-1 neutralizes most HCV genotypes but has modest potency. To improve neutralization, we affinity-matured HC-1 by constructing a library of yeast-displayed HC-1 single chain Fv (scFv) mutants, using for selection an E2 antigen from one of the poorly neutralized HCVpp. We developed an approach by parallel mutagenesis of the heavy chain variable (VH) and κ-chain variable (Vk) genes separately, then combining the optimized VH and Vk mutants. This resulted in the generation of HC-1-related scFv variants exhibiting improved affinities. The best scFv variant had a 92-fold improved affinity. After conversion to IgG1, some of the antibodies exhibited a 30-fold improvement in neutralization activity. Both surface plasmon resonance and solution kinetic exclusion analysis showed that the increase in affinity was largely due to a lowering of the dissociation rate constant, Koff. Neutralization against a panel of HCV pseudoparticles and infectious 2a HCV virus improved with the affinity-matured IgG1 antibodies. Interestingly, some of these antibodies neutralized a viral isolate that was not neutralized by wild-type HC-1. Moreover, propagating 2a HCVcc under the selective pressure of WT HC-1 or affinity-matured HC-1 antibodies yielded no viral escape mutants and, with the affinity-matured IgG1, needed 100-fold less antibody to achieve complete virus elimination. Taken together, these findings suggest that affinity-matured HC-1 antibodies are excellent candidates for therapeutic development. PMID:22002064

  5. Two routes to actorhood: lexicalized potency to act and identification of the actor role.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Sabine; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2015-01-01

    The inference of causality is a crucial cognitive ability and language processing is no exception: recent research suggests that, across different languages, the human language comprehension system attempts to identify the primary causer of the state of affairs described (the "actor") quickly and unambiguously (Bornkessel-Schlesewsky and Schlesewsky, 2009). This identification can take place verb-independently based on certain prominence cues (e.g., case, word order, animacy). Here, we present two experiments demonstrating that actor potential is also encoded at the level of individual nouns (a king is a better actor than a beggar). Experiment 1 collected ratings for 180 German nouns on 12 scales defined by adjective oppositions and deemed relevant for actorhood potential. By means of structural equation modeling, an actor potential (ACT) value was calculated for each noun. Experiment 2, an event-related potential study, embedded nouns from Experiment 1 in verb-final sentences, in which they were either actors or non-actors. N400 amplitude increased with decreasing ACT values and this modulation was larger for highly frequent nouns and for actor versus non-actor nouns. We argue that potency to act is lexically encoded for individual nouns and, since it modulates the N400 even for non-actor participants, it should be viewed as a property that modulates ease of lexical access (akin, for example, to lexical frequency). We conclude that two separate dimensions of actorhood computation are crucial to language comprehension: an experience-based, lexically encoded (bottom-up) representation of actorhood potential, and a prominence-based, computational mechanism for calculating goodness-of-fit to the actor role in a particular (top-down) sentence context. PMID:25688217

  6. Species diversity and cytotoxic potency of airborne sterigmatocystin-producing Aspergilli from the section Versicolores.

    PubMed

    Despot, Daniela Jakšić; Kocsubé, Sandor; Bencsik, Ottó; Kecskeméti, Anita; Szekeres, András; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Varga, Janos; Klarić, Maja Šegvić

    2016-08-15

    This study presents the distribution and species diversity of sterigmatocystin-producing Aspergilli from the section Versicolores in the indoor air of apartment-AP, basements-BS and grain mill-GM in Croatia, as well as the cytotoxic potency of isolates. The species comprised 0.7-20% of total airborne fungi detected in the AP, 11-55% in the BS, and 0-2% in the GM. Based on CaM sequences, seven species were identified; dominant were Aspergillus jensenii and Aspergillus creber, followed by Aspergillus protuberus, Aspergillus venenatus, Aspergillus tennesseensis, Aspergillus amoenus, Aspergillus griseoaurantiacus and three undescribed species. All of the identified species produced sterigmatocystin-STC (HPLC/UV-VIS); A. griseoaurantiacus (208.29μg/mL) and A. jensenii (1.192-133.63μg/mL) produced the highest levels, the lowest were detected in A. protuberus and A. tennesseensis (0.117-2.749μg/mL). Lower species diversity was obtained in the GM due to overgrowth with more propulsive fungi. Relatively high STC levels (0.06-2.35μg/g) detected in 52% of GM dust samples confirmed the presence of STC-producers, although this STC cannot be exclusively attributed to Aspergilli (Versicolores). STC and the majority of STC-producing Aspergilli were cytotoxic to human lung A549 cells (IC50 0.9-2.3μg/mL) and THP-1 macrophage-like cells (IC50 0.3-0.6μg/mL) in relatively low concentrations suggesting that humans can be at high risk during chronic exposure. PMID:27100010

  7. Two routes to actorhood: lexicalized potency to act and identification of the actor role

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Sabine; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2015-01-01

    The inference of causality is a crucial cognitive ability and language processing is no exception: recent research suggests that, across different languages, the human language comprehension system attempts to identify the primary causer of the state of affairs described (the “actor”) quickly and unambiguously (Bornkessel-Schlesewsky and Schlesewsky, 2009). This identification can take place verb-independently based on certain prominence cues (e.g., case, word order, animacy). Here, we present two experiments demonstrating that actor potential is also encoded at the level of individual nouns (a king is a better actor than a beggar). Experiment 1 collected ratings for 180 German nouns on 12 scales defined by adjective oppositions and deemed relevant for actorhood potential. By means of structural equation modeling, an actor potential (ACT) value was calculated for each noun. Experiment 2, an event-related potential study, embedded nouns from Experiment 1 in verb-final sentences, in which they were either actors or non-actors. N400 amplitude increased with decreasing ACT values and this modulation was larger for highly frequent nouns and for actor versus non-actor nouns. We argue that potency to act is lexically encoded for individual nouns and, since it modulates the N400 even for non-actor participants, it should be viewed as a property that modulates ease of lexical access (akin, for example, to lexical frequency). We conclude that two separate dimensions of actorhood computation are crucial to language comprehension: an experience-based, lexically encoded (bottom–up) representation of actorhood potential, and a prominence-based, computational mechanism for calculating goodness-of-fit to the actor role in a particular (top–down) sentence context. PMID:25688217

  8. Dual allosteric modulation of opioid antinociceptive potency by α2A-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Millecamps, Magali; Naso, Lina; Devost, Dominic; Trieu, Phan; Piltonen, Marjo; Diatchenko, Luda; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Wilcox, George L; Hébert, Terence E; Stone, Laura S

    2015-12-01

    Opioid and α2-adrenoceptor (AR) agonists are analgesic when administered in the spinal cord and show a clinically beneficial synergistic interaction when co-administered. However, α2-AR antagonists can also inhibit opioid antinociception, suggesting a complex interaction between the two systems. The α2A-AR subtype is necessary for spinal adrenergic analgesia and synergy with opioids for most agonist combinations. Therefore, we investigated whether spinal opioid antinociception and opioid-adrenergic synergy were under allosteric control of the α2A-AR. Drugs were administered intrathecally in wild type (WT) and α2A-knock-out (KO) mice and antinociception was measured using the hot water tail immersion or substance P behavioral assays. The α2A-AR agonist clonidine was less effective in α2A-KO mice in both assays. The absence of the α2A-AR resulted in 10-70-fold increases in the antinociceptive potency of the opioid agonists morphine and DeltII. In contrast, neither morphine nor DeltII synergized with clonidine in α2A-KO mice, indicating that the α2AAR has both positive and negative modulatory effects on opioid antinociception. Depletion of descending adrenergic terminals with 6-OHDA resulted in a significant decrease in morphine efficacy in WT but not in α2A-KO mice, suggesting that endogenous norepinephrine acts through the α2A-AR to facilitate morphine antinociception. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby ligand-occupied versus ligand-free α2A-AR produce distinct patterns of modulation of opioid receptor activation. In this model, agonist-occupied α2A-ARs potentiate opioid analgesia, while non-occupied α2A-ARs inhibit opioid analgesia. Exploiting such interactions between the two receptors could lead to the development of better pharmacological treatments for pain management. PMID:26254859

  9. Differential Potency of 2,6-Dimethylcyclohexanol Isomers for Positive Modulation of GABAA Receptor Currents.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Luvana; Croft, Celine J; Goel, Shikha; Zaman, Naina; Tai, Angela C-S; Walch, Erin M; Smith, Kelly; Page, Alexandra; Shea, Kevin M; Hall, C Dennis; Jishkariani, D; Pillai, Girinath G; Hall, Adam C

    2016-06-01

    GABAA receptors meet all of the pharmacological requirements necessary to be considered important targets for the action of general anesthetic agents in the mammalian brain. In the following patch-clamp study, the relative modulatory effects of 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol diastereomers were investigated on human GABAA (α1β3γ2s) receptor currents stably expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. Cis,cis-, trans,trans-, and cis,trans-isomers were isolated from commercially available 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol and were tested for positive modulation of submaximal GABA responses. For example, the addition of 30 μM cis,cis-isomer resulted in an approximately 2- to 3-fold enhancement of the EC20 GABA current. Coapplications of 30 μM 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol isomers produced a range of positive enhancements of control GABA responses with a rank order for positive modulation: cis,cis > trans,trans ≥ mixture of isomers > > cis,trans-isomer. In molecular modeling studies, the three cyclohexanol isomers bound with the highest binding energies to a pocket within transmembrane helices M1 and M2 of the β3 subunit through hydrogen-bonding interactions with a glutamine at the 224 position and a tyrosine at the 220 position. The energies for binding to and hydrogen-bond lengths within this pocket corresponded with the relative potencies of the agents for positive modulation of GABAA receptor currents (cis,cis > trans,trans > cis,trans-2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol). In conclusion, the stereochemical configuration within the dimethylcyclohexanols is an important molecular feature in conferring positive modulation of GABAA receptor activity and for binding to the receptor, a consideration that needs to be taken into account when designing novel anesthetics with enhanced therapeutic indices. PMID:27029583

  10. Stem Cells Expanded from the Human Embryonic Hindbrain Stably Retain Regional Specification and High Neurogenic Potency

    PubMed Central

    Tailor, Jignesh; Kittappa, Raja; Leto, Ketty; Gates, Monte; Borel, Melodie; Paulsen, Ole; Spitzer, Sonia; Karadottir, Ragnhildur Thora; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell lines that faithfully maintain the regional identity and developmental potency of progenitors in the human brain would create new opportunities in developmental neurobiology and provide a resource for generating specialized human neurons. However, to date, neural progenitor cultures derived from the human brain have either been short-lived or exhibit restricted, predominantly glial, differentiation capacity. Pluripotent stem cells are an alternative source, but to ascertain definitively the identity and fidelity of cell types generated solely in vitro is problematic. Here, we show that hindbrain neuroepithelial stem (hbNES) cells can be derived and massively expanded from early human embryos (week 5–7, Carnegie stage 15–17). These cell lines are propagated in adherent culture in the presence of EGF and FGF2 and retain progenitor characteristics, including SOX1 expression, formation of rosette-like structures, and high neurogenic capacity. They generate GABAergic, glutamatergic and, at lower frequency, serotonergic neurons. Importantly, hbNES cells stably maintain hindbrain specification and generate upper rhombic lip derivatives on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). When grafted into neonatal rat brain, they show potential for integration into cerebellar development and produce cerebellar granule-like cells, albeit at low frequency. hbNES cells offer a new system to study human cerebellar specification and development and to model diseases of the hindbrain. They also provide a benchmark for the production of similar long-term neuroepithelial-like stem cells (lt-NES) from pluripotent cell lines. To our knowledge, hbNES cells are the first demonstration of highly expandable neuroepithelial stem cells derived from the human embryo without genetic immortalization. PMID:23884946

  11. Effects of Formulation on Microbicide Potency and Mitigation of the Development of Bacterial Insusceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Nicola L.; Forbes, Sarah; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Humphreys, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Risk assessments of the potential for microbicides to select for reduced bacterial susceptibility have been based largely on data generated through the exposure of bacteria to microbicides in aqueous solution. Since microbicides are normally formulated with multiple excipients, we have investigated the effect of formulation on antimicrobial activity and the induction of bacterial insusceptibility. We tested 8 species of bacteria (7 genera) before and after repeated exposure (14 passages), using a previously validated gradient plating system, for their susceptibilities to the microbicides benzalkonium chloride, benzisothiozolinone, chlorhexidine, didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride, DMDM-hydantoin, polyhexamethylene biguanide, thymol, and triclosan in aqueous solution (nonformulated) and in formulation with excipients often deployed in consumer products. Susceptibilities were also assessed following an additional 14 passages without microbicide to determine the stability of any susceptibility changes. MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were on average 11-fold lower for formulated microbicides than for nonformulated microbicides. After exposure to the antimicrobial compounds, of 72 combinations of microbicide and bacterium there were 19 ≥4-fold (mean, 8-fold) increases in MIC for nonformulated and 8 ≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MIC for formulated microbicides. Furthermore, there were 20 ≥4-fold increases in MBC (mean, 8-fold) for nonformulated and 10 ≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MBC for formulated microbicides. Susceptibility decreases fully or partially reverted back to preexposure values for 49% of MICs and 72% of MBCs after further passage. In summary, formulated microbicides exhibited greater antibacterial potency than unformulated actives and susceptibility decreases after repeated exposure were lower in frequency and extent. PMID:26253662

  12. Quaternary ammonium compounds as water channel blockers. Specificity, potency, and site of action.

    PubMed

    Detmers, Frank J M; de Groot, Bert L; Müller, E Matthias; Hinton, Andrew; Konings, Irene B M; Sze, Mozes; Flitsch, Sabine L; Grubmüller, Helmut; Deen, Peter M T

    2006-05-19

    Excessive water uptake through Aquaporins (AQP) can be life-threatening and reversible AQP inhibitors are needed. Here, we determined the specificity, potency, and binding site of tetraethylammonium (TEA) to block Aquaporin water permeability. Using oocytes, externally applied TEA blocked AQP1/AQP2/AQP4 with IC50 values of 1.4, 6.2, and 9.8 microM, respectively. Related tetraammonium compounds yielded some (propyl) or no (methyl, butyl, or pentyl) inhibition. TEA inhibition was lost upon a Tyr to Phe amino acid switch in the external water pore of AQP1/AQP2/AQP4, whereas the water permeability of AQP3 and AQP5, which lack a corresponding Tyr, was not blocked by TEA. Consistent with experimental data, multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations showed one stable binding site for TEA, but not tetramethyl (TMA), in AQP1, resulting in a nearly 50% water permeability inhibition, which was reduced in AQP1-Y186F due to effects on the TEA inhibitory binding region. Moreover, in the simulation TEA interacted with charged residues in the C (Asp128) and E (Asp185) loop, and the A(Tyr37-Asn42-Thr44) loop of the neighboring monomer, but not directly with Tyr186. The loss of TEA inhibition in oocytes expressing properly folded AQP1-N42A or -T44A is in line with the computationally predicted binding mode. Our data reveal that the molecular interaction of TEA with AQP1 differs and is about 1000-fold more effective on AQPs than on potassium channels. Moreover, the observed experimental and simulated similarities open the way for rational design and virtual screening for AQP-specific inhibitors, with quaternary ammonium compounds in general, and TEA in particular as a lead compound. PMID:16551622

  13. Effects of Formulation on Microbicide Potency and Mitigation of the Development of Bacterial Insusceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Nicola L; Forbes, Sarah; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Humphreys, Gavin J; McBain, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Risk assessments of the potential for microbicides to select for reduced bacterial susceptibility have been based largely on data generated through the exposure of bacteria to microbicides in aqueous solution. Since microbicides are normally formulated with multiple excipients, we have investigated the effect of formulation on antimicrobial activity and the induction of bacterial insusceptibility. We tested 8 species of bacteria (7 genera) before and after repeated exposure (14 passages), using a previously validated gradient plating system, for their susceptibilities to the microbicides benzalkonium chloride, benzisothiozolinone, chlorhexidine, didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride, DMDM-hydantoin, polyhexamethylene biguanide, thymol, and triclosan in aqueous solution (nonformulated) and in formulation with excipients often deployed in consumer products. Susceptibilities were also assessed following an additional 14 passages without microbicide to determine the stability of any susceptibility changes. MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were on average 11-fold lower for formulated microbicides than for nonformulated microbicides. After exposure to the antimicrobial compounds, of 72 combinations of microbicide and bacterium there were 19≥4-fold (mean, 8-fold) increases in MIC for nonformulated and 8≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MIC for formulated microbicides. Furthermore, there were 20≥4-fold increases in MBC (mean, 8-fold) for nonformulated and 10≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MBC for formulated microbicides. Susceptibility decreases fully or partially reverted back to preexposure values for 49% of MICs and 72% of MBCs after further passage. In summary, formulated microbicides exhibited greater antibacterial potency than unformulated actives and susceptibility decreases after repeated exposure were lower in frequency and extent. PMID:26253662

  14. SAMHD1 Specifically Affects the Antiviral Potency of Thymidine Analog HIV Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ballana, Ester; Badia, Roger; Terradas, Gerard; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Ruiz, Alba; Pauls, Eduardo; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Clotet, Bonaventura; Martí, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Sterile alpha motif and histidine-aspartic domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase recently recognized as an antiviral factor that acts by depleting dNTP availability for viral reverse transcriptase (RT). SAMHD1 restriction is counteracted by the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) accessory protein Vpx, which targets SAMHD1 for proteosomal degradation, resulting in an increased availability of dNTPs and consequently enhanced viral replication. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), one of the most common agents used in antiretroviral therapy, compete with intracellular dNTPs as the substrate for viral RT. Consequently, SAMHD1 activity may be influencing NRTI efficacy in inhibiting viral replication. Here, a panel of different RT inhibitors was analyzed for their different antiviral efficacy depending on SAMHD1. Antiviral potency was measured for all the inhibitors in transformed cell lines and primary monocyte-derived macrophages and CD4+ T cells infected with HIV-1 with or without Vpx. No changes in sensitivity to non-NRTI or the integrase inhibitor raltegravir were observed, but for NRTI, sensitivity significantly changed only in the case of the thymidine analogs (AZT and d4T). The addition of exogenous thymidine mimicked the change in viral sensitivity observed after Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation, pointing toward a differential effect of SAMHD1 activity on thymidine. Accordingly, sensitivity to AZT was also reduced in CD4+ T cells infected with HIV-2 compared to infection with the HIV-2ΔVpx strain. In conclusion, reduction of SAMHD1 levels significantly decreases HIV sensitivity to thymidine but not other nucleotide RT analog inhibitors in both macrophages and lymphocytes. PMID:24913159

  15. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer.

    PubMed

    Mesonero, Alexander; Suarez, David L; van Santen, Edzard; Tang, De-Chu C; Toro, Haroldo

    2011-06-01

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibody persistence, transfer of maternal antibodies (MtAb), and interference between MtAb and active in ovo or mucosal immunization with RCA-free recombinant Ad expressing a codon-optimized AIV H5 HA gene from A/turkey/WI/68 (AdTW68.H5(ck)). Vaccine coverage and intrapotency test repeatability were based on anti-H5 hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels detected in in ovo vaccinated chickens. Even though egg inoculation of each replicate was performed by individuals with varying expertise and with different vaccine batches, the average vaccine coverage of three replicates was 85%. The intrapotency test repeatability, which considers both positive as well as negative values, varied between 0.69 and 0.71, indicating effective vaccination. Highly pathogenic (HP) AIV challenge of chicken groups vaccinated with increasing vaccine doses showed 90% protection in chickens receiving > or = 10(8) ifu (infectious units)/bird. The protective dose 50% (PD50) was determined to be 10(6.5) ifu. Even vaccinated chickens that did not develop detectable antibody levels were effectively protected against HP AIV challenge. This result is consistent with previous findings ofAd-vector eliciting T lymphocyte responses. Higher vaccine doses significantly reduced viral shedding as determined by AIV RNA concentration in oropharyngeal swabs. Assessment of antibody persistence showed that antibody levels of in ovo immunized chickens continued to increase until 12 wk and started to decline after 18 wk of age. Intramuscular (IM) booster vaccination with the same vaccine at 16 wk of age significantly increased the antibody responses in breeder hens, and these responses were maintained at high

  16. Special Higher Education Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Meyer

    1982-01-01

    Cites works relevant to the higher education of Blacks and minority group members. Lists references alphabetically under the following headings: (1) financial aid on the campus; (2) Chicanos in higher education; and (3) race and equality on California campuses. (GC)

  17. Odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc table wines and icewines by gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Amy J; Reynolds, Andrew G

    2012-03-21

    This study aimed to elucidate the odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc (syn. Vidal) table wines and icewines from the Niagara Peninsula using stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry. Dilution analysis determined the most odor-potent compounds in Vidal and Riesling icewines (n = 2) and table wines (n = 2) from a commercial producer. The top 15 odor-potent compounds in each wine were identified and quantified, resulting in 23 and 24 compounds for Riesling and Vidal, respectively. The most odor-potent compounds were β-damascenone, decanal, 1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 4-vinylguaiacol, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl 3-methylbutyrate. In general, icewines had higher concentrations of most aroma compounds compared to table wines. Through computation of odor activity values, the compounds with the highest odor activity for the icewines were β-damascenone, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl octanoate, cis-rose oxide, and ethyl hexanoate. In table wines the highest odor activity values were found for ethyl octanoate, β-damascenone, ethyl hexanoate, cis-rose oxide, ethyl 3-methylbutyrate, and 4-vinylguaiacol. These findings provide a foundation to determine impact odorants in icewines and the effects of viticultural and enological practices on wine aroma volatile composition. PMID:22324474

  18. Spotlight on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Donna; Iwanowski, Jay

    1997-01-01

    A number of current issues and initiatives in higher education are highlighted, including impending reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, the need for advocacy of higher education in public policy arenas, a University of Florida program combining accountability and institutional autonomy, and institutional compliance with nonresident alien…

  19. Higher Education Exchange, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" discuss the concept of growing public scholars; each contribution incorporates a student component. Articles include: (1) "Foreword"…

  20. The Higher Education Enterprise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottinger, Cecilia A.

    1991-01-01

    Higher education not only contributes to the development of the human resources and intellectual betterment of the nation but is also a major economic enterprise. This research brief reviews and highlights data on the size and growth of higher education and illustrates how higher education institutions are preparing the future labor force. It…

  1. Nano-titanium dioxide modulates the dermal sensitization potency of DNCB

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We determined the ability of a model nanoparticle (NP) (titanium dioxide, TiO2) to modulate sensitization induced by a known potent dermal sensitizer (dinitrochlorobenzene) using a variant of the local lymph node assay called lymph node proliferation assay. BALB/c mice received sub-cutaneous injections of vehicle (2.5 mM sodium citrate), TiO2 NPs (0.004, 0.04 or 0.4 mg/ml) or pigment particles (0.04 mg/ml) both stabilized in sodium citrate buffer at the base of each ear (2x50μl), before receiving dermal applications (on both ears) of 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) (2x25μl of 0.1%) or its vehicle (acetone olive oil – AOO (4:1)) on days 0, 1 and 2. On day 5, the stimulation index (SI) was calculated as a ratio of 3HTdR incorporation in lymphocytes from DNBC-treated mice and AOO-treated controls. In a second experiment the EC3-value for DNCB (0 to 0.1%) was assessed in the absence or presence of 0.04 mg/ml TiO2. In a third experiment, the lymphocyte subpopulations and the cytokine secretion profile were analyzed after TiO2 (0.04 mg/ml) and DNCB (0.1%) treatment. Injection of NPs in AOO-treated control mice did not have any effect on lymph node (LN) proliferation. DNCB sensitization resulted in LN proliferation, which was further increased by injection of TiO2 NPs before DNCB sensitization. The EC3 of DNCB, with prior injection of vehicle control was 0.041%, while injection with TiO2 decreased the EC3 of DNCB to 0.015%. TiO2 NPs pre-treatment did not alter the lymphocyte subpopulations, but significantly increased the level of IL-4 and decreased IL-10 production in DNCB treated animals. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that administration of nano-TiO2 increases the dermal sensitization potency of DNCB, by augmenting a Th2 response, showing the immunomodulatory abilities of NPs. PMID:22621278

  2. Development of a carcinogenic potency index for dermal exposure to viscous oil products.

    PubMed

    Brandt, H C; Booth, E D; de Groot, P C; Watson, W P

    1999-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) present in oil streams and formulated products are important determinants of possible carcinogenicity. Following dermal exposures the transport of the PACs from oil (the carrier) into the skin is a factor that may affect macromolecular (DNA) adduct formation and thus determine carcinogenicity. We have developed a mathematical model, which describes the flux into the skin for a representative carcinogenic PAC, benzo(a)pyrene. The model is based on measurements of the amount of benzo(a)pyrene bound to skin DNA or blood observed in mouse skin painting studies. The degree of adduct formation from a particular oil product, which we term the Bioavailability Index (BI), was shown to be a function of both the viscosity of the oil product, which affected the transport of the PAC through the carrier, and the aromaticity, which affected the partition of PAC between the carrier and the skin. Literature data were analysed from mouse skin painting studies with mineral oils of known carcinogenicity. A linear relationship was shown between the amount of DNA adduct formation, expressed as alkylation frequency, and the arithmetic product of the total (3-6) ring PAC content and the BI, which we have termed the Carcinogenic Potency Index (CPI). Comparison of literature data on DNA alkylation frequencies for oil products and their carcinogenicity indicated that oils giving rise to an alkylation frequency below a certain threshold (ca. 1 adduct in 10(8) nucleotides) are non-carcinogenic to mouse skin. This threshold level can be translated into a value for the CPI, below which the genotoxic carcinogenic risk arising from skin contact with the oil product is considered to be negligible. The CPI for bitumens is well below this value, being both due to the low BI from bitumen, but more so, due to their low PAC content. For some bitumens diluted with solvents, i.e. cutback-bitumens, the CPI may exceed this value, indicating a possible carcinogenic risk

  3. Teratogenic potency of valproate analogues evaluated by quantitative estimation of cellular morphology in vitro.

    PubMed

    Berezin, V; Kawa, A; Bojic, U; Foley, A; Nau, H; Regan, C; Edvardsen, K; Bock, E

    1996-10-01

    To develop a simple prescreening system for teratogenicity testing, a novel in vitro assay was established using computer assisted microscopy allowing automatic delineation of contours of stained cells and thereby quantitative determination of cellular morphology. The effects of valproic acid (VPA) and analogues with high as well as low teratogenic activities-(as previously determined in vivo)-were used as probes for study of the discrimination power of the in vitro model. VPA, a teratogenic analogue (+/-)-4-en-VPA, and a non-teratogenic analogue (E)-2-en-VPA, as well as the purified (S)- and (R)-enantiomers of 4-yn-VPA (teratogenic and non-teratogenic, respectively), were tested for their effects on cellular morphology of cloned mouse fibroblastoid L-cell lines, neuroblastoma N2a cells, and rat glioma BT4Cn cells, and were found to induce varying increases in cellular area: Furthermore, it was demonstrated that under the chosen conditions the increase in area correlated statistically significantly with the teratogenic potency of the employed compounds. Setting the cellular area of mouse L-cells to 100% under control conditions, the most pronounced effect was observed for (S)-4-yn-VPA (211%, P = < 0.001) followed by VPA (186%, P < 0.001), 4-en-VPA (169%, P < 0.001) and non-teratogenic 2-en-VPA (137%, P < 0.005) and (R)-4-yn-VPA (105%). This effect was independent of the choice of substrata, since it was observed on L-cells grown on plastic, fibronectin, laminin and Matrigel. However, when VPA-treated cells were exposed to an arginyl-glycyl-aspartate (RGD)-containing peptide to test whether VPA treatment was able to modulate RGD-dependent integrin interactions with components of the extracellular matrix, hardly any effect could be observed, whereas control cells readily detached from the substratum, indicating a changed substrate adhesion of the VPA-treated cells. The data thus indicate that measurement of cellular area may serve as a simple in vitro test in the

  4. Chimeric D1/D2 dopamine receptors. Distinct determinants of selective efficacy, potency, and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Kozell, L B; Machida, C A; Neve, R L; Neve, K A

    1994-12-01

    D1/D2 chimeras were constructed that had D1 dopamine receptor sequence at the amino-terminal end and D2 dopamine receptor sequence at the carboxyl-terminal end. The chimeras with the first four, five and six transmembrane domains of the D1 receptor (CH2, CH3, CH4, respectively) bound the D1 receptor antagonist [3H]SCH 23390 with high affinity. Reciprocal chimeras constructed with D2 receptor sequence at the amino-terminal end displayed no detectable specific binding of [3H]SCH 23390, [125I]epidepride, or [3H]spiperone. CH2, CH3, and CH4 had lower affinity than either D1 or D2 dopamine receptors for the nonselective antagonists and agonists and D2-selective antagonists tested. The chimeric receptors had affinities for three D1-selective ligands and the D2-selective agonist, quinpirole, that were intermediate between D1 and D2 receptor affinities for the drugs. The substantial loss or gain of affinity for three ligands upon replacement of D1 transmembrane VII with D2 sequence (CH4) suggests an important role for this region in the selectivity of these drugs. Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by D1 agonists occurred in cells expressing CH3 and CH4, both of which included the D1 third cytoplasmic loop, but not in cells expressing CH1 or CH2, both with the D2 third cytoplasmic loop. However, only CH3 was able to mediate stimulation of adenylyl cyclase by quinpirole, implying that D2 receptor transmembrane domain VI was an important determinant of the selective efficacy of quinpirole. On the other hand, transmembrane domain VII was particularly important for the selective potency of quinpirole. Inhibition of beta-adrenergic receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity by dopamine was seen in cells expressing D2 receptors and CH1, but not CH2, CH3, or CH4. Thus, the third cytoplasmic loop of D1 dopamine receptors was crucial for the coupling of the receptors to Gs, but inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via Gi required structural features, such as the second

  5. Jointly handling potency and toxicity of antimicrobial peptidomimetics by simple rules from desirability theory and chemoinformatics.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Borges, Fernanda; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2011-12-27

    Today, emerging and increasing resistance to antibiotics has become a threat to public health worldwide. Antimicrobial peptides have unique action mechanisms making them an attractive therapeutic prospect to be applied against resistant bacteria. However, the major drawback is related with their high hemolytic activity which cancels out the safety requirements for a human antibiotic. Therefore, additional efforts are needed to develop new antimicrobial peptides that possess a greater potency for bacterial cells and less or no toxicity over erythrocytes. In this paper, we introduce a practical approach to simultaneously deal with these two conflicting properties. The convergence of machine learning techniques and desirability theory allowed us to derive a simple, predictive, and interpretable multicriteria classification rule for simultaneously handling the antibacterial and hemolytic properties of a set of cyclic β-hairpin cationic peptidomimetics (Cβ-HCPs). The multicriteria classification rule exhibited a prediction accuracy of about 80% on training and external validation sets. Results from an additional concordance test have shown an excellent agreement between the multicriteria classification rule predictions and the predictions from independent classifiers for complementary antibacterial and hemolytic activities, respectively, evidencing the reliability of the multicriteria classification rule. The rule was also consistent with the general mode of action of cationic peptides pointing out its biophysical relevance. We also propose a multicriteria virtual screening strategy based on the joint use of the multicriteria classification rule, desirability, similarity, and chemometrics concepts. The ability of such a virtual screening strategy to prioritize selective (nonhemolytic) antibacterial Cβ-HCPs was assessed and challenged for their predictivity regarding the training, validation, and overall data. In doing so, we were able to rank a selective

  6. The effect of glucose on the potency of two distinct glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Birgitte; Westergaard, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Two distinct glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors, 5-chloro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid [1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-2-(4-hydroxy-piperidin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl]amide (CP-320,626) and 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-D-arabinitol (DAB), were characterized in vitro with respect to the influence of glucose on their potencies. CP-320,626 has previously been shown to bind to a newly characterized indole site, whereas DAB seems to act as a glucose analogue, but with slightly different properties from those of glucose. When analysed in pig liver glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa) activity assays, the two inhibitors showed very different properties. When GPa activity was measured in the physiological direction (glycogenolysis), DAB was the most potent inhibitor with an IC(50) value of 740+/-9 nM compared with the IC(50) value for CP-320-626 of 2.39+/-0.37 microM. There was no effect of glucose on the inhibitory properties of DAB, whereas a glucose analogue N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (1-GlcNAc) antagonized the effect of DAB. Likewise, there was no synergistic effect of CP-320,626 and glucose, whereas CP-320,626 and 1-GlcNAc inhibited GPa in synergy. Moreover, the synergistic effect of glucose and CP-320,626 was GPa-isoform-specific, since CP-320,626 and glucose inhibited rabbit muscle GPa in synergy when the GPa activity was measured towards glycogenolysis. When GPa activity was measured towards glycogen synthesis, CP-320,626 showed a synergistic effect with glucose, whereas the effect of DAB was slightly antagonized by glucose in this assay direction. Caffeine was included in the investigation as a control GP inhibitor, and both glucose and 1-GlcNAc potentiated the effect of caffeine independent of the assay direction. In primary cultured rat hepatocytes 1-GlcNAc and CP-320,626 inhibited basal and glucagon-induced glycogenolysis in synergy, whereas the ability of DAB to inhibit basal or glucagon-induced glycogenolysis was unaltered by 1-GlcNAc. Glucose had no effect on either CP-320,626 or DAB

  7. AB269. Optimizing recovery of potency and continence during radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    commonly used penile rehabilitation methods. Currently, the body of evidence does seem to suggest a beneficial role for penile rehabilitation after prostatectomy in improving return of potency. Such a program should begin with a detailed evaluation on the preoperative sexual performance characteristic of the patient and then a thorough discussion of the available rehabilitation regiments. The practitioner should consider factors that are important to the patient including ease of use and compliance, patient motivation, conditioning, cost and patient expectations about sexual function, and penile length. Penile rehabilitation may continue to remain investigative until more standardized clinical data becomes available.

  8. Increased potency of BioThrax anthrax vaccine with the addition of the C-class CpG oligonucleotide adjuvant CPG 10109.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mili; Hine, Paul M; James Jackson, W; Giri, Lallan; Nabors, Gary S

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of an adjuvant, in addition to the existing aluminum hydroxide, in the formulation of the licensed anthrax vaccine BioThrax may have the potential to positively modify immune responses. Some potential desirable outcomes from the inclusion of an additional adjuvant include increased immune response kinetics, increased response rates, more prolonged antibody decay rates, and the ability to use less antigen per dose or fewer doses to achieve immunity. One promising group of adjuvants that is being investigated with a variety of vaccines and which has been shown to cause many of these effects are oligonucleotides which contain unmethylated CpG motifs. The C-class oligonucleotide CPG 10109, constructed of a mixed phosphorothioate/phosphodiester backbone and containing 3 CpG motifs, was added to various dilutions of BioThrax and used in mouse and guinea pig immunogenicity studies. Anti-protective antigen (PA) IgG ELISAs and the anthrax toxin neutralization assay (TNA) were performed on serum samples from both species. Anti-PA IgG and TNA responses were approximately 10-fold higher after a single dose of undiluted or diluted BioThrax upon addition of 100 microg CPG 10109 in the mouse regardless of the route of immunization. Responses were also significantly greater in the guinea pig after receiving CpG-adjuvanted undiluted BioThrax or CpG-adjuvanted BioThrax diluted 1:5, 1:10 or 1:30 compared to those achieved with BioThrax alone. A guinea pig spore challenge study showed that a single injection of BioThrax vaccine diluted 1:10 in the presence of 25 microg CPG 10109 was as protective as undiluted BioThrax, whereas a single injection of BioThrax diluted 1:10 was not protective. Taken together with the results from the immunogenicity studies, these results suggest that a CpG adjuvant could be used to reduce the dose of active ingredient required to elicit a protective response, and could lead to improved immune response kinetics. PMID:16973247

  9. Granular Activated Carbon Treatment May Result in Higher Predicted Genotoxicity in the Presence of Bromide.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W; Lee, Tiffany Chih Fen; Westerhoff, Paul; Fischer, Natalia; Hanigan, David; Karanfil, Tanju; Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Taylor-Edmonds, Liz; Andrews, Robert C

    2016-09-01

    Certain unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are more of a health concern than regulated DBPs. Brominated species are typically more cytotoxic and genotoxic than their chlorinated analogs. The impact of granular activated carbon (GAC) on controlling the formation of regulated and selected unregulated DBPs following chlorine disinfection was evaluated. The predicted cyto- and genotoxicity of DBPs was calculated using published potencies based on the comet assay for Chinese hamster ovary cells (assesses the level of DNA strand breaks). Additionally, genotoxicity was measured using the SOS-Chromotest (detects DNA-damaging agents). The class sum concentrations of trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, and unregulated DBPs, and the SOS genotoxicity followed the breakthrough of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), however the formation of brominated species did not. The bromide/DOC ratio was higher than the influent through much of the breakthrough curve (GAC does not remove bromide), which resulted in elevated brominated DBP concentrations in the effluent. Based on the potency of the haloacetonitriles and halonitromethanes, these nitrogen-containing DBPs were the driving agents of the predicted genotoxicity. GAC treatment of drinking or reclaimed waters with appreciable levels of bromide and dissolved organic nitrogen may not control the formation of unregulated DBPs with higher genotoxicity potencies. PMID:27467860

  10. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo clastogenic potency based on benchmark dose analysis of flow cytometric micronucleus data.

    PubMed

    Bemis, Jeffrey C; Wills, John W; Bryce, Steven M; Torous, Dorothea K; Dertinger, Stephen D; Slob, Wout

    2016-05-01

    The application of flow cytometry as a scoring platform for both in vivo and in vitro micronucleus (MN) studies has enabled the efficient generation of high quality datasets suitable for comprehensive assessment of dose-response. Using this information, it is possible to obtain precise estimates of the clastogenic potency of chemicals. We illustrate this by estimating the in vivo and the in vitro potencies of seven model clastogenic agents (melphalan, chlorambucil, thiotepa, 1,3-propane sultone, hydroxyurea, azathioprine and methyl methanesulfonate) by deriving BMDs using freely available BMD software (PROAST). After exposing male rats for 3 days with up to nine dose levels of each individual chemical, peripheral blood samples were collected on Day 4. These chemicals were also evaluated for in vitro MN induction by treating TK6 cells with up to 20 concentrations in quadruplicate. In vitro MN frequencies were determined via flow cytometry using a 96-well plate autosampler. The estimated in vitro and in vivo BMDs were found to correlate to each other. The correlation showed considerable scatter, as may be expected given the complexity of the whole animal model versus the simplicity of the cell culture system. Even so, the existence of the correlation suggests that information on the clastogenic potency of a compound can be derived from either whole animal studies or cell culture-based models of chromosomal damage. We also show that the choice of the benchmark response, i.e. the effect size associated with the BMD, is not essential in establishing the correlation between both systems. Our results support the concept that datasets derived from comprehensive genotoxicity studies can provide quantitative dose-response metrics. Such investigational studies, when supported by additional data, might then contribute directly to product safety investigations, regulatory decision-making and human risk assessment. PMID:26049158

  11. Inhibitory potency of quinolone antibacterial agents against cytochrome P450IA2 activity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fuhr, U; Anders, E M; Mahr, G; Sörgel, F; Staib, A H

    1992-01-01

    Inhibition of cytochrome P450IA2 activity is an important adverse effect of quinolone antibacterial agents. It results in a prolonged half-life for some drugs that are coadministered with quinolones, such as theophylline. The objective of the study described here was to define the parameters for quantifying the inhibitory potencies of quinolones against cytochrome P450IA2 in vivo and in vitro and to investigate the relationship between the results of both approaches. Cytochrome P450IA2 activity in vitro was measured by using the 3-demethylation rate of caffeine (500 microM) in human liver microsomes. The inhibitory potency of a quinolone in vitro was determined by calculating the decrease in the activity of cytochrome P450IA2 caused by addition of the quinolone (500 microM) into the incubation medium. The mean values (percent reduction of activity without quinolone) were as follows: enoxacin, 74.9%; ciprofloxacin, 70.4%; nalidixic acid, 66.6%; pipemidic acid, 59.3%; norfloxacin, 55.7%; lomefloxacin, 23.4%; pefloxacin, 22.0%; amifloxacin, 21.4%; difloxacin, 21.3%; ofloxacin, 11.8%; temafloxacin, 10.0%; fleroxacin, no effect. The inhibitory potency of a quinolone in vivo was defined by a dose- and bioavailability-normalized parameter calculated from changes of the elimination half-life of theophylline and/or caffeine reported in previously published studies. Taking the pharmacokinetics of the quinolones into account, it was possible to differentiate between substances with and without clinically relevant inhibitory effects by using results of in vitro investigations. The in vitro test described here may help to qualitatively predict the relevant drug interactions between quinolones and methylxanthines that occur during therapy. PMID:1510417

  12. Development and validation of a quantitative competitive ELISA for potency testing of equine anti rabies sera with other potential use.

    PubMed

    Korimbocus, Jehanara; Dehay, Nicolas; Tordo, Noël; Cano, François; Morgeaux, Sylvie

    2016-06-14

    In case of a bite by a rabies infected animal, the World Health Organisation recommends a prophylactic treatment including the administration of Human Rabies Immunoglobulins (HRIGs) or highly purified F(ab')2 fragments produced from Equine Rabies Immunoglobulin (F(ab')2 - ERIGs). According to international regulation, quality control of F(ab')2 - ERIGs lots requires potency testing by the in vivo Mouse Neutralisation Test (MNT) prior marketing. However, the strategy of the 3Rs (Reduce, Refine, Replace) for animal testing required by the European Directive encourages the replacement of the in vivo potency test by an in vitro assay. In this context, a competitive ELISA method (c-ELISA) has been developed by the Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Médicament et des Produits de Santé where F(ab')2 - ERIGs are in competition with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the trimeric native form of the rabies glycoprotein. After a full validation study, the c-ELISA has been applied to commercial batches of F(ab')2 - ERIGs. A correlation study with the MNT demonstrated a similarity between the two methods (r=0.751). Moreover, the c-ELISA method which does not need any species specific reagent has been applied to HRIGs potency testing as an alternative method to Rapid Fluorescent Focus Inhibition Test (RFFIT), thus avoiding the handling of live rabies virus in BSL3 containment. In conclusion, the c-ELISA has shown its potential to replace MNT and possibly RFFIT for the quantification of rabies immunoglobulin. After optimisation it may be used for the quantification of rabies immunoglobulin in any animal species, notably for rabies immunogenicity assay in mice. PMID:27151880

  13. Comparison of Emetic Potencies of the 8-Ketotrichothecenes Deoxynivalenol, 15-Acetyldeoxynivalenol, 3-Acetyldeoxynivalenol, Fusarenon X, and Nivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the acute toxic effects of trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON or vomitoxin), a known cause of human food poisoning, have been well characterized in several animal species, much less is known about closely related 8-ketotrichothecenes that similarly occur in cereal grains colonized by toxigenic fusaria. To address this, we compared potencies of DON, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), fusarenon X (FX), and nivalenol (NIV) in the mink emesis model following intraperitoneal (ip) and oral administration. All five congeners dose-dependently induced emesis by both administration methods. With increasing doses, there were marked decreases in latency to emesis with corresponding increases in emesis duration and number of emetic events. The effective doses resulting in emetic events in 50% of the animals for ip exposure to DON, 15-ADON, 3-ADON, FX, and NIV were 80, 170, 180, 70, and 60 µg/kg bw, respectively, and for oral exposure, they were 30, 40, 290, 30, and 250 µg/kg bw, respectively. The emetic potency of DON determined here was comparable to that reported in analogous studies conducted in pigs and dogs, suggesting that the mink is a suitable small animal model for investigating acute trichothecene toxicity. The use of a mouse pica model, based on the consumption of kaolin, was also evaluated as a possible surrogate for studying emesis but was found unsuitable. From a public health perspective, comparative emetic potency data derived from small animal models such as the mink should be useful for establishing toxic equivalency factors for DON and other trichothecenes. PMID:22997060

  14. Co-administration of antigen with chemokine MCP-3 or MDC/CCL22 enhances DNA vaccine potency.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinmei; Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenliang; Yu, Ruishuang; Li, Qingli; Pang, Xiaobin

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the utility of chemokine MCP-3 and MDC/CCL22 as molecular adjuvants of DNA vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in a Balb/c mouse model. Notably, the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine against BoNT/A was not enhanced using a fusion of the AHc-C antigen with the MCP-3 or MDC/CCL22. Nevertheless, the potency of the DNA vaccine was significantly modulated and enhanced by co-administration of the AHc-C antigen with MCP-3 or MDC/CCL22. This strategy elicited high levels of humoral immune responses and protection against BoNT/A. The enhanced potency was further boosted by co-administration of the AHc-C antigen with both MCP-3 and MDC/CCL22 in Balb/c mice, but not by co-administration of AHc-C antigen with the MCP-3-MDC/CCL22 fusion. Co-immunization with both the MCP-3 and MDC/CCL22 constructs induced the highest levels of humoral immunity and protective potency against BoNT/A. Our results indicated that MCP-3 and MDC/CCL22 are effective molecular adjuvants of the immune responses induced by the AHc-C-expressing DNA vaccine when delivered by co-administration of the individual chemokines, but not when delivered in the form of a chemokine/antigen fusion. Thus, we describe an alternative strategy to the design and optimization of DNA vaccine constructs based on co-administration of the antigen with the chemokine rather than in the form of a chemokine/antigen fusion. PMID:25952465

  15. Potency enhancement of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist probe ML140 through sulfonamide constraint utilizing a tetrahydroisoquinoline motif.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Kevin J; Slauson, Stephen R; Lovell, Kimberly M; Phillips, Angela M; Streicher, John M; Zhou, Lei; Whipple, David A; Schoenen, Frank J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Bohn, Laura M; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2015-07-15

    Optimization of the sulfonamide-based kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist probe molecule ML140 through constraint of the sulfonamide nitrogen within a tetrahydroisoquinoline moiety afforded a marked increase in potency. This strategy, when combined with additional structure-activity relationship exploration, has led to a compound only six-fold less potent than norBNI, a widely utilized KOR antagonist tool compound, but significantly more synthetically accessible. The new optimized probe is suitably potent for use as an in vivo tool to investigate the therapeutic potential of KOR antagonists. PMID:25593096

  16. Enhanced Potency of a Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody In Vitro Improves Protection against Lentiviral Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Kwon, Young Do; Ko, Sung-Youl; Pegu, Amarendra; Louder, Mark K.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Xuejun; Shi, Wei; Yang, Zhi-yong; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Todd, John-Paul; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Eudailey, Joshua; Roberts, Kyle E.; Donald, Bruce R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Ledgerwood, Julie; Mullikin, James C.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Koup, Richard A.; Graham, Barney S.; Nason, Martha C.; Connors, Mark; Haynes, Barton F.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Roederer, Mario; Kwong, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the past 5 years, a new generation of highly potent and broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies has been identified. These antibodies can protect against lentiviral infection in nonhuman primates (NHPs), suggesting that passive antibody transfer would prevent HIV-1 transmission in humans. To increase the protective efficacy of such monoclonal antibodies, we employed next-generation sequencing, computational bioinformatics, and structure-guided design to enhance the neutralization potency and breadth of VRC01, an antibody that targets the CD4 binding site of the HIV-1 envelope. One variant, VRC07-523, was 5- to 8-fold more potent than VRC01, neutralized 96% of viruses tested, and displayed minimal autoreactivity. To compare its protective efficacy to that of VRC01 in vivo, we performed a series of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge experiments in nonhuman primates and calculated the doses of VRC07-523 and VRC01 that provide 50% protection (EC50). VRC07-523 prevented infection in NHPs at a 5-fold lower concentration than VRC01. These results suggest that increased neutralization potency in vitro correlates with improved protection against infection in vivo, documenting the improved functional efficacy of VRC07-523 and its potential clinical relevance for protecting against HIV-1 infection in humans. IMPORTANCE In the absence of an effective HIV-1 vaccine, alternative strategies are needed to block HIV-1 transmission. Direct administration of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies may be able to prevent HIV-1 infections in humans. This approach could be especially useful in individuals at high risk for contracting HIV-1 and could be used together with antiretroviral drugs to prevent infection. To optimize the chance of success, such antibodies can be modified to improve their potency, breadth, and in vivo half-life. Here, knowledge of the structure of a potent neutralizing antibody, VRC01, that targets the CD4-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope

  17. Chemical Modification of Recombinant Interleukin 2 by Polyethylene Glycol Increases Its Potency in the Murine Meth A Sarcoma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katre, Nandini V.; Knauf, Michael J.; Laird, Walter J.

    1987-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin 2 purified from Escherichia coli has limited solubility at neutral pH and a short circulatory half-life. This recombinant interleukin 2 was chemically modified by an active ester of polyethylene glycol. The modified interleukin 2 was purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. This conjugate was compared to unmodified recombinant interleukin 2 in vitro and in vivo. Covalent attachment of the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol enhanced the solubility of interleukin 2, decreased its plasma clearance, and increased its antitumor potency in the Meth A murine sarcoma model.

  18. Adenine Nucleotide Analogues Locked in a Northern Methanocarba Conformation: Enhanced Stability and Potency as P2Y1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, R. Gnana; Kim, Hak Sung; Servos, Jörg; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lee, Kyeong; Maddileti, Savitri; Boyer, José L.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Preference for the Northern (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of nucleotide 5′-triphosphate agonists at P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y11 receptors, but not P2Y6 receptors, was established using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a 3.1.0-bicyclohexane) ring as a ribose substitute (Kim et al. J. Med. Chem. 2002, 45, 208–218.). We have now combined the ring-constrained (N)-methanocarba modification of adenine nucleotides with other functionalities known to enhance potency at P2 receptors. The potency of the newly synthesized analogues was determined in the stimulation of phospholipase C through activation of turkey erythrocyte P2Y1 or human P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors stably expressed in astrocytoma cells. An (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio-ADP analogue displayed an EC50 at the hP2Y1 receptor of 0.40 nM and was 55-fold more potent than the corresponding triphosphate and 16-fold more potent than the riboside 5′-diphosphate. 2-Cl–(N)-methanocarba-ATP and its N6-Me analogue were also highly selective, full agonists at P2Y1 receptors. The (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio and 2-chloromonophosphate analogues were full agonists exhibiting micromolar potency at P2Y1 receptors, while the corresponding ribosides were inactive. Although β,γ-methylene-ATP was inactive at P2Y receptors, β,γ-methylene-(N)-methanocarba-ATP was a potent hP2Y1 receptor agonist with an EC50 of 160 nM and was selective versus hP2Y2 and hP2Y4 receptors. The rates of hydrolysis of Northern (N) and Southern (S) methanocarba analogues of AMP by rat 5′-ectonucleotidase were negligible. The rates of hydrolysis of the corresponding triphosphates by recombinant rat NTPDase1 and 2 were studied. Both isomers were hydrolyzed by NTPDase 1 at about half the rate of ATP hydrolysis. The (N) isomer was hardly hydrolyzed by NTPDase 2, while the (S) isomer was hydrolyzed at one-third of the rate of ATP hydrolysis. This suggests that new, more stable and selective nucleotide agonists may be designed on the basis of

  19. Reinventing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions are in the battle of a lifetime as they are coping with political and economic uncertainties, threats to federal aid, declining state support, higher tuition rates and increased competition from for-profit institutions. Amid all these challenges, these institutions are pressed to keep up with technological demands,…

  20. Higher Education in Arkansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Higher Education, Little Rock.

    This report presents information about higher education in Arkansas. Arkansas is 49th in the United States in the number of citizens over the age of 25 with a baccalaureate or higher degree. Arkansas faces shortages of qualified teachers and nurses in regions of the state at a time when the number of graduates in these professions is declining…

  1. Minorities in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justiz, Manuel J., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 19 papers on efforts to increase the participation of members of minority groups in higher education. The papers are: (1) "Demographic Trends and the Challenges to American Higher Education" (Manuel Justiz); (2) "Three Realities: Minority Life in the United States--The Struggle for Economic Equity (adapted by Don M. Blandin);…

  2. Reimagining Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulme, E. Eileen; Groom, David E., Jr.; Heltzel, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges facing higher education continue to mount. The shifting of the U.S. ethnic and racial demographics, the proliferation of advanced digital technologies and data, and the move from traditional degrees to continuous learning platforms have created an unstable environment to which Christian higher education must adapt in order to remain…

  3. Quality in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This volume contains 21 new and classic papers and readings on quality philosophies and concepts, first, as they have been applied in business and industry but primarily as they relate to and can be applied in higher education. The introduction is titled "The Quality Approach in Higher Education: Context and Concepts for Change" by Brent D. Ruben.…

  4. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge, Judgment and…

  5. UNIVERSAL HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCGRATH, EARL J.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A REPORT ON A GROUP INQUIRY INTO THE SUBSTANCE AND IMPLICATIONS OF UNIVERSAL HIGHER EDUCATION. ELEVEN CHAPTERS ARE PAPERS PRESENTED AT A CONFERENCE HELD UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, IN PUERTO RICO, NOVEMBER 15-21, 1964, FORECASTING THE FORM AND MISSION OF AMERICAN…

  6. Reinventing Continuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2012-01-01

    Re-inventing continuing higher education is about finding ways to be a more central player in a region's civic, cultural, and economic life as well as in the education of individuals for work and citizenship. Continuing higher education will require data gathering, analytical tools, convening authority, interpretive skills, new models of delivery,…

  7. Gender and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive, encyclopedic review explores gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. Challenging recent claims that gender inequities in U.S. higher education no longer exist, the contributors--leading experts in the field--reveal the many ways in which gender is embedded in the educational…

  8. Consumerism in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Mark

    1973-01-01

    In considering consumerism in higher education, the student becomes the consumer,'' the university the corporation,'' and higher education the education industry.'' Other members of the education fraternity become investors, management, workers, direct consumers, and indirect consumers. This article proposes that it behooves the student to…

  9. [Deregulation and Higher Education].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Officer, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The extent to which the Reagan Administration has achieved its deregulation goals in the area of higher education is addressed in three articles: "Deregulation and Higher Education: The View a Year Later" (Sheldon Elliot Steinbach); "Student Financial Aid Deregulation: Rhetoric or Reality?" (Robin E. Jenkins); and "Administration Reform of Civil…

  10. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge produced…

  11. Higher Education Exchange, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Kettering's president David Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological…

  12. Assessment of the sensitizing potency of preservatives with chance of skin contact by the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA).

    PubMed

    Sonnenburg, Anna; Schreiner, Maximilian; Stahlmann, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Parabens, methylisothiazolinone (MI) and its derivative methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI), are commonly used as preservatives in personal care products. They can cause hypersensitivity reactions of the human skin. We have tested a set of nine parabens, MI alone and in combination with MCI in the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA). The coculture of primary human keratinocytes and allogenic dendritic cell-related cells (DC-rc) in this assay emulates the in vivo situation of the human skin. Sensitization potency of the test substances was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of the DC-rc maturation marker CD86. Determination of the concentration required to cause a half-maximal increase in CD86-expression (EC50sens) allowed a quantitative evaluation. The cytotoxicity of test substances as indicator for irritative potency was measured by 7-AAD (7-amino-actinomycin D) staining. Parabens exhibited weak (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and isopropylparaben) or strong (butyl-, isobutyl-, pentyl- and benzylparaben) effects, whereas phenylparaben was found to be a moderate sensitizer. Sensitization potencies of parabens correlated with side chain length. Due to a pronounced cytotoxicity, we could not estimate an EC50sens value for MI, whereas MI/MCI was classified as sensitizer and also showed cytotoxic effects. Parabens showed no (methyl- and ethylparaben) or weak irritative potencies (propyl-, isopropyl-, butyl-, isobutyl-, phenyl- and benzylparaben), only pentylparaben was rated to be irritative. Overall, we were able to demonstrate and compare the sensitizing potencies of parabens in this in vitro test. Furthermore, we showed an irritative potency for most of the preservatives. The data further support the usefulness of the LCSA for comparison of the sensitizing potencies of xenobiotics. PMID:25395006

  13. The potency and efficacy of anticholinergics to inhibit haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats correlates with their rank order of affinities for the muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Erosa-Rivero, Helena B; Bata-García, José L; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Heredia-López, Francisco J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2014-06-01

    Extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS) caused by antipsychotic therapy are currently treated with anticholinergics that lack selectivity for the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. Since these receptors are heterogeneously expressed among the different classes of striatal neurons and their afferents, it can be expected that their simultaneous blockade will cause distinct, sometimes opposed, effects within the striatal circuitry. In order to test the hypothesis that the differential blockade of the muscarinic receptor subtypes would influence their potency and efficacy to prevent EPS, here we tested four anticholinergics with varying order of affinities for the muscarinic receptor subtypes, and compared their dose-response curves to inhibit haloperidol-induced catalepsy in male rats. Drugs were applied into the lateral ventricle 15 min before haloperidol (2 mg/kg, s.c.). Catalepsy was measured in the bar test at 15 min intervals during 5 h. The preferential M1/M4 antagonist pirenzepine (3, 10, 30, 100, and 300 nmol) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of catalepsy intensity: ED50 = 5.6 nmol [95% CI, 3.9-8.1], and latency: ED50 = 5.6 nmol [95% CI, 3.7-8.6]. Pirenzepine had the steepest dose-response curve, producing maximal inhibition (84 ± 5%) at the dose of 10 nmol, while its effect tended to reverse at higher doses (62 ± 11%). The purported M1/M3 antagonist 4-DAMP (30, 100, and 300 nmol) also caused a dose-dependent inhibition of catalepsy intensity: ED50 = 29.5 nmol [95% CI, 7.0 to 123.0], and latency: ED50 = 28.5 nmol [95% CI, 2.2 to 362.0]. However, the curve for 4-DAMP had a less pronounced slope, reaching its maximal effect (63 ± 14%) at the dose of 300 nmol. The M2/M4 antagonist AF-DX 116 (10, 30, and 300 nmol) only caused a partial inhibition of catalepsy (30 ± 11%) at the dose of 30 nmol, but this changed to a non-significant increment (15 ± 10%) at the dose of 100 nmol. The alleged M4 antagonist tropicamide (30, 100, 300, and

  14. United States Standard Diphtheria Toxin for the Schick Text and the Erythema Potency Assay for the Schick Text Dose

    PubMed Central

    Barile, Michael F.; Kolb, Robert W.; Pittman, Margaret

    1971-01-01

    A diphtheria toxin shown to have high toxicity and avidity and to combine with antitoxin in multiple proportions was selected for the U.S. standard diphtheria toxin for the Schick test and freeze-dried. Assayed values per vial were 1.09 Lf, 1.09 Lr, 1,090 Schick test doses (STD), 33 LD80, 38 LD50, and 43,000 minimum skin reactive doses. One STD (Lr/1000) is slightly more toxic than one unit of the international standard (Lf/1,000). Experiments showed that the potency assay of Schick test toxin by guinea pig erythema toxicity, determined relative to the toxicity of the standard, was highly reproducible and significantly more reproducible than the lethal (minimum lethal dose) test and that the STD, defined as one Lr/1000, was equivalent to approximately 1/50 minimum lethal dose. The erythema potency assay was prescribed in the U.S. standards for Schick test toxin effective in 1969. PMID:4949493

  15. Neutralization breadth and potency of serum derived from recently human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected Thai individuals.

    PubMed

    Chaitaveep, Nithinart; Utachee, Piraporn; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Karasavvan, Nicos; Takeda, Naokazu; Kameoka, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Neutralizing antibody responses play important roles in controlling several viral infections including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Potent and broad neutralizing antibody responses have been reported in some HIV-1-infected individuals; therefore, elucidating the mechanisms underlying neutralizing antibody responses will provide important information for the development of anti-HIV-1 vaccines. We herein performed a comparative study on the neutralization breadth and potency of serum samples collected from Thai individuals recently and chronically infected with HIV-1. Neutralization tests using a series of envelope glycoproteins (Env)-recombinant viruses revealed that although several serum samples derived from recently infected individuals did not show any HIV-1-specific neutralizing activity, the remaining serum samples exhibited neutralizing activity not only for recombinant viruses with CRF01_AE Env, but also for viruses with subtypes B and C Env. Furthermore, some serum samples derived from recently infected individuals showed the neutralization potency. Our results may provide a deeper insight into the characteristics of neutralizing antibody responses that develop during the course of HIV-1 infection among individuals in Thailand. PMID:26774333

  16. Potency and Stability of Intradermal Capsaicin: Implications for Use as a Human Model of Pain in Multicenter Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Balabathula, Pavan; Bhattacharjee, Himanshu; Thoma, Laura A; Nolly, Robert J; Horton, Frank P; Stornes, Gwendolyn D; Wan, Jim Y; Brooks, Ian M; Bachmann, Gloria A; Foster, David C; Brown, Candace S

    2014-01-01

    Intradermally injected capsaicin has been used extensively both as a human pain model and to assess analgesic efficacy. Factors such as dose, formulation, route, and site are known to affect its sensitivity. We determined whether potency and stability of capsaicin solutions were further sources of variability when following strict manufacturing guidelines. Capsaicin solution (1.0 mg/mL) was prepared according to Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) guidelines and aseptically filled into sterile amber borosilicate vials and stored at 5°C, 25°C, and 30°C. All samples were analyzed at one, three, six, and twelve months. Chemical stability was determined using HPLC and physical stability was evaluated by visual inspection of color changes, clarity, particulate matter, and product/ container closure abnormalities during each sampling time. Capsaicin intradermal injection was found to be sterile and retained 95% of the initial concentration for at least one year, regardless of studied storage temperatures (P<0.0001). Visual inspection indicated no changes in color, clarity, particulate matter, and product/ container closure abnormalities in all samples. These data show that capsaicin solutions (1.0 mg/mL) maintain their potency and stability over one year when manufactured according to cGMP guidelines. These results suggest that in clinical trials manufacturing of capsaicin solutions is recommended over extemporaneous compounding. PMID:25105064

  17. Dipeptide boronic acid inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV: determinants of potency and in vivo efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Beth A; Sanford, David G; Chiluwal, Amrita K; Healey, Sarah E; Peters, Diane E; Dimare, Matthew T; Wu, Wengen; Liu, Yuxin; Maw, Hlaing; Zhou, Yuhong; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Sudmeier, James L; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W

    2008-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV; E.C. 3.4.14.5), a serine protease that degrades the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP, is now a validated target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Dipeptide boronic acids, among the first, and still among the most potent DPP-IV inhibitors known, suffer from a concern over their safety. Here we evaluate the potency, in vivo efficacy, and safety of a selected set of these inhibitors. The adverse effects induced by boronic acid-based DPP-IV inhibitors are essentially limited to what has been observed previously for non-boronic acid inhibitors and attributed to cross-reactivity with DPP8/9. While consistent with the DPP8/9 hypothesis, they are also consistent with cross-reactivity with some other intracellular target. The results further show that the potency of simple dipeptide boronic acid-based inhibitors can be combined with selectivity against DPP8/9 in vivo to produce agents with a relatively wide therapeutic index (>500) in rodents. PMID:18783201

  18. [Humane endpoints as a replacement for the estimation of lethality rates in the potency testing of rabies vaccines

    PubMed

    Cubetaler, Klaus; Morton, David; Hendriksen, Coenraad F. M.

    1998-01-01

    Vaccines are successfully used to prevent rabies infections in humans and animals. The quality requirements for these products are high. After licensing it is still necessary for batch release to perform animal challenge tests to demonstrate the potency of the vaccines. In these experiments it is registered how many animals in the immunised groups die or show symptoms of rabies within a defined time frame. An ECVAM working group has examined whether clinical signs can be used in challenge tests for vaccine control to replace lethality as criterion. The severe distress and the typical signs of the disease made the rabies infection a promising example for this study. Clinical signs, body temperature and body weight were the criteria used to define humane endpoints. It could be shown, that the reduction of body weight and the appearance of typical clinical signs are suitable to define humane endpoints. Pain and distress could be considerably reduced by the implementation of these criteria in to the legal requirements for potency tests of rabies vaccines. PMID:11178538

  19. An in vitro growth inhibition test for measuring the potency of Leptospira spp. Sejroe group vaccine in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    de Nardi, Geraldo; Genovez, Margareth Elide; Ribeiro, Marcio Garcia; Castro, Vanessa; Jorge, André Mendes

    2010-07-01

    Leptospira spp. serovars Hardjo and Wollfi from Sejroe serogroup have been detected in livestock in Brazil, where the main control procedures rely on vaccination. The potency of two commercial vaccines available in this country was monitored by microagglutination test-MAT and in vitro growth inhibition test-GIT in serum samples from 33 female buffaloes divided into: G1-unvaccinated control; G2-vaccinated with Leptobac-6 containing serovars Hardjo and Wolffi and G3-vaccinated with Triangle-9 containing serovar Hardjo. G2 and G3 animals were vaccinated on day zero, and received a booster and two revaccinations on days 30, 210 and 390 and G1 animals received phosphate buffered saline. Serum samples were collected at 15-day intervals between days 0 and 60; and at 30-day intervals between days 60 and 540 and were tested by MAT and GIT with serovars Hardjo and Wolffi. G1 remained negative throughout the experiment. Both vaccines were able to induce agglutinating and growth inhibition antibodies. Six months after the last revaccination, all animals tested negative by MAT, but still were positive by GIT until the end of experimental period. GIT could be a good tool to evaluate the potency and to monitor antibodies responses of vaccines of Sejroe group serovars. PMID:20332068

  20. Tamoxifen-Poly(ethylene glycol)-Thiol Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates: Enhanced Potency and Selective Delivery for Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dreaden, Erik C.; Mwakwari, Sandra C.; Sodji, Quaovi H.; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

    2009-01-01

    The breast cancer treatment drug tamoxifen has been widely administered for more than three decades. This small molecule competes with 17β-estradiol for binding to estrogen receptor, a hormone receptor upregulated in a majority of breast cancers, subsequently initiating programmed cell death. We have synthesized a thiol--PEGylated tamoxifen derivative that can be used to selectively target and deliver plasmonic gold nanoparticles to estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells with up to 2.7-fold enhanced drug potency in vitro. Optical microscopy/spectroscopy, time-dependent dose-response data, and estrogen competition studies indicate that augmented activity is due to increased rates of intracellular tamoxifen transport by nanoparticle endocytosis, rather than by passive diffusion of the free drug. Both ligand- and receptor- dependent intracellular delivery of gold nanoparticles suggest that plasma membrane localized estrogen receptor alpha may facilitate selective uptake/retention of this and other therapeutic nanoparticle conjugates. Combined targeting selectivity and enhanced potency provides opportunities for both multimodal endocrine treatment strategies and adjunctive laser photothermal therapy. PMID:19919059

  1. Binding Mode and Potency of N-Indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-Based Inhibitors Targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection in humans caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and manifested in progressive cardiomyopathy and/or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Limited therapeutic options to prevent and treat Chagas disease put 8 million people infected with T. cruzi worldwide at risk. CYP51, involved in the biosynthesis of the membrane sterol component in eukaryotes, is a promising drug target in T. cruzi. We report the structure–activity relationships (SAR) of an N-arylpiperazine series of N-indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based inhibitors designed to probe the impact of substituents in the terminal N-phenyl ring on binding mode, selectivity and potency. Depending on the substituents at C-4, two distinct ring binding modes, buried and solvent-exposed, have been observed by X-ray structure analysis (resolution of 1.95–2.48 Å). The 5-chloro-substituted analogs 9 and 10 with no substituent at C-4 demonstrated improved selectivity and potency, suppressing ≥99.8% parasitemia in mice when administered orally at 25 mg/kg, b.i.d., for 4 days. PMID:25393646

  2. In silico modelling of permeation enhancement potency in Caco-2 monolayers based on molecular descriptors and random forest.

    PubMed

    Welling, Søren H; Clemmensen, Line K H; Buckley, Stephen T; Hovgaard, Lars; Brockhoff, Per B; Refsgaard, Hanne H F

    2015-08-01

    Structural traits of permeation enhancers are important determinants of their capacity to promote enhanced drug absorption. Therefore, in order to obtain a better understanding of structure-activity relationships for permeation enhancers, a Quantitative Structural Activity Relationship (QSAR) model has been developed. The random forest-QSAR model was based upon Caco-2 data for 41 surfactant-like permeation enhancers from Whitehead et al. (2008) and molecular descriptors calculated from their structure. The QSAR model was validated by two test-sets: (i) an eleven compound experimental set with Caco-2 data and (ii) nine compounds with Caco-2 data from literature. Feature contributions, a recent developed diagnostic tool, was applied to elucidate the contribution of individual molecular descriptors to the predicted potency. Feature contributions provided easy interpretable suggestions of important structural properties for potent permeation enhancers such as segregation of hydrophilic and lipophilic domains. Focusing on surfactant-like properties, it is possible to model the potency of the complex pharmaceutical excipients, permeation enhancers. For the first time, a QSAR model has been developed for permeation enhancement. The model is a valuable in silico approach for both screening of new permeation enhancers and physicochemical optimisation of surfactant enhancer systems. PMID:26004819

  3. Serum corticosterone as a quantitative test of the phlogistic potency of various agents topically applied in the rat.

    PubMed

    Giagnoni, G; Marsi, A; Parolaro, D; Sala, M; Gori, E

    1976-12-01

    The application into the rat conjunctiva of various phlogistic agents, such as croton oil, mustard oil and formaldehyde, elicits an increase of serum corticosterone linearly related to the log of the applied concentrations, so that from their parallelized regression lines it is possible to calculate the phlogistic potency of each tested agent in reference to croton oil. The time kinetic of such an increase (elicited by croton oil) is compared with that of two other parameters previously adopted as indirect quantitative indices of the phlogosis: the adrenal ascorbic acid depletion and the liver tyrosine-alpha-ketoglutarate transaminase increase. Serum corticosterone is shown to be the quickest and the most sensitive of the adopted indices, even if the phlogistic potency of the tested agents and the precision of these evaluations substantially coincides whatsoever the index adopted. Finally the pathways of adrenocortical activation are investigated and it is shown that the activation may be peripherally blocked by topical application of corticosteroids (but not of local anesthetics) and centrally by hypophysectomy or parenteral administration of pentobarbital plus morphine. PMID:13751

  4. Generic Hockey-Stick Model for Estimating Benchmark Dose and Potency: Performance Relative to BMDS and Application to Anthraquinone.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T

    2011-01-01

    Benchmark Dose Model software (BMDS), developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, involves a growing suite of models and decision rules now widely applied to assess noncancer and cancer risk, yet its statistical performance has never been examined systematically. As typically applied, BMDS also ignores the possibility of reduced risk at low doses ("hormesis"). A simpler, proposed Generic Hockey-Stick (GHS) model also estimates benchmark dose and potency, and additionally characterizes and tests objectively for hormetic trend. Using 100 simulated dichotomous-data sets (5 dose groups, 50 animals/group), sampled from each of seven risk functions, GHS estimators performed about as well or better than BMDS estimators, and a surprising observation was that BMDS mis-specified all of six non-hormetic sampled risk functions most or all of the time. When applied to data on rodent tumors induced by the genotoxic chemical carcinogen anthraquinone (AQ), the GHS model yielded significantly negative estimates of net potency exhibited by the combined rodent data, suggesting that-consistent with the anti-leukemogenic properties of AQ and structurally similar quinones-environmental AQ exposures do not likely increase net cancer risk. In addition to its simplicity and flexibility, the GHS approach offers a unified, consistent approach to quantifying environmental chemical risk. PMID:21731536

  5. The impact of minimally oversized adeno-associated viral vectors encoding human factor VIII on vector potency in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kyostio-Moore, Sirkka; Berthelette, Patricia; Piraino, Susan; Sookdeo, Cathleen; Nambiar, Bindu; Jackson, Robert; Burnham, Brenda; O’Riordan, Catherine R; Cheng, Seng H; Armentano, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors containing oversized genomes provide transgene expression despite low efficiency packaging of complete genomes. Here, we characterized the properties of oversized rAAV2/8 vectors (up to 5.4 kb) encoding human factor VIII (FVIII) under the transcriptional control of three liver promoters. All vectors provided sustained production of active FVIII in mice for 7 months and contained comparable levels of vector genomes and complete expression cassettes in liver. Therefore, for the 5.4 kb genome size range, a strong expression cassette was more important for FVIII production than the vector genome size. To evaluate the potency of slightly oversized vectors, a 5.1 kb AAVrh8R/FVIII vector was compared to a 4.6 kb (wild-type size) vector with an identical expression cassette (but containing a smaller C1-domain deleted FVIII) for 3 months in mice. The 5.1 kb vector had twofold to threefold lower levels of plasma FVIII protein and liver vector genomes than that obtained with the 4.6 kb vector. Vector genomes for both vectors persisted equally and existed primarily as high molecular weight concatemeric circular forms in liver. Taken together, these results indicate that the slightly oversized vectors containing heterogeneously packaged vector genomes generated a functional transgene product but exhibited a twofold to threefold lower in vivo potency. PMID:26958574

  6. The stress response and anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia for total Hip Replacement in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Tian, Chun; Li, Min; Peng, Ming-Qing; Ma, Kun-Long; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Ding, Jia-Hui; Cai, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Recently, some scholars suggested that it is important to keep a stablehemodynamic state and prevent the stress responses in geriatric patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR). We conducted this randomized prospective study to observe anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia and stress response to it in geriatric patients during THR. We compared the effect of unilateral spinal and bilateral spinal on inhibition of stress response through measuring Norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and cortisol (CORT). Plasma concentrations of NE, E and CORT were determined in blood samples using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) at three time points: To (prior to anesthesia) T1 (at the time point of skin closure), T2 (twenty-four hours after the operation). Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (unilateral spinal anesthesia) and group B (conventional bilateral spinal anesthesia). 7.5tymg of hypobaric bupivacaine were injected into subarachnoid cavity at group A and 12mg hypobaric bupivacaine were given at group B. The onset time of sensory and motor block, loss of pinprick sensation, degree of motor block, regression of sensory and motor blocks and hemodynamic changes were also recorded. These data were used to evaluate anesthetic potency of spinal anesthesia. The results of this experiment show that unilateral spinal anesthesia can provide restriction of sensory and motor block, minimize the incidence of hypotension and prevent the stress responses undergoing THR. It is optimal anesthesia procedure for geriatric patients by rapid subarachnoid injection of small doses of bupivacaine. PMID:25410068

  7. Respiratory allergenic potential of plant-derived proteins: Understanding the relationship between exposure and potency for risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Karen; N'jai, Alhaji U; Dearman, Rebecca J; Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank

    2015-01-01

    Botanical ingredients (ingredients derived from plants) are finding increasing application in personal care products and the public perceives these ingredients to be safe. However, some proteins in botanicals have the potential to cause immediate-type (IgE-mediated) respiratory allergic reactions. Although reports of such reactions are uncommon, when they do occur, they can be severe. Experience with soap containing wheat proteins illustrated that under certain specific conditions, consumers may be affected. Establishing safe exposure levels for botanical proteins has been challenging. Industrial enzymes provide a rich reference dataset based on their historical association with allergic reactions among workers, which includes robust dose-response information. In the absence of similar data on the potency of plant proteins, a conservative default approach has historically been applied based on information derived from allergenic enzymes. In this article we review the historical default approach and dataset for setting limits for plant proteins in botanical ingredients based on analogy to industrial enzymes followed by a synthesis of literature data on allergic reactions following inhalation exposure to plant-derived proteins. The aim is to share relevant background information and display the relationship between exposure and potency as a first step in the development of a strategy for the development of an improved approach to support the risk assessment of plant-derived proteins. PMID:26565768

  8. Binding mode and potency of N-indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based inhibitors targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Debora F; Choi, Jun Yong; Calvet, Claudia M; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Johnston, Jonathan B; Kellar, Danielle; Gut, Jiri; Cameron, Michael D; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R; Podust, Larissa M

    2014-12-11

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection in humans caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and manifested in progressive cardiomyopathy and/or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Limited therapeutic options to prevent and treat Chagas disease put 8 million people infected with T. cruzi worldwide at risk. CYP51, involved in the biosynthesis of the membrane sterol component in eukaryotes, is a promising drug target in T. cruzi. We report the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of an N-arylpiperazine series of N-indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based inhibitors designed to probe the impact of substituents in the terminal N-phenyl ring on binding mode, selectivity and potency. Depending on the substituents at C-4, two distinct ring binding modes, buried and solvent-exposed, have been observed by X-ray structure analysis (resolution of 1.95-2.48 Å). The 5-chloro-substituted analogs 9 and 10 with no substituent at C-4 demonstrated improved selectivity and potency, suppressing ≥ 99.8% parasitemia in mice when administered orally at 25 mg/kg, b.i.d., for 4 days. PMID:25393646

  9. A novel long-acting human growth hormone fusion protein (VRS-317): enhanced in vivo potency and half-life.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Jeffrey L; Geething, Nathan C; Moore, Jerome A; Rogers, Brian C; Spink, Benjamin J; Wang, Chai-Wei; Alters, Susan E; Stemmer, Willem P C; Schellenberger, Volker

    2012-08-01

    A novel recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) fusion protein (VRS-317) was designed to minimize receptor-mediated clearance through a reduction in receptor binding without mutations to rhGH by genetically fusing with XTEN amino acid sequences to the N-terminus and the C-terminus of the native hGH sequence. Although in vitro potency of VRS-317 was reduced approximately 12-fold compared with rhGH, in vivo potency was increased because of the greatly prolonged exposure to the target tissues and organs. VRS-317 was threefold more potent than daily rhGH in hypophysectomized rats and fivefold more potent than daily rhGH in juvenile monkeys. In juvenile monkeys, a monthly dose of 1.4 mg/kg VRS-317 (equivalent to 0.26 mg/kg rhGH) caused a sustained pharmacodynamic response for 1 month equivalent to 0.05 mg/kg/day rhGH (1.4 mg/kg rhGH total over 28 days). In monkeys, VRS-317, having a terminal elimination half-life of approximately 110 h, was rapidly and near-completely absorbed, and was well tolerated with no observed adverse effects after every alternate week subcutaneous dosing for 14 weeks. VRS-317 also did not cause lipoatrophy in pig and monkey studies. VRS-317 is currently being studied in GH-deficient patients to confirm the observations in these animal studies. PMID:22678811

  10. Synthetic reactions with rare taccalonolides reveal the value of C-22,23 epoxidation for microtubule stabilizing potency.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiangnan; Risinger, April L; Li, Jing; Mooberry, Susan L

    2014-07-24

    The taccalonolides are microtubule stabilizers isolated from plants of the genus Tacca. Taccalonolide AF is 231 times more potent than the major metabolite taccalonolide A and differs only by the oxidation of the C-22,23 double bond in A to an epoxy group in AF. In the current study, 10 other rare natural taccalonolides were epoxidized and in each case epoxidation improved potency. The epoxidation products of taccalonolide T and AI were the most potent, with IC50 values of 0.43 and 0.88 nM, respectively. These potent taccalonolides retained microtubule stabilizing effects, and T-epoxide demonstrated antitumor effects in a xenograft model of breast cancer. Additional reactions demonstrated that reduction of the C-6 ketone resulted in an inactive taccalonolide and that C-22,23 epoxidation restored its activity. These studies confirm the value of C-22,23 epoxidation as an effective strategy for increasing the potency of a wide range of structurally diverse taccalonolide microtubule stabilizers. PMID:24959756

  11. In vitro potency determination of botulinum neurotoxin B based on its receptor-binding and proteolytic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wild, Emina; Bonifas, Ursula; Klimek, Jolanta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Krämer, Beate; Kegel, Birgit; Behrensdorf-Nicol, Heike A

    2016-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent toxins known. However, the paralytic effect caused by BoNT serotypes A and B is taken advantage of to treat different forms of dystonia and in cosmetic procedures. Due to the increasing areas of application, the demand for BoNTs A and B is rising steadily. Because of the high toxicity, it is mandatory to precisely determine the potency of every produced BoNT batch, which is usually accomplished by performing toxicity testing (LD50 test) in mice. Here we describe an alternative in vitro assay for the potency determination of the BoNT serotype B. In this assay, the toxin is first bound to its specific receptor molecules. After the proteolytic subunit of the toxin has been released and activated by chemical reduction, it is exposed to synaptobrevin, its substrate protein. Finally the proteolytic cleavage is quantified by an antibody-mediated detection of the neoepitope, reaching a detection limit below 0.1mouseLD50/ml. Thus, the assay, named BoNT/B binding and cleavage assay (BoNT/B BINACLE), takes into account the binding as well as the protease function of the toxin, thereby measuring its biological activity. PMID:27032463

  12. Two Acidic, Anticoagulant PLA2 Isoenzymes Purified from the Venom of Monocled Cobra Naja kaouthia Exhibit Different Potency to Inhibit Thrombin and Factor Xa via Phospholipids Independent, Non-Enzymatic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ashis K.; Kalita, Bhargab; Thakur, Rupamoni

    2014-01-01

    Background The monocled cobra (Naja kaouthia) is responsible for snakebite fatality in Indian subcontinent and in south-western China. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2; EC 3.1.1.4) is one of the toxic components of snake venom. The present study explores the mechanism and rationale(s) for the differences in anticoagulant potency of two acidic PLA2 isoenzymes, Nk-PLA2α (13463.91 Da) and Nk-PLA2β (13282.38 Da) purified from the venom of N. kaouthia. Principal Findings By LC-MS/MS analysis, these PLA2s showed highest similarity (23.5% sequence coverage) with PLA2 III isolated from monocled cobra venom. The catalytic activity of Nk-PLA2β exceeds that of Nk-PLA2α. Heparin differentially regulated the catalytic and anticoagulant activities of these Nk-PLA2 isoenzymes. The anticoagulant potency of Nk-PLA2α was comparable to commercial anticoagulants warfarin, and heparin/antithrombin-III albeit Nk-PLA2β demonstrated highest anticoagulant activity. The anticoagulant action of these PLA2s was partially contributed by a small but specific hydrolysis of plasma phospholipids. The strong anticoagulant effect of Nk-PLA2α and Nk-PLA2β was achieved via preferential, non-enzymatic inhibition of FXa (Ki = 43 nM) and thrombin (Ki = 8.3 nM), respectively. Kinetics study suggests that the Nk-PLA2 isoenzymes inhibit their “pharmacological target(s)” by uncompetitive mechanism without the requirement of phospholipids/Ca2+. The anticoagulant potency of Nk-PLA2β which is higher than that of Nk-PLA2α is corroborated by its superior catalytic activity, its higher capacity for binding to phosphatidylcholine, and its greater strength of thrombin inhibition. These PLA2 isoenzymes thus have evolved to affect haemostasis by different mechanisms. The Nk-PLA2β partially inhibited the thrombin-induced aggregation of mammalian platelets suggesting its therapeutic application in the prevention of unwanted clot formation. Conclusion/Significance In order to develop peptide-based superior

  13. Standardization of an enzyme immunoassay for the in vitro potency assay of inactivated tissue culture rabies vaccines: determination of the rabies virus glycoprotein with polyclonal antisera.

    PubMed

    Thraenhart, O; Ramakrishnan, K

    1989-10-01

    A non-competitive enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) has been standardized to supplement the in vivo potency test used for the quality control of inactivated tissue culture vaccines against rabies. The essentials of the ELISA were: fixation of the virus in different dilutions of vaccine on the surface of microtitre plates; testing of the reference and up to six test vaccines on one plate; incubation with polyclonal antisera to rabies virus glycoprotein containing an excess of antibody; further incubation with a species-specific anti-IgG coupled to peroxidase; a final incubation with a substrate. The incubation periods were 1 h, 1 h and 30 min both at +37 degrees C. The relative potency determinations were made graphically or by a computer using a parallel line bioassay in which the potencies of the vaccines of unknown potency were tested against the reference preparation on a single microtitre plate. Under these conditions inactivated rabies vaccines of different types (virus strains, cell substrates, inactivation and concentration procedures) were tested for potency. Furthermore, it was possible with this in vitro method to assay adjuvanted vaccines, in process samples such as tissue culture supernatants with live or inactivated rabies virus, concentrates, and vaccines undergoing thermal stability tests. The rabies glycoprotein antigen-antibody reaction was highly specific according to the results and the glycoprotein content was measured quantitatively. The potency determined by the in vitro ELISA correlated with the in vivo NIH protection potency test. The lower limit of detection of the ELISA was 0.015 IU/ml. Quantitative antigen determination was possible with both homologous and heterologous antisera to rabies virus glycoprotein when vaccines of the same virus strain were tested. When the potencies of vaccines of different virus strain specificity were calculated, it was necessary to take into account the strain-specific antigenicity. Even so vaccines of high

  14. On higher structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baas, Nils A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss various philosophical aspects of the hyperstructure concept extending networks and higher categories. By this discussion, we hope to pave the way for applications and further developments of the mathematical theory of hyperstructures.

  15. Forecasting Higher Education's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, Don; Buck, Tina S.; Kollie, Ellen; Przyborowski, Danielle; Rondinelli, Joseph A.; Hunter, Jeff; Hanna, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Offers predictions on trends in higher education to accommodate changing needs, lower budgets, and increased enrollment. They involve campus construction, security, administration, technology, interior design, athletics, and transportation. (EV)

  16. Marketing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Edward J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the 4 basic areas in which institutional marketing can be put to use in higher educational institutions: educational services offered, pricing (tuition), promotion to prospective students, and distribution (extension courses and courses that go to the student). (PG)

  17. Recombinant pediocin in Lactococcus lactis: increased production by propeptide fusion and improved potency by co-production with PedC.

    PubMed

    Back, Alexandre; Borges, Frédéric; Mangavel, Cécile; Paris, Cédric; Rondags, Emmanuel; Kapel, Romain; Aymes, Arnaud; Rogniaux, Hélène; Pavlović, Marija; van Heel, Auke J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    We describe the impact of two propeptides and PedC on the production yield and the potency of recombinant pediocins produced in Lactococcus lactis. On the one hand, the sequences encoding the propeptides SD or LEISSTCDA were inserted between the sequence encoding the signal peptide of Usp45 and the structural gene of the mature pediocin PA-1. On the other hand, the putative thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase PedC was coexpressed with pediocin. The concentration of recombinant pediocins produced in supernatants was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The potency of recombinant pediocins was investigated by measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration by agar well diffusion assay. The results show that propeptides SD or LEISSTCDA lead to an improved secretion of recombinant pediocins with apparently no effect on the antibacterial potency and that PedC increases the potency of recombinant pediocin. To our knowledge, this study reveals for the first time that pediocin tolerates fusions at the N-terminal end. Furthermore, it reveals that only expressing the pediocin structural gene in a heterologous host is not sufficient to get an optimal potency and requires the accessory protein PedC. In addition, it can be speculated that PedC catalyses the correct formation of disulfide bonds in pediocin. PMID:26147827

  18. Confidence in indirect assessment of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine potency and vaccine matching carried out by liquid phase ELISA and virus neutralization tests.

    PubMed

    Robiolo, Blanca; La Torre, José; Maradei, Eduardo; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Perez, Alejandro; Seki, Cristina; Smitsaart, Eliana; Fondevila, Norberto; Palma, Eduardo; Goris, Nesya; De Clercq, Kris; Mattion, Nora

    2010-08-31

    The necessity of avoiding the use of animals in vaccine potency testing has been widely recognized. The repeatability and reproducibility of the Expected Percentage of Protection (EPP) as a serological potency surrogate for A24 Cruzeiro foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) strain was assessed, and compared with the results obtained with challenge in the Protection against Podal Generalization (PPG) test. To determine the EPPs, the serum titers obtained by liquid phase blocking competitive ELISA (lpELISA) and virus neutralization (VNT) in 10 potency trials using the same A24 Cruzeiro vaccine, were interpolated into previously validated logit transformation curves that correlate PPG with serology. Indirect serological assessment of vaccine matching between the serotype A FMDV strains A24 Cruzeiro and A/Argentina/01 was also carried out by lpELISA and VNT. The results obtained in this study strongly support the replacement of challenge tests for vaccine potency by indirect serological assays, at least for A24 Cruzeiro FMDV strain. While determination of EPPs by lpELISA titers showed an excellent repeatability, reproducibility and concordance with PPG for vaccine potency, assessments of cross-protection by VNT titers were more consistent with the PPG outcome. PMID:20643090

  19. A step forward in the quality control testing of inactivated rabies vaccines - extensive evaluation of European vaccines by using alternative methods to the in vivo potency tests.

    PubMed

    Servat, Alexandre; Kempff, Sébastien; Brogat, Valère; Litaize, Estelle; Schereffer, Jean-Luc; Cliquet, Florence

    2015-03-01

    The mouse challenge test still remains the reference method for the potency determination of human and animal inactivated rabies vaccines, and it is still widely used throughout the world. This test suffers from many disadvantages - it is expensive and time consuming, uses a large number of mice, causes significant animal distress, and suffers from high variability. Recently, the European Pharmacopoeia has recognised the use of a serological potency assay (SPA) as an alternative method to the challenge test. This new test is based on the determination of rabies neutralising antibody titres in vaccinated mice, by using the modified Rapid Fluorescent Focus Inhibition Test (mRFFIT). With the objective of adopting this new method for the batch release of inactivated rabies vaccines, we evaluated its performance on a large collection of rabies vaccines currently assessed in our laboratory. The Fluorescent Antibody Virus Neutralisation test (FAVNt) was used in parallel with the mRFFIT, and the results were compared to the mouse challenge test. Our results demonstrate that the SPA is capable of estimating the potency of vaccines formulated with a potency margin well above the minimum of 1IU/dose. For low potency vaccines, this new method demonstrated some limitations, due to the recurrent invalidation of the assay. We have also demonstrated the superior sensitivity of the FAVNt when compared to the mRFFIT, and the importance of minimising the risk of detecting non-responders in vaccinated mice. PMID:25802995

  20. Folate receptor-targeted liposomes loaded with a diacid metabolite of norcantharidin enhance antitumor potency for H22 hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Chen; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xia-Rong; Shuai, Wu-Ping; Hu, Ying; Han, Min; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The diacid metabolite of norcantharidin (DM-NCTD) is clinically effective against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but is limited by its short half-life and high incidence of adverse effects at high doses. We developed a DM-NCTD-loaded, folic acid (FA)-modified, polyethylene glycolated (DM-NCTD/FA-PEG) liposome system to enhance the targeting effect and antitumor potency for HCC at a moderate dose based on our previous study. The DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposome system produced liposomes with regular spherical morphology, with mean particle size approximately 200 nm, and an encapsulation efficiency >80%. MTT cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that the DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes showed significantly stronger cytotoxicity effects on the H22 hepatoma cell line than did PEG liposomes without the FA modification (P<0.01). We used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for determination of DM-NCTD in tissues and tumors, and found it to be sensitive, rapid, and reliable. In addition, the biodistribution study showed that DM-NCTD liposomes improved tumor-targeting efficiency, and DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes exhibited the highest efficiency of the treatments (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the results indicated that although the active liposome group had an apparently increased tumor-targeting efficiency of DM-NCTD, the risk to the kidney was higher than in the normal liposome group. With regard to in vivo antitumor activity, DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes inhibited tumors in H22 tumor-bearing mice better than either free DM-NCTD or DM-NCTD/PEG liposomes (P<0.01), and induced considerably more significant cellular apoptosis in the tumors, with no obvious toxicity to the tissues of model mice or the liver tissue of normal mice, as shown by histopathological examination. All these results demonstrate that DM-NCTD-loaded FA-modified liposomes might have potential application for HCC-targeting therapy. PMID:27110110

  1. Folate receptor-targeted liposomes loaded with a diacid metabolite of norcantharidin enhance antitumor potency for H22 hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min-Chen; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xia-Rong; Shuai, Wu-Ping; Hu, Ying; Han, Min; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The diacid metabolite of norcantharidin (DM-NCTD) is clinically effective against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but is limited by its short half-life and high incidence of adverse effects at high doses. We developed a DM-NCTD-loaded, folic acid (FA)-modified, polyethylene glycolated (DM-NCTD/FA-PEG) liposome system to enhance the targeting effect and antitumor potency for HCC at a moderate dose based on our previous study. The DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposome system produced liposomes with regular spherical morphology, with mean particle size approximately 200 nm, and an encapsulation efficiency >80%. MTT cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that the DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes showed significantly stronger cytotoxicity effects on the H22 hepatoma cell line than did PEG liposomes without the FA modification (P<0.01). We used liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for determination of DM-NCTD in tissues and tumors, and found it to be sensitive, rapid, and reliable. In addition, the biodistribution study showed that DM-NCTD liposomes improved tumor-targeting efficiency, and DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes exhibited the highest efficiency of the treatments (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the results indicated that although the active liposome group had an apparently increased tumor-targeting efficiency of DM-NCTD, the risk to the kidney was higher than in the normal liposome group. With regard to in vivo antitumor activity, DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes inhibited tumors in H22 tumor-bearing mice better than either free DM-NCTD or DM-NCTD/PEG liposomes (P<0.01), and induced considerably more significant cellular apoptosis in the tumors, with no obvious toxicity to the tissues of model mice or the liver tissue of normal mice, as shown by histopathological examination. All these results demonstrate that DM-NCTD-loaded FA-modified liposomes might have potential application for HCC-targeting therapy. PMID:27110110

  2. Evaluation of relative effect potencies (REPs) for dioxin-like compounds to derive systemic or human-specific TEFs to improve human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    van Ede, Karin I; van Duursen, Majorie B M; van den Berg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) are generally applied for estimating human risk of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds using systemic (e.g., blood) levels, even though these TEFs are established based on intake doses in rodent studies. This review shows that systemic relative effect potencies (REPs) can deviate substantially from intake REPs, but are similar to in vitro-derived REPs. Interestingly, the in vitro REPs for 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (HpCDD) and 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (4-PeCDF) are up to one order of magnitude higher than their in vivo REPs and WHO-TEFs, based on oral intake. In addition, clear species-differences in in vitro REPs were apparent for some congeners. Especially the human-derived REP for polychlorinated biphenyl 126 is one to two orders of magnitude lower than rodent REPs and its current WHO-TEF. Next, suggested adapted systemic or human-specific TEFs for these congeners were applied to calculate changes in systemic TEQ concentrations in studies from the USA, Germany and Japan and compared with either the JECFA TDI or USEPA RfD of TCDD. Overall, the effect of such TEF changes for these three congeners on total TEQ roughly balances each other out in the general population. However, results may be different for situations in which a specific group of congeners dominates. For those congeners that show a distinct deviation between either intake and systemic REPs or between rodent- and human-based in vitro REPs, we propose that especially REPs derived from human-based in vitro models are weighted more heavily in establishing systemic or human-specific TEF values to improve human health risk assessment. PMID:27161441

  3. A Model for Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Activated Gene Expression Shows Potency and Efficacy Changes and Predicts Squelching Due to Competition for Transcription Co-Activators

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ted W.; Budinsky, Robert A.; Rowlands, J. Craig

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic model of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription was developed based on activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) and subsequent binding the activated AHR to xenobiotic response elements (XREs) on DNA. The model was based on effects observed in cells lines commonly used as in vitro experimental systems. Following ligand binding, the AHR moves into the cell nucleus and forms a heterodimer with the aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator (ARNT). In the model, a requirement for binding to DNA is that a generic coregulatory protein is subsequently bound to the AHR-ARNT dimer. Varying the amount of coregulator available within the nucleus altered both the potency and efficacy of TCDD for inducing for transcription of CYP1A1 mRNA, a commonly used marker for activation of the AHR. Lowering the amount of available cofactor slightly increased the EC50 for the transcriptional response without changing the efficacy or maximal response. Further reduction in the amount of cofactor reduced the efficacy and produced non-monotonic dose-response curves (NMDRCs) at higher ligand concentrations. The shapes of these NMDRCs were reminiscent of the phenomenon of squelching. Resource limitations for transcriptional machinery are becoming apparent in eukaryotic cells. Within single cells, nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression appears to be a stochastic process; however, intercellular communication and other aspects of tissue coordination may represent a compensatory process to maintain an organism’s ability to respond on a phenotypic level to various stimuli within an inconstant environment. PMID:26039703

  4. Comparison of Intake and Systemic Relative Effect Potencies of Dioxin-like Compounds in Female Mice after a Single Oral Dose

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Patrik L.; Gaisch, Konrad P.J.; van den Berg, Martin; van Duursen, Majorie B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Risk assessment for mixtures of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is performed using the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach. These TEF values are derived mainly from relative effect potencies (REPs) linking an administered dose to an in vivo toxic or biological effect, resulting in “intake” TEFs. At present, there is insufficient data available to conclude that intake TEFs are also applicable for systemic concentrations (e.g., blood and tissues). Objective: We compared intake and systemic REPs of 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzodioxin (PeCDD), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (4-PeCDF), 3,3´,4,4´,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126), 2,3´,4,4´,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-118), and 2,3,3´,4,4´,5-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-156) in female C57BL/6 mice 3 days after a single oral dose. Methods: We calculated intake REPs and systemic REPs based on administered dose and liver, adipose, or plasma concentrations relative to TCDD. Hepatic cytochrome P450 1A1–associated ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and gene expression of Cyp1a1, 1a2 and 1b1 in the liver and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were used as biological end points. Results: We observed up to one order of magnitude difference between intake REPs and systemic REPs. Two different patterns were discerned. Compared with intake REPs, systemic REPs based on plasma or adipose levels were higher for PeCDD, 4-PeCDF, and PCB-126 but lower for the mono-ortho PCBs 118 and 156. Conclusions: Based on these mouse data, the comparison between intake REPs and systemic REPs reveals significant congener-specific differences that warrants the development of systemic TEFs to calculate toxic equivalents (TEQs) in blood and body tissues. PMID:23674508

  5. A robust potency assay highlights significant donor variation of human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell immune modulatory capacity and extended radio-resistance.

    PubMed

    Ketterl, Nina; Brachtl, Gabriele; Schuh, Cornelia; Bieback, Karen; Schallmoser, Katharina; Reinisch, Andreas; Strunk, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The inherent immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) encouraged initiation of multiple clinical trials. Release criteria for therapeutic MSPCs cover identity, purity and safety but appropriate potency assessment is often missing. Reports on functional heterogeneity of MSPCs created additional uncertainty regarding donor and organ/source selection. We established a robust immunomodulation potency assay based on pooling responder leukocytes to minimize individual immune response variability. Comparing various MSPCs revealed significant potency inconsistency and generally diminished allo-immunosuppression compared to dose-dependent inhibition of mitogenesis. Gamma-irradiation to block unintended MSPC proliferation did not prohibit chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in vivo, indicating the need for alternative safety strategies. PMID:26620155

  6. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline tested against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections in Europe (2010).

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S

    2013-01-01

    Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a novel cephalosporin exhibiting in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. The objective of this study was to determine the spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against recent leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) isolated in Europe. A total of 1563 isolates from the 2010 Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation (AWARE) Program were identified as CARTI pathogens by the infection type and/or specimen type recorded by the participating laboratory. Isolates were collected from patients in 52 medical centers located in 19 European countries (including Israel and Turkey). Susceptibility testing for ceftaroline and commonly used antimicrobials was performed by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution methodology. Susceptibility interpretations for comparators were as published in CLSI and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing guidelines, and for ceftaroline US-FDA breakpoints were also applied. Ceftaroline was very active overall against 799 S. pneumoniae (MIC(50/90,) ≤ 0.008/0.12 μg/mL) and inhibited 100.0% of all isolates at a MIC ≤ 0.5 μg/mL. Ceftaroline was very potent against penicillin-resistant (CLSI oral penicillin V breakpoints) and -intermediate S. pneumoniae (MIC(50/90), 0.12/0.25 and 0.03/0.12 μg/mL, respectively), but potency was lower than observed against penicillin-susceptible isolates (MIC(50/90), ≤ 0.008/≤ 0.008 μg/mL). Ceftaroline was also very active (MIC(50/90), ≤ 0.008/0.015 μg/mL) against 515 Haemophilus influenzae, including β-lactamase-producing strains (MIC(50/90), 0.015/0.06 μg/mL). Ceftaroline also demonstrated good activity against 205 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates (MIC(50

  7. Synergy with Rifampin and Kanamycin Enhances Potency, Kill Kinetics, and Selectivity of De Novo-Designed Antimicrobial Peptides▿

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Aparna; Rizvi, Meryam Sardar; Sahal, Dinkar

    2010-01-01

    By choosing membranes as targets of action, antibacterial peptides offer the promise of providing antibiotics to which bacteria would not become resistant. However, there is a need to increase their potency against bacteria along with achieving a reduction in toxicity to host cells. Here, we report that three de novo-designed antibacterial peptides (ΔFm, ΔFmscr, and Ud) with poor to moderate antibacterial potencies and kill kinetics improved significantly in all of these aspects when synergized with rifampin and kanamycin against Escherichia coli. (ΔFm and ΔFmscr [a scrambled-sequence version of ΔFm] are isomeric, monomeric decapeptides containing the nonproteinogenic amino acid α,β-didehydrophenylalanine [ΔF] in their sequences. Ud is a lysine-branched dimeric peptide containing the helicogenic amino acid α-aminoisobutyric acid [Aib].) In synergy with rifampin, the MIC of ΔFmscr showed a 34-fold decrease (67.9 μg/ml alone, compared to 2 μg/ml in combination). A 20-fold improvement in the minimum bactericidal concentration of Ud was observed when the peptide was used in combination with rifampin (369.9 μg/ml alone, compared to 18.5 μg/ml in combination). Synergy with kanamycin resulted in an enhancement in kill kinetics for ΔFmscr (no killing until 60 min for ΔFmscr alone, versus 50% and 90% killing within 20 min and 60 min, respectively, in combination with kanamycin). Combination of the dendrimeric peptide ΔFq (a K-K2 dendrimer for which the sequence of ΔFm constitutes each of the four branches) (MIC, 21.3 μg/ml) with kanamycin (MIC, 2.1 μg/ml) not only lowered the MIC of each by 4-fold but also improved the therapeutic potential of this highly hemolytic (37% hemolysis alone, compared to 4% hemolysis in combination) and cytotoxic (70% toxicity at 10× MIC alone, versus 30% toxicity in combination) peptide. Thus, synergy between peptide and nonpeptide antibiotics has the potential to enhance the potency and target selectivity of antibacterial

  8. The 5-HT3B subunit affects high-potency inhibition of 5-HT3 receptors by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Baptista-Hon, Daniel T; Deeb, Tarek Z; Othman, Nidaa A; Sharp, Douglas; Hales, Tim G

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Morphine is an antagonist at 5-HT3A receptors. 5-HT3 and opioid receptors are expressed in many of the same neuronal pathways where they modulate gut motility, pain and reinforcement. There is increasing interest in the 5-HT3B subunit, which confers altered pharmacology to 5-HT3 receptors. We investigated the mechanisms of inhibition by morphine of 5-HT3 receptors and the influence of the 5-HT3B subunit. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH 5-HT-evoked currents were recorded from voltage-clamped HEK293 cells expressing human 5-HT3A subunits alone or in combination with 5-HT3B subunits. The affinity of morphine for the orthosteric site of 5-HT3A or 5-HT3AB receptors was assessed using radioligand binding with the antagonist [3H]GR65630. KEY RESULTS When pre-applied, morphine potently inhibited 5-HT-evoked currents mediated by 5-HT3A receptors. The 5-HT3B subunit reduced the potency of morphine fourfold and increased the rates of inhibition and recovery. Inhibition by pre-applied morphine was insurmountable by 5-HT, was voltage-independent and occurred through a site outside the second membrane-spanning domain. When applied simultaneously with 5-HT, morphine caused a lower potency, surmountable inhibition of 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptors. Morphine also fully displaced [3H]GR65630 from 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptors with similar potency. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings suggest that morphine has two sites of action, a low-affinity, competitive site and a high-affinity, non-competitive site that is not available when the channel is activated. The affinity of morphine for the latter is reduced by the 5-HT3B subunit. Our results reveal that morphine causes a high-affinity, insurmountable and subunit-dependent inhibition of human 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:21740409

  9. Higher dimensional Hadamard matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichta, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper defines higher dimensional Hadamard matrices and enumerates on some of the simplest three-, four-, and five-dimensional cases and procedures for generating them. Special emphasis is given to proper matrices that have a dimensional hierarchy of orthogonalities. It is determined that this property lends itself primarily to the application of higher dimensional Hadamard matrices to error-correcting codes. A list of derived statements for n-dimensional Hadamard matrices are given, as well as a definition of Hadamard matrix families, such as minimal, Petrie polygon, antipodal (n-2)-dimensional sections, and double proximity shells.

  10. Higher Spin Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chi-Ming

    This dissertation splits into two distinct halves. The first half is devoted to the study of the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 3. We present a conjecture that the holographic dual of W N minimal model in a 't Hooft-like large N limit is an unusual "semi-local" higher spin gauge theory on AdS3 x 1. At each point on the S1 lives a copy of three-dimensional Vasiliev theory, that contains an infinite tower of higher spin gauge fields coupled to a single massive complex scalar propagating in AdS3. The Vasiliev theories at different points on the S1 are correlated only through the AdS3 boundary conditions on the massive scalars. All but one single tower of higher spin symmetries are broken by the boundary conditions. This conjecture is checked by comparing tree-level two- and three-point functions, and also one-loop partition functions on both side of the duality. The second half focuses on the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 4. We demonstrate that a supersymmetric and parity violating version of Vasiliev's higher spin gauge theory in AdS4 admits boundary conditions that preserve N = 0,1,2,3,4 or 6 supersymmetries. In particular, we argue that the Vasiliev theory with U( M) Chan-Paton and N = 6 boundary condition is holographically dual to the 2+1 dimensional U(N) k x U(M) -k ABJ theory in the limit of large N, k and finite M. In this system all bulk higher spin fields transform in the adjoint of the U(M) gauge group, whose bulk t'Hooft coupling is M/N. Our picture suggests that the supersymmetric Vasiliev theory can be obtained as a limit of type IIA string theory in AdS4 x CP3, and that the non-Abelian Vasiliev theory at strong bulk 't Hooft coupling smoothly turn into a string field theory. The fundamental string is a singlet bound state of Vasiliev's higher spin particles held together by U(M) gauge interactions.

  11. Higher spin cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Raju, Avinash; Roy, Shubho; Thakur, Somyadip

    2014-02-01

    We construct cosmological solutions of higher spin gravity in 2+1 dimensional de Sitter space. We show that a consistent thermodynamics can be obtained for their horizons by demanding appropriate holonomy conditions. This is equivalent to demanding the integrability of the Euclidean boundary conformal field theory partition function, and it reduces to Gibbons-Hawking thermodynamics in the spin-2 case. By using the prescription of Maldacena, we relate the thermodynamics of these solutions to those of higher spin black holes in AdS3.

  12. Measured and predicted affinities of binding and relative potencies to activate the AhR of PAHs and their alkylated analogues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Shin, Woong-Hee; Hong, Seongjin; Kang, Habyeong; Jung, Dawoon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Khim, Jong Seong; Seok, Chaok; Giesy, John P; Choi, Kyungho

    2015-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their alkylated forms are important components of crude oil. Both groups of PAHs have been reported to cause dioxin-like responses, mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Thus, characterization of binding affinity to the AhR of unsubstituted or alkylated PAHs is important to understand the toxicological consequences of oil contamination on ecosystems. We investigated the potencies of major PAHs of crude oil, e.g., chrysene, phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene, and their alkylated forms (n=17) to upregulate expression of AhR-mediated processes by use of the H4IIE-luc transactivation bioassay. In addition, molecular descriptors of different AhR activation potencies among PAHs were investigated by use of computational molecular docking models. Based on responses of the H4IIE-luc in vitro assay, it was shown that potencies of PAHs were determined by alkylation in addition to the number and conformation of rings. Potencies of AhR-mediated processes were generally greater when a chrysene group was substituted, especially in 1-methyl-chrysene. Significant negative correlations were observed between the in vitro dioxin-like potency measured in H4IIE-luc cells and the binding distance estimated from the in silico modeling. The difference in relative potency for AhR activation observed among PAHs and their alkylated forms could be explained by differences among binding distances in the ligand binding domain of the AhR caused by alkylation. The docking model developed in the present study may have utility in predicting risks of environmental contaminants of which toxicities are mediated by AhR binding. PMID:26037956

  13. Empirical analysis of BMD metrics in genetic toxicology part I: in vitro analyses to provide robust potency rankings and support MOA determinations.

    PubMed

    Wills, John W; Johnson, George E; Doak, Shareen H; Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; Slob, Wout; White, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Genetic toxicity testing has traditionally been used for hazard identification, with dichotomous classification of test results serving to identify genotoxic agents. However, the utility of genotoxicity data can be augmented by employing dose-response analysis and point of departure determination. Via interpolation from a fitted dose-response model, the benchmark dose (BMD) approach estimates the dose that elicits a specified (small) effect size. BMD metrics and their confidence intervals can be used for compound potency ranking within an endpoint, as well as potency comparisons across other factors such as cell line or exposure duration. A recently developed computational method, the BMD covariate approach, permits combined analysis of multiple dose-response data sets that are differentiated by covariates such as compound, cell type or exposure regime. The approach provides increased BMD precision for effective potency rankings across compounds and other covariates that pertain to a hypothesised mode of action (MOA). To illustrate these applications, the covariate approach was applied to the analysis of published in vitro micronucleus frequency dose-response data for ionising radiations, a set of aneugens, two mutagenic azo compounds and a topoisomerase II inhibitor. The ionising radiation results show that the precision of BMD estimates can be improved by employing the covariate method. The aneugen analysis provided potency groupings based on the BMD confidence intervals, and analyses of azo compound data from cells lines with differing metabolic capacity confirmed the influence of endogenous metabolism on genotoxic potency. This work, which is the first of a two-part series, shows that BMD-derived potency rankings can be employed to support MOA evaluations as well as facilitate read across to expedite chemical evaluations and regulatory decision-making. The follow-up (Part II) employs the combined covariate approach to analyse in vivo genetic toxicity dose

  14. Interdisciplinarity in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanisch, Thor Einar; Vollmann, Wolfgang, Ed.

    The advantages of an interdisciplinary approach to college instruction and research are examined, based in part on a 1983 symposium of the European Centre for Higher Education. Six case studies are also presented. It is noted that interdisciplinarity opens up possibilities of exchange between individual disciplines and encourages the development…

  15. Higher Education's Strange Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Harold, II

    The university which has had the temerity to change the world has not had the nerve to change itself to live in that world. The result is that the university's grading system, curriculum, teaching methods, and philosophies are in conflict with the world beyond the campus gates, and higher education does not meet the intellectual and social needs…

  16. Entrepreneurship and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Jonathan, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Stimulating innovative and growth-oriented entrepreneurship is a key economic and societal challenge to which universities and colleges have much to contribute. This book examines the role that higher education institutions are currently playing through teaching entrepreneurship and transferring knowledge and innovation to enterprises and…

  17. California's Future: Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Hans

    2015-01-01

    California's higher education system is not keeping up with the changing economy. Projections suggest that the state's economy will continue to need more highly educated workers. In 2025, if current trends persist, 41 percent of jobs will require at least a bachelor's degree and 36 percent will require some college education short of a bachelor's…

  18. Corporatizing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Gerda

    2008-01-01

    The process of changing U.S. higher education institutions along a corporate model has been going on for several decades. It consists of changes, some open, some obscured, on various fronts: the erosion of tenure by attrition; the simultaneous increase in the use of contingent faculty; the rise in tuition; the dramatic decrease in federal and…

  19. Marketing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockenberger, Susan J.

    Educational institutions must seek new approaches to institutional planning because of such factors as shrinking traditional college age populations, eroding grants, governmental and judicial incursion, the tightening economic belt, and concern over the relevance of education to modern day needs. The concept of marketing higher education is…

  20. Liberty and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dennis F.

    1989-01-01

    John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty is discussed with the view that it needs to be revised to guide moral judgments in higher education. Three key elements need to be modified: the action that is constrained; the constraint on the action; and the agent whose action is constrained. (MLW)

  1. Higher Education Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clery, Sue; Lee, John

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews changes in higher education staff by occupation between 1993 and 1997. Specific attention is paid to staffing patterns in states with right to work laws compared to those without it. When a state enacts a right to work law, it can be assumed it is not supportive of public unions. This analysis is based on data from the National…

  2. Curriculum in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, A. I., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Four articles on higher education curriculum are presented. In "The Articulate Curriculum" an approach to curriculum description is presented that is designed to have minimal ambiguity concerning the intention, content, and processes of the curriculum and that will lead to questioning several discrete factors in the curriculum planning process. It…

  3. Networks for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interuniversity Communications Council (EDUCOM), Princeton, NJ.

    EDUCOM, the Inter University Communications Council, Inc., planned its 1972 spring conference as a forum for presentations, discussions, and informal meetings to review the present state and the future possibilities of computer networks for higher education. Speeches presented were specifically related to: (1) the current status and future plans…

  4. Evaluation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bognar, Branko; Bungic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    One of the means of transforming classroom experience is by conducting action research with students. This paper reports about the action research with university students. It has been carried out within a semester of the course "Methods of Upbringing". Its goal has been to improve evaluation of higher education teaching. Different forms…

  5. Marketing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalili, Farid

    The use of marketing activities by educational institutions and the transfer of marketing activities from business to higher education are considered. Market analysis helps colleges and universities determine what programs, scheduling, or services are strong and to which student market the institution should appeal. It is suggested that the…

  6. Understanding Higher Education Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middaugh, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Public discussion of higher education costs frequently confuses price with expenditure. This article examines factors associated with increases in the sticker price of a college education and the expenditures incurred by institutions in delivering that education. The discussion suggests that while growth in college tuition is real, access to…

  7. Higher Education Exchange, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The Kettering Foundation's research has been focused on putting the public back into the public's business for more than thirty years. Some questions that have recently been useful to Kettering researchers as the foundation focuses on its work with institutional actors--especially higher education and its relationship with the public--have…

  8. Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Alan

    Women have traditionally been discriminated against in higher education in both the attainment of degrees and in employment after earning degrees. It has been felt that women are not as capable, reliable, or effective as men in administrative and classroom situations. Statistics show that even at the present time women are underemployed and…

  9. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson and Helen…

  10. Online Higher Education Commodity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chau, Paule

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the current trend towards online education. It examines some of the reasons for the trend and the ramifications it may have on students, faculty and institutions of higher learning. The success and profitability of online programs and institutions such as the University of Phoenix has helped to make the move towards online…

  11. Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Sheryl, Ed.; Shaver, Barbara, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Articles on women's studies and females in higher education are presented in this publication. A University of North Dakota project that sought to promote the integration of new research and scholarship results into the curriculum is described in "Women's Equity Committee Offers a Model Project," (Leola Furman, Robert Young). Historical…

  12. Creativity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaspar, Drazena; Mabic, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results of research related to perception of creativity in higher education made by the authors at the University of Mostar from Bosnia and Herzegovina. This research was based on a survey conducted among teachers and students at the University. The authors developed two types of questionnaires, one for teachers and the other…

  13. Black at Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadi-Hanifi, Karima

    2013-01-01

    This is an exploratory paper, drawing on the author's experiences as well as those of three other black lecturers in Higher Education (HE). Three interviews were carried out, asking the same five questions around themes of concern to the author. These are about the learning and teaching approaches used by these lecturers; their experiences of…

  14. Higher Education Exchange 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.

    Nine articles discuss the relationship between the higher education community and the public. The articles are: (1) "On a Certain Blindness in Teaching" by Michael S. Roth, who stresses the necessity of political citizenship education for a healthy democracy; (2) "Monocultural Perspectives and Campus Diversity" by Jane Fried, who explores the…

  15. Unraveling Higher Education's Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Gus; Charles, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The activity-based costing (ABC) method of analyzing institutional costs in higher education involves four procedures: determining the various discrete activities of the organization; calculating the cost of each; determining the cost drivers; tracing cost to the cost objective or consumer of each activity. Few American institutions have used the…

  16. NEXUS: Digitizing Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Camille

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of digital technology in the context of higher education planning considers how these technologies change teaching; the digital divide; the costs of information technology; hard wiring the campus; material consequences of information technology; digitally enabled crimes and misdemeanors; and libraries and scholarly publishing. Concludes…

  17. Valuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the value of higher education is today set in the context of an unprecedented banking and financial crisis. In this context of fundamental change and financial realignment, it is important that we as members of the university remake our case for why the university deserves to be considered alongside all those other worthy causes…

  18. Developing Higher Level Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limbach, Barbara; Waugh, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This paper identifies an interdisciplinary, five-step process, built upon existing theory and best practices in cognitive development, effective learning environments, and outcomes-based assessment. The "Process for the Development of Higher Level Thinking Skills" provides teachers with an easy to implement method of moving toward a more…

  19. Free Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Jr., Adolph; Szymanski, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    The crisis of affordability in higher education is intensifying. Illustrations of its resonance abound: from the frequent news articles describing and amplifying the crisis and its sources to legislators' and candidates' proposed responses. Republicans' responses tend to be mainly punitive toward institutions; Democrats' proposals are more…

  20. Shell Higher Olefins Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how olefin isomerization and the exotic olefin metathesis reaction can be harnessed in industrial processes. Indicates that the Shell Higher Olefins Process makes use of organometallic catalysts to manufacture alpha-olefins and internal carbon-11 through carbon-14 alkenes in a flexible fashion that can be adjusted to market needs. (JN)

  1. Comparative Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    The comparative higher education course offered at the State University of New York at Buffalo is briefly described, and a course schedule is presented, including required and recommended readings for each topic. The course is intended to provide a broad cross-cultural perspective and considers the growth and development of universities in Europe,…

  2. Development of indole/indazole-aminopyrimidines as inhibitors of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK): optimization for JNK potency and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gong, Leyi; Han, Xiaochun; Silva, Tania; Tan, Yun-Chou; Goyal, Bindu; Tivitmahaisoon, Parch; Trejo, Alejandra; Palmer, Wylie; Hogg, Heather; Jahagir, Alam; Alam, Muzaffar; Wagner, Paul; Stein, Karin; Filonova, Lubov; Loe, Brad; Makra, Ferenc; Rotstein, David; Rapatova, Lubica; Dunn, James; Zuo, Fengrong; Dal Porto, Joseph; Wong, Brian; Jin, Sue; Chang, Alice; Tran, Patricia; Hsieh, Gary; Niu, Linghao; Shao, Ada; Reuter, Deborah; Hermann, Johaness; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Goldstein, David

    2013-06-15

    A novel series of indole/indazole-aminopyrimidines was designed and synthesized with an aim to achieve optimal potency and selectivity for the c-Jun kinase family or JNKs. Structure guided design was used to optimize the series resulting in a significant potency improvement. The best compound (17) has IC50 of 3 nM for JNK1 and 20 nM for JNK2, with greater than 40-fold selectivity against other kinases with good physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:23664880

  3. Discovery of pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives as CMGC family protein kinase inhibitors: Design, synthesis, inhibitory potency and X-ray co-crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Esvan, Yannick J; Zeinyeh, Wael; Boibessot, Thibaut; Nauton, Lionel; Théry, Vincent; Knapp, Stefan; Chaikuad, Apirat; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Anizon, Fabrice; Giraud, Francis; Moreau, Pascale

    2016-08-01

    The design and synthesis of new pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives is described as well as their protein kinase inhibitory potencies toward five CMGC family members (CDK5, CK1, GSK3, CLK1 and DYRK1A). The interest for this original tricyclic heteroaromatic scaffold as modulators of CLK1/DYRK1A activity was validated by nanomolar potencies (compounds 12 and 13). CLK1 co-crystal structures with two inhibitors revealed the binding mode of these compounds within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:27128181

  4. Impaired Neural Differentiation Potency by Retinoic Acid Receptor-α Pathway Defect in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Pei-Shan; Huang, Wen-Chin; Chiang, Wei; Lin, Wei-Che

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are reprogrammed from somatic cells via ectopic gene expression and, similarly to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), possess powerful abilities to self-renew and differentiate into cells of various lineages. However, the neural differentiation potency of iPSCs remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated the neural differentiation ability of iPSCs compared with ESCs using an retinoic acid (RA) induction system. The neural differentiation efficiency of iPSCs was obviously lower than that of ESCs. Retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) was critical in the RA-induced neural differentiation of iPSCs, and the effect of RARα was confirmed by applying a specific RARα antagonist ER50891 to ESCs. These findings indicate that iPSCs do not possess the complete properties that ESCs have. PMID:25364979

  5. Structural and biochemical analyses of the catalysis and potency impact of inhibitor phosphoribosylation by human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Oh, Angela; Ho, Yen-Ching; Zak, Mark; Liu, Yongbo; Chen, Xukun; Yuen, Po-Wai; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Liu, Yichin; Dragovich, Peter S; Wang, Weiru

    2014-05-26

    Prolonged inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a strategy for targeting cancer metabolism. Many NAMPT inhibitors undergo NAMPT-catalyzed phosphoribosylation (pRib), a property often correlated with their cellular potency. To understand this phenomenon and facilitate drug design, we analyzed a potent cellularly active NAMPT inhibitor (GNE-617). A crystal structure of pRib-GNE-617 in complex with NAMPT protein revealed a relaxed binding mode. Consistently, the adduct formation resulted in tight binding and strong product inhibition. In contrast, a biochemically equipotent isomer of GNE-617 (GNE-643) also formed pRib adducts but displayed significantly weaker cytotoxicity. Structural analysis revealed an altered ligand conformation of GNE-643, thus suggesting weak association of the adducts with NAMPT. Our data support a model for cellularly active NAMPT inhibitors that undergo NAMPT-catalyzed phosphoribosylation to produce pRib adducts that retain efficient binding to the enzyme. PMID:24797455

  6. Guidelines for the development and validation of new potency assays for the evaluation of umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Stephen; Hurley, Carolyn K; Brady, Colleen; Phillips-Johnson, Lisa; Chow, Robert; Laughlin, Mary; McMannis, John; Reems, Jo-Anna; Regan, Donna; Rubinstein, Pablo; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2011-08-01

    The following commentary was developed by the National Marrow Donor Program Cord Blood Advisory Group and is intended to provide an overview of umbilical cord blood (UCB) processing, summarize the current state of potency assays used to characterize UCB, and define limitations of the assays and future needs of the cord blood banking and transplant community. The UCB banking industry is eager to participate in the development of standardized assays to uniformly characterize cellular therapy products that are manufactured in a variety of ways. This paper describes the desired qualities of these assays and how the industry proposes to co-operate with developers to bring relevant assays to market. To that end, the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) Cord Blood Bank Network is available to serve as a resource for UCB testing material, research and development consulting, and product/assay testing in an accredited UCB manufacturing environment. PMID:21449685

  7. Optimization of chromone-2-carboxamide melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists: assessment of potency, efficacy, and cardiovascular safety.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John K; Freeman, Jennifer C; Judd, Andrew S; Iyengar, Rajesh; Mulhern, Mathew; Zhao, Gang; Napier, James J; Wodka, Dariusz; Brodjian, Sevan; Dayton, Brian D; Falls, Doug; Ogiela, Christopher; Reilly, Regina M; Campbell, Thomas J; Polakowski, James S; Hernandez, Lisa; Marsh, Kennan C; Shapiro, Robin; Knourek-Segel, Victoria; Droz, Brian; Bush, Eugene; Brune, Michael; Preusser, Lee C; Fryer, Ryan M; Reinhart, Glenn A; Houseman, Kathryn; Diaz, Gilbert; Mikhail, Ann; Limberis, James T; Sham, Hing L; Collins, Christine A; Kym, Philip R

    2006-11-01

    Evaluation of multiple structurally distinct series of melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists in an anesthetized rat cardiovascualar assay led to the identification of a chromone-2-carboxamide series as having excellent safety against the chosen cardiovascular endpoints at high drug concentrations in the plasma and brain. Optimization of this series led to considerable improvements in affinity, functional potency, and pharmacokinetic profile. This led to the identification of a 7-fluorochromone-2-carboxamide (22) that was orally efficacious in a diet-induced obese mouse model, retained a favorable cardiovascular profile in rat, and demonstrated dramatic improvement in effects on mean arterial pressure in our dog cardiovascular model compared to other series reported by our group. However, this analogue also led to prolongation of the QT interval in the dog that was linked to affinity for hERG channel and unexpectedly potent functional blockade of this ion channel. PMID:17064075

  8. Single prostacyclin receptor of gel-filtered platelets provides a correlation with antiaggregatory potency of PGI2 mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Eggerman, T.L.; Hartzell, C.J.; Selfe, S.; Andersen, N.H.

    1987-03-01

    Gel-filtered human platelets (GFP) display only a single binding site for (/sup 3/H)-PGI2: KD = 61nM, 234 fmol/10(8) platelets (1410 sites/platelet). Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) displays the same receptor density but the KD value increases to 123 nM due to protein binding of PGI2 which lowers its effective concentration. The (/sup 3/H)-PGI2/GFP binding assay has been used to evaluate the molecular basis of aggregation inhibition for prostacyclin analogs and mimics, three PGE type structures, and PGD2. Antiaggregatory IC50s and radioligand binding IC50s correlate for PGE2, E1, and six PGI2 analogs. PGD2, and to a lesser extent 6-oxo-PGE1, display greater antiaggregatory potency than expected based on PGI2-binding site affinity data.

  9. High potency inhibition of hERG potassium channels by the sodium–calcium exchange inhibitor KB-R7943

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hongwei; Zhang, Yihong; Du, Chunyun; Dempsey, Christopher E; Hancox, Jules C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE KB-R7943 is an isothiourea derivative that is used widely as a pharmacological inhibitor of sodium–calcium exchange (NCX) in experiments on cardiac and other tissue types. This study investigated KB-R7943 inhibition of hERG (human ether-à-go-go-related gene) K+ channels that underpin the cardiac rapid delayed rectifier potassium current, IKr. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements were made of hERG current (IhERG) carried by wild-type or mutant hERG channels and of native rabbit ventricular IKr. Docking simulations utilized a hERG homology model built on a MthK-based template. KEY RESULTS KB-R7943 inhibited both IhERG and native IKr rapidly on membrane depolarization with IC50 values of ∼89 and ∼120 nM, respectively, for current tails at −40 mV following depolarizing voltage commands to +20 mV. Marked IhERG inhibition also occurred under ventricular action potential voltage clamp. IhERG inhibition by KB-R7943 exhibited both time- and voltage-dependence but showed no preference for inactivated over activated channels. Results of alanine mutagenesis and docking simulations indicate that KB-R7943 can bind to a pocket formed of the side chains of aromatic residues Y652 and F656, with the compound's nitrobenzyl group orientated towards the cytoplasmic side of the channel pore. The structurally related NCX inhibitor SN-6 also inhibited IhERG, but with a markedly reduced potency. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS KB-R7943 inhibits IhERG/IKr with a potency that exceeds that reported previously for acute cardiac NCX inhibition. Our results also support the feasibility of benzyloxyphenyl-containing NCX inhibitors with reduced potential, in comparison with KB-R7943, to inhibit hERG. PMID:21950687

  10. NanoDisk containing super aggregated amphotericin B: a high therapeutic index antifungal formulation with enhanced potency

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Braydon L; He, Yumin; Baker, Mandie M; Luo, Bing; Carroll, Stephen F; Forte, Trudy M; Oda, Michael N

    2013-01-01

    Objectives NanoDisk–amphotericin B (ND-AMB) is a protein-phospholipid bioparticle containing a “super aggregate” form of antifungal AMB. While lipid-based formulations of AMB, including liposomal AMB (L-AMB), are safer than the deoxycholate (DOC) solubilized form (DOC-AMB), the potency of lipid-based formulations is attenuated. We have developed an AMB-based therapy that is both well tolerated and fully efficacious. Methods Potency was determined using broth culture growth-inhibition assays and candidacidal kinetics by quantitative culture plating. Toxicology studies were performed in healthy mice. Efficacy was assessed using both immune-competent and leukopenic murine models of systemic Candida albicans infection. Results ND-AMB C. albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus minimum inhibitory concentrations were fourfold and sixfold lower, respectively, than that observed for L-AMB. ND-AMB exhibited candidacidal activity at 0.125 mg/L, 16-fold lower than L-AMB. In mice, ND-AMB produced no statistically significant kidney or liver toxicity at 15 mg/kg, the highest dose tested. When evaluated in immune-competent mice infected with C. albicans, ND-AMB was at least as effective as DOC-AMB or L-AMB. In a leukopenic model of candidiasis, the 50% effective dose of ND-AMB was around threefold lower than L-AMB. Conclusion These results indicate that ND-AMB exhibits a more favorable safety profile while maintaining uncompromised antifungal properties compared to both DOC-AMB and L-AMB. ND-AMB is a promising therapy for the treatment of invasive fungal infections. PMID:24379661

  11. Drug binding affinities and potencies are best described by a log-normal distribution and use of geometric means

    SciTech Connect

    Stanisic, D.; Hancock, A.A.; Kyncl, J.J.; Lin, C.T.; Bush, E.N.

    1986-03-05

    (-)-Norepinephrine (NE) is used as an internal standard in their in vitro adrenergic assays, and the concentration of NE which produces a half-maximal inhibition of specific radioligand binding (affinity; K/sub I/), or half-maximal contractile response (potency; ED/sub 50/) has been measured numerous times. The goodness-of-fit test for normality was performed on both normal (Gaussian) or log /sub 10/-normal frequency histograms of these data using the SAS Univariate procedure. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-prazosin to rat liver (..cap alpha../sub 1/-), /sup 3/H rauwolscine to rat cortex (..cap alpha../sub 2/-) and /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol to rat ventricle (..beta../sub 1/-) or rat lung (..beta../sub 2/-receptors) was inhibited by NE; the distributions of NE K/sub I/'s at all these sites were skewed to the right, with highly significant (p < 0.01) deviations from normality. However, these data were better described by log-normal distributions. Similar results were obtained with ED/sub 50/'s of NE in isolated rabbit aorta (..cap alpha../sub 1/), phenoxybenzamine-treated dog saphenous vein (..cap alpha../sub 2/) and guinea pig atrium (..beta../sub 1/). The vasorelaxant potency of atrial natriuretic hormone in histamine-contracted rabbit aorta also was better described by a log-normal distribution, indicating that log-normalcy is probably a general phenomenon of drug-receptor interactions. Because data of this type appear to be log-normally distributed, geometric means should be used in parametric statistical analyses.

  12. Variability of cannabis potency in the Venice area (Italy): a survey over the period 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Zamengo, Luca; Frison, Giampietro; Bettin, Chiara; Sciarrone, Rocco

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance globally, with an estimated annual prevalence in 2010 of 2.6-5.0% of the adult population. Concerns have been expressed about increases in the potency of cannabis products. A high tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content can increase anxiety, depression, and psychotic symptoms, and can increase the risk of dependence and adverse effects on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in regular users. The aim of this study was to report statistical data about the potency of cannabis products seized in the north-east of Italy, in a geographical area centred in Venice and extending for more than 10,000  km(2) with a population of more than two million, by investigating the variability observed in THC levels of about 4000 samples of cannabis products analyzed over the period 2010-2012. Overall median THC content showed an increasing trend over the study period from about 6.0% to 8.1% (6.2-8.9% for cannabis resin, 5.1-7.6% for herbal cannabis). The variation in the THC content of individual samples was very large, ranging from 0.3% to 31% for cannabis resin and from 0.1 to 19% for herbal cannabis. Median CBN:THC ratios showed a slightly decreasing trend over the study period, from 0.09 (2010) to 0.03 (2012), suggesting an increasing freshness of submitted materials. Median CBD:THC ratios also showed a decreasing trend over the study from about 0.52 (2010) to 0.18 (2012), likely due to the increase in submissions of materials from indoor and domestic cultivation with improved breeding methods. PMID:23868754

  13. Effects of chemical modification on the potency, serum stability, and immunostimulatory properties of short shRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Qing; Dallas, Anne; Ilves, Heini; Shorenstein, Joshua; Behlke, Mark A.; Johnston, Brian H.

    2010-01-01

    Small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) with 19-base-pair, or shorter, stems (short shRNAs [sshRNAs]) have been found to constitute a class whose mechanism of action appears to be distinct from that of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or longer shRNAs. These sshRNAs can be as active as canonical siRNAs or longer shRNAs. Their activity is affected by whether the antisense strand is positioned 5′ or 3′ to the loop (L or R sshRNAs, respectively). Dicer seems not to be involved in the processing of sshRNAs, although the mechanism of target gene suppression by these hairpins is through Ago2-mediated mRNA cleavage. In this study, the effects of chemical modifications on the potency, serum stability, and innate immune response of sshRNAs were investigated. Deoxynucleotide substitution and 2′-O-methyl (2′-OMe) modification in the sense strand and loop did not affect silencing activity, but, unlike with siRNAs, when placed in the antisense strand these modifications were detrimental. Conjugation with bulky groups at the 5′-end of L sshRNAs or 3′-end of R sshRNAs had a negative impact on the potency. Unmodified sshRNAs in dimer form or with blunt ends were immunostimulatory. Some modifications such as 3′-end conjugation and phosphorothioate linkages on the backbone of the sshRNAs could also induce inflammatory cytokine production. However, 2′-OMe substitution of sshRNAs abrogated the innate immune response and improved the serum stability of the hairpins. PMID:19948766

  14. Spectrum and potency of dalbavancin tested against 3322 Gram-positive cocci isolated in the United States Surveillance Program (2004).

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Stilwell, Matthew G; Sader, Helio S; Fritsche, Thomas R; Goldstein, Beth P

    2006-02-01

    Dalbavancin is an injectable, next generation lipoglycopeptide with an extended serum elimination half-life. Once-weekly dosing has been successful for treatment of skin and skin structure (SSSI) and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI). Concurrent with clinical trails, dalbavancin resistance surveillance was initiated in 2003, and results are reported here for the 2004 United States (USA) component. A total of 3322 Gram-positive cocci were tested by reference broth microdilution methods. Organism species tested included: Staphylococcus aureus (2102; 49% oxacillin-resistant), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS; 255, 82% oxacillin-resistant), beta-hemolytic streptococci (241), viridans group streptococci (46), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (678). Dalbavancin (MIC90,0.06-0.12 microg/mL) was comparable in spectrum, but superior in potency to vancomycin (MIC90,1-2 microg/mL) against staphylococci. Dalbavancin MIC90 values against the tested streptococci was 0.03 microg/mL. Dalbavancin was more active against tested SSTI pathogens than comparator agents having complete susceptibility rates (100.0%) similar to vancomycin. Vancomycin, (16- to 32-fold), linezolid (8- to 32-fold), daptomycin (4- to 32-fold), and quinupristin/dalfopristin (4- to 32-fold) were less active than dalbavancin. In conclusion, dalbavancin exhibited greater potency than comparison glycopeptides or lipopeptides, streptogramin combinations, and oxazolidinones against Gram-positive pathogens associated with SSSI or CR-BSI. Dalbavancin wild-type MIC distributions remain unchanged compared with prior sampled years (2002-2003) in the USA. PMID:16426793

  15. A Novel Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Fusion Protein (VRS-317): Enhanced In Vivo Potency and Half-Life

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Jeffrey L; Geething, Nathan C; Moore, Jerome A; Rogers, Brian C; Spink, Benjamin J; Wang, Chai-Wei; Alters, Susan E; Stemmer, Willem P C; Schellenberger, Volker

    2012-01-01

    A novel recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) fusion protein (VRS-317) was designed to minimize receptor-mediated clearance through a reduction in receptor binding without mutations to rhGH by genetically fusing with XTEN amino acid sequences to the N-terminus and the C-terminus of the native hGH sequence. Although in vitro potency of VRS-317 was reduced approximately 12-fold compared with rhGH, in vivo potency was increased because of the greatly prolonged exposure to the target tissues and organs. VRS-317 was threefold more potent than daily rhGH in hypophysectomized rats and fivefold more potent than daily rhGH in juvenile monkeys. In juvenile monkeys, a monthly dose of 1.4 mg/kg VRS-317 (equivalent to 0.26 mg/kg rhGH) caused a sustained pharmacodynamic response for 1 month equivalent to 0.05 mg/kg/day rhGH (1.4 mg/kg rhGH total over 28 days). In monkeys, VRS-317, having a terminal elimination half-life of approximately 110 h, was rapidly and near-completely absorbed, and was well tolerated with no observed adverse effects after every alternate week subcutaneous dosing for 14 weeks. VRS-317 also did not cause lipoatrophy in pig and monkey studies. VRS-317 is currently being studied in GH-deficient patients to confirm the observations in these animal studies. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 101:2744–2754, 2012 PMID:22678811

  16. Generalized higher gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Patricia; Sämann, Christian; Schmidt, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    We study a generalization of higher gauge theory which makes use of generalized geometry and seems to be closely related to double field theory. The local kinematical data of this theory is captured by morphisms of graded manifolds between the canonical exact Courant Lie 2-algebroid T M ⊕ T ∗ M over some manifold M and a semistrict gauge Lie 2-algebra. We discuss generalized curvatures and infinitesimal gauge transformations. Finite gauge transformation as well as global kinematical data are then obtained from principal 2-bundles over 2-spaces. As dynamical principle, we consider first the canonical Chern-Simons action for such a gauge theory. We then show that a previously proposed 3-Lie algebra model for the six-dimensional (2,0) theory is very naturally interpreted as a generalized higher gauge theory.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF RELATIVE POTENCY ESTIMATES FOR PAHS AND HYDROCARBON COMBUSTION PRODUCT FRACTIONS COMPARED TO BENZO[A]PYRENE AND THEIR USE IN CARCINOGENIC RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As an extension of the work started in a previous contract (EPA 68-02-4403, April 1988), various approaches for estimating the carcinogenic potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mixtures were investigated. he approach uses the two-stage model described in the previous...

  18. MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC POTENCY OF EXTRACTS OF DIESEL AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL EMISSIONS: STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLE GENERATION, COLLECTION, AND PREPARATION (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major diesel emissions research program has been initiated by the US Environmental Protection Agency to assess the human health risk associated with increased use of diesel automobiles. This program is intended to establish the mutagenic and carcinogenic potency of complex orga...

  19. Cryopreserved Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Maintain Potency in a Retinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Model: Toward an off-the-shelf Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, Oliver W.; Burand, Anthony J.; Brown, Alex J.; Deutsch, Riley J.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Ankrum, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to use mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) directly out of cryostorage would significantly reduce the logistics of MSC therapy by allowing on-site cryostorage of therapeutic doses of MSC at hospitals and clinics. Such a paradigm would be especially advantageous for the treatment of acute conditions such as stroke and myocardial infarction, which are likely to require treatment within hours after ischemic onset. Recently, several reports have emerged that suggest MSC viability and potency are damaged by cryopreservation. Herein we examine the effect of cryopreservation on human MSC viability, immunomodulatory potency, growth factor secretion, and performance in an ischemia/reperfusion injury model. Using modifications of established cryopreservation methods we developed MSC that retain >95% viability upon thawing, remain responsive to inflammatory signals, and are able to suppress activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Most importantly, when injected into the eyes of mice 3 hours after the onset of ischemia and 2 hours after the onset of reperfusion, cryopreserved performed as well as fresh MSC to rescue retinal ganglion cells. Thus, our data suggests when viability is maintained throughout the cryopreservation process, MSC retain their therapeutic potency in both in vitro potency assays and an in vivo ischemia/reperfusion model. PMID:27212469

  20. Multi-Level Analysis of Peer Support, Internet Self-Efficacy and E-Learning Outcomes--The Contextual Effects of Collectivism and Group Potency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Regina Juchun; Chu, Anita Zichun

    2010-01-01

    The present study intends to explore the role of collectivism and group potency at group level in predicting individual Internet self-efficacy (ISE) and individual e-learning outcomes for people aged over 45. Group learning has been widely discussed in the research into online formats. However, less study has been carried out about how…