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Sample records for 10-fold higher potency

  1. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum.

  2. Splenectomy Causes 10-Fold Increased Risk of Portal Venous System Thrombosis in Liver Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xingshun; Han, Guohong; Ye, Chun; Zhang, Yongguo; Dai, Junna; Peng, Ying; Deng, Han; Li, Jing; Hou, Feifei; Ning, Zheng; Zhao, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xintong; Wang, Ran; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Portal venous system thrombosis (PVST) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis. We conducted a retrospective study to comprehensively analyze the prevalence and risk factors of PVST in liver cirrhosis. Material/Methods All cirrhotic patients without malignancy admitted between June 2012 and December 2013 were eligible if they underwent contrast-enhanced CT or MRI scans. Independent predictors of PVST in liver cirrhosis were calculated in multivariate analyses. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the severity of PVST (any PVST, main portal vein [MPV] thrombosis >50%, and clinically significant PVST) and splenectomy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. Results Overall, 113 cirrhotic patients were enrolled. The prevalence of PVST was 16.8% (19/113). Splenectomy (any PVST: OR=11.494, 95%CI=2.152–61.395; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=29.987, 95%CI=3.247–276.949; clinically significant PVST: OR=40.415, 95%CI=3.895–419.295) and higher hemoglobin (any PVST: OR=0.974, 95%CI=0.953–0.996; MPV thrombosis >50%: OR=0.936, 95%CI=0.895–0.980; clinically significant PVST: OR=0.935, 95%CI=0.891–0.982) were the independent predictors of PVST. The prevalence of PVST was 13.3% (14/105) after excluding splenectomy. Higher hemoglobin was the only independent predictor of MPV thrombosis >50% (OR=0.952, 95%CI=0.909–0.997). No independent predictors of any PVST or clinically significant PVST were identified in multivariate analyses. Additionally, PVST patients who underwent splenectomy had a significantly higher proportion of clinically significant PVST but lower MELD score than those who did not undergo splenectomy. In all analyses, the in-hospital mortality was not significantly different between cirrhotic patient with and without PVST. Conclusions Splenectomy may increase by at least 10-fold the risk of PVST in liver cirrhosis independent of severity of liver dysfunction. PMID:27432511

  3. Higher potency of RP 67580, in the mouse and the rat compared with other nonpeptide and peptide tachykinin NK1 antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Beaujouan, J. C.; Heuillet, E.; Petitet, F.; Saffroy, M.; Torrens, Y.; Glowinski, J.

    1993-01-01

    1. This study was undertaken to compare the potency and selectivity of the nonpeptide (RP 67580, (+/-)-CP-96,345 and its chloro-derivative [(+/-)-cis-3-(2-chlorobenzylamino)-2-benzhydrylquinuclidine] (CP-C1)) and peptide (GR 71,251 and spantide) neurokinin1 (NK1) antagonists in mouse and rat preparations. 2. Among the NK1 antagonists tested, RP 67580 was the most potent in inhibiting the specific binding of [125I]-Bolton Hunter substance P ([125I]-BHSP) to crude synaptosomes from the rat brain (Ki: 2.9 nM). (+/-)-CP-96,345 was about ten fold less potent (Ki: 31 nM) than RP 67580 while other compounds exhibited even less affinity. 3. All NK1 antagonists inhibit competitively the activation of phospholipase C by [Pro9]substance P ([Pro9]SP) in cultured cortical astrocytes from the newborn mouse, a preparation rich in NK1 receptors but devoid of NK2 and NK3 receptors. pA2 values for the most potent compounds, RP 67580 and (+/-)-CP-96,345, were 8.28 and 7.08 respectively. When used alone, all antagonists showed some agonist activity at 10(-5) M, except spantide which was already effective at 10(-6) M. 4. An excellent correlation was found between the potency of the NK1 antagonists in blocking the stimulation by [Pro9]SP of phosphoinositide breakdown in cortical astrocytes and in inhibiting [125I]-BHSP specific binding to rat brain synaptosomes. 5. As shown on single cells by use of the Indo-1 microfluorometric method, RP 67580 (10(-7) M) prevented reversibly the elevation of cytosolic calcium concentration induced by [Pro9]SP (10(-8) M) in cultured cortical astrocytes. 6. Several experiments indicated that the antagonists were highly selective for NK1 receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682138

  4. Potency in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, A A

    1976-06-01

    This paper defines therapeutic potency in terms of constructive as opposed to destructive intervention. In judging the degree of success in psychotherapy we may use either a medical or a growth model. Whichever criterion is adopted the conclusion stands that potency will be at a maximum whenever the therapist selects the most efficient technique for working with his client regardless of the school which gave birth to it. An eclectic approach views the differences between schools as exaggerated by the use of divergent psychological models and terminology, and sees value in various explanatory concepts such as 'reinforcement' 'conditioning', 'insight' and 'cognitive restructuring'. PMID:1067838

  5. Exploration of Dimensions of Estrogen Potency

    PubMed Central

    Jeyakumar, M.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Gunther, Jillian R.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  6. Conjugation of mono and di-GalNAc sugars enhances the potency of antisense oligonucleotides via ASGR mediated delivery to hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Yu, Jinghua; Vasquez, Guillermo; Low, Audrey; Chappell, Alfred; Schmidt, Karsten; Murray, Heather M; Gaus, Hans; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2016-08-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) conjugated to trivalent GalNAc ligands show 10-fold enhanced potency for suppressing gene targets expressed in hepatocytes. Trivalent GalNAc is a high affinity ligand for the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGR)-a C-type lectin expressed almost exclusively on hepatocytes in the liver. In this communication, we show that conjugation of two and even one GalNAc sugar to single stranded chemically modified ASOs can enhance potency 5-10 fold in mice. Evaluation of the mono- and di-GalNAc ASO conjugates in an ASGR binding assay suggested that chemical features of the ASO enhance binding to the receptor and provide a rationale for the enhanced potency.

  7. Inhaled corticosteroids: potency, dose equivalence and therapeutic index

    PubMed Central

    Daley-Yates, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are a group of structurally related molecules that includes natural hormones and synthetic drugs with a wide range of anti-inflammatory potencies. For synthetic corticosteroid analogues it is commonly assumed that the therapeutic index cannot be improved by increasing their glucocorticoid receptor binding affinity. The validity of this assumption, particularly for inhaled corticosteroids, has not been fully explored. Inhaled corticosteroids exert their anti-inflammatory activity locally in the airways, and hence this can be dissociated from their potential to cause systemic adverse effects. The molecular structural features that increase glucocorticoid receptor binding affinity and selectivity drive topical anti-inflammatory activity. However, in addition, these structural modifications also result in physicochemical and pharmacokinetic changes that can enhance targeting to the airways and reduce systemic exposure. As a consequence, potency and therapeutic index can be correlated. However, this consideration is not reflected in asthma treatment guidelines that classify inhaled corticosteroid formulations as low-, mid- and high dose, and imbed a simple dose equivalence approach where potency is not considered to affect the therapeutic index. This article describes the relationship between potency and therapeutic index, and concludes that higher potency can potentially improve the therapeutic index. Therefore, both efficacy and safety should be considered when classifying inhaled corticosteroid regimens in terms of dose equivalence. The historical approach to dose equivalence in asthma treatment guidelines is not appropriate for the wider range of molecules, potencies and device/formulations now available. A more robust method is needed that incorporates pharmacological principles. PMID:25808113

  8. The Effects of Medical Marijuana Laws on Potency

    PubMed Central

    Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Heaton, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Marijuana potency has risen dramatically over the past two decades. In the United States, it is unclear whether state medical marijuana policies have contributed to this increase. Methods Employing a differences-in-differences model within a mediation framework, we analyzed data on n = 39,157 marijuana samples seized by law enforcement in 51 U.S. jurisdictions between 1990-2010, producing estimates of the direct and indirect effects of state medical marijuana laws on potency, as measured by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol content. Results We found evidence that potency increased by a half percentage point on average after legalization of medical marijuana, although this result was not significant. When we examined specific medical marijuana supply provisions, results suggest that legal allowances for retail dispensaries had the strongest influence, significantly increasing potency by about one percentage point on average. Our mediation analyses examining the mechanisms through which medical marijuana laws influence potency found no evidence of direct regulatory impact. Rather, the results suggest that the impact of these laws occurs predominantly through a compositional shift in the share of the market captured by high-potency sinsemilla. Conclusion Our findings have important implications for policymakers and those in the scientific community trying to understand the extent to which greater availability of higher potency marijuana increases the risk of negative public health outcomes, such as drugged driving and drug-induced psychoses. Future work should reconsider the impact of medical marijuana laws on health outcomes in light of dramatic and ongoing shifts in both marijuana potency and the medical marijuana policy environment. PMID:24502887

  9. Engineering high-potency R-spondin adult stem cell growth factors.

    PubMed

    Warner, Margaret L; Bell, Tufica; Pioszak, Augen A

    2015-01-01

    Secreted R-spondin proteins (RSPOs1-4) function as adult stem cell growth factors by potentiating Wnt signaling. Simultaneous binding of distinct regions of the RSPO Fu1-Fu2 domain module to the extracellular domains (ECDs) of the LGR4 G protein-coupled receptor and the ZNRF3 transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates Wnt receptor availability. Here, we examine the molecular basis for the differing signaling strengths of RSPOs1-4 using purified RSPO Fu1-Fu2, LGR4 ECD, and ZNRF3 ECD proteins in Wnt signaling and receptor binding assays, and we engineer novel high-potency RSPOs. RSPO2/3/4 had similar signaling potencies that were stronger than that of RSPO1, whereas RSPO1/2/3 had similar efficacies that were greater than that of RSPO4. The RSPOs bound LGR4 with affinity rank order RSPO4 > RSPO2/3 > RSPO1 and ZNRF3 with affinity rank order RSPO2/3 > > RSPO1 > RSPO4. An RSPO2-4 chimera combining RSPO2 ZNRF3 binding with RSPO4 LGR4 binding was a "Superspondin" that exhibited enhanced ternary complex formation and 10-fold stronger signaling potency than RSPO2 and efficacy equivalent to RSPO2. An RSPO4-1 chimera combining RSPO4 ZNRF3 binding with RSPO1 LGR4 binding was a "Poorspondin" that exhibited signaling potency similar to RSPO1 and efficacy equivalent to RSPO4. Conferring increased ZNRF3 binding upon RSPO4 with amino acid substitutions L56F, I58L, and I63M enhanced its signaling potency and efficacy. Our results reveal the molecular basis for RSPOs1-4 activity differences and suggest that signaling potency is determined by ternary complex formation ability, whereas efficacy depends on ZNRF3 recruitment. High-potency RSPOs may be of value for regenerative medicine and/or therapeutic applications.

  10. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  11. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  12. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  13. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of...

  14. Energetics of mutation-induced changes in potency of lersivirine against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-06-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key components of highly active antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV-1. A common problem with the first generation NNRTIs is the emergence of mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), in particular, K103N and Y181C, which lead to resistance to the entire class of inhibitor. Here we have evaluated the relative affinity of the newly designed NNRTI lersivirine (LRV) against drug-resistant mutations in HIV-1 RT using the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method. Eight single and one double mutant variants of RT are considered. Our results are in good agreement with experimental results and yield insights into the mechanisms underlying mutation-induced changes in the potency of LRV against RT. The strongest (54-fold) increase in the dissociation constant is found for the mutant F227C, originating from reduced electrostatic and van der Waals interactions between LRV and RT as well as a higher energetic penalty from the desolvation of polar groups. For the mutants K103N and Y181C only a moderate (2-fold) increase in the dissociation constant is found, due to a balance of opposite changes in the polar solvation as well as the electrostatic and van der Waals interactions between LRV and RT. The dissociation constant is decreased for the Y188C and G190A (2-fold), the M184V (5-fold), and the Y188C/Y188C mutant (10-fold), due to stronger electrostatic interactions between LRV and RT. Our results thus suggest that LRV is a highly potent and selective NNRTI, with excellent efficacy against NNRTI-resistant viruses, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  15. The local anesthetic potency of norcocaine, a metabolite of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Just, W W; Hoyer, J

    1977-01-15

    The local anesthetic effects of cocaine and one of its main metabolites norcocaine, were investigated comparatively on isolated ganglion cells of the marine gastropod, Aplysia californica. During a 4-hour-period, different action potential parameters such as amplitude, duration, maximum rate of rise were observed, which demonstrated that norcocaine exhibits a higher local anesthetic potency than cocaine.

  16. A Review of OIE Country Status Recovery Using Vaccinate-to-Live Versus Vaccinate-to-Die Foot-and-Mouth Disease Response Policies I: Benefits of Higher Potency Vaccines and Associated NSP DIVA Test Systems in Post-Outbreak Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Barnett, P V; Geale, D W; Clarke, G; Davis, J; Kasari, T R

    2015-08-01

    To rapidly return to trade, countries with OIE status, FMD-free country where vaccination is not practised, have destroyed emergency vaccinated animals, raising ethical concerns with respect to social values, the environment, animal welfare and global food security. This two-part review explores whether science could support eligibility to return to previous OIE status in 3 months irrespective of vaccinate-to-live or vaccinate-to-die policies. Here, we examine the benefits of higher potency (≥ 6 PD50 ), high-purity vaccines formulated from antigen banks for emergency use, their efficacy and performance in differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) assays for post-outbreak surveillance. From an intensive programme of research, we conclude that high-quality, higher potency vaccines are proven to reduce FMD virus (FMDV) subclinical circulation and the risk of carriers. Broader coverage than predicted by serology suggests the potential to hold a few 'key' vaccine strains improving logistics and reducing the financial burden of antigen banks. The OIE should adopt formal definitions for emergency vaccination and emergency vaccines. In terms of supportive tools, we consider that the lack of OIE recognition of DIVA tests other than those of PANAFTOSA in cattle is a shortcoming. There is need for research on maternal antibody interference with DIVA tests and on the use of such tests to establish whether greater purification of vaccines improves performance. We consider that alignment of waiting periods for vaccinate-to-live and vaccinate-to-die in OIE Code Article 8.5.9 1 b. and c. is feasible until an acceptable level of statistical certainty for surveillance or target probability of freedom is established to substantiate the absence of FMDV infection or circulation. It is surveillance intensity rather than waiting periods that establishes the risk of residual FMDV. EU Directive 2003/85/EC implicitly recognizes this, permitting derogation of the OIE waiting

  17. A Review of OIE Country Status Recovery Using Vaccinate-to-Live Versus Vaccinate-to-Die Foot-and-Mouth Disease Response Policies I: Benefits of Higher Potency Vaccines and Associated NSP DIVA Test Systems in Post-Outbreak Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Barnett, P V; Geale, D W; Clarke, G; Davis, J; Kasari, T R

    2015-08-01

    To rapidly return to trade, countries with OIE status, FMD-free country where vaccination is not practised, have destroyed emergency vaccinated animals, raising ethical concerns with respect to social values, the environment, animal welfare and global food security. This two-part review explores whether science could support eligibility to return to previous OIE status in 3 months irrespective of vaccinate-to-live or vaccinate-to-die policies. Here, we examine the benefits of higher potency (≥ 6 PD50 ), high-purity vaccines formulated from antigen banks for emergency use, their efficacy and performance in differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) assays for post-outbreak surveillance. From an intensive programme of research, we conclude that high-quality, higher potency vaccines are proven to reduce FMD virus (FMDV) subclinical circulation and the risk of carriers. Broader coverage than predicted by serology suggests the potential to hold a few 'key' vaccine strains improving logistics and reducing the financial burden of antigen banks. The OIE should adopt formal definitions for emergency vaccination and emergency vaccines. In terms of supportive tools, we consider that the lack of OIE recognition of DIVA tests other than those of PANAFTOSA in cattle is a shortcoming. There is need for research on maternal antibody interference with DIVA tests and on the use of such tests to establish whether greater purification of vaccines improves performance. We consider that alignment of waiting periods for vaccinate-to-live and vaccinate-to-die in OIE Code Article 8.5.9 1 b. and c. is feasible until an acceptable level of statistical certainty for surveillance or target probability of freedom is established to substantiate the absence of FMDV infection or circulation. It is surveillance intensity rather than waiting periods that establishes the risk of residual FMDV. EU Directive 2003/85/EC implicitly recognizes this, permitting derogation of the OIE waiting

  18. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency test. 660.4 Section 660.4 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface...

  19. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Potency test. 660.4 Section 660.4 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface...

  20. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency test. 660.43 Section 660.43 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test... antibody in the appropriate sera of the reference panel by all test methods recommended by the...

  1. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Potency test. 660.43 Section 660.43 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test... antibody in the appropriate sera of the reference panel by all test methods recommended by the...

  2. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jonas; Tvedesøe, Claus; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Lysdahl, Helle; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Chen, Muwan; Baas, Jorgen; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. Methods: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone marrow and the molar teeth of each pig, respectively. BMSCs and DPSCs were cultured in monolayer and on a three-dimensional (3D) polycaprolactone (PCL) – hyaluronic acid – tricalcium phosphate (HT-PCL) scaffold. Population doubling (PD), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and calcium deposition were measured in monolayer. In the 3D culture ALP activity, DNA content, and calcium deposition were evaluated. Six non-penetrating critical-size defects were made in each calvarium of 14 pigs. Three paired sub-studies were conducted: (1) empty defects vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; (2) PCL scaffolds vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; and (3) autologous BMSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds vs. autologous DPSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds. The observation time was five weeks. Bone volume fractions (BV/TV) were assessed with micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. Results and discussion: The results from the in vitro study revealed a higher ALP activity and calcium deposition of the DPSC cultures compared with BMSC cultures. Significantly more bone was present in the HT-PCL group than in both the pure PCL scaffold group and the empty defect group in vivo. DPSCs generated more bone than BMSCs when seeded on HT-PCL. In conclusion, DPSCs exhibited a higher osteogenic potential compared with BMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, making it a potential cell source for future bone tissue engineering. PMID:27163105

  3. Rainbow trout cell bioassay-derived relative potencies for halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons: Comparison and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, D.L.; Blankenship, A.L.; Giesy, J.P.; Richter, C.A.

    1999-05-01

    Rainbow trout hepatoma cells, stably transfected with a luciferase reporter gene under control of dioxin-responsive elements (RLT 2.0 cells) were used to derive relative potencies (RPs) for a variety of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) that are structurally similar to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). This in vitro bioassay utilizes 96-well microplates, which provide high sample throughput and assay efficiency without affecting sensitivity. The RLT 2.0-derived potencies for dioxin and furan congeners, relative to 2,3,7,8-TCDD, ranged from 0.917 for 1,2,3,4,7,8-hexachlorodibenzofuran to 0.208 or 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran. All mono- and di-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) tested had RPs that were orders of magnitude less than TCDD, but point estimates could not be determined. The RLT 2.0-derived RPs were found to be comparable to both other rainbow trout-specific RPs and RPs based on mammalian bioassays. Sensitivity analysis suggested that the range of uncertainty associated with TCDD equivalent (TEQ) estimates based on RLT 2.0-derived RPs is approximately 10-fold. Within this degree of uncertainty and the context of this study, the RLT 2.0 bioassay showed no definitive biases or inaccuracies relative to similar mammalian- or fish-specific in vitro bioassays. Thus, the RLT 2.0 bioassay appears to be a useful tool for evaluating dioxin-like potency of HAHs to fish.

  4. Increasing the potency of neutralizing single-domain antibodies by functionalization with a CD11b/CD18 binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Rossotti, Martin A; González-Techera, Andrés; Guarnaschelli, Julio; Yim, Lucia; Camacho, Ximena; Fernández, Marcelo; Cabral, Pablo; Leizagoyen, Carmen; Chabalgoity, José A; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant single domain antibodies (nanobodies) constitute an attractive alternative for the production of neutralizing therapeutic agents. Their small size warrants rapid bioavailability and fast penetration to sites of toxin uptake, but also rapid renal clearance, which negatively affects their performance. In this work, we present a new strategy to drastically improve the neutralizing potency of single domain antibodies based on their fusion to a second nanobody specific for the complement receptor CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1). These bispecific antibodies retain a small size (˜30 kDa), but acquire effector functions that promote the elimination of the toxin-immunocomplexes. The principle was demonstrated in a mouse model of lethal toxicity with tetanus toxin. Three anti-tetanus toxin nanobodies were selected and characterized in terms of overlapping epitopes and inhibition of toxin binding to neuron gangliosides. Bispecific constructs of the most promising monodomain antibodies were built using anti Mac-1, CD45 and MHC II nanobodies. When co-administered with the toxin, all bispecific antibodies showed higher toxin-neutralizing capacity than the monomeric ones, but only their fusion to the anti-endocytic receptor Mac-1 nanobody allowed the mice to survive a 10-fold lethal dose. In a model of delayed neutralization of the toxin, the anti- Mac-1 bispecific antibodies outperformed a sheep anti-toxin polyclonal IgG that had shown similar neutralization potency in the co-administration experiments. This strategy should have widespread application in the development of nanobody-based neutralizing therapeutics, which can be produced economically and more safely than conventional antisera. PMID:26192995

  5. Engineering High-Potency R-spondin Adult Stem Cell Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Margaret L.; Bell, Tufica

    2015-01-01

    Secreted R-spondin proteins (RSPOs1–4) function as adult stem cell growth factors by potentiating Wnt signaling. Simultaneous binding of distinct regions of the RSPO Fu1–Fu2 domain module to the extracellular domains (ECDs) of the LGR4 G protein–coupled receptor and the ZNRF3 transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates Wnt receptor availability. Here, we examine the molecular basis for the differing signaling strengths of RSPOs1–4 using purified RSPO Fu1–Fu2, LGR4 ECD, and ZNRF3 ECD proteins in Wnt signaling and receptor binding assays, and we engineer novel high-potency RSPOs. RSPO2/3/4 had similar signaling potencies that were stronger than that of RSPO1, whereas RSPO1/2/3 had similar efficacies that were greater than that of RSPO4. The RSPOs bound LGR4 with affinity rank order RSPO4 > RSPO2/3 > RSPO1 and ZNRF3 with affinity rank order RSPO2/3 > > RSPO1 > RSPO4. An RSPO2–4 chimera combining RSPO2 ZNRF3 binding with RSPO4 LGR4 binding was a “Superspondin” that exhibited enhanced ternary complex formation and 10-fold stronger signaling potency than RSPO2 and efficacy equivalent to RSPO2. An RSPO4–1 chimera combining RSPO4 ZNRF3 binding with RSPO1 LGR4 binding was a “Poorspondin” that exhibited signaling potency similar to RSPO1 and efficacy equivalent to RSPO4. Conferring increased ZNRF3 binding upon RSPO4 with amino acid substitutions L56F, I58L, and I63M enhanced its signaling potency and efficacy. Our results reveal the molecular basis for RSPOs1–4 activity differences and suggest that signaling potency is determined by ternary complex formation ability, whereas efficacy depends on ZNRF3 recruitment. High-potency RSPOs may be of value for regenerative medicine and/or therapeutic applications. PMID:25504990

  6. Specific binding of gibberellic acid by cytokinin-specific binding proteins: a new aspect of plant hormone-binding proteins with the PR-10 fold.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Sliwiak, Joanna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Barciszewski, Jakub; Sikorski, Michal; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2014-07-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins of class 10 (PR-10) are a family of plant proteins with the same fold characterized by a large hydrophobic cavity that allows them to bind various ligands, such as phytohormones. A subfamily with only ~20% sequence identity but with a conserved canonical PR-10 fold have previously been recognized as Cytokinin-Specific Binding Proteins (CSBPs), although structurally the binding mode of trans-zeatin (a cytokinin phytohormone) was found to be quite diversified. Here, it is shown that two CSBP orthologues from Medicago truncatula and Vigna radiata bind gibberellic acid (GA3), which is an entirely different phytohormone, in a conserved and highly specific manner. In both cases a single GA3 molecule is found in the internal cavity of the protein. The structural data derived from high-resolution crystal structures are corroborated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), which reveals a much stronger interaction with GA3 than with trans-zeatin and pH dependence of the binding profile. As a conclusion, it is postulated that the CSBP subfamily of plant PR-10 proteins should be more properly linked with general phytohormone-binding properties and termed phytohormone-binding proteins (PhBP).

  7. The copper-mobilizing-potential of dissolved organic matter in soils varies 10-fold depending on soil incubation and extraction procedures.

    PubMed

    Amery, Fien; Degryse, Fien; Degeling, Wim; Smolders, Erik; Merckx, Roel

    2007-04-01

    Copper is mobilized in soil by dissolved organic matter (DOM) but the role of DOM quality in this process is unclear. A one-step resin-exchange method was developed to measure the Cu-Mobilizing-Potential (CuMP) of DOM at pCu 11.3 and pH 7.0, representing background values. The CuMP of DOM was measured in soil solutions of 13 uncontaminated soils with different DOM extraction methods. The CuMP, expressed per unit dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varied 10-fold and followed the order water extracts > 0.01 M CaCl2 extracts > pore water. Soil solutions, obtained from soils that were stored air-dry for a long time or were subjected to drying-wetting cycles, had elevated DOC concentration, but the DOM had a low CuMP. Prolonged soil incubations decreased the DOC concentration and increased the CuMP, suggesting that most of the initially elevated DOM is less humified and has lower Cu affinity than DOM remaining after incubation. A significant positive correlation between the specific UV-absorption of DOM (indicating aromaticity) and CuMP was found for all DOM samples (R(2) = 0.58). It is concluded that the DOC concentration in soil is an insufficient predictor for the Cu mobilization and that DOM samples isolated from air-dried soils are distinct from those of soils kept moist. PMID:17438775

  8. A Mixture of Functionally Oligoclonal Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies That Neutralize Clostridium difficile TcdA and TcdB with High Levels of In Vitro Potency Shows In Vivo Protection in a Hamster Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Nicola L.; Compson, Joanne E.; MacKenzie, Brendon; O'Dowd, Victoria L.; Oxbrow, Amanda K. F.; Heads, James T.; Turner, Alison; Sarkar, Kaushik; Dugdale, Sarah L.; Jairaj, Mark; Christodoulou, Louis; Knight, David E. O.; Cross, Amanda S.; Hervé, Karine J. M.; Tyson, Kerry L.; Hailu, Hanna; Doyle, Carl B.; Ellis, Mark; Kriek, Marco; Cox, Matthew; Page, Matthew J. T.; Moore, Adrian R.; Lightwood, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are a major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospital and care facility patients. In spite of the availability of effective antibiotic treatments, C. difficile infection (CDI) is still a major cause of patient suffering, death, and substantial health care costs. Clostridium difficile exerts its major pathological effects through the actions of two protein exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, which bind to and disrupt gut tissue. Antibiotics target the infecting bacteria but not the exotoxins. Administering neutralizing antibodies against TcdA and TcdB to patients receiving antibiotic treatment might modulate the effects of the exotoxins directly. We have developed a mixture of three humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which neutralize TcdA and TcdB to address three clinical needs: reduction of the severity and duration of diarrhea, reduction of death rates, and reduction of the rate of recurrence. The UCB MAb mixture showed higher potency in a variety of in vitro binding and neutralization assays (∼10-fold improvements), higher levels of protection in a hamster model of CDI (82% versus 18% at 28 days), and higher valencies of toxin binding (12 versus 2 for TcdA and 3 versus 2 for TcdB) than other agents in clinical development. Comparisons of the MAb properties also offered some insight into the potential relative importance of TcdA and TcdB in the disease process. PMID:23324518

  9. Assaying the Potency of Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    The potency of vaccines must be determined to ensure that the appropriate dose is given. The manufacture and assessment of influenza vaccines are complicated by the continuously changing nature of the pathogen, which makes efficacy estimates difficult but also confounds attempts to produce a well-validated, consistent potency assay. Single radial diffusion has been used for decades and provides a relatively simple way to measure the amount of biologically active materials present in the vaccine. It requires reagents, which are updated on a regular, frequently yearly, basis and alternative methods continue to be sought. PMID:26344948

  10. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL... in vitro or in vivo tests, or both, which have been specifically designed for each product so as...

  11. 21 CFR 640.104 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Immune Globulin (Human) § 640.104 Potency. (a) Antibody levels and tests. Each lot of final product shall contain at least the minimum levels of antibodies for... stored at a temperature above 5 °C the antibody level tests shall be performed after such storage with...

  12. 21 CFR 640.104 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Immune Globulin (Human) § 640.104 Potency. (a) Antibody levels and tests. Each lot of final product shall contain at least the minimum levels of antibodies for... stored at a temperature above 5 °C the antibody level tests shall be performed after such storage with...

  13. 21 CFR 640.104 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Immune Globulin (Human) § 640.104 Potency. (a) Antibody levels and tests. Each lot of final product shall contain at least the minimum levels of antibodies for... stored at a temperature above 5 °C the antibody level tests shall be performed after such storage with...

  14. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  15. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  16. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  17. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  18. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  19. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  20. Structural determinants of Tau aggregation inhibitor potency.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Kelsey N; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-11-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers.

  1. Structural Determinants of Tau Aggregation Inhibitor Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J.; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers. PMID:24072703

  2. Exploration of dimensions of estrogen potency: parsing ligand binding and coactivator binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Carlson, Kathryn E; Gunther, Jillian R; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2011-04-15

    The estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are ligand-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression programs in target tissues. The molecular events underlying estrogen action involve minimally two steps, hormone binding to the ER ligand-binding domain followed by coactivator recruitment to the ER·ligand complex; this ligand·receptor·coactivator triple complex then alters gene expression. Conceptually, the potency of an estrogen in activating a cellular response should reflect the affinities that characterize both steps involved in the assembly of the active ligand·receptor·coactivator complex. Thus, to better understand the molecular basis of estrogen potency, we developed a completely in vitro system (using radiometric and time-resolved FRET assays) to quantify independently three parameters: (a) the affinity of ligand binding to ER, (b) the affinity of coactivator binding to the ER·ligand complex, and (c) the potency of ligand recruitment of coactivator. We used this system to characterize the binding and potency of 12 estrogens with both ERα and ERβ. Some ligands showed good correlations between ligand binding affinity, coactivator binding affinity, and coactivator recruitment potency with both ERs, whereas others showed correlations with only one ER subtype or displayed discordant coactivator recruitment potencies. When ligands with low receptor binding affinity but high coactivator recruitment potencies to ERβ were evaluated in cell-based assays, elevation of cellular coactivator levels significantly and selectively improved their potency. Collectively, our results indicate that some low affinity estrogens may elicit greater cellular responses in those target cells that express higher levels of specific coactivators capable of binding to their ER complexes with high affinity. PMID:21321128

  3. CONSTITUTIONAL FACTORS IN MALE POTENCY DISORDERS*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, A. K.; Agarwal, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    SUMMARY Fifty five patients of sexual inadequacy were studied for libidunous strength and androgyny score. Androgyny score was compared with a normal male population. The results show that premature ejaculators and patients with secondary disorders have a high sex drive. Androgyny scores did not differentiate the patients from controls as well as different subgroup of potency disorders. Biiliac diameter of patients with erectile impotence was more than the patients with premature ejaculation. PMID:22064896

  4. Endogenous 2-oxoglutarate levels impact potencies of competitive HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thirstrup, Kenneth; Christensen, Søren; Møller, Henriette Aaris; Ritzén, Andreas; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Sager, Thomas Nikolaj; Jensen, Henrik Sindal

    2011-09-01

    The stability and transcriptional activity of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are regulated by oxygen-dependent hydroxylation that is catalyzed by three HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases (HPHs). Use of HPH inhibition as a mean for HIF-upregulation has recently gained interest as a potential treatment paradigm against neurodegenerative diseases like ischemia and Parkinson's disease. In the present investigation we report the development of a new and robust assay to measure HPH activity. The assay is based on capture of hydroxylated peptide product by the von Hippel-Lindau protein which is directly measured in a scintillation proximity assay. In addition we describe the determination of HPH subtype potencies of HPH inhibitors which either directly or indirectly inhibit the HPH enzyme. The potencies of the HPH inhibitors displayed almost identical IC(50) values toward the HPH1 and HPH2 subtype while the potency against the HPH3 subtype was increased for several of the compounds. For the most potent compound, a hydroxyl thiazole derivative, the potency against HPH2 and HPH3 was 7nM and 0.49nM, respectively corresponding to a 14-fold difference. These results suggest that HPH subtype-selective compounds may be developed. In addition we determined the 2-oxoglutarate concentration in brain tissue and neuronal cell lines as 2-oxoglutarate is an important co-factor used by the HPH enzyme during the hydroxylation reaction. The high intracellular 2-oxoglutarate concentration provides an explanation for the diminished cellular HIF activating potency of a competitive HPH inhibitor compared to its orders of magnitude higher HPH inhibiting potency. The present reported data suggest that in the development of specific Hif prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors the high 2-oxoglutarate tissue level should be taken into account as this might affect the cellular potency. Thus to specifically inhibit the intracellular HPH enzymatic reaction a competitive inhibitor with a low Ki should be developed.

  5. Antimicrobial potency of alkali ion substituted calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Gbureck, Uwe; Knappe, Oliver; Grover, Liam M; Barralet, Jake E

    2005-12-01

    Potassium and sodium containing nanoapatite cements were produced by the reaction of mechanically activated CaNaPO(4) (CSP), CaKPO(4) (CPP) and Ca(2)KNa(PO(4))(2) (CPCP) with a 2.5% Na(2)HPO(4) solution. The cements exhibited clinically acceptable setting times of approximately 5 min and compressive strengths of 5-10 MPa. The antimicrobial properties of the cements were tested with the agar diffusion test using Streptococcus salvarius, Staphylococcus epidermis and Candida albicans. All types of alkali ion containing cements showed a significantly higher antimicrobial potency with inhibition zones of approx. 4-11 mm than a commercial calcium hydroxide cement which resulted in small inhibition zones around the cement samples of a maximum of 1.5 mm. The antimicrobial properties of all the cements were not found to diminish even after longer incubation times. This behaviour was attributed to the formation of soluble alkaline metal phosphates during setting which increased the pH value in the agar gel around the alkali containing calcium phosphate cement to 8.5-10.7 compared to 6.5-8.0 for the Ca(OH)(2) product. The high antimicrobial potency of alkali-calcium phosphate cements may find an application in dentistry as pulp capping agents, root fillers or cavity liners. PMID:16005511

  6. Potency of Animal Models in KANSEI Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Hisano, Setsuji; Iwamoto, Yoshiki

    Various species of animals have been used as animal models for neuroscience and provided critical information about the brain functions. Although it seems difficult to elucidate a highly advanced function of the human brain, animal models have potency to clarify the fundamental mechanisms of emotion, decision-making and social behavior. In this review, we will pick up common animal models and point to both the merits and demerits caused by the characteristics. We will also mention that wide-ranging approaches from animal models are advantageous to understand KANSEI as well as mind in humans.

  7. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  8. Development of a flow cytometry-based potency assay for measuring the in vitro immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Andreia; Ritter, Thomas; Griffin, Matthew; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-09-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) have well-documented modulatory effects on multiple immune cell types. Although these effects are linked to their therapeutic benefit in diverse diseases, a reliable, quantitative assay of the immunomodulatory potency of individual human MSC preparations is lacking. The aims of this study were to develop an optimised rapid turnaround, flow cytometry-based whole-blood assay to monitor MSC potency and to validate its application to MSC immunomodulation. A protocol for short-term LPS stimulation of anti-coagulated whole blood samples followed by combined surface CD45/CD14 and intracellular TNF-α staining was initially developed for analysis on a 4 colour desktop cytometer. Optimal monocyte activation was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium ions thereby precluding the use of EDTA and sodium citrate as anticoagulants. Optimal assay conditions proved to be 1ng/mL ultrapure-LPS added to 10-fold diluted, heparin anti-coagulated whole blood incubated for 6h at 37°C. Under these conditions, addition of human bone marrow-derived MSC (hBM-MSC) from multiple donors resulted in a reproducible, dose-dependent inhibition of LPS-stimulated monocyte TNF-α expression. We conclude that this protocol represents a practical, quantitative assay of a clinically relevant functional effect of hBM-MSCs as well as other immunomodulatory agents. PMID:27451032

  9. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quality control test for potency. 640.56 Section 640.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.56 Quality control test for potency. (a) Quality...

  10. Potency matters: thresholds govern endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Baker, Stephen P; Matthews, John C

    2013-10-01

    Whether thresholds exist for endocrine active substances and for endocrine disrupting effects of exogenous chemicals has been posed as a question for regulatory policy by the European Union. This question arises from a concern that the endocrine system is too complex to allow estimations of safe levels of exposure to any chemical with potential endocrine activity, and a belief that any such chemical can augment, retard, or disrupt the normal background activity of endogenous hormones. However, vital signaling functions of the endocrine system require it to continuously discriminate the biological information conveyed by potent endogenous hormones from a more concentrated background of structurally similar, endogenous molecules with low hormonal potential. This obligatory ability to discriminate important hormonal signals from background noise can be used to define thresholds for induction of hormonal effects, without which normal physiological functions would be impossible. From such thresholds, safe levels of exposure can be estimated. This brief review highlights how the fundamental principles governing hormonal effects - affinity, efficacy, potency, and mass action - dictate the existence of thresholds and why these principles also define the potential that exogenous chemicals might have to interfere with normal endocrine functioning.

  11. Correlation between carcinogenic potency of chemicals in animals and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.C.; Crump, K.S.; Shipp, A.M.

    1988-12-01

    Twenty-three chemicals were selected for comparison of the carcinogenic potencies estimated from epidemiological data to those estimated from animal carcinogenesis bioassays. The chemicals were all those for which reasonably strong evidence of carcinogenicity could be found in humans or animals and for which suitable data could be obtained for quantifying carcinogenic potencies in both humans and animals. Many alternative methods of analyzing the bioassay data were investigated. Almost all of the methods yielded potency estimates that were highly correlated with potencies estimated from epidemiological data; correlations were highly statistically significant (p < 0.001), with the corresponding correlation coefficients ranging as high as 0.9. These findings provide support for the general use of animal data to evaluate carcinogenic potential in humans and also for the use of animal data to quantify human risk.

  12. New Member of the V1V2-Directed CAP256-VRC26 Lineage That Shows Increased Breadth and Exceptional Potency

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Bhiman, Jinal N.; Roark, Ryan S.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Gorman, Jason; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Pancera, Marie; Cale, Evan M.; Ernandes, Michael J.; Louder, Mark K.; Asokan, Mangaiarkarasi; Bailer, Robert T.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Fraschilla, Isabella R.; Garrett, Nigel J.; Jarosinski, Marissa; Lynch, Rebecca M.; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Pegu, Amarendra; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Sutton, Matthew S.; Wang, Keyun; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Haynes, Barton F.; Abdool-Karim, Salim; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Moore, Penny L.; Morris, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epitopes defined by HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are valuable templates for vaccine design, and studies of the immunological development of these antibodies are providing insights for vaccination strategies. In addition, the most potent and broadly reactive of these bNAbs have potential for clinical use. We previously described a family of 12 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies, CAP256-VRC26, isolated from an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor at years 1, 2, and 4 of infection (N. A. Doria-Rose et al., Nature 509:55–62, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13036). Here, we report on the isolation and characterization of new members of the family mostly obtained at time points of peak serum neutralization breadth and potency. Thirteen antibodies were isolated from B cell culture, and eight were isolated using trimeric envelope probes for differential single B cell sorting. One of the new antibodies displayed a 10-fold greater neutralization potency than previously published lineage members. This antibody, CAP256-VRC26.25, neutralized 57% of diverse clade viral isolates and 70% of clade C isolates with remarkable potency. Among the viruses neutralized, the median 50% inhibitory concentration was 0.001 μg/ml. All 33 lineage members targeted a quaternary epitope focused on V2. While all known bNAbs targeting the V1V2 region interact with the N160 glycan, the CAP256-VRC26 antibodies showed an inverse correlation of neutralization potency with dependence on this glycan. Overall, our results highlight the ongoing evolution within a single antibody lineage and describe more potent and broadly neutralizing members with potential clinical utility, particularly in areas where clade C is prevalent. IMPORTANCE Studies of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) provide valuable information for vaccine design, and the most potent and broadly reactive of these bNAbs have potential for clinical use. We previously described a family of V1V2

  13. Skin sensitization testing in potency and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Kimber, I; Basketter, D A; Berthold, K; Butler, M; Garrigue, J L; Lea, L; Newsome, C; Roggeband, R; Steiling, W; Stropp, G; Waterman, S; Wiemann, C

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to review, and make recommendations for, the use of relevant skin sensitization test methods, for the purposes of determination of relative potency and the threshold dose necessary for the induction of skin sensitization, and for risk assessment. In addressing the first area, the utility of three guinea pig tests (the guinea pig maximization test, the occluded patch test, and the open epicutaneous test) of the local lymph node assay (LLNA) and of human volunteer testing for the assessment of relative potency and identification of thresholds for sensitization were considered. The following conclusions were drawn. (1) Although attempts have been made to modify the guinea pig maximization test for the purposes of deriving dose-response relationships, this method is usually unsuitable for determination of relative sensitizing potency. (2) Guinea pig methods that do not require the use of adjuvant and which employ a relevant route of exposure (the occluded patch test and the open epicutaneous test) are more appropriate for the assessment of relative skin-sensitizing potency. (3) The LLNA is suitable for the determination of relative skin sensitizing potency, and the adaptation of this method for derivation of comparative criteria such as EC3 values (the estimated concentration of test chemical required to induce a stimulation index of 3 in the LLNA) provides an effective and quantitative basis for such measurements. (4) For all the methods identified above, potency is assessed relative to other chemical allergens of known skin sensitizing potential. The estimation of likely threshold concentrations is dependent upon the availability of suitable benchmark chemicals of known potency for human sensitization. (5) Human testing (and specifically, the Human Repeat Insult Patch Test) can provide information of value in confirming the absence of skin sensitizing activity of formulations and products under specific conditions of use and exposure

  14. Potency determination of antidandruff shampoos in nystatin international unit equivalents.

    PubMed

    Anusha Hewage, D B G; Pathirana, W; Pinnawela, Amara

    2008-09-01

    A convenient standard microbiological potency determination test for the antidandruff shampoos was developed by adopting the pharmacopoeial microbiological assay procedure of the drug nystatin. A standard curve was drawn consisting of the inhibition zone diameters vs. logarithm of nystatin concentrations in international units using the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) strain National Collection of Type Culture (NCTC) 1071606 as the test organism. From the standard curve the yeast inhibitory potencies of the shampoos in nystatin international unit equivalents were determined from the respective inhibition zones of the test samples of the shampoos. Under test conditions four shampoo samples showed remarkable fungal inhibitory potencies of 10227, 10731, 12396 and 18211 nystatin international unit equivalents/ml while two shampoo samples had extremely feeble inhibitory potencies 4.07 and 4.37 nystatin international unit equivalents/ml although the latter two products claimed antifungal activity. The potency determination method could be applied to any antidandruff shampoo with any one or a combination of active ingredients.

  15. Potency Determination of Antidandruff Shampoos in Nystatin International Unit Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Anusha Hewage, D. B. G.; Pathirana, W.; Pinnawela, Amara

    2008-01-01

    A convenient standard microbiological potency determination test for the antidandruff shampoos was developed by adopting the pharmacopoeial microbiological assay procedure of the drug nystatin. A standard curve was drawn consisting of the inhibition zone diameters vs. logarithm of nystatin concentrations in international units using the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) strain National Collection of Type Culture (NCTC) 1071606 as the test organism. From the standard curve the yeast inhibitory potencies of the shampoos in nystatin international unit equivalents were determined from the respective inhibition zones of the test samples of the shampoos. Under test conditions four shampoo samples showed remarkable fungal inhibitory potencies of 10227, 10731, 12396 and 18211 nystatin international unit equivalents/ml while two shampoo samples had extremely feeble inhibitory potencies 4.07 and 4.37 nystatin international unit equivalents/ml although the latter two products claimed antifungal activity. The potency determination method could be applied to any antidandruff shampoo with any one or a combination of active ingredients. PMID:21394271

  16. Solvatochromic dyes detect the presence of homeopathic potencies.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    A systematic approach to the design of simple, chemical systems for investigating the nature of homeopathic medicines has led to the development of an experimental protocol in which solvatochromic dyes are used as molecular probes of serially diluted and agitated solutions. Electronic spectroscopy has been used to follow changes in the absorbance of this class of dyes across the visible spectrum in the presence of homeopathic potencies. Evidence is presented using six different solvatochromic dyes in three different solvent systems. In all cases homeopathic potencies produce consistent and reproducible changes in the spectra of the dyes. Results suggest that potencies influence the supramolecular chemistry of solvatochromic dyes, enhancing either dye aggregation or disaggregation, depending upon dye structure. Comparable dyes lacking the intramolecular charge transfer feature of solvatochromic dyes are unaffected by homeopathic potencies, suggesting potencies require the oscillating dipole of solvatochromic dyes for effective interaction. The implications of the results presented, both for an eventual understanding of the nature of homeopathic medicines and their mode of action, together with future directions for research in this area, are discussed.

  17. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  18. In vitro potency and combination testing of antimicrobial agents against Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Amrita; Martin, Irene; Zhanel, George G; Mulvey, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Antimicrobial resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a major concern to public health due to decreased susceptibility to frontline antimicrobials. To find agents that are active against N. gonorrhoeae, we tested antimicrobials alone or in combination by Etest gradient strips. The potencies (as assessed by minimum inhibitory concentrations) of twenty-five antimicrobials were evaluated against nine reference strains of N. gonorrhoeae (WHO F, G, K, L, M, N, O, P and ATCC 49226). Potency was greatest for netilmicin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. Combinations of azithromycin, moxifloxacin, or gentamicin with ceftriaxone, doripenem, or aztreonam were tested against reference isolates and the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was calculated. All nine combinations resulted in indifference (>0.5 FICI ≤ 4). Combinations with FICI < 1 were further evaluated in nine clinical isolates which supported the finding of indifference. No antagonism was observed in any of the combinations tested. This is the first report in which the six combinations of azithromycin, moxifloxacin or gentamcin in combination with doripenem or aztreonam were tested in N. gonorrhoeae. These data on antimicrobials with higher potency and combinations that did not show antagonism can help to guide larger scale susceptibility studies for antimicrobial resistant N. gonorrhoeae.

  19. Introduction of mismatches in a random shRNA-encoding library improves potency for phenotypic selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongping; Speier, Jacqueline S; Engram-Pearl, Jessica; Wilson, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism for interfering with gene expression through the action of small, non-coding RNAs. We previously constructed a short-hairpin-loop RNA (shRNA) encoding library that is random at the nucleotide level [1]. In this library, the stems of the hairpin are completely complementary. To improve the potency of initial hits, and therefore signal-to-noise ratios in library screening, as well as to simplify hit-sequence retrieval by PCR, we constructed a second-generation library in which we introduced random mismatches between the two halves of the stem of each hairpin, on a random template background. In a screen for shRNAs that protect an interleukin-3 (IL3) dependent cell line from IL3 withdrawal, our second-generation library yielded hit sequences with significantly higher potencies than those from the first-generation library in the same screen. Our method of random mutagenesis was effective for a random template and is likely suitable, therefore, for any DNA template of interest. The improved potency of our second-generation library expands the range of possible unbiased screens for small-RNA therapeutics and biologic tools.

  20. Emergency planning and the acute toxic potency of inhaled ammonia.

    PubMed

    Michaels, R A

    1999-08-01

    Ammonia is present in agriculture and commerce in many if not most communities. This report evaluates the toxic potency of ammonia, based on three types of data: anecdotal data, in some cases predating World War 1, reconstructions of contemporary industrial accidents, and animal bioassays. Standards and guidelines for human exposure have been driven largely by the anecdotal data, suggesting that ammonia at 5,000-10,000 parts per million, volume/volume (ppm-v), might be lethal within 5-10 min. However, contemporary accident reconstructions suggest that ammonia lethality requires higher concentrations. For example, 33,737 ppm-v was a 5-min zero-mortality value in a major ammonia release in 1973 in South Africa. Comparisons of secondary reports of ammonia lethality with original sources revealed discrepancies in contemporary sources, apparently resulting from failure to examine old documents or accurately translate foreign documents. The present investigation revealed that contemporary accident reconstructions yield ammonia lethality levels comparable to those in dozens of reports of animal bioassays, after adjustment of concentrations to human equivalent concentrations via U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) procedures. Ammonia levels potentially causing irreversible injury or impairing the ability of exposed people to escape from further exposure or from coincident perils similarly have been biased downwardly in contemporary sources. The EPA has identified ammonia as one of 366 extremely hazardous substances subject to community right-to-know provisions of the Superfund Act and emergency planning provisions of the Clean Air Act. The Clean Air Act defines emergency planning zones (EPZs) around industrial facilities exceeding a threshold quantity of ammonia on-site. This study suggests that EPZ areas around ammonia facilities can be reduced, thereby also reducing emergency planning costs, which will vary roughly with the EPZ radius squared.

  1. Emergency planning and the acute toxic potency of inhaled ammonia.

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, R A

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia is present in agriculture and commerce in many if not most communities. This report evaluates the toxic potency of ammonia, based on three types of data: anecdotal data, in some cases predating World War 1, reconstructions of contemporary industrial accidents, and animal bioassays. Standards and guidelines for human exposure have been driven largely by the anecdotal data, suggesting that ammonia at 5,000-10,000 parts per million, volume/volume (ppm-v), might be lethal within 5-10 min. However, contemporary accident reconstructions suggest that ammonia lethality requires higher concentrations. For example, 33,737 ppm-v was a 5-min zero-mortality value in a major ammonia release in 1973 in South Africa. Comparisons of secondary reports of ammonia lethality with original sources revealed discrepancies in contemporary sources, apparently resulting from failure to examine old documents or accurately translate foreign documents. The present investigation revealed that contemporary accident reconstructions yield ammonia lethality levels comparable to those in dozens of reports of animal bioassays, after adjustment of concentrations to human equivalent concentrations via U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) procedures. Ammonia levels potentially causing irreversible injury or impairing the ability of exposed people to escape from further exposure or from coincident perils similarly have been biased downwardly in contemporary sources. The EPA has identified ammonia as one of 366 extremely hazardous substances subject to community right-to-know provisions of the Superfund Act and emergency planning provisions of the Clean Air Act. The Clean Air Act defines emergency planning zones (EPZs) around industrial facilities exceeding a threshold quantity of ammonia on-site. This study suggests that EPZ areas around ammonia facilities can be reduced, thereby also reducing emergency planning costs, which will vary roughly with the EPZ radius squared. Images Figure 1

  2. Studying the reducing potencies of antioxidants with the electrochemistry inherently present in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Sabine; Erb, Robert; Chervet, Jean-Pierre; Oberacher, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    In this proof-of-principle study, the applicability of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to characterize the reducing potencies of natural antioxidants is demonstrated. The ESI source represents a controlled-current electrochemical cell. The interfacial potential at the emitter electrode will be at or near the electrochemical potential of those reactions that sufficiently supply all the required current for the ESI circuit. Indicator molecules prone to oxidation in ESI such as amodiaquine were used to visualize the impact of reducing compounds on the interfacial potential. The extent of inhibition of the oxidation of the indicator molecule was found to be dependent on the kind and amount of antioxidant added. Concentration-inhibition curves were constructed and used to compare reducing potencies and to rank antioxidants. This ranking was found to be dependent on the electrode material-indicator molecule combination applied. For fast and automated characterization of the reducing potencies of electrochemically active molecules, a flow-injection system was combined with ESI-MS. Liquid chromatography was used to process complex biological samples, such as red and white wine. Due to their high content of different polyphenols, red wine fractions were found to exhibit higher reducing potencies than the corresponding white wine fractions. Furthermore, for 14 important natural antioxidants, the results obtained with the controlled-current EC-ESI-MS assay were compared to those obtained with chemical antioxidant assays. Irrespectively of the kind of assay used to test the reducing potency, gallic acid, quercetin, and epicatechin were found to be potent reductants. Other antioxidants performed well in one particular assay only. This observation suggests that different kinds of redox and antioxidant chemistry were assessed with each of the assays applied. Therefore, several assays should be used to comprehensively study antioxidants and their reducing

  3. Modulating Cocaine Vaccine Potency Through Hapten Fluorination

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaoqing; Tsuchikama, Kyoji; Janda, Kim D.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a long-lasting relapsing illness characterized by cycles of abuse, abstinence and reinstatement, and antibody-based therapies could be a powerful therapeutic approach. Herein, we explored the possibility of using halogenated cocaine haptens to enhance the immunological properties of anti-cocaine vaccines. Three fluorine-containing cocaine haptens (GNF, GNCF and GN5F) and one chlorine-containing cocaine hapten (GNCl) were designed and synthesized, based upon the chemical scaffold of the only hapten that has reached clinical trials, succinyl norcocaine (SNC). Hapten GNF was found to retain potent cocaine affinity, and also elicit antibodies in a higher concentration than the parent structure SNC. Our data suggests that strategic hapten fluorination could be useful for not only improving upon the current cocaine vaccine undergoing clinical trials, but it may also be a valuable new approach, with application to any of the vaccines being developed for the treatment of drugs of abuse. PMID:23398531

  4. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  5. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  6. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  7. High Potency and Other Alcoholic Beverage Consumption among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobli, Edessa C.; Dore, Heather S.; Werch, Chudley E.; Moore, Michele J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high potency (liquor, malt liquor, fortified wine) and other alcoholic beverage consumption (beer, wine/wine coolers) among adolescents, the impact of gender and ethnicity, and the risk and protective factors that predicted consumption. A confidential survey revealed that, among eighth grade students,…

  8. Mutagenic Potency of Food-Derived Heterocyclic Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, J S; Knize, M G; Wu, R W; Colvin, M E; Hatch, F T; Malfatti, M A

    2006-10-26

    The understanding of mutagenic potency has been primarily approached using ''quantitative structure activity relationships'' (QSAR). Often this method allows the prediction of mutagenic potency of the compound based on its structure. But it does not give the underlying reason why the mutagenic activities differ. We have taken a set of heterocyclic amine structures and used molecular dynamic calculations to dock these molecules into the active site of a computational model of the cytochrome P-450 1A1 enzyme. The calculated binding strength using Boltzman distribution constants was then compared to the QSAR value (HF/6-31G* optimized structures) and the Ames/Salmonella mutagenic potency. Further understanding will only come from knowing the complete set of mutagenic determinants. These include the nitrenium ion half-life, DNA adduct half-life, efficiency of repair of the adduct, and ultimately fixation of the mutation through cellular processes. For two isomers, PhIP and 3-Me-PhIP, we showed that for the 100-fold difference in the mutagenic potency a 5-fold difference can be accounted for by differences in the P450 oxidation. The other factor of 20 is not clearly understood but is downstream from the oxidation step. The application of QSAR (chemical characteristics) to biological principles related to mutagenesis is explored in this report.

  9. Setting specifications for potency assays--basic principles.

    PubMed

    Mire-Sluis, A R

    2002-01-01

    To develop any biological therapeutic successfully, it is necessary to characterise the product thoroughly, both physicochemically and biologically. To ensure that consistency of production is maintained, some level of control is required to limit the variability of the product from batch to batch. This premise forms the basis of specification setting. The biological activity or potency of the product must be appropriately assessed through a functional assay unless specifically justified otherwise e.g. for binding proteins where binding has been correlated with biological activity. Biological assays are particularly prone to assay variability and therefore it is necessary to design and execute the assay to reduce variability as much as possible while providing a statistically valid measure of the reproducibility of potency estimates. Therefore, specifications for potency should only be derived following establishment of a well validated and controlled bioassay and should include some measure of the variability of the estimate in addition to the actual potency estimate itself. The limits applied to those specifications need to reflect the true batch to batch consistency of the product, its nature and toxicity as well as its intended use. PMID:12079184

  10. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  11. Improving the regulation of carcinogens by expediting cancer potency estimation.

    PubMed

    Hoover, S M; Zeise, L; Pease, W S; Lee, L E; Hennig, M P; Weiss, L B; Cranor, C

    1995-04-01

    The statutory language of the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65; California Health and Safety Code 25249.5 et seq.) encourages rapid adoption of "no significant risk levels" (NSRLs), intakes associated with estimated cancer risks of no more than 1 in 100,000. Derivation of an NSRL for a carcinogen listed under Proposition 65 requires the development of a cancer potency value. This paper discusses the methodology for the derivation of cancer potencies using an expedited procedure, and provides potency estimates for a number of agents listed as carcinogens under Proposition 65. To derive expedited potency values, default risk assessment methods are applied to data sets selected from an extensive tabulation of animal cancer bioassays according to criteria used by regulatory agencies. A subset of these expedited values is compared to values previously developed by regulatory agencies using conventional quantitative risk assessment and found to be in good agreement. Specific regulatory activities which could be facilitated by adopting similar expedited procedures are identified. PMID:7597261

  12. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... recommended for the test tube methods, including the indirect antiglobulin tests, shall have the following... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potency tests without reference preparations. 660... SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS...

  13. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... recommended for the test tube methods, including the indirect antiglobulin tests, shall have the following... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potency tests without reference preparations. 660... SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS...

  14. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... recommended for the test tube methods, including the indirect antiglobulin tests, shall have the following... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potency tests without reference preparations. 660... SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS...

  15. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... recommended for the test tube methods, including the indirect antiglobulin tests, shall have the following... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency tests without reference preparations. 660... SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS...

  16. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration. Such testing shall not be... Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration. (d) If the average potency level of antihemophilic... corrective actions shall be taken and a record maintained of such action....

  17. Assay of neutralizing antibody against variola virus by the degree of focus reduction on HeLa cell cultures and its application to revaccination with smallpox vaccines of various potencies.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, T; Shinjo, N

    1972-01-01

    A method for assaying neutralizing antibody against variola virus was established by focus counting on HeLa cell cultures. The ND(50) titre, i.e., the serum dilution endpoint to give a 50% reduction in the number of foci, was determined with excellent reproducibility.Groups of students 19-20 years of age were revaccinated by the multiple pressure method with serial 10-fold dilutions of a smallpox vaccine and their neutralizing antibody response was assayed by the focus counting assay system and was related to the local skin reactions on the seventh day after inoculation and to the potency of the vaccine administered. There was a significant rise in the antibody level even after inoculation with a vaccine whose potency was as low as 1.3 x 10(5) pock-forming units/ml. In general, the rise in the log antibody level was proportional to the diameter of the reddening, but a significant rise was found among individuals who had no detectable skin reaction. The skin reaction was greater among individuals with a lower initial antibody level when the vaccine administered had a potency lower than 1.3 x 10(6) pock-forming units/ml.

  18. Positions under positive selection--key for selectivity and potency of scorpion alpha-toxins.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Hagar; Moran, Yehu; Gordon, Dalia; Turkov, Michael; Kahn, Roy; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Alpha-neurotoxins target voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) and constitute an important component in the venom of Buthidae scorpions. These toxins are short polypeptides highly conserved in sequence and three-dimensional structure, and yet they differ greatly in activity and preference for insect and various mammalian Na(v)s. Despite extensive studies of the structure-function relationship of these toxins, only little is known about their evolution and phylogeny. Using a broad data set based on published sequences and rigorous cloning, we reconstructed a reliable phylogenetic tree of scorpion alpha-toxins and estimated the evolutionary forces involved in the diversification of their genes using maximum likelihood-based methods. Although the toxins are largely conserved, four positions were found to evolve under positive selection, of which two (10 and 18; numbered according to LqhalphaIT and Lqh2 from the Israeli yellow scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus) have been previously shown to affect toxin activity. The putative role of the other two positions (39 and 41) was analyzed by mutagenesis of Lqh2 and LqhalphaIT. Whereas substitution P41K in Lqh2 did not alter its activity, substitution K41P in LqhalphaIT significantly decreased the activity at insect and mammalian Na(v)s. Surprisingly, not only that substitution A39L in both toxins increased their activity by 10-fold but also LqhalphaIT(A39L) was active at the mammalian brain channel rNa(v)1.2a, which otherwise is hardly affected by LqhalphaIT, and Lqh2(A39L) was active at the insect channel, DmNa(v)1, which is almost insensitive to Lqh2. Thus, position 39 is involved not only in activity but also in toxin selectivity. Overall, this study describes evolutionary forces involved in the diversification of scorpion alpha-toxins, highlights the key role of positions under positive selection for selectivity and potency, and raises new questions as to the toxin-channel face of interaction.

  19. Aligning Potency and Pharmacokinetic Properties for Pyridine-Based NCINIs.

    PubMed

    Fader, Lee D; Bailey, Murray; Beaulieu, Eric; Bilodeau, François; Bonneau, Pierre; Bousquet, Yves; Carson, Rebekah J; Chabot, Catherine; Coulombe, René; Duan, Jianmin; Fenwick, Craig; Garneau, Michel; Halmos, Ted; Jakalian, Araz; James, Clint; Kawai, Stephen H; Landry, Serge; LaPlante, Steven R; Mason, Stephen W; Morin, Sebastien; Rioux, Nathalie; Simoneau, Bruno; Surprenant, Simon; Thavonekham, Bounkham; Thibeault, Carl; Trinh, Thao; Tsantrizos, Youla; Tsoung, Jennifer; Yoakim, Christiane; Wernic, Dominik

    2016-08-11

    Optimization of pyridine-based noncatalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs) based on compound 2 has led to the discovery of molecules capable of inhibiting virus harboring N124 variants of HIV integrase (IN) while maintaining minimal contribution of enterohepatic recirculation to clearance in rat. Structure-activity relationships at the C6 position established chemical space where the extent of enterohepatic recirculation in the rat is minimized. Desymmetrization of the C4 substituent allowed for potency optimization against virus having the N124 variant of integrase. Combination of these lessons led to the discovery of compound 20, having balanced serum-shifted antiviral potency and minimized excretion in to the biliary tract in rat, potentially representing a clinically viable starting point for a new treatment option for individuals infected with HIV. PMID:27563405

  20. Can biochemistry drive drug discovery beyond simple potency measurements?

    PubMed

    Chène, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Among the fields of expertise required to develop drugs successfully, biochemistry holds a key position in drug discovery at the interface between chemistry, structural biology and cell biology. However, taking the example of protein kinases, it appears that biochemical assays are mostly used in the pharmaceutical industry to measure compound potency and/or selectivity. This limited use of biochemistry is surprising, given that detailed biochemical analyses are commonly used in academia to unravel molecular recognition processes. In this article, I show that biochemistry can provide invaluable information on the dynamics and energetics of compound-target interactions that cannot be obtained on the basis of potency measurements and structural data. Therefore, an extensive use of biochemistry in drug discovery could facilitate the identification and/or development of new drugs.

  1. A novel antilithiatic protein from Tribulus terrestris having cytoprotective potency.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Anshu; Tandon, Simran; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2012-08-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals to kidney cells is a key event in kidney stones associated with marked hyperoxaluria. As the propensity of stone recurrence and persistent side effects are not altered by surgical techniques available, phytotherapeutic agents could be useful as an adjuvant therapy. The present study is aimed at examining the antilithiatic potency of the protein biomolecules of Tribulus terrestris, a plant which is a common constituent of herbal marketed preparations to treat urolithiasis. Various biochemical methods with mass spectrometry were used to purify and characterize the purified protein. The protective potency of the protein was tested on the oxalate induced injury on renal epithelial cell lines (NRK 52E). An antilithiatic protein having molecular weight of ~ 60kDa was purified. This purified protein showed similarities with Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 7 (CCD7) of Arabidopsis thaliana after matching peptide mass fingerprints in MASCOT search engine. An EF hand domain was identified in CCD7 by SCAN PROSITE. Presence of an EF hand domain, a characteristic feature of calcium binding proteins and a role in the synthesis of retinol which is transported by retinol binding protein, a protein found in kidney stone matrix; of CCD7 support the role of TTP as an antilithiatic protein. The protective potency of TTP on NRK 52E was quite comparable to the aqueous extract of cystone. Our findings suggest that this purified protein biomolecule from Tribulus terrestris could open new vista in medical management of urolithiasis.

  2. Redesigned HIV antibodies exhibit enhanced neutralizing potency and breadth

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jordan R.; Sapparapu, Gopal; Murrell, Sasha; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Singh, Vidisha; King, Hannah G.; Xia, Yan; Pickens, Jennifer A.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Slaughter, James C.; Montefiori, David C.; Wilson, Ian A.; Meiler, Jens; Crowe, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Several HIV envelope-targeting (Env-targeting) antibodies with broad and potent neutralizing activity have been identified and shown to have unusual features. Of these, the PG9 antibody has a long heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) and possesses unique structural elements that interact with protein and glycan features of the HIV Env glycoprotein. Here, we used the Rosetta software suite to design variants of the PG9 antibody HCDR3 loop with the goal of identifying variants with increased potency and breadth of neutralization for diverse HIV strains. One variant, designated PG9_N100FY, possessed increased potency and was able to neutralize a diverse set of PG9-resistant HIV strains, including those lacking the Env N160 glycan, which is critical for PG9 binding. An atomic resolution structure of the PG9_N100FY fragment antigen binding (Fab) confirmed that the mutated residue retains the paratope surface when compared with WT PG9. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments revealed that the mutation caused a modest increase in thermodynamic stability of the Fab, a feature predicted by the computational model. Our findings suggest that thermodynamic stabilization of the long HCDR3 in its active conformation is responsible for the increased potency of PG9_N100FY, and strategies aimed at stabilizing this region in other HIV antibodies could become an important approach to in silico optimization of antibodies. PMID:25985274

  3. Relative potency estimation for synthetic petroleum skin carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J M; Wolf, D A; Clark, B R

    1981-01-01

    A procedure for quantitative analysis of skin carcinogenesis data, for the purpose of establishing carcinogenic potency, has been applied to observations obtained from C3H mice exposed continuously to synthetic and natural petroleums. The importance of total polynuclear aromatic (PNA) content to the skin carcinogenic activity of the crude materials was also examined. Of three synthetic petroleums evaluated, all were shown capable of inducing skin neoplasms within a two-year exposure period. Under comparable exposure conditions a composite sample of five natural petroleums was noncarcinogenic. Comparison of the distributions of times to initial skin neoplasm versus dose rate, for groups exposed to synthetic fossil liquids and the reference skin carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene, provided estimates of relative carcinotenic potency for the synthetic petroleums ranging from 1/500 to 1/1400 the potency of benzo(a)pyrene. The carcinogenic activity of a chemically isolated PNA fraction versus the crude from which it was derived suggested that this fraction was responsible for the carcinogenic activity of these synthetic petroleums in mouse skin. PMID:7238444

  4. Rapid infrared determination of the potency of chlorinated bactericides.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, F; Cestaro, J P

    1971-06-01

    A rapid infrared reflectance method for evaluating the germicidal potency of synthetic materials containing various amounts of two chlorinated bactericides was developed. The dimeric product 2,2'-methylenebis (4,6-dichlorophenol) exhibited a characteristic C=C skeletal inplane stretching infrared absorption band at 1,640 cm(-1). The monomeric 2,4-dichlorophenol precursor showed a characteristic absorption band at 1,579 cm(-1). These characteristic infrared absorptions may be used for analysis of the potency of the manufactured chlorinated bactericide. For a series of samples known to vary in dimer content, the micrograms per milliliter required for a 100% bacterial kill is first determined by a standard American Petroleum Institute method. Then the area ratio of the infrared absorption bands characteristic of the chlorinated bactericides is measured for each sample and plotted versus the microgram per milliliter required for 100% bacterial kill. The potency of subsequent samples is simply and rapidly determined by measuring this ratio from the infrared absorption curve and calculating micrograms per milliliter required for 100% kill from the calibration curve. Analysis time is approximately 1 hr compared to biocidal tests in current use requiring approximately a 1-month incubation period. PMID:5564677

  5. Studies on the potency of various antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, S C; Chou, D T; Wallenstein, M C

    1977-09-01

    Several antitussive agents were assessed for their cough-suppressant activity. Cough responses were obtained by electrically stimulating the lower brainstem, in cats lightly anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital or in unanesthetized midcollicular decerebrate preparations. Cough sounds were recorded with the aid of a microphone. The cough reactive region was concentrated in an area dorsomedial to the trigeminal tract and nucleus. The potency of these antitussive agents (dextromethorphan, RO 21-4790-001, codeine, clonazepam, diazepam and caramiphen) were determined by studying their effect on the centrally induced cough responses. Each of these agents was administered in graded doses intravenously to determine the minimal effective doses for suppressing the cough responses. They are 0.57, 2.55, 1.71, 0.048, 0.28 and 3.18 mg/kg for the above listed drugs. The results indicate that clonazepam was found to be the most potent antitussive among these agents, the mean effective dose being about 1/35 of that of codeine. The antitussive potency of benzodiazepines is not well correlated with their muscle relaxant activity. For instance, clonazepam and diazepam have the same potency in depressing polysynaptic spinal reflexes, whereas the former is six times more potent than diazepam as an antitussive. This finding indicates that clonazepam has a high specificity as an antitussive.

  6. Essential Oil from Berries of Lebanese Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb Displays Similar Antibacterial Activity to Chlorhexidine but Higher Cytocompatibility with Human Oral Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Cochis, Andrea; Beyrouthy, Marc El; Iriti, Marcello; Uberti, Francesca; Sorrentino, Rita; Landini, Manuela Miriam; Rimondini, Lia; Varoni, Elena Maria

    2015-05-21

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), one of the most effective drugs administered for periodontal treatment, presents collateral effects including toxicity when used for prolonged periods; here, we have evaluated the bactericidal potency and the cytocompatibility of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb essential oil (EO) in comparison with 0.05% CHX. The EO was extracted from berries by hydrodistillation and components identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Bacterial inhibition halo analysis, quantitative cell viability 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide assay (XTT), and colony forming unit (CFU) count were evaluated against the two biofilm formers Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans. Finally, cytocompatibility was assessed with human primary gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and mucosal keratinocytes (HK). The resulting EO was mainly composed of monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes. An inhibition halo test demonstrated that both bacteria were sensitive to the EO; XTT analysis and CFU counts confirmed that 10-fold-diluted EO determined a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in bacteria count and viability towards both biofilm and planktonic forms in a comparable manner to those obtained with CHX. Moreover, EO displayed higher cytocompatibility than CHX (p < 0.05). In conclusion, EO exhibited bactericidal activity similar to CHX, but a superior cytocompatibility, making it a promising antiseptic alternative to CHX.

  7. Enhanced potency of a fucose-free monoclonal antibody being developed as an Ebola virus immunoprotectant.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Larry; Pettitt, James; Scully, Corinne; Bohorova, Natasha; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Hiatt, Andrew; Ngo, Long; Steinkellner, Herta; Whaley, Kevin J; Olinger, Gene G

    2011-12-20

    No countermeasures currently exist for the prevention or treatment of the severe sequelae of Filovirus (such as Ebola virus; EBOV) infection. To overcome this limitation in our biodefense preparedness, we have designed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which could be used in humans as immunoprotectants for EBOV, starting with a murine mAb (13F6) that recognizes the heavily glycosylated mucin-like domain of the virion-attached glycoprotein (GP). Point mutations were introduced into the variable region of the murine mAb to remove predicted human T-cell epitopes, and the variable regions joined to human constant regions to generate a mAb (h-13F6) appropriate for development for human use. We have evaluated the efficacy of three variants of h-13F6 carrying different glycosylation patterns in a lethal mouse EBOV challenge model. The pattern of glycosylation of the various mAbs was found to correlate to level of protection, with aglycosylated h-13F6 providing the least potent efficacy (ED(50) = 33 μg). A version with typical heterogenous mammalian glycoforms (ED(50) = 11 μg) had similar potency to the original murine mAb. However, h-13F6 carrying complex N-glycosylation lacking core fucose exhibited superior potency (ED(50) = 3 μg). Binding studies using Fcγ receptors revealed enhanced binding of nonfucosylated h-13F6 to mouse and human FcγRIII. Together the results indicate the presence of Fc N-glycans enhances the protective efficacy of h-13F6, and that mAbs manufactured with uniform glycosylation and a higher potency glycoform offer promise as biodefense therapeutics.

  8. Resveratrol derivatives as promising chemopreventive agents with improved potency and selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Park, Eun-Jung; Marler, Laura E.; Ahn, Soyoun; Yuan, Yang; Choi, Yongsoo; Yu, Rui; van Breemen, Richard B.; Sun, Bin; Hoshino, Juma; Cushman, Mark; Jermihov, Katherine C.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Grubbs, Clinton J.; Pezzuto, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite scores of investigations, the actual impact of resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) on human health, as a dietary component or supplement, remains moot. This is due to many factors, such as relatively low potency, pleiotropic mechanisms, and rapid metabolism. Nonetheless, as a promiscuous molecule that interacts with numerous targets, resveratrol can be viewed as a scaffold for designing structural relatives potentially capable of mediating more intense responses with greater mechanistic stringency. We currently report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 92 stilbene analogs. The compounds were tested with in vitro assays for activation of quinone reductase 1, inhibition of QR2, nitric oxide production, aromatase, NFκB, TPA-induced ornithine decarboxylase, or cyclooxygenase-1 and -2, quenching of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical, interaction with estrogen receptors, and as antiproliferative agents. Several compounds were found to mediate responses with much greater potency than resveratrol; some mediated pleiotropic responses, as is the case with the parent molecule, but others were highly specific or totally inactive. When administered to rats, higher serum concentrations and greater stability was demonstrated with prototype lead molecules. Due to structural simplicity, facile syntheses are available for large-scale production. These data support the promise of more advanced development of novel resveratrol derivatives as drug entities. PMID:21714126

  9. Enhancement of suicidal DNA vaccine potency by delaying suicidal DNA-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, T W; Hung, C-F; Juang, J; He, L; Hardwick, J M; Wu, T-C

    2004-02-01

    DNA-based alphaviral RNA replicon vectors, also called suicidal DNA vectors, alleviate the concerns of integration or transformation related to conventional DNA vectors since suicidal DNA vectors eventually cause apoptosis of transfected cells. However, the expression of inserted genes in these vectors is transient and the potency of suicidal DNA vaccines may be compromised because of apoptotic cell death. Therefore, to enhance the immune response to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 antigen, we generated a DNA-based Semliki Forest virus vector, pSCA1, encoding E7 fused with BCL-xL, an antiapoptotic member of the BCL-2 family. Our results indicated that pSCA1 encoding E7/BCL-xL fusion protein delayed cell death in the pSCA1-transfected dendritic cell line and generated significantly higher E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses and better antitumor effects than pSCA1 encoding wild-type E7 gene in vaccinated mice. The antiapoptotic function of BCL-xL is important for the enhancement of antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in vaccinated mice, because a point mutant of BCL-xL lacking antiapoptotic function was ineffective. These results suggest that strategies to delay suicidal DNA-induced cell death using antiapoptotic proteins may greatly enhance the potency of suicidal DNA.

  10. Fluorescence polarization competition assay: the range of resolvable inhibitor potency is limited by the affinity of the fluorescent ligand.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi

    2003-02-01

    For the development of fluorescence polarization (FP) competition assays, there is a widespread belief that tight-binding fluorescent ligands should be avoided to identify inhibitors of low or intermediate potency in the screening of small-molecule compound libraries. It is demonstrated herein that this statement is a misconception; in fact, the higher the affinity of the fluorescent ligand, the wider the range of inhibitor potency that can be resolved. An approximate estimate for the low end of inhibitor K(i) values that can be resolved is the K(d) value of the fluorescent ligand. Because FP competition assays are typically conducted under nonstoichiometric titration conditions, it is suggested that a fluorescent ligand of highest affinity that also has an adequate quantum yield to satisfy such conditions be selected.

  11. Alkylating potency of nitrosated amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Shephard, S E; Meier, I; Lutz, W K

    1991-01-01

    The alkylating potency of unstable N-nitrosamino acids and N-nitrosopeptides was investigated in vitro using 4-(para-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) as nucleophile. Of the amino acids, Met and those with an aromatic side chain were the most potent. The relative overall alkylating potency was 23:10:5:4:2:1: for Trp, Met, His, Tyr, Phe and Gly, respectively. The homo-dipeptides were much more potent than the amino acids, with relative potencies of 400:110:100:8:3:1, for Trp-Trp, Tyr-Tyr, Met-Met, Asp-Asp, Phe-Phe and Gly, respectively. In the one-phase reaction system (in which NBP is already present during the nitrosation reaction at acidic pH), all amino acids tested showed a second-order reaction for nitrite. In the two-phase system (in which NBP is added only after bringing the nitrosation reaction mixture to neutrality), all amino acids tested except one again showed a second-order reaction for nitrite (Phe, His, Asp and the dipeptide artificial sweetener aspartame); only Met under these conditions had a reaction order of one for nitrite. This could mean that nitrosation of the side chain of Met produces a second N-nitroso product which is relatively stable in acid but reacts with NBP under neutral conditions. In the human stomach, this side-chain nitrosation might become more important than the reactions at the primary amino group, firstly because of the greater stability of the product(s) in acid and secondly because of the first-order reaction rate for nitrite.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Cannabis-induced psychosis associated with high potency "wax dabs".

    PubMed

    Pierre, Joseph M; Gandal, Michael; Son, Maya

    2016-04-01

    With mounting evidence that the risk of cannabis-induced psychosis may be related to both dose and potency of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), increasing reports of psychosis associated with cannabinoids containing greater amounts of THC are anticipated. We report two cases of emergent psychosis after using a concentrated THC extract known as cannabis "wax," "oil," or "dabs" raising serious concerns about its psychotic liability. Although "dabbing" with cannabis wax is becoming increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and "medicinal" intentions, our cases raise serious concerns about its psychotic liability and highlight the importance of understanding this risk by physicians recommending cannabinoids for purported medicinal purposes. PMID:26876313

  13. Towards in vitro potency testing of inactivated erysipelas vaccines.

    PubMed

    Balks, E; Wolf, C; Loessner, H; Werner, E

    2012-01-01

    Ph. Eur. Monograph 0064 "Swine erysipelas vaccine (inactivated)" currently advises mouse serology for batch potency testing. However, technological advances in vaccine production, improved quality control systems and comprehensive post marketing surveillance increasingly promote the acceptance of non-animal approaches for batch release testing. Protein and immune profiles of inactivated swine erysipelas vaccines obtained by SDS-PAGE and Western Blot might offer a convenient global and functional in vitro alternative. Characteristic and consistent protein and immune profiles could be obtained for aluminium-adjuvanted vaccines. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal sera raised in mice differs markedly from reactivity of swine sera.

  14. Cannabis-induced psychosis associated with high potency "wax dabs".

    PubMed

    Pierre, Joseph M; Gandal, Michael; Son, Maya

    2016-04-01

    With mounting evidence that the risk of cannabis-induced psychosis may be related to both dose and potency of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), increasing reports of psychosis associated with cannabinoids containing greater amounts of THC are anticipated. We report two cases of emergent psychosis after using a concentrated THC extract known as cannabis "wax," "oil," or "dabs" raising serious concerns about its psychotic liability. Although "dabbing" with cannabis wax is becoming increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and "medicinal" intentions, our cases raise serious concerns about its psychotic liability and highlight the importance of understanding this risk by physicians recommending cannabinoids for purported medicinal purposes.

  15. Protein binding-dependent decreases in hERG channel blocker potency assessed by whole-cell voltage clamp in serum.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Michael; Sorota, Steve; Chu, Inhou; Soares, Anthony; Priestley, Tony; Nomeir, Amin A

    2010-04-01

    In vitro hERG blocking potency is measured in drug discovery as part of an integrated cardiovascular risk assessment. Typically, the concentrations producing 50% inhibition are measured in protein-free saline solutions and compared with calculated free therapeutic in vivo Cmax values to estimate a hERG safety multiple. The free/unbound fraction is believed responsible for activity. We tested the validity of this approach with 12 compounds by determining potencies in voltage clamp studies conducted in the absence and presence of 100% dialyzed fetal bovine serum (FBS). Bath drug concentrations in saline solutions were measured to account for loss of compounds due to solubility, stability, and/or adsorption. Protein binding in dialyzed FBS was measured to enable predictions of serum IC50s based on the unbound fraction and the saline IC50. For 11 of 12 compounds, the measured potency in the presence of dialyzed FBS was within 2-fold of the predicted potency. The predicted IC50 in dialyzed FBS for one highly bound compound, amiodarone, was 9-fold higher than the measured serum IC50. These data suggest that for highly bound compounds, direct measurement of IC50s in the presence of 100% serum may provide a more accurate estimate of in vivo potencies than the approach based on calculated serum shifts. PMID:20125032

  16. Enhanced substituted resorcinol hydrophobicity augments tyrosinase inhibition potency.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Soliman; Nerya, Ohad; Musa, Ramadan; Tamir, Snait; Peter, Tal; Vaya, Jacob

    2007-05-31

    The objective of the present study was to investigate to what extent the addition of hydrophobic residues to a 2,4-resorcinol derivative would contribute to their tyrosinase inhibitory potency. Hence, 3-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid, isolated from Ficus carica, was transformed into esters, and the relationship between the structure of these esters to their mushroom tyrosinase inhibition activity was explored. The enzyme crystallographic structure, published recently (Matoba, Y. et al. J. Biol. Chem. 2006, 281, 8981-8990) was docked with the new esters, and their calculated free energy (FE) and docking energy (DE) were compared with the experimental IC(50) values, providing good correlations. The observed IC(50) of the isopropyl ester was 0.07 microM, and its interaction with the enzyme binding site appears to be composed of four hydrogen bonds and two hydrophobic interactions. It may be concluded that the addition of a hydrophobic moiety to 2,4-resorcinol derivatives augments tyrosinase inhibitory potency as was predicted from the modeling study. PMID:17447749

  17. γ-Secretase Modulators: Can We Combine Potency with Safety?

    PubMed Central

    Gijsen, Harrie J. M.; Mercken, Marc

    2012-01-01

    γ-Secretase modulation has been proposed as a potential disease modifying anti-Alzheimer's approach. γ-Secretase modulators (GSMs) cause a product shift from the longer amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide isoforms to shorter, more soluble, and less amyloidogenic isoforms, without inhibiting APP or Notch proteolytic processing. As such, modulating γ-secretase may avoid some of the adverse effects observed with γ-secretase inhibitors. Since the termination of the GSM tarenfurbil in 2008 due to negative phase III trial results, a considerable progress has been made towards more potent and better brain penetrable compounds. However, an analysis of their lipophilic efficiency indices indicates that their increased potency can be largely attributed to their increased lipophilicity. The need for early and chronic dosing with GSMs will require high-safety margins. This will be a challenge to achieve with the current, highly lipophilic GSMs. We will demonstrate that by focusing on the drug-like properties of GSMs, a combination of high in vitro potency and reduced lipophilicity can be achieved and does result in better tolerated compounds. The next hurdle will be to translate this knowledge into GSMs which are highly efficacious and safe in vivo. PMID:23365783

  18. Conformationally selective biophysical assay for influenza vaccine potency determination.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yingxia; Han, Liqun; Palladino, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Annette; Xie, Yuhong; Carfi, Andrea; Dormitzer, Philip R; Settembre, Ethan C

    2015-10-01

    Influenza vaccines are the primary intervention for reducing the substantial health burden from pandemic and seasonal influenza. Hemagglutinin (HA) is the most important influenza vaccine antigen. Subunit and split influenza vaccines are formulated, released for clinical use, and tested for stability based on an in vitro potency assay, single-radial immunodiffusion (SRID), which selectively detects HA that is immunologically active (capable of eliciting neutralizing or hemagglutination inhibiting antibodies in an immunized subject). The time consuming generation of strain-specific sheep antisera and calibrated antigen standards for SRID can delay vaccine release. The limitation in generating SRID reagents was evident during the early days of the 2009 pandemic, prompting efforts to develop more practical, alternative, quantitative assays for immunologically active HA. Here we demonstrate that, under native conditions, trypsin selectively digests HA produced from egg or mammalian cell in monovalent vaccines that is altered by stress conditions such as reduced pH, elevated temperature, or deamidation, leaving native, pre-fusion HA, intact. Subsequent reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) can separate trypsin-resistant HA from the digested HA. Integration of the resulting RP-HPLC peak yields HA quantities that match well the values obtained by SRID. Therefore, trypsin digestion, to pre-select immunologically active HA, followed by quantification by RP-HPLC is a promising alternative in vitro potency assay for influenza vaccines. PMID:26348403

  19. A comparison of the potencies of several diluted and undiluted corticosteroid preparations using the vasoconstrictor assay.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, J; Gibson, J R; Darley, C R; Burke, C A

    1983-01-01

    10 subjects were assessed using the vasoconstrictor assay technique in a double-blind study in order to evaluate the relative potencies of several diluted and undiluted proprietary corticosteroid preparations. Dermovate ointment achieved a significantly higher score than any other preparation but there was no significant difference between the scores for Betnovate ointment (betamethasone valerate 0.1%), Propaderm Forte cream (beclomethasone dipropionate 0.5%), Propaderm ointment (beclomethasone dipropionate 0.025%), Nerisone Forte ointment (diflucortolone valerate 0.3%), and Nerisone ointment (diflucortolone valerate 0.1%). Furthermore, no significant difference in scores could be demonstrated between Adcortyl ointment (triamcinolone acetonide 0.1%), Ledercort ointment (triamcinolone acetonide 0.1%) and extemporaneous dilutions of these ointments 1 part in 4 in their recommended diluents (triamcinolone acetonide 0.025%). The relevance of these findings to clinical practice is discussed. PMID:6195026

  20. Ferulic acid from aleurone determines the antioxidant potency of wheat grain (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Mateo Anson, Nuria; van den Berg, Robin; Havenaar, Rob; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2008-07-23

    Grain is an important source of phytochemicals, which have potent antioxidant capacity. They have been implicated in the beneficial health effect of whole grains in reducing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to identify the most important antioxidant fractions of wheat grain. It was found that the aleurone content of these fractions was highly correlated with the antioxidant capacity of the fractions (r = 0.96, p < 0.0001). Ferulic acid appeared to be the major contributor to the antioxidant capacity in fractions with higher antioxidant capacity. The contribution of protein was rather limited. It was concluded that the antioxidant potency of wheat grain fractions is predominantly determined by aleurone content, which can be attributed to the presence of relatively large amounts of phenolic compounds, primarily ferulic acid.

  1. The role of peer respect in linking abusive supervision to follower outcomes: Dual moderation of group potency.

    PubMed

    Schaubroeck, John M; Peng, Ann C; Hannah, Sean T

    2016-02-01

    We develop a model in which abusive supervision undermines individuals' perceptions of the level of respect they are accorded by their group peers, which in turn reduces their performance and disconnects them psychologically from the organization. High group potency strengthens each of these connections. We studied the theorized relationships across 3 periods during a 10-week residential organizational entry program. Group potency, representing shared group perceptions, moderated relationships at the individual level. These included the negative relationship between abusive supervision (Time 1) and perceived peer respect (Time 2) and the relationship between perceived peer respect and organizational commitment, organizational identification, and turnover intention (Time 3). We found stronger relationships between abusive supervision and perceived peer respect--and between peer respect and the attitudinal outcomes and turnover intention--among groups with higher potency. Perceived peer respect was also positively related to followers' task performance. We discuss implications of the conceptual framework and findings for future research and theory development concerning how groups and individuals respond to abusive supervision and to treatment by their peers. PMID:26348478

  2. Comparative study on anesthetic potency of dental local anesthetics assessed by the jaw-opening reflex in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, T.; Aida, H.; Kaneko, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The potency of 4 local anesthetics to dental pulp was compared. Drugs were 4% articaine with 12 microgram/mL epinephrine (A12), 4% articaine with 6 microgram/mL epinephrine (A6), 2% lidocaine with 12.5 microgram/mL epinephrine (L), and 3% propitocaine with 0.03 IU/mL felypressin (P). Local anesthetics were injected into the dental root of the mandibular incisor. Electromyogram (EMG) of the digastric muscle was measured during the jaw-opening reflex induced by electrical stimulation. The disappearance of the EMG wave was judged as positive evidence of anesthesia. The determination of ED50 of the anesthetic was made by probit analysis. The ED50 of the A12 was minimal in all the tested anesthetics throughout the entire course. The potency in the A6 was 2.8 times that of the L. The potency of the A12 at the 15-minute measurement was 3.8 times that of the A6. The ED50 of the P was higher compared with those of the other 3 groups. It was concluded that articaine showed quicker onset than lidocaine and propitocaine and that there was a need to increase the dosage to attain a quick onset or to extend the duration. PMID:11881694

  3. Evaluation of tumour promoting potency of fish borne toxaphene residues, as compared to technical toxaphene and UV-irradiated toxaphene.

    PubMed

    Besselink, H; Nixon, E; McHugh, B; Rimkus, G; Klungsøyr, J; Leonards, P; De Boer, J; Brouwer, A

    2008-08-01

    In this study the potential impact of food chain-based biotransformation and physico-chemical weathering of toxaphene on its tumour promoting potential was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human exposure to toxaphene is mainly through consumption of contaminated fish, therefore fish-borne residues of toxaphene (cod liver extract, CLE) were prepared by exposing cod to technical toxaphene (TT) for 63 days. UV-irradiated toxaphene (uvT) was included to represent a physico-chemical weathered toxaphene mixture. In vitro, TT, uvT and CLE all showed a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) with a relative potency of CLE>TT=uvT. Tumour promoting potency was further studied in vivo in a medium term two-stage initiation/promotion bioassay in female Sprague-Dawley rats, using an increase in altered hepatic foci positive for glutathione-S-transferase-P (AHF-GST-P) as read out. No increase in AHF-GST-P occurred following exposure to either TT, uvT, or CLE, except for the positive control group (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Based on this study the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for tumour promoting potency is at least 12.5mg/kg/week, or higher for CLE. Considering current human exposure levels in Europe it is doubtful that consumption of fish at current levels of toxaphene contamination give rise to human health risk. PMID:18558458

  4. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Harper, Michael S; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J; Dillon, Stephanie M; Barrett, Bradley S; McCarter, Martin D; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C; Santiago, Mario L

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  5. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Michael S.; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Bradley S.; McCarter, Martin D.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  6. LM potencies: one of the hidden treasures of the sixth edition of the Organon.

    PubMed

    De Schepper, L

    1999-07-01

    50 millesimal (LM) potencies have great advantages for all patients, not just those who are hypersensitive because of their great power to heal without major aggravations. Before discussing their advantages this paper describes what LM potencies are, and how they are administered, then addresses two questions: why do we want to avoid aggravations if most homeopaths look for aggravation to know if the remedy is working? And if LM potencies are indeed superior, why are they still relatively unknown and unused?

  7. Synthetic inhibitors of endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.15: potency and stability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Lew, R. A.; Tomoda, F.; Evans, R. G.; Lakat, L.; Boublik, J. H.; Pipolo, L. A.; Smith, A. I.

    1996-01-01

    1. The role of the metalloendopeptidase EC 3.4.24.15 (EP 24.15) in peptide metabolism in vivo is unknown, in part reflecting the lack of a stable enzyme inhibitor. The most commonly used inhibitor, N-[1-(R,S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Tyr-p-aminobenzoate (cFP-AAY-pAB, Ki = 16 nM), although selective in vitro, is rapidly degraded in the circulation to cFP-Ala-Ala, an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. This metabolite is thought to be generated by neutral endopeptidase (NEP; EC 3.4.24.11), as the Ala-Tyr bond of cFP-AAY-pAB is cleaved by NEP in vitro. In the present study, we have examined the role of NEP in the metabolism of cFP-AAY-pAB in vivo, and have tested a series of inhibitor analogues, substituted at the second alanine, for both potency and stability relative to the parent compound. 2. Analogues were screened for inhibition of fluorescent substrate cleavage by recombinant rat testes EP 24.15. D-Ala or Asp substitution abolished inhibitory activity, while Val-, Ser- and Leu-substituted analogues retained activity, albeit at a reduced potency. A relative potency order of Ala (1) > Val (0.3) > Ser (0.16) > Leu (0.06) was observed. Resistance to cleavage by NEP was assessed by incubation of the analogues with rabbit kidney membranes. The parent compound was readily degraded, but the analogues were twice (Ser) and greater than 10 fold (Leu and Val) more resistant to cleavage. 3. Metabolism of cFP-AAY-pAB and the Val-substituted analogue was also examined in conscious rabbits. A bolus injection of cFP-AAY-pAB (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) significantly reduced the blood pressure response to angiotensin I, indicating ACE inhibition. Pretreatment with NEP inhibitors, SCH 39370 or phosphoramidon, slowed the loss of cFP-AAY-pAB from the plasma, but did not prevent inhibition of ACE. Injection of 1 mg kg-1 inhibitor resulted in plasma concentrations at 10 s of 23.5 microM (cFP-AAY-pAB) and 18.0 microM (cFP-AVY-pAB), which fell 100 fold over 5 min. Co-injection of

  8. Relative potency of ketamine and S(+)-ketamine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Duque, J C; Oleskovicz, N; Guirro, E C B P; Valadão, C A A; Soares, V E

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative potency of racemic ketamine and S(+)-ketamine for the hypnotic effect and to evaluate the clinical anesthesia produced by equianesthetic doses of these two substances in dogs. One hundred and eight dogs were allocated in groups R2, R2.5, R3, R6, R9, R12, S2, S2.5, S3, S6, S9, and S12, to receive by intravenous route 2, 2.5, 3, 6, 9, and 12 mg/kg of ketamine or S(+)-ketamine, respectively. A dose-effect curve was drawn with the dose logarithm and the percentage of dogs that presented hypnosis in each group. The curve was used to obtain a linear regression, to determine the effective doses 100 and the potency relationship. In another experimental phase, eight groups of five dogs received 3, 6, 9 and 12 mg/kg of ketamine or S(+)-ketamine to evaluate the periods of latency, hypnosis, and total recovery. The times in which the dogs reached the sternal position, attempted to stand up for the first time, recovered the standing position, and started to walk were also recorded. The hypnotic dose for ketamine was 9.82 +/- 3.02 (6.86-16.5) mg/kg and for S(+)-ketamine was 7.76 +/- 2.17 (5.86-11.5) mg/kg. The time of hypnosis was longer in R3 and the first attempt to stand up occurred early in R6 when compared with S3 and S6 respectively. When R9 (100% of hypnosis with ketamine) and S6 [100% of hypnosis with S(+)-ketamine] were compared (1:1.5 ratio), the time to sternal position (12 +/- 2.5 and 20.2 +/- 5.6 min respectively) and the total recovery time (45 +/- 5.5 and 60.2 +/- 5.2 min respectively) were significantly shorter with S(+)-ketamine. It was concluded that the potency ratio between ketamine and S(+)-ketamine in dogs is smaller than the one reported in other species, and that the dose obtained after a reduction of 50%, as usually performed in humans, would not be enough to obtain equianesthetic effects in dogs.

  9. Biologically active cannabinoids from high-potency Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Mohamed M; Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Slade, Desmond; Ahmed, Safwat A; Khan, Ikhlas A; Ross, Samir A

    2009-05-22

    Nine new cannabinoids (1-9) were isolated from a high-potency variety of Cannabis sativa. Their structures were identified as (+/-)-4-acetoxycannabichromene (1), (+/-)-3''-hydroxy-Delta((4'',5''))-cannabichromene (2), (-)-7-hydroxycannabichromane (3), (-)-7R-cannabicoumarononic acid A (4), 5-acetyl-4-hydroxycannabigerol (5), 4-acetoxy-2-geranyl-5-hydroxy-3-n-pentylphenol (6), 8-hydroxycannabinol (7), 8-hydroxycannabinolic acid A (8), and 2-geranyl-5-hydroxy-3-n-pentyl-1,4-benzoquinone (9) through 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, GC-MS, and HRESIMS. The known sterol beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-6'-acetate was isolated for the first time from cannabis. Compounds 6 and 7 displayed significant antibacterial and antifungal activities, respectively, while 5 displayed strong antileishmanial activity. PMID:19344127

  10. Cytoplasmic Dynein Antagonists with Improved Potency and Isoform Selectivity.

    PubMed

    See, Stephanie K; Hoogendoorn, Sascha; Chung, Andrew H; Ye, Fan; Steinman, Jonathan B; Sakata-Kato, Tomoyo; Miller, Rand M; Cupido, Tommaso; Zalyte, Ruta; Carter, Andrew P; Nachury, Maxence V; Kapoor, Tarun M; Chen, James K

    2016-01-15

    Cytoplasmic dyneins 1 and 2 are related members of the AAA+ superfamily (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) that function as the predominant minus-end-directed microtubule motors in eukaryotic cells. Dynein 1 controls mitotic spindle assembly, organelle movement, axonal transport, and other cytosolic, microtubule-guided processes, whereas dynein 2 mediates retrograde trafficking within motile and primary cilia. Small-molecule inhibitors are important tools for investigating motor protein-dependent mechanisms, and ciliobrevins were recently discovered as the first dynein-specific chemical antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that ciliobrevins directly target the heavy chains of both dynein isoforms and explore the structure-activity landscape of these inhibitors in vitro and in cells. In addition to identifying chemical motifs that are essential for dynein blockade, we have discovered analogs with increased potency and dynein 2 selectivity. These antagonists effectively disrupt Hedgehog signaling, intraflagellar transport, and ciliogenesis, making them useful probes of these and other cytoplasmic dynein 2-dependent cellular processes.

  11. In vitro toxicity and transformation potency of nickel compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, K; Stern, R M

    1983-01-01

    An in vitro bioassay utilizing BHK-21 cells in culture is used to determine the relative transformation potential of a number of nickel compounds including, as relatively insoluble particulates a known carcinogen (Ni3S2) and several oxides either of commercial interest or found in the working environment in the metal industry (e.g., NiO), and a soluble salt [Ni(CH3COO)2]. Although a wide range of transformation potency is found as a function of the dose of Ni per area of culture, all substances produce the same number of transformed colonies at the same degree of toxicity (e.g., 50% survival). If toxicity is a direct measure of intracellular concentration, then apparently nickel per se is the ultimate transforming agent independent of source or uptake mechanism. PMID:6641656

  12. Sexual Function and the Use of Medical Devices or Drugs to Optimize Potency After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J. Taylor; Levy, Lawrence B.; Swanson, David A.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Frank, Steven J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of sexual outcomes after prostate brachytherapy with iodine-125 seeds as monotherapy at a tertiary cancer care center. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 129 men with prostate cancer with I-125 seed implants (prescribed dose, 145 Gy) without supplemental hormonal or external beam radiation therapy. Sexual function, potency, and bother were prospectively assessed at baseline and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months using validated quality-of-life self-assessment surveys. Postimplant dosimetry values, including dose to 10% of the penile bulb (D10), D20, D33, D50, D75, D90, and penile volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) were calculated. Results: At baseline, 56% of patients recorded having optimal erections; at 1 year, 62% of patients with baseline erectile function maintained optimal potency, 58% of whom with medically prescribed sexual aids or drugs. Variables associated with pretreatment-to-posttreatment decline in potency were time after implant (p = 0.04) and age (p = 0.01). Decline in urinary function may have been related to decline in potency. At 1 year, 69% of potent patients younger than 70 years maintained optimal potency, whereas 31% of patients older than 70 maintained optimal potency (p = 0.02). Diabetes was related to a decline in potency (p = 0.05), but neither smoking nor hypertension were. For patients with optimal potency at baseline, mean sexual bother scores had declined significantly at 1 year (p < 0.01). Sexual potency, sexual function, and sexual bother scores failed to correlate with any dosimetric variable tested. Conclusions: Erections firm enough for intercourse can be achieved at 1 year after treatment, but most men will require medical aids to optimize potency. Although younger men were better able to maintain erections firm enough for intercourse than older men, there was no correlation between potency, sexual function, or sexual bother and penile bulb dosimetry.

  13. Low potency and limited efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in the mouse 6 Hz corneal kindling model.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, K; Matagne, A; Kaminski, R M

    2014-05-01

    Corneal kindling is a useful alternative to electrically induced amygdala or hippocampal kindling, which requires advanced surgical and EEG techniques that may not be easily available in many laboratories. Therefore the first aim of this study was to evaluate whether repeated 6 Hz corneal stimulation in mice would lead to an increased and persistent seizure response as described for higher frequency (50/60 Hz) corneal kindling. Male NMRI mice stimulated twice daily (except weekends) for 3 s with 6 Hz electrical current at 44 mA displayed robust kindling development, i.e., a progressive increase in seizure severity. The majority of the animals (about 90%) developed a fully kindled state, defined as at least 10 consecutive stage 3-5 seizures within 5 weeks of corneal stimulation. Afterwards, the fully kindled state was maintained for at least 8 weeks with only two days of stimulations per week. Next, the protective efficacy of four mechanistically different antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; clonazepam, valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam) was assessed and compared between 6 Hz and 50 Hz fully kindled mice. All tested AEDs showed a relatively lower potency in the 6 Hz kindling model and a limited efficacy against partial seizures was observed with carbamazepine and levetiracetam. We can conclude that 6 Hz kindling may be more advantageous than the previously described 50/60 Hz corneal kindling models due to its robustness and persistence of the fully kindled state. Furthermore, the observed low potency and limited efficacy of AEDs in 6 Hz fully kindled mice suggest that this model could be a useful tool in the discovery of novel AEDs targeting treatment resistant epilepsy.

  14. Ultra-low-dose naltrexone reduces the rewarding potency of oxycodone and relapse vulnerability in rats.

    PubMed

    Leri, Francesco; Burns, Lindsay H

    2005-10-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists have been shown to enhance opioid analgesia and alleviate opioid tolerance and dependence. Our present studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats assessed the abuse potential of oxycodone+ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) versus oxycodone alone. The lowest NTX dose (1 pg/kg/infusion), but not slightly higher doses (10 and 100 pg/kg/infusion), enhanced oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) intravenous self-administration, suggesting a reduced rewarding potency per infusion. During tests of reinstatement performed in extinction conditions, co-self-administration of any of these three NTX doses significantly reduced drug-seeking precipitated by priming injections of oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.), a drug-conditioned cue, or foot-shock stress. During self-administration on a progressive-ratio schedule, animals self-administering oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion)+NTX (1 pg/kg/infusion) reached a "break-point" sooner and showed a trend toward less responding compared to rats self-administering oxycodone alone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion). In the final experiment, the addition of ultra-low-dose NTX (10 pg/kg, s.c.) enhanced the acute stimulatory effect of oxycodone (1 mg/kg, s.c.), as well as locomotor sensitization produced by repeated oxycodone administration (7 x 1 mg/kg, s.c.). In summary, this work shows that ultra-low-dose NTX co-treatment augments the locomotor effects of oxycodone as it enhances opioid analgesia, but reduces oxycodone's rewarding potency and subsequent vulnerability to relapse.

  15. Active Efflux Influences the Potency of Quorum Sensing Inhibitors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Joseph D.; Gerdt, Joseph P.; Eibergen, Nora R.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria regulate gene expression through a cell-cell signaling process called quorum sensing (QS). In proteobacteria, QS is largely mediated by signaling molecules known as N-acylated L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) and their associated intracellular LuxR-type receptors. The design of non-native small molecules capable of inhibiting LuxR-type receptors, and thereby QS, in proteobacteria is an active area of research, and numerous lead compounds are AHL derivatives that mimic native AHL signals. Much of this past work has focused on the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which controls an arsenal of virulence factors and biofilm formation through QS. The MexAB-OprM drug efflux pump has been shown to play a role in the secretion of the major AHL signal in P. aeruginosa, N-(3-oxododecanoyl) L-homoserine lactone. In the current study, we show that a variety of non-native AHLs and related derivatives capable of inhibiting LuxR-type receptors in P. aeruginosa display significantly higher potency in a P. aeruginosa Δ(mexAB-oprM) mutant, suggesting that MexAB-OprM also recognizes these compounds as substrates. We also demonstrate that the potency of 5,6-dimethyl-2-aminobenzimidazole, recently shown to be a QS and biofilm inhibitor in P. aeruginosa, is not affected by the presence or absence of the MexAB-OprM pump. These results have implications for the use of non-native AHLs and related derivatives as QS modulators in P. aeruginosa and other bacteria, and provide a potential design strategy for the development of new QS modulators that are resistant to active efflux. PMID:24478193

  16. Relating skin sensitizing potency to chemical reactivity: reactive Michael acceptors inhibit NF-κB signaling and are less sensitizing than S(N)Ar- and S(N)2- reactive chemicals.

    PubMed

    Natsch, Andreas; Haupt, Tina; Laue, Heike

    2011-11-21

    The skin sensitization potency of chemicals is partly related to their reactivity to proteins. This can be quantified as the rate constant of the reaction with a model peptide, and a kinetic profiling approach to determine rate constants was previously proposed. A linear relationship between the skin sensitization potency in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the rate constant for Michael acceptors was reported, characterized by a relatively flat regression line. Thus, a 10-fold increase of reactivity correlates to an increase of the sensitization potential of only 1.7-fold. Here, we first validate this model by repeating previous data and testing additional Michael acceptors and prove that the model is both reproducible and robust to the addition of new data. Chemicals of different mechanistic applicability domains, namely, S(N)Ar- and S(N)2-reactive sensitizers, were then tested with the same kinetic profiling approach. A linear relationship between sensitization potency in the LLNA and rate constants was also found, yet with a much steeper slope, i.e., for S(N)Ar- and S(N)2-reactive sensitizers, increasing reactivity correlates to a much stronger increase in sensitization potency. On the basis of the well-known inhibitory activity of some Michael acceptors on IKK kinase, it was hypothesized that the difference in the slopes is due to the specific anti-inflammatory potential of Michael acceptor chemicals. Therefore, all chemicals were tested for anti-inflammatory activity in a reporter gene assay for the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Increasingly reactive Michael acceptors have increasing anti-inflammatory potential in this assay, whereas no such biological activity was detected for the S(N)Ar and S(N)2 reactive sensitizers. Thus, the increasing reactivity of Michael acceptors confers both anti-inflammatory and skin sensitizing/pro-inflammatory potential, which may partially neutralize each other. This may be the reason for the relatively weak relationship

  17. Alkenyl substituted bicyclic nucleoside analogues retain nanomolar potency against Varicella Zoster Virus.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Christopher; Bidet, Olivier; Derudas, Marco; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; Balzarini, Jan

    2009-04-15

    Novel alkenyl substituted aryl bicyclic furano pyrimidines have been prepared and evaluated in vitro against Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV). The para-substituted analogues retain the nanomolar potency we have reported for p-alkyl analogues, while the ortho- and meta-alkenyl systems lose 3-4 orders of potency. PMID:19328697

  18. 76 FR 9028 - Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated January 2011. The guidance document provides manufacturers of cellular and gene therapy (CGT) products with recommendations for developing... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products''...

  19. Conformational Fine-Tuning of Pore-Forming Peptide Potency and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the sequence–structure–function relationships that control the activity and selectivity of membrane-permeabilizing peptides, we screened a peptide library, based on the archetypal pore-former melittin, for loss-of-function variants. This was accomplished by assaying library members for failure to cause leakage of entrapped contents from synthetic lipid vesicles at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:20, 10-fold higher than the concentration at which melittin efficiently permeabilizes the same vesicles. Surprisingly, about one-third of the library members are inactive under these conditions. In the negative peptides, two changes of hydrophobic residues to glycine were especially abundant. We show that loss-of-function activity can be completely recapitulated by a single-residue change of the leucine at position 16 to glycine. Unlike the potently cytolytic melittin, the loss-of-function peptides, including the single-site variant, are essentially inactive against phosphatidylcholine vesicles and multiple types of eukaryotic cells. Loss of function is shown to result from a shift in the binding–folding equilibrium away from the active, bound, α-helical state toward the inactive, unbound, random-coil state. Accordingly, the addition of anionic lipids to synthetic lipid vesicles restored binding, α-helical secondary structure, and potent activity of the “negative” peptides. While nontoxic to mammalian cells, the single-site variant has potent bactericidal activity, consistent with the anionic nature of bacterial membranes. The results show that conformational fine-tuning of helical pore-forming peptides is a powerful way to modulate their activity and selectivity. PMID:26632653

  20. Appropriateness of in vitro potency tests as a measure of vaccine or reference stability.

    PubMed

    Pfannenstiel, M-A; Inman, M

    2012-01-01

    A proposed definition of a stability indicating assay is "a validated quantitative analytical procedure that can detect changes over time in the pertinent properties of the product" (Federal Register/Vol. 75 No. 180/Friday, September 17, 2010/Proposed Rules). In vaccines intended for veterinary usage, the potency assay has traditionally been used as a measure of stability. Some potency assays may be acceptable as stability indicating assays, whereas other potency assay will not meet the criteria for stability indicating assays. For example, an ELISA potency test may or may not detect degradation products depending on the specificity of the antisera. With time, the ELISA may overestimate the antigen as partial degradation occurs or if an aggregated or particulate antigen dissociates. Specific assays parameters and attributes that are required for a potency assay to be indicative of serial or reference stability are discussed.

  1. Deletion Genotypes Reduce Occlusion Body Potency but Increase Occlusion Body Production in a Colombian Spodoptera frugiperda Nucleopolyhedrovirus Population

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Gloria; Williams, Trevor; Villamizar, Laura; Caballero, Primitivo; Simón, Oihane

    2013-01-01

    A Colombian field isolate (SfCOL-wt) of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) is a mixture of different genotypes. To evaluate the insecticidal properties of the different genotypic variants, 83 plaque purified virus were characterized. Ten distinct genotypes were identified (named A through J). SfCOL-A was the most prevalent (71±2%; mean ± SE) showing a PstI restriction profile indistinguishable to that of SfCOL-wt. The remaining nine genotypes presented genomic deletions of 3.8 - 21.8 Kb located mainly between nucleotides 11,436 and 33,883 in the reference genome SfMNPV-B, affecting the region between open reading frames (ORFs) sf20 and sf33. The insecticidal activity of each genotype from SfCOL-wt and several mixtures of genotypes was compared to that of SfCOL-wt. The potency of SfCOL-A occlusion bodies (OBs) was 4.4-fold higher than SfCOL-wt OBs, whereas the speed of kill of SfCOL-A was similar to that of SfCOL-wt. Deletion genotype OBs were similarly or less potent than SfCOL-wt but six deletion genotypes were faster killing than SfCOL-wt. The potency of genotype mixtures co-occluded within OBs were consistently reduced in two-genotype mixtures involving equal proportions of SfCOL-A and one of three deletion genotypes (SfCOL-C, -D or -F). Speed of kill and OB production were improved only when the certain genotype mixtures were co-occluded, although OB production was higher in the SfCOL-wt isolate than in any of the component genotypes, or mixtures thereof. Deleted genotypes reduced OB potency but increased OB production of the SfCOL-wt population, which is structured to maximize the production of OBs in each infected host. PMID:24116220

  2. CD22-Antagonists with Nanomolar Potency: The Synergistic Effect of Hydrophobic Groups at C-2 and C-9 of Sialic Acid Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Abdu-Allah, Hajjaj H. M.; Watanabe, Kozo; Completo, Gladys C.; Sadagopan, Magesh; Hayashizaki, Koji; Takaku, Chiaki; Tamanaka, Taichi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Paulson, James C.; Tsubata, Takeshi; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    In earlier studies, we identified the C-9 amido derivative 1 (9-(4'-hydroxy-4-biphenyl)acetamido-9-deoxy-Neu5Gcα2-6GalOMP) and the C-9 amino derivative 2 (9-(4'-hydroxy-4-biphenyl)methylamino-9-deoxy-Neu5Gcα2-6GalOMP) have the most promising affinity for mouse CD22 and human CD22, respectively. Replacing the subterminal galactose residue (2-6Gal-OMP) of 1 with benzyl (5) or biphenylmethyl (6) as aglycone led to even higher potency for mCD22. In this study, both compounds showed improved potency and selectivity for CD22 (IC50 70 nM) and 712-fold more selective for CD22 than for MAG. The corresponding derivatives of 2, compounds 8 and 9, showed comparable activity to 2 but lower potency and selectivity than 5 and 6. Although compounds 5-9 are simple and small molecular weight antagonists, they showed much high potency and selectivity than the corresponding compounds having α 2-6Gal linkage. Both biological and computational docking simulation studies suggest that the 2-6Gal-OMP residues of 1 and 2 are not critical for binding process and could be replaced with hydrophobic non carbohydrate moieties. The data presented herein has significant implications for the design and discovery of next-generation CD22-antagonists PMID:21349726

  3. Minor oxygenated cannabinoids from high potency Cannabis sativa L

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Safwat A.; Ross, Samir A.; Slade, Desmond; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    Nine oxygenated cannabinoids were isolated from a high potency Cannabis sativa L. variety. Structure elucidation was achieved using spectroscopic techniques, including 1D and 2D NMR, HRMS and GC–MS. These minor compounds include four hexahydrocannabinols, four tetrahydrocannabinols, and one hydroxylated cannabinol, namely 9α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 7-oxo-9α-hydroxyhexa-hydrocannabinol, 10α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 10aR-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC aldehyde A, 8-oxo-Δ9-THC, 10aα-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ8-THC, 9α-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ6a,10a-THC, and 1′S-hydroxycannabinol, respectively. The latter compound showed moderate anti-MRSa (IC50 10.0 μg/mL), moderate antileishmanial (IC50 14.0 μg/mL) and mild antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum (D6 clone) and P. falciparum (W2 clone) with IC50 values of 3.4 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:26093324

  4. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  5. Cytoplasmic Dynein Antagonists with Improved Potency and Isoform Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins 1 and 2 are related members of the AAA+ superfamily (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) that function as the predominant minus-end-directed microtubule motors in eukaryotic cells. Dynein 1 controls mitotic spindle assembly, organelle movement, axonal transport, and other cytosolic, microtubule-guided processes, whereas dynein 2 mediates retrograde trafficking within motile and primary cilia. Small-molecule inhibitors are important tools for investigating motor protein-dependent mechanisms, and ciliobrevins were recently discovered as the first dynein-specific chemical antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that ciliobrevins directly target the heavy chains of both dynein isoforms and explore the structure–activity landscape of these inhibitors in vitro and in cells. In addition to identifying chemical motifs that are essential for dynein blockade, we have discovered analogs with increased potency and dynein 2 selectivity. These antagonists effectively disrupt Hedgehog signaling, intraflagellar transport, and ciliogenesis, making them useful probes of these and other cytoplasmic dynein 2-dependent cellular processes. PMID:26555042

  6. Indanones as high-potency reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Samantha; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-05-01

    Recent reports document that α-tetralone (3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one) is an appropriate scaffold for the design of high-potency monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Based on the structural similarity between α-tetralone and 1-indanone, the present study involved synthesis of 34 1-indanone and related indane derivatives as potential inhibitors of recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B. The results show that C6-substituted indanones are particularly potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, with IC50 values ranging from 0.001 to 0.030 μM. C5-Substituted indanone and indane derivatives are comparatively weaker MAO-B inhibitors. Although the 1-indanone and indane derivatives are selective inhibitors of the MAO-B isoform, a number of homologues are also potent MAO-A inhibitors, with three homologues possessing IC50 values <0.1 μM. Dialysis of enzyme-inhibitor mixtures further established a selected 1-indanone as a reversible MAO inhibitor with a competitive mode of inhibition. It may be concluded that 1-indanones are promising leads for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and depression.

  7. Minor oxygenated cannabinoids from high potency Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Safwat A; Ross, Samir A; Slade, Desmond; Radwan, Mohamed M; Khan, Ikhlas A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2015-09-01

    Nine oxygenated cannabinoids were isolated from a high potency Cannabis sativa L. variety. Structure elucidation was achieved using spectroscopic techniques, including 1D and 2D NMR, HRMS and GC-MS. These minor compounds include four hexahydrocannabinols, four tetrahydrocannabinols, and one hydroxylated cannabinol, namely 9α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 7-oxo-9α-hydroxyhexa-hydrocannabinol, 10α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 10aR-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, Δ(9)-THC aldehyde A, 8-oxo-Δ(9)-THC, 10aα-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ(8)-THC, 9α-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ(6a,10a)-THC, and 1'S-hydroxycannabinol, respectively. The latter compound showed moderate anti-MRSa (IC50 10.0 μg/mL), moderate antileishmanial (IC50 14.0 μg/mL) and mild antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum (D6 clone) and P. falciparum (W2 clone) with IC50 values of 3.4 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:26093324

  8. Minor oxygenated cannabinoids from high potency Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Safwat A; Ross, Samir A; Slade, Desmond; Radwan, Mohamed M; Khan, Ikhlas A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2015-09-01

    Nine oxygenated cannabinoids were isolated from a high potency Cannabis sativa L. variety. Structure elucidation was achieved using spectroscopic techniques, including 1D and 2D NMR, HRMS and GC-MS. These minor compounds include four hexahydrocannabinols, four tetrahydrocannabinols, and one hydroxylated cannabinol, namely 9α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 7-oxo-9α-hydroxyhexa-hydrocannabinol, 10α-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, 10aR-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, Δ(9)-THC aldehyde A, 8-oxo-Δ(9)-THC, 10aα-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ(8)-THC, 9α-hydroxy-10-oxo-Δ(6a,10a)-THC, and 1'S-hydroxycannabinol, respectively. The latter compound showed moderate anti-MRSa (IC50 10.0 μg/mL), moderate antileishmanial (IC50 14.0 μg/mL) and mild antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum (D6 clone) and P. falciparum (W2 clone) with IC50 values of 3.4 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively.

  9. GABA receptor subunit composition relative to insecticide potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ratra, G S; Casida, J E

    2001-07-01

    Three observations on the 4-[(3)H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB) binding site in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor indicate the specific target for insecticide action in human brain and a possible mechanism for selectivity. First, from published data, alpha-endosulfan, lindane and fipronil compete for the [(3)H]EBOB binding site with affinities of 0.3--7 nM in both human recombinant homooligomeric beta 3 receptors and housefly head membranes. Second, from structure-activity studies, including new data, GABAergic insecticide binding potency on the pentameric receptor formed from the beta 3 subunit correlates well with that on the housefly receptor (r=0.88, n=20). This conserved inhibitor specificity is consistent with known sequence homologies in the housefly GABA receptor and the human GABA(A) receptor beta 3 subunit. Third, as mostly new findings, various combinations of alpha 1, alpha 6, and gamma 2 subunits coexpressed with a beta 1 or beta 3 subunit confer differential insecticide binding sensitivity, particularly to fipronil, indicating that subunit composition is a major factor in insecticide selectivity.

  10. Potency of Fish Collagen as a Scaffold for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Yanagiguchi, Kajiro

    2014-01-01

    Cells, growth factors, and scaffold are the crucial factors for tissue engineering. Recently, scaffolds consisting of natural polymers, such as collagen and gelatin, bioabsorbable synthetic polymers, such as polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid, and inorganic materials, such as hydroxyapatite, as well as composite materials have been rapidly developed. In particular, collagen is the most promising material for tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. Collagen contains specific cell adhesion domains, including the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif. After the integrin receptor on the cell surface binds to the RGD motif on the collagen molecule, cell adhesion is actively induced. This interaction contributes to the promotion of cell growth and differentiation and the regulation of various cell functions. However, it is difficult to use a pure collagen scaffold as a tissue engineering material due to its low mechanical strength. In order to make up for this disadvantage, collagen scaffolds are often modified using a cross-linker, such as gamma irradiation and carbodiimide. Taking into account the possibility of zoonosis, a variety of recent reports have been documented using fish collagen scaffolds. We herein review the potency of fish collagen scaffolds as well as associated problems to be addressed for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:24982861

  11. Cutoff in Potency Implicates Alcohol Inhibition of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors in Alcohol Intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peoples, Robert W.; Weight, Forrest F.

    1995-03-01

    As the number of carbon atoms in an aliphatic n-alcohol is increased from one to five, intoxicating potency, lipid solubility, and membrane lipid disordering potency all increase in a similar exponential manner. However, the potency of aliphatic n-alcohols for producing intoxication reaches a maximum at six to eight carbon atoms and then decreases. The molecular basis of this "cutoff" effect is not understood, as it is not correlated with either the lipid solubility or the membrane disordering potency of the alcohols, which continue to increase exponentially. Since it has been suggested that inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by alcohols may play a role in alcohol intoxication, we investigated whether a series of aliphatic n-alcohols would exhibit a cutoff in potency for inhibition of NMDA receptors. We found that although potency for inhibition of NMDA receptors increased exponentially for alcohols with one to five carbon atoms, potency for inhibition of NMDA receptors reached a maximum at six to eight carbon atoms and then abruptly disappeared. This cutoff for alcohol inhibition of NMDA receptors is consistent with an interaction of the alcohols with a hydrophobic pocket on the receptor protein. In addition, the similarity of the cutoffs for alcohol inhibition of NMDA receptors and alcohol intoxication suggests that the cutoff for NMDA receptor inhibition may contribute to the cutoff for alcohol intoxication, which is consistent with an important role of NMDA receptors in alcohol intoxication.

  12. Potency testing for the experimental Na-GST-1 hookworm vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Amar R; Oliveira, Luciana M; Diemert, David J; Keegan, Brian; Plieskatt, Jordan L; Periago, Maria V; Bottazzi, Maria E; Hotez, Peter J; Bethony, Jeffrey M

    2010-10-01

    Over the next decade, a new generation of vaccines will target the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The goal of most NTD vaccines will be to reduce the morbidity and decrease the chronic debilitating nature of these often-forgotten infections – outcomes that are hard to measure in the traditional potency testing paradigm. The absence of measurable correlates of protection, a lack of permissive animal models for lethal infection, and a lack of clinical indications that do not include the induction of sterilizing immunity required us to reconsider the traditional bioassay methods for determining vaccine potency. Owing to these limitations, potency assay design for NTD vaccines will increasingly rely on a paradigm where potency testing is one among many tools to ensure that a manufacturing process yields a product of consistent quality. Herein, we discuss the evolution of our thinking regarding the design of a potency assay along these newly defined lines and its application to the release of the experimental Necator americanus-glutathione-S- transferase-1 (Na-GST-1) vaccine to prevent human hookworm infection. We discuss the necessary steps to accomplish the design and implementation of such a new potency assay as a resource for the burgeoning NTD vaccine community. Our experience is that much of the existing information is proprietary and needs to be pulled together in a single source to aid in our overall understanding of potency testing.

  13. Osteogenic Potency of Nacre on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Green, David W.; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Nacre seashell is a natural osteoinductive biomaterial with strong effects on osteoprogenitors, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts during bone tissue formation and morphogenesis. Although nacre has shown, in one study, to induce bridging of new bone across large non-union bone defects in 8 individual human patients, there have been no succeeding human surgical studies to confirm this outstanding potency. But the molecular mechanisms associated with nacre osteoinduction and the influence on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC’s), skeletal stem cells or bone marrow stromal cells remain elusive. In this study we highlight the phenotypic and biochemical effects of Pinctada maxima nacre chips and the global nacre soluble protein matrix (SPM) on primary human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. In static co-culture with nacre chips, the hBMSCs secreted Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) at levels that exceeded bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) treatment. Concentrated preparation of SPM applied to Stro-1 selected hBMSC’s led to rapid ALP secretions, at concentrations exceeding the untreated controls even in osteogenic conditions. Within 21 days the same population of Stro-1 selected hBMSCs proliferated and secreted collagens I–IV, indicating the premature onset of an osteoblast phenotype. The same SPM was found to promote unselected hBMSC differentiation with osteocalcin detected at 7 days, and proliferation increased at 7 days in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, nacre particles and nacre SPM induced the early stages of human bone cell differentiation, indicating that they may be promising soluble factors with osteoinductive capacity in primary human bone cell progenitors such as, hBMSC’s. PMID:25666352

  14. Pyridalyl, a novel insecticide: potency and insecticidal selectivity.

    PubMed

    Isayama, S; Saito, S; Kuroda, K; Umeda, K; Kasamatsu, K

    2005-04-01

    Pyridalyl is an insecticide of a novel chemical class (unclassified insecticides). Toxicity of pyridalyl to two insect pest species, Spodoptera litura and Frankliniella occidentalis, an insect predator, Orius stringicollis, and a pollinator, Bombus terrestris, was evaluated in the laboratory. The insecticidal activity of pyridalyl against S. litura was evaluated using the leaf-dipping method. The potency of pyridalyl was highly effective against all development stages (2nd to 6th instar larvae) of S. litura. This compound was also evaluated against F. occidentalis using the direct spray method. For F. occidentalis, toxicity of pyridalyl was almost similar to that of acrinathrin, but greater than acrinathrin for adults. Then the toxicity of this product to the natural enemies, Orius stringicollis and the pollinating insect Bombus terrestris, was evaluated using the body-dipping method or direct spray method. No acute toxicity of this product was observed on these non-target insects. Moreover, the influence of pyridalyl to the nest of Bombus terrestris was evaluated using the direct spray to the inside of the nest. No apparent influence of this compound was observed by 21 days after treatment. The cytotoxicity of pyridalyl to the Sf9 insect cell line and the CHO-K1 mammalian cell line was evaluated using the trypan-blue exclusion method. High toxicity to the insect cell line, but almost no toxicity to the mammalian cell line, was observed. Thus, pyridalyl exhibited high selectivity in cytotoxicity between the insect and mammalian cell line as well as in insecticidal activity among insect species. We infer pyridalyl may be useful for IPM programs of greenhouse cultivation system. PMID:15756699

  15. Activation of G proteins and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation via human dopamine D4.4 receptors: differential pathway-dependent potencies of receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Bruins Slot, Liesbeth; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Palmier, Christiane; Tardif, Stéphanie; Tourette, Amélie; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Cussac, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Agonist activity at recombinant human dopamine D4.4 receptors was compared in stably transfected CHO cells using two functional readouts: G protein activation by [35S]GTPgammaS binding and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2). Results with a large series of agonists reveal markedly higher relative agonist efficacy in the pERK1/2 assay compared with [35S]GTPgammaS binding, while potencies were generally higher in the latter readout. Whereas efficacies were highly correlated when comparing both tests, potencies determined using the pERK1/2 assay were neither correlated with those for G protein activation nor with binding affinities. In order to examine if these differences may be attributable to distinct assay conditions (5 min incubation for pERK1/2 compared with binding equilibrium conditions for [35S]GTPgammaS), selected compounds were tested in a modified short-duration [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay. In these experiments, potencies were generally reduced; however, compounds exhibiting comparably high potency in the pERK1/2 assay were not affected by this duration-dependent potency shift. We conclude that assay parameters such as signal amplification and incubation time have to be considered with respect to the appropriate choice of experimental approaches that best reflect agonist activity at dopamine D4 receptors in vivo.

  16. Relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem cell test compared with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Louisse, Jochem; Gönen, Süleyman; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Verwei, Miriam

    2011-05-30

    The present study determines the relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cell differentiation assay of the embryonic stem cell test, and compares the outcomes with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity. The results reveal that the potency ranking obtained in the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay is similar to the reported potency rankings in the two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity. TTNPB ((E)-4[2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-1-propenyl]benzoic acid) was the most potent retinoid, whereas etretinate and retinol had the lowest potency. All-trans-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, 9-cis-retinoic acid and acitretin showed an intermediate potency. In vivo potency rankings of the developmental toxicity of retinoids appear to be dependent on the species and/or exposure regimens used. The obtained in vitro potency ranking does not completely correspond with the in vivo potency rankings, although TTNPB is correctly predicted to be the most potent and retinol the least potent congener. The lack of in vivo kinetic processes in the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay might explain the deviating potency predictions of some retinoids. Therefore, knowledge on the species-dependent in vivo kinetics is essential when using in vitro toxicity data for the estimation of in vivo developmental toxicity potencies within series of related compounds.

  17. Toxico-Cheminformatics and QSPR Modeling of the Carcinogenic Potency Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    Report on the development of a tiered, confirmatory scheme for prediction of chemical carcinogenicity based on QSAR studies of compounds with available mutagenic and carcinogenic data. For 693 such compounds from the Carcinogenic Potency Database characterized molecular topologic...

  18. Quantitative structure - mesothelioma Potency Model Optimization for Complex Mixtures of Elongated Particles in Rat Pleura

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer potencies of mineral and synthetic elongated particle (EP) mixtures, including fibers from asbestos, are influenced by changes in fiber dose composition, bioavailability and biodurability in combination with relevant cytotoxic dose-response relationships. A unique and com...

  19. Comptational comparison of asbestos fibers: Dosimetry model simulations to characterize variabilty and potency (Presentation poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled asbestos fibers result in respiratory diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma, but different asbestos fibers exhibit different potency. We applied a recently developed dosimetry model (Asgharian et al., Poster # 104) that describes th...

  20. THE VALENCE AND METHYLATION STATE OF ARSENIC DETERMINES ITS POTENCY IN INTERACTION WITH THE MITOTIC APPARATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the cytotoxic and genotoxic potency of arsenicals is dependent upon their valence and methylation state. Trivalent methylated arsenicals are much more potent DNA damaging agents than are their inorganic and pentavalent counterparts. Furthermore, thei...

  1. Potency of Massoia Bark in Combating Immunosuppressed-related Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hertiani, Triana; Pratiwi, Sylvia Utami Tunjung; Yuswanto, Agustinus; Permanasari, Prisci

    2016-01-01

    Background: As part of our search for new potential natural resources to eradicate infection, we have revealed the prominent potency of massoia bark (Massoia aromatica Becc, Lauraceae) in combating immunosuppressed-related infection. Materials and Methods: The extract was prepared by macerating the pulverized dried bark in ethanol 95%, followed by solvent evaporation. The oil was extracted from the dried bark by steam-hydrodistillation of which preparative thin-layer chromatography was performed on the oil to isolate the active constituent, C-10 massoia lactone (ML). Anti-biofilm assay against Candida albicans was conducted on polystyrene 96 wells microtiter plates, followed by a confocal laser scanning microscope observation to get three-dimensional profiles of the affected biofilms. Effects on the hyphae development inoculated on RPMI-1640 agar plates were observed for 7 days. Influences of samples on mice macrophage phagocytosis were examined by an in vitro technique. Samples concentration tested were in the range of 2.0–0.0625 mg/mL and done in triplicate. Results: Massoia bark extracts (oil and solid phase) and ML exhibited promising activities as anti-biofilm against C. albicans at IC50 0.074% v/v, 271 μg/mL and 0.026 μg/mL, respectively. The ML did not inhibit the hyphae development at the concentration tested; however, the extracts showed inhibition at 62.5 μg/mL. Macrophage phagocytosis stimulation was correlated to the ML content. Conclusion: Massoia bark is potential to be developed as anti-infective in immunosuppressed condition of which the C10 ML (C10H16O2) plays a major role in exerting activity. SUMMARY Massoia bark extracts (oily and solid phase) and C-10 Massoia lactone exhibited promising activities as antibiofilm against Candida albicans at IC50 are 0.074 %v/v, 271 μg/mL and 0.026 μg/mL respectively. The major constituent, C-10 Massoia lactone (C10H16O2) plays major role in exerting anticandida activity and potentially acts as an

  2. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Michael A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  3. The role of the 4''-hydroxyl on motilin agonist potency in the 9-dihydroerythromycin series.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoquan; Carreras, Christopher W; Claypool, Mark; Myles, David C; Shaw, Simon J

    2011-06-15

    The role of the erythromycin 4''-hydroxyl group has been explored on the motilin agonist potential in the 9-dihydroerythromycin series of motilides. The compounds show potencies 2- to 4-fold superior to the corresponding hydroxylated compounds. The relationship is maintained when the 9-hydroxyl is alkylated to generate the corresponding 4''-deoxy-9-O-acetamido-9-dihydroerythromycins. However, concomitant with this increase in potency is an increase in hERG inhibition.

  4. Assessment of the skin sensitising potency of the lower alkyl methacrylate esters.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Pemberton, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    There is continued interest in, and imperatives for, the classification of contact allergens according to their relative skin sensitising potency. However, achieving that end can prove problematic, not least when there is an apparent lack of concordance between experimental assessments of potency and the prevalence allergic contact dermatitis as judged by clinical experience. For the purpose of exploring this issue, and illustrating the important considerations that are required to reach sound judgements about potency categorisation, the lower alkyl methacrylate esters (LAM) have been employed here as a case study. Although the sensitising potential of methyl methacrylate (MMA) has been reviewed previously, there is available new information that is relevant for assessment of skin sensitising potency. Moreover, for the purposes of this article, analyses have been extended to include also other LAM for which relevant data are available: ethyl methacrylate (EMA), n-butyl methacrylate (nBMA), isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA), and 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate (EHMA). In addressing the skin sensitising activity of these chemicals and in drawing conclusions regarding relative potency, a number of sources of information has been considered, including estimates of potency derived from local lymph node assay (LLNA) data, the results of guinea pig assays, and data derived from in silico methods and from recently developed in vitro approaches. Moreover, clinical experience of skin sensitisation of humans by LAM has also been evaluated. The conclusion drawn is that MMA and other LAM are contact allergens, but that none of these chemicals has any more than weak skin sensitising potency. We have also explored here the possible bases for this modest sensitising activity. Finally, the nature of exposure to LAM has been reviewed briefly and on the basis of that information, together with an understanding of skin sensitising potency, a risk assessment has been prepared. PMID:24956587

  5. The noninvasive mouse ear swelling assay. II. Testing the contact sensitizing potency of fragrances.

    PubMed

    Thorne, P S; Hawk, C; Kaliszewski, S D; Guiney, P D

    1991-11-01

    The noninvasive mouse ear swelling assay (MESA) for contact allergy testing was evaluated using fragrance components and complex fragrance mixtures. The test materials represented weak sensitizers and nonsensitizers. Two versions of the MESA were investigated. Both were noninvasive and utilized only topical abdominal dosing and ear challenge with single applications in BALB/cBy mice. The vit A MESA differed from the regular MESA only in that mice were maintained on a diet with 17-fold higher levels of vitamin A (vit A) acetate beginning 3 weeks prior to induction. Sensitization reactions were determined by measuring the mean increase in ear swelling over baseline at 24, 48 and 72 hr postexposure. Irritation dose-response curves facilitated choosing a high nonirritating challenge dose. Sensitization dose-response curves were developed for cinnamaldehyde (CINN) and a complex fragrance mixture, F-16. From these curves, the SD50 was determined. This value represents the dose which sensitized half the animals and serves to rank the potency of compounds for allergic contact dermatitis and to compare values among different assays. The SD50 for CINN was 21.6% while the SD50vit A for F-16 was 26.6%. The other fragrance, isoeugenol (ISOE), and fragrance mixtures, F-07 and F-22, were also found to be weak sensitizers in the MESA and vit A MESA. The results in the MESA for CINN and ISOE were in the range observed with guinea pig test protocols but showed that the MESA was more sensitive than human test protocols. Two of the fragrance mixtures tested in the MESA gave comparable results in the Buehler guinea pig assay. However, the third (F-22) was negative in the Buehler assay and the MESA, but positive in the vit A MESA. The results of this work with weak sensitizers and the companion study (Thorne et al., 1991) with potent sensitizers at low doses illustrate that the noninvasive MESA is as sensitive as many standard guinea pig assays. In addition, it is easier and much less

  6. Preventive Effects of Multi-Lamellar Emulsion on Low Potency Topical Steroid Induced Local Adverse Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Geun Dong; Park, Hyun Jung; Bae, Jong Hwan; Hong, Keum Duck; Park, Byeong Deog; Chun, Jaesun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun; Ahn, Sung Ku

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical steroid treatment induces diverse local Wand systemic adverse effects. Several approaches have been tried to reduce the steroid-induced adverse effects. Simultaneous application of physiological lipid mixture is also suggested. Objective Novel vehicles for topical glucocorticoids formulation were evaluated for the efficacy of reducing side-effects and the drug delivery properties of desonide, a low potency topical steroid. Methods Transcutaneous permeation and skin residual amount of desonide were measured using Franz diffusion cells. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using murine model. Results Topical steroids formulation containing desonide, in either cream or lotion form, were prepared using multi-lamellar emulsion (MLE), and conventional desonide formulations were employed for comparison. MLE formulations did not affect the anti-inflammatory activity of the desonide in phobol ester-induced skin inflammation model, compared with conventional formulations. While the penetrated amounts of desonide were similar for all the tested formulations at 24 hours after application, the increased lag time was observed for the MLE formulations. Interestingly, residual amount of desonide in epidermis was significantly higher in lotion type MLE formulation. Steroid-induced adverse effects, including permeability barrier function impairment, were partially prevented by MLE formulation. Conclusion Topical desonide formulation using MLE as a vehicle showed a better drug delivery with increased epidermal retention. MLE also partially prevented the steroid-induced side effects, such as skin barrier impairment. PMID:23467730

  7. Mathematical analysis of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) behaviour of monoclonal antibodies: predicting in vivo potency.

    PubMed

    Aston, Philip J; Derks, Gianne; Raji, Adewale; Agoram, Balaji M; van der Graaf, Piet H

    2011-07-21

    We consider the relationship between the target affinity of a monoclonal antibody and its in vivo potency. The dynamics of the system is described mathematically by a target-mediated drug disposition model. As a measure of potency, we consider the minimum level of the free receptor following a single bolus injection of the ligand into the plasma compartment. From the differential equations, we derive two expressions for this minimum level in terms of the parameters of the problem, one of which is valid over the full range of values of the equilibrium dissociation constant K(D) and the other which is valid only for a large drug dose or for a small value of K(D). Both of these formulae show that the potency achieved by increasing the association constant k(on) can be very different from the potency achieved by decreasing the dissociation constant k(off). In particular, there is a saturation effect when decreasing k(off) where the increase in potency that can be achieved is limited, whereas there is no such effect when increasing k(on). Thus, for certain monoclonal antibodies, an increase in potency may be better achieved by increasing k(on) than by decreasing k(off).

  8. Implications of binding mode and active site flexibility for inhibitor potency against the salicylate synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chi, Gamma; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; O'Connor, Patrick D; Johnston, Jodie M; Evans, Genevieve L; Baker, Edward N; Payne, Richard J; Lott, J Shaun; Bulloch, Esther M M

    2012-06-19

    MbtI is the salicylate synthase that catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of the iron chelating compound mycobactin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We previously developed a series of aromatic inhibitors against MbtI based on the reaction intermediate for this enzyme, isochorismate. The most potent of these inhibitors had hydrophobic substituents, ranging in size from a methyl to a phenyl group, appended to the terminal alkene of the enolpyruvyl group. These compounds exhibited low micromolar inhibition constants against MbtI and were at least an order of magnitude more potent than the parental compound for the series, which carries a native enolpyruvyl group. In this study, we sought to understand how the substituted enolpyruvyl group confers greater potency, by determining cocrystal structures of MbtI with six inhibitors from the series. A switch in binding mode at the MbtI active site is observed for inhibitors carrying a substituted enolpyruvyl group, relative to the parental compound. Computational studies suggest that the change in binding mode, and higher potency, is due to the effect of the substituents on the conformational landscape of the core inhibitor structure. The crystal structures and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays indicate that substituents larger than a methyl group are accommodated in the MbtI active site through significant but localized flexibility in the peptide backbone. These findings have implications for the design of improved inhibitors of MbtI, as well as other chorismate-utilizing enzymes from this family. PMID:22607697

  9. Synthetic and structural studies on syringolin A and B reveal critical determinants of selectivity and potency of proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Jérôme; Groll, Michael; Illich, Damir J.; Bachmann, André S.; Huber, Robert; Schellenberg, Barbara; Dudler, Robert; Kaiser, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Syrbactins, a family of natural products belonging either to the syringolin or glidobactin class, are highly potent proteasome inhibitors. Although sharing similar structural features, they differ in their macrocyclic lactam core structure and exocyclic side chain. These structural variations critically influence inhibitory potency and proteasome subsite selectivity. Here, we describe the total synthesis of syringolin A and B, which together with enzyme kinetic and structural studies, allowed us to elucidate the structural determinants underlying the proteasomal subsite selectivity and binding affinity of syrbactins. These findings were used successfully in the rational design and synthesis of a syringolin A-based lipophilic derivative, which proved to be the most potent syrbactin-based proteasome inhibitor described so far. With a Ki′ of 8.65 ± 1.13 nM for the chymotryptic activity, this syringolin A derivative displays a 100-fold higher potency than the parent compound syringolin A. In light of the medicinal relevance of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer compounds, the present findings may assist in the rational design and development of syrbactin-based chemotherapeutics. PMID:19359491

  10. Increased potency and binding of mazindol to putative brain anorectic receptors in obesity-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Levin, B E; Brown, K L; Vincent, G

    1994-12-30

    A class of sodium-sensitive, low affinity binding sites in the brain recognizes [3H]mazindol (MAZ). Competition for [3H]MAZ binding at these sites correlates with the anorectic potency of various phenethylamine drugs suggesting that these might be anorectic binding sites. Here [3H]MAZ binding, in the absence of sodium, was assessed by quantitative receptor autoradiography in rat brain. Binding was saturable, widespread and heterogenous with Kd = 3-229 microM and Bmax = 0.64-21.9 nmol/mg protein in various brain areas. By saturation studies, highest binding was in the somatosensory cortex, central amygdalar nucleus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Hypothalamic subnuclei had intermediate and the piriform cortex had low binding. Rats were identified as prone to develop (DIO-prone) or resist (DR-prone) diet-induced obesity by their low vs. high 24 h urine norepinephrine excretion, respectively. While similar in body weight and basal 30 min intake of 4% sucrose, DIO-prone rats had 28% greater inhibition of sucrose intake by 3 mg/kg MAZ, i.p. (86 +/- 5%) than DR-prone rats (67 +/- 6%; P = 0.05). DIO-prone rats also had 23-55% higher levels of 10 nM [3H]MAZ binding in various hypothalamic and amygdalar nuclei, the somatosensory, piriform and gustatory cortices and thalamus. Given their greater sensitivity the highest dose of MAZ used and their higher binding of MAZ to putative brain anorectic receptors, DIO-prone rats might have a deficiency of an endogenous satiety factor which could predispose them to develop obesity when challenged with high energy, high sucrose diets.

  11. Incipient cytotoxicity: A time-independent measure of cytotoxic potency in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gülden, Michael; Kähler, Daria; Seibert, Hasso

    2015-09-01

    Time is an important determinant of toxicity but largely ignored in in vitro toxicity assays where exposure times chosen are rather arbitrary. To investigate the impact of time on the cytotoxic potency of chemicals in vitro, the concentration dependent cytotoxic action of selected chemicals (surfactants, metals, oxidative stressors, a mitochondrial poison) was determined after various exposure times (1-72 h) in cultures of Balb/c 3T3 cells. Time affected the cytotoxic potency as well as the cytotoxic efficacy. The median cytotoxic concentrations, EC50, decreased and in most cases approached an "incipient" value, EC50,∞, within 72 h. Cytotoxicity due to mitochondrial insult occurred after a threshold time which was dependent on the medium glucose concentration. Within the chemicals studied the extent of potency change with time ranged from 3- to >1000-fold and the "time to incipient cytotoxicity", tic, from 4 to >72 h. Hence, also the relative cytotoxic potencies depend on exposure time. Ignoring this may lead to severe bias in toxicological hazard and risk assessment. Therefore it is recommended to determine the incipient cytotoxic potency of chemical compounds, represented by, e.g., the incipient median effect (EC50,∞), no effect (NEC∞) or lowest effect concentrations (LEC∞) instead of measures obtained after arbitrary exposure times. If this is not possible, the 72 h-potency measurements appear to be useful surrogates. These time-independent incipient potency values can be reasonably compared between substances, endpoints, cells and biological test systems and may serve to define points of departure for quantitative in vitro-in vivo extrapolations.

  12. Development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the carcinogenic potency of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatapathy, Raghuraman Wang Chingyi; Bruce, Robert Mark; Moudgal, Chandrika

    2009-01-15

    Determining the carcinogenicity and carcinogenic potency of new chemicals is both a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In order to expedite the screening process, there is a need to identify alternative toxicity measures that may be used as surrogates for carcinogenic potency. Alternative toxicity measures for carcinogenic potency currently being used in the literature include lethal dose (dose that kills 50% of a study population [LD{sub 50}]), lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between tumor dose (TD{sub 50}) and three alternative toxicity measures as an estimator of carcinogenic potency. A second aim of this study was to develop a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) between TD{sub 50} and estimated/experimental predictor variables to predict the carcinogenic potency of new chemicals. Rat TD{sub 50}s of 590 structurally diverse chemicals were obtained from the Cancer Potency Database, and the three alternative toxicity measures considered in this study were estimated using TOPKAT, a toxicity estimation software. Though poor correlations were obtained between carcinogenic potency and the three alternative toxicity (both experimental and TOPKAT) measures for the CPDB chemicals, a CART developed using experimental data with no missing values as predictor variables provided reasonable estimates of TD{sub 50} for nine chemicals that were part of an external validation set. However, if experimental values for the three alternative measures, mutagenicity and logP are not available in the literature, then either the CART developed using missing experimental values or estimated values may be used for making a prediction.

  13. Potency assay development for cellular therapy products: an ISCT review of the requirements and experiences in the industry.

    PubMed

    Bravery, Christopher A; Carmen, Jessica; Fong, Timothy; Oprea, Wanda; Hoogendoorn, Karin H; Woda, Juliana; Burger, Scott R; Rowley, Jon A; Bonyhadi, Mark L; Van't Hof, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of potency plays a key role in defining the quality of cellular therapy products (CTPs). Potency can be defined as a quantitative measure of relevant biologic function based on the attributes that are linked to relevant biologic properties. To achieve an adequate assessment of CTP potency, appropriate in vitro or in vivo laboratory assays and properly controlled clinical data need to be created. The primary objective of a potency assay is to provide a mechanism by which the manufacturing process and the final product for batch release are scrutinized for quality, consistency and stability. A potency assay also provides the basis for comparability assessment after process changes, such as scale-up, site transfer and new starting materials (e.g., a new donor). Potency assays should be in place for early clinical development, and validated assays are required for pivotal clinical trials. Potency is based on the individual characteristics of each individual CTP, and the adequacy of potency assays will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by regulatory agencies. We provide an overview of the expectations and challenges in development of potency assays specific for CTPs; several real-life experiences from the cellular therapy industry are presented as illustrations. The key observation and message is that aggressive early investment in a solid potency evaluation strategy can greatly enhance eventual CTP deployment because it can mitigate the risk of costly product failure in late-stage development.

  14. Using carcinogenic potency ranking to assign air contaminants to emission classes.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher-Wolz, Ulrike; Konietzka, Rainer; Schneider, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    Carcinogenic air contaminants are assigned to emission classes with different emission limits on the basis of their inhalation carcinogenic potency within the revised form of the German First General Administrative Regulation Pertaining to the Federal Emission Control Law (Technical Instructions on Air Quality Control-TA Luft). Accordingly, compounds with high carcinogenic potency are regulated more strictly than less potent substances. The data on carcinogenic properties are heterogeneous. Twenty-five substances or substance groups have been scrutinized and a procedure has been developed to rank these chemicals according to their carcinogenic potency. For 14 substances well-founded unit risk estimates were available to allow assignment of these air contaminants to emission classes. Unit risk estimates for bromoethane, 2-butanone oxime, and o-toluidine were derived using the ED(10)/LED(10) method based on animal studies. For several substances no qualified unit risk estimates or carcinogenicity studies were available to estimate carcinogenic potency after inhalation. Carcinogenic potency of these substances was approximated using two simple methods, T25 and CELmin.

  15. Causes of endocrine disrupting potencies in surface water in East China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Deng, Dongyang; Wang, Yuting; Hu, Guanjiu; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Xinru; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hongxia; Wang, Ziheng

    2016-02-01

    Surface water is essential for human health and ecological diversity, but some endocrine disrupting chemicals are detectable. Both thyroid receptor (TR) and androgen receptor (AR) agonistic/antagonistic potencies in grade II surface water in East China were investigated using reporter gene assays. While none of the water exhibited agonistic potency, significant AR and TR antagonistic potencies were detectable. TR antagonistic equivalents (TR-AntEQ) and AR antagonistic equivalents (AR-AntEQ) ranged from 3.6 to 76.1 μg dibutyl phthalate/L and from 2.3 to 242.6 μg flutamide/L, respectively. The TR and AR antagonistic potencies in the Yangtze River watershed were highlighted, with equivalents greater than the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of dibutyl phthalate and flutamide, respectively. Phthalate esters (PAEs) being the most abundant explained most of the TR antagonistic potency, contributing more than 65% of the TR-AntEQ and diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) was the major contributor. In most surface waters studied, PAEs contributed little of the AR-AntEQ, but the frequently detected octylphenol, nonylphenol and benzo[a]pyrene might be responsible. PMID:26495828

  16. Modulating the potency of an activator in a yeast in vitro transcription system.

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Y; Brickman, J M; Furman, E; Middleton, B; Carey, M

    1994-01-01

    The intrinsic stimulatory potential or potency of a eukaryotic gene activator is controlled by the interaction between the activation domain and the transcriptional machinery. To further understand this interaction, we undertook a biochemical study to identify parameters that could be used to modulate activator potency. We considered how varying the number of activation domains, their flexibility, and the number of promoter sites affects potency in a yeast nuclear extract. The effects of GAL4 derivatives bearing either one, two, or four herpes simplex virus VP16 activation domains (amino acids 413 to 454) were measured on DNA templates containing one or two GAL4 sites in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear extract. We found that multimerized VP16 activation domains acted synergistically to increase the potency of the activators. The spacing between the activation domains was critical, such that the increased flexibility imparted by a protein linker contributed to increased activator potency. With highly potent activators, the levels of transcription stimulated on a single site were saturating, whereas the stimulatory effect of weaker activators increased with the number of sites. We discuss how these biochemical studies relate to the mechanism of gene activation and synergy in a yeast in vitro system. Images PMID:8139572

  17. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Osnat; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; David, Alon Ben; Zichel, Ran

    2016-09-24

    Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV < 13%. Most importantly, the antitoxin potency measured by the in vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p < 0.0001). Thus, this new in vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval.

  18. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Osnat; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; David, Alon Ben; Zichel, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV < 13%. Most importantly, the antitoxin potency measured by the in vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p < 0.0001). Thus, this new in vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval. PMID:27669303

  19. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Osnat; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; David, Alon Ben; Zichel, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV < 13%. Most importantly, the antitoxin potency measured by the in vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p < 0.0001). Thus, this new in vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval. PMID:27669303

  20. Incorporation of metabolically stable ketones into a small molecule probe to increase potency and water solubility.

    PubMed

    Larraufie, Marie-Helene; Yang, Wan Seok; Jiang, Elise; Thomas, Ajit G; Slusher, Barbara S; Stockwell, Brent R

    2015-11-01

    Introducing a reactive carbonyl to a scaffold that does not otherwise have an electrophilic functionality to create a reversible covalent inhibitor is a potentially useful strategy for enhancing compound potency. However, aldehydes are metabolically unstable, which precludes the use of this strategy for compounds to be tested in animal models or in human clinical studies. To overcome this limitation, we designed ketone-based functionalities capable of forming reversible covalent adducts, while displaying high metabolic stability, and imparting improved water solubility to their pendant scaffold. We tested this strategy on the ferroptosis inducer and experimental therapeutic erastin, and observed substantial increases in compound potency. In particular, a new carbonyl erastin analog, termed IKE, displayed improved potency, solubility and metabolic stability, thus representing an ideal candidate for future in vivo cancer therapeutic applications. PMID:26231156

  1. USDA regulatory guidelines and practices for veterinary Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, G B; Walker, A; Rippke, B

    2013-09-01

    Batch-release potency testing of leptospiral vaccines licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) historically was conducted through animal vaccination-challenge models. The hamster vaccination-challenge assay was Codified in 1974 for bacterins containing Leptospira pomona, Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae, and Leptospira canicola, and in 1975 for bacterins containing Leptospira grippotyphosa. In brief, 10 hamsters are vaccinated with a specified dilution of bacterin. After a holding period, the vaccinated hamsters, as well as nonvaccinated controls, are challenged with virulent Leptospira and observed for mortality. Eighty percent of vaccinated hamsters must survive in the face of a valid challenge. The high cost of the Codified tests, in terms of monetary expense and animal welfare, prompted the Center for Veterinary Biologics (CVB) to develop ELISA alternatives for them. Potency tests for other serogroups, such as Leptospira hardjo-bovis, that do not have Codified requirements for potency testing continue to be examined on a case-by-case basis. PMID:23838570

  2. Hydraphiles enhance antimicrobial potency against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit B; Garrad, Evan C; Stavri, Ariel; Gokel, Michael R; Negin, Saeedeh; Meisel, Joseph W; Cusumano, Zachary; Gokel, George W

    2016-06-15

    Hydraphiles are synthetic amphiphiles that form ion-conducting pores in liposomal membranes. These pores exhibit open-close behavior when studied by planar bilayer conductance techniques. In previous work, we showed that when co-administered with various antibiotics to the DH5α strain of Escherichia coli, they enhanced the drug's potency. We report here potency enhancements at low concentrations of hydraphiles for the structurally and mechanistically unrelated antibiotics erythromycin, kanamycin, rifampicin, and tetracycline against Gram negative E. coli (DH5α and K-12) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as Gram positive Bacillus subtilis. Earlier work suggested that potency increases correlated to ion transport function. The data presented here comport with the function of hydraphiles to enhance membrane permeability in addition to, or instead of, their known function as ion conductors. PMID:27166575

  3. The spermicidal potency of Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola.

    PubMed

    Hong, C Y; Shieh, C C; Wu, P; Chiang, B N

    1987-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of Old Coke, caffeine-free New Coke, New Coke, Diet Coke and Pepsi-Cola on human sperm motility was studied with a trans-membrane migration method. None of them could decrease sperm motility to less than 70% of control within one hour. A previous study which claimed a marked variation of spermicidal potencies among different formulations of Coca-Cola could not be confirmed. Even if cola has a spermicidal effect, its potency is relatively weak as compared with other well-known spermicidal agents.

  4. Behavioural thermoregulation in mice: effects of low doses of general anaesthetics of different potency.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, R G; Marshall, N R; Macdonald, A G

    1990-09-01

    Chloroform, monochlorodifluoromethane and nitrous oxide produced dose-related decreases in the rectal temperatures of mice allowed to choose between a warm and a cool environment. The doses used were subanaesthetic, respectively 0.0013-0.004, 0.028-0.085 and 0.25-0.5 atm. The hypothermia (up to 3.6 degrees C) was usually associated with significant reductions in time spent in the warm. The log dose-hypothermic response plots were approximately parallel and there was a marked correlation between anaesthetic potency, as measured by the abolition of the righting response, and hypothermic potency.

  5. Comparison between in vitro potency tests for Cuban hepatitis B vaccine: contribution to the standardization process.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Mario Landys Chovel; de Castro Yanes, Ania Fernández

    2004-12-01

    Quality control of recombinant Hepatitis B vaccines performed by National Control Laboratories prior to marketing vaccine batches requires in vivo and or a well validated in vitro potency assays as recommended by WHO technical series. The in vitro test must also demonstrate its suitability for monitoring the consistency of the vaccine manufacturer. The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between both in vitro potency tests performed by Cuban manufacturer and National Control Laboratory for Hepatitis B vaccine and the suitability of our method for monitoring the manufacturer's test results and consistency. We also intended to contribute to the standardisation process consisting of in vitro methods for this vaccine.

  6. Rationale for Further Medical and Health Research on High-Potency Sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High-potency or artificial sweeteners have historically been considered inert compounds without physiological consequences other than taste sensations. However, recent data suggest that some of these sweeteners have biological effects that may impact human health. Furthermore, there are significant gaps in our current knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of these sweeteners, their potential for “sweetener–drug interactions” and their impact on appetite and body weight regulation. Nine research needs are described that address some of the major unknown issues associated with ingestion of high-potency sweeteners. PMID:22539626

  7. Effect of Chirality of Small Molecule Organofluorine Inhibitors of Amyloid Self-Assembly on Inhibitor Potency

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Abha; Abid, Mohammed; Hailemichael, Samson; Foster, Michelle; Török, Béla

    2009-01-01

    The effect of enantiomeric trifluromethyl-indolyl-acetic acid ethyl esters on the fibrillogenesis of Alzheimer's amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is described. These compounds have been previously identified as effective inhibitors of the Aβ self-assembly in their racemic form. Thioflavin-T Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy were applied to assess the potency of the chiral target compounds. Both enantiomers showed significant inhibition in the in vitro assays. The potency of the enantiomeric inhibitors appeared to be very similar to each other suggesting the lack of the stereospecific binding interactions between these small molecule inhibitors and the Aβ peptide. PMID:19880318

  8. Higher Education or Higher Skilling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Steven

    1974-01-01

    Higher education may return to education for a minority, an unlikely course; concentrate on higher skilling, the road we are on today; or restore general education, the most attractive possibility, which can be implemented by restoring basic education in literacy, history, human biology, and language. (JH)

  9. Relative potency of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans for inducing mixed-function oxygenase activity in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Parrott, J.L.; Dixon, D.G.; Hodson, P.V.; Servos, M.R.; Huestis, S.L.

    1995-06-01

    Toxic equivalent factors (TEFs) were generated for various polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) to compare the relative potencies as inducers of liver mixed-function oxygenase (MFO) activity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Trout, dosed orally with one of five PCDD congeners, either [{sup 3}H]-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (PnCDD), 1,2,3,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD), [{sup 14}C]-1,2,3,4,7,8-hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD), or [{sup 14}C]-1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (HpCDD) or one of four PCDF congeners, either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (1,2,3,7,8-PnCDF), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,4,7,8-PnCDF), or 1,2,3,4,7,8--hexachlorodibenzofuran (HxCDF), showed increases in liver ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity up to 250-fold. Liver concentrations of congeners were better predictors of EROD activity than oral dose. TEFs, ratios of the potency of each congener to that of TCDD, were calculated comparing ``threshold`` PCDD concentrations that induced EROD significantly above control levels. In cases of nonparallel dose-response curves between congeners, these comparisons are more relevant to environmental situations as PCDDs are compared at concentrations closer to those in the environment, instead of at higher pharmaceutical levels. Threshold-based TEFs were: PnCDD, 1.8; 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD and 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD, 0.4; HpCDD, 0.05; 2,3,4,7,8-PnCDF, 2; TCDF, 0.5; 1,2,3,7,8-PnCDF and HxCDF, 0.4. The ranking of potencies of the PCDFs was the same in fish as in mammalian tests, with the exception of PnCDD and 2,3,4,7,8-PnCDF, which were more potent to fish than was TCDD.

  10. Comparative Elongated Mineral Particle Toxicology & Erionite’s Apparent  High Potency for Inducing Mesothelioma

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent NHEERL research under EPA's Libby Action Plan has determined that elongated particle relative potency for rat pleural mesothelioma is best predicted on the basis of total external surface area (TSA) of slightly acid leached test samples which simulate particle bio-durabili...

  11. Opportunities and strategies to further reduce animal use for Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Walker, A; Srinivas, G B

    2013-09-01

    Hamsters are routinely infected with virulent Leptospira for two purposes in the regulation of biologics: the performance of Codified potency tests and maintenance of challenge culture for the Codified potency tests. Options for reducing animal use in these processes were explored in a plenary lecture at the "International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Leptospira Vaccine Potency Testing: State of the Science and the Way Forward" held at the Center for Veterinary Biologics in September 2012. The use of validated in vitro potency assays such as those developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for Leptospira (L.) canicola, Leptospira grippotyphosa, Leptospira pomona, and Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae rather than the Codified hamster vaccination-challenge assay was encouraged. Alternatives such as reduced animal numbers in the hamster vaccination-challenge testing were considered for problematic situations. Specifically, the merits of sharing challenge controls, reducing group sizes, and eliminating animals for concurrent challenge dose titration were assessed. Options for maintaining virulent, stable cultures without serial passage through hamsters or with decreased hamster use were also discussed. The maintenance of virulent Leptospira without the use of live animals is especially difficult since a reliable means to maintain virulence after multiple in vitro passages has not yet been identified.

  12. Social Capital, Team Efficacy and Team Potency: The Mediating Role of Team Learning Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Emmerik, Hetty; Jawahar, I. M.; Schreurs, Bert; de Cuyper, Nele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Drawing on social capital theory and self-identification theory, this study aims to examine the associations of two indicators of social capital, personal networks and deep-level similarity, with team capability measures of team efficacy and team potency. The central focus of the study is to be the hypothesized mediating role of team…

  13. Quantitative correlation of anesthetic potencies of halogenated hydrocarbons with boiling point and molecular connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bindal, M C; Singh, P; Gupta, S P

    1980-01-01

    The anesthetic potencies of halogenated hydrocarbons are found by the regression analysis to have a fairly good correlation with boiling point and first-order valence molecular connectivity (1 chi v). Also a significant correlation is found between boiling point and 1 chi v themselves.

  14. A Luciferase-Based Quick Potency Assay to Predict Chondrogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Oberbauer, Eleni; Steffenhagen, Carolin; Feichtinger, Georg; Hildner, Florian; Hacobian, Ara; Danzer, Martin; Gabriel, Christian; Redl, Heinz; Wolbank, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) is challenging but highly promising for cartilage repair. Large donor variability of chondrogenic differentiation potential raises the risk for transplantation of cells with reduced efficacy and a low chondrogenic potential. Therefore, quick potency assays are required to control the potency of the isolated cells before cell transplantation. Current in vitro methods to analyze the differentiation capacity are time-consuming, and thus, a novel enhancer and tissue-specific promoter combination was used for the detection of chondrogenic differentiation of ASC in a novel quick potency bioassay. Human primary ASC were cotransfected with the Metridia luciferase-based collagen type II reporter gene pCMVE_ACDCII-MetLuc together with a Renilla control plasmid and analyzed for their chondrogenic potential. On day 3 after chondrogenic induction, the luciferase activity was induced in all tested donors under three-dimensional culture conditions and, in a second approach, also under two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions. With our newly developed quick potency bioassay, we can determine chondrogenic potential already after 3 days of chondrogenic induction and under 2D culture conditions. This will enhance the efficiency of testing cell functionality, which should allow in the future to predict the suitability of cells derived from individual patients for cell therapies in a very short time and at low costs. PMID:27019357

  15. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 2: improvements in kinase selectivity and cell potency.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J; Parikh, Mihir D

    2009-08-15

    Optimization of kinase selectivity for a set of benzothiophene MK2 inhibitors provided analogs with potencies of less than 500 nM in a cell based assay. The selectivity of the inhibitors can be rationalized by examination of X-ray crystal structures of inhibitors bound to MK2.

  16. In vivo potency of different ligands on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Safrany-Fark, Arpad; Petrovszki, Zita; Kekesi, Gabriella; Liszli, Peter; Benedek, Gyorgy; Keresztes, Csilla; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2015-09-01

    The Ranvier nodes of thick myelinated nerve fibers contain almost exclusively voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs), while the unmyelinated fibers have several receptors (e.g., cannabinoid, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1), too. Therefore, a nerve which contains only motor fibers can be an appropriate in vivo model for selective influence of Navs. The goals were to evaluate the potency of local anesthetic drugs on such a nerve in vivo; furthermore, to investigate the effects of ligands with different structures (arachidonic acid, anandamide, capsaicin and nisoxetine) that were proved to inhibit Navs in vitro with antinociceptive properties. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was explored in anesthetized Wistar rats; after its stimulation, the electrical activity of the vibrissae muscles was registered following the perineural injection of different drugs. Lidocaine, bupivacaine and ropivacaine evoked dose-dependent decrease in electromyographic activity, i.e., lidocaine had lower potency than bupivacaine or ropivacaine. QX-314 did not cause any effect by itself, but its co-application with lidocaine produced a prolonged inhibition. Nisoxetine had a very low potency. While anandamide and capsaicin in high doses caused about 50% decrease in the amplitude of action potential, arachidonic acid did not influence the responses. We proved that the classical local anesthetics have high potency on motor nerves, suggesting that this method might be a reliable model for selective targeting of Navs in vivo circumstances. It is proposed that the effects of these endogenous lipids and capsaicin on sensory fibers are not primarily mediated by Navs.

  17. RELATIVE POTENCIES FOR ACUTE EFFECTS OF PYRETHROIDS ON MOTOR FUNCTION IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript reports data from initial studies on the cumulative risk of pyrethroid insecticides. The objective of this work was to characterize individual dose-response curves for in vivo motor function and calculate relative potencies, for eleven commonly used pyrethroids. Acu...

  18. Development of Leptospira in vitro potency assays: EU/industry experience and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, H L B M; van der Veen, M; Molkenboer, M J C H; Bruderer, U

    2013-09-01

    Nobivac® Lepto (MSD Animal Health) is a non-adjuvanted canine leptospirosis vaccine containing inactivated whole cells of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Canicola serovar Portlandvere and L. interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Copenhageni. The current standard in vivo potency test is a hamster challenge test associated with major drawbacks such as animal suffering and poor reproducibility. Here, the quantification of antigenic mass by ELISA as a new in vitro potency test is described, supporting the 3Rs concept (replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal tests) and in accordance with European Pharmacopoeia Monograph 0447 (Canine Leptospirosis Vaccine [Inactivated]). The two corresponding sandwich ELISAs are based on monoclonal antibodies specific for immunodominant leptospiral lipopolysaccharide epitopes. Protection in passive immunization experiments demonstrate that these monoclonal antibodies recognize key protective antigens in currently licensed human and veterinary whole cell Leptospira vaccines. The high precision and robustness renders the two ELISAs much more reliable correlates of potency in dogs than the hamster potency test. The recent approval of these assays for a new canine leptospirosis vaccine is an important contribution to the 3Rs in quality control testing of Leptospira vaccines. PMID:23867758

  19. Opportunities and strategies to further reduce animal use for Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Walker, A; Srinivas, G B

    2013-09-01

    Hamsters are routinely infected with virulent Leptospira for two purposes in the regulation of biologics: the performance of Codified potency tests and maintenance of challenge culture for the Codified potency tests. Options for reducing animal use in these processes were explored in a plenary lecture at the "International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Leptospira Vaccine Potency Testing: State of the Science and the Way Forward" held at the Center for Veterinary Biologics in September 2012. The use of validated in vitro potency assays such as those developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for Leptospira (L.) canicola, Leptospira grippotyphosa, Leptospira pomona, and Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae rather than the Codified hamster vaccination-challenge assay was encouraged. Alternatives such as reduced animal numbers in the hamster vaccination-challenge testing were considered for problematic situations. Specifically, the merits of sharing challenge controls, reducing group sizes, and eliminating animals for concurrent challenge dose titration were assessed. Options for maintaining virulent, stable cultures without serial passage through hamsters or with decreased hamster use were also discussed. The maintenance of virulent Leptospira without the use of live animals is especially difficult since a reliable means to maintain virulence after multiple in vitro passages has not yet been identified. PMID:23891496

  20. A carcinogenic potency database of the standardized results of animal bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Lois Swirsky; Sawyer, Charles B.; Magaw, Renae; Backman, Georganne M.; De Veciana, Margarita; Levinson, Robert; Hooper, N. Kim; Havender, William R.; Bernstein, Leslie; Peto, Richard; Pike, Malcolm C.; Ames, Bruce N.

    1984-01-01

    The preceding paper described our numerical index of carcinogenic potency, the TD50 and the statistical procedures adopted for estimating it from experimental data. This paper presents the Carcinogenic Potency Database, which includes results of about 3000 long-term, chronic experiments of 770 test compounds. Part II is a discussion of the sources of our data, the rationale for the inclusion of particular experiments and particular target sites, and the conventions adopted in summarizing the literature. Part III is a guide to the plot of results presented in Part IV. A number of appendices are provided to facilitate use of the database. The plot includes information about chronic cancer tests in mammals, such as dose and other aspects of experimental protocol, histopathology and tumor incidence, TD50 and its statistical significance, dose response, author's opinion and literature reference. The plot readily permits comparisons of carcinogenic potency and many other aspects of cancer tests; it also provides quantitative information about negative tests. The range of carcinogenic potency is over 10 million-fold. PMID:6525996

  1. RELTIVE POTENCIES OF SELECTED DIHALOACETATES AND THEIR MAJOR METABOLITES IN RODENT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relative potencies of selected dihaloacetic acids and their major metabolites in rodent whole embryo culture.

    S. Hunter, M. Blanton, E. Rogers
    RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711

    Haloacetic acids (HAA) are produced by disinfection and present in tap water. S...

  2. Influence of plasma protein on the potencies of inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy D; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Mitchell, Jane A

    2006-03-01

    It is widely believed that the potencies of nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) are influenced by protein binding in the extracellular fluid, since NSAIDs are bound to circulating albumin by well over 95%. This is an important point because the protein concentrations in synovial fluid and the central nervous system, which are sites of NSAID action, are markedly different from those in plasma. Here we have used a modified whole-blood assay to compare the potencies of aspirin, celecoxib, diclofenac, indomethacin, lumiracoxib, meloxicam, naproxen, rofecoxib, sodium salicylate, and SC560 as inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2 in the presence of differing concentrations of protein. The potencies of diclofenac, naproxen, rofecoxib, and salicylate, but not aspirin, celecoxib, indomethacin, lumiracoxib, meloxicam, or SC560, against COX-1 (human platelets) increased as protein concentrations were reduced. Varying protein concentrations did not affect the potencies of any of the drugs against COX-2, with the exception of sodium salicylate (A549 cells). Clearly, our findings show that the selectivity of inhibitors for COX-1 and COX-2, which are taken to be linked to their efficacy and side effects, may change in different extracellular fluid conditions. In particular, selectivity in one body compartment does not demonstrate selectivity in another. Thus, whole-body safety or toxicity cannot be linked to one definitive measure of COX selectivity.

  3. Development of Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) Models to Predict the Carcinogenic Potency of Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining the carcinogenicity and carcinogenic potency of new chemicals is both a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In order to expedite the screening process, there is a need to either: (1) identify alternative toxicity measures (shorter duration) that may be used as...

  4. Relative potency of culture supernatants of Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus spp. on growth of some fungal phytopathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the potency of 10% v/v cell-free culture supernatants of cultures of the bacteria X. bovienii, X. nematophila, X. cabanillasii, X. szentirmaii, P. temperata, P. luminescens (VS) and P. luminescens (K22) against Fusicladium carpophilum (peach scab), Fusicladium effusum (pecan scab), Moni...

  5. A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR EVALUATING RELATIVE POTENCY DATA FOR USE IN ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For chemicals with a common mechanism of toxicity, relative potency factors (RPFs) allow dose and exposure measures to be normalized to an equivalent toxicity amount of a model chemical... In ecological risk assessments the large number of possible target species, variety of expo...

  6. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    This eighth chapter of "The Yearbook of School Law, 1986" summarizes and analyzes over 330 state and federal court cases litigated in 1985 in which institutions of higher education were involved. Among the topics examined were relationships between postsecondary institutions and various governmental agencies; discrimination in the employment of…

  7. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Gregory, Dennis E.

    Decisions made by federal and state courts during 1983 concerning higher education are reported in this chapter. Issues of employment and the treatment of students underlay the bulk of the litigation. Specific topics addressed in these and other cases included federal authority to enforce regulations against age discrimination and to revoke an…

  8. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    Litigation in 1987 was very brisk with an increase in the number of higher education cases reviewed. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under four major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining and denial of employee benefits; (3)…

  9. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Finnegan, Dorothy E.

    The higher education case law in 1988 is extensive. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under five major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining, and denial of employee benefits; (3) students, involving admissions, financial aid, First…

  10. Higher Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bok, Derek

    Factors that distinguish the United States higher education system and its performance are considered, with attention to new developments, propsects for change, undergraduate education, and professional schools (especially law, business, and medicine). The way universities change the methods and content of their teaching in response to new…

  11. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their carcinogenic potencies from cooking sources to the urban atmosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-The; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2003-01-01

    sources (13,500 kg/year), the emission rates of total B[a]Peq for cooking sources were much higher than those for traffic sources (61.4 kg/year). The above results clearly indicate that although cooking sources are less important than traffic sources in contributing to total PAH emissions, PAH emissions from cooking sources might cause much more serious problems than traffic sources, from the perspective of carcinogenic potency. PMID:12676603

  12. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their carcinogenic potencies from cooking sources to the urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-The; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2003-04-01

    sources (13,500 kg/year), the emission rates of total B[a]Peq for cooking sources were much higher than those for traffic sources (61.4 kg/year). The above results clearly indicate that although cooking sources are less important than traffic sources in contributing to total PAH emissions, PAH emissions from cooking sources might cause much more serious problems than traffic sources, from the perspective of carcinogenic potency. PMID:12676603

  13. Dopamine D3 autoreceptor inhibition enhances cocaine potency at the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Molly M; Siciliano, Cody A; Jones, Sara R

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused central nervous system stimulant that enhances dopamine (DA) neurotransmission through its ability to block dopamine transporters (DATs). Recent evidence suggests there may be an interaction between DATs and D2/D3 autoreceptors that modulates cocaine's effects. The purpose of this study was to explore how D2/D3 autoreceptors modulate the ability of cocaine to inhibit DA uptake through DATs on pre-synaptic DA terminals. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens core from male and female C57BL/6J mice, we first sought to examine the effects of global autoreceptor blockade using the non-selective D2/D3 autoreceptor antagonist, raclopride. We found that the ability of cocaine to inhibit DA uptake was increased by raclopride and that this effect was consistent across sexes. Furthermore, using D2 (L-741,626) or D3 (SB-277011-A) autoreceptor selective antagonists, we discovered that blockade of D3, but not D2, autoreceptors was responsible for the increased cocaine potency. Alterations in cocaine potency were attributable to alterations in uptake inhibition, rather than cocaine effects on vesicular DA release, suggesting that these results may be a product of a functional D3/DAT interaction apart from the canonical inhibitory actions of D3 autoreceptors on DA release. In addition, application of D2 (sumanirole) and D3 (PD 128907) autoreceptor-specific agonists had inverse effects, whereby D2 autoreceptor activation decreased cocaine potency and D3 autoreceptor activation had no effect. Together, these data show that DA autoreceptors dynamically regulate cocaine potency at the DAT, which is important for understanding cocaine's rewarding and addictive properties. We propose a model whereby presynaptic dopamine autoreceptors dynamically modulate cocaine potency through two separate mechanisms. We demonstrate that D2 agonists decrease cocaine potency, whereas D3 antagonists increase cocaine potency

  14. RELATIVE POTENCY OF FUNGAL EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. However, relative potency of molds in the induction of allergic asthma is not clear. In this study, we tested the relative potency of fungal extracts (Metarizium anisophilae [MACA], Stachybotrys ...

  15. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 1: structure-activity relationships, assessments of selectivity and cellular potency.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J

    2009-08-15

    Identification of potent benzothiophene inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, selectivity assessments against CDK2, cellular potency and mechanism of action are presented. Crystallographic data provide a rationale for the observed MK2 potency as well as selectivity over CDK2 for this class of inhibitors.

  16. Determination of relative potencies for chemical inhibition of spontaneous neuronal activity using a four amplifier MEA system.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potency determination is important to identify the most promising drug candidates as well as identification of and ranking of compound toxicity. In our laboratory, we have utilized MEA recording techniques to determine the relative potency of 11 insecticidal compounds and rank th...

  17. A QSAR for the Mutagenic Potencies of Twelve 2-Amino-trimethylimidazopyridine Isomers: Structural, Quantum Chemical,and Hydropathic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, M G; Hatch, F T; Tanga, M J; Lau, E V; Colvin, M E

    2005-04-23

    An isomeric series of heterocyclic amines related to one found in heated muscle meats was investigated for properties that predict their measured mutagenic potency. Eleven of the 12 possible 2-amino-trimethylimidazopyridine (TMIP) isomers were tested for mutagenic potency in the Ames/Salmonella test with bacterial strain TA98, and resulted in a 600-fold range in potency. Structural, quantum chemical and hydropathic data were calculated on the parent molecules and the corresponding nitrenium ions of all of the tested isomers to establish models for predicting the potency of the unknown isomer. The regression model accounting for the largest fraction of the total variance in mutagenic potency contains four predictor variables: dipole moment, a measure of the gap between amine LUMO and HOMO energies, percent hydrophilic surface, and energy of amine LUMO. The most important determinants of high mutagenic potency in these amines are: (1) a small dipole moment, (2) the combination of b-face ring fusion and N3-methyl group, and (3) a lower calculated energy of the {pi} electron system. Based on predicted potency from the average of five models, the isomer not yet synthesized and tested is expected to have a mutagenic potency of 0.84 revertants/{micro}g in test strain TA98.

  18. Evaluation of residual antibacterial potency in antibiotic production wastewater using a real-time quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Liu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    While antibiotic pollution has attracted considerable attention due to its potential in promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, the antibiotic activity of their related substances has been neglected, which may underestimate the environmental impacts of antibiotic wastewater discharge. In this study, a real-time quantitative approach was established to evaluate the residual antibacterial potency of antibiotics and related substances in antibiotic production wastewater (APW) by comparing the growth of a standard bacterial strain (Staphylococcus aureus) in tested water samples with a standard reference substance (e.g. oxytetracycline). Antibiotic equivalent quantity (EQ) was used to express antibacterial potency, which made it possible to assess the contribution of each compound to the antibiotic activity in APW. The real-time quantitative method showed better repeatability (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 1.08%) compared with the conventional fixed growth time method (RSD 5.62-11.29%). And its quantification limits ranged from 0.20 to 24.00 μg L(-1), depending on the antibiotic. We applied the developed method to analyze the residual potency of water samples from four APW treatment systems, and confirmed a significant contribution from antibiotic transformation products to potent antibacterial activity. Specifically, neospiramycin, a major transformation product of spiramycin, was found to contribute 13.15-22.89% of residual potency in spiramycin production wastewater. In addition, some unknown related substances with antimicrobial activity were indicated in the effluent. This developed approach will be effective for the management of antibacterial potency discharge from antibiotic wastewater and other waste streams.

  19. Differential influence of dopamine transport rate on the potencies of cocaine, amphetamine, and methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Siciliano, Cody A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-21

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) levels vary across brain regions and individuals, and are altered by drug history and disease states; however, the impact of altered DAT expression on psychostimulant effects in brain has not been systematically explored. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we measured the effects of elevated DAT levels on presynaptic dopamine parameters as well as the uptake inhibition potency of the blockers cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) and the releaser amphetamine (AMPH) in the nucleus accumbens core. Here we found that increases in DAT levels, resulting from either genetic overexpression or MPH self-administration, caused markedly increased maximal rates of uptake (Vmax) that were positively correlated with the uptake inhibition potency of AMPH and MPH, but not cocaine. AMPH and MPH were particularly sensitive to DAT changes, with a 100% increase in Vmax resulting in a 200% increase in potency. The relationship between Vmax and MPH potency was the same as that for AMPH, but was different from that for cocaine, indicating that MPH more closely resembles a releaser with regard to uptake inhibition. Conversely, the effects of MPH on stimulated dopamine release were similar to those of cocaine, with inverted U-shaped increases in release over a concentration-response curve. This was strikingly different from the release profile of AMPH, which showed only reductions at high concentrations, indicating that MPH is not a pure releaser. These data indicate that although MPH is a DAT blocker, its uptake-inhibitory actions are affected by DAT changes in a similar manner to releasers. Together, these data show that fluctuations in DAT levels alter the potency of releasers and MPH but not blockers and suggest an integral role of the DAT in the addictive potential of AMPH and related compounds. PMID:25474655

  20. Differential Influence of Dopamine Transport Rate on the Potencies of Cocaine, Amphetamine, and Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) levels vary across brain regions and individuals, and are altered by drug history and disease states; however, the impact of altered DAT expression on psychostimulant effects in brain has not been systematically explored. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we measured the effects of elevated DAT levels on presynaptic dopamine parameters as well as the uptake inhibition potency of the blockers cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) and the releaser amphetamine (AMPH) in the nucleus accumbens core. Here we found that increases in DAT levels, resulting from either genetic overexpression or MPH self-administration, caused markedly increased maximal rates of uptake (Vmax) that were positively correlated with the uptake inhibition potency of AMPH and MPH, but not cocaine. AMPH and MPH were particularly sensitive to DAT changes, with a 100% increase in Vmax resulting in a 200% increase in potency. The relationship between Vmax and MPH potency was the same as that for AMPH, but was different from that for cocaine, indicating that MPH more closely resembles a releaser with regard to uptake inhibition. Conversely, the effects of MPH on stimulated dopamine release were similar to those of cocaine, with inverted U-shaped increases in release over a concentration–response curve. This was strikingly different from the release profile of AMPH, which showed only reductions at high concentrations, indicating that MPH is not a pure releaser. These data indicate that although MPH is a DAT blocker, its uptake-inhibitory actions are affected by DAT changes in a similar manner to releasers. Together, these data show that fluctuations in DAT levels alter the potency of releasers and MPH but not blockers and suggest an integral role of the DAT in the addictive potential of AMPH and related compounds. PMID:25474655

  1. Covalent EGFR inhibitor analysis reveals importance of reversible interactions to potency and mechanisms of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Phillip A; Kuzmic, Petr; Solowiej, James; Bergqvist, Simon; Bolanos, Ben; Almaden, Chau; Nagata, Asako; Ryan, Kevin; Feng, Junli; Dalvie, Deepak; Kath, John C; Xu, Meirong; Wani, Revati; Murray, Brion William

    2014-01-01

    Covalent inhibition is a reemerging paradigm in kinase drug design, but the roles of inhibitor binding affinity and chemical reactivity in overall potency are not well-understood. To characterize the underlying molecular processes at a microscopic level and determine the appropriate kinetic constants, specialized experimental design and advanced numerical integration of differential equations are developed. Previously uncharacterized investigational covalent drugs reported here are shown to be extremely effective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (kinact/Ki in the range 10(5)-10(7) M(-1)s(-1)), despite their low specific reactivity (kinact ≤ 2.1 × 10(-3) s(-1)), which is compensated for by high binding affinities (Ki < 1 nM). For inhibitors relying on reactivity to achieve potency, noncovalent enzyme-inhibitor complex partitioning between inhibitor dissociation and bond formation is central. Interestingly, reversible binding affinity of EGFR covalent inhibitors is highly correlated with antitumor cell potency. Furthermore, cellular potency for a subset of covalent inhibitors can be accounted for solely through reversible interactions. One reversible interaction is between EGFR-Cys797 nucleophile and the inhibitor's reactive group, which may also contribute to drug resistance. Because covalent inhibitors target a cysteine residue, the effects of its oxidation on enzyme catalysis and inhibitor pharmacology are characterized. Oxidation of the EGFR cysteine nucleophile does not alter catalysis but has widely varied effects on inhibitor potency depending on the EGFR context (e.g., oncogenic mutations), type of oxidation (sulfinylation or glutathiolation), and inhibitor architecture. These methods, parameters, and insights provide a rational framework for assessing and designing effective covalent inhibitors.

  2. Evaluation of residual antibacterial potency in antibiotic production wastewater using a real-time quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Liu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    While antibiotic pollution has attracted considerable attention due to its potential in promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, the antibiotic activity of their related substances has been neglected, which may underestimate the environmental impacts of antibiotic wastewater discharge. In this study, a real-time quantitative approach was established to evaluate the residual antibacterial potency of antibiotics and related substances in antibiotic production wastewater (APW) by comparing the growth of a standard bacterial strain (Staphylococcus aureus) in tested water samples with a standard reference substance (e.g. oxytetracycline). Antibiotic equivalent quantity (EQ) was used to express antibacterial potency, which made it possible to assess the contribution of each compound to the antibiotic activity in APW. The real-time quantitative method showed better repeatability (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 1.08%) compared with the conventional fixed growth time method (RSD 5.62-11.29%). And its quantification limits ranged from 0.20 to 24.00 μg L(-1), depending on the antibiotic. We applied the developed method to analyze the residual potency of water samples from four APW treatment systems, and confirmed a significant contribution from antibiotic transformation products to potent antibacterial activity. Specifically, neospiramycin, a major transformation product of spiramycin, was found to contribute 13.15-22.89% of residual potency in spiramycin production wastewater. In addition, some unknown related substances with antimicrobial activity were indicated in the effluent. This developed approach will be effective for the management of antibacterial potency discharge from antibiotic wastewater and other waste streams. PMID:26395288

  3. Tumor targeting of the IL-15 superagonist RLI by an anti-GD2 antibody strongly enhances its antitumor potency.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marie; Bessard, Anne; Cochonneau, Denis; Teppaz, Géraldine; Solé, Véronique; Maillasson, Mike; Birklé, Stéphane; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Quéméner, Agnès; Jacques, Yannick

    2013-08-01

    Immunocytokines (ICKs) targeting cytokines to the tumor environment using antibodies directed against a tumor-associated antigen often have a higher therapeutic index than the corresponding unconjugated cytokines. Various ICKs displaying significant antitumoral effects in several murine tumor models have already been developed, and some of them, in particular interleukin (IL)-2-based ICKs, are in Phase II clinical trials. Although sharing common biological activities with IL-2 in vitro, IL-15 is now considered as having a better potential in antitumor immunotherapeutical strategies and has been shown to be less toxic than IL-2 in preclinical studies. We previously developed the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. RLI showed better biological activities than IL-15 in vitro as well as higher antitumoral effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. Here, we investigated, in the context of an ICK, the effect of associating RLI with an antibody targeting the GD2 ganglioside, a validated tumoral target expressed on many neurectodermal tumors. Anti-GD2-RLI fully retained the cytokine potential of RLI and the antibody effector functions (antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity). It displayed strong antitumor activities in two syngeneic cancer models in immunocompetent mice (subcutaneous EL4 and metastatic NXS2). Its therapeutic potency was higher than those of RLI and anti-GD2 alone or in combination. We suggest that this is related to its bifunctional (cytokine and antibody) nature.

  4. Effect of chemical modifications on allergenic potency of peanut proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bencharitiwong, Ramon; van der Kleij, Hanneke P.M.; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modification of native peanut extracts could reduce adverse effects of peanut immunotherapy. Objective: We sought to compare native and chemically modified crude peanut extract (CPE) and major peanut allergens Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 in a mediator-release assay based on the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell line transfected with human Fcε receptor. Methods: Native Ara h 2/6 was reduced and alkylated (RA), with or without additional glutaraldehyde treatment (RAGA). CPE was reduced and alkylated. Sera of subjects with peanut allergy (16 males; median age 7 years) were used for overnight RBL-passive sensitization. Cells were stimulated with 0.1 pg/mL to 10 μg/mL of peanut. β-N-acetylhexosaminidase release (NHR) was used as a marker of RBL degranulation, expressed as a percentage of total degranulation caused by Triton X. Results: Median peanut-specific immunoglobulin E was 233 kUA/L. Nineteen subjects were responders, NHR ≥ 10% in the mediator release assay. Responders had reduced NHR by RA and RAGA compared with the native Ara h 2/6. Modification resulted in a later onset of activation by 10- to 100-fold in concentration and a lowering of the maximum release. Modified RA-Ara h 2/6 and RAGA-Ara h 2/6 caused significantly lower maximum mediator release than native Ara h 2/6, at protein concentrations 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/mL (p < 0.001, < 0.001, and < 0.001, respectively, for RA; and < 0.001, 0.026, and 0.041, respectively, for RAGA). RA-CPE caused significantly lower maximum NHR than native CPE, at protein concentration 1 ng/mL (p < 0.001) and 10 ng/mL (p < 0.002). Responders had high rAra h 2 immunoglobulin E (mean, 61.1 kUA/L; p < 0.001) and higher NHR in mediator release assay to native Ara h 2/6 than CPE, which indicates that Ara h 2/6 were the most relevant peanut allergens in these responders. Conclusions: Chemical modification of purified native Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 reduced mediator release in an in vitro assay ∼100-fold, which indicates decreased

  5. ECETOC Florence workshop on risk assessment of endocrine substances, including the potency concept.

    PubMed

    Fegert, Ivana

    2013-12-16

    The European regulation on plant protection products (1107/2009) and the Biocidal Products Regulation (EC Regulation 528/2012) only support the marketing and use of chemicals if they do not cause endocrine disruption in humans or wildlife species. Also, substances with endocrine properties are subject to authorization under the European regulation on the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH; 1907/2006). Therefore, the regulatory consequences of identifying a substance as an endocrine disrupting chemical are severe. In contrast to that, basic scientific criteria, necessary to define endocrine disrupting properties, are not described in any of these legislative documents. Thus, the European Center for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) established a task force to provide scientific criteria for the identification and assessment of chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties that may be used within the context of these three legislative texts (ECETOC, 2009a). In 2009, ECETOC introduced a scientific framework as a possible concept for identifying endocrine disrupting properties within a regulatory context (ECETOC, 2009b; Bars et al., 2011a,b). The proposed scientific criteria integrated, in a weight of evidence approach, information from regulatory (eco)toxicity studies and mechanistic/screening studies by combining evidence for adverse effects detected in apical whole-organism studies with an understanding of the mode of action (MoA) of endocrine toxicity. However, since not all chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties are of equal hazard, an adequate concept should also be able to differentiate between chemicals with endocrine properties of low concern from those of higher concern (for regulatory purposes). For this purpose, the task force refined this part of their concept. Following an investigation of the key factors at a second workshop of invited regulatory, academic and industry scientists, the

  6. Enhanced bactericidal potency of nanoliposomes by modification of the fusion activity between liposomes and bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Wen; Lu, Tingli; Wang, Rutao; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a good model of antibiotic resistance. These organisms have an outer membrane with a low level of permeability to drugs that is often combined with multidrug efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of the drug, or alteration of its molecular target. The acute and growing problem of antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas to conventional antibiotics made it imperative to develop new liposome formulations to overcome these mechanisms, and investigate the fusion between liposome and bacterium. Methods The rigidity, stability and charge properties of phospholipid vesicles were modified by varying the cholesterol, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and negatively charged lipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol sodium salt (DMPG), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phopho-L-serine sodium salt (DMPS), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), nature phosphatidylserine sodium salt from brain and nature phosphatidylinositol sodium salt from soybean concentrations in liposomes. Liposomal fusion with intact bacteria was monitored using a lipid-mixing assay. Results It was discovered that the fluid liposomes-bacterium fusion is not dependent on liposomal size and lamellarity. A similar degree of fusion was observed for liposomes with a particle size from 100 to 800 nm. The fluidity of liposomes is an essential pre-request for liposomes fusion with bacteria. Fusion was almost completely inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol into fluid liposomes. The increase in the amount of negative charges in fluid liposomes reduces fluid liposomes-bacteria fusion when tested without calcium cations due to electric repulsion, but addition of calcium cations brings the fusion level of fluid liposomes to similar or higher levels. Among the negative phospholipids examined, DMPA gave the highest degree of fusion, DMPS and DMPG had intermediate fusion levels, and PI resulted in the lowest degree of fusion

  7. ECETOC Florence workshop on risk assessment of endocrine substances, including the potency concept.

    PubMed

    Fegert, Ivana

    2013-12-16

    The European regulation on plant protection products (1107/2009) and the Biocidal Products Regulation (EC Regulation 528/2012) only support the marketing and use of chemicals if they do not cause endocrine disruption in humans or wildlife species. Also, substances with endocrine properties are subject to authorization under the European regulation on the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH; 1907/2006). Therefore, the regulatory consequences of identifying a substance as an endocrine disrupting chemical are severe. In contrast to that, basic scientific criteria, necessary to define endocrine disrupting properties, are not described in any of these legislative documents. Thus, the European Center for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) established a task force to provide scientific criteria for the identification and assessment of chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties that may be used within the context of these three legislative texts (ECETOC, 2009a). In 2009, ECETOC introduced a scientific framework as a possible concept for identifying endocrine disrupting properties within a regulatory context (ECETOC, 2009b; Bars et al., 2011a,b). The proposed scientific criteria integrated, in a weight of evidence approach, information from regulatory (eco)toxicity studies and mechanistic/screening studies by combining evidence for adverse effects detected in apical whole-organism studies with an understanding of the mode of action (MoA) of endocrine toxicity. However, since not all chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties are of equal hazard, an adequate concept should also be able to differentiate between chemicals with endocrine properties of low concern from those of higher concern (for regulatory purposes). For this purpose, the task force refined this part of their concept. Following an investigation of the key factors at a second workshop of invited regulatory, academic and industry scientists, the

  8. Hydrophobic substituents increase the potency of salacinol, a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor from Ayurvedic traditional medicine 'Salacia'.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Genzoh; Xie, Weijia; Balakishan, Gorre; Amer, Mumen F A; Tsutsui, Nozomi; Takemura, Haruka; Nakamura, Shinya; Akaki, Junji; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Morikawa, Toshio; Nakanishi, Isao; Muraoka, Osamu

    2016-08-15

    Using an in silico method, seven analogs bearing hydrophobic substituents (8a: Me, 8b: Et, 8c: n-Pent, 8d: n-Hept, 8e: n-Tridec, 8f: isoBu and 8g: neoPent) at the 3'-O-position in salacinol (1), a highly potent natural α-glucosidase inhibitor from Ayurvedic traditional medicine 'Salacia', were designed and synthesized. In order to verify the computational SAR assessments, their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated in vitro. All analogs (8a-8g) exhibited an equal or considerably higher level of inhibitory activity against rat small intestinal α-glucosidases compared with the original sulfonate (1), and were as potent as or higher in potency than the clinically used anti-diabetics, voglibose, acarbose or miglitol. Their activities against human maltase exhibited good relationships to the results obtained with enzymes of rat origin. Among the designed compounds, the one with a 3'-O-neopentyl moiety (8g) was most potent, with an approximately ten fold increase in activity against human maltase compared to 1. PMID:27325449

  9. Estimating Potency in High-Throughput Screening Experiments by Maximizing the Rate of Change in Weighted Shannon Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Shockley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput in vitro screening experiments can be used to generate concentration-response data for large chemical libraries. It is often desirable to estimate the concentration needed to achieve a particular effect, or potency, for each chemical tested in an assay. Potency estimates can be used to directly compare chemical profiles and prioritize compounds for confirmation studies, or employed as input data for prediction modeling and association mapping. The concentration for half-maximal activity derived from the Hill equation model (i.e., AC50) is the most common potency measure applied in pharmacological research and toxicity testing. However, the AC50 parameter is subject to large uncertainty for many concentration-response relationships. In this study we introduce a new measure of potency based on a weighted Shannon entropy measure termed the weighted entropy score (WES). Our potency estimator (Point of Departure, PODWES) is defined as the concentration producing the maximum rate of change in weighted entropy along a concentration-response profile. This approach provides a new tool for potency estimation that does not depend on the assumption of monotonicity or any other pre-specified concentration-response relationship. PODWES estimates potency with greater precision and less bias compared to the conventional AC50 assessed across a range of simulated conditions. PMID:27302286

  10. Cell culture adapted sheeppox virus as a challenge virus for potency testing of sheeppox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, M; Bhanuprakash, V; Kallesh, D J; Balamurugan, V; Pande, A; Singh, R K

    2008-10-01

    Sheeppox virus from an outbreak of sheeppox that occurred in Srinagar (Jammu and Kashmir, India) in 2000 was isolated by inoculation of susceptible sheep and further re-isolated in cell culture. The field virus, adapted to grow in lamb testes culture, was evaluated for its potential use as challenge virus in potency testing of sheeppox vaccine currently in use. The virus (passage 6) produced severe disease in susceptible sheep when inoculated subcutaneously with a dose of 106.2 TCID50. The virus identity was confirmed by PCR, sequencing of P32 gene and species-specific signature residues identified in deduced aa sequence of the gene. The virus was successfully evaluated for its virulence using two batches of sheep pox vaccines. Use of this field virus enables consistent potency experiments of sheeppox vaccines avoiding use of animals for its propagation and titration.

  11. Immunocytochemical focus assay for potency determination of measles-mumps-rubella trivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, A; Hishiyama, M; Umino, Y; Sugiura, A

    1987-03-01

    The immunocytochemically stained focus assay for the determination of potency of individual components in measles-mumps-rubella trivalent vaccine is described. The method involves the reaction of infected cultures maintained under the agar overlay medium sequentially with rabbit antiserum specific to each component, biotinylated anti-rabbit IgG serum, avidin-biotinylated-peroxidase complex, and substrate mixture. The potency of one component determined by the method was not influenced by the presence of two other components and was comparable to that determined by either dilution end point titration or plaque assay. The method offers a number of advantages over the current method based on neutralization of components other than the one to be titrated.

  12. A Pentacyclic Aurora Kinase Inhibitor (AKI-001) With High in Vivo Potency And Oral Bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Rawson, T.E.; Ruth, M.; Blackwood, E.; Burdick, D.; Corson, L.; Dotson, J.; Drummond, J.; Fields, C.; Georges, G.J.; Goller, B.; Halladay, J.; Hunsaker, T.; Kleinheinz, T.; Krell, H.-W.; Li, J.; Liang, J.; Limberg, A.; McNutt, A.; Moffat, J.; Phillips, G.; Ran, Y.

    2009-05-21

    Aurora kinase inhibitors have attracted a great deal of interest as a new class of antimitotic agents. We report a novel class of Aurora inhibitors based on a pentacyclic scaffold. A prototype pentacyclic inhibitor 32 (AKI-001) derived from two early lead structures improves upon the best properties of each parent and compares favorably to a previously reported Aurora inhibitor, 39 (VX-680). The inhibitor exhibits low nanomolar potency against both Aurora A and Aurora B enzymes, excellent cellular potency (IC{sub 50} < 100 nM), and good oral bioavailability. Phenotypic cellular assays show that both Aurora A and Aurora B are inhibited at inhibitor concentrations sufficient to block proliferation. Importantly, the cellular activity translates to potent inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. An oral dose of 5 mg/kg QD is well tolerated and results in near stasis (92% TGI) in an HCT116 mouse xenograft model.

  13. Relationship between potency and boiling point of general anesthetics: a thermodynamic consideration.

    PubMed

    Dastmalchi, S; Barzegar-Jalali, M

    2000-07-20

    The most important group of nonspecific drugs is that of the general anesthetics. These nonspecific compounds vary greatly in structure, from noble gases such as Ar or Xe to complex steroids. Since the development of clinical anesthesia over a century ago, there has been a vast amount of research and speculation concerning the mechanism of action of general anesthetics. Despite these efforts, the exact mechanism remains unknown. Many theories of narcosis do not explain how unconsciousness is produced at a molecular level, but instead relate some physicochemical property of anesthetic agents to their anesthetic potencies. In this paper, we address some of those physicochemical properties, with more emphasis on correlating the anesthetic potency of volatile anesthetics to their boiling points based on thermodynamic principles.

  14. Mechanism of Multivalent Nanoparticle Encounter with HIV-1 for Potency Enhancement of Peptide Triazole Virus Inactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Rosemary Bastian, Arangassery; Nangarlia, Aakansha; Bailey, Lauren D.; Holmes, Andrew; Kalyana Sundaram, R. Venkat; Ang, Charles; Moreira, Diogo R. M.; Freedman, Kevin; Duffy, Caitlin; Contarino, Mark; Abrams, Cameron; Root, Michael; Chaiken, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into host cells remains a compelling yet elusive target for developing agents to prevent infection. A peptide triazole (PT) class of entry inhibitor has previously been shown to bind to HIV-1 gp120, suppress interactions of the Env protein at host cell receptor binding sites, inhibit cell infection, and cause envelope spike protein breakdown, including gp120 shedding and, for some variants, virus membrane lysis. We found that gold nanoparticle-conjugated forms of peptide triazoles (AuNP-PT) exhibit substantially more potent antiviral effects against HIV-1 than corresponding peptide triazoles alone. Here, we sought to reveal the mechanism of potency enhancement underlying nanoparticle conjugate function. We found that altering the physical properties of the nanoparticle conjugate, by increasing the AuNP diameter and/or the density of PT conjugated on the AuNP surface, enhanced potency of infection inhibition to impressive picomolar levels. Further, compared with unconjugated PT, AuNP-PT was less susceptible to reduction of antiviral potency when the density of PT-competent Env spikes on the virus was reduced by incorporating a peptide-resistant mutant gp120. We conclude that potency enhancement of virolytic activity and corresponding irreversible HIV-1 inactivation of PTs upon AuNP conjugation derives from multivalent contact between the nanoconjugates and metastable Env spikes on the HIV-1 virus. The findings reveal that multispike engagement can exploit the metastability built into virus the envelope to irreversibly inactivate HIV-1 and provide a conceptual platform to design nanoparticle-based antiviral agents for HIV-1 specifically and putatively for metastable enveloped viruses generally. PMID:25371202

  15. Increasing hydrophobicity of residues in an anti-HIV-1 Env peptide synergistically improves potency.

    PubMed

    Leung, Michael Y K; Cohen, Fredric S

    2011-04-20

    T-20/Fuzeon/Enfuvirtide (ENF), a peptide inhibitor of HIV-1 infection, targets the grooves created by heptad repeat 2 (HR2) of Env's coiled-coil, but mutants resistant to ENF emerge. In this study, ENF-resistant mutants--V38A, N43D, N43D/S138A, Q40H/L45M--were combined with modified inhibitory peptides to identify what we believe to be novel ways to improve peptide efficacy. V38A did not substantially reduce infectivity, but was relatively resistant to inhibitory peptides. N43D was more resistant to inhibitory peptides than wild-type, but infectivity was reduced. The additional mutation S138A (N43D/S138A) increased infectivity and further reduced peptide inhibitory potency. It is concluded that S138A increased binding of HR2/ENF into grooves and that S138A compensated for electrostatic repulsion between N43D and HR2. The six-helix bundle structure indicated that E148A should increase hydrophobic interactions between the coiled-coil and peptide. Importantly, the modifications S138A and E148A in the same peptide retained potency against ENF-escape mutants. The double mutant's increase in potency was greater than the increases from the sum of S138A and E148A individually, showing that these two altered residues synergistically contributed to peptide binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry established that hydrophobic substitutions at positions S138 and E148 improved potency of inhibitory peptides against escape mutants by increasing enthalpic release of energy upon peptide binding.

  16. Inhibitory Potency of 4-Carbon Alkanes and Alkenes toward CYP2E1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Jessica H.; Miller, Grover P.; Boysen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    CYP2E1 has been implicated in the bioactivation of many small molecules into reactive metabolites which form adducts with proteins and DNA, and thus a better understanding of the molecular determinants of its selectivity are critical for accurate toxicological predictions. In this study, we determined the potency of inhibition of human CYP2E1 for various 4-carbon alkanes, alkenes and alcohols. In addition, known CYP2E1 substrates and inhibitors including 4-methylpyrazole, aniline, and dimethylnitrosamine were included to determine their relative potencies. Of the 1,3-butadiene-derived metabolites studied, 3,4-epoxy-1-butene was the strongest inhibitor with an IC50 of 110 μM compared to 1700 μM and 6600 μM for 1,2-butenediol and 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane, respectively. Compared to known inhibitors, inhibitory potency of 3,4-epoxy-1-butene is between 4-methylpyrazole (IC50 = 1.8 μM) and dimethylnitrosamine (IC50 = 230 μM). All three butadiene metabolites inhibit CYP2E1 activity through a simple competitive mechanism. Among the 4-carbon compounds studied, the presence and location of polar groups seems to influence inhibitory potency. To further examine this notion, the investigation was extended to include structurally and chemically similar analogs, including propylene oxide and various butane alcohols. Those results demonstrated preferential recognition of CYP2E1 toward the type and location of polar and hydrophobic structural elements. Taken together, CYP2E1 metabolism may be modified in vivo by exposure to 4-carbon compounds, such as drugs, and nutritional constituents, a finding that highlights the complexity of exposure to mixtures. PMID:24561005

  17. N-aryl-oxazolidin-2-imine muscle selective androgen receptor modulators enhance potency through pharmacophore reorientation.

    PubMed

    Nirschl, Alexandra A; Zou, Yan; Krystek, Stanley R; Sutton, James C; Simpkins, Ligaya M; Lupisella, John A; Kuhns, Joyce E; Seethala, Ramakrishna; Golla, Rajasree; Sleph, Paul G; Beehler, Blake C; Grover, Gary J; Egan, Donald; Fura, Aberra; Vyas, Viral P; Li, Yi-Xin; Sack, John S; Kish, Kevin F; An, Yongmi; Bryson, James A; Gougoutas, Jack Z; DiMarco, John; Zahler, Robert; Ostrowski, Jacek; Hamann, Lawrence G

    2009-05-14

    A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) scaffold was discovered as a byproduct obtained during synthesis of our earlier series of imidazolidin-2-ones. The resulting oxazolidin-2-imines are among the most potent SARMs known, with many analogues exhibiting sub-nM in vitro potency in binding and functional assays. Despite the potential for hydrolytic instability at gut pH, compounds of the present class showed good oral bioavailability and were highly active in a standard rodent pharmacological model.

  18. N-Aryl-oxazolidin-2-imine Muscle Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators Enhance Potency through Pharmacophore Reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    Nirschl, Alexandra A.; Zou, Yan; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Sutton, James C.; Simpkins, Ligaya M.; Lupisella, John A.; Kuhns, Joyce E.; Seethala, Ramakrishna; Golla, Rajasree; Sleph, Paul G.; Beehler, Blake C.; Grover, Gary J.; Egan, Donald; Fura, Aberra; Vyas, Viral P.; Li, Yi-Xin; Sack, John S.; Kish, Kevin F.; An, Yongmi; Bryson, James A.; Gougoutas, Jack Z.; DiMarco, John; Zahler, Robert; Ostrowski, Jacek; Hamann, Lawrence G.

    2010-11-09

    A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) scaffold was discovered as a byproduct obtained during synthesis of our earlier series of imidazolidin-2-ones. The resulting oxazolidin-2-imines are among the most potent SARMs known, with many analogues exhibiting sub-nM in vitro potency in binding and functional assays. Despite the potential for hydrolytic instability at gut pH, compounds of the present class showed good oral bioavailability and were highly active in a standard rodent pharmacological model.

  19. Increase in body cell mass and decrease in wasting are associated with increasing potency of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Stephen J; Rabkin, Judith G; Lin, Shu-Hsing; McElhiney, Martin

    2005-04-01

    With the advent of potent combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), there has been a reduction in the incidence of wasting. However, few studies have investigated specific body composition changes associated with these treatments. This study aimed to investigate longitudinally the association of increasingly potent ART with changes in body cell mass and wasting utilizing bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA). In this longitudinal cohort study, 159 HIV-positive men were assessed semiannually from 1995 to 1997 for body composition utilizing BIA, CD4 lymphocyte count, HIV viral load, medical and depressive symptoms. Wasting was defined as body cell mass/height below the 90th percentile based on HIV positive norms. ART potency at each visit was scored utilizing published clinical guidelines, ranging from 1 (0-1 antiretrovirals) to 5 (3 or more antiretrovirals including a potent protease inhibitor). Viral resistance testing was not used. The mixed-effects model and the generalized estimating equations approaches were used to determine longitudinal correlates of body cell mass and of wasting, respectively. Over the 2 years of follow-up, potent combination ART use increased from 6% to 79%. Concurrently, a significant increase in mean body cell mass and a reduction in prevalence of wasting were seen, while total body weight, fat mass, and total body water did not change. Increasingly potent ART was associated with significant increases in body cell mass and reduction in wasting. Other significant correlates of increased body cell mass included higher CD4 count and decreased severity of HIV-related symptoms, fatigue and depression. The current study found that higher potency ART taken for relatively short term (2 years) was associated with an increase in body cell mass and a reduction in wasting and that these changes were associated with both medical (CD4, HIV symptoms) and behavioral (fatigue, depression) improvements. One caveat is this study did not distinguish among

  20. A common genetic influence on human intensity ratings of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Zhu, Gu; Breslin, Paul A S; Reed, Danielle R; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    The perception of sweetness varies among individuals but the sources of this variation are not fully understood. Here, in a sample of 1,901 adolescent and young adults (53.8% female; 243 MZ and 452 DZ twin pairs, 511 unpaired individuals; mean age 16.2±2.8, range 12–26 years), we studied the variation in the perception of sweetness intensity of two monosaccharides and two high-potency sweeteners: glucose, fructose, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone (NHDC), and aspartame. Perceived intensity for all sweeteners decreased with age (2–5% per year) and increased with the history of otitis media (6–9%). Males rated aspartame slightly stronger than females (7%). We found similar heritabilities for sugars (glucose: h2=0.31, fructose: h2=0.34) and high-potency sweeteners (NHDC: h2=0.31, aspartame: h2=0.30); all were in the modest range. Multivariate modeling showed that a common genetic factor accounted for >75% of the genetic variance in the four sweeteners, suggesting that individual differences in perceived sweet intensity, which are partly due to genetic factors, may be attributed to a single set of genes. This study provided evidence of the shared genetic pathways between the perception of sugars and high-potency sweeteners. PMID:26181574

  1. Intravenous Oxycodone, Hydrocodone and Morphine in Recreational Opioid Users: Abuse Potential and Relative Potencies

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Hatton, Kevin W.; Lofwall, Michelle R.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Nonmedical use and abuse of prescription opioids is an increasing public health problem. Intravenous (IV) administration of opioid analgesics intended for oral use is not uncommon, yet little is known about the relative abuse potential of these drugs when administered intravenously to recreational opioid abusers without physical dependence. Methods This inpatient study employed a double-blind, randomized, within-subject, placebo-controlled design to examine the relative abuse potential of IV doses of oxycodone, hydrocodone and morphine. Nine healthy adult participants reporting recreational opioid use and histories of IV opioid use completed 11 experimental sessions, including one active-dose practice session. IV doses were infused over 5-min and included three identical doses of each opioid (5, 10 and 20 mg/10 ml) and saline placebo. Physiological, subjective and performance effects were collected before and for 6 h after drug administration. Results All three opioids produced prototypical mu agonist effects (e.g., miosis; increased ratings of liking) that were generally dose-related. Pharmacodynamic effects were observed within 5 min of IV administration. Physiological effects were more prolonged than subjective effects for all three drugs. While the magnitude of effects was generally comparable across drugs and qualitatively similar, valid potency assays indicated the following potency relationship: oxycodone > morphine > hydrocodone. Conclusions There were modest potency differences between oxycodone, hydrocodone and morphine, but their overall profile of effects was similar, indicating significant abuse potential when administered intravenously. PMID:20665209

  2. Traditional marijuana, high‐potency cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids: increasing risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Robin M.; Quigley, Harriet; Quattrone, Diego; Englund, Amir; Di Forti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence demonstrates that cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of psychotic outcomes, and confirms a dose‐response relationship between the level of use and the risk of later psychosis. High‐potency cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids carry the greatest risk. Experimental administration of tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient of cannabis, induces transient psychosis in normal subjects, but this effect can be ameliorated by co‐administration of cannabidiol. This latter is a constituent of traditional hashish, but is largely absent from modern high‐potency forms of cannabis. Argument continues over the extent to which genetic predisposition is correlated to, or interacts with, cannabis use, and what proportion of psychosis could be prevented by minimizing heavy use. As yet, there is not convincing evidence that cannabis use increases risk of other psychiatric disorders, but there are no such doubts concerning its detrimental effect on cognitive function. All of the negative aspects are magnified if use starts in early adolescence. Irrespective of whether use of cannabis is decriminalized or legalized, the evidence that it is a component cause of psychosis is now sufficient for public health messages outlining the risk, especially of regular use of high‐potency cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids. PMID:27717258

  3. Validation of an in vitro potency test for the Cuban hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Landys Chovel Cuervo, M; Reyes Huerta, N

    2002-01-01

    Cuban Hepatitis B vaccine is used for immunisation in our country and by other countries. There is a need to harmonise the quality control procedures, mainly the potency tests. Taking into account that the in vivo potency test is more expensive, variable and longer than the alternative methods and that the commercial kits are expensive, we designed an in-house method based on the principle of the previous neutralisation test (using Hepanostika anti-HbsAg kit). This is the same principle used by the Cuban Hepatitis B manufacturer for lot release. The aim of this paper was to validate our in vitro method, to replace the in vivo test in our laboratory. We evaluated validation parameters such as specificity, accuracy, and precision with outstanding results. We also correlated our method with the in vitro test performed by the Cuban manufacturer (r=0.96, p=0.0093) and the method performed by Venezuela using commercial kits (for direct determination of antigen) and we got very good results (r=0.998, p=0.0009). The correlation with the in vivo potency test (using Hepanostika anti-HbsAg kit) was also good (r=0.995, p=0.0008).

  4. Potency testing of veterinary vaccines: the way from in vivo to in vitro.

    PubMed

    Romberg, Judith; Lang, Stefan; Balks, Elisabeth; Kamphuis, Elisabeth; Duchow, Karin; Loos, Daniela; Rau, Henriette; Motitschke, Andreas; Jungbäck, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Current quality control of inactivated animal vaccines still focuses on the potency of final products in a batch-wise manner. Animal welfare concerns as well as scientific considerations have led to the '3Rs-concept' that comprises the refinement of animal procedures, the reduction of animal numbers, and the replacement of animal models. Although the 3Rs-concept has been widely accepted as a fundamental principle, the number of approved alternatives for in vivo tests is still limited. To promote further progress, the international scientific workshop 'Potency Testing of Veterinary Vaccines: The Way from in vivo to in vitro' was held at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut in Langen, Germany, on 01-03 December 2010. More than 130 participants from industry, academia and regulatory authorities discussed the current state of the 3Rs-concept, examples of its successful implementation as well as still existing hurdles. Special emphasis was laid on the 'consistency approach' that aims to ensure relevant quality attributes of vaccine batches by in vitro analyses during production rather than by in vivo potency tests on the final product. This report provides an overview of the insights gained, including the recommendations produced at the end of the workshop.

  5. Traditional marijuana, high‐potency cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids: increasing risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Robin M.; Quigley, Harriet; Quattrone, Diego; Englund, Amir; Di Forti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence demonstrates that cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of psychotic outcomes, and confirms a dose‐response relationship between the level of use and the risk of later psychosis. High‐potency cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids carry the greatest risk. Experimental administration of tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient of cannabis, induces transient psychosis in normal subjects, but this effect can be ameliorated by co‐administration of cannabidiol. This latter is a constituent of traditional hashish, but is largely absent from modern high‐potency forms of cannabis. Argument continues over the extent to which genetic predisposition is correlated to, or interacts with, cannabis use, and what proportion of psychosis could be prevented by minimizing heavy use. As yet, there is not convincing evidence that cannabis use increases risk of other psychiatric disorders, but there are no such doubts concerning its detrimental effect on cognitive function. All of the negative aspects are magnified if use starts in early adolescence. Irrespective of whether use of cannabis is decriminalized or legalized, the evidence that it is a component cause of psychosis is now sufficient for public health messages outlining the risk, especially of regular use of high‐potency cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids.

  6. Correlation of contact sensitizer potency with T cell frequency and TCR repertoire diversity.

    PubMed

    Esser, Philipp R; Kimber, Ian; Martin, Stefan F

    2014-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a T cell-mediated skin disease. Many hundreds of organic chemicals and some metal ions are contact sensitizers. They induce an innate inflammatory immune response in the skin that results in the priming of contact sensitizer-specific T cells by dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes. The factors that determine the strength of this T cell response and thereby define the potency of a contact sensitizer are largely unknown. This chapter highlights different variables such as precursor frequency of antigen-specific T cells, possible bystander activation, and T cell receptor diversity or avidity of the TCR/peptide-MHC interactions, which might impact the quality and strength of T cell responses to contact sensitizers. In addition, different methods available to determine both the frequency of antigen-specific T cells and T cell receptor repertoires are discussed. Identification of the factors determining potency may allow for the development of suitable in vitro assays for potency assessment of contact sensitizers.

  7. A common genetic influence on human intensity ratings of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Zhu, Gu; Breslin, Paul A S; Reed, Danielle R; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    The perception of sweetness varies among individuals but the sources of this variation are not fully understood. Here, in a sample of 1,901 adolescent and young adults (53.8% female; 243 MZ and 452 DZ twin pairs, 511 unpaired individuals; mean age 16.2±2.8, range 12–26 years), we studied the variation in the perception of sweetness intensity of two monosaccharides and two high-potency sweeteners: glucose, fructose, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone (NHDC), and aspartame. Perceived intensity for all sweeteners decreased with age (2–5% per year) and increased with the history of otitis media (6–9%). Males rated aspartame slightly stronger than females (7%). We found similar heritabilities for sugars (glucose: h2=0.31, fructose: h2=0.34) and high-potency sweeteners (NHDC: h2=0.31, aspartame: h2=0.30); all were in the modest range. Multivariate modeling showed that a common genetic factor accounted for >75% of the genetic variance in the four sweeteners, suggesting that individual differences in perceived sweet intensity, which are partly due to genetic factors, may be attributed to a single set of genes. This study provided evidence of the shared genetic pathways between the perception of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

  8. Study on Toxicity Reduction and Potency Induction in Whole-cell Pertussis Vaccine by Developing a New Optimal Inactivation Condition Processed on Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadpour Dounighi, Naser; Razzaghi-Abyane, Mehdi; Nofeli, Mojtaba; Zolfagharian, Hossein; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Background Whooping cough is caused by Bordetella pertussis, and it remains a public health concern. Whole-cell pertussis vaccines have been commonly employed for expanded immunization. There is no doubt of the efficacy of whole cell pertussis vaccine, but it is necessary to improve the vaccine to decrease its toxicity. Objectives In this study, an inactivation process of dealing with pertussis bacteria is optimized in order to decrease the bacteria content in human doses of vaccines and reduce the vaccine’s toxicity. Materials and Methods The bacterial suspensions of pertussis strains 509 and 134 were divided into 21 sample parts from F1 to F21 and inactivated under different conditions. The inactivated suspensions of both strains were tested for opacity, non-viability, agglutination, purity, and sterility; the same formulation samples that passed quality tests were then pooled together. The pool of inactivated suspensions were analyzed for sterility, agglutination, opacity, specific toxicity, and potency. Results The harvest of both bacterial strains showed purity. The opacity of various samples were lost under different treatment conditions by heat from 8% to 12%, formaldehyde 6% to 8%, glutaraldehyde 6% to 8%, and thimerosal 5% to 8%. Tests on suspensions after inactivation and on pooled suspensions showed inactivation conditions not degraded agglutinins of both strains. The samples of F2, F4, F8, F12, F15, and F17 passed the toxicity test. The potency (ED50) of these samples showed following order F17 > F12 > F8 > F15, F4 > F2, and F17 revealed higher potency compared to other formulations. Conclusions It can be concluded that F17 showed desirable outcomes in the toxicity test and good immunogenicity with a low bacterial number content. Consequently, lower adverse effects and good immunogenicity are foreseeable for vaccine preparation with this method.

  9. Study on Toxicity Reduction and Potency Induction in Whole-cell Pertussis Vaccine by Developing a New Optimal Inactivation Condition Processed on Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadpour Dounighi, Naser; Razzaghi-Abyane, Mehdi; Nofeli, Mojtaba; Zolfagharian, Hossein; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Background Whooping cough is caused by Bordetella pertussis, and it remains a public health concern. Whole-cell pertussis vaccines have been commonly employed for expanded immunization. There is no doubt of the efficacy of whole cell pertussis vaccine, but it is necessary to improve the vaccine to decrease its toxicity. Objectives In this study, an inactivation process of dealing with pertussis bacteria is optimized in order to decrease the bacteria content in human doses of vaccines and reduce the vaccine’s toxicity. Materials and Methods The bacterial suspensions of pertussis strains 509 and 134 were divided into 21 sample parts from F1 to F21 and inactivated under different conditions. The inactivated suspensions of both strains were tested for opacity, non-viability, agglutination, purity, and sterility; the same formulation samples that passed quality tests were then pooled together. The pool of inactivated suspensions were analyzed for sterility, agglutination, opacity, specific toxicity, and potency. Results The harvest of both bacterial strains showed purity. The opacity of various samples were lost under different treatment conditions by heat from 8% to 12%, formaldehyde 6% to 8%, glutaraldehyde 6% to 8%, and thimerosal 5% to 8%. Tests on suspensions after inactivation and on pooled suspensions showed inactivation conditions not degraded agglutinins of both strains. The samples of F2, F4, F8, F12, F15, and F17 passed the toxicity test. The potency (ED50) of these samples showed following order F17 > F12 > F8 > F15, F4 > F2, and F17 revealed higher potency compared to other formulations. Conclusions It can be concluded that F17 showed desirable outcomes in the toxicity test and good immunogenicity with a low bacterial number content. Consequently, lower adverse effects and good immunogenicity are foreseeable for vaccine preparation with this method. PMID:27679704

  10. Pertussis serological potency test as an alternatively to the intracerebral mouse protection test.

    PubMed

    van der Ark, A; van Straaten-van de Kappelle, I; Hendriksen, C; van de Donk, H

    1996-01-01

    The current potency test for pertussis vaccines, the intracerebral protection test (MPT), is still the only mandatory laboratory model available. This test, however, is a valid, but inhumane and imprecise test and therefore a good candidate for replacement. Recently we have developed the Pertussis Serological Potency Test (PSPT) as an alternative for the MPT. The PSPT is based on in vitro assessment of the humoral immune response against the whole range of surface -antigens of B. pertussis in mice after immunisation with Whole Cell Vaccine (WCV). We have demonstrated a relationship between the mean pertussis antibody concentration at the day of challenge and the proportion of surviving mice at each vaccine dose in the MPT (R = 0.91). The PSPT is a model in which mice (20-24 g) are immunised i.p. with graded doses of vaccine and bled after four weeks. Sera are titrated in a whole cell ELISA and potency based on the vaccine dose-dependent antibody response is estimated by means of a parallel line analysis. In an in-house validation study 13 WCVs were tested in the PSPT and MPT. Homogeneity of both tests was proven by means of the chi-square test; potencies were significantly similar (p = 0.95). Compared to the MPT, the PSPT is more reproducible as is indicated by its smaller 95% confidence intervals. Moreover, by using the PSPT the animal distress can be reduced to an acceptable level and the PSPT also results in a reduction of more than 25% in use of mice. Additional experiments showed that estimation of WCV-potency in the PSPT based on specific antibody responses against protective antigens (PT, FHA, 69- and 92-kDa OMPS) was not possible or did not correlate with protection in MPT. Sera obtained from the PSPT showed a correlation between pertussis antibody levels and complement-mediated killing by pertussis antibodies in in vitro assays. In conclusion, the PSPT is a promising substitute for the MPT though further validation and additional studies on functional

  11. The relative teratogenic index and teratogenic potency: proposed components of developmental toxicity risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Fabro, S; Shull, G; Brown, N A

    1982-01-01

    Teratogenicity tests should provide answers to three questions: (1) Can the agent induce developmental defects? ("teratogenic potential"); (2) What are the effective doses? ("teratogenic potency"); and (3) Are effective doses below adult toxic doses? ("teratogenic hazard"). The answers to (2) and (3) should be quantitative in nature, but there are no accepted parameters to express these properties. In this paper we propose parameters for the description of teratogenic potency and hazard in quantitative terms. Derivation and calculation of the parameters are illustrated by the analysis of adult lethality and teratogenicity data of eight structurally related anhydrides and imides, following testing in the CD-1 mouse. Teratogenicity was evaluated following treatment on Days 8-10 of gestation, using an average of four dose groups per compound and at least 10 dams per group. Adult lethality was estimated following a similar 3-day dosage schedule with an average of 6 dose groups per compound and at least 8 animals per group. Dose-response relationships of teratogenicity were fitted to a probit model from which tD50 (median effective dose), and other effective doses were computed. It is proposed that tD05, as a minimum teratogenic dose, best represents teratogenic potency. In this study, potency ranged from 0.17 mmol/kg/day for phenytoin to 5.2 mmol/kg/day for ethosuximide. In order to measure teratogenic hazard a ratio between adult toxic (lethality was chosen as the most appropriate measure) and teratogenic responses was made. Since the dose-response slopes of lethality and teratogenicity were different, a simple ratio between median effective doses could not be used. It is shown that a ratio of LD01 to tD05 provides a "Relative Teratogenic Index" (RTI) which reflects the teratogenic hazard of a test agent. The following RTI values (LD01/tD05) were computed in this study: phthalic anhydride, 0.9; phensuximide, 1.0; succinic anhydride, 1.0; ethosuximide, 1.2; phenytoin

  12. Relative embryotoxic potency of p-substituted phenols in the embryonic stem cell test (EST) and comparison to their toxic potency in vivo and in the whole embryo culture (WEC) assay.

    PubMed

    Strikwold, Marije; Woutersen, Ruud A; Spenkelink, Bert; Punt, Ans; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-09-01

    The applicability of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) as an alternative for in vivo embryotoxicity testing was evaluated for a series of five p-substituted phenols. To this purpose, the potency ranking for this class of compounds derived from the inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation in the EST was compared to in vivo embryotoxic potency data obtained from literature and to the potency ranking defined in the in vitro whole embryo culture (WEC) assay. From the results obtained it appears that the EST was able to identify the embryotoxic potential for p-substituted phenols, providing an identical potency ranking compared to the WEC assay. However, the EST was not able to predict an accurate ranking for the phenols compared to their potency observed in vivo. Only phenol, the least potent compound within this series, was correctly ranked. Furthermore, p-mercaptophenol was correctly identified as a relative potent congener of the phenols tested, but its ranking was distorted by p-heptyloxyphenol, of which the toxicity was overestimated in the EST. It is concluded that when attempting to explain the observed disparity in potency rankings between in vitro and in vivo embryotoxicity, the in vitro models should be combined with a kinetic model describing in vivo absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion processes of the compounds.

  13. Antecedents of team potency and team effectiveness: an examination of goal and process clarity and servant leadership.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Liden, Robert C

    2011-07-01

    Integrating theories of self-regulation with team and leadership literatures, this study investigated goal and process clarity and servant leadership as 3 antecedents of team potency and subsequent team effectiveness, operationalized as team performance and organizational citizenship behavior. Our sample of 304 employees represented 71 teams in 5 banks. Results showed that team-level goal and process clarity as well as team servant leadership served as 3 antecedents of team potency and subsequent team performance and team organizational citizenship behavior. Furthermore, we found that servant leadership moderated the relationships between both goal and process clarity and team potency, such that the positive relationships between both goal and process clarity and team potency were stronger in the presence of servant leadership.

  14. Quantitative structure - mesothelioma potency model optimization for complex mixtures of elongated particles in rat pleura: A retrospective study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer potencies of mineral and synthetic elongated particle (EP) mixtures, including asbestos fibers, are influenced by changes in fiber dose composition, bioavailability, and biodurability in combination with relevant cytotoxic dose-response relationships. A unique and compreh...

  15. Tetrahydroindazole inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases. Part 2: SAR development and potency against multidrug-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Wiener, John J M; Gomez, Laurent; Venkatesan, Hariharan; Santillán, Alejandro; Allison, Brett D; Schwarz, Kimberly L; Shinde, Shirin; Tang, Liu; Hack, Michael D; Morrow, Brian J; Motley, S Timothy; Goldschmidt, Raul M; Shaw, Karen Joy; Jones, Todd K; Grice, Cheryl A

    2007-05-15

    We have previously reported a novel class of tetrahydroindazoles that display potency against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, potentially via interaction with type II bacterial topoisomerases. Herein are reported SAR investigations of this new series. Several compounds possessing broad-spectrum potency were prepared. Further, these compounds exhibit activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive microorganisms equivalent to that against susceptible strains.

  16. Development and validation of a serological potency test for the release of Leptospira vaccines--requirements in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Balks, Elisabeth; Gyra, Heike; Kobe, Babett; Cussler, Klaus; Werner, Esther

    2013-09-01

    Both European Pharmacopoeia Monograph 01/2008:0447 "Canine Leptospirosis vaccine (inactivated)" and the more recent Monograph 01/2008:1939 "Bovine Leptospirosis vaccine (inactivated)" explicitly allow for a sero-response test to assess batch potency. Test setup and requirements for in vivo and in vitro validation are described. Furthermore, the two main strategies to assess batch potency and their specific demands are addressed. PMID:23911253

  17. A monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay for measuring the potency of 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Falko; Vasudevan, Anupama; Soto, Jackeline; Kumar, Arunima; Williams, Ollie; Weir, Jerry P

    2014-01-01

    Background The potency of inactivated influenza vaccines is determined using a single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) assay. This assay is relatively easy to standardize, it is not technically demanding, and it is capable of measuring the potency of several vaccine strain subtypes in a multivalent vaccine. Nevertheless, alternative methods that retain the major advantages of the SRID, but with a greater dynamic range of measurement and with reduced reagent requirements, are needed. Objectives The feasibility of an ELISA-based assay format was explored as an alternative potency assay for inactivated influenza vaccines. Methods Several murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), specific for the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), were evaluated for their potential to capture and quantify HA antigen. Vaccine samples, obtained from four licensed influenza vaccine manufacturers, included monovalent bulk vaccine, monovalent vaccine, and trivalent vaccine. Traditional SRID potency assays were run in parallel with the mAb–ELISA potency assay using the reference antigen standard appropriate for the vaccine samples being tested. Results The results indicated that the ELISA potency assay can quantify HA over a wide range of concentrations, including vaccine at subpotent doses, and the ELISA and SRID potency values correlated well for most vaccine samples. Importantly, the assay was capable of quantifying A/California HA in a trivalent formulation. Conclusions This study demonstrates the general feasibility of the mAb approach and strongly suggests that such ELISAs have potential for continued development as an alternative method to assay the potency of inactivated influenza vaccines. PMID:25087462

  18. High potency olfactory receptor agonists discovered by virtual high-throughput screening: molecular probes for receptor structure and olfactory function

    PubMed Central

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Van Name, Eric; Laslier, Guillaume; Cai, Diana; Paillard, Guillaume; Sorensen, Peter W.; Hoffmann, Rémy; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Ngai, John; Acher, Francine C.

    2008-01-01

    The detection and discrimination of diverse chemical structures by the vertebrate olfactory system is accomplished by the recognition of odorous ligands by their cognate receptors. In the present study we used a computational high-throughput screening strategy to discover novel high affinity agonists of an olfactory G protein-coupled receptor tuned to recognize amino acid ligands. Functional testing of the top candidates validated several agonists with potencies higher than any of the receptor’s known natural ligands. Computational modeling revealed molecular interactions involved in ligand recognition by this receptor, and further highlighted interactions that have been conserved in evolutionarily divergent amino acid receptors. Significantly, the top compounds display robust activities as odorants in vivo, and include a natural product that may be used to signal the presence of bacteria in the aquatic environment. Our virtual screening approach should be applicable to the identification of new bioactive molecules for probing the structure of chemosensory receptors and the function of chemosensory systems in vivo. PMID:19081373

  19. Potency and selectivity of inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus protease by a small nonpeptide cyclic urea, DMP 323.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson-Viitanen, S; Klabe, R M; Cawood, P G; O'Neal, P L; Meek, J L

    1994-01-01

    DMP 323 is a potent inhibitor of the protease of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), with antiviral activity against both HIV type 1 and HIV type 2. This compound is representative of a class of small, novel, nonpeptide cyclic urea inhibitors of HIV protease that were designed on the basis of three-dimensional structural information and three-dimensional database searching. We report here studies of the kinetics of DMP 323 inhibition of the cleavage of peptide and HIV-1 gag polyprotein substrates. DMP 323 acts as a rapidly binding, competitive inhibitor of HIV protease. DMP 323 is as potent against both peptide and viral polyprotein substrates as A-80987, Q8024, and Ro-31-8959, which are among the most potent inhibitors of HIV protease described in the literature to date. Incubation with human plasma or serum did not decrease the effective potency of DMP 323 for HIV protease, suggesting that plasma protein binding is of a low affinity relative to that of HIV protease. DMP 323 was also assessed for its ability to inhibit the mammalian proteases renin, pepsin, cathepsin D, cathepsin G, and chymotrypsin. No inhibition of greater than 12% was observed for any of these enzymes at concentrations of DMP 323 that were 350 to 40,000 times higher than that required to inhibit the viral protease 50%. Images PMID:7979296

  20. Screening for Endophytic Fungi from Turmeric Plant (Curcuma longa L.) of Sukabumi and Cibinong with Potency as Antioxidant Compounds Producer.

    PubMed

    Bustanussalam; Rachman, Fauzy; Septiana, Eris; Lekatompessy, Sylvia J R; Widowati, Tiwit; Sukiman, Harmastini I; Simanjuntak, Partomuan

    2015-01-01

    Potency of medicinal plant is related to microorganisms lived in the plant tissue. Those microorganisms are known as endophytic microbes that live and form colonies in the plant tissue without harming its host. Each plant may contains several endophytic microbes that produce biological compounds or secondary metabolites due to co-evolution or genetic transfer from the host plant to endophytic microbes. Endophytic fungi research done for turmeric plant (Curcuma longa L.) gave 44 isolated fungi as results. Those 44 fungi isolated were fermented in Potato Dextrose Broth (PDB) media, filtered, extracted with ethylacetate and then were analyzed by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) method and tested for their antioxidant activity by radical scavenging method. The antioxidant activity of the ethylacetate filtrate extracts either from Sukabumi or Cibinong were higher than the biomass extracts. There were 6 fungi that showed antioxidant activities over 65%, i.e., with code name K.Cl.Sb.R9 (93.58%), K.Cl.Sb.A11 (81.49%), KCl.Sb.B1 (78.81%), KCl.Sb.R11 (71.67%) and K.Cl.Sb.A12 (67.76%) from Sukabumi and K.Cl.Cb.U1 (69.27%) from Cibinong. These results showed that bioproduction by endophytic microbes can gave potential antioxidant compounds.

  1. Conjugation of Palmitic Acid Improves Potency and Longevity of siRNA Delivered via Endosomolytic Polymer Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sarett, Samantha M.; Kilchrist, Kameron V.; Miteva, Martina; Duvall, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical translation of siRNA therapeutics has been limited by the inability to effectively overcome the rigorous delivery barriers associated with intracellular-acting biologics. Here, in order to address both potency and longevity of siRNA gene silencing, pH-responsive micellar nanoparticle (NP) carriers loaded with siRNA conjugated to palmitic acid (siRNA-PA) were investigated as a combined approach to improve siRNA endosomal escape and stability. Conjugation to hydrophobic PA improved NP loading efficiency relative to unmodified siRNA, enabling complete packaging of siRNA-PA at a lower polymer:siRNA ratio. PA conjugation also increased intracellular uptake of the nucleic acid cargo by 35-fold and produced a 3.1-fold increase in intracellular half-life. The higher uptake and improved retention of siRNA-PA NPs correlated to a 2- and 11-fold decrease in gene silencing IC50 in comparison to siRNA NPs in fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells, respectively, for both the model gene luciferase and the therapeutically relevant gene PHD2. PA conjugation also significantly increased longevity of silencing activity following a single treatment, as observed in fibroblasts. Thus, conjugation of PA to siRNA paired with endosomolytic NPs is a promising approach to enhance the functional efficacy of siRNA in tissue regenerative and other applications. PMID:25641816

  2. Development of a FACS-based assay for evaluating antiviral potency of compound in dengue infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yilong; Chen, Yen-Liang; Herve, Maxime; Gu, Feng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Blasco, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arthropod-transmitted viral disease affecting humans. It is a blood-borne disease characterized by persistent fever and joint pain. In the blood, primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), in particular monocytes, are the main target of the dengue virus (DENV). These cells are poorly permissive for in vitro dengue virus infection and their infectivity varies from donor to donor. To overcome this barrier, an anti-dengue antibody was used to improve the infectivity of DENV-2 clinical isolates to PBMCs, the monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1 and the granulocyte cell line, KU812. A higher throughput 96-well-format assay based on a fluorescent-activated cell sorter could potentially be developed to evaluate the antiviral potency of compounds in DENV-infected PBMCs in vitro. The results correlate well with data obtained by a standard plaque assay. Altogether, an assay has been developed that enables evaluation of the antiviral activity of test compounds in a physiologically-relevant cell system (PBMCs). These screening processes are urgently needed for dengue drug discovery.

  3. Biosorption of Congo Red from aqueous solution by Bacillus weihenstephanensis RI12; effect of SPB1 biosurfactant addition on biodecolorization potency.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Inès; Fendri, Raouia; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus weihenstephanensis RI12, isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil, was assessed for Congo Red bio-treatment potency. Results suggested the potential of this bacterium for use in effective treatment of Congo Red contaminated wastewaters under shaking conditions at acidic and neutral pH value. The strain could tolerate higher doses of dyes as it could decolorize up to 1,000 mg/l of Congo Red. When used as microbial surfactant to enhance Congo Red biodecolorization, Bacillus subtilis SPB1-derived lipopeptide accelerated the decolorization rate and maximized the decolorization efficiency at an optimal concentration of biosurfactant of about 0.075%. Studies ensured that Congo Red removal by this strain could be due to an adsorption phenomena. Germination potencies of tomato seeds using the treated dyes under different conditions showed the efficient biotreatment of the azo dye Congo Red especially with the addition of SPB1 biosurfactant. To conclude, the addition of SPB1 bioemulsifier reduced energy costs by reducing the effective decolorization period; the biosurfactant stimulated bacterial decolorization method may provide a highly efficient, inexpensive and time-saving procedure in the treatment of textile effluents.

  4. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides to parathyroid hormone affects its structure, potency, and transepithelial permeation.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mie; de Groot, Anne Marit; Berthelsen, Jens; Franzyk, Henrik; Sijts, Alice; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-03-18

    Delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins by the use of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as carriers has been suggested as a feasible strategy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of conjugating a series of well-known CPPs to the biologically active part of parathyroid hormone, i.e., PTH(1-34), and to evaluate the effect with regard to secondary structure, potency in Saos-2 cells, immunogenicity, safety, as well as the transepithelial permeation across monolayers by using the Caco-2 cell culture model. Further, co-administration of CPP and PTH(1-34) as an alternative to covalent conjugation was compared with regard to the transepithelial permeation. CPP-conjugated PTH(1-34) fusion peptides were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and purified from inclusion bodies. No clear correlation between the degree of secondary structure of the CPP-conjugated PTH(1-34) fusion peptides and their potency was found, albeit a general decrease in permeation was observed for both N- and C-terminally CPP-conjugated PTH(1-34) as compared to native PTH(1-34). However, attachment of CPP to the N-terminus significantly increased permeation across Caco-2 cell monolayers as compared to the corresponding C-terminally CPP-conjugated PTH(1-34). In addition, the nonaarginine sequence proved to be the only CPP capable of increasing permeation when conjugated to PTH(1-34) as compared to co-administration of CPP and PTH(1-34). This enhancement effect was, however, associated with an unacceptably low level of cell viability. In conclusion, covalent conjugation of CPPs to PTH(1-34) influenced the secondary structure, potency, and transepithelial permeation efficiency of the resulting conjugate, and hence this approach appears not to be favorable as compared to co-administration when optimizing CPP-mediated permeation of PTH(1-34) across an intestinal epithelium.

  5. Third Transmembrane Domain of the Adrenocorticotropic Receptor Is Critical for Ligand Selectivity and Potency

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yingkui; Mishra, Vinod; Crasto, Chiquito J.; Chen, Min; Dimmitt, Reed; Harmon, Carroll M.

    2015-01-01

    The ACTH receptor, known as the melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R), plays an important role in regulating and maintaining adrenocortical function. MC2R is a subtype of the melanocortin receptor (MCR) family and has unique characteristics among MCRs. Endogenous ACTH is the only endogenous agonist for MC2R, whereas the melanocortin peptides α-, β-, and γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and ACTH are full agonists for all other MCRs. In this study, we examined the molecular basis of MC2R responsible for ligand selectivity using ACTH analogs and MC2R mutagenesis. Our results indicate that substitution of Phe7 with d-Phe or d-naphthylalanine (d-Nal(2′)) in ACTH(1–24) caused a significant decrease in ligand binding affinity and potency. Substitution of Phe7 with d-Nal(2′) in ACTH(1–24) did not switch the ligand from agonist to antagonist at MC2R, which was observed in MC3R and MC4R. Substitution of Phe7 with d-Phe7 in ACTH(1–17) resulted in the loss of ligand binding and activity. Molecular analysis of MC2R indicated that only mutation of the third transmembrane domain of MC2R resulted in a decrease in d-Phe ACTH binding affinity and potency. Our results suggest that Phe7 in ACTH plays an important role in ligand selectivity and that the third transmembrane domain of MC2R is crucial for ACTH selectivity and potency. PMID:25605722

  6. Statin therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment and effect of statin potency

    PubMed Central

    Chinwong, Dujrudee; Patumanond, Jayanton; Chinwong, Surarong; Siriwattana, Khanchai; Gunaparn, Siriluck; Hall, John Joseph; Phrommintikul, Arintaya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Current guidelines recommend an LDL-C target of <70 mg/dL (<1.8 mmol/L) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, and the first-line treatment to lower lipids is statin therapy. Despite current guidelines and the efficacious lipid-lowering agents available, about half of patients at very high risk, including ACS patients, fail to achieve their LDL-C goal. This study assessed LDL-C goal attainment according to use of high and low potency statins in routine practice in Thailand. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed by retrieving data from medical records and the electronic hospital database for a tertiary care hospital in Thailand between 2009 and 2011. Included were ACS patients treated with statins at baseline and with follow-up of LDL-C levels. Patients were divided into high or low potency statin users, and the proportion reaching the LDL-C goal of <70 mg/dL was determined. A Cox proportional hazard model was applied to determine the relationship between statin potency and LDL-C goal attainment. Propensity score adjustment was used to control for confounding by indication. Results Of 396 ACS patients (60% males, mean age 64.3±11.6 years), 229 (58%) were treated with high potency statins and 167 (42%) with low potency statins. A quarter reached their target LDL-C goal (25% for patients on high potency statins and 23% on low potency statins). High potency statins were not associated with increased LDL-C goal attainment (adjusted hazards ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 0.79–1.88; P=0.363). Conclusion There was no significant effect of high potency statins on LDL-C goal attainment. Moreover, this study showed low LDL-C goal attainment for patients on either low or high potency statins. The reasons for the low LDL-C goal attainment rate warrants further investigation. PMID:25670902

  7. Standard Preparations, Limits of Potency, and Dating Period Limitations for Biological Products. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency or we) is amending the general biological products standards relating to dating periods and also removing certain standards relating to standard preparations and limits of potency. FDA is taking this action to update outdated requirements, and accommodate new and evolving technology and testing capabilities, without diminishing public health protections. This action is part of FDA's retrospective review of its regulations in response to an Executive order. FDA is issuing these amendments directly as a final rule because the Agency believes they are noncontroversial and FDA anticipates no significant adverse comments. PMID:27192727

  8. An epidermal equivalent assay for identification and ranking potency of contact sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Susan; Corsini, Emanuela; Spiekstra, Sander W.; Galbiati, Valentina; Fuchs, Horst W.; DeGeorge, George; Troese, Matthew; Hayden, Patrick; Deng, Wei; Roggen, Erwin

    2013-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of combining the epidermal equivalent (EE) potency assay with the assay which assesses release of interleukin-18 (IL-18) to provide a single test for identification and classification of skin sensitizing chemicals, including chemicals of low water solubility or stability. A protocol was developed using different 3D-epidermal models including in house VUMC model, epiCS® (previously EST1000™), MatTek EpiDerm™ and SkinEthic™ RHE and also the impact of different vehicles (acetone:olive oil 4:1, 1% DMSO, ethanol, water) was investigated. Following topical exposure for 24 h to 17 contact allergens and 13 non-sensitizers a robust increase in IL-18 release was observed only after exposure to contact allergens. A putative prediction model is proposed from data obtained from two laboratories yielding 95% accuracy. Correlating the in vitro EE sensitizer potency data, which assesses the chemical concentration which results in 50% cytotoxicity (EE-EC{sub 50}) with human and animal data showed a superior correlation with human DSA{sub 05} (μg/cm{sup 2}) data (Spearman r = 0.8500; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0061) compared to LLNA data (Spearman r = 0.5968; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0542). DSA{sub 05} = induction dose per skin area that produces a positive response in 5% of the tested population Also a good correlation was observed for release of IL-18 (SI-2) into culture supernatants with human DSA{sub 05} data (Spearman r = 0.8333; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0154). This easily transferable human in vitro assay appears to be very promising, but additional testing of a larger chemical set with the different EE models is required to fully evaluate the utility of this assay and to establish a definitive prediction model. - Highlights: • A potential epidermal equivalent assay to label and classify sensitizers • Il-18 release distinguishes sensitizers from non sensitizers • IL-18 release can rank sensitizer potency

  9. THE EFFECT OF DIGESTIVE JUICES ON THE POTENCY OF BOTULINUS TOXIN.

    PubMed

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Schlesinger, M J

    1924-03-31

    Botulinus toxin resists a degree of acidity equivalent to that of the stomach even when exposed thereto for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. It is less resistant to alkali, however, as shown by the fact that in a medium of weakly alkaline reaction its potency is reduced to less than one-tenth in 24 hours. It is unaffected by peptic and tryptic digestion. Because of its instability in mildly alkaline solutions and resistance to acid, there is reason to believe that the toxin is in the main absorbed from the upper portion of the digestive tract; that is to say, from the stomach and upper duodenum.

  10. Bridging the Gap Between Validation and Implementation of Non-Animal Veterinary Vaccine Potency Testing Methods.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Samantha; Brown, Jeffrey; Currie, Alistair

    2011-11-29

    In recent years, technologically advanced high-throughput techniques have been developed that replace, reduce or refine animal use in vaccine quality control tests. Following validation, these tests are slowly being accepted for use by international regulatory authorities. Because regulatory acceptance itself has not guaranteed that approved humane methods are adopted by manufacturers, various organizations have sought to foster the preferential use of validated non-animal methods by interfacing with industry and regulatory authorities. After noticing this gap between regulation and uptake by industry, we began developing a paradigm that seeks to narrow the gap and quicken implementation of new replacement, refinement or reduction guidance. A systematic analysis of our experience in promoting the transparent implementation of validated non-animal vaccine potency assays has led to the refinement of our paradigmatic process, presented here, by which interested parties can assess the local regulatory acceptance of methods that reduce animal use and integrate them into quality control testing protocols, or ensure the elimination of peripheral barriers to their use, particularly for potency and other tests carried out on production batches.

  11. In vitro vaccine potency testing: a proposal for reducing animal use for requalification testing.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Stokes, W

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a program under which the use of animals for requalification of in vitro potency tests could be eliminated. Standard References (USDA/CVB nomenclature) would be developed, characterized, stored and monitored by selected reference laboratories worldwide. These laboratories would employ scientists skilled in protein and glycoprotein chemistry and equipped with state-of-the-art instruments for required analyses. After Standard References are established, the reference laboratories would provide them to the animal health industry as "gold standards". Companies would then establish and validate a correlation between the Standard Reference and the company Master Reference (USDA/CVB nomenclature) using an internal in vitro assay. After this correlation is established, the company could use the Standard References for qualifying, monitoring and requalifying company Master References without the use of animals. Such a program would eliminate the need for animals for requalification of Master References and the need for each company to develop and validate a battery of Master Reference Monitoring assays. It would also provide advantages in terms of reduced costs and reduced time for requalification testing. As such it would provide a strong incentive for companies to develop and use in vitro assays for potency testing.

  12. Immunosuppressive potency of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors in solid-organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José A

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin, also known as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that belongs to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, which is involved in several fundamental cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, and survival. This protein and its associated pathway have been implicated in cancer development and the regulation of immune responses, including the rejection response generated following allograft transplantation. Inhibitors of mTOR (mTORi) such as rapamycin and its derivative everolimus are potent immunosuppressive drugs that both maintain similar rates of efficacy and could optimize the renal function and diminish the side effects compared with calcineurin inhibitors. These drugs are used in solid-organ transplantationtoinduceimmunosuppression while also promoting the expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells that could favor a scenery of immunological tolerance. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which inhibitors of mTOR induce suppression by regulation of these pathways at different levels of the immune response. In addition, we particularly emphasize about the main methods that are used to assess the potency of immunosuppressive drugs, highlighting the studies carried out about immunosuppressive potency of inhibitors of mTOR. PMID:27011916

  13. A collaborative study of an alternative in vitro potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Kim, Do-Keun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Yeonhee; Lim, Jong-Mi; Hong, JiYoung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Park, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jaeok

    2016-09-01

    The use of inactivated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines has been ongoing in East Asia for 40 years. A mouse immunogenicity assay followed by a Plaque Reduction Neutralization (PRN) Test (PRNTest) is currently recommended for each lot release of the vaccine by many national authorities. We developed an alternative in vitro ELISA to determine the E antigen content of the Japanese encephalitis virus to observe the 3Rs strategy. A collaborative study for replacing the in vivo potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine with the in vitro ELISA assay was confirmed comparability between these two methods. The study demonstrated that an in vitro assay could perform faster and was more convenient than the established in vivo PRNTest. Moreover, this assay had better precision and reproducibility compared with the conventional in vivo assay. Additionally, the content of antigen determined using the in vitro ELISA correlated well with the potency of the in vivo assay. Furthermore, this method allowed discrimination between individual lots. Thus, we propose a progressive switch from the in vivo assay to the in vitro ELISA for JE vaccine quality control. PMID:27497622

  14. In vitro potency of doripenem tested against an international collection of rarely isolated bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Bell, Jan M; Sader, Helio S; Turnidge, John D; Stilwell, Matthew G

    2009-04-01

    Doripenem, a new 1beta-methyl parenteral carbapenem, has very broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic bacteria. As noted here, the spectrum and potency extended to many rarely isolated species sampled by the Doripenem Global Surveillance Program. Among the species or species groups with 0.25 microg/mL for all tested species except Lactococcus garvieae, Listeria monocytogenes, and Micrococcus spp. In conclusion, doripenem exhibited a very wide spectrum but variable potencies against uncommonly cultured aerobic bacterial pathogens isolated in 2003 to 2007. These results confirm the potential use of this new carbapenem for broad-spectrum empiric or directed antimicrobial therapy.

  15. In vitro potency assay for yellow fever vaccines: comparison of three vero cell lines sources.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Caruana, J; Poirier, B; Garnier, F; Fuchs, F

    2000-03-01

    Quality control of Yellow Fever vaccines performed by Control Authorities prior to marketing vaccines batches requires in vitro potency assays. The two currently available methods are the plaque formation assay and the cytopathic effect assay based on the use of porcine kidney PS cells or monkey kidney Vero cells. Among several sources of variation in virus titration, the cell systems are considered as important issues and Quality Assurance strongly recommends working with cell banks from certified suppliers. The aim of our study was to compare the behaviour and the sensitivity of three Vero cell sources obtained from ATCC, WHO and EP used at different passage levels in a plaque formation test. The conclusion of this work was that the yellow fever live attenuated virus titration, adapted in Vero cell lines appeared as a reliable method applicable for routine in vitro potency assay. The comparison of Vero cell lines, originated from three different sources, showed that they could be equally used as substrates by laboratories having the basic facility of cell culture, without influence on the final viral titre.

  16. European regulatory framework and practices for veterinary Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Lukas

    2013-09-01

    In Europe, the legal basis for requirements for medicinal products is described in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) In the European Union, the Ph. Eur. is supplemented by several guidelines issued by the European Medicines Agency. Immunological veterinary products must comply with the Ph. Eur. monograph on veterinary vaccines and the accompanying texts, as well as specific monographs. The Ph. Eur. includes monographs on canine leptospirosis and bovine leptospirosis vaccines (inactivated). Both monographs require that an immunogenicity test be performed once in the target species during the life of a vaccine. The hamster challenge test is applied for batch potency testing of canine vaccines. Alternatively, serological tests or suitable validated in vitro tests to determine the content of one or more antigenic components indicative of protection may be performed. Vaccines for use in cattle are tested in a serological test in guinea pigs. The acceptance criteria in alternative tests are set with reference to a batch of vaccine that has given satisfactory results in the immunogenicity test. At a January 2012 European workshop, the suitability of the hamster potency test was questioned and unanimous agreement was reached that moving toward complete in vitro testing is possible and should be promoted. PMID:23886926

  17. Indazole- and indole-5-carboxamides: selective and reversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitors with subnanomolar potency.

    PubMed

    Tzvetkov, Nikolay T; Hinz, Sonja; Küppers, Petra; Gastreich, Marcus; Müller, Christa E

    2014-08-14

    Indazole- and indole-carboxamides were discovered as highly potent, selective, competitive, and reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). The compounds are easily accessible by standard synthetic procedures with high overall yields. The most potent derivatives were N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methyl-1H-indazole-5-carboxamide (38a, PSB-1491, IC50 human MAO-B 0.386 nM, >25000-fold selective versus MAO-A) and N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1H-indole-5-carboxamide (53, PSB-1410, IC50 human MAO-B 0.227 nM, >5700-fold selective versus MAO-A). Replacement of the carboxamide linker with a methanimine spacer leading to (E)-N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-(1H-indazol-5-yl)methanimine (58) represents a further novel class of highly potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors (IC50 human MAO-B 0.612 nM, >16000-fold selective versus MAO-A). In N-(3,4-difluorophenyl-1H-indazole-5-carboxamide (30, PSB-1434, IC50 human MAO-B 1.59 nM, selectivity versus MAO-A>6000-fold), high potency and selectivity are optimally combined with superior physicochemical properties. Computational docking studies provided insights into the inhibitors' interaction with the enzyme binding site and a rationale for their high potency despite their small molecular size.

  18. In vitro potency of doripenem tested against an international collection of rarely isolated bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Bell, Jan M; Sader, Helio S; Turnidge, John D; Stilwell, Matthew G

    2009-04-01

    Doripenem, a new 1beta-methyl parenteral carbapenem, has very broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic bacteria. As noted here, the spectrum and potency extended to many rarely isolated species sampled by the Doripenem Global Surveillance Program. Among the species or species groups with 0.25 microg/mL for all tested species except Lactococcus garvieae, Listeria monocytogenes, and Micrococcus spp. In conclusion, doripenem exhibited a very wide spectrum but variable potencies against uncommonly cultured aerobic bacterial pathogens isolated in 2003 to 2007. These results confirm the potential use of this new carbapenem for broad-spectrum empiric or directed antimicrobial therapy. PMID:19302927

  19. Specific increase in potency via structure-based design of a T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malecek, Karolina; Grigoryan, Arsen; Zhong, Shi; Gu, Wei Jun; Johnson, Laura A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Cardozo, Timothy; Krogsgaard, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific T lymphocytes is a powerful strategy for cancer treatment. However, most tumor antigens are non-reactive “self” proteins, which presents an immunotherapy design challenge. Recent studies have shown that tumor-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) can be transduced into normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, which persist after transfer in about 30% of patients and effectively destroy tumor cells in vivo. Although encouraging, the limited clinical responses underscore the need for enrichment of T cells with desirable anti-tumor capabilities prior to patient transfer. In this study, we used structure-based design to predict point mutations of a TCR (DMF5) that enhance its binding affinity for an agonist tumor antigen-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC), Mart-1(27L)-HLA-A2, which elicits full T cell activation to trigger immune responses. We analyzed the effects of selected TCR point mutations on T cell activation potency and analyzed cross-reactivity with related antigens. Our results showed that the mutated TCRs had improved T cell activation potency, while retaining a high degree of specificity. Such affinity-optimized TCRs have demonstrated to be very specific for Mart-1 (27L), the epitope for which they were structurally designed. And even though of limited clinical relevance, these studies open the possibility for future structural-based studies that could potentially be used in adoptive immunotherapy to treat melanoma while avoiding adverse autoimmunity-derived effects. PMID:25070852

  20. Potential for Improving Potency and Specificity of Reovirus Oncolysis with Next-Generation Reovirus Variants.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Adil; Johnston, Randal N; Shmulevitz, Maya

    2015-12-01

    Viruses that specifically replicate in tumor over normal cells offer promising cancer therapies. Oncolytic viruses (OV) not only kill the tumor cells directly; they also promote anti-tumor immunotherapeutic responses. Other major advantages of OVs are that they dose-escalate in tumors and can be genetically engineered to enhance potency and specificity. Unmodified wild type reovirus is a propitious OV currently in phase I-III clinical trials. This review summarizes modifications to reovirus that may improve potency and/or specificity during oncolysis. Classical genetics approaches have revealed reovirus variants with improved adaptation towards tumors or with enhanced ability to establish specific steps of virus replication and cell killing among transformed cells. The recent emergence of a reverse genetics system for reovirus has provided novel strategies to fine-tune reovirus proteins or introduce exogenous genes that could promote oncolytic activity. Over the next decade, these findings are likely to generate better-optimized second-generation reovirus vectors and improve the efficacy of oncolytic reotherapy. PMID:26633466

  1. Discovery of tankyrase inhibiting flavones with increased potency and isoenzyme selectivity.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Mohit; Koivunen, Jarkko; Haikarainen, Teemu; Obaji, Ezeogo; Legala, Ongey E; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Joensuu, Päivi; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Lehtiö, Lari

    2013-10-24

    Tankyrases are ADP-ribosyltransferases that play key roles in various cellular pathways, including the regulation of cell proliferation, and thus, they are promising drug targets for the treatment of cancer. Flavones have been shown to inhibit tankyrases and we report here the discovery of more potent and selective flavone derivatives. Commercially available flavones with single substitutions were used for structure-activity relationship studies, and cocrystal structures of the 18 hit compounds were analyzed to explain their potency and selectivity. The most potent inhibitors were also tested in a cell-based assay, which demonstrated that they effectively antagonize Wnt signaling. To assess selectivity, they were further tested against a panel of homologous human ADP-ribosyltransferases. The most effective compound, 22 (MN-64), showed 6 nM potency against tankyrase 1, isoenzyme selectivity, and Wnt signaling inhibition. This work forms a basis for rational development of flavones as tankyrase inhibitors and guides the development of other structurally related inhibitors. PMID:24116873

  2. Titer on Chip: New Analytical Tool for Influenza Vaccine Potency Determination

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Erin; Srivastava, Indresh; Cox, Manon M. J.; Rowlen, Kathy L.

    2014-01-01

    Titer on Chip (Flu-ToC) is a new technique for quantification of influenza hemagglutinin (HA) concentration. In order to evaluate the potential of this new technique, a comparison of Flu-ToC to more conventional methods was conducted using recombinant HA produced in a baculovirus expression system as a test case. Samples from current vaccine strains were collected from four different steps in the manufacturing process. A total of 19 samples were analysed by Flu-ToC (blinded), single radial immunodiffusion (SRID), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the purity adjusted bicinchoninic acid assay (paBCA). The results indicated reasonable linear correlation between Flu-ToC and SRID, ELISA, and paBCA, with regression slopes of log-log plots being 0.91, 1.03, and 0.91, respectively. The average ratio for HA content measured by Flu-ToC relative to SRID, ELISA, and paBCA was 83%, 147%, and 81%, respectively; indicating nearly equivalent potency determination for Flu-ToC relative to SRID and paBCA. These results, combined with demonstrated multiplexed analysis of all components within a quadrivalent formulation and robust response to HA strains over a wide time period, support the conclusion that Flu-ToC can be used as a reliable and time-saving alternative potency assay for influenza vaccines. PMID:25330238

  3. Potential for Improving Potency and Specificity of Reovirus Oncolysis with Next-Generation Reovirus Variants

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Adil; Johnston, Randal N.; Shmulevitz, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that specifically replicate in tumor over normal cells offer promising cancer therapies. Oncolytic viruses (OV) not only kill the tumor cells directly; they also promote anti-tumor immunotherapeutic responses. Other major advantages of OVs are that they dose-escalate in tumors and can be genetically engineered to enhance potency and specificity. Unmodified wild type reovirus is a propitious OV currently in phase I–III clinical trials. This review summarizes modifications to reovirus that may improve potency and/or specificity during oncolysis. Classical genetics approaches have revealed reovirus variants with improved adaptation towards tumors or with enhanced ability to establish specific steps of virus replication and cell killing among transformed cells. The recent emergence of a reverse genetics system for reovirus has provided novel strategies to fine-tune reovirus proteins or introduce exogenous genes that could promote oncolytic activity. Over the next decade, these findings are likely to generate better-optimized second-generation reovirus vectors and improve the efficacy of oncolytic reotherapy. PMID:26633466

  4. Relative potency as a means of evaluating ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) health risks

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, C.E.; Glass, L.R.

    1990-09-01

    In the 1970's, a variety of developments took place to heightened public and scientific interest in electromagnetic fields. During this time, biological studies of nonionizing electromagnetic fields were taking place, but no clear evidence of risks to public health was identified. Then came the surprising epidemiological finding suggesting that 60 Hz magnetic fields may be related to some childhood leukemias. Our particular interest at ORNL was how to interpret the available data with respect to human exposures to the nearly ubiquitous fields. A review of the available data showed that consistent biological effects were difficult to identify. Classical toxicological tests used in chemical risk assessment had not been performed with Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) fields but rather a wide range of mechanistic studies had been pursued. To evaluate the level of anticipated hazard or risk there was neither a mechanistic understanding nor a consistent phenomenological outcome. A risk evaluation normally requires one or the other of these two types of information. Two quite different approaches were pursued: meta-analysis and relative potency. The first of these is a method to combine data from similar experiments to enhance the relative statistical power of a collection of small sample size studies, and will not be discussed further. The second, relative potency, will be the focus of this paper. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Anti-hepatitis C virus potency of a new autophagy inhibitor using human liver slices model

    PubMed Central

    Lagaye, Sylvie; Brun, Sonia; Gaston, Jesintha; Shen, Hong; Stranska, Ruzena; Camus, Claire; Dubray, Clarisse; Rousseau, Géraldine; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Courcambeck, Jerôme; Bassisi, Firas; Halfon, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral potency of a new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral agent targeting the cellular autophagy machinery. METHODS: Non-infected liver slices, obtained from human liver resection and cut in 350 μm-thick slices (2.7 × 106 cells per slice) were infected with cell culture-grown HCV Con1b/C3 supernatant (multiplicity of infection = 0.1) cultivated for up to ten days. HCV infected slices were treated at day 4 post-infection with GNS-396 for 6 d at different concentrations. HCV replication was evaluated by strand-specific real-time quantitative reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. The infectivity titers of supernatants were evaluated by foci formation upon inoculation into naive Huh-7.5.1 cells. The cytotoxic effect of the drugs was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assays. RESULTS: The antiviral efficacy of a new antiviral drug, GNS-396, an autophagy inhibitor, on HCV infection of adult human liver slices was evidenced in a dose-dependent manner. At day 6 post-treatment, GNS-396 EC50 was 158 nmol/L without cytotoxic effect (compared to hydroxychloroquine EC50 = 1.17 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that our ex vivo model is efficient for evaluation the potency of autophagy inhibitors, in particular a new quinoline derivative GNS-396 as antiviral could inhibit HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. PMID:27478540

  6. Potency against enterotoxemia of a recombinant Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxoid in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lobato, Francisco C F; Lima, Catarina G R D; Assis, Ronnie A; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Salvarani, Felipe M; Carmo, Anderson O; Contigli, Christiane; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2010-08-31

    Enterotoxemia, a disease that affects domestic ruminants, is caused mainly by the epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens type D. Its eradication is virtually impossible, control and prophylaxis are based on systematic vaccination of herds with epsilon toxoids that are efficient in inducing protective antibody production. The use of recombinant toxins is one of the most promising of these strategies. This work evaluates the potency of a Cl. perfringens type D epsilon toxoid expressed by Escherichia coli administered to goats, sheep, and cattle. The etx gene was cloned into the pET-11a plasmid of E. coli strain BL21 to produce the recombinant toxin. Rabbits (n=8), goats, sheep, and cattle (n=5 for each species) were immunized with 0.2mg of the insoluble recombinant protein fraction to evaluate vaccine potency of the epsilon toxoid studied. Antibody titers were 40, 14.3, 26, and 13.1 IU/mL in the rabbit, goat, sheep, and cattle serum pools, respectively. The epsilon toxoid produced and tested in this work is adequate for immunization of ruminants against enterotoxemia. PMID:20670910

  7. DeoxyArbutin: a novel reversible tyrosinase inhibitor with effective in vivo skin lightening potency.

    PubMed

    Boissy, Raymond E; Visscher, Marty; DeLong, Mitchell A

    2005-08-01

    Modulation of melanogenesis in the melanocytes can be achieved using chemicals that share structural homologies with the substrate tyrosine and as thus competitively inhibit the catalytic function of tyrosinase. We have developed a new tyrosinase inhibitor, deoxyArbutin (dA), based on this premise. DeoxyArbutin demonstrates effective inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase in vitro with a Ki that is 10-fold lower that hydroquinone (HQ) and 350-fold lower than arbutin. In a hairless, pigmented guinea pig model, dA demonstrated rapid and sustained skin lightening that was completely reversible within 8 weeks after halt in topical application. In contrast, HQ induced a short but unsustained skin lightening effect whereas kojic acid and arbutin exhibit no skin lightening effect. Results from a panel of safety tests supported the overall establishment of dA as an actionable molecule. In a human clinical trial, topical treatment of dA for 12 weeks resulted in a significant or slight reduction in overall skin lightness and improvement of solar lentigines in a population of light skin or dark skin individuals, respectively. These data demonstrate that dA has potential tyrosinase inhibitory activity that can result in skin lightening and may be used to ameliorate hyperpigmentary lesions. PMID:16026582

  8. DeoxyArbutin: a novel reversible tyrosinase inhibitor with effective in vivo skin lightening potency.

    PubMed

    Boissy, Raymond E; Visscher, Marty; DeLong, Mitchell A

    2005-08-01

    Modulation of melanogenesis in the melanocytes can be achieved using chemicals that share structural homologies with the substrate tyrosine and as thus competitively inhibit the catalytic function of tyrosinase. We have developed a new tyrosinase inhibitor, deoxyArbutin (dA), based on this premise. DeoxyArbutin demonstrates effective inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase in vitro with a Ki that is 10-fold lower that hydroquinone (HQ) and 350-fold lower than arbutin. In a hairless, pigmented guinea pig model, dA demonstrated rapid and sustained skin lightening that was completely reversible within 8 weeks after halt in topical application. In contrast, HQ induced a short but unsustained skin lightening effect whereas kojic acid and arbutin exhibit no skin lightening effect. Results from a panel of safety tests supported the overall establishment of dA as an actionable molecule. In a human clinical trial, topical treatment of dA for 12 weeks resulted in a significant or slight reduction in overall skin lightness and improvement of solar lentigines in a population of light skin or dark skin individuals, respectively. These data demonstrate that dA has potential tyrosinase inhibitory activity that can result in skin lightening and may be used to ameliorate hyperpigmentary lesions.

  9. Caffeine's antioxidant potency optically sensed with double-stranded DNA-encased single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Edward H; Ergul, Busra; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-12

    There is great interest in developing a sensitive method being able to quantitatively measure and compare antioxidant potencies of samples of interest against multiple reactive oxygen species (ROS) whose imbalance could cause oxidative stress. Here, a sensitive nanoprobe, double-stranded DNA encased single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed to determine antioxidant potencies of selected samples (caffeine, regular coffee, and decaffeinated coffee) against ROS, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals. Antioxidant vitamin C and uric acid are used as standards. The method focuses on unique dual optical sensing capability of SWNTs, the rate of spectral suppression when exposed to ROS, and the magnitude of spectral recovery of the ROS-suppressed SWNTs when an antioxidant is added. It is found that the dual sensing capability of SWNTs is still sustained when reacting with the reactive hydroxyl radicals. The results show that caffeine's antioxidant potency is weak, about one millionth of those of vitamin C and uric acid. It is a better scavenger of hydrogen peroxide and a little less effective for hydroxyl radicals. In comparison, coffee, regardless of regular or decaffeinated, is a more efficient antioxidant than caffeine, having an antioxidant potency about ten thousand times stronger. This work provides a versatile detection method for evaluating the antioxidant potencies of samples of interest against various ROS for chemical, biological, and medical applications. PMID:25714428

  10. Discovery of triazolopyridinone GS-462808, a late sodium current inhibitor (Late INai) of the cardiac Nav1.5 channel with improved efficacy and potency relative to ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Elzein, Elfatih; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Jiang, Robert H; Li, Xiaofen; Perry, Thao D; Avila, Belem; Wang, Wei-Qun; Hirakawa, Ryoko; Smith-Maxwell, Catherine; Wu, Lin; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Mollova, Nevena; Stafford, Brian; Tang, Jennifer; Belardinelli, Luiz; Zablocki, Jeff A

    2016-07-01

    Previously we disclosed the discovery of potent Late INa current inhibitor 2 (GS-458967, IC50 of 333nM) that has a good separation of late versus peak Nav1.5 current, but did not have a favorable CNS safety window due to high brain penetration (3-fold higher partitioning into brain vs plasma) coupled with potent inhibition of brain sodium channel isoforms (Nav1.1, 1.2, 1.3). We increased the polar surface area from 50 to 84Å(2) by adding a carbonyl to the core and an oxadiazole ring resulting in 3 GS-462808 that had lower brain penetration and serendipitously lower activity at the brain isoforms. Compound 3 has an improved CNS window (>20 rat and dog) relative to 2, and improved anti-ischemic potency relative to ranolazine. The development of 3 was not pursued due to liver lesions in 7day rat toxicology studies. PMID:27038498

  11. Subliminal Affect Valence Words Change Conscious Mood Potency but Not Valence: Is This Evidence for Unconscious Valence Affect?

    PubMed Central

    Shevrin, Howard; Panksepp, Jaak; Brakel, Linda A. W.; Snodgrass, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Whether or not affect can be unconscious remains controversial. Research claiming to demonstrate unconscious affect fails to establish clearly unconscious stimulus conditions. The few investigations that have established unconscious conditions fail to rule out conscious affect changes. We report two studies in which unconscious stimulus conditions were met and conscious mood changes measured. The subliminal stimuli were positive and negative affect words presented at the objective detection threshold; conscious mood changes were measured with standard manikin valence, potency, and arousal scales. We found and replicated that unconscious emotional stimuli produced conscious mood changes on the potency scale but not on the valence scale. Were positive and negative affects aroused unconsciously, but reflected consciously in potency changes? Or were the valence words unconscious cognitive causes of conscious mood changes being activated without unconscious affect? A thought experiment is offered as a way to resolve this dilemma. PMID:24961258

  12. Sources of variation in the mutagenic potency of complex chemical mixtures based on the salmonella/microsome assay

    SciTech Connect

    Krewski, D.; Leroux, B.G.; Creason, J.; Claxton, L.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty laboratories worldwide participated in a collaborative trial sponsored by the International Program on Chemical Safety on the mutagenicity of complex mixtures as expressed in the Salmonella/microsome assay. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology provided homogeneous reference samples of urban air and diesel particles and a coal tar solution to each participating laboratory, along with samples of benzo(a)pyrene and 1-nitropyrene which served as positive controls. Mutagenic potency was characterized by the slope of the initial linear component of the dose response curve. Analysis of variance revealed significant interlaboratory variation in mutagenic potency, which accounted for 57-96% of the total variance on a logarithmic scale, depending on the sample, strain and activation conditions. No significant differences were noted in the average potency reported for air and diesel particles between laboratories using soxhlet extracts and those using sonication, although there was larger interlaboratory variation for the soxhlet method.

  13. Comparative potency approach based on H2AX assay for estimating the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Audebert, M.; Zeman, F.; Beaudoin, R.; Péry, A.; Cravedi, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) constitute a family of over one hundred compounds and can generally be found in complex mixtures. PAHs metabolites cause DNA damage which can lead to the development of carcinogenesis. Toxicity assessment of PAH complex mixtures is currently expressed in terms of toxic equivalents, based on Toxicity Equivalent Factors (TEFs). However, the definition of new TEFs for a large number of PAH could overcome some limitations of the current method and improve cancer risk assessment. The current investigation aimed at deriving the relative potency factors of PAHs, based on their genotoxic effect measured in vitro and analyzed with mathematical models. For this purpose, we used a new genotoxic assay (γH2AX) with two human cell lines (HepG2 and LS-174T) to analyze the genotoxic properties of 13 selected PAHs at low doses after 24 h treatment. The dose–response for genotoxic effects was modeled with a Hill model; equivalency between PAHs at low dose was assessed by applying constraints to the model parameters. In the two cell lines tested, we observed a clear dose–response for genotoxic effects for 11 tested compounds. LS-174T was on average ten times more sensitive than HepG2 towards PAHs regarding genotoxicity. We developed new TEFs, which we named Genotoxic Equivalent Factor (GEF). Calculated GEF for the tested PAHs were generally higher than the TEF usually used. Our study proposed a new in vitro based method for the establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment. -- Highlights: ► Examination of the genotoxic properties of 13 PAHs on two human cell lines. ► Modelization with a Hill model of the genotoxic dose–response. ► First investigation of the genotoxicity of benzo[c]fluorene on human cell lines. ► Establishment of relevant TEFs for PAHs to improve cancer risk assessment.

  14. Acylation of SC4 dodecapeptide increases bactericidal potency against Gram-positive bacteria, including drug-resistant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Nathan A; Haseman, Judith R; Tirrell, Matthew V; Mayo, Kevin H

    2004-01-01

    We have conjugated dodecyl and octadecyl fatty acids to the N-terminus of SC4, a potently bactericidal, helix-forming peptide 12-mer (KLFKRHLKWKII), and examined the bactericidal activities of the resultant SC4 'peptide-amphiphile' molecules. SC4 peptide-amphiphiles showed up to a 30-fold increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-positive strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus anthracis), including S. aureus strains resistant to conventional antibiotics, but little or no increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Fatty acid conjugation improved endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) neutralization by 3- to 6-fold. Although acylation somewhat increased lysis of human erythrocytes, it did not increase lysis of endothelial cells, and the haemolytic effects occurred at concentrations 10- to 100-fold higher than those required for bacterial cell lysis. For insight into the mechanism of action of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles, CD, NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy studies were performed in micelle and liposome models of eukaryotic and bacterial cell membranes. CD indicated that SC4 peptide-amphiphiles had the strongest helical tendencies in liposomes mimicking bacterial membranes, and strong membrane integration of the SC4 peptide-amphiphiles was observed using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy under these conditions; results that correlated with the increased bactericidal activities of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles. NMR structural analysis in micelles demonstrated that the two-thirds of the peptide closest to the fatty acid tail exhibited a helical conformation, with the positively-charged side of the amphipathic helix interacting more with the model membrane surface. These results indicate that conjugation of a fatty acid chain to the SC4 peptide enhances membrane interactions, stabilizes helical structure in the membrane-bound state and increases bactericidal potency. PMID:14609430

  15. Maintained cocaine self-administration is determined by quantal responses: implications for the measurement of antagonist potency.

    PubMed

    Norman, Andrew B; Tabet, Michael R; Norman, Mantana K; Tsibulsky, Vladimir L

    2014-02-01

    The change in frequency of cocaine self-administration as a function of the unit dose is widely assumed to represent a graded pharmacodynamic response. Alternatively, a pharmacological theory states that during maintained self-administration, a quantal response occurs at a minimum maintained cocaine concentration (satiety threshold). Rats self-administered cocaine at unit doses spanning an 8-fold range from 0.75 to 6 µmol/kg. Despite an approximately 7-fold difference in the interinjection intervals, there were no differences in the plasma cocaine concentration at the time of lever press across this range of unit doses, consistent with the satiety threshold representing an equiactive cocaine concentration. Because self-administration always occurs when cocaine concentrations decline back to the satiety threshold, this behavior represents a process of automatic back titration of equiactive agonist concentrations. Therefore, the lower frequency of self-administration at higher unit doses is caused by an increase in the duration of the cocaine-induced satiety response, and the graded dose-frequency relationship is due to cocaine pharmacokinetics. After the interinjection intervals at a particular unit dose were stable, rats were injected with the competitive D₁-like dopamine receptor antagonist R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH23390; 15 nmol/kg intravenously) and the session continued. At all cocaine unit doses, SCH23390 accelerated self-administration with a concomitant increase in the calculated satiety threshold, and these equiactive cocaine concentration ratios were independent of the cocaine unit dose. Therefore, the measurement of antagonist potency requires only a single unit dose of cocaine, selected on the basis of convenience, and using multiple cocaine unit doses is redundant. PMID:24307200

  16. Comparison of in vivo genotoxic and carcinogenic potency to augment mode of action analysis: Case study with hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Bichteler, Anne; Rager, Julia E; Suh, Mina; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Recent analyses-highlighted by the International Workshops on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group on Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Toxicology Risk Assessment-have identified a correlation between (log) estimates of a carcinogen's in vivo genotoxic potency and in vivo carcinogenic potency in typical laboratory animal models, even when the underlying data have not been matched for tissue, species, or strain. Such a correlation could have important implications for risk assessment, including informing the mode of action (MOA) of specific carcinogens. When in vivo genotoxic potency is weak relative to carcinogenic potency, MOAs other than genotoxicity (e.g., endocrine disruption or regenerative hyperplasia) may be operational. Herein, we review recent in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), following oral ingestion, in relevant tissues and species in the context of the aforementioned correlation. Potency estimates were generated using benchmark doses, or no-observable-adverse-effect-levels when data were not amenable to dose-response modeling. While the ratio between log values for carcinogenic and genotoxic potency was ≥1 for many compounds, the ratios for several Cr(VI) datasets (including in target tissue) were less than unity. In fact, the ratios for Cr(VI) clustered closely with ratios for chloroform and diethanolamine, two chemicals posited to have non-genotoxic MOAs. These findings suggest that genotoxicity may not play a major role in the cancers observed in rodents following exposure to high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking water-a finding consistent with recent MOA and adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses concerning Cr(VI). This semi-quantitative analysis, therefore, may be useful to augment traditional MOA and AOP analyses. More case examples will be needed to further explore the general applicability and validity of this approach for human health risk assessment.

  17. Equivalence of concentration-response relationships in aquatic toxicology studies: Testing and implications for potency estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Oris, J.T.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe statistical procedures to test the equivalence of concentration-response relationships in acute toxicology studies and to illustrate the implications of nonequivalence on potency endpoints such as LC10, LC50, or LC90. A logistic regression model for binary response endpoints such as mortality that allowed for the examination of equivalence of slopes and intercepts of the responses between populations is described. Test statistics were derived from comparing nested regression models. This procedure was used to test the equivalence of concentration versus acute mortality response relationships between two nonpolar, narcotic chemicals in a single population of fish and between two populations of fish with different exposure histories to a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. These case studies illustrate different outcomes in the comparison of concentration-response relationships and demonstrate the need to consider more than a single endpoint (e.g., LC50) in a risk assessment context when nonparallel concentration-responses are observed.

  18. Evaluation of models for predicting the phototoxicity potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.J.; Ankley, G.T.; Sheedy, B.R.; Kosian, P.A.; Mattson, V.R.; Cox, J.S.; Defoe, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    The acute phototoxicities of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus were investigated in order to evaluate a predictive structure/activity relationship (SAR) for the phototoxic potential of PAHs and to determine the relationship of phototoxicity to PAH accumulation, light intensity, and exposure duration. Test organisms were exposed to multiple concentrations of anthracene, pyrene, fluorene, and fluoranthene in water for 96 h and then to various intensities of ultraviolet light for 96 h in clean water. In agreement with the SAR model, fluorene was not phototoxic while pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene were. Based upon measured accumulations of PAHs, anthracene and pyrene had similar potencies, and both were 3--4 fold more toxic than fluoranthene. Time-to-death was found to adhere well to a model based on damage accumulating as a function of the product of chemical accumulation and light intensity. Additivity of PAH phototoxicity was evaluated in exposures using mixtures of these chemicals.

  19. Cholinergic modulation of multivesicular release regulates striatal synaptic potency and integration.

    PubMed

    Higley, Michael J; Soler-Llavina, Gilberto J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2009-09-01

    The pleiotropic actions of neuromodulators on pre- and postsynaptic targets make disentangling the mechanisms underlying regulation of synaptic transmission challenging. In the striatum, acetylcholine modulates glutamate release via activation of muscarinic receptors (mAchRs), although the consequences for postsynaptic signaling are unclear. Using two-photon microscopy and glutamate uncaging to examine individual synapses in the rat striatum, we found that glutamatergic afferents have a high degree of multivesicular release (MVR) in the absence of postsynaptic receptor saturation. We found that mAchR activation decreased both the probability of release and the concentration of glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The corresponding decrease in synaptic potency reduced the duration of synaptic potentials and limited temporal summation of afferent inputs. These findings reveal a mechanism by which a combination of basal MVR and low receptor saturation allow the presynaptic actions of a neuromodulator to control the engagement of postsynaptic nonlinearities and regulate synaptic integration.

  20. A Simple Method for Labeling Human Embryonic Stem Cells Destined to Lose Undifferentiated Potency.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Ayako; Suga, Mika; Yanagihara, Kana; Itoh, Yumi; Takemori, Hiroshi; Furue, Miho K

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is a major source of cellular ATP. Its usage as an energy source varies, not only according to the extracellular environment, but also during development and differentiation, as indicated by the reported changes in the flux ratio of glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. The fluorescent probe JC-1 allows visualization of changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Strong JC-1 signals were localized in the differentiated cells located at the edge of H9 ES colonies that expressed vimentin, an early differentiation maker. The JC-1 signals were further intensified when individual adjacent colonies were in contact with each other. Time-lapse analyses revealed that JC-1-labeled H9 cells under an overconfluent condition were highly differentiated after subculture, suggesting that monitoring oxidative phosphorylation in live cells might facilitate the prediction of induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as ES cells, that are destined to lose their undifferentiated potency.

  1. A Cusp Catastrophe Model for Team Learning, Team Potency and Team Culture.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Teresa; Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Lourenco, Paulo Renato; Dimas, Isabel; Pinheiro, Margarida

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines team learning behaviors within a nonlinear dynamical system (NDS) perspective. The present research is based on a sample of 36 project workgroups, where data were collected at two moments of their life cycle, with visual analogue scales. Using both the least squares method and maximum likelihood, it proposes a cusp catastrophe model for explaining team learning. The cusp model is superior to its linear alternatives and implements team culture as the asymmetry variable and team potency as bifurcation. The findings of cusp structure in the data support the existence of discontinuous shifts in learning behavior and furthermore a proposition that the punctuated equilibrium model (PEM) might be a reasonable model for describing group functioning, since it encompasses such sudden changes between distinct stages (attractors). A discussion on small group research is also provided by highlighting the nonlinear dynamics of team processes, along with further implications for research and practice. PMID:27550707

  2. Honing a harder-hitting hammerhead improves broadly neutralizing antibody breadth and potency.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K

    2015-06-01

    While current HIV-1 therapies have greatly improved the quality and duration of life for infected individuals, a vaccine to prevent transmission of the virus is lacking. Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs) with the capacity to neutralize multiple HIV-1 variants have been isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals, and there has been a great effort to investigate how these bnmAbs arise, due their potential for HIV-1 vaccination. In this issue of the JCI, Willis and colleagues apply a computational approach to design variants of the bnmAb PG9 in an attempt to enhance potency and neutralization breadth. One of these variants was able to target multiple PG9-resistant strains, as the result of stabilization of the long heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3). The results of this study provide important insight and a unique approach to optimizing HIV-1 bnmABs.

  3. Combination strategies to enhance the potency of monocyte-derived dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fecek, Ronald J; Storkus, Walter J

    2016-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent inducers of adaptive immunity and their clinical use in cancer vaccine formulations remains an area of active translational and clinical investigation. Although cancer vaccines applied as monotherapies have had a modest history of clinical success, there is great enthusiasm for novel therapeutic strategies combining DC-based cancer vaccines with agents that 'normalize' immune function in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Broadly, these combination vaccines are designed to antagonize/remove immunosuppressive networks within the TME that serve to limit the antitumor action of vaccine-induced T cells and/or to condition the TME to facilitate the recruitment and optimal function and durability of vaccine-induced T cells. Such combination regimens are expected to dramatically enhance the clinical potency of DC-based cancer vaccine platforms. PMID:27605069

  4. Ensuring the quality, potency and safety of vaccines during preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Jose A; Wolf, Jayanthi J; Kaplanski, Catherine V; Ledwith, Brian J

    2005-12-01

    There is an abundance of vaccines currently in development, with most of them exploring novel mechanisms, adjuvants and/or delivery systems not only for traditional prophylactic use, but also for therapeutic uses. As vaccines are generally administered to healthy individuals, ensuring their quality, potency and safety becomes crucial, especially prior to evaluation in humans. To ensure these key attributes, vaccine developers need to incorporate them as early in the development program as possible, starting in basic research and continuing through preclinical, clinical and postmarketing development. Fortunately for vaccine developers, ample guidance is available from various regulatory agencies to enlighten the long and arduous path of vaccine development. This review will highlight these regulatory expectations, and provide some clarity as to why they are in place.

  5. U-turn Our Complacency in Dealing With the Potency of Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that we need to reverse our complacency in dealing with alcohol, a drug that kills at least 2.7 million people worldwide annually. Ecological studies suggest that humans have evolved to be active and functional in relation to alcohol use; the present problem is that alcohol is too easily available in too potent a form. Toxicological analyses indicate that European adults consume, on average, 1,000 times the dose of alcohol that would normally be set for voluntary exposure to a consumed carcinogen. Political analyses find that a predominant driver of alcohol-related harm is the potency of business influence on policy making. Complacency would be reversed by compulsory warning labels that alcohol causes cancer; by holding producers accountable for the harm that their products cause; and, by governments moving toward a global legally binding agreement for alcohol.

  6. Comparison of Pharmacological Potency and Safety of Glutamate Blocker IEM-1913 and Memantine.

    PubMed

    Gmiro, V E; Serdyuk, S E; Veselkina, O S

    2015-11-01

    Adamantane-containing glutamate blocker IEM-1913 (1-amino-4-(1-adamantane-amino)-butane dihydrochloride) equals to memantine in antiparkinsonian potency, but surpasses it in anticonvulsive, antidepressant, and analgesic activities. Moreover, its use is less toxic and safer. IEM-1913 produces significant pharmacological effects at a wide concentration diapason (0.03-1.00 mg/kg), while memantine is effective within a narrow range only (15-20 mg/kg). High pharmacological efficacy and low toxicity of IEM-1913 can be explained by the fact that in contrast to monocationic selective NMDA antagonist memantine, the dicationic glutamate blocker IEM-1913 produces a combined block of cerebral NMDA and AMPA receptors.

  7. Inositol 1,3,4,6-tetrakisphosphate mobilizes calcium in Xenopus oocytes with high potency.

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra, I; Gigg, R; Irvine, R F; Parker, I

    1991-01-01

    Injection of Ins(1,3,4,6)P4 into Xenopus oocytes evoked Ca2(+)-dependent membrane currents with a potency 5-10 times less than Ins(1,4,5)P3, whereas Ins(1,3,4)P3 and Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5 were almost ineffective. Responses to Ins(1,3,4,6)P4 arose through liberation of intracellular Ca2+ and through entry of extracellular Ca2+. These results, together with the observation that Ins(1,3,4,6)P4 facilitated responses to Ins(1,4,5)P3, suggests that both of these compounds may act on the same intracellular receptors. PMID:1991032

  8. A Cusp Catastrophe Model for Team Learning, Team Potency and Team Culture.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Teresa; Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Lourenco, Paulo Renato; Dimas, Isabel; Pinheiro, Margarida

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines team learning behaviors within a nonlinear dynamical system (NDS) perspective. The present research is based on a sample of 36 project workgroups, where data were collected at two moments of their life cycle, with visual analogue scales. Using both the least squares method and maximum likelihood, it proposes a cusp catastrophe model for explaining team learning. The cusp model is superior to its linear alternatives and implements team culture as the asymmetry variable and team potency as bifurcation. The findings of cusp structure in the data support the existence of discontinuous shifts in learning behavior and furthermore a proposition that the punctuated equilibrium model (PEM) might be a reasonable model for describing group functioning, since it encompasses such sudden changes between distinct stages (attractors). A discussion on small group research is also provided by highlighting the nonlinear dynamics of team processes, along with further implications for research and practice.

  9. Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Jenny; Vare, Daniel; Motwani, Hitesh V; Jenssen, Dag; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration-time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration×cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at a rate of 0.08±0.01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study.

  10. Interaction of the serine hydrolase KIAA1363 with organophosphorus agents: Evaluation of potency and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ross, Matthew K; Pluta, Kim; Bittles, Victoria; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Crow, J Allen

    2016-01-15

    Oxons are bioactive metabolites of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that covalently inactivate serine hydrolases. KIAA1363 is one of the most abundant serine hydrolases in mouse brain. Although the physiological consequences related to the inhibition of KIAA1363 due to environmental exposures to OPs are poorly understood, the enzyme was previously shown to have a role in the detoxification of oxons. Here, we overexpressed human KIAA1363 and CES1 in COS7 cells and compared the potency of inhibition (IC50s, 15 min) of KIAA1363 and CES1 by chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), paraoxon (PO), and methyl paraoxon (MPO). The order of potency was CPO > PO > MPO for both enzymes. We also determined the bimolecular rate constants (kinact/Ki) for reactions of CPO and PO with KIAA1363 and CES1. KIAA1363 and CES1 were inactivated by CPO at comparable rates (4.4 × 10(6) s(-1) M(-1) and 6.7 × 10(6) s(-1) M(-1), respectively), whereas PO inactivated both enzymes at slower rates (0.4 × 10(6) s(-1) M(-1) and 1.5 × 10(6) s(-1) M(-1), respectively). Finally, the reactivation rate of KIAA1363 following inhibition by CPO was evaluated. Together, the results define the kinetics of inhibition of KIAA1363 by active metabolites of agrochemicals and indicate that KIAA1363 is highly sensitive to inhibition by these compounds. PMID:26617293

  11. New analogs of the CART peptide with anorexigenic potency: the importance of individual disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Blechová, Miroslava; Nagelová, Veronika; Záková, Lenka; Demianová, Zuzana; Zelezná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide is an anorexigenic neuropeptide that acts in the hypothalamus. The receptor and the mechanism of action of this peptide are still unknown. In our previous study, we showed that the CART peptide binds specifically to PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells in both the native and differentiated into neuronal phenotype. Two biologically active forms, CART(55-102) and CART(61-102), with equal biological activity, contain three disulfide bridges. To clarify the importance of each of these disulfide bridges in maintaining the biological activity of CART(61-102), an Ala scan at particular S-S bridges forming cysteines was performed, and analogs with only one or two disulfide bridges were synthesized. In this study, a stabilized CART(61-102) analog with norleucine instead of methionine at position 67 was also prepared and was found to bind to PC12 cells with an anorexigenic potency similar to that of CART(61-102). The binding study revealed that out of all analogs tested, [Ala(68,86)]CART(61-102), which contains two disulfide bridges (positions 74-94 and 88-101), preserved a high affinity to both native PC12 cells and those that had been differentiated into neurons. In food intake and behavioral tests with mice after intracerebroventricular administration, this analog showed strong and long-lasting anorexigenic potency. Therefore, the disulfide bridge between cysteines 68 and 86 in CART(61-102) can be omitted without a loss of biological activity, but the preservation of two other disulfide bridges and the full-length peptide are essential for biological activity.

  12. Chronological supplement to the Carcinogenic Potency Database: standardized results of animal bioassays published through December 1982.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, L S; de Veciana, M; Backman, G M; Magaw, R; Lopipero, P; Smith, M; Blumenthal, M; Levinson, R; Bernstein, L; Ames, B N

    1986-01-01

    This paper is a chronological supplement to our earlier publication, "A Carcinogenic Potency Database of the Standardized Results of Animal Bioassays.¿ We report here results of carcinogenesis bioassays published in Technical Reports of the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program between July 1980 and December 1982, and the general literature between July 1981 and December 1982. This supplement includes results of 280 long-term, chronic experiments of 114 test compounds, and reports the same information about each experiment in the same plot format as the earlier paper: e.g., the species and strain of test animal, the route and duration of compound administration, dose level and other aspects of experimental protocol, histopathology and tumor incidence, TD50 and its statistical significance, dose response, author's opinion about carcinogenicity, and literature reference. While a number of appendices are provided to facilitate use of this supplement, we have not duplicated here the material published earlier. Instead, we refer the reader to the earlier publications (Peto et al. and Gold et al.) for a thorough description of the numerical index of carcinogenic potency (TD50), a guide to the plot of the database, and a discussion of the sources of data, the rationale for the inclusion of particular experiments and particular target sites, and the conventions adopted in summarizing the literature. For 44 of the 114 chemicals reported in this second plot, results of earlier experiments are also given in the first plot; since only 1981-1982 results are reported here, the first plot is required for these repeated compounds. In this paper we also give corrections for errors that appeared in the earlier publication. PMID:3530736

  13. Microwave assisted synthesis and biomedical potency of salicyloyloxy and 2-methoxybenzoyloxy androstane and stigmastane derivatives.

    PubMed

    Penov Gaši, Katarina M; Djurendić, Evgenija A; Szécsi, Mihály; Gardi, János; Csanádi, János J; Klisurić, Olivera R; Dojčinović-Vujašković, Sanja V; Nikolić, Andrea R; Savić, Marina P; Ajduković, Jovana J; Oklješa, Aleksandar M; Kojić, Vesna V; Sakač, Marija N; Jovanović-Šanta, Suzana S

    2015-02-01

    A convenient microwave assisted solvent free synthesis as well as conventional synthesis of salicyloyloxy and 2-methoxybenzoyloxy androstane and stigmastane derivatives 7-19 from appropriate steroidal precursors 1-6 and methyl salicylate is reported. The microwave assisted synthesis in most cases was more successful regarding reaction time and product yields. It was more environmentally friendly too, compared to the conventional method. The antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity of the synthesized derivatives were evaluated in a series of in vitro tests, as well as their inhibition potency exerted on hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes (Δ(5)-3βHSD, 17βHSD2 and 17βHSD3). All of the tested compounds were effective in OH radical neutralization, particularly compounds 9, 11 and 14, which exhibited about 100-fold stronger activity than commercial antioxidants BHT and BHA. In DPPH radical scavenging new compounds were effective, but less than reference compounds. 2-Methoxybenzoyl ester 10 exhibited strong cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 cells. Most compounds inhibited growth of PC-3 cells, where salicyloyloxy stigmastane derivative 15 showed the best inhibition potency. Compounds 9, 10 and 11 were the best inhibitors of 17βHSD2 enzyme. X-ray structure analysis and molecular mechanics calculations (MMC) were performed for the best cytotoxic agents, compounds 10 and 15. A comparison of crystal and MMC structures of compounds 10 and 15 revealed that their molecules conformations are stable even after releasing of the influence of crystalline field and that the influence of crystal packing on molecular conformation is not predominant. PMID:25541058

  14. Reassessment of MTBE cancer potency considering modes of action for MTBE and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T; Heilman, Jacqueline M

    2015-01-01

    A 1999 California state agency cancer potency (CP) evaluation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) assumed linear risk extrapolations from tumor data were plausible because of limited evidence that MTBE or its metabolites could damage DNA, and based such extrapolations on data from rat gavage and rat and mouse inhalation studies indicating elevated tumor rates in male rat kidney, male rat Leydig interstitial cells, and female rat leukemia/lymphomas. More recent data bearing on MTBE cancer potency include a rodent cancer bioassay of MTBE in drinking water; several new studies of MTBE genotoxicity; several similar evaluations of MTBE metabolites, formaldehyde, and tert-butyl alcohol or TBA; and updated evaluations of carcinogenic mode(s) of action (MOAs) of MTBE and MTBE metabolite's. The lymphoma/leukemia data used in the California assessment were recently declared unreliable by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Updated characterizations of MTBE CP, and its uncertainty, are currently needed to address a variety of decision goals concerning historical and current MTBE contamination. To this end, an extensive review of data sets bearing on MTBE and metabolite genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and tumorigenicity was applied to reassess MTBE CP and related uncertainty in view of MOA considerations. Adopting the traditional approach that cytotoxicity-driven cancer MOAs are inoperative at very low, non-cytotoxic dose levels, it was determined that MTBE most likely does not increase cancer risk unless chronic exposures induce target-tissue toxicity, including in sensitive individuals. However, the corresponding expected (or plausible upper bound) CP for MTBE conditional on a hypothetical linear (e.g., genotoxic) MOA was estimated to be ∼2 × 10(-5) (or 0.003) per mg MTBE per kg body weight per day for adults exposed chronically over a lifetime. Based on this conservative estimate of CP, if MTBE is carcinogenic to humans, it is among the weakest 10% of chemical

  15. Analysis of cannabis seizures in NSW, Australia: cannabis potency and cannabinoid profile.

    PubMed

    Swift, Wendy; Wong, Alex; Li, Kong M; Arnold, Jonathon C; McGregor, Iain S

    2013-01-01

    Recent analysis of the cannabinoid content of cannabis plants suggests a shift towards use of high potency plant material with high levels of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and low levels of other phytocannabinoids, particularly cannabidiol (CBD). Use of this type of cannabis is thought by some to predispose to greater adverse outcomes on mental health and fewer therapeutic benefits. Australia has one of the highest per capita rates of cannabis use in the world yet there has been no previous systematic analysis of the cannabis being used. In the present study we examined the cannabinoid content of 206 cannabis samples that had been confiscated by police from recreational users holding 15 g of cannabis or less, under the New South Wales "Cannabis Cautioning" scheme. A further 26 "Known Provenance" samples were analysed that had been seized by police from larger indoor or outdoor cultivation sites rather than from street level users. An HPLC method was used to determine the content of 9 cannabinoids: THC, CBD, cannabigerol (CBG), and their plant-based carboxylic acid precursors THC-A, CBD-A and CBG-A, as well as cannabichromene (CBC), cannabinol (CBN) and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THC-V). The "Cannabis Cautioning" samples showed high mean THC content (THC+THC-A = 14.88%) and low mean CBD content (CBD+CBD-A = 0.14%). A modest level of CBG was detected (CBG+CBG-A = 1.18%) and very low levels of CBC, CBN and THC-V (<0.1%). "Known Provenance" samples showed no significant differences in THC content between those seized from indoor versus outdoor cultivation sites. The present analysis echoes trends reported in other countries towards the use of high potency cannabis with very low CBD content. The implications for public health outcomes and harm reduction strategies are discussed.

  16. Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Jenny; Vare, Daniel; Motwani, Hitesh V; Jenssen, Dag; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration-time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration×cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at a rate of 0.08±0.01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study. PMID:27402481

  17. Searching for Drug Synergy in Complex Dose-Response Landscapes Using an Interaction Potency Model.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bhagwan; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rational design of multi-targeted drug combinations is a promising strategy to tackle the drug resistance problem for many complex disorders. A drug combination is usually classified as synergistic or antagonistic, depending on the deviation of the observed combination response from the expected effect calculated based on a reference model of non-interaction. The existing reference models were proposed originally for low-throughput drug combination experiments, which make the model assumptions often incompatible with the complex drug interaction patterns across various dose pairs that are typically observed in large-scale dose-response matrix experiments. To address these limitations, we proposed a novel reference model, named zero interaction potency (ZIP), which captures the drug interaction relationships by comparing the change in the potency of the dose-response curves between individual drugs and their combinations. We utilized a delta score to quantify the deviation from the expectation of zero interaction, and proved that a delta score value of zero implies both probabilistic independence and dose additivity. Using data from a large-scale anticancer drug combination experiment, we demonstrated empirically how the ZIP scoring approach captures the experimentally confirmed drug synergy while keeping the false positive rate at a low level. Further, rather than relying on a single parameter to assess drug interaction, we proposed the use of an interaction landscape over the full dose-response matrix to identify and quantify synergistic and antagonistic dose regions. The interaction landscape offers an increased power to differentiate between various classes of drug combinations, and may therefore provide an improved means for understanding their mechanisms of action toward clinical translation.

  18. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T.; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities. PMID:26627251

  19. Carbon nanotubes' surface chemistry determines their potency as vaccine nanocarriers in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hatem A.F.M.; Smyth, Lesley; Rubio, Noelia; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Wang, Julie T.-W.; Bansal, Sukhvinder S.; Summers, Huw D.; Diebold, Sandra S.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown marked capabilities in enhancing antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells. However, proper understanding of how altering the physical properties of CNTs may influence antigen uptake by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), has not been established yet. We hypothesized that altering the physical properties of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs)-antigen conjugates, e.g. length and surface charge, can affect the internalization of MWNT-antigen by DCs, hence the induced immune response potency. For this purpose, pristine MWNTs (p-MWNTs) were exposed to various chemical reactions to modify their physical properties then conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA), a model antigen. The yielded MWNTs-OVA conjugates were long MWNT-OVA (~ 386 nm), bearing net positive charge (5.8 mV), or short MWNTs-OVA (~ 122 nm) of increasing negative charges (− 23.4, − 35.8 or − 39 mV). Compared to the short MWNTs-OVA bearing high negative charges, short MWNT-OVA with the lowest negative charge demonstrated better cellular uptake and OVA-specific immune response both in vitro and in vivo. However, long positively-charged MWNT-OVA showed limited cellular uptake and OVA specific immune response in contrast to short MWNT-OVA displaying the least negative charge. We suggest that reduction in charge negativity of MWNT-antigen conjugate enhances cellular uptake and thus the elicited immune response intensity. Nevertheless, length of MWNT-antigen conjugate might also affect the cellular uptake and immune response potency; highlighting the importance of physical properties as a consideration in designing a MWNT-based vaccine delivery system. PMID:26802552

  20. Carbon nanotubes' surface chemistry determines their potency as vaccine nanocarriers in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hatem A F M; Smyth, Lesley; Rubio, Noelia; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Wang, Julie T-W; Bansal, Sukhvinder S; Summers, Huw D; Diebold, Sandra S; Lombardi, Giovanna; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2016-03-10

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown marked capabilities in enhancing antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells. However, proper understanding of how altering the physical properties of CNTs may influence antigen uptake by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), has not been established yet. We hypothesized that altering the physical properties of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs)-antigen conjugates, e.g. length and surface charge, can affect the internalization of MWNT-antigen by DCs, hence the induced immune response potency. For this purpose, pristine MWNTs (p-MWNTs) were exposed to various chemical reactions to modify their physical properties then conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA), a model antigen. The yielded MWNTs-OVA conjugates were long MWNT-OVA (~386nm), bearing net positive charge (5.8mV), or short MWNTs-OVA (~122nm) of increasing negative charges (-23.4, -35.8 or -39mV). Compared to the short MWNTs-OVA bearing high negative charges, short MWNT-OVA with the lowest negative charge demonstrated better cellular uptake and OVA-specific immune response both in vitro and in vivo. However, long positively-charged MWNT-OVA showed limited cellular uptake and OVA specific immune response in contrast to short MWNT-OVA displaying the least negative charge. We suggest that reduction in charge negativity of MWNT-antigen conjugate enhances cellular uptake and thus the elicited immune response intensity. Nevertheless, length of MWNT-antigen conjugate might also affect the cellular uptake and immune response potency; highlighting the importance of physical properties as a consideration in designing a MWNT-based vaccine delivery system.

  1. Studies with bioengineered Nisin peptides highlight the broad-spectrum potency of Nisin V.

    PubMed

    Field, Des; Quigley, Lisa; O'Connor, Paula M; Rea, Mary C; Daly, Karen; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2010-07-01

    Nisin A is the most thoroughly investigated member of the lantibiotic family of antimicrobial peptides. In addition to a long history of safe use as a food antimicrobial, its activity against multi-drug resistant pathogens has resulted in a renewed interest in applying nisin as a chemotherapeutic to treat bacterial infections. The wealth of Nisin-related information that has been generated has also led to the development of the biotechnological capacity to engineer novel Nisin variants with a view to improving the function and physicochemical properties of this already potent peptide. However, the identification of bioengineered Nisin derivatives with enhanced antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive targets is a recent event. In this study, we created stable producers of the most promising derivatives of Nisin A generated to date [M21V (hereafter Nisin V) and K22T (hereafter Nisin T)] and assessed their potency against a range of drug-resistant clinical, veterinary and food pathogens. Nisin T exhibited increased activity against all veterinary isolates, including streptococci and staphylococci, and against a number of multi-drug resistant clinical isolates including MRSA, but not vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In contrast, Nisin V displayed increased potency against all targets tested including hVISA strains and the hyper-virulent Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 and against important food pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus. Significantly, this enhanced activity was validated in a model food system against L. monocytogenes. We conclude that Nisin V possesses significant potential as a novel preservative or chemotherapeutic compound. PMID:21255345

  2. Bridging the Gap Between Validation and Implementation of Non-Animal Veterinary Vaccine Potency Testing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, Samantha; Brown, Jeffrey; Currie, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary Many vaccines are tested for quality in experiments that require the use of large numbers of animals in procedures that often cause significant pain and distress. Newer technologies have fostered the development of vaccine quality control tests that reduce or eliminate the use of animals, but the availability of these newer methods has not guaranteed their acceptance by regulators or use by manufacturers. We discuss a strategic approach that has been used to assess and ultimately increase the use of non-animal vaccine quality tests in the U.S. and U.K. Abstract In recent years, technologically advanced high-throughput techniques have been developed that replace, reduce or refine animal use in vaccine quality control tests. Following validation, these tests are slowly being accepted for use by international regulatory authorities. Because regulatory acceptance itself has not guaranteed that approved humane methods are adopted by manufacturers, various organizations have sought to foster the preferential use of validated non-animal methods by interfacing with industry and regulatory authorities. After noticing this gap between regulation and uptake by industry, we began developing a paradigm that seeks to narrow the gap and quicken implementation of new replacement, refinement or reduction guidance. A systematic analysis of our experience in promoting the transparent implementation of validated non-animal vaccine potency assays has led to the refinement of our paradigmatic process, presented here, by which interested parties can assess the local regulatory acceptance of methods that reduce animal use and integrate them into quality control testing protocols, or ensure the elimination of peripheral barriers to their use, particularly for potency and other tests carried out on production batches. PMID:26486625

  3. Effects of modifications of residues in position 3 of dynorphin A(1-11)-NH2 on kappa receptor selectivity and potency.

    PubMed

    Lung, F D; Meyer, J P; Lou, B S; Xiang, L; Li, G; Davis, P; DeLeon, I A; Yamamura, H I; Porreca, F; Hruby, V J

    1996-06-21

    Tyrosine1 and phenylalanine4 in dynorphin A (Dyn A) have been reported to be important residues for opioid agonist activity and for potency at kappa receptors. The glycine residues in the 2 and 3 positions of dynorphin A may affect the relative orientation of the aromatic rings in positions 1 and 4, but their flexibility precludes careful analysis. To examine these effects on dynorphin A, we previously have synthesized the linear analogues [D-Ala3]Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 (2) and [Ala3]Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 (3) and reported their biological activities. Analogues 2 and 3 displayed affinities for the central kappa opioid receptor (IC50 = 0.76 and 1.1 nM, respectively) similar to that of Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 (1) (IC50 = 0.58 nM) and greatly enhanced selectivities for kappa vs mu and kappa vs delta receptors (IC50 ratios of 350 and 1300 for 2, and 190 and 660 for 3, respectively). These results suggest that the structure and lipophilicity of the amino acid present in position 3 of Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 as well as the conformational changes they induce in the message sequence of dynorphin have important effects on potency and selectivity for kappa opioid receptors. To further investigate structure-activity relationships involving the residue at the 3 position of Dyn A(1-11)-NH2, a series of Dyn A analogues with aromatic, charged, and aliphatic side chain substitutions at the 3 position was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their affinities for kappa, mu, and delta opioid receptors. It was found that analogues with lipophilic amino acids at the 3 position of Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 generally displayed higher affinity but similar selectivities for the kappa receptor than analogues with charged residues at the same position. It is suggested that the structural, configurational, and steric/lipophilic effects of amino acids at position 3 of Dyn A(1-11)-NH2 may play an important role in potency and selectivity for the kappa receptor.

  4. Cross-species comparison of relative potencies and relative sensitivities of fishes to dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls in vitro.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Bryanna K; Doering, Jon A; Beitel, Shawn C; Wiseman, Steve; Raine, Jason C; Hecker, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Dioxin-like compounds of varying toxicities are found in complex mixtures. The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach was developed based on the potency of a dioxin-like compound relative to the potency of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to streamline risk assessment. One limitation of the TEF approach is uncertainty regarding differences in the relative potency of dioxin-like compounds among different species. Relative potencies among fishes are limited, relative to relative potencies among birds and mammals, and TEFs for fishes are based entirely on the model species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). An in vitro liver explant assay was used to characterize species-specific responses with regard to up-regulation of CYP1A transcript after exposure to 6 dioxin-like compounds in rainbow trout, white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), and northern pike (Esox lucius). Differences in sensitivities were observed among species after exposure to dioxin-like compounds. The relative potencies developed from liver explants of rainbow trout were comparable to relative potencies developed from embryo toxicity assays. Differences in relative potencies between species with the least and greatest relative potencies were up to 40-fold. To compare relative potencies among species, concentrations of dioxin-like compounds in fish eggs in the Fraser River and in Lake Ontario were used to calculate toxic equivalency quotients (TEQs) determined from TEFs or TCDD equivalents determined from relative potencies. The TEQs underestimated TCDD equivalents for white sturgeon, lake sturgeon, and northern pike, indicating uncertainty in application of TEFs to diverse fishes.

  5. A novel variable antibody fragment dimerized by leucine zippers with enhanced neutralizing potency against rabies virus G protein compared to its corresponding single-chain variable antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuang; Cheng, Yue; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2015-12-01

    Fatal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragments (scFv), which are composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and a variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, can potentially be used to replace RIG. However, in our previous study, a scFv (scFV57S) specific for the rabies virus (RV) G protein showed a lower neutralizing potency than that of its parent IgG due to lower stability and altered peptide assembly pattern. In monoclonal antibodies, the VH and VL interact non-covalently, while in scFvs the VH is connected covalently with the VL by the artificial linker. In this study, we constructed and expressed two peptides 57VL-JUN-HIS and 57VH-FOS-HA in Escherichia coli. The well-known Fos and Jun leucine zippers were utilized to dimerize VH and VL similarly to the IgG counterpart. The two peptides assembled to form zipFv57S in vitro. Due to the greater similarity in structure with IgG, the zipFv57S protein showed a higher binding ability and affinity resulting in notable improvement of in vitro neutralizing activity over its corresponding scFv. The zipFv57S protein was also found to be more stable and showed similar protective rate as RIG in mice challenged with a lethal dose of RV. Our results not only indicated zipFv57S as an ideal alternative for RIG in PEP but also offered a novel and efficient hetero-dimerization pattern of VH and VL leading to enhanced neutralizing potency.

  6. Guinea pig protection test as indicator of potency of oil emulsion foot-and-mouth disease vaccines.

    PubMed

    Black, L; Pullen, L; Boge, A

    1985-09-01

    A vaccine potency test is described involving virus challenge to six groups of 10 guinea pigs at five weeks after vaccination. Sixteen oil emulsion foot-and-mouth disease vaccines were so tested and nine retested after storage at 4 degrees C for up to 28.3 months. The results were compared with those of the routinely used oil emulsion vaccine potency test (protection afforded to eight pigs challenged 21 days after vaccination). When guinea pig estimates of 3 log2 PD50 or more were obtained, then, with one exception, the batches protected all or almost all pigs from challenge, but when the guinea pig estimates were less than 1 log2 PD50, the vaccines failed to protect five out of eight pigs. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the guinea pig method, established by repeated tests on two vaccine batches, seemed acceptable. The results suggested that guinea pig estimates might provide a suitable substitute for pig challenge potency tests because they reflected the potency of the vaccines, were likely to involve smaller standard errors and caused less discomfort to animals. PMID:2999930

  7. CYTOTOXICITY AND CELL SIGNALING IN MH-S CELLS: RELATIVE POTENCY OF DIESEL AND COAL COMBUSTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxicity and Cell Signaling in MH-S Cells: Relative Potency of Diesel and Coal Combustion Particles P. Singh1, Y. Kostetski2, M. Daniels1, T. Stevens3 and MI Gilmour 1USEPA, RTP, NC, 2National University of Singapore, Singapore, 3University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC<...

  8. Development of a Relative Potency Factor (RPF) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Mixtures (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On February 26, 2010, the draft Development of a Relative Potency Factor (RPF) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Mixtures document and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The draft document and t...

  9. Collaborative studies on the development of national reference standards for potency determination of H7N9 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Changgui; Xu, Kangwei; Hashem, Anwar; Shao, Ming; Liu, Shuzhen; Zou, Yong; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Yongchao; Yuan, Liyong; Xu, Miao; Li, Xuguang; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of human infections of a novel avian influenza virus A (H7N9) prompted the development of the vaccines against this virus. Like all types of influenza vaccines, H7N9 vaccine must be tested for its potency prior to being used in humans. However, the unavailability of international reference reagents for the potency determination of H7N9 vaccines substantially hinders the progress in vaccine development. To facilitate clinical development, we enlisted 5 participants in a collaborative study to develop critical reagents used in Single Radial Immunodiffusion (SRID), the currently acceptable assay for potency determination of influenza vaccine. Specifically, the hemagglutinin (HA) content of one vaccine bulk for influenza A (H7N9), herein designated as Primary Liquid Standard (PLS), was determined by SDS-PAGE. In addition, the freeze-dried antigen references derived from PLS were prepared to enhance the stability for long term storage. The final HA content of lyophilized antigen references were calibrated against PLS by SRID assay in a collaborative study. Importantly, application of these national reference standards to potency analyses greatly facilitated the development of H7N9 vaccines in China.

  10. RELATIVE POTENCY OF MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Mold has been associated with the exacerbation of allergic asthma. However, its role in induction of allergic asthma is not clear. Using a previously developed mouse model for allergic asthma, we compared potencies of two fungal extracts (Metarhizium anisop...

  11. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  12. LC-MS based assay to measure intracellular compound levels in Mycobacterium smegmatis: linking compound levels to cellular potency.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jyothi; Narayan, Ashwini; Venkatraman, Janani; Chatterji, Monalisa

    2013-08-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a central role in maintaining cellular pool of tetrahydrofolic acid, a cofactor necessary for DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. The clinical validation of DHFR as antibacterial target was established by the success of trimethoprim (TMP). DHFR is also an attractive target for identifying anti-tuberculosis molecules however, due to observed weak cellular potency, no DHFR inhibitors have been developed as drugs so far. TMP and its analogs have poor cellular potency on Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis cells. We found a mutant strain of M. smegmatis, mc²155 to be sensitive to TMP whereas wild type strain was not inhibited by TMP. We utilized this system to probe if poor or lack of activity of TMP is a consequence of poor intracellular compound levels. An LC-MS based method was developed for measuring TMP and rifampicin (RIF) in M. smegmatis. Using the assay, equivalent RIF levels were observed in both strains however, TMP was detected only in mc²155 cells, hence proving a positive correlation between potency and compound levels. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time LC-MS method has been used to measure compound levels in mycobacterial cells. We propose it to be a valuable tool to understand the lack of potency or resistance mechanisms in antimycobacterial drug development.

  13. Tablet potency of Tianeptine in coated tablets by near infrared spectroscopy: model optimisation, calibration transfer and confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Boiret, Mathieu; Meunier, Loïc; Ginot, Yves-Michel

    2011-02-20

    A near infrared (NIR) method was developed for determination of tablet potency of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in a complex coated tablet matrix. The calibration set contained samples from laboratory and production scale batches. The reference values were obtained by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to establish a model. The model was challenged by calculating tablet potency of two external test sets. Root mean square errors of prediction were respectively equal to 2.0% and 2.7%. To use this model with a second spectrometer from the production field, a calibration transfer method called piecewise direct standardisation (PDS) was used. After the transfer, the root mean square error of prediction of the first test set was 2.4% compared to 4.0% without transferring the spectra. A statistical technique using bootstrap of PLS residuals was used to estimate confidence intervals of tablet potency calculations. This method requires an optimised PLS model, selection of the bootstrap number and determination of the risk. In the case of a chemical analysis, the tablet potency value will be included within the confidence interval calculated by the bootstrap method. An easy to use graphical interface was developed to easily determine if the predictions, surrounded by minimum and maximum values, are within the specifications defined by the regulatory organisation.

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF SERUM BINDING PROTEINS AND CLEARANCE ON THE COMPARATIVE RECEPTOR BINDING POTENCY OF ENDOCRINE ACTIVE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF SERUM BINDING PROTEINS AND CLEARANCE ON THE COMPARATIVE RECEPTOR BINDING POTENCY OF ENDOCRINE ACTIVE COMPOUNDS. JG Teeguarden1 and HA Barton2. 1ENVIRON International, Ruston LA; 2US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Pharmacokinetics Branch, RTP, NC.

    One measure of th...

  15. Principles for identification of High Potency Category Chemicals for which the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) approach should not be applied.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David W; Api, Anne Marie; Safford, Robert J; Lalko, Jon F

    2015-08-01

    An essential step in ensuring the toxicological safety of chemicals used in consumer products is the evaluation of their skin sensitising potential. The sensitising potency, coupled with information on exposure levels, can be used in a Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) to determine an acceptable level of a given chemical in a given product. Where consumer skin exposure is low, a risk assessment can be conducted using the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) approach, avoiding the need to determine potency experimentally. Since skin sensitisation involves chemical reaction with skin proteins, the first step in the DST approach is to assess, on the basis of the chemical structure, whether the chemical is expected to be reactive or not. Our accompanying publication describes the probabilistic derivation of a DST of 64 μg/cm(2) for chemicals assessed as reactive. This would protect against 95% of chemicals assessed as reactive, but the remaining 5% would include chemicals with very high potency. Here we discuss the chemical properties and structural features of high potency sensitisers, and derive an approach whereby they can be identified and consequently excluded from application of the DST.

  16. Mixtures of Complete and pif1- and pif2-Deficient Genotypes Are Required for Increased Potency of an Insect Nucleopolyhedrovirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo, Gabriel; Williams, Trevor; Simón, Oihane; Muñoz, Delia; Cerutti, Martine; López-Ferber, Miguel; Caballero, Primitivo

    2009-01-01

    The insecticidal potency of a nucleopolyhedrovirus population (SfNIC) that infects Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera) is greater than the potency of any of the component genotypes alone. Occlusion bodies (OBs) produced in mixed infections comprising the complete genotype and a deletion genotype are as pathogenic as the natural population of genotypes from the field. To test whether this increased potency was due to the deletion or to some other characteristic of the deletion variant genome, we used the SfNIC-B genome to construct a recombinant virus (SfNIC-BΔ16K) with the same 16.4-kb deletion as that observed in SfNIC-C and another recombinant (SfNIC-BΔpifs) with a deletion encompassing two adjacent genes (pif1 and pif2) that are essential for transmission per os. Mixtures comprising SfNIC-B and SfNIC-BΔ16K in OB ratios that varied between 10:90 and 90:10 were injected into insects, and the progeny OBs were fed to larvae in an insecticidal potency assay. A densitometric analysis of PCR products indicated that SfNIC-B was generally more abundant than expected in mixtures based on the proportions of OBs used to produce the inocula. Mixtures derived from OB ratios of 10, 25, or 50% of SfNIC-BΔ16K and the corresponding SfNIC-B proportions showed a significant increase in potency compared to SfNIC-B alone. The results of potency assays with mixtures comprising various proportions of SfNIC-B plus SfNIC-BΔpifs were almost identical to the results observed with SfNIC-BΔ16K, indicating that deletion of the pif gene region was responsible for the increased potency observed in mixtures of SfNIC-B and each deletion recombinant virus. Subsequently, mixtures produced from OB ratios involving 10 or 90% of SfNIC-BΔ16K with the corresponding proportions of SfNIC-B were subjected to four rounds of per os transmission in larvae. The composition of each experimental mixture rapidly converged to a common equilibrium with a genotypic composition of ∼85% SfNIC-B plus ∼15% Sf

  17. Influence of different free radicals on scavenging potency of gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Đorović, Jelena; Marković, Jasmina M Dimitrić; Stepanić, Višnja; Begović, Nebojša; Amić, Dragan; Marković, Zoran

    2014-07-01

    The M05-2X/6-311++G(d,p) and B3LYP-D2/6-311++G(d,p) models are used to evaluate scavenging potency of gallic acid. The hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET), and single electron transfer followed by proton transfer (SET-PT) mechanisms of gallic acid with some radicals ((•)OO(-), (•)OH, and CH3OO(•)) were investigated using the corresponding thermodynamic quantities: bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE), ionization potential (IP), and proton affinity (PA). Namely, the ΔHBDE, ΔHIP, and ΔHPA values of the corresponding reactions in some solvents (water, DMSO, pentylethanoate, and benzene) are investigated using an implicit solvation model (SMD). An approach based on the reactions enthalpies related to the examined mechanisms is applied. This approach shows that a thermodynamically favored mechanism depends on the polarity of reaction media and properties of free radical reactive species. The most acidic 4-OH group of gallic acid is the active site for radical inactivation. The results of this investigation indicate that the SPLET mechanism can be a favored reaction pathway for all three radicals in all solvents, except for (•)OH in the aqueous solution. In water, gallic acid can inactivate (•)OH by the HAT mechanism.

  18. Development of a Sweetness Sensor for Aspartame, a Positively Charged High-Potency Sweetener

    PubMed Central

    Yasuura, Masato; Tahara, Yusuke; Ikezaki, Hidekazu; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration of aspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame. PMID:24763213

  19. Part 2: Potencies and interactions of polybrominated aromatic hydrocarbons in rainbow trout early life stage mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, M.W.; Zabel, E.W.; Peterson, R.E.; Bergman, A.; Safe, S.

    1994-12-31

    Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs), dibenzofurans (PBDFs), and diphenylethers (PBDPES) in aquatic environments may pose a risk to fish early life stage survival. Following rainbow trout egg microinjection, the potencies of these polybrominated aromatic hydrocarbons were determined using fish specific toxic equivalency factors (TEFs). TEFs are defined as the ratio of TCDD LD{sub 50} to brominated congener LD{sub 50}. Sac fry stage specific TCDD like toxicity included yolk sac edema, pericardial edema, multifocal hemorrhages and craniofacial malformations. TEFs of active congeners were: 2,3,7,8-TBDF = 0.23; 2,3,4,7,8-PBDF = 0.069; 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxBDD = 0.009. No signs of toxicity with 2,2{prime},4,4{prime}-TBDPE, 2,2{prime},3,4,4{prime}-PBDPE, or 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5-PBDPE occurred at egg concentrations up to 126,37 {mu}g/g. Since these congeners occur as complex mixtures, the potential for additive, antagonistic, or synergistic interactions must also be determined for accurate risk assessment. Graded doses of 2,3,7,8-TBDD or 1,2,3,7,8-PBDD alone, or graded doses of fixed ratios of the two congeners were injected into newly fertilized rainbow trout eggs. Separate dose response curves were determined for each ratio and each individual congener. Isobolographic analysis supports the hypothesis that these congeners act additively.

  20. Verification of Potency of Aerial Digital Oblique Cameras for Aerial Photogrammetry in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Ryuji; Takigawa, Masanori; Ohga, Tomowo; Fujii, Noritsuna

    2016-06-01

    Digital oblique aerial camera (hereinafter called "oblique cameras") is an assembly of medium format digital cameras capable of shooting digital aerial photographs in five directions i.e. nadir view and oblique views (forward and backward, left and right views) simultaneously and it is used for shooting digital aerial photographs efficiently for generating 3D models in a wide area. For aerial photogrammetry of public survey in Japan, it is required to use large format cameras, like DMC and UltraCam series, to ensure aerial photogrammetric accuracy. Although oblique cameras are intended to generate 3D models, digital aerial photographs in 5 directions taken with them should not be limited to 3D model production but they may also be allowed for digital mapping and photomaps of required public survey accuracy in Japan. In order to verify the potency of using oblique cameras for aerial photogrammetry (simultaneous adjustment, digital mapping and photomaps), (1) a viewer was developed to interpret digital aerial photographs taken with oblique cameras, (2) digital aerial photographs were shot with an oblique camera owned by us, a Penta DigiCAM of IGI mbH, and (3) accuracy of 3D measurements was verified.

  1. Structural determinants of resveratrol for cell proliferation inhibition potency: experimental and docking studies of new analogs.

    PubMed

    Mazué, Frédéric; Colin, Didier; Gobbo, Jessica; Wegner, Maria; Rescifina, Antonio; Spatafora, Carmela; Fasseur, Dominique; Delmas, Dominique; Meunier, Philippe; Tringali, Corrado; Latruffe, Norbert

    2010-07-01

    Resveratrol is the subject of intense research because of the abundance of this compound in the human diet and as one of the most valuable natural chemopreventive agents. Further advances require new resveratrol analogs be used to identify the structural determinants of resveratrol for the inhibition potency of cell proliferation by comparing experimental and docking studies. Therefore, we synthesized new trans/(E)- and cis/(Z)-resveratrol - analogs not reported to date - by modifying the hydroxylation pattern of resveratrol and a double bond geometry. We included them in a larger panel of 14 molecules, including (Z)-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene, the most powerful molecule that is used as reference. Using a docking model complementary to experimental studies on the proliferation inhibition of the human colorectal tumor SW480 cell line, we show that methylation is the determinant substitution in inhibition efficacy, but only in molecules bearing a Z configuration. Most of the synthetic methylated derivatives (E or Z) stop mitosis at the M phase and lead to polyploid cells, while (E)-resveratrol inhibits cells at the S phase. Docking studies show that almost all of the docked structures of (Z)-polymethoxy isomers, but not most of the (E)-polymethoxy isomers substantially overlap the docked structure of combretastatin A-4, taken as reference ligand at the colchicine-tubulin binding site. PMID:20395019

  2. Replacing the NIH test for rabies vaccine potency testing: a synopsis of drivers and barriers.

    PubMed

    Schiffelers, Marie-Jeanne; Blaauboer, Bas; Bakker, Wieger; Hendriksen, Coenraad

    2014-07-01

    Approximately 70% of animal use is utilized to demonstrate quality control of vaccines. Especially rabies vaccine potency testing, using the NIH challenge test, involves objections in terms of scientific relevance, animal welfare concern and costs. Several 3R models have been proposed to refine, reduce or replace this test. Some are formally incorporated into regulatory requirements, but actual regulatory acceptance and use by industry lags behind, raising the question concerning which factors influence this process. This question is answered by a combination of literature review, interviews and a survey among 50 rabies vaccine experts. The findings are analyzed using the multilevel perspective on technology transition, which distinguishes 3 levels of factors influencing innovation acceptance. At the micro level (where 3R models are developed and validated) the dis-advantages of, and fractional experience with, 3R models, scarce data sharing and demanding validation processes exist. The meso level (existing regulatory regime) encloses the barriers of the 'gold standard', the lack of harmonization and the driving force of legislation stimulating 3Rs use. The macro level (the societal context) combines risk aversion and increased concern for animal welfare. Regulatory acceptance and use of 3R models requires dedicated stakeholder communication, cooperation and coordination at all three levels.

  3. Analysis of earthquake body wave spectra for potency and magnitude values: implications for magnitude scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Zachary E.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; White, Malcolm C.; Vernon, Frank L.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a simple methodology for reliable automated estimation of the low-frequency asymptote in seismic body wave spectra of small to moderate local earthquakes. The procedure corrects individual P- and S-wave spectra for propagation and site effects and estimates the seismic potency from a stacked spectrum. The method is applied to >11 000 earthquakes with local magnitudes 0 < ML < 4 that occurred in the Southern California plate-boundary region around the San Jacinto fault zone during 2013. Moment magnitude Mw values, derived from the spectra and the scaling relation of Hanks & Kanamori, follow a Gutenberg-Richter distribution with a larger b-value (1.22) from that associated with the ML values (0.93) for the same earthquakes. The completeness magnitude for the Mw values is 1.6 while for ML it is 1.0. The quantity (Mw - ML) linearly increases in the analysed magnitude range as ML decreases. An average earthquake with ML = 0 in the study area has an Mw of about 0.9. The developed methodology and results have important implications for earthquake source studies and statistical seismology.

  4. Composition and Potency Characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Purified Protein Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Capsel, Randal T.; Thoen, Charles O.; Reinhardt, Timothy A.; Lippolis, John D.; Olsen, Renee; Stabel, Judith R.; Bannantine, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37°C, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtration, and protein precipitation. Three traditional production PPDs were used in this study including lot 9801, which served as a reference and has been used in the field for decades. Alternative production PPDs (0902A and 0902B), in which the autoclaving step was removed, were also analyzed in this study. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed protein smearing in traditional PPDs, but distinct bands were observed in the alternative PPD preparations. Antibody bound distinct protein bands in the alternative PPDs by immunoblot analysis, whereas an immunoreactive smear was observed with the traditional PPDs. Mass spectrometry identified 194 proteins among three PPD lots representing the two different production methods, ten of which were present in all PPDs examined. Selected proteins identified by mass spectrometry were recombinantly expressed and purified from E. coli and evaluated by the guinea pig potency test. Seven recombinant proteins showed greater erythema as compared to the reference PPD lot 9801 in paired guinea pigs and were able to stimulate interferon-gamma production in blood from Johne’s positive animals. These results suggest that autoclaving culture suspensions is not a necessary step in PPD production and specific proteins could supplant the PPD antigen for intradermal skin testing procedures and for use as in-vitro assay reagents. PMID:27136199

  5. Development of a sweetness sensor for aspartame, a positively charged high-potency sweetener.

    PubMed

    Yasuura, Masato; Tahara, Yusuke; Ikezaki, Hidekazu; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-23

    Taste evaluation technology has been developed by several methods, such as sensory tests, electronic tongues and a taste sensor based on lipid/polymer membranes. In particular, the taste sensor can individually quantify five basic tastes without multivariate analysis. However, it has proven difficult to develop a sweetness sensor, because sweeteners are classified into three types according to the electric charges in an aqueous solution; that is, no charge, negative charge and positive charge. Using membrane potential measurements, the taste-sensing system needs three types of sensor membrane for each electric charge type of sweetener. Since the commercially available sweetness sensor was only intended for uncharged sweeteners, a sweetness sensor for positively charged high-potency sweeteners such as aspartame was developed in this study. Using a lipid and plasticizers, we fabricated various lipid/polymer membranes for the sweetness sensor to identify the suitable components of the sensor membranes. As a result, one of the developed sensors showed responses of more than 20 mV to 10 mM aspartame and less than 5 mV to any other taste. The responses of the sensor depended on the concentration of aspartame. These results suggested that the developed sweetness sensor had high sensitivity to and high selectivity for aspartame.

  6. Dynamics of Antagonistic Potency of Rhodobacter capsulatus PG Lipopolysaccharide against Endotoxin-Induced Effects.

    PubMed

    Kabanov, D S; Serov, D A; Zubova, S V; Grachev, S V; Prokhorenko, I R

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of antagonistic potency of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Rhodobacter capsulatus PG on the synthesis of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IFN-γ) and antiinflammatory (IL-10, IL-1Ra) cytokines induced by highly stimulatory endotoxins from Escherichia coli or Salmonella enterica have been studied. Using human whole blood, we have shown that R. capsulatus PG LPS inhibited most pronouncedly the endotoxin-induced synthesis of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 during the first 6 h after endotoxin challenge. Similarly, the endotoxin-induced release of IFN-γ was abolished by R. capsulatus PG LPS as well (24 h). In contrast to the above-mentioned cytokines, the relatively weak antagonistic activity of R. capsulatus PG LPS against endotoxin-triggered production of IL-6 and IL-8 was revealed. Since R. capsulatus PG LPS displays more potent antagonistic activity against deleterious effects of S. enterica LPS than those of E. coli LPS in the cases of such cytokines as IL-1β (6 and 24 h), IL-6 and IL-8 (4 h), we conclude that the effectiveness of protective action of antagonist is mostly determined by the primary lipid A structure of the employed agonist.

  7. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease. PMID:27045658

  8. [Test of the potency of trivalent oral polio vaccines: comparison of 2 methods of reading].

    PubMed

    Chocarro, L B; Manau, M V

    1987-01-01

    Trivalent oral poliovaccine is used in Argentina to prevent poliomyelitis. Its potency is tested by infectivity titration of the three viruses in susceptible cell cultures (Hep-2 cell line). In order to compare the conventional reading method of cytopathic effect (CPE) with the staining technique of cell monolayers with crystal violet-formol, the reference viruses and several lots of trivalent vaccines were titrated. Between 3 and 10 days post-infection (pi) the plates were read under microscope and immediately stained. The maximum viral titer was reached at 5-7 days pi and additional CPE after this period did not alter the results. An incomplete monolayer confluence or cell aging (6-7 days pi) resulted in a poor definition between positive and negative cultures when the staining test was used. By contrast, CPE was easily read by microscope observation. Therefore, the staining method should only be considered for vaccine titration as a possible alternative when an inverted microscope is lacking or a great number of plates has to be read. In this case, to stain at day 7 pi is recommended.

  9. Fragment-Based De Novo Design of Antimycobacterial Agents and In Vitro Potency Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sardari, Soroush; Portugal, Isabel; ALKafri, Abeer; Moradi, Danesh; Ghavami, Ghazaleh

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection with global impact that over time demonstrates enormously high mortality rates. The vital need for improving novel and efficient anti-TB drugs is caused by the rising rate of appearance of Multi Drug Resistant (MDR) strains to the frequently utilized drugs.In addition, the longer periods of therapy and healing, mainly in the immune compromised patients aggrevates the situation. Recent studies indicate that computer-based techniques have been used successfully in the antibacterial research. In our current approach, utilizing combined pattern of computer-based methods as fragment-based de novo design, structure-based docking and scoring, in addition to similaritybased compound searching, led to introduce seven in silico designed compounds with probable antimycobacterial properties. Then, we investigated their potency against sensitive and resistant strains of Mycobacterium sp. in vitro. Findings resulted from antimycobacterial tests and MTT assay indicated that two compounds, 1-amino-4-(phenylamino) anthracene-9,10-dione and 5-fluoroindoline-2,3-dione have useful profile and maybe good candidates for developing novel antimycobacterial drugs.

  10. Methyl Substitution of a Rexinoid Agonist Improves Potency and Reveals Site of Lipid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (2E,4E,6Z,8E)-8-(3′,4′-Dihydro-1′(2′H)-naphthalen-1′-ylidene)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienoic acid, 9cUAB30, is a selective rexinoid that displays substantial chemopreventive capacity with little toxicity. 4-Methyl-UAB30, an analogue of 9cUAB30, is a potent RXR agonist but caused increased lipid biosynthesis unlike 9cUAB30. To evaluate how methyl substitution influenced potency and lipid biosynthesis, we synthesized four 9cUAB30 homologues with methyl substitutions at the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-position of the tetralone ring. The syntheses and biological evaluations of these new analogues are reported here along with the X-ray crystal structures of each homologue bound to the ligand binding domain of hRXRα. We demonstrate that each homologue of 9cUAB30 is a more potent agonist, but only the 7-methyl-9cUAB30 caused severe hyperlipidemia in rats. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structures of these new rexinoids and bexarotene (Targretin) bound to hRXRα-LBD, we reveal that each rexinoid, which induced hyperlipidemia, had methyl groups that interacted with helix 7 residues of the LBD. PMID:24801499

  11. Relative potency estimates of acceptable residues and reentry intervals after nerve agent release

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Jones, T.D.; Adams, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of a chemical warfare agent during any stage of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, the potential exists for off-post contamination of drinking water, forage crops, grains, garden produce, and livestock. The more persistent agents, such as the organophosphate nerve agent VX, pose the greatest human health concern for reentry. A relative potency approach comparing the toxicity of VX to organophosphate insecticide analogues is developed and used to estimate allowable residues for VX in agricultural products and reentry intervals for public access to contaminated areas. Analysis of mammalian LD50 data by all exposure routes indicates that VX is 10(3) to 10(4) times more toxic than most commercially available organophosphate insecticides. Thus, allowable residues of VX could be considered at concentration levels 10(3) to 10(4) lower than those established for certain insecticides by the U.S. EPA. Evaluation of reentry intervals developed for these organophosphate analogues indicate that, if environmental monitoring cannot reliably demonstrate acceptable levels of VX, restricted access to suspect or contaminated areas may be on the order of weeks to months following agent release. Planning for relocation, mass care centers, and quarantine should take this time period into account.

  12. Vitamin and mineral status in physically active men: effects of a high-potency supplement.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Moses, F M; Deuster, P A

    1992-01-01

    Changes in nutritional status during supplementation with a high-potency multivitamin-mineral supplement were examined in 22 physically active men randomly assigned to take a supplement (n = 11) or placebo (n = 11) for approximately 12 wk. Four-day dietary intakes, blood concentrations, and urinary excretions of selected vitamins and minerals were measured before, during (approximately 6 and 12 wk), and after supplementation. No changes were observed in blood concentrations of vitamins A and C and measures of zinc, magnesium, and calcium status; the supplement provided less than 300% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of these nutrients. In contrast, blood concentrations of thiamin, riboflavin, vitamins B-6 and B-12, pantothenate, and biotin increased significantly (P less than 0.05) by 6 wk to values that were maintained until the end of the supplementation. These vitamins were provided in amounts that ranged from 396% (biotin) to 6250% (vitamin B-6) of the RDA. Urinary excretions of these vitamins also increased during supplementation and both blood and urine values returned to presupplementation concentrations at approximately 13.5 wk postsupplementation. PMID:1728807

  13. Potency of irritation by benzylidenemalononitriles in humans correlates with TRPA1 ion channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Christopher D.; Green, Christopher; Bird, Mike; Jones, James T. A.; Riches, James R.; McKee, Katherine K.; Sandford, Mark S.; Wakefield, Debra A.; Timperley, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the physiological activity of solid aerosolized benzylidenemalononitriles (BMNs) including ‘tear gas’ (CS) in historic human volunteer trials correlates with activation of the human transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 ion channel (hTRPA1). This suggests that the irritation caused by the most potent of these compounds results from activation of this channel. We prepared 50 BMNs and measured their hTRPA1 agonist potencies. A mechanism of action consistent with their physiological activity, involving their dissolution in water on contaminated body surfaces, cell membrane penetration and reversible thiolation by a cysteine residue of hTRPA1, supported by data from nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with a model thiol, explains the structure–activity relationships. The correlation provides evidence that hTRPA1 is a receptor for irritants on nociceptive neurons involved in pain perception; thus, its activation in the eye, nose, mouth and skin would explain the symptoms of lachrymation, sneezing, coughing and stinging, respectively. The structure–activity results and the use of the BMNs as pharmacological tools in future by other researchers may contribute to a better understanding of the TRPA1 channel in humans (and other animals) and help facilitate the discovery of treatments for human diseases involving this receptor. PMID:26064575

  14. [In vitro dissolution rate of Liuwei Wuling tablet based on biological potency and integrated dissolution].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan; Cheng, Ling; Shen, Cheng-ying; Li, Juan-juan; Qiu, Ling; Shen, Gang; Han, Jin; Yuan, Hai-long

    2015-11-01

    To explore the feasibility of chemical and biological method in evaluation of the in vitro dissolution rate of Liuwei Wuling tablet (LWT), this experiment investigated the inhibitory effect of LWT dissolving solutions on LX-2 hepatic stellate cells in 0.1% SDS dissolution medium in different dissolving periods. From these results, the cumulative dissolution rate of LWT was obtained based on the cell inhibitory rate. The dissolution rates of deoxyschizandrin, phillyrin, and Specnuezhenide were determined by HPLC method. A novel approach of self-defined weighting coefficient had been created to establish the integrated dissolution rate model. Then f2 similar factor method was used to evaluate the relevance of these two methods. The results showed that f2 values for deoxyschizandrin, phillyrin, Specnuezhenide, and the integrated dissolution were 61, 43, 61 and 75 respectively, indicating that the dissolution of multi-component integration could fully reflect the biological potency of the whole recipe. The dissolution evaluation method for multicomponent integration based on biological activity is expected to be one of the effective means for in vitro dissolution test of LWT. PMID:27097413

  15. Low-Pressure Gas Effects on the Potency of an Electron Beam Against Ceramic Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    An 8-kv electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 mA from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" (UHT) burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1,427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 scc at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6-24 in. At both closer (2 in.) and farther (48 in.) standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high-voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  16. The p110 delta structure: mechanisms for selectivity and potency of new PI(3)K inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Alex; Miller, Simon; Williams, Olusegun; Le, Daniel D; Houseman, Benjamin T; Pacold, Joseph I; Gorrec, Fabrice; Hon, Wai-Ching; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Gaillard, Pascale; Rückle, Thomas; Schwarz, Matthias K; Shokat, Kevan M; Shaw, Jeffrey P; Williams, Roger L

    2010-02-01

    Deregulation of the phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) pathway has been implicated in numerous pathologies including cancer, diabetes, thrombosis, rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Recently, small-molecule and ATP-competitive PI(3)K inhibitors with a wide range of selectivities have entered clinical development. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying the isoform selectivity of these inhibitors, we developed a new expression strategy that enabled us to determine to our knowledge the first crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of the class IA PI(3)K p110 delta. Structures of this enzyme in complex with a broad panel of isoform- and pan-selective class I PI(3)K inhibitors reveal that selectivity toward p110 delta can be achieved by exploiting its conformational flexibility and the sequence diversity of active site residues that do not contact ATP. We have used these observations to rationalize and synthesize highly selective inhibitors for p110 delta with greatly improved potencies. PMID:20081827

  17. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  18. The influence of professional expertise and task complexity upon the potency of the contextual interference effect.

    PubMed

    Ollis, Stewart; Button, Chris; Fairweather, Malcolm

    2005-03-01

    The contextual interference (CI) effect has been investigated through practice schedule manipulations within both basic and applied studies. Despite extensive research activity there is little conclusive evidence regarding the optimal practice structure of real world manipulative tasks in professional training settings. The present study therefore assessed the efficacy of practising simple and complex knot-tying skills in professional fire-fighters training. Forty-eight participants were quasi-randomly assigned to various practice schedules along the CI continuum. Twenty-four participants were students selected for their novice knot-tying capabilities and 24 were experienced fire-fighters who were more 'experienced knot-tiers'. They were assessed for skill acquisition, retention and transfer effects having practiced tying knots classified as simple or complex. Surprisingly, high levels of CI scheduling enhance learning for novices even when practising a complex task. The findings also revealed that CI benefits are most apparent as learners engage in tasks high in transfer distality. In conclusion, complexity and experience are mediating factors influencing the potency of the CI training effect in real-world settings. PMID:15698822

  19. Application of the concept of relative photomutagenic potencies to selected furocoumarins in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Christiane; Raquet, Nicole; Schrenk, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Furocoumarins are phototoxic and photomutagenic natural plant constituents found in many medicinal plants and food items. Since plants contain mixtures of several furocoumarins, there is a need for a comparative risk assessment of a large number of furocoumarins. Previously, we have introduced the concept of relative Photomutagenicity Equivalency Factors (PMEFs) derived from the slope of the concentration-response curve of photomutagenicity of individual furocoumarins in V79 cells using the HPRT mutation assay in the presence of UVA irradiation at 125mJ/cm(2). Here we have applied this method to the furocoumarins bergamottin, isopimpinellin and psoralen using 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) as a reference compound with a PMEF of 1.0. We found that neither bergamottin nor isopimpinellin, two furocoumarins abundant in plants, food etc., exerted any significant photomutagenicity while psoralen was clearly photomutagenic with a PMEF of 0.36. Similarly, isopimpinellin was not phototoxic in V79 cells, while bergamottin showed some cytotoxicity which, however, was completely independent of UVA irradiation. Only psoralen was photocytotoxic showing a similar concentration-response relationship for photomutagenicity, and for photocytotoxicity (at 72h after irradiation). Data from the micronucleus assay for DNA damage at 20h after irradiation were in complete agreement with the HPRT mutation data. Our findings indicate that individual furocoumarins differ enormously in their photomutagenic potency, and that a specific toxicological risk assessment is required for each furocoumarin instead of an assessment based on the sum of furocoumarins in a given sample.

  20. Structure-Based Design of Human TLR8-Specific Agonists with Augmented Potency and Adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human Toll-like receptor 8 (hTLR8) is expressed in myeloid dendritic cells, monocytes, and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Engagement by TLR8 agonists evokes a distinct cytokine profile which favors the development of type 1 helper T cells. Crystal structures of the ectodomain of hTLR8 cocrystallized with two regioisomers of a dual TLR7/8-agonistic N1-substituted imidazoquinolines showed subtle differences in their interactions in the binding site of hTLR8. We hypothesized that the potency of a previously reported best-in-class pure TLR8 agonist, 3-pentylquinoline-2-amine, could be further enhanced by “designing in” functional groups that would mimic key intermolecular interactions that we had observed in the crystal structures. We performed a focused exploration of decorating the quinoline core with alkylamino groups at all possible positions. These studies have led to the identification of a novel TLR8 agonist that was ∼20-fold more potent than the parent compound and displays prominent adjuvantic activity in a rabbit model of immunization. PMID:26351878

  1. Tetraploid Embryonic Stem Cells Maintain Pluripotency and Differentiation Potency into Three Germ Layers

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Hiroyuki; Kano, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Wataru; Takasawa, Ken; Wakitani, Shoichi; Hiyama, Masato; Nishino, Koichiro; Kusakabe, Ken Takeshi; Kiso, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Polyploid amphibians and fishes occur naturally in nature, while polyploid mammals do not. For example, tetraploid mouse embryos normally develop into blastocysts, but exhibit abnormalities and die soon after implantation. Thus, polyploidization is thought to be harmful during early mammalian development. However, the mechanisms through which polyploidization disrupts development are still poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to elucidate how genome duplication affects early mammalian development. To this end, we established tetraploid embryonic stem cells (TESCs) produced from the inner cell masses of tetraploid blastocysts using electrofusion of two-cell embryos in mice and studied the developmental potential of TESCs. We demonstrated that TESCs possessed essential pluripotency and differentiation potency to form teratomas, which differentiated into the three germ layers, including diploid embryonic stem cells. TESCs also contributed to the inner cell masses in aggregated chimeric blastocysts, despite the observation that tetraploid embryos fail in normal development soon after implantation in mice. In TESCs, stability after several passages, colony morphology, and alkaline phosphatase activity were similar to those of diploid ESCs. TESCs also exhibited sufficient expression and localization of pluripotent markers and retained the normal epigenetic status of relevant reprogramming factors. TESCs proliferated at a slower rate than ESCs, indicating that the difference in genomic dosage was responsible for the different growth rates. Thus, our findings suggested that mouse ESCs maintained intrinsic pluripotency and differentiation potential despite tetraploidization, providing insights into our understanding of developmental elimination in polyploid mammals. PMID:26091100

  2. Embryonic Stem Cell Culture Conditions Support Distinct States Associated with Different Developmental Stages and Potency.

    PubMed

    Martin Gonzalez, Javier; Morgani, Sophie M; Bone, Robert A; Bonderup, Kasper; Abelchian, Sahar; Brakebusch, Cord; Brickman, Joshua M

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are cell lines derived from the mammalian pre-implantation embryo. Here we assess the impact of derivation and culture conditions on both functional potency and ESC transcriptional identity. Individual ESCs cultured in either two small-molecule inhibitors (2i) or with knockout serum replacement (KOSR), but not serum, can generate high-level chimeras regardless of how these cells were derived. ESCs cultured in these conditions showed a transcriptional correlation with early pre-implantation embryos (E1.5-E3.5) and contributed to development from the 2-cell stage. Conversely, the transcriptome of serum-cultured ESCs correlated with later stages of development (E4.5), at which point embryonic cells are more restricted in their developmental potential. Thus, ESC culture systems are not equivalent, but support cell types that resemble distinct developmental stages. Cells derived in one condition can be reprogrammed to another developmental state merely by adaptation to another culture condition. PMID:27509134

  3. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., "FKK", "LKL", "KKLL", "KWK", "VLK", "CYCR", "CRR", "RFC", "RRR", "LKKL") are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  4. Isolation and Pharmacological Evaluation of Minor Cannabinoids from High-Potency Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Mohamed M; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; El-Alfy, Abir T; Ahmed, Safwat A; Slade, Desmond; Husni, Afeef S; Manly, Susan P; Wilson, Lisa; Seale, Suzanne; Cutler, Stephen J; Ross, Samir A

    2015-06-26

    Seven new naturally occurring hydroxylated cannabinoids (1-7), along with the known cannabiripsol (8), have been isolated from the aerial parts of high-potency Cannabis sativa. The structures of the new compounds were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, GC-MS, and HRESIMS as 8α-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (1), 8β-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (2), 10α-hydroxy-Δ(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (3), 10β-hydroxy-Δ(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (4), 10α-hydroxy-Δ(9,11)-hexahydrocannabinol (5), 9β,10β-epoxyhexahydrocannabinol (6), and 11-acetoxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (7). The binding affinity of isolated compounds 1-8, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and Δ(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol toward CB1 and CB2 receptors as well as their behavioral effects in a mouse tetrad assay were studied. The results indicated that compound 3, with the highest affinity to the CB1 receptors, exerted the most potent cannabimimetic-like actions in the tetrad assay, while compound 4 showed partial cannabimimetic actions. Compound 2, on the other hand, displayed a dose-dependent hypolocomotive effect only.

  5. Prediction of neurotoxic potency of hazardous substances with a modular in vitro test battery.

    PubMed

    Binding, N; Madeja, M; Musshoff, U; Neidt, U; Altrup, U; Speckmann, E J; Witting, U

    1996-11-01

    Neurotoxic action was investigated on different model nervous systems linked to a modular in vitro test battery. Voltage operated potassium channels and glutamate operated ion channels expressed in oocytes of the clawed frog Xenopus laevis by injection of cRNA (cloned RNA) or mRNA, respectively, as well as isolated neurons and isolated neuronal networks from the buccal ganglia of the snail Helix pomatia, were used as consecutive modules of different complexity. Lead (Pb2+) was chosen as a known neurotoxic model substance to evaluate the suitability of the test battery to predict the neurotoxic potency of hazardous substances, to establish dose-response relationships, and to investigate the basic mechanisms involved in neurotoxicity. All modules delivered consistent results: potassium currents were reduced by lead with a threshold concentration of 0.1 mumol/l. Membrane currents elicited by the glutamate receptor agonists kainate were decreased by lead with a threshold concentration below 0.1 mumol/l, while currents elicited by the agonist AMPA were not affected. Action potentials generated by the isolated B4 snail neuron showed a decrease of potential amplitude and a prolongation of potential duration after application of lead. The neuronal network controlling the feeding activities of the snail reacted with a decrease of the frequency of the spontaneously generated feeding depolarisations, thus showing the direct neurotoxic effect of lead on body functions and behaviour.

  6. Preparation of nano/submicrometer Ganoderma tsugae and its mutagenic potencies and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Hsin; Yeh, An-I

    2014-12-17

    This study explored the feasibility of preparing nano/submicrometer particles from Ganoderma tsugae to enhance the contents of bioactive compounds and to assess its mutagenic potencies and cytotoxicity. Hot-water extract, a common product, was employed as a reference. After 3 h of media milling, almost all of the particles were smaller than 1 μm with a number-mean diameter of 0.11 μm. There were about 62% particles smaller than 0.1 μm in terms of number of particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the presence of particles at nano/submicrometer scale. The content of 1→3-β-D-glucan in nano/submicrometer G. tsugae was 3.5 times of that in hot-water extract. Both nano/submicrometer and hot-water extract G. tsugae exhibited no mutagenic potential to Salmonella Typhimurium tester strains. Cell toxicity test also confirmed the safety of both nano/submicrometer and hot-water extract G. tsugae. The effect of media milling on the structural change of hyphae was also discussed.

  7. Functions of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins in Stem Cell Potency and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qishan; Jin, Min; Zhu, Jianhua; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells possess huge importance in developmental biology, disease modelling, cell replacement therapy, and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine because they have the remarkable potential for self-renewal and to differentiate into almost all the cell types in the human body. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell potency and differentiation is essential and critical for extensive application. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are modular proteins consisting of RNA-binding motifs and auxiliary domains characterized by extensive and divergent functions in nucleic acid metabolism. Multiple roles of hnRNPs in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation enable them to be effective gene expression regulators. More recent findings show that hnRNP proteins are crucial factors implicated in maintenance of stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency and cell differentiation. The hnRNPs interact with certain sequences in target gene promoter regions to initiate transcription. In addition, they recognize 3′UTR or 5′UTR of specific gene mRNA forming mRNP complex to regulate mRNA stability and translation. Both of these regulatory pathways lead to modulation of gene expression that is associated with stem cell proliferation, cell cycle control, pluripotency, and committed differentiation. PMID:23984388

  8. A General Strategy to Enhance the Potency of Chimeric Transcriptional Activators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natesan, Sridaran; Molinari, Elizabeth; Rivera, Victor M.; Rickles, Richard J.; Gilman, Michael

    1999-11-01

    Efforts to increase the potency of transcriptional activators are generally unsuccessful because poor expression of activators in mammalian cells limits their delivery to target promoters. Here we report that the effectiveness of chimeric activators can be dramatically improved by expressing them as noncovalent tetrameric bundles. Bundled activation domains are much more effective at activating a reporter gene than simple monomeric activators, presumably because, at similar expression levels, up to 4 times as many the activation domains are delivered to the target promoter. These bundled activation domains are also more effective than proteins in which activation domains are tandemly reiterated in the same polypeptide chain, because such proteins are very poorly expressed and therefore not delivered effectively. These observations suggest that there is a threshold number of activation domains that must be bound to a promoter for activation, above which promoter activity is simply a function of the number of activators bound. We show that bundling can be exploited practically to enhance the sensitivity of mammalian two-hybrid assays, enabling detection of weak interactions or those between poorly expressed proteins. Bundling also dramatically improves the performance of a small-molecule-regulated gene expression system when the expression level of regulatory protein is limiting, a situation that may be encountered in gene therapy applications.

  9. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-04-05

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease.

  10. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  11. First systematic evaluation of the potency of Cannabis sativa plants grown in Albania.

    PubMed

    Bruci, Zana; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Athanaselis, Sotirios; Nikolaou, Panagiota; Pazari, Ermira; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Vyshka, Gentian

    2012-10-10

    Cannabis products (marijuana, hashish, cannabis oil) are the most frequently abused illegal substances worldwide. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive component of Cannabis sativa plant, whereas cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) are other major but no psychoactive constituents. Many studies have already been carried out on these compounds and chemical research was encouraged due to the legal implications concerning the misuse of marijuana. The aim of this study was to determine THC, CBD and CBN in a significant number of cannabis samples of Albanian origin, where cannabis is the most frequently used drug of abuse, in order to evaluate and classify them according to their cannabinoid composition. A GC-MS method was used, in order to assay cannabinoid content of hemp samples harvested at different maturation degree levels during the summer months and grown in different areas of Albania. This method can also be used for the determination of plant phenotype, the evaluation of psychoactive potency and the control of material quality. The highest cannabinoid concentrations were found in the flowers of cannabis. The THC concentrations in different locations of Albania ranged from 1.07 to 12.13%. The influence of environmental conditions on cannabinoid content is discussed. The cannabinoid content of cannabis plants were used for their profiling, and it was used for their classification, according to their geographical origin. The determined concentrations justify the fact that Albania is an area where cannabis is extensively cultivated for illegal purposes.

  12. Collaborative study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of diphtheria toxoid vaccines-part 1.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, R; Sesardic, D; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study on the evaluation of an alternative functional assay, the Vero cell method, to the Ph. Eur. in vivo challenge procedures for potency determination of diphtheria toxoid in 6 different combined vaccines was initiated in January 2001. The study was an extension of a previous study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of tetanus toxoid vaccines for human use. To allow interim evaluation of test results and to monitor study progress, the project was divided into three consecutive phases. The results of Phase I and II studies are presented in this report. Pre-validation (Phase I) study, performed in two laboratories, indicated that comparable diphtheria potency estimates were obtained in the Ph. Eur. direct intradermal challenge assay in guinea pigs, in Vero cell assay and in indirect ELISA for five vaccines of different potencies (range of estimates: ca. 20-200 IU/ml). The correlation coefficients between the challenge assay and the Vero cell assay corresponded to those between the challenge assay and ELISA, confirming that the antibodies play an important role in protection and that predominantly protective/neutralising antibodies are present in guinea pigs, at the time point investigated. It was observed, for Vero cell assays, that about 16-35 (9-28 in Phase II study) fold lower titre of individual serum samples were obtained when using equine, rather than guinea pig reference serum. The study also provided preliminary information that sera from the same guinea pigs may be used for potency determination of both diphtheria and tetanus toxoid components of vaccines. In Phase II, another five laboratories analysed a subset of the vaccines included in Phase I study plus an additional vaccine. Four laboratories performed the lethal challenge assay and one laboratory carried out the intradermal challenge assay. All laboratories also performed the Vero cell assay and both ELISA for diphtheria antitoxin and ELISA for tetanus

  13. CNS depressants accelerate the dissociation of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding and GABA enhances their displacing potencies

    SciTech Connect

    Maksay, G.; Ticku, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    The specific binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) was studied in synaptosomal membranes of rat cerebral cortex. The displacing potencies of eleven CNS depressants and three convulsants were determined in the presence of 1 /sup +/M GABA and 10 nM R 5135. GABA enhanced the displacing potencies of depressants of most diverse chemical structures: diaryltriazine (LY 81067), pyrazolopyridine (etazolate), cinnamide, glutarimide, 2,3-benzodiazepine (tofizopam) and alcohol derivatives, barbiturates, (+)etomidate, methaqualone and meprobamate. In contrast, the IC/sub 50/ values of convulsants (picrotoxinin, pentetrazol and the barbiturate enantiomer S(+)MPPB) were not significantly affected. The depressants accelerated either basal or GABA-augmented dissociation of /sup 35/-TBPS mainly by increasing the contribution of its rapid first phase.

  14. Assessing the potency of oral polio vaccine kept outside of the cold chain during a national immunization campaign in Chad.

    PubMed

    Zipursky, Simona; Boualam, Liliane; Cheikh, Dah Ould; Fournier-Caruana, Jacqueline; Hamid, Djabar; Janssen, Mathias; Kartoglu, Umit; Waeterloos, Genevieve; Ronveaux, Olivier

    2011-08-01

    This study is the first systematic documentation of the potency of monovalent oral polio vaccine type 3 (mOPV3) kept at ambient temperatures during a polio immunization campaign in Chad. During the study test vials were exposed to temperatures of up to 47.1 °C, and kept outside of the 2-8 °C range for a maximum of 86.9 hours. Post-campaign laboratory testing confirmed that the test vials were still potent, and in conformity with the defined release specifications. Further, the Vaccine Vial Monitors performed as expected, giving an early warning indication of when cumulative exposure to heat reached levels that may have negatively affected the vaccine's potency. This study provides proof-of-concept evidence that certain types of OPV remain potent and thus can be kept, for limited periods of time, as well as administered at ambient temperatures.

  15. Product-specific validation of a serological potency test for release of Leptospira vaccines in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Catrina; Novokova, Viera

    2013-09-01

    Historically in the European Union, all Leptospira vaccines were released using the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) hamster potency assay. Recently, there has been a shift toward alternatives that offer either refinement of testing or replacement of animals for product release. This is being driven by animal welfare concerns but also by a drive to have more consistent, cheaper, and faster batch release tests. This publication discusses one such example of a multicomponent canine vaccine that includes three Leptospira serovars and has recently been registered in the European Union. The potency release test is a refinement because it uses rabbit serology rather than hamster challenge. This publication covers the principles of the test method, challenges faced during its development and registration, and discussion about benefits and limitations of this method. It concludes with a view of how the use of serology testing could fit into an overall strategy to move to fully in vitro testing by adopting a consistency approach.

  16. Product-specific validation of a serological potency test for release of Leptospira vaccines in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Catrina; Novokova, Viera

    2013-09-01

    Historically in the European Union, all Leptospira vaccines were released using the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) hamster potency assay. Recently, there has been a shift toward alternatives that offer either refinement of testing or replacement of animals for product release. This is being driven by animal welfare concerns but also by a drive to have more consistent, cheaper, and faster batch release tests. This publication discusses one such example of a multicomponent canine vaccine that includes three Leptospira serovars and has recently been registered in the European Union. The potency release test is a refinement because it uses rabbit serology rather than hamster challenge. This publication covers the principles of the test method, challenges faced during its development and registration, and discussion about benefits and limitations of this method. It concludes with a view of how the use of serology testing could fit into an overall strategy to move to fully in vitro testing by adopting a consistency approach. PMID:23849308

  17. Bayesian integrated testing strategy (ITS) for skin sensitization potency assessment: a decision support system for quantitative weight of evidence and adaptive testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy; Strickland, Judy; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The presented Bayesian network Integrated Testing Strategy (ITS-3) for skin sensitization potency assessment is a decision support system for a risk assessor that provides quantitative weight of evidence, leading to a mechanistically interpretable potency hypothesis, and formulates adaptive testing strategy for a chemical. The system was constructed with an aim to improve precision and accuracy for predicting LLNA potency beyond ITS-2 (Jaworska et al., J Appl Toxicol 33(11):1353-1364, 2013) by improving representation of chemistry and biology. Among novel elements are corrections for bioavailability both in vivo and in vitro as well as consideration of the individual assays' applicability domains in the prediction process. In ITS-3 structure, three validated alternative assays, DPRA, KeratinoSens and h-CLAT, represent first three key events of the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization. The skin sensitization potency prediction is provided as a probability distribution over four potency classes. The probability distribution is converted to Bayes factors to: 1) remove prediction bias introduced by the training set potency distribution and 2) express uncertainty in a quantitative manner, allowing transparent and consistent criteria to accept a prediction. The novel ITS-3 database includes 207 chemicals with a full set of in vivo and in vitro data. The accuracy for predicting LLNA outcomes on the external test set (n = 60) was as follows: hazard (two classes)-100 %, GHS potency classification (three classes)-96 %, potency (four classes)-89 %. This work demonstrates that skin sensitization potency prediction based on data from three key events, and often less, is possible, reliable over broad chemical classes and ready for practical applications.

  18. Bayesian integrated testing strategy (ITS) for skin sensitization potency assessment: a decision support system for quantitative weight of evidence and adaptive testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy; Strickland, Judy; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The presented Bayesian network Integrated Testing Strategy (ITS-3) for skin sensitization potency assessment is a decision support system for a risk assessor that provides quantitative weight of evidence, leading to a mechanistically interpretable potency hypothesis, and formulates adaptive testing strategy for a chemical. The system was constructed with an aim to improve precision and accuracy for predicting LLNA potency beyond ITS-2 (Jaworska et al., J Appl Toxicol 33(11):1353-1364, 2013) by improving representation of chemistry and biology. Among novel elements are corrections for bioavailability both in vivo and in vitro as well as consideration of the individual assays' applicability domains in the prediction process. In ITS-3 structure, three validated alternative assays, DPRA, KeratinoSens and h-CLAT, represent first three key events of the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization. The skin sensitization potency prediction is provided as a probability distribution over four potency classes. The probability distribution is converted to Bayes factors to: 1) remove prediction bias introduced by the training set potency distribution and 2) express uncertainty in a quantitative manner, allowing transparent and consistent criteria to accept a prediction. The novel ITS-3 database includes 207 chemicals with a full set of in vivo and in vitro data. The accuracy for predicting LLNA outcomes on the external test set (n = 60) was as follows: hazard (two classes)-100 %, GHS potency classification (three classes)-96 %, potency (four classes)-89 %. This work demonstrates that skin sensitization potency prediction based on data from three key events, and often less, is possible, reliable over broad chemical classes and ready for practical applications. PMID:26612363

  19. Measles vaccine potency and sero-conversion rates among infants receiving measles immunization in Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fowotade, A; Okonko, I O; Nwabuisi, C; Bakare, R A; Fadeyi, A; Adu, F D

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the seroconversion rate of measles vaccine among infants receiving measles immunization in Ilorin, Nigeria. The pre- and post-measles vaccination sera of the children were tested using the Haemagglutination Inhibition test. The measles vaccines administered at the immunization centre were also tested for their potency using in-vitro titration method. Only 286 (71.5%) of the vacinees returned to give post-vaccination samples. All the infants screened had low pre-vaccination measles antibody titers. Thirty one (8.0%) of the infants had measles prior to vaccination. The seroconversion pattern showed that 196 (68.6%) of the infants developed protective antibody titers. Low seroconversion rate reported in this study was due to low vaccine potency. The titers of vaccines with low potency ranged between log10(-1.0)-log10(-2.25) TCID/per dose. This was beside other non specific antiviral substances exhibited virus neutralizing activity. Only 3 (50%) of the 6 vaccine vials tested had virus titers of log10(-3.25) to log10(-3.5), which fell above the cut-off point recommended by the World Health Organization for measles vaccines. The sero-conversion rate of 68.6% observed among vaccinees is far lower than the immunity level of 95% required stopping measles transmission in an endemic community. Failure of 31.4% of these infants to sero-convert post vaccination can be attributed partly to administration of sub-potent vaccines. There is need for improvement and maintenance of effective vaccine cold chain system in Nigeria. There is need also for periodic monitoring of post-vaccination antibody titers as well as vaccine potency status in order to ensure development of protective seroconversion rates.

  20. Efficacy and potency of class I antiarrhythmic drugs for suppression of Ca2+ waves in permeabilized myocytes lacking calsequestrin.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Eleonora Savio; Knollmann, Björn C

    2011-11-01

    Ca(2+) waves can trigger ventricular arrhythmias such as catecholaminergic-polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Drugs that prevent Ca(2+) waves may have antiarrhythmic properties. Here, we use permeabilized ventricular myocytes from a CPVT mouse model lacking calsequestrin (casq2) to screen all clinically available class I antiarrhythmic drugs and selected other antiarrhythmic agents for activity against Ca(2+) waves. Casq2-/- myocytes were imaged in line-scan mode and the following Ca(2+) wave parameters analyzed: wave incidence, amplitude, frequency, and propagation speed. IC(50) (potency) and maximum inhibition (efficacy) were calculated for each drug. Drugs fell into 3 distinct categories. Category 1 drugs (flecainide and R-propafenone) suppressed wave parameters with the highest potency (IC(50)<10 μM) and efficacy (>50% maximum wave inhibition). Category 2 drugs (encainide, quinidine, lidocaine, and verapamil) had intermediate potency (IC(50) 20-40 μM) and efficacy (20-40% maximum wave inhibition). Category 3 drugs (procainamide, disopyramide, mexiletine, cibenzoline, and ranolazine) had no significant effects on Ca(2+) waves at the highest concentration tested (100 μM). Propafenone was stereoselective, with R-propafenone suppressing waves more potently than S-propafenone (IC(50): R-propafenone 2 ± 0.2 μM vs. S-propafenone 54 ± 18 μM). Both flecainide and R-propafenone decreased Ca(2+) spark mass and converted propagated Ca(2+) waves into non-propagated wavelets and frequent sparks, suggesting that reduction in spark mass, not spark frequency, was responsible for wave suppression. Among all class I antiarrhythmic drugs, flecainide and R-propafenone inhibit Ca(2+) waves with the highest potency and efficacy. Permeabilized casq2-/- myocytes are a simple in-vitro assay for finding drugs with activity against Ca(2+) waves. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Possible Editorial'. PMID:21798265

  1. Integrating The Stereotype Content Model (Warmth And Competence) And The Osgood Semantic Differential (Evaluation, Potency, And Activity)

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Susan T.; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y.

    2015-01-01

    We integrate two prominent models of social perception dimensionality. In three studies, we demonstrate how the well-established semantic differential dimensions of evaluation and potency relate to the stereotype content model dimensions of warmth and competence. Specifially, using a correlational design (Study 1) and experimental designs (Studies 2 and 3), we found that semantic differential dimensions run diagonally across stereotype content model quadrants. Implications of integrating classic and modern approaches of social perception are discussed. PMID:26120217

  2. P4 capped amides and lactams as HCV NS3 protease inhibitors with improved potency and DMPK profile

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Latha G.; Sannigrahi, Mousumi; Bogen, Stephane; Pinto, Patrick; Chen, Kevin X.; Prongay, Andrew; Tong, Xiao; Cheng, K.-C.; Girijavallabhann, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F. George

    2010-09-03

    SAR studies on the extension of P3 unit of Boceprevir (1, SCH 503034) with amides and lactams and their synthesis is described. Extensive SAR studies resulted in the identification of 36 bearing 4,4-dimethyl lactam as the new P4 cap unit with improved potency (K*{sub i}, EC 90 = 70 nM) and pharmacokinetic properties (Rat AUC (PO) = 3.52 {micro}M h) compared to 1.

  3. Developing tools for risk assessment in protected species: Relative potencies inferred from competitive binding of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons to aryl hydrocarbon receptors from beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) and mouse.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brenda A; Reddy, Christopher M; Nelson, Robert K; Hahn, Mark E

    2010-11-01

    Persistent organic pollutants such as halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) biomagnify in food webs and accumulate to high concentrations in top predators like odontocete cetaceans (toothed whales). The most toxic HAHs are the 2,3,7,8-substituted halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans, and non-ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which exert their effects via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Understanding the impact of HAHs in wildlife is limited by the lack of taxon-specific information about the relative potencies of toxicologically important congeners. To assess whether Toxic Equivalency Factors (TEFs) determined in rodents are predictive of HAH relative potencies in a cetacean, we used beluga and mouse AHRs expressed in vitro from cloned cDNAs to measure the relative AHR-binding affinities of ten HAHs from five different structural classes. The rank order of mean IC(50)s for competitive binding to beluga AHR was: TCDDhigher affinity than the mouse AHR for most of the HAHs tested, consistent with the ∼2-fold higher [(3)H]TCDD binding affinity determined previously. These results are consistent with the World Health Organization mammalian TEFs for non- and mono-ortho PCB congeners. The comparatively high HAH binding affinities of the beluga AHR relative to those of an AHR from a dioxin-responsive mouse suggests that beluga, and perhaps cetaceans in general, may be particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of AHR agonists. Further study is warranted in order to more fully address this important question affecting protected and endangered species.

  4. Developing tools for risk assessment in protected species: Relative potencies inferred from competitive binding of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons to aryl hydrocarbon receptors from beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) and mouse.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brenda A; Reddy, Christopher M; Nelson, Robert K; Hahn, Mark E

    2010-11-01

    Persistent organic pollutants such as halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) biomagnify in food webs and accumulate to high concentrations in top predators like odontocete cetaceans (toothed whales). The most toxic HAHs are the 2,3,7,8-substituted halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans, and non-ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which exert their effects via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Understanding the impact of HAHs in wildlife is limited by the lack of taxon-specific information about the relative potencies of toxicologically important congeners. To assess whether Toxic Equivalency Factors (TEFs) determined in rodents are predictive of HAH relative potencies in a cetacean, we used beluga and mouse AHRs expressed in vitro from cloned cDNAs to measure the relative AHR-binding affinities of ten HAHs from five different structural classes. The rank order of mean IC(50)s for competitive binding to beluga AHR was: TCDDhigher affinity than the mouse AHR for most of the HAHs tested, consistent with the ∼2-fold higher [(3)H]TCDD binding affinity determined previously. These results are consistent with the World Health Organization mammalian TEFs for non- and mono-ortho PCB congeners. The comparatively high HAH binding affinities of the beluga AHR relative to those of an AHR from a dioxin-responsive mouse suggests that beluga, and perhaps cetaceans in general, may be particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of AHR agonists. Further study is warranted in order to more fully address this important question affecting protected and endangered species. PMID:20728228

  5. Two routes to actorhood: lexicalized potency to act and identification of the actor role

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Sabine; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2015-01-01

    The inference of causality is a crucial cognitive ability and language processing is no exception: recent research suggests that, across different languages, the human language comprehension system attempts to identify the primary causer of the state of affairs described (the “actor”) quickly and unambiguously (Bornkessel-Schlesewsky and Schlesewsky, 2009). This identification can take place verb-independently based on certain prominence cues (e.g., case, word order, animacy). Here, we present two experiments demonstrating that actor potential is also encoded at the level of individual nouns (a king is a better actor than a beggar). Experiment 1 collected ratings for 180 German nouns on 12 scales defined by adjective oppositions and deemed relevant for actorhood potential. By means of structural equation modeling, an actor potential (ACT) value was calculated for each noun. Experiment 2, an event-related potential study, embedded nouns from Experiment 1 in verb-final sentences, in which they were either actors or non-actors. N400 amplitude increased with decreasing ACT values and this modulation was larger for highly frequent nouns and for actor versus non-actor nouns. We argue that potency to act is lexically encoded for individual nouns and, since it modulates the N400 even for non-actor participants, it should be viewed as a property that modulates ease of lexical access (akin, for example, to lexical frequency). We conclude that two separate dimensions of actorhood computation are crucial to language comprehension: an experience-based, lexically encoded (bottom–up) representation of actorhood potential, and a prominence-based, computational mechanism for calculating goodness-of-fit to the actor role in a particular (top–down) sentence context. PMID:25688217

  6. Anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane in goats: comparison with isoflurane and halothane.

    PubMed Central

    Hikasa, Y; Okuyama, K; Kakuta, T; Takase, K; Ogasawara, S

    1998-01-01

    The anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane were compared with those of isoflurane and halothane in goats. The (mean +/- SD) minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) was 0.96 +/- 0.12% for halothane, 1.29 +/- 0.11% for isoflurane, and 2.33 +/- 0.15% for sevoflurane. Cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane were examined at end-tidal concentrations equivalent to 1, 1.5 and 2 MAC during either spontaneous or controlled ventilation (SV or CV). During SV, there were no significant differences in respiration rate, tidal volume and minute ventilation between anesthetics. Dose-dependent decreases in both tidal volume and minute ventilation induced by halothane were greater than those by either sevoflurane or isoflurane. Hypercapnia and acidosis induced by sevoflurane were not significantly different from those by either isoflurane or halothane at 1 and 1.5 MAC, but were less than those by halothane at 2 MAC. There was no significant difference in heart rate between anesthetics during SV and CV. During SV, all anesthetics induced dose-dependent decreases in arterial pressure, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and left ventricular stroke work index. Systemic vascular resistance with isoflurane at 2 MAC was lower than that with sevoflurane. During CV, sevoflurane induced dose-dependent circulatory depression (decreases in arterial pressure, cardiac index, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and right ventricular minute work index), similar to isoflurane. Halothane did not significantly alter systemic vascular resistance from 1 to 2 MAC. PMID:9798097

  7. Stem cells expanded from the human embryonic hindbrain stably retain regional specification and high neurogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Jignesh; Kittappa, Raja; Leto, Ketty; Gates, Monte; Borel, Melodie; Paulsen, Ole; Spitzer, Sonia; Karadottir, Ragnhildur Thora; Rossi, Ferdinando; Falk, Anna; Smith, Austin

    2013-07-24

    Stem cell lines that faithfully maintain the regional identity and developmental potency of progenitors in the human brain would create new opportunities in developmental neurobiology and provide a resource for generating specialized human neurons. However, to date, neural progenitor cultures derived from the human brain have either been short-lived or exhibit restricted, predominantly glial, differentiation capacity. Pluripotent stem cells are an alternative source, but to ascertain definitively the identity and fidelity of cell types generated solely in vitro is problematic. Here, we show that hindbrain neuroepithelial stem (hbNES) cells can be derived and massively expanded from early human embryos (week 5-7, Carnegie stage 15-17). These cell lines are propagated in adherent culture in the presence of EGF and FGF2 and retain progenitor characteristics, including SOX1 expression, formation of rosette-like structures, and high neurogenic capacity. They generate GABAergic, glutamatergic and, at lower frequency, serotonergic neurons. Importantly, hbNES cells stably maintain hindbrain specification and generate upper rhombic lip derivatives on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). When grafted into neonatal rat brain, they show potential for integration into cerebellar development and produce cerebellar granule-like cells, albeit at low frequency. hbNES cells offer a new system to study human cerebellar specification and development and to model diseases of the hindbrain. They also provide a benchmark for the production of similar long-term neuroepithelial-like stem cells (lt-NES) from pluripotent cell lines. To our knowledge, hbNES cells are the first demonstration of highly expandable neuroepithelial stem cells derived from the human embryo without genetic immortalization.

  8. Effects of Formulation on Microbicide Potency and Mitigation of the Development of Bacterial Insusceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Nicola L.; Forbes, Sarah; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Humphreys, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Risk assessments of the potential for microbicides to select for reduced bacterial susceptibility have been based largely on data generated through the exposure of bacteria to microbicides in aqueous solution. Since microbicides are normally formulated with multiple excipients, we have investigated the effect of formulation on antimicrobial activity and the induction of bacterial insusceptibility. We tested 8 species of bacteria (7 genera) before and after repeated exposure (14 passages), using a previously validated gradient plating system, for their susceptibilities to the microbicides benzalkonium chloride, benzisothiozolinone, chlorhexidine, didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride, DMDM-hydantoin, polyhexamethylene biguanide, thymol, and triclosan in aqueous solution (nonformulated) and in formulation with excipients often deployed in consumer products. Susceptibilities were also assessed following an additional 14 passages without microbicide to determine the stability of any susceptibility changes. MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were on average 11-fold lower for formulated microbicides than for nonformulated microbicides. After exposure to the antimicrobial compounds, of 72 combinations of microbicide and bacterium there were 19 ≥4-fold (mean, 8-fold) increases in MIC for nonformulated and 8 ≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MIC for formulated microbicides. Furthermore, there were 20 ≥4-fold increases in MBC (mean, 8-fold) for nonformulated and 10 ≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MBC for formulated microbicides. Susceptibility decreases fully or partially reverted back to preexposure values for 49% of MICs and 72% of MBCs after further passage. In summary, formulated microbicides exhibited greater antibacterial potency than unformulated actives and susceptibility decreases after repeated exposure were lower in frequency and extent. PMID:26253662

  9. Quaternary ammonium compounds as water channel blockers. Specificity, potency, and site of action.

    PubMed

    Detmers, Frank J M; de Groot, Bert L; Müller, E Matthias; Hinton, Andrew; Konings, Irene B M; Sze, Mozes; Flitsch, Sabine L; Grubmüller, Helmut; Deen, Peter M T

    2006-05-19

    Excessive water uptake through Aquaporins (AQP) can be life-threatening and reversible AQP inhibitors are needed. Here, we determined the specificity, potency, and binding site of tetraethylammonium (TEA) to block Aquaporin water permeability. Using oocytes, externally applied TEA blocked AQP1/AQP2/AQP4 with IC50 values of 1.4, 6.2, and 9.8 microM, respectively. Related tetraammonium compounds yielded some (propyl) or no (methyl, butyl, or pentyl) inhibition. TEA inhibition was lost upon a Tyr to Phe amino acid switch in the external water pore of AQP1/AQP2/AQP4, whereas the water permeability of AQP3 and AQP5, which lack a corresponding Tyr, was not blocked by TEA. Consistent with experimental data, multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations showed one stable binding site for TEA, but not tetramethyl (TMA), in AQP1, resulting in a nearly 50% water permeability inhibition, which was reduced in AQP1-Y186F due to effects on the TEA inhibitory binding region. Moreover, in the simulation TEA interacted with charged residues in the C (Asp128) and E (Asp185) loop, and the A(Tyr37-Asn42-Thr44) loop of the neighboring monomer, but not directly with Tyr186. The loss of TEA inhibition in oocytes expressing properly folded AQP1-N42A or -T44A is in line with the computationally predicted binding mode. Our data reveal that the molecular interaction of TEA with AQP1 differs and is about 1000-fold more effective on AQPs than on potassium channels. Moreover, the observed experimental and simulated similarities open the way for rational design and virtual screening for AQP-specific inhibitors, with quaternary ammonium compounds in general, and TEA in particular as a lead compound. PMID:16551622

  10. Effects of Formulation on Microbicide Potency and Mitigation of the Development of Bacterial Insusceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Nicola L; Forbes, Sarah; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Humphreys, Gavin J; McBain, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Risk assessments of the potential for microbicides to select for reduced bacterial susceptibility have been based largely on data generated through the exposure of bacteria to microbicides in aqueous solution. Since microbicides are normally formulated with multiple excipients, we have investigated the effect of formulation on antimicrobial activity and the induction of bacterial insusceptibility. We tested 8 species of bacteria (7 genera) before and after repeated exposure (14 passages), using a previously validated gradient plating system, for their susceptibilities to the microbicides benzalkonium chloride, benzisothiozolinone, chlorhexidine, didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride, DMDM-hydantoin, polyhexamethylene biguanide, thymol, and triclosan in aqueous solution (nonformulated) and in formulation with excipients often deployed in consumer products. Susceptibilities were also assessed following an additional 14 passages without microbicide to determine the stability of any susceptibility changes. MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were on average 11-fold lower for formulated microbicides than for nonformulated microbicides. After exposure to the antimicrobial compounds, of 72 combinations of microbicide and bacterium there were 19≥4-fold (mean, 8-fold) increases in MIC for nonformulated and 8≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MIC for formulated microbicides. Furthermore, there were 20≥4-fold increases in MBC (mean, 8-fold) for nonformulated and 10≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MBC for formulated microbicides. Susceptibility decreases fully or partially reverted back to preexposure values for 49% of MICs and 72% of MBCs after further passage. In summary, formulated microbicides exhibited greater antibacterial potency than unformulated actives and susceptibility decreases after repeated exposure were lower in frequency and extent. PMID:26253662

  11. Potency of various peptides as histamine liberators in the rat hind limb.

    PubMed

    Rioux, F; Kérouac, R; St-Pierre, S

    1985-07-01

    The potency of several peptides and drugs as histamine liberators was assessed using the rat isolated hind limb preparation. Neurotensin (NT) and compound 48/80 (C48/80) were effective in concentrations as low as 10(-9) M and 10(-8) M, respectively. Threshold concentrations of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) varied between 5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-6) M while somatostatin (SS) was barely active at 6 X 10(-6) M. No histamine release could be detected following the use of high concentrations of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) (6 X 10(-6) M), dynorphin (DYN) (6 X 10(-6) M) bradykinin (BK), des-Arg9-BK or bombesin (BB) (at 10(-5) M). Poly-L-Lysine and the calcium ionophore A23187 were about 100 times less active than NT. Concanavalin A (Con A) was inactive at 10(-6) M. These results indicate that NT is more potent (on a molar basis) as histamine liberator in the rat hind limb preparation (which contains a large population of cutaneous and subcutaneous mast cells) than any of the other compounds tested. Histamine release by NT was inhibited by preexposure of the rat hind limb mast cells to a high concentration of SP (1.5 X 10(-6) M). This result adds further support to the hypothesis suggesting that NT and SP might share a common mechanism of action and/or act through common receptors at least in rat mast cells.

  12. Potency and selectivity of inhibition of cathepsin K, L and S by their respective propeptides.

    PubMed

    Guay, J; Falgueyret, J P; Ducret, A; Percival, M D; Mancini, J A

    2000-10-01

    The prodomains of several cysteine proteases of the papain family have been shown to be potent inhibitors of their parent enzymes. An increased interest in cysteine proteases inhibitors has been generated with potential therapeutic targets such as cathepsin K for osteoporosis and cathepsin S for immune modulation. The propeptides of cathepsin S, L and K were expressed as glutathione S-transferase-fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The proteins were purified on glutathione affinity columns and the glutathione S-transferase was removed by thrombin cleavage. All three propeptides were tested for inhibitor potency and found to be selective within the cathepsin L subfamily (cathepsins K, L and S) compared with cathepsin B or papain. Inhibition of cathepsin K by either procathepsin K, L or S was time-dependent and occurred by an apparent one-step mechanism. The cathepsin K propeptide had a Ki of 3.6-6.3 nM for each of the three cathepsins K, L and S. The cathepsin L propeptide was at least a 240-fold selective inhibitor of cathepsin K (Ki = 0.27 nM) and cathepsin L (Ki = 0.12 nM) compared with cathepsin S (Ki = 65 nM). Interestingly, the cathepsin S propeptide was more selective for inhibition of cathepsin L (Ki = 0.46 nM) than cathepsin S (Ki = 7.6 nM) itself or cathepsin K (Ki = 7.0 nM). This is in sharp contrast to previously published data demonstrating that the cathepsin S propeptide is equipotent for inhibition of human cathepsin S and rat and paramecium cathepsin L [Maubach, G., Schilling, K., Rommerskirch, W., Wenz, I., Schultz, J. E., Weber, E. & Wiederanders, B. (1997), Eur J. Biochem. 250, 745-750]. These results demonstrate that limited selectivity of inhibition can be measured for the procathepsins K, L and S vs. the parent enzymes, but selective inhibition vs. cathepsin B and papain was obtained.

  13. Effects of Formulation on Microbicide Potency and Mitigation of the Development of Bacterial Insusceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Nicola L; Forbes, Sarah; Amézquita, Alejandro; McClure, Peter; Humphreys, Gavin J; McBain, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    Risk assessments of the potential for microbicides to select for reduced bacterial susceptibility have been based largely on data generated through the exposure of bacteria to microbicides in aqueous solution. Since microbicides are normally formulated with multiple excipients, we have investigated the effect of formulation on antimicrobial activity and the induction of bacterial insusceptibility. We tested 8 species of bacteria (7 genera) before and after repeated exposure (14 passages), using a previously validated gradient plating system, for their susceptibilities to the microbicides benzalkonium chloride, benzisothiozolinone, chlorhexidine, didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride, DMDM-hydantoin, polyhexamethylene biguanide, thymol, and triclosan in aqueous solution (nonformulated) and in formulation with excipients often deployed in consumer products. Susceptibilities were also assessed following an additional 14 passages without microbicide to determine the stability of any susceptibility changes. MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were on average 11-fold lower for formulated microbicides than for nonformulated microbicides. After exposure to the antimicrobial compounds, of 72 combinations of microbicide and bacterium there were 19≥4-fold (mean, 8-fold) increases in MIC for nonformulated and 8≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MIC for formulated microbicides. Furthermore, there were 20≥4-fold increases in MBC (mean, 8-fold) for nonformulated and 10≥4-fold (mean, 2-fold) increases in MBC for formulated microbicides. Susceptibility decreases fully or partially reverted back to preexposure values for 49% of MICs and 72% of MBCs after further passage. In summary, formulated microbicides exhibited greater antibacterial potency than unformulated actives and susceptibility decreases after repeated exposure were lower in frequency and extent.

  14. Characterization and Biological Potency of Mono- to Tetra-Halogenated Carbazoles.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Nicole; Jin, Un-Ho; Safe, Stephen; Cheng, Yating; Chittim, Brock; Konstantinov, Alex; Parette, Robert; Pena-Abaurrea, Miren; Reiner, Eric J; Poirier, David; Stefanac, Tomislav; McAlees, Alan J; McCrindle, Robert

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the characterization and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist activities of a series of chlorinated, brominated, and mixed bromo/chlorocarbazoles, some of which have been identified in various environmental samples. Attention is directed here to the possibility that halogenated carbazoles may currently be emitted into the environment as a result of the production of carbazole-containing polymers present in a wide variety of electronic devices. We have found that any carbazole that is not substituted in the 1,3,6,8 positions may be lost during cleanup of environmental extracts if a multilayer column is utilized, as is common practice for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) and related compounds. In the present study, (1)H NMR spectral shift data for 11 relevant halogenated carbazoles are reported, along with their gas chromatographic separation and analysis by mass spectrometry. These characterization data allow for confident structural assignments and the derivation of possible correlations between structure and toxicity based on the halogenation patterns of the isomers investigated. Some halogenated carbazoles exhibit characteristics of persistent organic pollutants and their potential dioxin-like activity was further investigated. The structure-dependent induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression in Ah-responsive MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells by these carbazoles was similar to that observed for other dioxin-like compounds, and the magnitude of the fold induction responses for the most active halogenated carbazoles was similar to that observed for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). 2,3,6,7-Tetrachlorocarbazole was one of the most active halogenated carbazoles and, like TCDD, contains 4 lateral substituents; however, the estimated relative effect potency for this compound (compared to TCDD) was 0.0001 and 0.0032, based on induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA, respectively.

  15. Systematic Artifacts in Support Vector Regression-Based Compound Potency Prediction Revealed by Statistical and Activity Landscape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balfer, Jenny; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Support vector machines are a popular machine learning method for many classification tasks in biology and chemistry. In addition, the support vector regression (SVR) variant is widely used for numerical property predictions. In chemoinformatics and pharmaceutical research, SVR has become the probably most popular approach for modeling of non-linear structure-activity relationships (SARs) and predicting compound potency values. Herein, we have systematically generated and analyzed SVR prediction models for a variety of compound data sets with different SAR characteristics. Although these SVR models were accurate on the basis of global prediction statistics and not prone to overfitting, they were found to consistently mispredict highly potent compounds. Hence, in regions of local SAR discontinuity, SVR prediction models displayed clear limitations. Compared to observed activity landscapes of compound data sets, landscapes generated on the basis of SVR potency predictions were partly flattened and activity cliff information was lost. Taken together, these findings have implications for practical SVR applications. In particular, prospective SVR-based potency predictions should be considered with caution because artificially low predictions are very likely for highly potent candidate compounds, the most important prediction targets. PMID:25742011

  16. Effects of testosterone undecanoate on sexual potency and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of impotent males.

    PubMed

    Benkert, O; Witt, W; Adam, W; Leitz, A

    1979-11-01

    A double-blind comparison was made of the effects of testosterone undecanoate (TU) and placebo on sexual potency of 29 impotent men ages 45--75. The main criteria for inclusion in the study were a reduced or nonexistent capacity to have an erection during intercourse and no clinical signs of endocrinological pathology. All patients received placebo for 2 weeks. Then TU was given at a daily dose of 120 mg to 13 patients selected at random while the other patients continued to receive placebo. After 8 weeks all patients received placebo again for 2 weeks. An improvement in sexual potency was reported by five patients given TU and eight patients given placebo, with no significant differences between the groups. Treatment with TU influenced neither the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as judged by levels of prolactin, LH, FSH, and the LHRH-induced LH/FSH response, nor depression, anxiety, and somatic scores or performance tests. The only specific effect of TU treatment was to decrease the total plasma testosterone level. The present findings show pharmacotherapy with androgens to be no more effective than placebo in restoring sexual potency to sexually impotent men without androgen deficiency. Further studies may be needed to elucidate fully the effects of androgen administration on psychological and endocrinological variables in such patients.

  17. Potencies and unblocking kinetic properties of antagonists at recombinant human NMDA receptors in a Xenopus oocytes model.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Tourette, Amélie; Cussac, Didier

    2015-05-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels are implicated in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, and a large number of pharmacological agents have been introduced that target the receptor via diverse mechanisms of action. Amongst others, subunit selectivity (in particular for the NR2B receptor subunit) and rapid unblocking kinetics have been put forward as favourable pharmacological properties of NMDA receptor-targeting drugs. Here, we describe a pharmacological characterization of human recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes in an electrophysiological set-up. Using this approach, we compare inhibitor potencies of several known NMDA receptor ligands as well as unblocking kinetic properties of selected compounds. All compounds tested had similar potencies at receptors containing NR2A or NR2B receptors with the exception of traxoprodil, which was selective for NR2B. The rank order of potency was (+)MK-801 > phencyclidine (PCP) ≈ traxoprodil > memantine ≈ ketamine > duloxetine. In line with its proposed rapid dissociation properties, the relatively well-tolerated drug memantine exhibits markedly faster unblocking than ketamine and PCP, similar to the low-affinity compound, duloxetine. Electrophysiological recording in Xenopus oocytes thus allows a relatively convenient comparison of key pharmacological parameters at recombinant human NMDA receptors.

  18. Antinociceptive potency of aminoglycoside antibiotics and magnesium chloride: a comparative study on models of phasic and incisional pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Prado, W A; Machado Filho, E B

    2002-03-01

    A close relationship exists between calcium concentration in the central nervous system and nociceptive processing. Aminoglycoside antibiotics and magnesium interact with N- and P/Q-type voltage-operated calcium channels. In the present study we compare the antinociceptive potency of intrathecal administration of aminoglycoside antibiotics and magnesium chloride in the tail-flick test and on incisional pain in rats, taken as models of phasic and persistent post-surgical pain, respectively. The order of potency in the tail-flick test was gentamicin (ED50 = 3.34 microg; confidence limits 2.65 and 4.2) > streptomycin (5.68 microg; 3.76 and 8.57) = neomycin (9.22 microg; 6.98 and 12.17) > magnesium (19.49 microg; 11.46 and 33.13). The order of potency to reduce incisional pain was gentamicin (ED50 = 2.06 microg; confidence limits 1.46 and 2.9) > streptomycin (47.86 microg; 26.3 and 87.1) = neomycin (83.17 microg; 51.6 and 133.9). The dose-response curves for each test did not deviate significantly from parallelism. We conclude that neomycin and streptomycin are more potent against phasic pain than against persistent pain, whereas gentamicin is equipotent against both types of pain. Magnesium was less potent than the antibiotics and effective in the tail-flick test only.

  19. Quantitative in vivo islet potency assay in normoglycemic nude mice correlates with primary graft function after clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Robert; Gmyr, Valery; Kremer, Bertrand; Hubert, Thomas; Soudan, Benoit; Lukowiak, Bruno; Vandewalle, Brigitte; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Pattou, Francois; Kerr-Conte, Julie

    2008-07-27

    Reliable assays are critically needed to monitor graft potency in islet transplantation (IT). We tested a quantitative in vivo islet potency assay (QIVIPA) based on human C-peptide (hCP) measurements in normoglycemic nude mice after IT under the kidney capsule. QIVIPA was initially tested by transplanting incremental doses of human islets. hCP levels in mice were correlated with the number of transplanted islet equivalents (r(2) = 0.6, P<0.01). We subsequently evaluated QIVIPA in eight islet preparations transplanted in type 1 diabetic patients. Conversely to standard criteria including islet mass, viability, purity, adenosine triphosphate content, or glucose stimulated insulin secretion, hCP in mice receiving 1% of the final islet product was correlated to primary graft function (hCP increase) after IT (r(2)=0.85, P<0.01). QIVIPA appears as a reliable test to monitor islet graft potency, applicable to validate new methods to produce primary islets or other human insulin secreting cells. PMID:18645503

  20. Phenylalanine in the pore of the Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel modulates picrotoxinin potency but not receptor function.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew J; Alqazzaz, Mona; Price, Kerry L; Weston, David A; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2014-10-01

    The Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC) is a bacterial homologue of eukaryotic Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. This protein has the potential to be a useful model for Cys-loop receptors but is unusual in that it has an aromatic residue (Phe) facing into the pore, leading to some predictions that this protein is incapable of ion flux. Subsequent studies have shown this is not the case, so here we probe the role of this residue by examining the function of the ELIC in cases in which the Phe has been substituted with a range of alternative amino acids, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and functionally examined. Most of the mutations have little effect on the GABA EC50, but the potency of the weak pore-blocking antagonist picrotoxinin at F16'A-, F16'D-, F16'S-, and F16'T-containing receptors was increased to levels comparable with those of Cys-loop receptors, suggesting that this antagonist can enter the pore only when residue 16' is small. T6'S has no effect on picrotoxinin potency when expressed alone but abolishes the increased potency when combined with F16'S, indicating that the inhibitor binds at position 6', as in Cys-loop receptors, if it can enter the pore. Overall, the data support the proposal that the ELIC pore is a good model for Cys-loop receptor pores if the role of F16' is taken into consideration.

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: measurement of relative inhibitory potency and serum drug levels by radioinhibitor binding displacement assay

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Cubela, R.; Johnston, C.I.

    1987-06-01

    Radioinhibitor binding displacement, a new method for the measurement of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) competitive inhibitors, has been used to assess the relative potency of nine synthetic ACE inhibitors. MK351A, tyrosyl derivative of enalaprilic acid was iodinated with /sup 125/I and used as the radioligand. (/sup 125/I)MK351A bound to human serum ACE in a concentration-dependent manner. It was displaced in a concentration-dependent manner by all ACE inhibitors tested. Fifty percent displacement of bound (/sup 125/I)MK351A (DD50) for each ACE inhibitor correlated well with inhibitor potency ID50, estimated using an ACE enzymatic activity assay using Hip-His-Leu as substrate (r = 0.96, p less than 0.001; n = 9). The radioinhibitor binding displacement assay was used to measure serum concentration of enalaprilic acid (MK422) in human serum samples. Drug concentration estimated by radioinhibitor binding displacement assay correlated closely (r = 0.96, p less than 0.001; n = 22) with the drug concentration measured by a specific radioimmunoassay. The radioinhibitor binding displacement technique using (/sup 125/I)MK351A as the ligand for human serum ACE has general application to all competitive ACE inhibitors, allowing comparison of in vitro ACE inhibitor potencies and estimation of serum ACE inhibitor concentrations.

  2. Evaluation of the skin sensitizing potency of chemicals by using the existing methods and considerations of relevance for elicitation.

    PubMed

    Basketter, David A; Andersen, Klaus E; Liden, Carola; Van Loveren, Henk; Boman, Anders; Kimber, Ian; Alanko, Kristiina; Berggren, Elisabet

    2005-01-01

    The Technical Committee of Classification and Labelling dealing with harmonized classification of substances and classification criteria under Directive 67/548/EEC on behalf of the European Commission nominated an expert group on skin sensitization in order to investigate further the possibility for potency consideration of skin sensitizers for future development of the classification criteria. All substances and preparations should be classified on the basis of their intrinsic properties and should be labelled accordingly with the rules set up in the Directive 67/548/EEC. The classification should be the same under their full life cycle and in the case that there is no harmonized classification the substance or preparation should be self-classified by the manufacturer in accordance with the same criteria. The Directive does not apply to certain preparations in the finished state, such as medical products, cosmetics, food and feeding stuffs, which are subject to specific community legislation. The main questions that are answered in this report are whether it would be possible to give detailed guidance on how to grade allergen potency based on the existing methods, whether such grading could be translated into practical thresholds and whether these could be set for both induction and elicitation. Examples are given for substances falling into various potency groups for skin sensitization relating to results from the local lymph node assay, the guinea pig maximization test, the Buehler method and human experience. PMID:15701129

  3. A comparative study of the allergenic potency of wild-type and glyphosate-tolerant gene-modified soybean cultivars.

    PubMed

    Sten, Eva; Skov, Per Stahl; Andersen, Sven B; Torp, Anna Maria; Olesen, Annette; Bindslev-Jensen, Ulla; Poulsen, Lars K; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    A large proportion of soybean cultivars grown in the USA are now genetically modified varieties and concern has been raised about the safety of these products for consumers. A study of the impact on allergenic potency in soybeans, comparable except for the newly introduced gene (CP4 EPSPS), was performed using soybean-sensitized patients. The allergenicity of 18 different (10 GM and 8 WT) soybean extracts was examined blindly by the following three methods: A) Sera from patients with specific IgE against soybean were used to determine concentrations inducing 50% RAST inhibition; B) Histamine release induced by the extracts was examined using blood from sensitized patients; C) SPT was performed on sensitized patients with all 18 extracts. All three methods showed variations in the allergenic potency between the individual extracts but allergenic potential was not affected by presence of the transgene. By using standard in vitro methods and SPT for determination of allergenicity we were not able to detect any significant difference in the allergenic potency between GM and WT soybeans.

  4. Update of potency factors for asbestos-related lung cancer and mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Berman, D Wayne; Crump, Kenny S

    2008-01-01

    The most recent update of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) health assessment document for asbestos (Nicholson, 1986, referred to as "the EPA 1986 update") is now 20 years old. That document contains estimates of "potency factors" for asbestos in causing lung cancer (K(L)'s) and mesothelioma (K(M)'s) derived by fitting mathematical models to data from studies of occupational cohorts. The present paper provides a parallel analysis that incorporates data from studies published since the EPA 1986 update. The EPA lung cancer model assumes that the relative risk varies linearly with cumulative exposure lagged 10 years. This implies that the relative risk remains constant after 10 years from last exposure. The EPA mesothelioma model predicts that the mortality rate from mesothelioma increases linearly with the intensity of exposure and, for a given intensity, increases indefinitely after exposure ceases, approximately as the square of time since first exposure lagged 10 years. These assumptions were evaluated using raw data from cohorts where exposures were principally to chrysotile (South Carolina textile workers, Hein et al., 2007; mesothelioma only data from Quebec miners and millers, Liddell et al., 1997) and crocidolite (Wittenoom Gorge, Australia miners and millers, Berry et al., 2004) and using published data from a cohort exposed to amosite (Paterson, NJ, insulation manufacturers, Seidman et al., 1986). Although the linear EPA model generally provided a good description of exposure response for lung cancer, in some cases it did so only by estimating a large background risk relative to the comparison population. Some of these relative risks seem too large to be due to differences in smoking rates and are probably due at least in part to errors in exposure estimates. There was some equivocal evidence that the relative risk decreased with increasing time since last exposure in the Wittenoom cohort, but none either in the South Carolina cohort up to 50

  5. Nanoparticle delivery of sterically hindered platinum(IV) prodrugs shows 100 times higher potency than that of cisplatin upon light activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiqin; Kang, Xiang; Sun, Jing; Jing, Xiabin; Wang, Zehua; Yan, Lesan; Qi, Ruogu; Zheng, Minhua

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of a sterically hindered pyridine ligand to a photosensitive platinum(iv) drug for drug delivery resulted in a >100 fold increase in effectiveness compared to the gold standard, cisplatin. PMID:26727577

  6. Pharmacological characterization of LY293284: A 5-HT1A receptor agonist with high potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Foreman, M M; Fuller, R W; Rasmussen, K; Nelson, D L; Calligaro, D O; Zhang, L; Barrett, J E; Booher, R N; Paget, C J; Flaugh, M E

    1994-09-01

    (-)-LY293284, (-)-4R-6-acetyl-4-(di-n-propylamino)1,3,4,5- tetrahydrobenz[c,d]indole, is a conformationally restricted tryptamine derivative with an acetyl group serving as a protophilic substitution for the hydroxyl in serotonin (5-HT). In ligand displacement studies, LY293284 had a Ki of 0.07 nM for the 5-HT1A receptor but no affinity for other monoaminergic receptors within 3 orders of magnitude. LY293284 was evaluated in in vivo models, which have been used as markers for presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor activity. LY293284 decreased hypothalamic 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels (ED50, 2.9 micrograms/kg s.c.) and dorsal raphe serotonergic neuron firing rate (ED50, 0.08 micrograms/kg s.c.), which are accepted indices of presynaptic activity. LY293284 also induced a reduction in body temperature in rats (ED50, 3.6 micrograms/kg s.c.), which was blocked by pretreatment with (+/-)-pindolol. Hypothermic responses of rats to 5-HT1A agonists have had both pre- and postsynaptic characteristics in previous studies. The ED50 values for 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) in these tests were 15 to 45 times higher than those observed for LY293284. In models for postsynaptic activity, the ED50 for LY293284 for elevating serum corticosterone levels was 9.7 micrograms/kg s.c. and the minimum effective doses to induce lower lip retraction and flat posture were 3 micrograms/kg s.c. For comparison, the same indices obtained for 8-OH-DPAT were 222.4 and 100 micrograms/kg, respectively. The 5-HT syndrome responses induced by LY293284 were also attenuated by pretreatment with (+/-)-pindolol. LY293284 was 10 times more potent than 8-OH-DPAT in a drug discrimination test that used pigeons trained to identify 8-OH-DPAT. In sexual behavior tests with male rats, LY293284 induced a maximal reduction in ejaculatory latency at 0.01 micrograms/kg s.c., which was approximately 10 times higher potency than 8-OH-DPAT. In the pigeon conflict model for anxiolytic

  7. Modelling the Spectrum of Potency a Stationary Random Process in the Form of Spline First Order at the Random Number of Data in Instant of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinova, I.; Kozlova, A.

    2016-08-01

    The spectrum of potency as same the function of correlation is one of the most important characteristic of the second process random order. The spectrum of potency allows to judge about, that structure of process gives opportunity to take estimation of spectrum composition of useful signals and hindrances, allows to produce synthesis (reconstruction) the signals and to build filters and to obtain the estimates filtration. The purpose of this presenting work is modeling of process random stationary potency spectrum by random dates number in measurement moments. Using by probability theory methods and mathematical statistics was derived unbiased estimator of the potency spectrum in the form of spline first order, and were researched statistic characteristics estimation.

  8. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  9. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  10. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  11. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  12. Higher Education Exchange, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The Higher Education Exchange is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the Higher Education Exchange publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  13. Higher Education Exchange, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The "Higher Education Exchange" is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  14. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  15. Nano-titanium dioxide modulates the dermal sensitization potency of DNCB

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We determined the ability of a model nanoparticle (NP) (titanium dioxide, TiO2) to modulate sensitization induced by a known potent dermal sensitizer (dinitrochlorobenzene) using a variant of the local lymph node assay called lymph node proliferation assay. BALB/c mice received sub-cutaneous injections of vehicle (2.5 mM sodium citrate), TiO2 NPs (0.004, 0.04 or 0.4 mg/ml) or pigment particles (0.04 mg/ml) both stabilized in sodium citrate buffer at the base of each ear (2x50μl), before receiving dermal applications (on both ears) of 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) (2x25μl of 0.1%) or its vehicle (acetone olive oil – AOO (4:1)) on days 0, 1 and 2. On day 5, the stimulation index (SI) was calculated as a ratio of 3HTdR incorporation in lymphocytes from DNBC-treated mice and AOO-treated controls. In a second experiment the EC3-value for DNCB (0 to 0.1%) was assessed in the absence or presence of 0.04 mg/ml TiO2. In a third experiment, the lymphocyte subpopulations and the cytokine secretion profile were analyzed after TiO2 (0.04 mg/ml) and DNCB (0.1%) treatment. Injection of NPs in AOO-treated control mice did not have any effect on lymph node (LN) proliferation. DNCB sensitization resulted in LN proliferation, which was further increased by injection of TiO2 NPs before DNCB sensitization. The EC3 of DNCB, with prior injection of vehicle control was 0.041%, while injection with TiO2 decreased the EC3 of DNCB to 0.015%. TiO2 NPs pre-treatment did not alter the lymphocyte subpopulations, but significantly increased the level of IL-4 and decreased IL-10 production in DNCB treated animals. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that administration of nano-TiO2 increases the dermal sensitization potency of DNCB, by augmenting a Th2 response, showing the immunomodulatory abilities of NPs. PMID:22621278

  16. The use of human skin fibroblasts to obtain potency estimates of drug binding to androgen receptors.

    PubMed

    Eil, C; Edelson, S K

    1984-07-01

    Although several drugs with antiandrogenic properties have been used to treat such conditions as prostatic carcinoma, precocious puberty, acne, and hirsutism, their relative strengths in human tissues are not known. Most of the compounds that are effective clinically in opposing androgen action interact with the androgen receptor in various assay systems. To determine in human cells the relative potencies of these agents as well as others with androgenic properties, we measured the abilities of various compounds to compete with [3H]dihydrotestosterone [( 3H]DHT) for androgen-binding sites in dispersed human genital skin fibroblasts at 22 degrees C. The concentrations of unlabeled DHT, methyltrienolone (a synthetic non- metabolizeable androgen), and testosterone required for 50% inhibition of [3H]DHT binding were similar, approximately 1 nM [0.87 +/- 0.12 (+/- SE), 1.18 +/- 0.18, and 1.01 +/- 0.20 nM, respectively]. The relative binding activities, defined by the ratio of the concentration of methyltrienolone to the concentration of competitor required for 50% displacement of [3H]DHT, were as follows: spironolactone greater than R2956 (a synthetic antiandrogen) greater than megestrol acetate greater than cyproterone acetate greater than estradiol greater than flutamide much greater than testolactone greater than cimetidine. Danazol, an androgen agonist that causes hirsutism, was nearly as effective as spironolactone in its ability to compete for the fibroblast androgen receptor, 50% inhibition of fibroblast [3H]DHT binding was achieved by 1.76 +/- 0.31 nM spironolactone and 2.85 +/- 0.50 nM danazol. Two other compounds that induce hirsutism, diphenylhydantoin and diazoxide, did not displace [3H]DHT. We conclude that 1) of the compounds tested, spironolactone, which is rapidly metabolized in vivo to a much less potent competitor, is the most potent antiandrogen in its ability to interact in vitro with human skin fibroblast androgen receptors; 2) estradiol is a

  17. MexAB-OprM specific efflux pump inhibitors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Part 3: Optimization of potency in the pyridopyrimidine series through the application of a pharmacophore model.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kiyoshi; Kawato, Haruko; Watanabe, Jun; Ohtsuka, Masami; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Yokomizo, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Atsunobu; Kuru, Noriko; Ohta, Toshiharu; Hoshino, Kazuki; Yoshida, Kumi; Ishida, Hiroko; Cho, Aesop; Palme, Monica H; Zhang, Jason Z; Lee, Ving J; Watkins, William J

    2004-01-19

    The addition of substituents to the pyridopyrimidine scaffold of MexAB-OprM specific efflux pump inhibitors was explored. As predicted by a pharmacophore model, the incorporation substituents at the 2-position improved potency. Piperidines were found to be optimal, and further introduction of polar groups without compromising the activity was shown to be feasible. Careful positioning of the essential acidic moiety of the pharmacophore relative to the scaffold led to the discovery of vinyl tetrazoles with still greater potency.

  18. Odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc table wines and icewines by gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Amy J; Reynolds, Andrew G

    2012-03-21

    This study aimed to elucidate the odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc (syn. Vidal) table wines and icewines from the Niagara Peninsula using stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry. Dilution analysis determined the most odor-potent compounds in Vidal and Riesling icewines (n = 2) and table wines (n = 2) from a commercial producer. The top 15 odor-potent compounds in each wine were identified and quantified, resulting in 23 and 24 compounds for Riesling and Vidal, respectively. The most odor-potent compounds were β-damascenone, decanal, 1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 4-vinylguaiacol, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl 3-methylbutyrate. In general, icewines had higher concentrations of most aroma compounds compared to table wines. Through computation of odor activity values, the compounds with the highest odor activity for the icewines were β-damascenone, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl octanoate, cis-rose oxide, and ethyl hexanoate. In table wines the highest odor activity values were found for ethyl octanoate, β-damascenone, ethyl hexanoate, cis-rose oxide, ethyl 3-methylbutyrate, and 4-vinylguaiacol. These findings provide a foundation to determine impact odorants in icewines and the effects of viticultural and enological practices on wine aroma volatile composition. PMID:22324474

  19. Odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc table wines and icewines by gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Amy J; Reynolds, Andrew G

    2012-03-21

    This study aimed to elucidate the odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc (syn. Vidal) table wines and icewines from the Niagara Peninsula using stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry. Dilution analysis determined the most odor-potent compounds in Vidal and Riesling icewines (n = 2) and table wines (n = 2) from a commercial producer. The top 15 odor-potent compounds in each wine were identified and quantified, resulting in 23 and 24 compounds for Riesling and Vidal, respectively. The most odor-potent compounds were β-damascenone, decanal, 1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 4-vinylguaiacol, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl 3-methylbutyrate. In general, icewines had higher concentrations of most aroma compounds compared to table wines. Through computation of odor activity values, the compounds with the highest odor activity for the icewines were β-damascenone, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl octanoate, cis-rose oxide, and ethyl hexanoate. In table wines the highest odor activity values were found for ethyl octanoate, β-damascenone, ethyl hexanoate, cis-rose oxide, ethyl 3-methylbutyrate, and 4-vinylguaiacol. These findings provide a foundation to determine impact odorants in icewines and the effects of viticultural and enological practices on wine aroma volatile composition.

  20. Development and validation of a quantitative competitive ELISA for potency testing of equine anti rabies sera with other potential use.

    PubMed

    Korimbocus, Jehanara; Dehay, Nicolas; Tordo, Noël; Cano, François; Morgeaux, Sylvie

    2016-06-14

    In case of a bite by a rabies infected animal, the World Health Organisation recommends a prophylactic treatment including the administration of Human Rabies Immunoglobulins (HRIGs) or highly purified F(ab')2 fragments produced from Equine Rabies Immunoglobulin (F(ab')2 - ERIGs). According to international regulation, quality control of F(ab')2 - ERIGs lots requires potency testing by the in vivo Mouse Neutralisation Test (MNT) prior marketing. However, the strategy of the 3Rs (Reduce, Refine, Replace) for animal testing required by the European Directive encourages the replacement of the in vivo potency test by an in vitro assay. In this context, a competitive ELISA method (c-ELISA) has been developed by the Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Médicament et des Produits de Santé where F(ab')2 - ERIGs are in competition with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the trimeric native form of the rabies glycoprotein. After a full validation study, the c-ELISA has been applied to commercial batches of F(ab')2 - ERIGs. A correlation study with the MNT demonstrated a similarity between the two methods (r=0.751). Moreover, the c-ELISA method which does not need any species specific reagent has been applied to HRIGs potency testing as an alternative method to Rapid Fluorescent Focus Inhibition Test (RFFIT), thus avoiding the handling of live rabies virus in BSL3 containment. In conclusion, the c-ELISA has shown its potential to replace MNT and possibly RFFIT for the quantification of rabies immunoglobulin. After optimisation it may be used for the quantification of rabies immunoglobulin in any animal species, notably for rabies immunogenicity assay in mice.

  1. Development and validation of a quantitative competitive ELISA for potency testing of equine anti rabies sera with other potential use.

    PubMed

    Korimbocus, Jehanara; Dehay, Nicolas; Tordo, Noël; Cano, François; Morgeaux, Sylvie

    2016-06-14

    In case of a bite by a rabies infected animal, the World Health Organisation recommends a prophylactic treatment including the administration of Human Rabies Immunoglobulins (HRIGs) or highly purified F(ab')2 fragments produced from Equine Rabies Immunoglobulin (F(ab')2 - ERIGs). According to international regulation, quality control of F(ab')2 - ERIGs lots requires potency testing by the in vivo Mouse Neutralisation Test (MNT) prior marketing. However, the strategy of the 3Rs (Reduce, Refine, Replace) for animal testing required by the European Directive encourages the replacement of the in vivo potency test by an in vitro assay. In this context, a competitive ELISA method (c-ELISA) has been developed by the Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Médicament et des Produits de Santé where F(ab')2 - ERIGs are in competition with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the trimeric native form of the rabies glycoprotein. After a full validation study, the c-ELISA has been applied to commercial batches of F(ab')2 - ERIGs. A correlation study with the MNT demonstrated a similarity between the two methods (r=0.751). Moreover, the c-ELISA method which does not need any species specific reagent has been applied to HRIGs potency testing as an alternative method to Rapid Fluorescent Focus Inhibition Test (RFFIT), thus avoiding the handling of live rabies virus in BSL3 containment. In conclusion, the c-ELISA has shown its potential to replace MNT and possibly RFFIT for the quantification of rabies immunoglobulin. After optimisation it may be used for the quantification of rabies immunoglobulin in any animal species, notably for rabies immunogenicity assay in mice. PMID:27151880

  2. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo clastogenic potency based on benchmark dose analysis of flow cytometric micronucleus data.

    PubMed

    Bemis, Jeffrey C; Wills, John W; Bryce, Steven M; Torous, Dorothea K; Dertinger, Stephen D; Slob, Wout

    2016-05-01

    The application of flow cytometry as a scoring platform for both in vivo and in vitro micronucleus (MN) studies has enabled the efficient generation of high quality datasets suitable for comprehensive assessment of dose-response. Using this information, it is possible to obtain precise estimates of the clastogenic potency of chemicals. We illustrate this by estimating the in vivo and the in vitro potencies of seven model clastogenic agents (melphalan, chlorambucil, thiotepa, 1,3-propane sultone, hydroxyurea, azathioprine and methyl methanesulfonate) by deriving BMDs using freely available BMD software (PROAST). After exposing male rats for 3 days with up to nine dose levels of each individual chemical, peripheral blood samples were collected on Day 4. These chemicals were also evaluated for in vitro MN induction by treating TK6 cells with up to 20 concentrations in quadruplicate. In vitro MN frequencies were determined via flow cytometry using a 96-well plate autosampler. The estimated in vitro and in vivo BMDs were found to correlate to each other. The correlation showed considerable scatter, as may be expected given the complexity of the whole animal model versus the simplicity of the cell culture system. Even so, the existence of the correlation suggests that information on the clastogenic potency of a compound can be derived from either whole animal studies or cell culture-based models of chromosomal damage. We also show that the choice of the benchmark response, i.e. the effect size associated with the BMD, is not essential in establishing the correlation between both systems. Our results support the concept that datasets derived from comprehensive genotoxicity studies can provide quantitative dose-response metrics. Such investigational studies, when supported by additional data, might then contribute directly to product safety investigations, regulatory decision-making and human risk assessment.

  3. The Higher Education Enterprise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottinger, Cecilia A.

    1991-01-01

    Higher education not only contributes to the development of the human resources and intellectual betterment of the nation but is also a major economic enterprise. This research brief reviews and highlights data on the size and growth of higher education and illustrates how higher education institutions are preparing the future labor force. It…

  4. Reflections on "Higher Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Felix

    1974-01-01

    The elitist, professional, and philosophical elements of higher education are reflected upon with stress on the differences between higher education and higher learning, where education is concerned with giving wider groups a share in a broad image of man, and learning is concerned with increasing specialization. (JH)

  5. Sources of variation in the mutagenic potency of complex chemical mixtures based on the Salmonella/microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Krewski, D; Leroux, B G; Creason, J; Claxton, L

    1992-01-01

    Twenty laboratories worldwide participated in a collaborative trial sponsored by the International Programme on Chemical Safety on the mutagenicity of complex mixtures as expressed in the Salmonella/microsome assay. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology provided homogeneous reference samples of urban air and diesel particles and a coal tar solution to each participating laboratory, along with samples of benzo[a]pyrene and 1-nitropyrene which served as positive controls. Mutagenic potency was characterized by the slope of the initial linear component of the dose-response curve. Analysis of variance revealed significant interlaboratory variation in mutagenic potency, which accounted for 57-96% of the total variance on a logarithmic scale, depending on the sample, strain and activation conditions. Variation among replicate extractions of organic material (required for the air and diesel particles) and among replicate bioassays within the same laboratory was also appreciable. The average potencies for air and diesel particles in laboratories using Soxhlet extracts were not significantly different from those in laboratories using sonication, although there was larger interlaboratory variation for the Soxhlet method. Repeatability (which approximates the coefficient of variation within laboratories) ranged from 18 to 40% for air and diesel particles extracted using sonication, depending on the strain and activation conditions. Repeatability of Soxhlet-extracted air and diesel particles, however, ranged from about 37 to 89% including outliers and from about 11 to 31% excluding outliers. Repeatability of the coal tar sample and the 2 positive controls was in the range 18-34%. Reproducibility (which approximates the coefficient of variation between laboratories) was generally at least twice repeatability, and exceeded 100% for Soxhlet-extracted air and diesel particles, as well as 1-nitropyrene. Reanalysis of the data omitting observations of more than

  6. Assessment of the potency and potential immunomodulatory effects of the measles mumps rubella and varicella vaccine in infants.

    PubMed

    Yerkovich, Stephanie T; Rowe, Julie; Richmond, Peter; Suriyaarachchi, Devinda; Heaton, Tricia; Hollams, Elysia; Ladyman, Claire; Serralha, Michael; Sadowska, Agata; Loh, Richard; Wesselingh, Steven L; Sly, Peter D; Holt, Patrick G

    2007-02-26

    This study compared the potency and immunomodulatory effects of measles mumps rubella (MMR) vaccine given to infants alone or in combination with varicella (MMR and V). In an additional group, MMR vaccination was delayed 42 days to permit analysis of potential effects on underlying maturation of systemic immune functions. Assessment of immunity to the vaccines indicated consistent antibody production coupled with mixed Th1/Th2 memory, and no significant differences between vaccine groups or to the group who had their MMR vaccination delayed. Parallel analyses of cytokine responses to phytohaemagglutinin and tetanus toxoid did not detect any "bystander" effects of the vaccines on systemic immunity.

  7. Potency enhancement of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist probe ML140 through sulfonamide constraint utilizing a tetrahydroisoquinoline motif

    PubMed Central

    Frankowski, Kevin J.; Slauson, Stephen R.; Lovell, Kimberly M.; Phillips, Angela M.; Streicher, John M.; Zhou, Lei; Whipple, David A.; Schoenen, Frank J.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Bohn, Laura M.; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the sulfonamide-based kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist probe molecule ML140 through constraint of the sulfonamide nitrogen within a tetrahydroisoquinoline moiety afforded a marked increase in potency. This strategy, when combined with additional structure-activity relationship exploration, has led to a compound only six-fold less potent than norBNI, a widely utilized KOR antagonist tool compound, but significantly more synthetically accessible. The new optimized probe is suitably potent for use as an in vivo tool to investigate the therapeutic potential of KOR antagonists. PMID:25593096

  8. The black agonist-receptor model of high potency sweeteners, and its implication to sweetness taste and sweetener design.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Attila; Híd, János

    2011-10-01

    The dose responses of the most commonly used high potency sweeteners (HPSs) have been measured by a more precise sensory procedure. The data were analyzed by Black's pharmacological model that takes into account not only agonist binding affinity but transduction efficiency as well. HPSs are clearly segregated into 2 groups depending on whether they bind to T1R2 or T1R3 of the receptor heterodimer. Surprisingly, the more potent sweeteners have lower transduction efficiencies. The implications of these on consumer product development and HPS design are discussed.

  9. The black agonist-receptor model of high potency sweeteners, and its implication to sweetness taste and sweetener design.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Attila; Híd, János

    2011-10-01

    The dose responses of the most commonly used high potency sweeteners (HPSs) have been measured by a more precise sensory procedure. The data were analyzed by Black's pharmacological model that takes into account not only agonist binding affinity but transduction efficiency as well. HPSs are clearly segregated into 2 groups depending on whether they bind to T1R2 or T1R3 of the receptor heterodimer. Surprisingly, the more potent sweeteners have lower transduction efficiencies. The implications of these on consumer product development and HPS design are discussed. PMID:22417603

  10. Enhanced Potency of a Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody In Vitro Improves Protection against Lentiviral Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Kwon, Young Do; Ko, Sung-Youl; Pegu, Amarendra; Louder, Mark K.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Xuejun; Shi, Wei; Yang, Zhi-yong; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Todd, John-Paul; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Eudailey, Joshua; Roberts, Kyle E.; Donald, Bruce R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Ledgerwood, Julie; Mullikin, James C.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Koup, Richard A.; Graham, Barney S.; Nason, Martha C.; Connors, Mark; Haynes, Barton F.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Roederer, Mario; Kwong, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the past 5 years, a new generation of highly potent and broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies has been identified. These antibodies can protect against lentiviral infection in nonhuman primates (NHPs), suggesting that passive antibody transfer would prevent HIV-1 transmission in humans. To increase the protective efficacy of such monoclonal antibodies, we employed next-generation sequencing, computational bioinformatics, and structure-guided design to enhance the neutralization potency and breadth of VRC01, an antibody that targets the CD4 binding site of the HIV-1 envelope. One variant, VRC07-523, was 5- to 8-fold more potent than VRC01, neutralized 96% of viruses tested, and displayed minimal autoreactivity. To compare its protective efficacy to that of VRC01 in vivo, we performed a series of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge experiments in nonhuman primates and calculated the doses of VRC07-523 and VRC01 that provide 50% protection (EC50). VRC07-523 prevented infection in NHPs at a 5-fold lower concentration than VRC01. These results suggest that increased neutralization potency in vitro correlates with improved protection against infection in vivo, documenting the improved functional efficacy of VRC07-523 and its potential clinical relevance for protecting against HIV-1 infection in humans. IMPORTANCE In the absence of an effective HIV-1 vaccine, alternative strategies are needed to block HIV-1 transmission. Direct administration of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies may be able to prevent HIV-1 infections in humans. This approach could be especially useful in individuals at high risk for contracting HIV-1 and could be used together with antiretroviral drugs to prevent infection. To optimize the chance of success, such antibodies can be modified to improve their potency, breadth, and in vivo half-life. Here, knowledge of the structure of a potent neutralizing antibody, VRC01, that targets the CD4-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope

  11. Assessment of the sensitizing potency of preservatives with chance of skin contact by the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA).

    PubMed

    Sonnenburg, Anna; Schreiner, Maximilian; Stahlmann, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Parabens, methylisothiazolinone (MI) and its derivative methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI), are commonly used as preservatives in personal care products. They can cause hypersensitivity reactions of the human skin. We have tested a set of nine parabens, MI alone and in combination with MCI in the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA). The coculture of primary human keratinocytes and allogenic dendritic cell-related cells (DC-rc) in this assay emulates the in vivo situation of the human skin. Sensitization potency of the test substances was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of the DC-rc maturation marker CD86. Determination of the concentration required to cause a half-maximal increase in CD86-expression (EC50sens) allowed a quantitative evaluation. The cytotoxicity of test substances as indicator for irritative potency was measured by 7-AAD (7-amino-actinomycin D) staining. Parabens exhibited weak (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and isopropylparaben) or strong (butyl-, isobutyl-, pentyl- and benzylparaben) effects, whereas phenylparaben was found to be a moderate sensitizer. Sensitization potencies of parabens correlated with side chain length. Due to a pronounced cytotoxicity, we could not estimate an EC50sens value for MI, whereas MI/MCI was classified as sensitizer and also showed cytotoxic effects. Parabens showed no (methyl- and ethylparaben) or weak irritative potencies (propyl-, isopropyl-, butyl-, isobutyl-, phenyl- and benzylparaben), only pentylparaben was rated to be irritative. Overall, we were able to demonstrate and compare the sensitizing potencies of parabens in this in vitro test. Furthermore, we showed an irritative potency for most of the preservatives. The data further support the usefulness of the LCSA for comparison of the sensitizing potencies of xenobiotics.

  12. Granular Activated Carbon Treatment May Result in Higher Predicted Genotoxicity in the Presence of Bromide.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W; Lee, Tiffany Chih Fen; Westerhoff, Paul; Fischer, Natalia; Hanigan, David; Karanfil, Tanju; Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Taylor-Edmonds, Liz; Andrews, Robert C

    2016-09-01

    Certain unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are more of a health concern than regulated DBPs. Brominated species are typically more cytotoxic and genotoxic than their chlorinated analogs. The impact of granular activated carbon (GAC) on controlling the formation of regulated and selected unregulated DBPs following chlorine disinfection was evaluated. The predicted cyto- and genotoxicity of DBPs was calculated using published potencies based on the comet assay for Chinese hamster ovary cells (assesses the level of DNA strand breaks). Additionally, genotoxicity was measured using the SOS-Chromotest (detects DNA-damaging agents). The class sum concentrations of trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, and unregulated DBPs, and the SOS genotoxicity followed the breakthrough of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), however the formation of brominated species did not. The bromide/DOC ratio was higher than the influent through much of the breakthrough curve (GAC does not remove bromide), which resulted in elevated brominated DBP concentrations in the effluent. Based on the potency of the haloacetonitriles and halonitromethanes, these nitrogen-containing DBPs were the driving agents of the predicted genotoxicity. GAC treatment of drinking or reclaimed waters with appreciable levels of bromide and dissolved organic nitrogen may not control the formation of unregulated DBPs with higher genotoxicity potencies. PMID:27467860

  13. The stress response and anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia for total Hip Replacement in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Tian, Chun; Li, Min; Peng, Ming-Qing; Ma, Kun-Long; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Ding, Jia-Hui; Cai, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Recently, some scholars suggested that it is important to keep a stablehemodynamic state and prevent the stress responses in geriatric patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR). We conducted this randomized prospective study to observe anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia and stress response to it in geriatric patients during THR. We compared the effect of unilateral spinal and bilateral spinal on inhibition of stress response through measuring Norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and cortisol (CORT). Plasma concentrations of NE, E and CORT were determined in blood samples using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) at three time points: To (prior to anesthesia) T1 (at the time point of skin closure), T2 (twenty-four hours after the operation). Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (unilateral spinal anesthesia) and group B (conventional bilateral spinal anesthesia). 7.5tymg of hypobaric bupivacaine were injected into subarachnoid cavity at group A and 12mg hypobaric bupivacaine were given at group B. The onset time of sensory and motor block, loss of pinprick sensation, degree of motor block, regression of sensory and motor blocks and hemodynamic changes were also recorded. These data were used to evaluate anesthetic potency of spinal anesthesia. The results of this experiment show that unilateral spinal anesthesia can provide restriction of sensory and motor block, minimize the incidence of hypotension and prevent the stress responses undergoing THR. It is optimal anesthesia procedure for geriatric patients by rapid subarachnoid injection of small doses of bupivacaine. PMID:25410068

  14. The stress response and anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia for total Hip Replacement in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Tian, Chun; Li, Min; Peng, Ming-Qing; Ma, Kun-Long; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Ding, Jia-Hui; Cai, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Recently, some scholars suggested that it is important to keep a stablehemodynamic state and prevent the stress responses in geriatric patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR). We conducted this randomized prospective study to observe anesthetic potency of unilateral spinal anesthesia and stress response to it in geriatric patients during THR. We compared the effect of unilateral spinal and bilateral spinal on inhibition of stress response through measuring Norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and cortisol (CORT). Plasma concentrations of NE, E and CORT were determined in blood samples using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) at three time points: To (prior to anesthesia) T1 (at the time point of skin closure), T2 (twenty-four hours after the operation). Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (unilateral spinal anesthesia) and group B (conventional bilateral spinal anesthesia). 7.5tymg of hypobaric bupivacaine were injected into subarachnoid cavity at group A and 12mg hypobaric bupivacaine were given at group B. The onset time of sensory and motor block, loss of pinprick sensation, degree of motor block, regression of sensory and motor blocks and hemodynamic changes were also recorded. These data were used to evaluate anesthetic potency of spinal anesthesia. The results of this experiment show that unilateral spinal anesthesia can provide restriction of sensory and motor block, minimize the incidence of hypotension and prevent the stress responses undergoing THR. It is optimal anesthesia procedure for geriatric patients by rapid subarachnoid injection of small doses of bupivacaine.

  15. Tamoxifen-poly(ethylene glycol)-thiol gold nanoparticle conjugates: enhanced potency and selective delivery for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Dreaden, Erik C; Mwakwari, Sandra C; Sodji, Quaovi H; Oyelere, Adegboyega K; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2009-12-01

    The breast cancer treatment drug tamoxifen has been widely administered for more than three decades. This small molecule competes with 17beta-estradiol for binding to estrogen receptor, a hormone receptor upregulated in a majority of breast cancers, subsequently initiating programmed cell death. We have synthesized a thiol-PEGylated tamoxifen derivative that can be used to selectively target and deliver plasmonic gold nanoparticles to estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells with up to 2.7-fold enhanced drug potency in vitro. Optical microscopy/spectroscopy, time-dependent dose-response data, and estrogen competition studies indicate that augmented activity is due to increased rates of intracellular tamoxifen transport by nanoparticle endocytosis, rather than by passive diffusion of the free drug. Both ligand- and receptor-dependent intracellular delivery of gold nanoparticles suggest that plasma membrane localized estrogen receptor alpha may facilitate selective uptake and retention of this and other therapeutic nanoparticle conjugates. Combined targeting selectivity and enhanced potency provides opportunities for both multimodal endocrine treatment strategies and adjunctive laser photothermal therapy. PMID:19919059

  16. The Potency of Nef-Mediated SERINC5 Antagonism Correlates with the Prevalence of Primate Lentiviruses in the Wild.

    PubMed

    Heigele, Anke; Kmiec, Dorota; Regensburger, Kerstin; Langer, Simon; Peiffer, Lukas; Stürzel, Christina M; Sauter, Daniel; Peeters, Martine; Pizzato, Massimo; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-09-14

    The cellular factor serine incorporator 5 (SERINC5) impairs HIV-1 infectivity but is antagonized by the viral Nef protein. We analyzed the anti-SERINC5 activity of Nef proteins across primate lentiviruses and examined whether SERINC5 represents a barrier to cross-species transmissions and/or within-species viral spread. HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV Nefs counteract human, ape, monkey, and murine SERINC5 orthologs with similar potency. However, HIV-1 Nefs are more active against SERINC5 than HIV-2 Nefs, and chimpanzee SIV (SIVcpz) Nefs are more potent than those of their monkey precursors. Additionally, Nefs of HIV and most SIVs rely on the dileucine motif in the C-terminal loop for anti-SERINC5 activity, while the Nef from colobus SIV (SIVcol) evolved different inhibitory mechanisms. We also found a significant correlation between anti-SERINC5 potency and the SIV prevalence in the respective ape and monkey species. Thus, Nef-mediated SERINC5 antagonism may determine the ability of primate lentiviruses to spread within natural hosts. PMID:27631701

  17. Adaptability to pain is associated with potency of local pain inhibition, but not conditioned pain modulation: a healthy human study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Wang, Kelun; Yao, Dongyuan; Xue, Charlie C L; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between pain sensitivity, adaptability, and potency of endogenous pain inhibition, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and local pain inhibition. Forty-one healthy volunteers (20 male, 21 female) received conditioning stimulation (CS) over 2 sessions in a random order: tonic heat pain (46 °C) on the right leg for 7 minutes and cold pressor pain (1 °C to 4 °C) on the left hand for 5 minutes. Participants rated the intensity of pain continuously using a 0 to 10 electronic visual analogue scale. The primary outcome measures were pressure pain thresholds (PPT) measured at the heterotopic and homotopic location to the CS sites before, during, and 20 minutes after CS. Two groups of participants, pain adaptive and pain nonadaptive, were identified based on their response to pain in the cold pressor test. Pain-adaptive participants showed a pain reduction between peak pain and pain at end of the test by at least 2 of 10 (n=16); whereas the pain-nonadaptive participants reported unchanged peak pain during 5-minute CS (n=25). Heterotopic PPTs during the CS did not differ between the 2 groups. However, increased homotopic PPTs measured 20 minutes after CS correlated with the amount of pain reduction during CS. These results suggest that individual sensitivity and adaptability to pain does not correlate with the potency of CPM. Adaptability to pain is associated with longer-lasting local pain inhibition.

  18. Respiratory allergenic potential of plant-derived proteins: Understanding the relationship between exposure and potency for risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Karen; N'jai, Alhaji U; Dearman, Rebecca J; Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank

    2015-01-01

    Botanical ingredients (ingredients derived from plants) are finding increasing application in personal care products and the public perceives these ingredients to be safe. However, some proteins in botanicals have the potential to cause immediate-type (IgE-mediated) respiratory allergic reactions. Although reports of such reactions are uncommon, when they do occur, they can be severe. Experience with soap containing wheat proteins illustrated that under certain specific conditions, consumers may be affected. Establishing safe exposure levels for botanical proteins has been challenging. Industrial enzymes provide a rich reference dataset based on their historical association with allergic reactions among workers, which includes robust dose-response information. In the absence of similar data on the potency of plant proteins, a conservative default approach has historically been applied based on information derived from allergenic enzymes. In this article we review the historical default approach and dataset for setting limits for plant proteins in botanical ingredients based on analogy to industrial enzymes followed by a synthesis of literature data on allergic reactions following inhalation exposure to plant-derived proteins. The aim is to share relevant background information and display the relationship between exposure and potency as a first step in the development of a strategy for the development of an improved approach to support the risk assessment of plant-derived proteins.

  19. An in vitro growth inhibition test for measuring the potency of Leptospira spp. Sejroe group vaccine in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    de Nardi, Geraldo; Genovez, Margareth Elide; Ribeiro, Marcio Garcia; Castro, Vanessa; Jorge, André Mendes

    2010-07-01

    Leptospira spp. serovars Hardjo and Wollfi from Sejroe serogroup have been detected in livestock in Brazil, where the main control procedures rely on vaccination. The potency of two commercial vaccines available in this country was monitored by microagglutination test-MAT and in vitro growth inhibition test-GIT in serum samples from 33 female buffaloes divided into: G1-unvaccinated control; G2-vaccinated with Leptobac-6 containing serovars Hardjo and Wolffi and G3-vaccinated with Triangle-9 containing serovar Hardjo. G2 and G3 animals were vaccinated on day zero, and received a booster and two revaccinations on days 30, 210 and 390 and G1 animals received phosphate buffered saline. Serum samples were collected at 15-day intervals between days 0 and 60; and at 30-day intervals between days 60 and 540 and were tested by MAT and GIT with serovars Hardjo and Wolffi. G1 remained negative throughout the experiment. Both vaccines were able to induce agglutinating and growth inhibition antibodies. Six months after the last revaccination, all animals tested negative by MAT, but still were positive by GIT until the end of experimental period. GIT could be a good tool to evaluate the potency and to monitor antibodies responses of vaccines of Sejroe group serovars. PMID:20332068

  20. Structure-Based Evaluation of Non-nucleoside Inhibitors with Improved Potency and Solubility That Target HIV Reverse Transcriptase Variants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) with activity against variants of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) is crucial for overcoming treatment failure. The NNRTIs bind in an allosteric pocket in RT ∼10 Å away from the active site. Earlier analogues of the catechol diether compound series have picomolar activity against HIV strains with wild-type RT but lose potency against variants with single Y181C and double K103N/Y181C mutations. As guided by structure-based and computational studies, removal of the 5-Cl substitution of compound 1 on the catechol aryl ring system led to a new analogue compound 2 that maintains greater potency against Y181C and K103N/Y181C variants and better solubility (510 μg/mL). Crystal structures were determined for wild-type, Y181C, and K103N/Y181C RT in complex with both compounds 1 and 2 to understand the structural basis for these findings. Comparison of the structures reveals that the Y181C mutation destabilizes the binding mode of compound 1 and disrupts the interactions with residues in the pocket. Compound 2 maintains the same conformation in wild-type and mutant structures, in addition to several interactions with the NNRTI binding pocket. Comparison of the six crystal structures will assist in the understanding of compound binding modes and future optimization of the catechol diether series. PMID:25700160

  1. RGS proteins destroy spare receptors: Effects of GPCR-interacting proteins and signal deamplification on measurements of GPCR agonist potency.

    PubMed

    Chidiac, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many GPCRs are able to activate multiple distinct signaling pathways, and these may include biochemical cascades activated via either heterotrimeric G proteins or by β-arrestins. The relative potencies and/or efficacies among a series of agonists that act on a common receptor can vary depending upon which signaling pathway is being activated. This phenomenon is known as biased signaling or functional selectivity, and is presumed to reflect underlying differences in ligand binding affinities for alternate conformational states of the receptor. The first part of this review discusses how various cellular GPCR interacting proteins (GIPs) can influence receptor conformation and thereby affect ligand-receptor interactions and contribute to signaling bias. Upon activation, receptors trigger biochemical cascades that lead to altered cellular function, and measuring points along the cascade (e.g., second messenger production) conveys information about receptor activity. As a signal continues along its way, the observed concentration dependence of a GPCR ligand may change due to amplification and saturation of biochemical steps. The second part of this review considers additional cellular factors that affect signal processing, focusing mainly on structural elements and deamplification mechanisms, and discusses the relevance of these to measurements of potency and functional selectivity. PMID:26297537

  2. The impact of minimally oversized adeno-associated viral vectors encoding human factor VIII on vector potency in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kyostio-Moore, Sirkka; Berthelette, Patricia; Piraino, Susan; Sookdeo, Cathleen; Nambiar, Bindu; Jackson, Robert; Burnham, Brenda; O’Riordan, Catherine R; Cheng, Seng H; Armentano, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors containing oversized genomes provide transgene expression despite low efficiency packaging of complete genomes. Here, we characterized the properties of oversized rAAV2/8 vectors (up to 5.4 kb) encoding human factor VIII (FVIII) under the transcriptional control of three liver promoters. All vectors provided sustained production of active FVIII in mice for 7 months and contained comparable levels of vector genomes and complete expression cassettes in liver. Therefore, for the 5.4 kb genome size range, a strong expression cassette was more important for FVIII production than the vector genome size. To evaluate the potency of slightly oversized vectors, a 5.1 kb AAVrh8R/FVIII vector was compared to a 4.6 kb (wild-type size) vector with an identical expression cassette (but containing a smaller C1-domain deleted FVIII) for 3 months in mice. The 5.1 kb vector had twofold to threefold lower levels of plasma FVIII protein and liver vector genomes than that obtained with the 4.6 kb vector. Vector genomes for both vectors persisted equally and existed primarily as high molecular weight concatemeric circular forms in liver. Taken together, these results indicate that the slightly oversized vectors containing heterogeneously packaged vector genomes generated a functional transgene product but exhibited a twofold to threefold lower in vivo potency. PMID:26958574

  3. Sulfur mustard as a carcinogen: application of relative potency analysis to the chemical warfare agents H, HD, and HT.

    PubMed

    Watson, A P; Jones, T D; Griffin, G D

    1989-08-01

    A relative potency method for assessing potential human health effects from exposures to relatively untested chemicals is presented and documented. The need for such a method in evaluating the carcinogenic potential of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (agent HD) from a limited data base is specifically addressed. The best-estimate potency factor for sulfur mustard relative to benzo[a]pyrene is 1.3, with an interquartile range of 0.6 to 2.9. The method is applied to (1) the estimated fence-boundary air concentrations of mustard during operation of a proposed agent incinerator at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, and (2) the current approved general population exposure level of 1 X 10(-4) mg HD/m3 and the occupational exposure level of 3 X 10(-3) mg HD/m3. Maximum estimates of excess lifetime cancer risk for individuals at sites along the APG boundary range between 3 X 10(-8) and 1 X 10(-7). Lifetime cancer risk estimates less than or equal to 10(-6) are not now regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or the Food and Drug Administration. Maximum estimates of excess lifetime cancer risk assuming daily exposure to the approved standards during the proposed 5 years of incinerator operation are on the order of 10(-5) for the general public and 10(-4) for the worker population. These values are considered upper limit estimates.

  4. Neutralization breadth and potency of serum derived from recently human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected Thai individuals.

    PubMed

    Chaitaveep, Nithinart; Utachee, Piraporn; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Karasavvan, Nicos; Takeda, Naokazu; Kameoka, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Neutralizing antibody responses play important roles in controlling several viral infections including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Potent and broad neutralizing antibody responses have been reported in some HIV-1-infected individuals; therefore, elucidating the mechanisms underlying neutralizing antibody responses will provide important information for the development of anti-HIV-1 vaccines. We herein performed a comparative study on the neutralization breadth and potency of serum samples collected from Thai individuals recently and chronically infected with HIV-1. Neutralization tests using a series of envelope glycoproteins (Env)-recombinant viruses revealed that although several serum samples derived from recently infected individuals did not show any HIV-1-specific neutralizing activity, the remaining serum samples exhibited neutralizing activity not only for recombinant viruses with CRF01_AE Env, but also for viruses with subtypes B and C Env. Furthermore, some serum samples derived from recently infected individuals showed the neutralization potency. Our results may provide a deeper insight into the characteristics of neutralizing antibody responses that develop during the course of HIV-1 infection among individuals in Thailand.

  5. A link between the accumulation of DNA damage and loss of multi-potency of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Alves, Hugo; Munoz-Najar, Ursula; De Wit, Jan; Renard, Auke J S; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Sedivy, John M; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; De Boer, Jan

    2010-12-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) represent an attractive cell source for clinic applications. Besides being multi-potent, recent clinical trials suggest that they secrete both trophic and immunomodulatory factors, allowing allogenic MSCs to be used in a wider variety of clinical situations. The yield of prospective isolation is however very low, making expansion a required step toward clinical applications. Unfortunately, this leads to a significant decrease in their stemness. To identify the mechanism behind loss of multi-potency, hMSCs were expanded until replicative senescence and the concomitant molecular changes were characterized at regular intervals. We observed that, with time of culture, loss of multi-potency was associated with both the accumulation of DNA damage and the respective activation of the DNA damage response pathway, suggesting a correlation between both phenomena. Indeed, exposing hMSCs to DNA damage agents led to a significant decrease in the differentiation potential. We also showed that hMSCs are susceptible to accumulate DNA damage upon in vitro expansion, and that although hMSCs maintained an effective nucleotide excision repair activity, there was a progressive accumulation of DNA damage. We propose a model in which DNA damage accumulation contributes to the loss of differentiation potential of hMSCs, which might not only compromise their potential for clinical applications but also contribute to the characteristics of tissue ageing.

  6. Respiratory allergenic potential of plant-derived proteins: Understanding the relationship between exposure and potency for risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Karen; N'jai, Alhaji U; Dearman, Rebecca J; Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank

    2015-01-01

    Botanical ingredients (ingredients derived from plants) are finding increasing application in personal care products and the public perceives these ingredients to be safe. However, some proteins in botanicals have the potential to cause immediate-type (IgE-mediated) respiratory allergic reactions. Although reports of such reactions are uncommon, when they do occur, they can be severe. Experience with soap containing wheat proteins illustrated that under certain specific conditions, consumers may be affected. Establishing safe exposure levels for botanical proteins has been challenging. Industrial enzymes provide a rich reference dataset based on their historical association with allergic reactions among workers, which includes robust dose-response information. In the absence of similar data on the potency of plant proteins, a conservative default approach has historically been applied based on information derived from allergenic enzymes. In this article we review the historical default approach and dataset for setting limits for plant proteins in botanical ingredients based on analogy to industrial enzymes followed by a synthesis of literature data on allergic reactions following inhalation exposure to plant-derived proteins. The aim is to share relevant background information and display the relationship between exposure and potency as a first step in the development of a strategy for the development of an improved approach to support the risk assessment of plant-derived proteins. PMID:26565768

  7. In silico modelling of permeation enhancement potency in Caco-2 monolayers based on molecular descriptors and random forest.

    PubMed

    Welling, Søren H; Clemmensen, Line K H; Buckley, Stephen T; Hovgaard, Lars; Brockhoff, Per B; Refsgaard, Hanne H F

    2015-08-01

    Structural traits of permeation enhancers are important determinants of their capacity to promote enhanced drug absorption. Therefore, in order to obtain a better understanding of structure-activity relationships for permeation enhancers, a Quantitative Structural Activity Relationship (QSAR) model has been developed. The random forest-QSAR model was based upon Caco-2 data for 41 surfactant-like permeation enhancers from Whitehead et al. (2008) and molecular descriptors calculated from their structure. The QSAR model was validated by two test-sets: (i) an eleven compound experimental set with Caco-2 data and (ii) nine compounds with Caco-2 data from literature. Feature contributions, a recent developed diagnostic tool, was applied to elucidate the contribution of individual molecular descriptors to the predicted potency. Feature contributions provided easy interpretable suggestions of important structural properties for potent permeation enhancers such as segregation of hydrophilic and lipophilic domains. Focusing on surfactant-like properties, it is possible to model the potency of the complex pharmaceutical excipients, permeation enhancers. For the first time, a QSAR model has been developed for permeation enhancement. The model is a valuable in silico approach for both screening of new permeation enhancers and physicochemical optimisation of surfactant enhancer systems.

  8. The potency and efficacy of anticholinergics to inhibit haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats correlates with their rank order of affinities for the muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Erosa-Rivero, Helena B; Bata-García, José L; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Heredia-López, Francisco J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2014-06-01

    Extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS) caused by antipsychotic therapy are currently treated with anticholinergics that lack selectivity for the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. Since these receptors are heterogeneously expressed among the different classes of striatal neurons and their afferents, it can be expected that their simultaneous blockade will cause distinct, sometimes opposed, effects within the striatal circuitry. In order to test the hypothesis that the differential blockade of the muscarinic receptor subtypes would influence their potency and efficacy to prevent EPS, here we tested four anticholinergics with varying order of affinities for the muscarinic receptor subtypes, and compared their dose-response curves to inhibit haloperidol-induced catalepsy in male rats. Drugs were applied into the lateral ventricle 15 min before haloperidol (2 mg/kg, s.c.). Catalepsy was measured in the bar test at 15 min intervals during 5 h. The preferential M1/M4 antagonist pirenzepine (3, 10, 30, 100, and 300 nmol) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of catalepsy intensity: ED50 = 5.6 nmol [95% CI, 3.9-8.1], and latency: ED50 = 5.6 nmol [95% CI, 3.7-8.6]. Pirenzepine had the steepest dose-response curve, producing maximal inhibition (84 ± 5%) at the dose of 10 nmol, while its effect tended to reverse at higher doses (62 ± 11%). The purported M1/M3 antagonist 4-DAMP (30, 100, and 300 nmol) also caused a dose-dependent inhibition of catalepsy intensity: ED50 = 29.5 nmol [95% CI, 7.0 to 123.0], and latency: ED50 = 28.5 nmol [95% CI, 2.2 to 362.0]. However, the curve for 4-DAMP had a less pronounced slope, reaching its maximal effect (63 ± 14%) at the dose of 300 nmol. The M2/M4 antagonist AF-DX 116 (10, 30, and 300 nmol) only caused a partial inhibition of catalepsy (30 ± 11%) at the dose of 30 nmol, but this changed to a non-significant increment (15 ± 10%) at the dose of 100 nmol. The alleged M4 antagonist tropicamide (30, 100, 300, and

  9. Confidence in indirect assessment of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine potency and vaccine matching carried out by liquid phase ELISA and virus neutralization tests.

    PubMed

    Robiolo, Blanca; La Torre, José; Maradei, Eduardo; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Perez, Alejandro; Seki, Cristina; Smitsaart, Eliana; Fondevila, Norberto; Palma, Eduardo; Goris, Nesya; De Clercq, Kris; Mattion, Nora

    2010-08-31

    The necessity of avoiding the use of animals in vaccine potency testing has been widely recognized. The repeatability and reproducibility of the Expected Percentage of Protection (EPP) as a serological potency surrogate for A24 Cruzeiro foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) strain was assessed, and compared with the results obtained with challenge in the Protection against Podal Generalization (PPG) test. To determine the EPPs, the serum titers obtained by liquid phase blocking competitive ELISA (lpELISA) and virus neutralization (VNT) in 10 potency trials using the same A24 Cruzeiro vaccine, were interpolated into previously validated logit transformation curves that correlate PPG with serology. Indirect serological assessment of vaccine matching between the serotype A FMDV strains A24 Cruzeiro and A/Argentina/01 was also carried out by lpELISA and VNT. The results obtained in this study strongly support the replacement of challenge tests for vaccine potency by indirect serological assays, at least for A24 Cruzeiro FMDV strain. While determination of EPPs by lpELISA titers showed an excellent repeatability, reproducibility and concordance with PPG for vaccine potency, assessments of cross-protection by VNT titers were more consistent with the PPG outcome. PMID:20643090

  10. Recombinant pediocin in L actococcus lactis: increased production by propeptide fusion and improved potency by co‐production with PedC

    PubMed Central

    Back, Alexandre; Mangavel, Cécile; Paris, Cédric; Rondags, Emmanuel; Kapel, Romain; Aymes, Arnaud; Rogniaux, Hélène; Pavlović, Marija; van Heel, Auke J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Revol‐Junelles, Anne‐Marie; Cailliez‐Grimal, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe the impact of two propeptides and PedC on the production yield and the potency of recombinant pediocins produced in L actococcus lactis. On the one hand, the sequences encoding the propeptides SD or LEISSTCDA were inserted between the sequence encoding the signal peptide of Usp45 and the structural gene of the mature pediocin PA‐1. On the other hand, the putative thiol‐disulfide oxidoreductase PedC was coexpressed with pediocin. The concentration of recombinant pediocins produced in supernatants was determined by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. The potency of recombinant pediocins was investigated by measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration by agar well diffusion assay. The results show that propeptides SD or LEISSTCDA lead to an improved secretion of recombinant pediocins with apparently no effect on the antibacterial potency and that PedC increases the potency of recombinant pediocin. To our knowledge, this study reveals for the first time that pediocin tolerates fusions at the N‐terminal end. Furthermore, it reveals that only expressing the pediocin structural gene in a heterologous host is not sufficient to get an optimal potency and requires the accessory protein PedC. In addition, it can be speculated that PedC catalyses the correct formation of disulfide bonds in pediocin. PMID:26147827

  11. Confidence in indirect assessment of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine potency and vaccine matching carried out by liquid phase ELISA and virus neutralization tests.

    PubMed

    Robiolo, Blanca; La Torre, José; Maradei, Eduardo; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Perez, Alejandro; Seki, Cristina; Smitsaart, Eliana; Fondevila, Norberto; Palma, Eduardo; Goris, Nesya; De Clercq, Kris; Mattion, Nora

    2010-08-31

    The necessity of avoiding the use of animals in vaccine potency testing has been widely recognized. The repeatability and reproducibility of the Expected Percentage of Protection (EPP) as a serological potency surrogate for A24 Cruzeiro foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) strain was assessed, and compared with the results obtained with challenge in the Protection against Podal Generalization (PPG) test. To determine the EPPs, the serum titers obtained by liquid phase blocking competitive ELISA (lpELISA) and virus neutralization (VNT) in 10 potency trials using the same A24 Cruzeiro vaccine, were interpolated into previously validated logit transformation curves that correlate PPG with serology. Indirect serological assessment of vaccine matching between the serotype A FMDV strains A24 Cruzeiro and A/Argentina/01 was also carried out by lpELISA and VNT. The results obtained in this study strongly support the replacement of challenge tests for vaccine potency by indirect serological assays, at least for A24 Cruzeiro FMDV strain. While determination of EPPs by lpELISA titers showed an excellent repeatability, reproducibility and concordance with PPG for vaccine potency, assessments of cross-protection by VNT titers were more consistent with the PPG outcome.

  12. A step forward in the quality control testing of inactivated rabies vaccines - extensive evaluation of European vaccines by using alternative methods to the in vivo potency tests.

    PubMed

    Servat, Alexandre; Kempff, Sébastien; Brogat, Valère; Litaize, Estelle; Schereffer, Jean-Luc; Cliquet, Florence

    2015-03-01

    The mouse challenge test still remains the reference method for the potency determination of human and animal inactivated rabies vaccines, and it is still widely used throughout the world. This test suffers from many disadvantages - it is expensive and time consuming, uses a large number of mice, causes significant animal distress, and suffers from high variability. Recently, the European Pharmacopoeia has recognised the use of a serological potency assay (SPA) as an alternative method to the challenge test. This new test is based on the determination of rabies neutralising antibody titres in vaccinated mice, by using the modified Rapid Fluorescent Focus Inhibition Test (mRFFIT). With the objective of adopting this new method for the batch release of inactivated rabies vaccines, we evaluated its performance on a large collection of rabies vaccines currently assessed in our laboratory. The Fluorescent Antibody Virus Neutralisation test (FAVNt) was used in parallel with the mRFFIT, and the results were compared to the mouse challenge test. Our results demonstrate that the SPA is capable of estimating the potency of vaccines formulated with a potency margin well above the minimum of 1IU/dose. For low potency vaccines, this new method demonstrated some limitations, due to the recurrent invalidation of the assay. We have also demonstrated the superior sensitivity of the FAVNt when compared to the mRFFIT, and the importance of minimising the risk of detecting non-responders in vaccinated mice.

  13. Higher Education in Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Richmond.

    For the past 7 years, the State Council of Higher Education has published a report of selected characteristics and degree programs for Virginia's state-supported colleges and universities. By combining data from independent institutions with information collected from the state-supported colleges, a more comprehensive picture of higher education…

  14. Minorities in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justiz, Manuel J., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 19 papers on efforts to increase the participation of members of minority groups in higher education. The papers are: (1) "Demographic Trends and the Challenges to American Higher Education" (Manuel Justiz); (2) "Three Realities: Minority Life in the United States--The Struggle for Economic Equity (adapted by Don M. Blandin);…

  15. Hypermedia and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, Jay L.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses changes in higher education that are resulting from the use of hypermedia. Topics addressed include the structure of traditional texts; a distributed model for academic communication; independent learning as a model for higher education; skills for hypermedia literacy; database searching; information retrieval; authoring skills; design…

  16. Reinventing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions are in the battle of a lifetime as they are coping with political and economic uncertainties, threats to federal aid, declining state support, higher tuition rates and increased competition from for-profit institutions. Amid all these challenges, these institutions are pressed to keep up with technological demands,…

  17. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge produced…

  18. Higher Education Exchange, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Kettering's president David Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological…

  19. PHOENIX. Higher Wage Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bismarck State Coll., ND.

    This document outlines the curriculum plan for the one-semester vocational-technical training component of PHOENIX: A Model Program for Higher-Wage Potential Careers offered by Bismarck State College (North Dakota) which prepares and/or retrains individuals for higher-wage technical careers. The comprehensive model for the program is organized…

  20. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge, Judgment and…

  1. Reimagining Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulme, E. Eileen; Groom, David E., Jr.; Heltzel, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges facing higher education continue to mount. The shifting of the U.S. ethnic and racial demographics, the proliferation of advanced digital technologies and data, and the move from traditional degrees to continuous learning platforms have created an unstable environment to which Christian higher education must adapt in order to remain…

  2. Gender and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive, encyclopedic review explores gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. Challenging recent claims that gender inequities in U.S. higher education no longer exist, the contributors--leading experts in the field--reveal the many ways in which gender is embedded in the educational…

  3. Hydrocortisone and dexamethasone in very deformable drug carriers have increased biological potency, prolonged effect, and reduced therapeutic dosage.

    PubMed

    Cevc, Gregor; Blume, Gabriele

    2004-05-27

    We characterised biological properties of novel formulations of two low-potency glucocorticosteroids, dexamethasone and hydrocortisone, which have an equivalent dose ratio of 1:50 in vasoconstriction tests. The rate of such carrier-mediated, mainly non-diffusive glucocorticosteroids transport with very deformable lipid vesicles (Transfersomes) through the skin, and the corresponding cutaneous drug biodistribution data, were complemented with the drug bio-efficacy studies. The minimum effective drug dose that reduces arachidonic acid-induced murine ear oedema by 50% was used as one bioactivity indicator. The minimum drug amount ensuring such an effect in mouse skin decreases appreciably when a corticosteroid is applied epicutaneously with very deformable vesicles rather than a lotion or a crème. Specifically, the minimum effective dose for hydrocortisone in very deformable carriers is 2-3 microg cm(-2) whereas for the crème- or lotion-like preparations at least 10 microg cm(-2) is required. Such three- to fivefold relative increase of hydrocortisone potency is accompanied by at least 13%, and more often >20%, absolute drug potency enhancement. The delivery of hydrocortisone with very deformable carriers moreover prolongs the suppression of the drug-induced oedema nearly 2-fold (to approximately 24 h per application). The effective dose of dexamethasone delivered with very deformable vesicles into murine skin is reduced >10 times compared with the crème- or lotion-based products. Specifically, less than 0.1 microg cm(-2) dexamethasone in very deformable vesicles suppresses the arachidonic acid-induced murine ear oedema >50%, on the average. Dexamethasone use on the skin in such vesicles extends the duration of drug action fourfold, compared with a commercial crème, i.e. to >48 h per application. Epicutaneous use of glucocorticosteroids in very deformable vesicles also diminishes such drug's abrasion sensitivity and may increase the general robustness of drug

  4. Taspoglutide, an analog of human glucagon-like Peptide-1 with enhanced stability and in vivo potency.

    PubMed

    Sebokova, Elena; Christ, Andreas D; Wang, Haiyan; Sewing, Sabine; Dong, Jesse Z; Taylor, John; Cawthorne, Michael A; Culler, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    Taspoglutide is a novel analog of human glucagon-like peptide-1 [hGLP-1(7-36)NH2] in clinical development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Taspoglutide contains alpha-aminoisobutyric acid substitutions replacing Ala(8) and Gly(35) of hGLP-1(7-36)NH2. The binding affinity [radioligand binding assay using [(125)I]hGLP-1(7-36)NH2], potency (cAMP production in CHO cells stably overexpressing hGLP-1 receptor), and in vitro plasma stability of taspoglutide compared with hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 have been evaluated. Effects on basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined in vitro in INS-1E cells and in vivo in normal rats. Taspoglutide has comparable affinity (affinity constant 1.1 +/- 0.2 nm) to the natural ligand (affinity constant 1.5 +/- 0.3 nm) for the hGLP-1 receptor and exhibits comparable potency in stimulating cAMP production (EC(50) Taspo 0.06 nm and EC(50) hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 0.08 nm). Taspoglutide exerts insulinotropic action in vitro and in vivo and retains the glucoincretin property of hGLP-1(7-36)NH2. Stimulation of insulin secretion is concentration dependent and evident in the presence of high-glucose concentrations (16.7 mm) with a taspoglutide concentration as low as 0.001 nm. Taspoglutide is fully resistant to dipeptidyl peptidase-4 cleavage (during 1 h incubation at room temperature with purified enzyme) and has an extended in vitro plasma half-life relative to hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 (9.8 h vs. 50 min). In vitro, taspoglutide does not inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity. This study provides the biochemical and pharmacological basis for the sustained plasma drug levels and prolonged therapeutic activity seen in early clinical trials of taspoglutide. Excellent stability and potency with substantial glucoincretin effects position taspoglutide as a promising new agent for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Folate receptor-targeted liposomes loaded with a diacid metabolite of norcantharidin enhance antitumor potency for H22 hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min-Chen; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xia-Rong; Shuai, Wu-Ping; Hu, Ying; Han, Min; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The diacid metabolite of norcantharidin (DM-NCTD) is clinically effective against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but is limited by its short half-life and high incidence of adverse effects at high doses. We developed a DM-NCTD-loaded, folic acid (FA)-modified, polyethylene glycolated (DM-NCTD/FA-PEG) liposome system to enhance the targeting effect and antitumor potency for HCC at a moderate dose based on our previous study. The DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposome system produced liposomes with regular spherical morphology, with mean particle size approximately 200 nm, and an encapsulation efficiency >80%. MTT cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that the DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes showed significantly stronger cytotoxicity effects on the H22 hepatoma cell line than did PEG liposomes without the FA modification (P<0.01). We used liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for determination of DM-NCTD in tissues and tumors, and found it to be sensitive, rapid, and reliable. In addition, the biodistribution study showed that DM-NCTD liposomes improved tumor-targeting efficiency, and DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes exhibited the highest efficiency of the treatments (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the results indicated that although the active liposome group had an apparently increased tumor-targeting efficiency of DM-NCTD, the risk to the kidney was higher than in the normal liposome group. With regard to in vivo antitumor activity, DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes inhibited tumors in H22 tumor-bearing mice better than either free DM-NCTD or DM-NCTD/PEG liposomes (P<0.01), and induced considerably more significant cellular apoptosis in the tumors, with no obvious toxicity to the tissues of model mice or the liver tissue of normal mice, as shown by histopathological examination. All these results demonstrate that DM-NCTD-loaded FA-modified liposomes might have potential application for HCC-targeting therapy. PMID:27110110

  6. A Model for Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Activated Gene Expression Shows Potency and Efficacy Changes and Predicts Squelching Due to Competition for Transcription Co-Activators

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ted W.; Budinsky, Robert A.; Rowlands, J. Craig

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic model of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription was developed based on activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) and subsequent binding the activated AHR to xenobiotic response elements (XREs) on DNA. The model was based on effects observed in cells lines commonly used as in vitro experimental systems. Following ligand binding, the AHR moves into the cell nucleus and forms a heterodimer with the aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator (ARNT). In the model, a requirement for binding to DNA is that a generic coregulatory protein is subsequently bound to the AHR-ARNT dimer. Varying the amount of coregulator available within the nucleus altered both the potency and efficacy of TCDD for inducing for transcription of CYP1A1 mRNA, a commonly used marker for activation of the AHR. Lowering the amount of available cofactor slightly increased the EC50 for the transcriptional response without changing the efficacy or maximal response. Further reduction in the amount of cofactor reduced the efficacy and produced non-monotonic dose-response curves (NMDRCs) at higher ligand concentrations. The shapes of these NMDRCs were reminiscent of the phenomenon of squelching. Resource limitations for transcriptional machinery are becoming apparent in eukaryotic cells. Within single cells, nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression appears to be a stochastic process; however, intercellular communication and other aspects of tissue coordination may represent a compensatory process to maintain an organism’s ability to respond on a phenotypic level to various stimuli within an inconstant environment. PMID:26039703

  7. Comparison of Intake and Systemic Relative Effect Potencies of Dioxin-like Compounds in Female Mice after a Single Oral Dose

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Patrik L.; Gaisch, Konrad P.J.; van den Berg, Martin; van Duursen, Majorie B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Risk assessment for mixtures of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is performed using the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach. These TEF values are derived mainly from relative effect potencies (REPs) linking an administered dose to an in vivo toxic or biological effect, resulting in “intake” TEFs. At present, there is insufficient data available to conclude that intake TEFs are also applicable for systemic concentrations (e.g., blood and tissues). Objective: We compared intake and systemic REPs of 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzodioxin (PeCDD), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (4-PeCDF), 3,3´,4,4´,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126), 2,3´,4,4´,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-118), and 2,3,3´,4,4´,5-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-156) in female C57BL/6 mice 3 days after a single oral dose. Methods: We calculated intake REPs and systemic REPs based on administered dose and liver, adipose, or plasma concentrations relative to TCDD. Hepatic cytochrome P450 1A1–associated ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and gene expression of Cyp1a1, 1a2 and 1b1 in the liver and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were used as biological end points. Results: We observed up to one order of magnitude difference between intake REPs and systemic REPs. Two different patterns were discerned. Compared with intake REPs, systemic REPs based on plasma or adipose levels were higher for PeCDD, 4-PeCDF, and PCB-126 but lower for the mono-ortho PCBs 118 and 156. Conclusions: Based on these mouse data, the comparison between intake REPs and systemic REPs reveals significant congener-specific differences that warrants the development of systemic TEFs to calculate toxic equivalents (TEQs) in blood and body tissues. PMID:23674508

  8. Relative induction potency of benzo(a)pyrene and dibenzo(a,h) anthracene in environmental samples using the H4IIE cell bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, K.; Gardinali, P.; Sericano, J.; Wade, T.; Safe, S.

    1995-12-31

    The induction of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity in H4IIE cells has proven to be a useful assay for assessing the toxic equivalents of complex mixtures of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and related compounds in environmental samples. However, there is often a discrepancy between bioassay induction results and toxic equivalents calculated from chemical analysis of samples; the former yielding higher I-TEQs (induction/toxic equivalents). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of chemicals which can significantly contribute to I-TEQ estimates. Benzo(a)pyrene (BAP) and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene (DBA) are both carcinogenic PAHs found in environmental samples, specifically oysters (Crassostrea virginica) collected from Galveston Bay. Dose-response studies were conducted with H4IIE cells to determine the relative induction potency of these two PAHs relative to 2,3,7,8-TCDD. Using probit analysis, the I-TEFs were 0.00144 and 0.0095 for BAP and DBA, respectively. Reconstituted PAH mixtures (744 to 4,466 ng/g total PAHs) with constant percentages of BAP (4.5%) and DEA (3.5%) yielded bioassay derived I-TEQs which ranged from 0.52 to 1.44 ng/g. Oysters treated with the same PAH mix for 30 days differentially accumulated the DBA and BAP over the time course. The bioassay derived I-TEQs of extracts from these oysters ranged from 0.99 to 6.14 ng/g whereas the calculated values using only the I-TEQs of BAP and BDA ranged from 0.04 to 0.57 accounting for only 5--10% of the observed induction response. These results indicate that presence of other PAHs in the treated oyster extracts are highly active as inducers of EROD activity in the H4IIE bioassay.

  9. On higher structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baas, Nils A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss various philosophical aspects of the hyperstructure concept extending networks and higher categories. By this discussion, we hope to pave the way for applications and further developments of the mathematical theory of hyperstructures.

  10. Forecasting Higher Education's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, Don; Buck, Tina S.; Kollie, Ellen; Przyborowski, Danielle; Rondinelli, Joseph A.; Hunter, Jeff; Hanna, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Offers predictions on trends in higher education to accommodate changing needs, lower budgets, and increased enrollment. They involve campus construction, security, administration, technology, interior design, athletics, and transportation. (EV)

  11. International Higher Education Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulat, Y. G-M.

    1988-01-01

    One in a series of bibliographies of articles in international higher education journals lists items on a variety of administrative, financial, faculty, student, curricular, and related issues. Articles on specific geographic regions are categorized separately. (MSE)

  12. Measured and predicted affinities of binding and relative potencies to activate the AhR of PAHs and their alkylated analogues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Shin, Woong-Hee; Hong, Seongjin; Kang, Habyeong; Jung, Dawoon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Khim, Jong Seong; Seok, Chaok; Giesy, John P; Choi, Kyungho

    2015-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their alkylated forms are important components of crude oil. Both groups of PAHs have been reported to cause dioxin-like responses, mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Thus, characterization of binding affinity to the AhR of unsubstituted or alkylated PAHs is important to understand the toxicological consequences of oil contamination on ecosystems. We investigated the potencies of major PAHs of crude oil, e.g., chrysene, phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene, and their alkylated forms (n=17) to upregulate expression of AhR-mediated processes by use of the H4IIE-luc transactivation bioassay. In addition, molecular descriptors of different AhR activation potencies among PAHs were investigated by use of computational molecular docking models. Based on responses of the H4IIE-luc in vitro assay, it was shown that potencies of PAHs were determined by alkylation in addition to the number and conformation of rings. Potencies of AhR-mediated processes were generally greater when a chrysene group was substituted, especially in 1-methyl-chrysene. Significant negative correlations were observed between the in vitro dioxin-like potency measured in H4IIE-luc cells and the binding distance estimated from the in silico modeling. The difference in relative potency for AhR activation observed among PAHs and their alkylated forms could be explained by differences among binding distances in the ligand binding domain of the AhR caused by alkylation. The docking model developed in the present study may have utility in predicting risks of environmental contaminants of which toxicities are mediated by AhR binding.

  13. Radioligand binding analysis of receptor subtypes in two FP receptor preparations that exhibit different functional rank orders of potency in response to prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Woodward, D F; Fairbairn, C E; Krauss, A H; Lawrence, R A; Protzman, C E

    1995-04-01

    The rat colon and Swiss 3T3 cells have been proposed as FP receptor preparations. However, the rank orders of potency for contraction of the rat colon and Ca++ signaling in Swiss 3T3 cells were found to be disparate. Although both appeared to be FP receptor preparations in that PGF2 alpha and FP receptor selective analogs were the most potent agonists, the potency ranking for other PGs and their analogs differed markedly. This presented two alternative major hypotheses for interpreting these data: (1) Swiss 3T3 cells and the rat colon possess different FP receptor subtypes and (2) the rat colon contains a heterogeneous population of prostanoid receptors. To further characterize prostanoid receptor populations in these two preparations, radioligand binding studies were performed with 3H-PGE2 and 3H-17-phenyl-PGF2 alpha. The rank order of potency for inhibition of 3H-PGE2 binding in the rat colon was consistent with EP3 receptor pharmacology. Thus, MB 28767, sulprostone and PGE2 were potent inhibitors, whereas PGF2 alpha, PGD2 and other analogs were substantially less potent. The rank order of potency for inhibition of 3H-17-phenyl-PGF2 alpha binding in the rat colon was consistent with the presence of an FP receptor. Thus, the potency rank order for the natural PGs was PGF2 alpha > PGD2 > PGE2 and among the synthetic analogs only PGF2 alpha analogs were potent competitors. In Swiss 3T3 cells an identical rank order of potency for eliciting a Ca++ transient signal and inhibition of 3H-17-phenyl-PGF2 alpha binding was obtained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Empirical analysis of BMD metrics in genetic toxicology part I: in vitro analyses to provide robust potency rankings and support MOA determinations.

    PubMed

    Wills, John W; Johnson, George E; Doak, Shareen H; Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; Slob, Wout; White, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Genetic toxicity testing has traditionally been used for hazard identification, with dichotomous classification of test results serving to identify genotoxic agents. However, the utility of genotoxicity data can be augmented by employing dose-response analysis and point of departure determination. Via interpolation from a fitted dose-response model, the benchmark dose (BMD) approach estimates the dose that elicits a specified (small) effect size. BMD metrics and their confidence intervals can be used for compound potency ranking within an endpoint, as well as potency comparisons across other factors such as cell line or exposure duration. A recently developed computational method, the BMD covariate approach, permits combined analysis of multiple dose-response data sets that are differentiated by covariates such as compound, cell type or exposure regime. The approach provides increased BMD precision for effective potency rankings across compounds and other covariates that pertain to a hypothesised mode of action (MOA). To illustrate these applications, the covariate approach was applied to the analysis of published in vitro micronucleus frequency dose-response data for ionising radiations, a set of aneugens, two mutagenic azo compounds and a topoisomerase II inhibitor. The ionising radiation results show that the precision of BMD estimates can be improved by employing the covariate method. The aneugen analysis provided potency groupings based on the BMD confidence intervals, and analyses of azo compound data from cells lines with differing metabolic capacity confirmed the influence of endogenous metabolism on genotoxic potency. This work, which is the first of a two-part series, shows that BMD-derived potency rankings can be employed to support MOA evaluations as well as facilitate read across to expedite chemical evaluations and regulatory decision-making. The follow-up (Part II) employs the combined covariate approach to analyse in vivo genetic toxicity dose

  15. Empirical analysis of BMD metrics in genetic toxicology part I: in vitro analyses to provide robust potency rankings and support MOA determinations.

    PubMed

    Wills, John W; Johnson, George E; Doak, Shareen H; Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; Slob, Wout; White, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Genetic toxicity testing has traditionally been used for hazard identification, with dichotomous classification of test results serving to identify genotoxic agents. However, the utility of genotoxicity data can be augmented by employing dose-response analysis and point of departure determination. Via interpolation from a fitted dose-response model, the benchmark dose (BMD) approach estimates the dose that elicits a specified (small) effect size. BMD metrics and their confidence intervals can be used for compound potency ranking within an endpoint, as well as potency comparisons across other factors such as cell line or exposure duration. A recently developed computational method, the BMD covariate approach, permits combined analysis of multiple dose-response data sets that are differentiated by covariates such as compound, cell type or exposure regime. The approach provides increased BMD precision for effective potency rankings across compounds and other covariates that pertain to a hypothesised mode of action (MOA). To illustrate these applications, the covariate approach was applied to the analysis of published in vitro micronucleus frequency dose-response data for ionising radiations, a set of aneugens, two mutagenic azo compounds and a topoisomerase II inhibitor. The ionising radiation results show that the precision of BMD estimates can be improved by employing the covariate method. The aneugen analysis provided potency groupings based on the BMD confidence intervals, and analyses of azo compound data from cells lines with differing metabolic capacity confirmed the influence of endogenous metabolism on genotoxic potency. This work, which is the first of a two-part series, shows that BMD-derived potency rankings can be employed to support MOA evaluations as well as facilitate read across to expedite chemical evaluations and regulatory decision-making. The follow-up (Part II) employs the combined covariate approach to analyse in vivo genetic toxicity dose

  16. Discovery of pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives as CMGC family protein kinase inhibitors: Design, synthesis, inhibitory potency and X-ray co-crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Esvan, Yannick J; Zeinyeh, Wael; Boibessot, Thibaut; Nauton, Lionel; Théry, Vincent; Knapp, Stefan; Chaikuad, Apirat; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Anizon, Fabrice; Giraud, Francis; Moreau, Pascale

    2016-08-01

    The design and synthesis of new pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives is described as well as their protein kinase inhibitory potencies toward five CMGC family members (CDK5, CK1, GSK3, CLK1 and DYRK1A). The interest for this original tricyclic heteroaromatic scaffold as modulators of CLK1/DYRK1A activity was validated by nanomolar potencies (compounds 12 and 13). CLK1 co-crystal structures with two inhibitors revealed the binding mode of these compounds within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:27128181

  17. Guidelines for the development and validation of new potency assays for the evaluation of umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Stephen; Hurley, Carolyn K; Brady, Colleen; Phillips-Johnson, Lisa; Chow, Robert; Laughlin, Mary; McMannis, John; Reems, Jo-Anna; Regan, Donna; Rubinstein, Pablo; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2011-08-01

    The following commentary was developed by the National Marrow Donor Program Cord Blood Advisory Group and is intended to provide an overview of umbilical cord blood (UCB) processing, summarize the current state of potency assays used to characterize UCB, and define limitations of the assays and future needs of the cord blood banking and transplant community. The UCB banking industry is eager to participate in the development of standardized assays to uniformly characterize cellular therapy products that are manufactured in a variety of ways. This paper describes the desired qualities of these assays and how the industry proposes to co-operate with developers to bring relevant assays to market. To that end, the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) Cord Blood Bank Network is available to serve as a resource for UCB testing material, research and development consulting, and product/assay testing in an accredited UCB manufacturing environment. PMID:21449685

  18. Towards an improved prediction of the free radical scavenging potency of flavonoids: the significance of double PCET mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Amić, Ana; Marković, Zoran; Dimitrić Marković, Jasmina M; Stepanić, Višnja; Lučić, Bono; Amić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    The 1H(+)/1e(-) and 2H(+)/2e(-) proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes of free radical scavenging by flavonoids were theoretically studied for aqueous and lipid environments using the PM6 and PM7 methods. The results reported here indicate that the significant contribution of the second PCET mechanism, resulting in the formation of a quinone/quinone methide, effectively discriminates the active from inactive flavonoids. The predictive potency of descriptors related to the energetics of second PCET mechanisms (the second O-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE2) related to hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism, and the second electron transfer enthalpy (ETE2) related to sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) mechanism) are superior to the currently used indices, which are related to the first 1H(+)/1e(-) processes, and could serve as primary descriptors in development of the QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationships) of flavonoids.

  19. Optimization of chromone-2-carboxamide melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists: assessment of potency, efficacy, and cardiovascular safety.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John K; Freeman, Jennifer C; Judd, Andrew S; Iyengar, Rajesh; Mulhern, Mathew; Zhao, Gang; Napier, James J; Wodka, Dariusz; Brodjian, Sevan; Dayton, Brian D; Falls, Doug; Ogiela, Christopher; Reilly, Regina M; Campbell, Thomas J; Polakowski, James S; Hernandez, Lisa; Marsh, Kennan C; Shapiro, Robin; Knourek-Segel, Victoria; Droz, Brian; Bush, Eugene; Brune, Michael; Preusser, Lee C; Fryer, Ryan M; Reinhart, Glenn A; Houseman, Kathryn; Diaz, Gilbert; Mikhail, Ann; Limberis, James T; Sham, Hing L; Collins, Christine A; Kym, Philip R

    2006-11-01

    Evaluation of multiple structurally distinct series of melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists in an anesthetized rat cardiovascualar assay led to the identification of a chromone-2-carboxamide series as having excellent safety against the chosen cardiovascular endpoints at high drug concentrations in the plasma and brain. Optimization of this series led to considerable improvements in affinity, functional potency, and pharmacokinetic profile. This led to the identification of a 7-fluorochromone-2-carboxamide (22) that was orally efficacious in a diet-induced obese mouse model, retained a favorable cardiovascular profile in rat, and demonstrated dramatic improvement in effects on mean arterial pressure in our dog cardiovascular model compared to other series reported by our group. However, this analogue also led to prolongation of the QT interval in the dog that was linked to affinity for hERG channel and unexpectedly potent functional blockade of this ion channel. PMID:17064075

  20. Introduction to a standardized method for the evaluation of the potency of Bacillus thuringiensis serotype H-14 based products*

    PubMed Central

    Rishikesh, N.; Quélennec, G.

    1983-01-01

    Vector resistance and other constraints have necessitated consideration of the use of alternative materials and methods in an integrated approach to vector control. Bacillus thuringiensis serotype H-14 is a promising biological control agent which acts as a conventional larvicide through its delta-endotoxin (active ingredient) and which now has to be suitably formulated for application in vector breeding habitats. The active ingredient in the formulations has so far not been chemically characterized or quantified and therefore recourse has to be taken to a bioassay method. Drawing on past experience and through the assistance mainly of various collaborating centres, the World Health Organization has standardized a bioassay method (described in the Annex), which gives consistent and reproducible results. The method permits the determination of the potency of a B.t. H-14 preparation through comparison with a standard powder. The universal adoption of the standardized bioassay method will ensure comparability of the results of different investigators. PMID:6601545

  1. Optimization of chromone-2-carboxamide melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists: assessment of potency, efficacy, and cardiovascular safety.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John K; Freeman, Jennifer C; Judd, Andrew S; Iyengar, Rajesh; Mulhern, Mathew; Zhao, Gang; Napier, James J; Wodka, Dariusz; Brodjian, Sevan; Dayton, Brian D; Falls, Doug; Ogiela, Christopher; Reilly, Regina M; Campbell, Thomas J; Polakowski, James S; Hernandez, Lisa; Marsh, Kennan C; Shapiro, Robin; Knourek-Segel, Victoria; Droz, Brian; Bush, Eugene; Brune, Michael; Preusser, Lee C; Fryer, Ryan M; Reinhart, Glenn A; Houseman, Kathryn; Diaz, Gilbert; Mikhail, Ann; Limberis, James T; Sham, Hing L; Collins, Christine A; Kym, Philip R

    2006-11-01

    Evaluation of multiple structurally distinct series of melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists in an anesthetized rat cardiovascualar assay led to the identification of a chromone-2-carboxamide series as having excellent safety against the chosen cardiovascular endpoints at high drug concentrations in the plasma and brain. Optimization of this series led to considerable improvements in affinity, functional potency, and pharmacokinetic profile. This led to the identification of a 7-fluorochromone-2-carboxamide (22) that was orally efficacious in a diet-induced obese mouse model, retained a favorable cardiovascular profile in rat, and demonstrated dramatic improvement in effects on mean arterial pressure in our dog cardiovascular model compared to other series reported by our group. However, this analogue also led to prolongation of the QT interval in the dog that was linked to affinity for hERG channel and unexpectedly potent functional blockade of this ion channel.

  2. Variability of cannabis potency in the Venice area (Italy): a survey over the period 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Zamengo, Luca; Frison, Giampietro; Bettin, Chiara; Sciarrone, Rocco

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance globally, with an estimated annual prevalence in 2010 of 2.6-5.0% of the adult population. Concerns have been expressed about increases in the potency of cannabis products. A high tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content can increase anxiety, depression, and psychotic symptoms, and can increase the risk of dependence and adverse effects on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in regular users. The aim of this study was to report statistical data about the potency of cannabis products seized in the north-east of Italy, in a geographical area centred in Venice and extending for more than 10,000  km(2) with a population of more than two million, by investigating the variability observed in THC levels of about 4000 samples of cannabis products analyzed over the period 2010-2012. Overall median THC content showed an increasing trend over the study period from about 6.0% to 8.1% (6.2-8.9% for cannabis resin, 5.1-7.6% for herbal cannabis). The variation in the THC content of individual samples was very large, ranging from 0.3% to 31% for cannabis resin and from 0.1 to 19% for herbal cannabis. Median CBN:THC ratios showed a slightly decreasing trend over the study period, from 0.09 (2010) to 0.03 (2012), suggesting an increasing freshness of submitted materials. Median CBD:THC ratios also showed a decreasing trend over the study from about 0.52 (2010) to 0.18 (2012), likely due to the increase in submissions of materials from indoor and domestic cultivation with improved breeding methods.

  3. Effects of chemical modification on the potency, serum stability, and immunostimulatory properties of short shRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Qing; Dallas, Anne; Ilves, Heini; Shorenstein, Joshua; Behlke, Mark A.; Johnston, Brian H.

    2010-01-01

    Small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) with 19-base-pair, or shorter, stems (short shRNAs [sshRNAs]) have been found to constitute a class whose mechanism of action appears to be distinct from that of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or longer shRNAs. These sshRNAs can be as active as canonical siRNAs or longer shRNAs. Their activity is affected by whether the antisense strand is positioned 5′ or 3′ to the loop (L or R sshRNAs, respectively). Dicer seems not to be involved in the processing of sshRNAs, although the mechanism of target gene suppression by these hairpins is through Ago2-mediated mRNA cleavage. In this study, the effects of chemical modifications on the potency, serum stability, and innate immune response of sshRNAs were investigated. Deoxynucleotide substitution and 2′-O-methyl (2′-OMe) modification in the sense strand and loop did not affect silencing activity, but, unlike with siRNAs, when placed in the antisense strand these modifications were detrimental. Conjugation with bulky groups at the 5′-end of L sshRNAs or 3′-end of R sshRNAs had a negative impact on the potency. Unmodified sshRNAs in dimer form or with blunt ends were immunostimulatory. Some modifications such as 3′-end conjugation and phosphorothioate linkages on the backbone of the sshRNAs could also induce inflammatory cytokine production. However, 2′-OMe substitution of sshRNAs abrogated the innate immune response and improved the serum stability of the hairpins. PMID:19948766

  4. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mutation (Y151S) causes reduced agonist potency to a range of neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zewen; Williamson, Martin S; Lansdell, Stuart J; Han, Zhaojun; Denholm, Ian; Millar, Neil S

    2006-11-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are potent selective agonists of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Since their introduction in 1991, resistance to neonicotinoids has been slow to develop, but it is now established in some insect field populations such as the planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, a major rice pest in many parts of Asia. We have reported recently the identification of a target-site mutation (Y151S) within two nAChR subunits (Nlalpha1 and Nlalpha3) from a laboratory-selected field population of N. lugens. In the present study, we have examined the influence of this mutation upon the functional properties of recombinant nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes (as hybrid nAChRs, co-expressed with a rat beta2 subunit). The agonist potency of several nicotinic agonists has been examined, including all of the neonicotinoid insecticides that are currently licensed for either crop protection or animal health applications (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam). The Y151S mutation was found to have no significant effect on the maximal current (I(max)) observed with the endogenous agonist, acetylcholine. In contrast, a significant reduction in I(max) was observed for all neonicotinoids (the I(max) for mutant nAChRs ranged from 13 to 81% of that observed on wild-type receptors). In addition, nAChRs containing the Y151S mutation caused a significant rightward shift in agonist dose-response curves for all neonicotinoids, but of varying magnitude (shifts in EC(50) values ranged from 1.3 to 3.6-fold). The relationship between neonicotinoid structure and their potency on nAChRs containing the Y151S target-site mutation is discussed.

  5. κ-opioid receptors are implicated in the increased potency of intra-accumbens nalmefene in ethanol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Nealey, Kathryn A; Smith, Alexander W; Davis, Seth M; Smith, Daniel G; Walker, Brendan M

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that ethanol-dependent animals display increased sensitivity to the general opioid receptor antagonist nalmefene compared to naltrexone. It was hypothesized that the dissociable effects of the two antagonists were attributable to a κ-opioid receptor mechanism. Nucleus accumbens dynorphin is upregulated following chronic ethanol exposure and such neuroadaptations could contribute to nalmefene's increased potency in ethanol-dependent animals. To test this hypothesis, male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer ethanol using an operant conditioning procedure. Animals were then implanted with bilateral intra-accumbens shell guide cannulae and assigned to either a chronic intermittent ethanol vapor-exposure condition (to induce dependence) or an air-exposed control group. Following a one-month exposure period, nalmefene, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; selective for κ-opioid receptors) or a combination of the selective opioid receptor antagonists CTOP and naltrindole (selective for the μ- and δ-opioid receptors, respectively) were site-specifically infused into the nucleus accumbens shell prior to ethanol self-administration sessions during acute withdrawal. Nalmefene and CTOP/naltrindole dose-dependently reduced ethanol self-administration in nondependent and dependent animals, whereas nor-BNI selectively attenuated ethanol self-administration in ethanol-dependent animals without affecting the self-administration of nondependent animals. Further analysis indentified that intra-accumbens shell nalmefene was more potent in ethanol-dependent animals and that the increased potency was attributable to a κ-opioid receptor mechanism. These data support the concept that dysregulation of DYN/κ-opioid receptor systems contributes to the excessive self-administration observed in dependent animals and suggest that pharmacotherapeutics for ethanol dependence that target κ-opioid receptors, in addition to μ- and δ-opioid receptors, are preferable

  6. Variability of cannabis potency in the Venice area (Italy): a survey over the period 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Zamengo, Luca; Frison, Giampietro; Bettin, Chiara; Sciarrone, Rocco

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance globally, with an estimated annual prevalence in 2010 of 2.6-5.0% of the adult population. Concerns have been expressed about increases in the potency of cannabis products. A high tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content can increase anxiety, depression, and psychotic symptoms, and can increase the risk of dependence and adverse effects on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in regular users. The aim of this study was to report statistical data about the potency of cannabis products seized in the north-east of Italy, in a geographical area centred in Venice and extending for more than 10,000  km(2) with a population of more than two million, by investigating the variability observed in THC levels of about 4000 samples of cannabis products analyzed over the period 2010-2012. Overall median THC content showed an increasing trend over the study period from about 6.0% to 8.1% (6.2-8.9% for cannabis resin, 5.1-7.6% for herbal cannabis). The variation in the THC content of individual samples was very large, ranging from 0.3% to 31% for cannabis resin and from 0.1 to 19% for herbal cannabis. Median CBN:THC ratios showed a slightly decreasing trend over the study period, from 0.09 (2010) to 0.03 (2012), suggesting an increasing freshness of submitted materials. Median CBD:THC ratios also showed a decreasing trend over the study from about 0.52 (2010) to 0.18 (2012), likely due to the increase in submissions of materials from indoor and domestic cultivation with improved breeding methods. PMID:23868754

  7. Anti-apoptotic potency of TNFR:Fc gene in ischemia/ reperfusion-induced myocardial cell injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Zheng, Dong; Li, Hai-Rui; Zhang, Ai-Dong; Li, Zi-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-apoptotic potency of TNFR:Fc gene in ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial cell injury and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes injury. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups (n=8): (1) sham operation group; (2) ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) rats treated with rAAV-EGFP; (3) I/R rats treated with rAAV-TNFR:Fc group. rAAV-EGFP or rAAV-TNFR:Fc was injected intra-myocardial at four sites on the anterior and posterior walls of left ventricle immediately after the construction of I/R-induced AMI model in rats. The effects of TNFR:Fc on apoptosis and cardiacfunction were observed after 72 h of coronary reperfusion. In the in vitro study, apoptosis was analyzed in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes treated either with nomoxia alone, or hypoxia/reoxygenation in the presence of rAAV-GFP or rAAV-TNFR:Fc. We found that (1) TNFR:Fc gene improved cardiac function (EF, LVESP, LVEDP and dp/dt max) post I/R-induced AMI; (2) TNFR:Fc gene inhibited I/R-induced apoptosis and attenuated the level of TNF-α in serum and cardiac tissue; (3) TNFR:Fc gene prevented apoptosis in hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activation and normalization of ratio of the Bcl-2/Bax. We concluded that TNFR:Fc gene transfection has anti-apoptotic potency in ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial cell injury. PMID:25015882

  8. The Signaling and Transformation Potency of the Overexpressed HER2 Protein is Dependent on the Normally-Expressed EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangdong; Agazie, Yehenew M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) belongs to the EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases that comprises four members. As opposed to the other family members, HER2 does not require ligand binding for activation. Hence, HER2 molecules can undergo spontaneous dimerization, autophosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling pathways especially under conditions of overexpression, a commonly encountered phenomenon in breast cancer. In this study, we sought to investigate the mechanism by which HER2 musters signaling and transformation potency. We show that HER2 overexpression per se induces a significant increase in basal mitogenic and cell survival signaling, which was augmented by EGF stimulation. Inhibition of the normally expressed EGFR significantly suppressed the ability of overexpressed HER2 to induce enhanced signaling and cell transformation, suggesting that HER2 requires the EGFR and potentially other members to maximize its signaling and transformation potency. The novel observation revealed by prolonged EGF stimulation studies was the biphasic signaling pattern in the presence of HER2 overexpression that suggested the induction of a short-circuited mechanism, permitting sustained signaling. Our results further show that the short-circuited signaling was due to the re-shuttling of internalized receptor molecules to the Rab11-positive recycling endosomes, while suppressing channeling to the LAMP1-positive lysosome-targeting endosomes. Therefore, HER2’s oncogenicity is dependent, not only on its constitutively active nature, but also on its ability to muster collaborative signaling from family members through modulation of ligand-induced receptor regulation. PMID:21911055

  9. Cheminformatics Approach to Gene Silencing: Z Descriptors of Nucleotides and SVM Regression Afford Predictive Models for siRNA Potency.

    PubMed

    Ebalunode, Jerry O; Zheng, Weifan

    2010-12-17

    Short interfering RNA mediated gene silencing technology has been through tremendous development over the past decade, and has found broad applications in both basic biomedical research and pharmaceutical development. Critical to the effective use of this technology is the development of reliable algorithms to predict the potency and selectivity of siRNAs under study. Existing algorithms are mostly built upon sequence information of siRNAs and then employ statistical pattern recognition or machine learning techniques to derive rules or models. However, sequence-based features have limited ability to characterize siRNAs, especially chemically modified ones. In this study, we proposed a cheminformatics approach to describe siRNAs. Principal component scores (z1, z2, z3, z4) have been derived for each of the 5 nucleotides (A, U, G, C, T) from the descriptor matrix computed by the MOE program. Descriptors of a given siRNA sequence are simply the concatenation of the z values of its composing nucleotides. Thus, for each of the 2431 siRNA sequences in the Huesken dataset, 76 descriptors were generated for the 19-NT representation, and 84 descriptors were generated for the 21-NT representation of siRNAs. Support Vector Machine regression (SVMR) was employed to develop predictive models. In all cases, the models achieved Pearson correlation coefficient r and R about 0.84 and 0.65 for the training sets and test sets, respectively. A minimum of 25 % of the whole dataset was needed to obtain predictive models that could accurately predict 75 % of the remaining siRNAs. Thus, for the first time, a cheminformatics approach has been developed to successfully model the structure-potency relationship in siRNA-based gene silencing data, which has laid a solid foundation for quantitative modeling of chemically modified siRNAs.

  10. Comparative Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    The comparative higher education course offered at the State University of New York at Buffalo is briefly described, and a course schedule is presented, including required and recommended readings for each topic. The course is intended to provide a broad cross-cultural perspective and considers the growth and development of universities in Europe,…

  11. Valuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the value of higher education is today set in the context of an unprecedented banking and financial crisis. In this context of fundamental change and financial realignment, it is important that we as members of the university remake our case for why the university deserves to be considered alongside all those other worthy causes…

  12. Higher Education Exchange, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    This annual collection focuses on the obligation of higher education to democracy. Scholars from a variety if disciplines explore this question and related issues, such as the civic mission of the university, what it means to be an "engaged" university, and how a university can itself by a "good citizen." Following a foreword by Deborah Witte, the…

  13. Higher Education's Strange Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Harold, II

    The university which has had the temerity to change the world has not had the nerve to change itself to live in that world. The result is that the university's grading system, curriculum, teaching methods, and philosophies are in conflict with the world beyond the campus gates, and higher education does not meet the intellectual and social needs…

  14. European Higher Education Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcal-Grilo, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    In his paper, the author--an academic and former Minister of Education for Portugal--traces the origins of the Bologna Declaration of 1999 and its follow-up studies leading to the Prague Conference of Higher Education Ministers in May 2001. He summarises the outcomes of the Prague Conference, and draws conclusions on the crucial role of…

  15. California's Future: Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Hans

    2015-01-01

    California's higher education system is not keeping up with the changing economy. Projections suggest that the state's economy will continue to need more highly educated workers. In 2025, if current trends persist, 41 percent of jobs will require at least a bachelor's degree and 36 percent will require some college education short of a bachelor's…

  16. Higher Education Interpreting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woll, Bencie; Porcari li Destri, Giulia

    This paper discusses issues related to the training and provision of interpreters for deaf students at institutions of higher education in the United Kingdom. Background information provided notes the increasing numbers of deaf and partially hearing students, the existence of funding to pay for interpreters, and trends in the availability of…

  17. Understanding Higher Education Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middaugh, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Public discussion of higher education costs frequently confuses price with expenditure. This article examines factors associated with increases in the sticker price of a college education and the expenditures incurred by institutions in delivering that education. The discussion suggests that while growth in college tuition is real, access to…

  18. Urban Higher Education Consortia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paltridge, James Gilbert

    This is a descriptive and evaluative study of 8 consortia formed by urban institutions of higher education confronted with common problems of minority student recruitment, training of teachers for inner-city schools, and the need for academic expertise to help solve their economic and social problems. Findings show that consortia weaknesses stem…

  19. Higher Level Thinking Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Barbara, Ed.

    This report describes two systems designed to improve teaching competencies and to develop higher level thinking abilities, and presents the evaluation design, statistical results, and a brief history of the major events which occurred during development. The McCollum-Davis Model is designed to develop understanding of and skill in relating a…

  20. Workstations in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Ronald F. E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Five articles discuss various aspects of workstations and their applications in higher education. Highlights include microcomputers and workstations; UNIX operating system; campus-wide networks; software; Project SOCRATES and the interdisciplinary aspect of engineering; mechanical system design and simulation; and the Creation Station, a…

  1. Higher-order Multiples.

    PubMed

    Stone, Joanne; Kohari, Katherine S

    2015-09-01

    Higher-order multiple gestations have increased since the advent of advanced reproductive technologies. These pregnancies present unique risks to both mothers and fetuses. It is imperative that early diagnosis of chronicity be determined and that proper counseling is performed, so patients understand the risks, evaluation, and management needed.

  2. Higher Education in Scotland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neave, Guy; Cowper, Henry

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes higher education in Scotland in terms of its history and administrative structure and in light of the myths and beliefs about the traditional Scottish university. Differences from English universities are stressed. Journal available from Editor, Gabriel Fragniere, Institute of Education, 60 rue de la Concorde, B-1050, Brussels, Belgium.…

  3. Black at Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadi-Hanifi, Karima

    2013-01-01

    This is an exploratory paper, drawing on the author's experiences as well as those of three other black lecturers in Higher Education (HE). Three interviews were carried out, asking the same five questions around themes of concern to the author. These are about the learning and teaching approaches used by these lecturers; their experiences of…

  4. Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Alan

    Women have traditionally been discriminated against in higher education in both the attainment of degrees and in employment after earning degrees. It has been felt that women are not as capable, reliable, or effective as men in administrative and classroom situations. Statistics show that even at the present time women are underemployed and…

  5. Marketing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockenberger, Susan J.

    Educational institutions must seek new approaches to institutional planning because of such factors as shrinking traditional college age populations, eroding grants, governmental and judicial incursion, the tightening economic belt, and concern over the relevance of education to modern day needs. The concept of marketing higher education is…

  6. Higher Education Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    This collection of 10 articles and stories highlights ongoing experiments in colleges and universities which address the relationship of higher education institutions and citizenship responsibility. Following a foreword by Deborah White, articles are: "The Civic Roots of Academic Social Science Scholarship in American" (R. Claire Snyder), which…

  7. Entrepreneurship and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Jonathan, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Stimulating innovative and growth-oriented entrepreneurship is a key economic and societal challenge to which universities and colleges have much to contribute. This book examines the role that higher education institutions are currently playing through teaching entrepreneurship and transferring knowledge and innovation to enterprises and…

  8. Shell Higher Olefins Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how olefin isomerization and the exotic olefin metathesis reaction can be harnessed in industrial processes. Indicates that the Shell Higher Olefins Process makes use of organometallic catalysts to manufacture alpha-olefins and internal carbon-11 through carbon-14 alkenes in a flexible fashion that can be adjusted to market needs. (JN)

  9. Unraveling Higher Education's Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Gus; Charles, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The activity-based costing (ABC) method of analyzing institutional costs in higher education involves four procedures: determining the various discrete activities of the organization; calculating the cost of each; determining the cost drivers; tracing cost to the cost objective or consumer of each activity. Few American institutions have used the…

  10. Free Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Jr., Adolph; Szymanski, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    The crisis of affordability in higher education is intensifying. Illustrations of its resonance abound: from the frequent news articles describing and amplifying the crisis and its sources to legislators' and candidates' proposed responses. Republicans' responses tend to be mainly punitive toward institutions; Democrats' proposals are more…

  11. Contracting and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The potential gains in efficiency of three types of contracts in college administration are contrasted. Contract types include explicit contracts in the budgeting process between the state and higher education institutions; institutional contracting for inputs; and interinstitutional contracting. The tradeoff between production cost savings and…

  12. Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Sheryl, Ed.; Shaver, Barbara, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Articles on women's studies and females in higher education are presented in this publication. A University of North Dakota project that sought to promote the integration of new research and scholarship results into the curriculum is described in "Women's Equity Committee Offers a Model Project," (Leola Furman, Robert Young). Historical…

  13. Developing Higher Level Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limbach, Barbara; Waugh, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This paper identifies an interdisciplinary, five-step process, built upon existing theory and best practices in cognitive development, effective learning environments, and outcomes-based assessment. The "Process for the Development of Higher Level Thinking Skills" provides teachers with an easy to implement method of moving toward a more…

  14. Leadership in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amey, Marilyn J.

    2006-01-01

    At a time when seasoned higher-education leaders are retiring and the challenges facing prospective administrators seem daunting, how do those in positions of authority or aspiring to those roles construct a meaningful and manageable identity as leaders? Where do they look for support and inspiration? How do they learn to lead? The author…

  15. Liberty and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dennis F.

    1989-01-01

    John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty is discussed with the view that it needs to be revised to guide moral judgments in higher education. Three key elements need to be modified: the action that is constrained; the constraint on the action; and the agent whose action is constrained. (MLW)

  16. Creativity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaspar, Drazena; Mabic, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results of research related to perception of creativity in higher education made by the authors at the University of Mostar from Bosnia and Herzegovina. This research was based on a survey conducted among teachers and students at the University. The authors developed two types of questionnaires, one for teachers and the other…

  17. Marketing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalili, Farid

    The use of marketing activities by educational institutions and the transfer of marketing activities from business to higher education are considered. Market analysis helps colleges and universities determine what programs, scheduling, or services are strong and to which student market the institution should appeal. It is suggested that the…

  18. Curriculum in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, A. I., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Four articles on higher education curriculum are presented. In "The Articulate Curriculum" an approach to curriculum description is presented that is designed to have minimal ambiguity concerning the intention, content, and processes of the curriculum and that will lead to questioning several discrete factors in the curriculum planning process. It…

  19. Higher Education Exchange, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The Kettering Foundation's research has been focused on putting the public back into the public's business for more than thirty years. Some questions that have recently been useful to Kettering researchers as the foundation focuses on its work with institutional actors--especially higher education and its relationship with the public--have…

  20. Online Higher Education Commodity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chau, Paule

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the current trend towards online education. It examines some of the reasons for the trend and the ramifications it may have on students, faculty and institutions of higher learning. The success and profitability of online programs and institutions such as the University of Phoenix has helped to make the move towards online…