Science.gov

Sample records for 10-minute temporal resolution

  1. 10 Minutes of Bliss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Olynda

    2014-01-01

    For many of us, it is challenging to find the time to sleep enough each night or to sit down for a meal. So how can this author convince you that taking 10 minutes to do anything every day is actually worth it? The benefits of meditation--increased calm, clarity, compassion, and empathy, to name a few--have been known for centuries. Recently,…

  2. Temporal resolution enhancement from motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollason, M. P.; Watson, G. H.; Strens, M. J. A.

    2009-09-01

    We describe progress in the third year of the EMRS DTC TEP theme project entitled "Temporal Resolution Enhancement from Motion". The aim is to develop algorithms that combine evidence over time from a sequence of images in order to improve spatial resolution and reduce unwanted artefacts. Years one and two of this project developed and demonstrated an efficient algorithm that provided good resolution enhancement of a scene viewed in the far field (approximately flat) [1]. This paper reports a new algorithm which is applicable to a three dimensional scene where substantial depth variation causes parallax within the imagery. The new algorithm is demonstrated using airborne infra-red imagery.

  3. Measuring temporal resolution of cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, David; Heuscher, Dominic

    2005-04-01

    Multi-slice CT today is capable of imaging the heart with excellent temporal resolution. Algorithms have been developed to perform reconstructions combining data from multiple cardiac cycles. This paper presents a simulation phantom that enables a direct measurement of the actual temporal resolution achieved by these algorithms. This is not only useful for assessing the temporal resolution but also for validating the algorithms themselves. A simulation phantom was developed that consists of a 20 cm. diameter water phantom containing an array of cylinders whose intensities are pulsed for various durations ranging from 10 msec. to 250 msec. The intensity varied between the background value of water (0 HU) and 800 HU. By measuring the nominal attenuation value at the center of each cylinder, a curve can be derived representing the response over the given temporal range. A temporal resolution representing the FWHM value is determined based on the half-max value of this curve. Reconstructions were performed using a multi-cycle cardiac algorithm described previously in the literature. The measured FWHM values agree quite well to the temporal resolution predicted by the cardiac algorithm itself. Even the variation along the longitudinal axis can be accounted for by the predicted values. A simulated phantom can be used to accurately assess the temporal resolution of cardiac reconstruction algorithms. Excellent agreement was achieved between the predicted and measured temporal resolution values for the multi-cycle algorithm used in this study.

  4. Multislice helical CT: image temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Hui, H; Pan, T; Shen, Y

    2000-05-01

    A multislice helical computed tomography (CT) halfscan (HS) reconstruction algorithm is proposed for cardiac applications. The imaging performances (in terms of the temporal resolution, z-axis resolution, image noise, and image artifacts) of the HS algorithm are compared to the existing algorithms using theoretical models and clinical data. A theoretical model of the temporal resolution performance (in terms of the temporal sensitivity profile) is established for helical CT, in general, i.e., for any number of detector rows and any reconstruction algorithm used. It is concluded that the HS reconstruction results in improved image temporal resolution than the corresponding 180 degrees LI (linear interpolation) reconstruction and is more immune to the inconsistent data problem induced by cardiac motions. The temporal resolution of multislice helical CT with the HS algorithm is comparable to that of single-slice helical CT with the HS algorithm. In practice, the 180 degrees LI and HS-LI algorithms can be used in parallel to generate two image sets from the same scan acquisition, one (180 degrees LI) for improved z-resolution and noises, and the other (HS-LI) for improved image temporal resolution.

  5. Temporal resolution in individuals with neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Camila Maia; Weihing, Jeffrey A; Schochat, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Temporal processing refers to the ability of the central auditory nervous system to encode and detect subtle changes in acoustic signals. This study aims to investigate the temporal resolution ability of individuals with mesial temporal sclerosis and to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the gaps-in-noise test in identifying this type of lesion. METHOD: This prospective study investigated differences in temporal resolution between 30 individuals with normal hearing and without neurological lesions (G1) and 16 individuals with both normal hearing and mesial temporal sclerosis (G2). Test performances were compared, and the sensitivity and specificity were calculated. RESULTS: There was no difference in gap detection thresholds between the two groups, although G1 revealed better average thresholds than G2 did. The sensitivity and specificity of the gaps-in-noise test for neurological lesions were 68% and 98%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Temporal resolution ability is compromised in individuals with neurological lesions caused by mesial temporal sclerosis. The gaps-in-noise test was shown to be a sensitive and specific measure of central auditory dysfunction in these patients. PMID:26375561

  6. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of...

  7. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of each advisory committee meeting shall be...

  8. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of...

  9. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of...

  10. 16 CFR 16.10 - Minutes and transcripts of meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minutes and transcripts of meetings. 16.10 Section 16.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.10 Minutes and transcripts of meetings. (a) Detailed minutes of...

  11. Shock Acceleration of Solar Energetic Protons: The First 10 Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chee K.; Reames, Donald V.

    2008-01-01

    Proton acceleration at a parallel coronal shock is modeled with self-consistent Alfven wave excitation and shock transmission. 18 - 50 keV seed protons at 0.1% of plasma proton density are accelerated in 10 minutes to a power-law intensity spectrum rolling over at 300 MeV by a 2500km s-1 shock traveling outward from 3.5 solar radius, for typical coronal conditions and low ambient wave intensities. Interaction of high-energy protons of large pitch-angles with Alfven waves amplified by low-energy protons of small pitch angles is key to rapid acceleration. Shock acceleration is not significantly retarded by sunward streaming protons interacting with downstream waves. There is no significant second-order Fermi acceleration.

  12. High temporal resolution functional MRI with partial separability model.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Giang-Chau; Holtrop, Joseph L; Fu, Maojing; Lam, Fan; Sutton, Bradley P

    2015-01-01

    Even though the hemodynamic response is a slow phenomenon, high temporal resolution in functional fMRI can enable better differentiation between the signal of interest and physiological noise or increase the statistical power of functional studies. To increase the temporal resolution, several methods have been developed to decrease the repetition time, TR, such as simultaneous multi-slice imaging and MR encephalography approaches. In this work, a method using a fast acquisition and a partial separability model is presented to achieve a multi-slice fMRI protocol at a temporal resolution of 75 ms. The method is demonstrated on a visual block task. PMID:26738022

  13. Auditory Processing Efficiency and Temporal Resolution in Children and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Penelope R.; Hartley, Douglas E.H.; Glasberg, Brian R.; Moore, Brian C.J.; Moore, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Children have higher auditory backward masking (BM) thresholds than adults. One explanation for this is poor temporal resolution, resulting in difficulty separating brief or rapidly presented sounds. This implies that the auditory temporal window is broader in children than in adults. Alternatively, elevated BM thresholds in children may indicate…

  14. Levitational Image Cytometry with Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Khoory, Joseph A; Tekin, Huseyin C; Thomas, Clemence; Karnoub, Antoine E; Ghiran, Ionita C; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-01

    A simple, yet powerful magnetic-levitation-based device is reported for real-time, label-free separation, as well as high-resolution monitoring of cell populations based on their unique magnetic and density signatures. This method allows a wide variety of cellular processes to be studied, accompanied by transient or permanent changes in cells' fundamental characteristics as a biological material. PMID:26058598

  15. Comparison of High Temporal Resolution SO2 Emission Rates and Geophysical Data at Central American Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, P. A.; Waite, G. P.; Palma, J. L.; Dalton, M. P.; Watson, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    Recently developed ultraviolet cameras present a significant improvement in the field of volcanic SO2 measurements. Older instruments utilized for measurement of SO2 emissions in volcanic plumes (e.g., COSPEC, mini-DOAS, FLYSPEC) are often limited in their accuracy by plume and volcano geometry, uncertainties in plume velocity, plume variability over the course of a single measurement, and low temporal resolution (generally at least 1 minute per measurement, more often <10 measurements per day). In contrast, UV cameras, with their data's synoptic nature, allow for investigation of the high degree of variability in plumes and offer the opportunity to measure SO2 flow rates (as a proxy for volcanic emission rates) at any number of locations within the image, including at or very near the vent. Plume velocities can be derived from UV camera data time series, eliminating the often erroneous estimations of plume velocity based on wind speed. Temporal resolution of the SO2 dataset is also much improved with the camera able to yield SO2 emission rates at sampling frequencies approaching 1 Hz. The superior temporal resolution facilitates comparison to other volcanic datasets, such as seismicity, microgravity, and deformation. UV camera time series from Fuego volcano, Guatemala, and Masaya volcano, Nicaragua indicate that SO2 flow rates at these volcanoes may double over the course of <10 minutes, and subsequently return to low levels on the same time scale. Though some of the variations in SO2 flow rate are apparently due to wind eddies or other small scale atmospheric variations near the vent, other variations are likely to be real variations in emission rate that are directly related to volcanic processes. These fluctuations are evaluated in relation to simultaneous acoustic and seismic datasets in an attempt to understand the nature of such fluctuations. We present the latest improvements to current algorithms for the processing of UV camera data, including advances in

  16. Whole-animal imaging with high spatio-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, Raghav; Amat, Fernando; Wan, Yinan; Höckendorf, Burkhard; Lemon, William C.; Keller, Philipp J.

    2016-03-01

    We developed isotropic multiview (IsoView) light-sheet microscopy in order to image fast cellular dynamics, such as cell movements in an entire developing embryo or neuronal activity throughput an entire brain or nervous system, with high resolution in all dimensions, high imaging speeds, good physical coverage and low photo-damage. To achieve high temporal resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time, IsoView microscopy rapidly images large specimens via simultaneous light-sheet illumination and fluorescence detection along four orthogonal directions. In a post-processing step, these four views are then combined by means of high-throughput multiview deconvolution to yield images with a system resolution of ≤ 450 nm in all three dimensions. Using IsoView microscopy, we performed whole-animal functional imaging of Drosophila embryos and larvae at a spatial resolution of 1.1-2.5 μm and at a temporal resolution of 2 Hz for up to 9 hours. We also performed whole-brain functional imaging in larval zebrafish and multicolor imaging of fast cellular dynamics across entire, gastrulating Drosophila embryos with isotropic, sub-cellular resolution. Compared with conventional (spatially anisotropic) light-sheet microscopy, IsoView microscopy improves spatial resolution at least sevenfold and decreases resolution anisotropy at least threefold. Compared with existing high-resolution light-sheet techniques, such as lattice lightsheet microscopy or diSPIM, IsoView microscopy effectively doubles the penetration depth and provides subsecond temporal resolution for specimens 400-fold larger than could previously be imaged.

  17. Persistence Diagrams of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Méndez, F.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study applies Topological Data Analysis (TDA), by generating persistence diagrams to uncover patterns in the data of high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City (IIHR, U of Iowa). Persistence diagrams are a way to identify essential cycles in state-space representations of the data.

  18. Temporal resolution improvement using PICCS in MDCT cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Tang, Jie; Hsieh, Jiang

    2009-06-01

    The current paradigm for temporal resolution improvement is to add more source-detector units and/or increase the gantry rotation speed. The purpose of this article is to present an innovative alternative method to potentially improve temporal resolution by approximately a factor of 2 for all MDCT scanners without requiring hardware modification. The central enabling technology is a most recently developed image reconstruction method: Prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS). Using the method, cardiac CT images can be accurately reconstructed using the projection data acquired in an angular range of about 120 degrees, which is roughly 50% of the standard short-scan angular range (approximately 240 degrees for an MDCT scanner). As a result, the temporal resolution of MDCT cardiac imaging can be universally improved by approximately a factor of 2. In order to validate the proposed method, two in vivo animal experiments were conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at different gantry rotation times and different heart rates. One animal was scanned at heart rate of 83 beats per minute (bpm) using 400 ms gantry rotation time and the second animal was scanned at 94 bpm using 350 ms gantry rotation time, respectively. Cardiac coronary CT imaging can be successfully performed at high heart rates using a single-source MDCT scanner and projection data from a single heart beat with gantry rotation times of 400 and 350 ms. Using the proposed PICCS method, the temporal resolution of cardiac CT imaging can be effectively improved by approximately a factor of 2 without modifying any scanner hardware. This potentially provides a new method for single-source MDCT scanners to achieve reliable coronary CT imaging for patients at higher heart rates than the current heart rate limit of 70 bpm without using the well-known multisegment FBP reconstruction algorithm. This method also enables dual-source MDCT scanner to achieve higher

  19. High-resolution CT of temporal bone trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, B.A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-08-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) finding in 18 patients with temporal bone trauma were reviewed. Eight patients suffered longitudinal fractures of the petrous bone, which were associated with ossicular dislocation in two patients. Transverse fractures were detected in six patients, with a contralateral mastoid fracture in one patient. In four patients, the fractures were restricted to the mastoid region. Of the 14 patients in whom adequate neurologic evaluation was available, seven had a permanent facial nerve or hearing deficit while five suffered at least a transient neurologic deficit related to the temporal bone trauma. Routine head CT (10 mm sections) demonstrated only eight of 19 petrous bone injuries. Evidence of brain trauma or extra-axial hemotoma was seen in 12 patients. In 13 cases, high-resolution CT was also performed, demonstrating temporal bone injuries in all. This latter technique allows rapid and detailed evaluation of temporal bone trauma.

  20. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy with Nanosecond Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Nigel

    2012-02-01

    The dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) can obtain both high spatial (˜1nm or better) and high temporal (˜1μs or faster) resolution. The high temporal resolution is achieved by using a short pulse laser to create the pulse of electrons through photo-emission. This pulse of electrons is propagated down the microscope column in the same way as in a conventional high-resolution TEM. The only difference is that the spatial resolution is limited by the electron-electron interactions in the pulse (a typical 10ns pulse contains ˜10^9 electrons). To synchronize this pulse of electrons with a particular dynamic event, a second laser is used to ``drive'' the sample a defined time interval prior to the arrival of the laser pulse. The important aspect of the DTEM is that one pulse of electrons is used to form the whole image, allowing irreversible transitions and cumulative phenomena such as nucleation and growth, to be studied directly in the microscope. The use of the drive laser for fast heating of the specimen presents differences and several advantages over conventional resistive heating in-situ TEM -- such as the ability to drive the sample into non-equilibrium states. So far, the drive laser has been used for in-situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. In this presentation, a summary of the development of the DTEM and in-situ stages to control the environment around the specimen will be described. Particular attention will be paid to the potential for gas stages to study catalytic processes and liquid stages to study biological specimens in their live hydrated states. The future potential improvements in spatial and temporal resolution that can be expected through the implementation of upgrades to the lasers, electron optics and detectors will also be discussed.

  1. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  2. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  3. Speeding rod recovery improves temporal resolution in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Fortenbach, Christopher R.; Kessler, Christopher; Peinado, Gabriel; Burns, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal resolution of the visual system progressively increases with light intensity. Under scotopic conditions, temporal resolution is relatively poor, and may be limited by both retinal and cortical processes. Rod photoresponses themselves are quite slow because of the slowly deactivating biochemical cascade needed for light transduction. Here, we have used a transgenic mouse line with faster than normal rod phototransduction deactivation (RGS9-overexpressors) to test whether rod signaling to second-order retinal neurons is rate-limited by phototransduction or by other mechanisms. We compared electrical responses of individual wild-type and RGS9-overexpressing (RGS9-ox) rods to steady illumination and found that RGS9-ox rods required 2-fold brighter light for comparable activation, owing to faster G-protein deactivation. When presented with flickering stimuli, RGS9-ox rods showed greater magnitude fluctuations around a given steady-state current amplitude. Likewise, in vivo electroretinography (ERG) and whole-cell recording from OFF-bipolar, rod bipolar, and horizontal cells of RGS9-ox mice displayed larger than normal magnitude flicker responses, demonstrating an improved ability to transmit frequency information across the rod synapse. Slow phototransduction recovery therefore limits synaptic transmission of increments and decrements of light intensity across the first retinal synapse in normal retinas, apparently sacrificing temporal responsiveness for greater overall sensitivity in ambient light. PMID:25748270

  4. PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS, A MARINE BACTERIUM WITH A GENERATION TIME OF LESS THAN 10 MINUTES

    PubMed Central

    Eagon, R. G.

    1962-01-01

    Eagon, R. G. (University of Georgia, Athens). Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine bacterium with a generation time of less than 10 minutes. J. Bacteriol. 83:736–737. 1962.—Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine microorganism, was demonstrated to have a generation time of 9.8 min. This is the shortest generation time reported to date. Optimal growth occurred at 37 C in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 1.5% sea salt. PMID:13888946

  5. Homology Groups of High-Resolution Temporal Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez Aguilar, R.; Carsteanu, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using high-resolution temporal rainfall intensities from Iowa City, IA (IIHR, U of Iowa), we perform an analysis of the homology groups generated by data connectivity in state space, and attempt a qualitative interpretation of the first and second homology groups. Let us note that homology groups are generated, in the context of topological data analysis (TDA), by representing the data in n-dimensional state space and building a connectivity diagram according to the respective distances between the data points. Subsequently, the topological invariants of the resulting connected structures are being analyzed.

  6. Synthesis of rainfall time series in a high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callau Poduje, Ana Claudia; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    In order to optimize the design and operation of urban drainage systems, long and continuous rain series in a high temporal resolution are essential. As the length of the rainfall records is often short, particularly the data available with the temporal and regional resolutions required for urban hydrology, it is necessary to find some numerical representation of the precipitation phenomenon to generate long synthetic rainfall series. An Alternating Renewal Model (ARM) is applied for this purpose, which consists of two structures: external and internal. The former is the sequence of wet and dry spells, described by their durations which are simulated stochastically. The internal structure is characterized by the amount of rain corresponding to each wet spell and its distribution within the spell. A multivariate frequency analysis is applied to analyze the internal structure of the wet spells and to generate synthetic events. The stochastic time series must reproduce the statistical characteristics of observed high resolution precipitation measurements used to generate them. The spatio-temporal interdependencies between stations are addressed by resampling the continuous synthetic series based on the Simulated Annealing (SA) procedure. The state of Lower-Saxony and surrounding areas, located in the north-west of Germany is used to develop the ARM. A total of 26 rainfall stations with high temporal resolution records, i.e. rainfall data every 5 minutes, are used to define the events, find the most suitable probability distributions, calibrate the corresponding parameters, simulate long synthetic series and evaluate the results. The length of the available data ranges from 10 to 20 years. The rainfall series involved in the different steps of calculation are compared using a rainfall-runoff model to simulate the runoff behavior in urban areas. The EPA Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is applied for this evaluation. The results show a good representation of the

  7. Effect of temporal resolution on the accuracy of ADCP measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez-Castro, J. A.; Oberg, K.; Duncker, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    The application of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP's) in river flow measurements is promoting a great deal of progress in hydrometry. ADCP's not only require shorter times to collect data than traditional current meters, but also allow streamflow measurements at sites where the use of conventional meters is either very expensive, unsafe, or simply not possible. Moreover, ADCP's seem to offer a means for collecting flow data with spatial and temporal resolutions that cannot be achieved with traditional current-meters. High-resolution data is essential to characterize the mean flow and turbulence structure of streams, which can in turn lead to a better understanding of the hydrodynamic and transport processes in rivers. However, to properly characterize the mean flow and turbulence intensities of stationary flows in natural turbulent boundary layers, velocities need to be sampled over a long-enough time span. The question then arises, how long should velocities be sampled in the flow field to achieve an adequate temporal resolution? Theoretically, since velocities cannot be sampled over an infinitely long time interval, the error due to finite integration time must be considered. This error can be estimated using the integral time scale. The integral time scale is not only a measure of the time interval over which a fluctuating function is correlated with itself but also a measure of the time span over which the function is dependent on itself. This time scale, however, is not a constant but varies spatially in the flow field. In this paper we present an analysis of the effect of the temporal resolution (sampling time span) on the accuracy of ADCP measurements based on the integral time scale. Single ping velocity profiles collected with frequencies of 1 Hz in the Chicago River at Columbus Drive using an uplooking 600 kHz ADCP are used in this analysis. The integral time scale at different depths is estimated based on the autocorrelation function of the

  8. High Spatio-Temporal Resolution Bathymetry Estimation and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsma, E. W. J.; Conley, D. C.; Davidson, M. A.; O'Hare, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, bathymetry estimates using video images have become increasingly accurate. With the cBathy code (Holman et al., 2013) fully operational, bathymetry results with 0.5 metres accuracy have been regularly obtained at Duck, USA. cBathy is based on observations of the dominant frequencies and wavelengths of surface wave motions and estimates the depth (and hence allows inference of bathymetry profiles) based on linear wave theory. Despite the good performance at Duck, large discrepancies were found related to tidal elevation and camera height (Bergsma et al., 2014) and on the camera boundaries. A tide dependent floating pixel and camera boundary solution have been proposed to overcome these issues (Bergsma et al., under review). The video-data collection is set estimate depths hourly on a grid with resolution in the order of 10x25 meters. Here, the application of the cBathy at Porthtowan in the South-West of England is presented. Hourly depth estimates are combined and analysed over a period of 1.5 years (2013-2014). In this work the focus is on the sub-tidal region, where the best cBathy results are achieved. The morphology of the sub-tidal bar is tracked with high spatio-temporal resolution on short and longer time scales. Furthermore, the impact of the storm and reset (sudden and large changes in bathymetry) of the sub-tidal area is clearly captured with the depth estimations. This application shows that the high spatio-temporal resolution of cBathy makes it a powerful tool for coastal research and coastal zone management.

  9. High resolution autofocus for spatial temporal biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sihong; Cui, Xiaodong; Huang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Maintaining focus has been a critical but challenging issue in optical microscopy, particularly for microscopic imaging systems currently used in biomedical research. During live cell imaging, environmental temperature fluctuations and other factors contribute to the unavoidable focus drift. For single molecular imaging and super resolution, focus drift can be significant even over short durations. The current commercial and experimental solutions are either optically complicated, expensive, or with limited axial resolution. Here, we present a simple autofocus solution based on low cost solid state laser and imaging sensor. By improving the optical train design and using real-time data analysis, improvement in axial resolution by approximately two orders of magnitudes over the focal depth of microscope objectives can be achieved. This solution has been tested for prolonged live cell imaging for fast ramping up in environmental chamber temperature and large daily swing in room temperature. In addition, this system can be used to spatial-temporally measure the surface for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue engineering, with flexibility that exceeds commercially available systems.

  10. How 10 Minutes Can Be Your Friend When You Want to Workout | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    One of the biggest challenges to becoming physically active is finding a way for exercise to fit into your already busy life. Finding an extra 30 minutes in the day to exercise can seem overwhelming. But there’s good news! First, every bit of exercise can help get you on the path to a healthier you—so getting in a little bit is good for you (and better than not at all). Second, especially with cardiovascular activities, getting at least 10 minutes of continuous moderate activity 3 times per day seems to yield the same health benefits as 30 minutes 1 time per day.

  11. The Impact of Horizontal and Temporal Resolution on Convection and Precipitation with High-Resolution GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putman, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Using a high-resolution non-hydrostatic version of GEOS-5 with the cubed-sphere finite-volume dynamical core, the impact of spatial and temporal resolution on cloud properties will be evaluated. There are indications from examining convective cluster development in high resolution GEOS-5 forecasts that the temporal resolution within the model may playas significant a role as horizontal resolution. Comparing modeled convective cloud clusters versus satellite observations of brightness temperature, we have found that improved. temporal resolution in GEOS-S accounts for a significant portion of the improvements in the statistical distribution of convective cloud clusters. Using satellite simulators in GEOS-S we will compare the cloud optical properties of GEOS-S at various spatial and temporal resolutions with those observed from MODIS. The potential impact of these results on tropical cyclone formation and intensity will be examined as well.

  12. Tactile feedback display with spatial and temporal resolutions.

    PubMed

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-01-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications. PMID:23982053

  13. Tactile Feedback Display with Spatial and Temporal Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W.; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-08-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications.

  14. Tactile Feedback Display with Spatial and Temporal Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W.; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-01-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications. PMID:23982053

  15. Tactile feedback display with spatial and temporal resolutions.

    PubMed

    Vishniakou, Siarhei; Lewis, Brian W; Niu, Xiaofan; Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Kalajian, Michael; Park, Namseok; Yang, Muchuan; Jing, Yi; Brochu, Paul; Sun, Zhelin; Li, Chun; Nguyen, Truong; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Deli

    2013-01-01

    We report the electronic recording of the touch contact and pressure using an active matrix pressure sensor array made of transparent zinc oxide thin-film transistors and tactile feedback display using an array of diaphragm actuators made of an interpenetrating polymer elastomer network. Digital replay, editing and manipulation of the recorded touch events were demonstrated with both spatial and temporal resolutions. Analog reproduction of the force is also shown possible using the polymer actuators, despite of the high driving voltage. The ability to record, store, edit, and replay touch information adds an additional dimension to digital technologies and extends the capabilities of modern information exchange with the potential to revolutionize physical learning, social networking, e-commerce, robotics, gaming, medical and military applications.

  16. Impact of a 10 minute Seated Yoga Practice in the Management of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi S; Ames, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to prospectively evaluate the impact of a 10 minute seated yoga program added to standard comprehensive diabetes care on glucose control and cardiovascular health in the severely ill, medically complex diabetic population. Method A total of 10 patients with type 2 diabetes, ages 49-77, with duration of diabetes >10 years and haemoglobin A1C >9% (75 mmol/mol) were included in the study. Patients randomized to a yoga intervention were taught a 10 minute seated yoga practice, were given an explanatory DVD and a fold-out pocket guide to encourage adherence at home, and were instructed to incorporate the practice as often as they could. The patients in the control arm were provided information and hand outs on the available yoga classes on campus. Results At 3 month clinical follow up, the mean decrease in fasting capillary blood glucose (CBG) was 45% among yoga participants (−5.2 ± 4.1 mmol/L). Heart rate (HR) dropped by 18% and Diastolic blood pressure (BP) dropped by 29% in the intervention arm, (−12.4 ± 6.69 and −26 ± 12.05 mmHg, respectively). There were no statistically significant changes in the haemoglobin A1C, systolic blood pressure, weight, or body mass index in either group. Conclusion Our small pilot study reinforces the current medical evidence supporting the use of yoga, combined with standard care, to improve health outcomes in diabetes.

  17. Spatial and temporal resolution of fluid flows: LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Schefer, R.W.; Perea, L.D.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activity to develop a diagnostic technique for simultaneous temporal and spatial resolution of fluid flows. The goal is to obtain two orders of magnitude resolution in two spatial dimensions and time simultaneously. The approach used in this study is to scale up Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) to acquire meter-size images at up to 200 frames/sec. Experiments were conducted in buoyant, fully turbulent, non-reacting and reacting plumes with a base diameter of one meter. The PIV results were successful in the ambient gas for all flows, and in the plume for non-reacting helium and reacting methane, but not reacting hydrogen. No PIV was obtained in the hot combustion product region as the seed particles chosen vaporized. Weak signals prevented PLIF in the helium. However, in reacting methane flows, PLIF images speculated to be from Poly-Aromatic-Hydrocarbons were obtained which mark the flame sheets. The results were unexpected and very insightful. A natural fluorescence from the seed particle vapor was also noted in the hydrogen tests.

  18. Improvement of temporal resolution in blood concentration imaging using NIR speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Naomichi; Shimatani, Yuichi; Kyoso, Masaki; Funamizu, Hideki; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2013-06-01

    In the imaging of blood concentration change using near infrared bio-speckles, temporal averaging of speckle images is necessary for speckle reduction. To improve the temporal resolution in blood concentration imaging, use of spatial averaging is investigated to measured data in rat experiments. Results show that three frames in temporal averaging with (2×2) pixels in spatial averaging can be accepted to obtain the temporal resolution of ten concentration images per second.

  19. Spectral sensitivity, spatial resolution and temporal resolution and their implications for conspecific signalling in cleaner shrimp.

    PubMed

    Caves, Eleanor M; Frank, Tamara M; Johnsen, Sönke

    2016-02-01

    Cleaner shrimp (Decapoda) regularly interact with conspecifics and client reef fish, both of which appear colourful and finely patterned to human observers. However, whether cleaner shrimp can perceive the colour patterns of conspecifics and clients is unknown, because cleaner shrimp visual capabilities are unstudied. We quantified spectral sensitivity and temporal resolution using electroretinography (ERG), and spatial resolution using both morphological (inter-ommatidial angle) and behavioural (optomotor) methods in three cleaner shrimp species: Lysmata amboinensis, Ancylomenes pedersoni and Urocaridella antonbruunii. In all three species, we found strong evidence for only a single spectral sensitivity peak of (mean ± s.e.m.) 518 ± 5, 518 ± 2 and 533 ± 3 nm, respectively. Temporal resolution in dark-adapted eyes was 39 ± 1.3, 36 ± 0.6 and 34 ± 1.3 Hz. Spatial resolution was 9.9 ± 0.3, 8.3 ± 0.1 and 11 ± 0.5 deg, respectively, which is low compared with other compound eyes of similar size. Assuming monochromacy, we present approximations of cleaner shrimp perception of both conspecifics and clients, and show that cleaner shrimp visual capabilities are sufficient to detect the outlines of large stimuli, but not to detect the colour patterns of conspecifics or clients, even over short distances. Thus, conspecific viewers have probably not played a role in the evolution of cleaner shrimp appearance; rather, further studies should investigate whether cleaner shrimp colour patterns have evolved to be viewed by client reef fish, many of which possess tri- and tetra-chromatic colour vision and relatively high spatial acuity.

  20. Spectral sensitivity, spatial resolution and temporal resolution and their implications for conspecific signalling in cleaner shrimp.

    PubMed

    Caves, Eleanor M; Frank, Tamara M; Johnsen, Sönke

    2016-02-01

    Cleaner shrimp (Decapoda) regularly interact with conspecifics and client reef fish, both of which appear colourful and finely patterned to human observers. However, whether cleaner shrimp can perceive the colour patterns of conspecifics and clients is unknown, because cleaner shrimp visual capabilities are unstudied. We quantified spectral sensitivity and temporal resolution using electroretinography (ERG), and spatial resolution using both morphological (inter-ommatidial angle) and behavioural (optomotor) methods in three cleaner shrimp species: Lysmata amboinensis, Ancylomenes pedersoni and Urocaridella antonbruunii. In all three species, we found strong evidence for only a single spectral sensitivity peak of (mean ± s.e.m.) 518 ± 5, 518 ± 2 and 533 ± 3 nm, respectively. Temporal resolution in dark-adapted eyes was 39 ± 1.3, 36 ± 0.6 and 34 ± 1.3 Hz. Spatial resolution was 9.9 ± 0.3, 8.3 ± 0.1 and 11 ± 0.5 deg, respectively, which is low compared with other compound eyes of similar size. Assuming monochromacy, we present approximations of cleaner shrimp perception of both conspecifics and clients, and show that cleaner shrimp visual capabilities are sufficient to detect the outlines of large stimuli, but not to detect the colour patterns of conspecifics or clients, even over short distances. Thus, conspecific viewers have probably not played a role in the evolution of cleaner shrimp appearance; rather, further studies should investigate whether cleaner shrimp colour patterns have evolved to be viewed by client reef fish, many of which possess tri- and tetra-chromatic colour vision and relatively high spatial acuity. PMID:26747903

  1. Spatio-temporal resolution of primary processes of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Technical progress in laser-sources and detectors has allowed the temporal and spatial resolution of chemical reactions down to femtoseconds and Å-units. In photon-excitable systems the key to chemical kinetics, trajectories across the vibrational saddle landscape, are experimentally accessible. Simple and thus well-defined chemical compounds are preferred objects for calibrating new methodologies and carving out paradigms of chemical dynamics, as shown in several contributions to this Faraday Discussion. Aerobic life on earth is powered by solar energy, which is captured by microorganisms and plants. Oxygenic photosynthesis relies on a three billion year old molecular machinery which is as well defined as simpler chemical constructs. It has been analysed to a very high precision. The transfer of excitation between pigments in antennae proteins, of electrons between redox-cofactors in reaction centres, and the oxidation of water by a Mn4Ca-cluster are solid state reactions. ATP, the general energy currency of the cell, is synthesized by a most agile, rotary molecular machine. While the efficiency of photosynthesis competes well with photovoltaics at the time scale of nanoseconds, it is lower by an order of magnitude for crops and again lower for bio-fuels. The enormous energy demand of mankind calls for engineered (bio-mimetic or bio-inspired) solar-electric and solar-fuel devices. PMID:25824647

  2. High temporal resolution dynamics of wintertime soil CO2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risk, D. A.; McArthur, G. S.; Nickerson, N. R.; Beltrami, H.

    2009-12-01

    Few studies have undertaken soil CO2 flux measurements during winter, despite the fact that even in temperate zones, winter-like conditions may persist for one-third of the year or more. When growing season monitoring equipment is stowed for the winter, we potentially miss a large portion of the carbon budget, and may also fail to develop an adequate appreciation of winter c production dynamics. These are critical gaps, especially with respect to soil carbon stability and CO2 emissions in northern and permafrost areas, which are expected to accelerate as a consequence of climate change and which may create a positive feedback on atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This study undertakes a thorough examination of overwinter soil CO2 dynamics at two contrasting sites; one with deeply frozen soils where snow cover is absent as a result of sustained high winds; and another site with heavy snow load (>150 cm typical) where soils underneath remain frost-free because of snowpack insulation. Our overwinter soil-surface CO2 flux measurements were facilitated by use of a new instrumental technique called Continuous Timeseries - Forced Diffusion (CT-FD) to record soil CO2 fluxes continuously at a temporal resolution of 60 seconds. The high frequency monitoring allows us to look not only at magnitudes of change and carbon budgets, but also in detail at the temporal characteristics of response to environmental forcings. Here, we concentrate our analysis on rates of change near critical thresholds such as freeze-thaw. At the deep snowpack site where soil frost was absent, we observed pronounced diurnal cyclicity in CO2 flux even under a >150 cm snowpack, marked moisture response after midwinter rain events, and a springtime respiratory burst that began slightly before full snowpack melt. The CO2 emission dynamics from the frozen soils of the snow-free site were dominated by respiratory bursts at freeze-thaw thresholds when solar heating and warm air temperatures created a thin active

  3. High spatial and temporal resolution studies of ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Charles Rankin, Jr.

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the polar structure and dynamics of ferroelectric thin films using newly developed high resolution optical, scanning- force microscopy and time-resolved methods. A technique based on confocal scanning optical microscopy (CSOM) is used to image the ferroelectric polarization of BaxSr1-xTiO 3 (BST) thin films at room temperature with sub-micron spatial resolution. Films of both paraelectric (x = 0.5) and ferroelectric ( x = 0.8) compositions show a coexistence of both paraelectric and ferroelectric phases on the smallest scale resolvable with this technique. These results suggest that non-uniform stress is responsible for the strong inhomogeneous thermal broadening of the ferroelectric phase transition, and that dielectric loss in thin films may be dominated by a relatively small fraction of nanometer-sized regions. Apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy (ANSOM) is used to map the inhomogeneous ferroelectric polarization in BaxSr 1-xTiO3 thin films. Images of nanometer-scale ferroelectric domains in BaxSr1-xTiO3 thin films are obtained with 30 Å spatial resolution using ANSOM. The images exhibit inhomogeneities in the ferroelectric polarization over the smallest scales that can be observed, and are largely uncorrelated with topographic features. The application of an in-plane static electric field causes domain reorientation and domain-wall motion over distances as small as 40 Å. These results demonstrate the promise of ANSOM for imaging near-atomic-scale polarization fluctuations in ferroelectric materials. Interferometric ANSOM is described in detail, including a practical description of how ANSOM images are acquired. A discussion of the various contrast mechanisms in ANSOM is followed by a prescription for eliminating a certain class of topographic artifacts. For the imaging of polarization in ferroelectric thin films, the linear electro-optic effect provides the central contrast mechanism. High-resolution

  4. Practical Considerations for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Boyden, K; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; DeHope, B; Frank, A M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F; Kim, J S; King, W E; LaGrange, T B; Pyke, B J; Reed, B W; Shuttlesworth, R M; Stuart, B C; Torralva, B R

    2006-05-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5 x 10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  5. Measurement of velocity fluctuations in microfluidics with simultaneously ultrahigh spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Khan, Jamil; Reifsnider, Ken; Wang, Guiren

    2016-01-01

    Although unsteady and electrokinetic flows are widely used in microfluidics, there is unfortunately no velocimeter today that can measure the random velocity fluctuation at high temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously in microfluidics. Here we, for the first time, theoretically study the temporal resolution of laser induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA) and experimentally verify that LIFPA can have simultaneously ultrahigh temporal ({˜ } 4 \\upmu s) and spatial ({˜ }203 nm) resolution and can measure velocity fluctuation up to at least 2 kHz, whose corresponding wave number is about 6× 10^6 {/}m in an electrokinetically forced unsteady flow in microfluidics.

  6. A 30-Minute, but Not a 10-Minute Nighttime Nap is Associated with Sleep Inertia

    PubMed Central

    Hilditch, Cassie J.; Centofanti, Stephanie A.; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess sleep inertia following 10-min and 30-min naps during a simulated night shift. Methods: Thirty-one healthy adults (aged 21–35 y; 18 females) participated in a 3-day laboratory study that included one baseline (BL) sleep (22:00–07:00) and one experimental night involving randomization to either: total sleep deprivation (NO-NAP), a 10-min nap (10-NAP) or a 30-min nap (30-NAP). Nap opportunities ended at 04:00. A 3-min psychomotor vigilance task (PVT-B), digit-symbol substitution task (DSST), fatigue scale, sleepiness scale, and self-rated performance scale were undertaken pre-nap (03:00) and at 2, 17, 32, and 47 min post-nap. Results: The 30-NAP (14.7 ± 5.7 min) had more slow wave sleep than the 10-NAP (0.8 ± 1.5 min; P < 0.001) condition. In the NO-NAP condition, PVT-B performance was worse than pre-nap (4.6 ± 0.3 1/sec) at 47 min post-nap (4.1 ± 0.4 1/sec; P < 0.001). There was no change across time in the 10-NAP condition. In the 30-NAP condition, performance immediately deteriorated from pre-nap (4.3 ± 0.3 1/sec) and was still worse at 47 min post-nap (4.0 ± 0.5 1/sec; P < 0.015). DSST performance deteriorated in the NO-NAP (worse than pre-nap from 17 to 47 min; P < 0.008), did not change in the 10-NAP, and was impaired 2 min post-nap in the 30-NAP condition (P = 0.028). All conditions self-rated performance as better than pre-nap for all post-nap test points (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study is the first to show that a 10-min (but not a 30-min) nighttime nap had minimal sleep inertia and helped to mitigate short-term performance impairment during a simulated night shift. Self-rated performance did not reflect objective performance following a nap. Citation: Hilditch CJ, Centofanti SA, Dorrian J, Banks S. A 30-minute, but not a 10-minute nighttime nap is associated with sleep inertia. SLEEP 2016;39(3):675–685. PMID:26715234

  7. Spectral and temporal resolutions of information-bearing acoustic changes for understanding vocoded sentencesa)

    PubMed Central

    Stilp, Christian E.; Goupell, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Short-time spectral changes in the speech signal are important for understanding noise-vocoded sentences. These information-bearing acoustic changes, measured using cochlea-scaled entropy in cochlear implant simulations [CSECI; Stilp et al. (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(2), EL136–EL141; Stilp (2014). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135(3), 1518–1529], may offer better understanding of speech perception by cochlear implant (CI) users. However, perceptual importance of CSECI for normal-hearing listeners was tested at only one spectral resolution and one temporal resolution, limiting generalizability of results to CI users. Here, experiments investigated the importance of these informational changes for understanding noise-vocoded sentences at different spectral resolutions (4–24 spectral channels; Experiment 1), temporal resolutions (4–64 Hz cutoff for low-pass filters that extracted amplitude envelopes; Experiment 2), or when both parameters varied (6–12 channels, 8–32 Hz; Experiment 3). Sentence intelligibility was reduced more by replacing high-CSECI intervals with noise than replacing low-CSECI intervals, but only when sentences had sufficient spectral and/or temporal resolution. High-CSECI intervals were more important for speech understanding as spectral resolution worsened and temporal resolution improved. Trade-offs between CSECI and intermediate spectral and temporal resolutions were minimal. These results suggest that signal processing strategies that emphasize information-bearing acoustic changes in speech may improve speech perception for CI users. PMID:25698018

  8. A spatial-temporal Hopfield neural network approach for super-resolution land cover mapping with multi-temporal different resolution remotely sensed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaodong; Ling, Feng; Du, Yun; Feng, Qi; Zhang, Yihang

    2014-07-01

    The mixed pixel problem affects the extraction of land cover information from remotely sensed images. Super-resolution mapping (SRM) can produce land cover maps with a finer spatial resolution than the remotely sensed images, and reduce the mixed pixel problem to some extent. Traditional SRMs solely adopt a single coarse-resolution image as input. Uncertainty always exists in resultant fine-resolution land cover maps, due to the lack of information about detailed land cover spatial patterns. The development of remote sensing technology has enabled the storage of a great amount of fine spatial resolution remotely sensed images. These data can provide fine-resolution land cover spatial information and are promising in reducing the SRM uncertainty. This paper presents a spatial-temporal Hopfield neural network (STHNN) based SRM, by employing both a current coarse-resolution image and a previous fine-resolution land cover map as input. STHNN considers the spatial information, as well as the temporal information of sub-pixel pairs by distinguishing the unchanged, decreased and increased land cover fractions in each coarse-resolution pixel, and uses different rules in labeling these sub-pixels. The proposed STHNN method was tested using synthetic images with different class fraction errors and real Landsat images, by comparing with pixel-based classification method and several popular SRM methods including pixel-swapping algorithm, Hopfield neural network based method and sub-pixel land cover change mapping method. Results show that STHNN outperforms pixel-based classification method, pixel-swapping algorithm and Hopfield neural network based model in most cases. The weight parameters of different STHNN spatial constraints, temporal constraints and fraction constraint have important functions in the STHNN performance. The heterogeneity degree of the previous map and the fraction images errors affect the STHNN accuracy, and can be served as guidances of selecting the

  9. Stimulus, Task, and Learning Effects on Measures of Temporal Resolution: Implications for Predictors of Language Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nicholas A.; Trainor, Laurel J.; Gray, Kellie; Plantinga, Judy A.; Shore, David I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Some studies find that temporal processing ability predicts language outcome whereas other studies do not. Resolution of this debate is hindered by the variety of temporal measures used, nonsensory loading of the tasks, and differential amounts of practice across studies. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of stimulus…

  10. Smooth pursuit eye movements improve temporal resolution for color perception.

    PubMed

    Terao, Masahiko; Watanabe, Junji; Yagi, Akihiro; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2010-06-21

    Human observers see a single mixed color (yellow) when different colors (red and green) rapidly alternate. Accumulating evidence suggests that the critical temporal frequency beyond which chromatic fusion occurs does not simply reflect the temporal limit of peripheral encoding. However, it remains poorly understood how the central processing controls the fusion frequency. Here we show that the fusion frequency can be elevated by extra-retinal signals during smooth pursuit. This eye movement can keep the image of a moving target in the fovea, but it also introduces a backward retinal sweep of the stationary background pattern. We found that the fusion frequency was higher when retinal color changes were generated by pursuit-induced background motions than when the same retinal color changes were generated by object motions during eye fixation. This temporal improvement cannot be ascribed to a general increase in contrast gain of specific neural mechanisms during pursuit, since the improvement was not observed with a pattern flickering without changing position on the retina or with a pattern moving in the direction opposite to the background motion during pursuit. Our findings indicate that chromatic fusion is controlled by a cortical mechanism that suppresses motion blur. A plausible mechanism is that eye-movement signals change spatiotemporal trajectories along which color signals are integrated so as to reduce chromatic integration at the same locations (i.e., along stationary trajectories) on the retina that normally causes retinal blur during fixation.

  11. Effective temporal resolution in pump-probe spectroscopy with strongly chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Polli, D.; Lanzani, G.; Brida, D.; Cerullo, G.; Mukamel, S.

    2010-11-15

    This paper introduces a general theoretical description of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy with chirped pulses whose joint spectral and temporal profile is expressed by Wigner spectrograms. We demonstrate that the actual experimental time resolution intimately depends on the pulse-sample interaction and that the commonly used instrumental response function needs to be replaced by a sample-dependent effective response function. We also show that, using the proper configurations in excitation and/or detection, it is possible to overcome the temporal smearing of the measured dynamics due to chirp-induced pulse broadening and recover the temporal resolution that would be afforded by the transform-limited pulses. We verify these predictions with experiments using broadband chirped pump and probe pulses. Our results allow optimization of the temporal resolution in the common case when the chirp of the pump and/or probe pulse is not corrected and may be extended to a broad range of time-resolved experiments.

  12. Temporally flickering nanoparticles for compound cellular imaging and super resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Danan, Yossef; Meir, Rinat; Meiri, Amihai; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-03-01

    This work presents the use of flickering nanoparticles for imaging biological samples. The method has high noise immunity, and it enables the detection of overlapping types of GNPs, at significantly sub-diffraction distances, making it attractive for super resolving localization microscopy techniques. The method utilizes a lock-in technique at which the imaging of the sample is done using a time-modulated laser beam that match the number of the types of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) that label a given sample, and resulting in the excitation of the temporal flickering of the scattered light at known temporal frequencies. The final image where the GNPs are spatially separated is obtained using post processing where the proper spectral components corresponding to the different modulation frequencies are extracted. This allows the simultaneous super resolved imaging of multiple types of GNPs that label targets of interest within biological samples. Additionally applying the post-processing algorithm of the K-factor image decomposition algorithm can further improve the performance of the proposed approach.

  13. The Role of Spatio-Temporal Resolution of Rainfall Inputs on a Landscape Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. J.; Coulthard, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Landscape Evolution Models are important experimental tools for understanding the long-term development of landscapes. Designed to simulate timescales ranging from decades to millennia, they are usually driven by precipitation inputs that are lumped, both spatially across the drainage basin, and temporally to daily, monthly, or even annual rates. This is based on an assumption that the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the rainfall will equalise over the long timescales simulated. However, recent studies (Coulthard et al., 2012) have shown that such models are sensitive to event magnitudes, with exponential increases in sediment yields generated by linear increases in flood event size at a basin scale. This suggests that there may be a sensitivity to the spatial and temporal scales of rainfall used to drive such models. This study uses the CAESAR-Lisflood Landscape Evolution Model to investigate the impact of spatial and temporal resolution of rainfall input on model outputs. The sediment response to a range of temporal (15 min to daily) and spatial (5 km to 50km) resolutions over three different drainage basin sizes was observed. The results showed the model was sensitive to both, generating up to 100% differences in modelled sediment yields with smaller spatial and temporal resolution precipitation. Larger drainage basins also showed a greater sensitivity to both spatial and temporal resolution. Furthermore, analysis of the distribution of erosion and deposition patterns suggested that small temporal and spatial resolution inputs increased erosion in drainage basin headwaters and deposition in the valley floors. Both of these findings may have implications for existing models and approaches for simulating landscape development.

  14. Temporal resolution limits of time-to-frequency transformations.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2006-10-15

    Time-to-frequency converters are devices that transfer the intensity of a light pulse to its spectrum. The two architectures of these converters are studied: a dispersive line followed by a phase modulator and a single time lens operating in the spectral Fraunhofer regime. These two configurations are shown not to be equivalent in general: the first one provides an incoherent time-to-frequency mapping, whereas the second depends on the degree of coherence of the pulse. In this case, the recorded spectrum is the intensity of a partially coherent residually dispersed pulse, and the spectral Fraunhofer condition is the requirement of negligible residual dispersion. Converters operated outside the spectral Fraunhofer limit can achieve a subpicosecond resolution with moderate time-lens phase factors. Their use for pulse characterization is briefly analyzed. PMID:17001396

  15. Songbird frequency selectivity and temporal resolution vary with sex and season

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Megan D.; Salameh, Therese S.; Lucas, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Many species of songbirds exhibit dramatic seasonal variation in song output. Recent evidence suggests that seasonal changes in auditory processing are coincident with seasonal variation in vocal output. Here, we show, for the first time, that frequency selectivity and temporal resolution of the songbird auditory periphery change seasonally and in a sex-specific manner. Male and female house sparrows (Passer domesticus) did not differ in their frequency sensitivity during the non-breeding season, nor did they differ in their temporal resolution. By contrast, female house sparrows showed enhanced frequency selectivity during the breeding season, which was matched by a concomitant reduction of temporal resolution. However, males failed to show seasonal plasticity in either of these auditory properties. We discuss potential mechanisms generating these seasonal patterns and the implications of sex-specific seasonal changes in auditory processing for vocal communication. PMID:23193125

  16. Integrated nanopore sensing platform with sub-microsecond temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Jacob K; Wanunu, Meni; Merchant, Christopher A; Drndic, Marija; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2012-01-01

    Nanopore sensors have attracted considerable interest for high-throughput sensing of individual nucleic acids and proteins without the need for chemical labels or complex optics. A prevailing problem in nanopore applications is that the transport kinetics of single biomolecules are often faster than the measurement time resolution. Methods to slow down biomolecular transport can be troublesome and are at odds with the natural goal of high-throughput sensing. Here we introduce a low-noise measurement platform that integrates a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) preamplifier with solid-state nanopores in thin silicon nitride membranes. With this platform we achieved a signal-to-noise ratio exceeding five at a bandwidth of 1 MHz, which to our knowledge is the highest bandwidth nanopore recording to date. We demonstrate transient signals as brief as 1 μs from short DNA molecules as well as current signatures during molecular passage events that shed light on submolecular DNA configurations in small nanopores. PMID:22426489

  17. Temporal Super Resolution Enhancement of Echocardiographic Images Based on Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Gifani, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Haddadi, Farzan; Sani, Zahra Alizadeh; Shojaeifard, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    A challenging issue for echocardiographic image interpretation is the accurate analysis of small transient motions of myocardium and valves during real-time visualization. A higher frame rate video may reduce this difficulty, and temporal super resolution (TSR) is useful for illustrating the fast-moving structures. In this paper, we introduce a novel framework that optimizes TSR enhancement of echocardiographic images by utilizing temporal information and sparse representation. The goal of this method is to increase the frame rate of echocardiographic videos, and therefore enable more accurate analyses of moving structures. For the proposed method, we first derived temporal information by extracting intensity variation time curves (IVTCs) assessed for each pixel. We then designed both low-resolution and high-resolution overcomplete dictionaries based on prior knowledge of the temporal signals and a set of prespecified known functions. The IVTCs can then be described as linear combinations of a few prototype atoms in the low-resolution dictionary. We used the Bayesian compressive sensing (BCS) sparse recovery algorithm to find the sparse coefficients of the signals. We extracted the sparse coefficients and the corresponding active atoms in the low-resolution dictionary to construct new sparse coefficients corresponding to the high-resolution dictionary. Using the estimated atoms and the high-resolution dictionary, a new IVTC with more samples was constructed. Finally, by placing the new IVTC signals in the original IVTC positions, we were able to reconstruct the original echocardiography video with more frames. The proposed method does not require training of low-resolution and high-resolution dictionaries, nor does it require motion estimation; it does not blur fast-moving objects, and does not have blocking artifacts.

  18. Methods of photoelectrode characterization with high spatial and temporal resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, Daniel V.; Baxter, Jason B.; John, Jimmy; Lewis, Nathan S.; Moffat, Thomas P.; Ogitsu, Tadashi; O'Neil, Glen D.; Pham, Tuan Anh; Talin, A. Alec; Velazquez, Jesus M.; et al

    2015-06-19

    Here, materials and photoelectrode architectures that are highly efficient, extremely stable, and made from low cost materials are required for commercially viable photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting technology. A key challenge is the heterogeneous nature of real-world materials, which often possess spatial variation in their crystal structure, morphology, and/or composition at the nano-, micro-, or macro-scale. Different structures and compositions can have vastly different properties and can therefore strongly influence the overall performance of the photoelectrode through complex structure–property relationships. A complete understanding of photoelectrode materials would also involve elucidation of processes such as carrier collection and electrochemical charge transfer that occurmore » at very fast time scales. We present herein an overview of a broad suite of experimental and computational tools that can be used to define the structure–property relationships of photoelectrode materials at small dimensions and on fast time scales. A major focus is on in situ scanning-probe measurement (SPM) techniques that possess the ability to measure differences in optical, electronic, catalytic, and physical properties with nano- or micro-scale spatial resolution. In situ ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, used to probe carrier dynamics involved with processes such as carrier generation, recombination, and interfacial charge transport, are also discussed. Complementing all of these experimental techniques are computational atomistic modeling tools, which can be invaluable for interpreting experimental results, aiding in materials discovery, and interrogating PEC processes at length and time scales not currently accessible by experiment. In addition to reviewing the basic capabilities of these experimental and computational techniques, we highlight key opportunities and limitations of applying these tools for the development of PEC materials.« less

  19. Methods of photoelectrode characterization with high spatial and temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, Daniel V.; Baxter, Jason B.; John, Jimmy; Lewis, Nathan S.; Moffat, Thomas P.; Ogitsu, Tadashi; O'Neil, Glen D.; Pham, Tuan Anh; Talin, A. Alec; Velazquez, Jesus M.; Wood, Brandon C.

    2015-06-19

    Here, materials and photoelectrode architectures that are highly efficient, extremely stable, and made from low cost materials are required for commercially viable photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting technology. A key challenge is the heterogeneous nature of real-world materials, which often possess spatial variation in their crystal structure, morphology, and/or composition at the nano-, micro-, or macro-scale. Different structures and compositions can have vastly different properties and can therefore strongly influence the overall performance of the photoelectrode through complex structure–property relationships. A complete understanding of photoelectrode materials would also involve elucidation of processes such as carrier collection and electrochemical charge transfer that occur at very fast time scales. We present herein an overview of a broad suite of experimental and computational tools that can be used to define the structure–property relationships of photoelectrode materials at small dimensions and on fast time scales. A major focus is on in situ scanning-probe measurement (SPM) techniques that possess the ability to measure differences in optical, electronic, catalytic, and physical properties with nano- or micro-scale spatial resolution. In situ ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, used to probe carrier dynamics involved with processes such as carrier generation, recombination, and interfacial charge transport, are also discussed. Complementing all of these experimental techniques are computational atomistic modeling tools, which can be invaluable for interpreting experimental results, aiding in materials discovery, and interrogating PEC processes at length and time scales not currently accessible by experiment. In addition to reviewing the basic capabilities of these experimental and computational techniques, we highlight key opportunities and limitations of applying these tools for the development of PEC materials.

  20. Environmental enrichment rescues the degraded auditory temporal resolution of cortical neurons induced by early noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cuiping; Xu, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Liping; Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Jiping

    2015-09-01

    The accurate processing of sound temporal information is crucial to human speech perception and other species-specific communication. During postnatal development, the auditory cortex shows environmental and experience-dependent plasticity. However, how the postnatal environment affects cortical processing of sound temporal information is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to determine whether postnatal noise exposure impairs neural temporal resolution in the auditory cortex, and, if so, whether environmental enrichment can rescue this degraded neural temporal acuity. Using the neural gap detection threshold determined in anesthetized rats as an index of temporal acuity, we found that exposure of juvenile rats to moderate-level noise induced much higher neural gap detection thresholds in adulthood than exposure of adult rats to the same noise. Environmental enrichment did not affect cortical neural gap detection thresholds in normally developing rats. However, rearing of rats with early noise exposure in an enriched environment promoted recovery from the noise-induced degraded neural temporal resolution. In addition, the tonal stimuli in the enriched environment contributed to only a portion of the recovery. These results provide evidence for noise-induced developmental impairment in neural gap detection thresholds in the auditory cortex, and suggest a therapeutic potential for environmental enrichment as a non-invasive approach to rescue developmentally degraded auditory temporal processing.

  1. Visual perception in space and time--mapping the visual field of temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Poggel, Dorothe A; Strasburger, Hans

    2004-01-01

    To characterize temporal aspects of information processing in the human visual field, we studied the topographical distribution of temporal and non-temporal performance parameters in 95 normally sighted subjects. Visual field maps of double-pulse resolution thresholds (DPR) (the minimum detectable temporal gap between two light stimuli) and simple visual reaction times (RT) (measuring the speed of reaction to a light stimulus) were compared to maps of luminance thresholds determined by standard perimetry. Thus, for the first time, the topography of a visual variable without temporal constraints (perimetry) could be compared to visual variables in the temporal domain, with (RT) and without (DPR) motor reaction. The goal of the study was to obtain and to describe the pattern of co-variation of performance indicators. In all three measures, performance was best in the central visual field and dropped significantly towards the periphery. Although the correlation between DPR and RT was significant, shared variance was low, and we observed large topographical differences between these two temporal-performance variables. In contrast, DPR and perimetric thresholds correlated more substantially, and visual field maps were similar. The Gestalt of DPR maps shares characteristics of basic visual processing (e.g., light sensitivity), but it also reflects top-down influences, i.e., from spatial attention. Although the correlation between DPR and RT suggests common characteristics between these two temporal variables, the topographic distributions reveal significant differences, indicating separate underlying processing mechanisms. PMID:15283484

  2. The Influence of Temporal Resolution Power and Working Memory Capacity on Psychometric Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troche, Stefan J.; Rammsayer, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    According to the temporal resolution power (TRP) hypothesis, higher TRP as reflected by better performance on psychophysical timing tasks accounts for faster speed of information processing and increased efficiency of information processing leading to better performance on tests of psychometric intelligence. An alternative explanation of…

  3. A system for optically controlling neural circuits with very high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Carlson, Eric T.; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics offers a powerful new approach for controlling neural circuits. It has a vast array of applications in both basic and clinical science. For basic science, it opens the door to unraveling circuit operations, since one can perturb specific circuit components with high spatial (single cell) and high temporal (millisecond) resolution. For clinical applications, it allows new kinds of selective treatments, because it provides a method to inactivate or activate specific components in a malfunctioning circuit and bring it back into a normal operating range [1–3]. To harness the power of optogenetics, though, one needs stimulating tools that work with the same high spatial and temporal resolution as the molecules themselves, the channelrhodopsins. To date, most stimulating tools require a tradeoff between spatial and temporal precision and are prohibitively expensive to integrate into a stimulating/recording setup in a laboratory or a device in a clinical setting [4, 5]. Here we describe a Digital Light Processing (DLP)-based system capable of extremely high temporal resolution (sub-millisecond), without sacrificing spatial resolution. Furthermore, it is constructed using off-the-shelf components, making it feasible for a broad range of biology and bioengineering labs. Using transgenic mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), we demonstrate the system’s capability for stimulating channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons in tissue with single cell and sub-millisecond precision. PMID:25699292

  4. Southern Hemisphere climate trends skewed by coarse temporal resolution of specified stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, R. R., III; Marsh, D. R.; Smith, K. L.; Davis, S. M.; Polvani, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate models that do not include interactive middle atmosphere chemistry, such as those contributing to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, typically specify stratospheric ozone using monthly-mean zonal-mean values. Here we show that such coarse temporal resolution leads to significant biases in the simulated climate of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) over the late twentieth century. This is demonstrated using the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model in simulations with and without interactive chemistry. Previous studies have attributed similar differences in SH climate change simulations to biases created by the spatial smoothing of specified ozone, i.e., due to prescribing zonal-mean concentrations. We isolate the impact of undersampling the rapid temporal changes in ozone during the seasonal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole from the impact of prescribing zonal-means, and show that temporal resolution of prescribed ozone is of equal importance to zonal asymmetries.

  5. Increment and decrement detection in sinusoids as a measure of temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Oxenham, A J

    1997-09-01

    Measuring thresholds for the detection of brief decrements in the level of a sinusoid is an established method of estimating auditory temporal resolution. Generally, a background noise is added to the stimulus to avoid the detection of the "spectral splatter" introduced by the decrement. Results are often described in terms of a temporal-window model, comprising a band-pass filter, a compressive nonlinearity, a sliding temporal integrator, and a decision device. In this study, thresholds for increments, as well as decrements, in the level of a 55 dB SPL, 4-kHz sinusoidal pedestal were measured as function of increment and decrement duration in the presence of a broadband background noise ranging in spectrum level from -20 to +20 dB SPL. Thresholds were also measured using a 55-dB, 8-kHz pedestal in the absence of background noise. Thresholds for decrements, in terms of the dB change in level (delta L), were found to be more dependent on duration than those for increments. Also, performance was found to be dependent on background-noise level over most levels tested. Neither finding is consistent with the predictions of the temporal-window model or other similar models of temporal resolution. The difference between increment and decrement detection was more successfully simulated by using a decision criterion based on the maximum slope of the temporal-window output. PMID:9301055

  6. On the sensitivity of urban hydrodynamic modelling to rainfall spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, G.; Reinoso, R.; van de Giesen, N. C.; Clemens, F. H. L. R.; ten Veldhuis, J. A. E.

    2015-02-01

    Cities are increasingly vulnerable to floods generated by intense rainfall, because of urbanisation of flood-prone areas and ongoing urban densification. Accurate information of convective storm characteristics at high spatial and temporal resolution is a crucial input for urban hydrological models to be able to simulate fast runoff processes and enhance flood prediction in cities. In this paper, a detailed study of the sensitivity of urban hydrodynamic response to high resolution radar rainfall was conducted. Rainfall rates derived from X-band dual polarimetric weather radar were used as input into a detailed hydrodynamic sewer model for an urban catchment in the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The aim was to characterise how the effect of space and time aggregation on rainfall structure affects hydrodynamic modelling of urban catchments, for resolutions ranging from 100 to 2000 m and from 1 to 10 min. Dimensionless parameters were derived to compare results between different storm conditions and to describe the effect of rainfall spatial resolution in relation to storm characteristics and hydrodynamic model properties: rainfall sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. storm size), catchment sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. catchment size), runoff and sewer sampling number (rainfall resolution vs. runoff and sewer model resolution respectively). Results show that for rainfall resolution lower than half the catchment size, rainfall volumes mean and standard deviations decrease as a result of smoothing of rainfall gradients. Moreover, deviations in maximum water depths, from 10 to 30% depending on the storm, occurred for rainfall resolution close to storm size, as a result of rainfall aggregation. Model results also showed that modelled runoff peaks are more sensitive to rainfall resolution than maximum in-sewer water depths as flow routing has a damping effect on in-sewer water level variations. Temporal resolution aggregation of rainfall inputs led to

  7. Encoding of natural sounds at multiple spectral and temporal resolutions in the human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Roberta; Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Goebel, Rainer; Ugurbil, Kamil; Yacoub, Essa; Formisano, Elia

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging research provides detailed observations of the response patterns that natural sounds (e.g. human voices and speech, animal cries, environmental sounds) evoke in the human brain. The computational and representational mechanisms underlying these observations, however, remain largely unknown. Here we combine high spatial resolution (3 and 7 Tesla) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with computational modeling to reveal how natural sounds are represented in the human brain. We compare competing models of sound representations and select the model that most accurately predicts fMRI response patterns to natural sounds. Our results show that the cortical encoding of natural sounds entails the formation of multiple representations of sound spectrograms with different degrees of spectral and temporal resolution. The cortex derives these multi-resolution representations through frequency-specific neural processing channels and through the combined analysis of the spectral and temporal modulations in the spectrogram. Furthermore, our findings suggest that a spectral-temporal resolution trade-off may govern the modulation tuning of neuronal populations throughout the auditory cortex. Specifically, our fMRI results suggest that neuronal populations in posterior/dorsal auditory regions preferably encode coarse spectral information with high temporal precision. Vice-versa, neuronal populations in anterior/ventral auditory regions preferably encode fine-grained spectral information with low temporal precision. We propose that such a multi-resolution analysis may be crucially relevant for flexible and behaviorally-relevant sound processing and may constitute one of the computational underpinnings of functional specialization in auditory cortex. PMID:24391486

  8. Infection propagator approach to compute epidemic thresholds on temporal networks: impact of immunity and of limited temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdano, Eugenio; Poletto, Chiara; Colizza, Vittoria

    2015-12-01

    The epidemic threshold of a spreading process indicates the condition for the occurrence of the wide spreading regime, thus representing a predictor of the network vulnerability to the epidemic. Such threshold depends on the natural history of the disease and on the pattern of contacts of the network with its time variation. Based on the theoretical framework introduced in [E. Valdano, L. Ferreri, C. Poletto, V. Colizza, Phys. Rev. X 5, 21005 (2015)] for a susceptible-infectious-susceptible model, we formulate here an infection propagator approach to compute the epidemic threshold accounting for more realistic effects regarding a varying force of infection per contact, the presence of immunity, and a limited time resolution of the temporal network. We apply the approach to two temporal network models and an empirical dataset of school contacts. We find that permanent or temporary immunity do not affect the estimation of the epidemic threshold through the infection propagator approach. Comparisons with numerical results show the good agreement of the analytical predictions. Aggregating the temporal network rapidly deteriorates the predictions, except for slow diseases once the heterogeneity of the links is preserved. Weight-topology correlations are found to be the critical factor to be preserved to improve accuracy in the prediction.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion for Generating High-Resolution Land Cover Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong

    Currently, remote sensing imagery has been widely used for generating global land cover products, but due to certain physical and budget limitations related to the sensors, their spatial and temporal resolution are too low to attain more accurate and more reliable global change research. In this situation, there is an urgent need to study and develop a more advanced satellite image processing method and land cover producing techniques to generate higher resolution images and land cover products for global change research. Through conducting a comprehensive study of the related theories and methods related to data fusion, various methods are systematically reviewed and summarized, such as HIS transformation image fusion, Wavelet transform image fusion, the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM), etc. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are highlighted according to their specific applications in the field of remote sensing. Based on my research target, the following are the main contents of this thesis: (1) Data fusion theory will be systematically studied and summarized, including various fusion models and specific applications, such as IHS transformation, PCA transformation, Wavelet analysis based data fusion, etc. Furthermore, their advantages and disadvantages are pointed out in relation to specific applications. (2) As traditional data fusion methods rely on spatial information and it is hard to deal with multi-source data fusion with temporal variation, therefore, the traditional data fusion theory and methods will be improved by a consideration of temporal information. Accordingly, some spatial and temporal data fusion methods will be proposed, in which both high-resolution & low-temporary imagery and low-resolution & high-temporary imagery are incorporated. Our experiments also show that they are suitable for dealing with multi-temporal data integration and generating high-resolution, multi-temporal images for global

  10. Spatio-temporal evaluation of resolution enhancement for passive microwave soil moisture and vegetation optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, A. I.; Parinussa, R. M.; Renzullo, L. J.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; de Jeu, R. A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Space-borne passive microwave radiometers are used to derive land surface parameters such as surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth (VOD). However, the value of such products in regional hydrology is limited by their coarse resolution. In this study, the land parameter retrieval model (LPRM) is used to derive enhanced resolution (∼10 km) soil moisture and VOD from advanced microwave scanning radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures sharpened by a modulation technique based on high-frequency observations. A precipitation mask based on brightness temperatures was applied to remove precipitation artefacts in the sharpened LPRM products. The spatial and temporal patterns in the resulting products are evaluated against field-measured and modeled soil moisture as well as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) over mainland Australia. Results show that resolution enhancement accurately sharpens the boundaries of different vegetation types, lakes and wetlands. Significant changes in temporal agreement between LPRM products and related datasets are limited to specific areas, such as lakes and coastal areas. Spatial correlations, on the other hand, increase over most of Australia. In addition, hydrological signals from irrigation and water bodies that were absent in the low-resolution soil moisture product become clearly visible after resolution enhancement. The increased information detail in the high-resolution LPRM products should benefit hydrological studies at regional scales.

  11. Temporal resolution of precipitation as a control of runoff model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorska, Anna; Seibert, Jan

    2016-04-01

    In most cases the choice of the temporal resolution of the data used for model calibration is driven by the data availability. Yet, a carefully chosen resolution could greatly improve the identifiability of catchment processes and enhance the model predictability, while saving costs and time for too detailed measurement protocols or simulations. In this work we formulate this issue as an inverse problem and investigate how data of different temporal resolutions, ranging from one hour to two days, affects the predictability of a precipitation-runoff model (HBV) for both high and low flow conditions. We employ a Bayesian inference with a formal likelihood function, which enables a quantitative comparison. Our study is based on the sample of five heterogeneous Swiss meso-scale catchments with two different datasets of precipitation fields: radar-based (RB) and ground station network (GSN). Our results showed that a high data resolution was preferable in small and medium size catchments, with catchments smaller than 60 km2 having a stronger tendency towards an hourly resolution. As opposed, a high data resolution was not so important in catchments larger than 200 km2 and daily data seemed to be detailed enough. A similar effect was observed for predictive uncertainty bands, which were significantly reduced with finer data in small and medium size catchments, whereas they remained similar in larger catchments despite increasing the temporal resolution. Moreover, RB resulted in a better model performance for both high and low flows in small and medium size catchments, whereas a similarly good model performance was obtained with GSN in the larger catchments.

  12. Improved Temporal Resolution of Ambient Seismic Noise Monitoring without the Green's Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadziioannou, Céline; Larose, Eric; Baig, Adam; Campillo, Michel

    2010-05-01

    Ambient noise crosscorrelations have been used on several occasions to monitor temporal variations in seismic velocity. In particular, Brenguier et al. (Science, 2008) find coseismic and postseismic velocity changes around a fault zone in Parkfield, California. In this study, and in others, it was initially assumed that a correct reconstruction of the Green's function is as necessary for temporal monitoring as it is for imaging. We show through laboratory experiments that a stable waveform reconstruction is sufficient to retrieve relative temporal variations. Armed with this knowledge, we revisit the data from Parkfield. One way to obtain a stable waveform, with an acceptable signal to noise ratio, is to average the correlations over a long period of time. However, for the application to monitoring one wants the possibility of following short-term variations. How can we resolve this conflict and improve temporal resolution without sacrificing SNR? We show that by applying an adaptive filter (Baig et al, J. Geophys. Res., 2009) to the Parkfield dataset the temporal resolution can be increased from 30 days up to 1 day. With this, we show that the velocity drop observed is coseismic with the Parkfield earthquake.

  13. Emulation of LISS III images for high temporal resolution at larger swath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. V.; Malleswara Rao, J.; Senthil Kumar, A.; Lakshmi, B.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Space borne sensors have limited capability to acquire images at high spatial and high temporal resolutions with larger swath simultaneously. In this paper, we propose alternatives to overcome this limitation by emulating such images at ground data processing system. Resourcesat-2, one of the Indian Space Research Organization's (ISRO) mission carries Linear Imaging Self-Scanners (LISS III and LISS-IV) and an Advanced Wide-Field Sensor (AWiFS) onboard. The spatial and temporal resolutions of LISS III are 23.5 m and 24 days, and those of AWiFS are 56 m and 5 days, respectively. The 141 km swath of LISS III data is overlapped with the 740 km swath of AWiFS data at centre portion in simultaneous acquisition. Two novel approaches are proposed to emulate the LISS III image with 740 km swath at 23.5 m spatial and 5-days temporal resolutions. First approach is to emulate the synthetic LISS III images at 23.5 m spatial and 5-days temporal resolutions. Mosaic such images to cover the full 740 km swath of AWiFS for a given date. First approach is achieved through a spatio-temporal data fusion technique which depends on the previously acquired single AWiFS-LISS III image pair. Second approach assumes that the non-overlapping region of AWiFS contains similar Earth's surface features of LISS III overlapping region; then it is possible to enhance the spatial resolution of AWiFS to the spatial resolution of LISS III in the nonoverlapping region. It is achieved through a single-image-super resolution technique over Non-sub sampled Contourlet Transform. First approach is computationally efficient but it requires prior knowledge of a single AWiFS-LISS III image pair for each emulated LISS III image. That image pair is acquired before or after the prediction date. Also, first approach faces radiometric issues in the mosaic process. Second approach has high computational complexity. But it works well for the data sets which are satisfying the above basic assumption. An accuracy of

  14. A Spatio-Temporal Enhancement Method for medium resolution LAI (STEM-LAI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houborg, Rasmus; McCabe, Matthew F.; Gao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing has been used successfully to map leaf area index (LAI) across landscapes, but advances are still needed to exploit multi-scale data streams for producing LAI at both high spatial and temporal resolution. A multi-scale Spatio-Temporal Enhancement Method for medium resolution LAI (STEM-LAI) has been developed to generate 4-day time-series of Landsat-scale LAI from existing medium resolution LAI products. STEM-LAI has been designed to meet the demands of applications requiring frequent and spatially explicit information, such as effectively resolving rapidly evolving vegetation dynamics at sub-field (30 m) scales. In this study, STEM-LAI is applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) based LAI data and utilizes a reference-based regression tree approach for producing MODIS-consistent, but Landsat-based, LAI. The Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) is used to interpolate the downscaled LAI between Landsat acquisition dates, providing a high spatial and temporal resolution improvement over existing LAI products. STARFM predicts high resolution LAI by blending MODIS and Landsat based information from a common acquisition date, with MODIS data from a prediction date. To demonstrate its capacity to reproduce fine-scale spatial features observed in actual Landsat LAI, the STEM-LAI approach is tested over an agricultural region in Nebraska. The implementation of a 250 m resolution LAI product, derived from MODIS 1 km data and using a scale consistent approach based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), is found to significantly improve accuracies of spatial pattern prediction, with the coefficient of efficiency (E) ranging from 0.77-0.94 compared to 0.01-0.85 when using 1 km LAI inputs alone. Comparisons against an 11-year record of in-situ measured LAI over maize and soybean highlight the utility of STEM-LAI in reproducing observed LAI dynamics (both characterized by r2 = 0.86) over a

  15. Cellular resolution circuit mapping with temporal-focused excitation of soma-targeted channelrhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher A; Elyada, Yishai M; Parra, Andres; Bolton, M McLean

    2016-01-01

    We describe refinements in optogenetic methods for circuit mapping that enable measurements of functional synaptic connectivity with single-neuron resolution. By expanding a two-photon beam in the imaging plane using the temporal focusing method and restricting channelrhodopsin to the soma and proximal dendrites, we are able to reliably evoke action potentials in individual neurons, verify spike generation with GCaMP6s, and determine the presence or absence of synaptic connections with patch-clamp electrophysiological recording. PMID:27525487

  16. Importance of temporal resolution of meteorological forcings for physics-based snow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Benjankar, R. M.; Kumar, M.; Marks, D. G.; Kormos, P.; Tonina, D.

    2015-12-01

    In alpine regions, snow delays hydrological responses to precipitation and controls initiation and length of the growing season. Therefore, precise simulations of snow accumulation and melt are crucial for understanding hydrological dynamics and predicting hydrologic response from watersheds. These predictions are important for water resource management and for ecological studies of vegetation distribution, growth and for wildlife habitat. Snow models require fine temporal resolution of meteorological inputs to capture diurnal changes. However, lack of meteorological data at fine-temporal resolution may force the use of coarser than hourly data. The objective of this work is to understand what sort of information can be lost over the watershed depending on the temporal resolution of meteorological inputs, for a range of hydroclimatic and topographic conditions. To address this goal, a spatially distributed and physics-based snow model (iSnobal) was run using 1-, 3- and 6-hourly meteorological inputs for a wet, average and a dry year over Boise River Basin (BRB), Idaho, USA. Simulated snow variables such as Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) and Surface Water Input (SWI - melt draining from the snowcover plus rain on bare ground) were averaged over 3 elevation bands including rain dominated (≤1400m), rain-snow transition (>1400 and ≤1900m) and snow dominated (>1900m). Except at the rain dominated band, using 6-hr inputs causes considerable overestimation of SWE and SWI, particularly in the wet year. The results show that at the rain-snow transition and snow dominated bands at least 3-hr meteorological data are necessary for snow modeling, due to strong diurnal changes in meteorological variables at these elevations. However, using course temporal resolution data for the rain dominated band made only a small difference in results.

  17. High-temporal Resolution Sediment Fingerprinting with Uncertainty: A Bayesian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Richard; Krueger, Tobi; Hiscock, Kevin; Rawlins, Barry

    2014-05-01

    A high-temporal resolution fluvial sediment source apportionment model, set within an empirical Bayesian framework, is presented for the River Wensum Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC), UK. Direct X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis of sediment covered filter papers were used in conjunction with ISCO automatic water samplers to monitor suspended particulate matter (SPM) geochemistry at high-temporal resolution throughout the progression of five heavy precipitation events during 2012-2013. Exploiting the spatial and temporal variation in four potential sediment source areas and SPM geochemistry respectively, we are able to apportion sediment contributions from eroding stream channel banks, arable topsoils, damaged road verges and agricultural field drains at 60-120 minute resolution. For all monitored precipitation episodes, pre- and post-event conditions are dominated by elevated SPM calcium concentrations that indicate major sediment inputs from carbonate-rich subsurface sources. Conversely, precipitation events coincide with an increase in concentrations of clay-associated elements and a consequent increase in predicted contributions from surface sources. Employing a Gibbs sampling Markov Chain Monte-Carlo mixing model procedure has enabled full characterisation of both spatial geochemical variability and instrument precision to quantify uncertainty around posterior distributions. All model source apportionment estimates correspond favourably with understanding of the regional geology, analysis of hysteresis behaviour, and visual observations of catchment processes. The results presented here demonstrate how to directly analyse SPM trapped on filter papers by spectroscopy to yield the high-temporal resolution source apportionment estimates required by catchment managers to help mitigate the deleterious effects of land-to-river sediment transfer.

  18. A novel high temporal resolution phase contrast MRI technique for measuring mitral valve flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, Abram; Bohmann, Katja; McGorty, Kelly Anne; Wei, Timothy; Chen, Qun

    2005-11-01

    Mitral valve flow imaging is inherently difficult due to valve plane motion and high blood flow velocities, which can range from 200 cm/s to 700 cm/s under regurgitant conditions. As such, insufficient temporal resolution has hampered imaging of mitral valve flows using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A novel phase contrast MRI technique, phase contrast using phase train imaging (PCPTI), has been developed to address the high temporal resolution needs for imaging mitral valve flows. The PCPTI sequence provides the highest temporal resolution to-date (6 ms) for measuring in-plane and through-plane flow patterns, with each velocity component acquired in a separate breathhold. Tested on healthy human volunteers, comparison to a conventional retrogated PC-FLASH cine sequence showed reasonable agreement. Results from a more rigorous validation using digital particle image velocimetry technique will be presented. The technique will be demonstrated in vitro using a physiological flow phantom and a St. Jude Medical Masters Series prosthetic valve.

  19. Temporal resolution ability in students with dyslexia and reading and writing disorders.

    PubMed

    Chaubet, Juliana; Pereira, Liliane; Perez, Ana Paula

    2014-04-01

    Introduction The Gaps-in-Noise (GIN) test assesses the hearing ability of temporal resolution. The development of this ability can be considered essential for learning how to read. Objective Identify temporal resolution in individuals diagnosed with reading and writing disorders compared with subjects with dyslexia. Methods A sample of 26 subjects of both genders, age 10 to 15 years, included 11 diagnosed with dyslexia and 15 diagnosed with reading and writing disorders. Subjects did not display otologic, neurologic, and/or cognitive diseases. A control group of 30 normal-hearing subjects was formed to compare thresholds and percentages obtained from the GIN test. The responses were obtained considering two measures of analysis: the threshold gap and the percentage of correct gap. Results The threshold was lower in the GIN for the typical group than for the other groups. There was no difference between groups with dyslexia and with reading and writing disorders. The GIN results of the typical group revealed a higher percentage of correct answer than in the other groups. No difference was obtained between the groups with dyslexia and with reading and writing disorders. Conclusion The GIN test identified a difficulty in auditory ability of temporal resolution in individuals with reading and writing disorders and in individuals with dyslexia in a similar way.

  20. Shift and Mean Algorithm for Functional Imaging with High Spatio-Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Rama, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Understanding neuronal physiology requires to record electrical activity in many small and remote compartments such as dendrites, axon or dendritic spines. To do so, electrophysiology has long been the tool of choice, as it allows recording very subtle and fast changes in electrical activity. However, electrophysiological measurements are mostly limited to large neuronal compartments such as the neuronal soma. To overcome these limitations, optical methods have been developed, allowing the monitoring of changes in fluorescence of fluorescent reporter dyes inserted into the neuron, with a spatial resolution theoretically only limited by the dye wavelength and optical devices. However, the temporal and spatial resolutive power of functional fluorescence imaging of live neurons is often limited by a necessary trade-off between image resolution, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and speed of acquisition. Here, I propose to use a Super-Resolution Shift and Mean (S&M) algorithm previously used in image computing to improve the SNR, time sampling and spatial resolution of acquired fluorescent signals. I demonstrate the benefits of this methodology using two examples: voltage imaging of action potentials (APs) in soma and dendrites of CA3 pyramidal cells and calcium imaging in the dendritic shaft and spines of CA3 pyramidal cells. I show that this algorithm allows the recording of a broad area at low speed in order to achieve a high SNR, and then pick the signal in any small compartment and resample it at high speed. This method allows preserving both the SNR and the temporal resolution of the signal, while acquiring the original images at high spatial resolution.

  1. Shift and Mean Algorithm for Functional Imaging with High Spatio-Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Understanding neuronal physiology requires to record electrical activity in many small and remote compartments such as dendrites, axon or dendritic spines. To do so, electrophysiology has long been the tool of choice, as it allows recording very subtle and fast changes in electrical activity. However, electrophysiological measurements are mostly limited to large neuronal compartments such as the neuronal soma. To overcome these limitations, optical methods have been developed, allowing the monitoring of changes in fluorescence of fluorescent reporter dyes inserted into the neuron, with a spatial resolution theoretically only limited by the dye wavelength and optical devices. However, the temporal and spatial resolutive power of functional fluorescence imaging of live neurons is often limited by a necessary trade-off between image resolution, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and speed of acquisition. Here, I propose to use a Super-Resolution Shift and Mean (S&M) algorithm previously used in image computing to improve the SNR, time sampling and spatial resolution of acquired fluorescent signals. I demonstrate the benefits of this methodology using two examples: voltage imaging of action potentials (APs) in soma and dendrites of CA3 pyramidal cells and calcium imaging in the dendritic shaft and spines of CA3 pyramidal cells. I show that this algorithm allows the recording of a broad area at low speed in order to achieve a high SNR, and then pick the signal in any small compartment and resample it at high speed. This method allows preserving both the SNR and the temporal resolution of the signal, while acquiring the original images at high spatial resolution. PMID:26635526

  2. Beyond spicule dynamics: spicule and fibril spectroscopy at high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes Domingos Pereira, T.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar spicules are chromospheric fibrils observed at the solar limb. They are observed everywhere in the Sun, but their origin is not yet understood. Much of our understanding of spicules has been obtained through filtergram observations and/or focused on the dynamics of spicules. Spectroscopic studies have been usually limited by spatial extent/resolution, temporal resolution, or variable seeing. In this work we make use of a unique time series of imaging spectroscopy at high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope under excellent seeing and coordinated with the IRIS mission. With these data we characterize the evolution of spectra along quiet Sun fibrils and spicules, and discuss what makes them visible in filtergrams and sets them apart from other chromospheric fibrils. With combined H-alpha and Ca II H high-resolution observations we also discuss how spicules appear in these two lines, a long standing issue that has been interpreted in conflicting ways. Finally, using the wide range of IRIS diagnostics we put together the spectral evolution of spicules through the chromosphere and transition region.

  3. Novel microfabricated device to measure hormone/neurotransmitter release with millisecond temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Kevin D.; Chen, Peng; Xu, Bai; Tokranova, Natalya; Feng, Xiaojun; Castracane, James

    2002-06-01

    We are developing a novel readout for secretion of hormones and neurotransmitter on micro/nanofabricated chips. Traditional biochemical assays of signaling molecules secreted from cells are slow, cumbersome and have at best, a temporal resolution of several seconds. On the other hand, electrochemical measurement of hormone or transmitter secretion can obtain millisecond temporal resolution if the diffusion distance between the release site on the cell and the working electrode is within 1 micron. Carbon fiber microelectrodes can have millisecond time resolution, but can only measure release form a small fraction of the cell surface. We have fabricated arrays of Au electrodes in wells micromachined on the surface of silicon microchips. Each well/microelectrode roughly conforms to the shape of a single cell in order to capture release forma large fraction of the surface area of each cell with minimal diffusional delays. This paper will present details of the microfabrication process flow as well a initial results demonstrating millisecond-resolution measurement of catecholamine secretion form adrenal chromaffin cells. Our goal for this project is to develop enabling technology for massively parallel systems on a chip such as cell-based biosensors to detect neurotoxins and high-throughput assays of drugs that affect neurotransmitter release.

  4. Time-resolved ARPES with sub-15 fs temporal and near Fourier-limited spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, G.; Hendel, A.; Stange, A.; Hanff, K.; Oloff, L.-P.; Yang, L. X.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with sub-15 fs temporal resolution is presented. A hollow-fiber compressor is used for the generation of 6.5 fs white light pump pulses, and a high-harmonic-generation source delivers 11 fs probe pulses at a photon energy of 22.1 eV. A value of 13 fs full width at half-maximum of the pump-probe cross correlation signal is determined by analyzing a photoemission intensity transient probing a near-infrared interband transition in 1T-TiSe2. Notably, the energy resolution of the setup conforms to typical values reported in conventional time-resolved photoemission studies using high harmonics, and an ultimate resolution of 170 meV is feasible.

  5. High spatial and temporal resolution phase contrast imaging of shock wave using the LCLS beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae Ja; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Schropp, A.; Hastings, J. B.; Lee, R. W.; Collins, G. W.; Ping, Y.; Schroer, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    A new technique using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the x-ray free electron laser source, was developed at Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) endstation to provide high spatial and temporal resolution phase contrast imaging of shock waves in matter. The LCLS has high peak brightness enabling a high beam current of a few mJ/pulse to be focused into a small spot to achieve high imaging resolution < 1 μm. 150 ps, 140 mJ, 800 nm short pulse laser beam was focused to produce shock waves in a material. We collected the first high resolution phase contrast movies of shock propagation inside materials. These results provide the first in-situ imaging of the shock front width, deformation length and time scale behind the shock of materials with free electron laser.

  6. The sensitivity of landscape evolution models to spatial and temporal rainfall resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulthard, Tom J.; Skinner, Christopher J.

    2016-09-01

    Climate is one of the main drivers for landscape evolution models (LEMs), yet its representation is often basic with values averaged over long time periods and frequently lumped to the same value for the whole basin. Clearly, this hides the heterogeneity of precipitation - but what impact does this averaging have on erosion and deposition, topography, and the final shape of LEM landscapes? This paper presents results from the first systematic investigation into how the spatial and temporal resolution of precipitation affects LEM simulations of sediment yields and patterns of erosion and deposition. This is carried out by assessing the sensitivity of the CAESAR-Lisflood LEM to different spatial and temporal precipitation resolutions - as well as how this interacts with different-size drainage basins over short and long timescales. A range of simulations were carried out, varying rainfall from 0.25 h × 5 km to 24 h × Lump resolution over three different-sized basins for 30-year durations. Results showed that there was a sensitivity to temporal and spatial resolution, with the finest leading to > 100 % increases in basin sediment yields. To look at how these interactions manifested over longer timescales, several simulations were carried out to model a 1000-year period. These showed a systematic bias towards greater erosion in uplands and deposition in valley floors with the finest spatial- and temporal-resolution data. Further tests showed that this effect was due solely to the data resolution, not orographic factors. Additional research indicated that these differences in sediment yield could be accounted for by adding a compensation factor to the model sediment transport law. However, this resulted in notable differences in the topographies generated, especially in third-order and higher streams. The implications of these findings are that uncalibrated past and present LEMs using lumped and time-averaged climate inputs may be under-predicting basin sediment

  7. Temporal Resolution of the Normal Ear in Listeners with Unilateral Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Dey, Ratul; Davessar, Jai Lal

    2015-12-01

    Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) leads to an imbalanced input to the brain and results in cortical reorganization. In listeners with unilateral impairments, while the perceptual deficits associated with the impaired ear are well documented, less is known regarding the auditory processing in the unimpaired, clinically normal ear. It is commonly accepted that perceptual consequences are unlikely to occur in the normal ear for listeners with UHL. This study investigated whether the temporal resolution in the normal-hearing (NH) ear of listeners with long-standing UHL is similar to those in listeners with NH. Temporal resolution was assayed via measuring gap detection thresholds (GDTs) in within- and between-channel paradigms. GDTs were assessed in the normal ear of adults with long-standing, severe-to-profound UHL (N = 13) and age-matched, NH listeners (N = 22) at two presentation levels (30 and 55 dB sensation level). Analysis indicated that within-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were not significantly different than those for the NH subject group, but the between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were poorer (by greater than a factor of 2) than those for the listeners with NH. The hearing thresholds in the normal or impaired ears were not associated with the elevated between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL. Contrary to the common assumption that auditory processing capabilities are preserved for the normal ear in listeners with UHL, the current study demonstrated that a long-standing unilateral hearing impairment may adversely affect auditory perception--temporal resolution--in the clinically normal ear. From a translational perspective, these findings imply that the temporal processing deficits in the unimpaired ear of listeners with unilateral hearing impairments may contribute to their overall auditory perceptual difficulties.

  8. River discharge estimation from multi-mission altimetry with optimized spatial coverage and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourian, Mohammad J.; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    One of the main challenges of hydrological modeling is the poor spatio-temporal coverage of in situ discharge databases. The global network of in situ gauges is declining steadily over the past few decades. It has been demonstrated that altimetry-derived water height over rivers can sensibly be used to deal with the growing lack of in situ discharge data. However, the altimetric discharge is often estimated from a single virtual station with a coarse temporal resolution, dictated by the satellite repeat period (10 or 35 days). In this study, we implement an assimilation scheme that connects all virtual stations of several satellite altimeters along the main stream and tributaries distributed over a catchment. This helps to generate densified water level time series with temporal resolution of less than ~3 days at any given location in the catchment. We then propose a scheme that extends the current one-on-one relationship between a discharge gauge and a nearby (densified) virtual station towards a methodology which links multiple virtual stations to all available gauges. We assess our method over the Amazon river/basin/catchment, where we have access to in situ discharge data from GRDC, and where multiple altimetric water level time series from different missions are available.

  9. Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics with high temporal and spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Background Methods exist to quantify the distribution of growth rate over the root axis. However, non-destructive, high-throughput evaluations of total root elongation in controlled environments and the field are lacking in growth studies. A new imaging approach to analyse total root elongation is described. Scope High pixel resolution of the images enables the study of growth in short time intervals and provides high temporal resolution. Using the method described, total root elongation rates are calculated from the displacement of the root tip. Although the absolute root elongation rate changes in response to growth conditions, this set-up enables root growth of Arabidopsis wild-type seedlings to be followed for more than 1 month after germination. The method provides an easy approach to decipher root extension rate and much simpler calculations compared with other methods that use segmental growth to address this question. Conclusions The high temporal resolution allows small modifications of total root elongation growth to be revealed. Furthermore, with the options to investigate growth of various mutants in diverse growth conditions the present tool allows modulations in root growth kinetics due to different biotic and abiotic stimuli to be unravelled. Measurements performed on Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type (Col0) plants revealed rhythms superimposed on root elongation. Results obtained from the starchless mutant pgm, however, present a clearly modified pattern. As expected, deviation is strongest during the dark period. PMID:20421235

  10. DUSTER: dynamic contrast enhance up-sampled temporal resolution analysis method.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Gilad; Louzoun, Yoram; Artzi, Moran; Nadav, Guy; Ewing, James R; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI using Tofts' model for estimating vascular permeability is widely accepted, yet inter-tissue differences in bolus arrival time (BAT) are generally ignored. In this work we propose a method, incorporating the BAT in the analysis, demonstrating its applicability and advantages in healthy subjects and patients. A method for DCE Up Sampled TEmporal Resolution (DUSTER) analysis is proposed which includes: baseline T1 map using DESPOT1 analyzed with flip angle (FA) correction; preprocessing; raw-signal-to-T1-to-concentration time curves (CTC) conversion; automatic arterial input function (AIF) extraction at temporal super-resolution; model fitting with model selection while incorporating BAT in the pharmacokinetic (PK) model, and fits contrast agent CTC while using exhaustive search in the BAT dimension in super-resolution. The method was applied to simulated data and to human data from 17 healthy subjects, six patients with glioblastoma, and two patients following stroke. BAT values were compared to time-to-peak (TTP) values extracted from dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging. Results show that the method improved the AIF estimation and allowed extraction of the BAT with a resolution of 0.8 s. In simulations, lower mean relative errors were detected for all PK parameters extracted using DUSTER compared to analysis without BAT correction (vp:5% vs. 20%, Ktrans: 9% vs. 24% and Kep: 8% vs. 17%, respectively), and BAT estimates demonstrated high correlations (r = 0.94, p < 1e− 10) with true values. In real data, high correlations between BAT values were detected when extracted from data acquired with high temporal resolution (2 s) and sub-sampled standard resolution data (6 s) (mean r = 0.85,p < 1e− 10). BAT and TTP values were significantly correlated in the different brain regions in healthy subjects (mean r = 0.72,p = < 1e− 3), as were voxel-wise comparisons in patients (mean r = 0.89, p < 1e− 10). In conclusion

  11. Temporal resolution of the human primary auditory cortex in gap detection.

    PubMed

    Rupp, André; Gutschalk, Alexander; Hack, Sebastian; Scherg, Michael

    2002-12-01

    The temporal resolution of the primary auditory cortex was studied by recording the magnetic middle latency fields (MAEF) evoked by gaps of 3, 6 and 9 ms inserted in the middle of 600 ms broadband noise bursts. Spatio-temporal source modelling showed that a significant neural representation as reflected by MAEF responses is present at gap durations as low as 3 sms. The comparison of the MAEF waveforms elicited by the onset, gap and offset of the noise bursts indicates that the gap related response near threshold is largely determined by the onset to the burst following the gap. The electro-physiologically derived minimum detectable gap closely resembled the psychoacoustic threshold of 2.0 ms obtained in the same subjects.

  12. Challenges of High Resolution Diffusion Imaging of the Human Medial Temporal Lobe in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeineh, Michael M.; Holdsworth, Samantha; Skare, Stefan; Atlas, Scott W.; Bammer, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The human medial temporal lobe performs an essential role in memory formation and retrieval. Diseases involving the hippocampus such as Alzheimer's disease present a unique opportunity for advanced imaging techniques to detect abnormalities at an early stage. In particular, it is possible that diffusion imaging may measure abnormal microarchitecture beyond the realm of macroscopic imaging. However, this task is formidable because of the detailed anatomy of the medial temporal lobe, the difficulties in obtaining high quality diffusion images of adequate resolution, and challenges in diffusion data processing. Moreover, it is unclear if any differences will be significant for an individual patient or simply groups of patients. Successful endeavors will need to address each of these challenges in an integrated fashion. The rewards of such analysis may be detection of microscopic disease in vivo, which could represent a landmark accomplishment for the field of neuroradiology. PMID:22158129

  13. An Improved Multi-Temporal Insar Method for Increasing Spatial Resolution of Surface Deformation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Liu, G.; Jia, H.; Lin, H.; Zhang, R.; Yu, B.; Luo, Q.

    2013-10-01

    The multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technology has proven very useful in extracting surface deformation with time series of SAR images over a study area. To increase spatial resolution of deformation information, this paper presents an improved multi-temporal InSAR (MTI) method by tracking both the point-like targets (PTs) and the distributed targets (DTs) with temporal steadiness of radar backscattering. The valid pixels corresponding to PTs and DTs are identified mainly by thresholding of the amplitude dispersion index (ADI) and the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC). To efficiently reduce error propagation, a hierarchical analysis strategy is applied to extract deformation rates at the valid pixels. For the pixels with lower ADI values, the deformation rates are estimated on an optimized network by a least squared estimator and a region growing method. For the pixels with higher ADI values, they are classified into several groups by the ADI intervals, and the deformation rates are estimated through the multi-levels of processing. The nonlinear deformation values at all the valid pixels are estimated by spatiotemporally filtering and spatially integrating. The proposed MTI algorithm has been tested for subsidence detection over Tianjin in China using the 40 high resolution TerraSAR-X images acquired between 2009 and 2010, and validated by using the ground-based leveling measurements. The testing results indicate that the spatial resolution and coverage of subsidence data can be increased dramatically by the hierarchical analysis, and the accuracy in subsidence values derived from the MTI solution can reach up to a millimeter level.

  14. Determination of Destructed and Infracted Forest Areas with Multi-temporal High Resolution Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker, D. Z.; Unal, A.; Kaya, S.; Alganci, U.

    2015-12-01

    Migration from rural areas to city centers and their surroundings is an important problem of not only our country but also the countries that under development stage. This uncontrolled and huge amount of migration brings out urbanization and socio - economic problems. The demand on settling the industrial areas and commercial activities nearby the city centers results with a negative change in natural land cover on cities. Negative impacts of human induced activities on natural resources and land cover has been continuously increasing for decades. The main human activities that resulted with destruction and infraction of forest areas can be defined as mining activities, agricultural activities, industrial / commercial activities and urbanization. Temporal monitoring of the changes in spatial distribution of forest areas is significantly important for effective management and planning progress. Changes can occur as spatially large destructions or small infractions. Therefore there is a need for reliable, fast and accurate data sources. At this point, satellite images proved to be a good data source for determination of the land use /cover changes with their capability of monitoring large areas with reasonable temporal resolutions. Spectral information derived from images provides discrimination of land use/cover types from each other. Developments in remote sensing technology in the last decade improved the spatial resolution of satellites and high resolution images were started to be used to detect even small changes in the land surface. As being the megacity of Turkey, Istanbul has been facing a huge migration for the last 20 years and effects of urbanization and other human based activities over forest areas are significant. Main focus of this study is to determine the destructions and infractions in forest areas of Istanbul, Turkey with 2.5m resolution SPOT 5 multi-temporal satellite imagery. Analysis was mainly constructed on threshold based classification of

  15. Cellular resolution circuit mapping with temporal-focused excitation of soma-targeted channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher A; Elyada, Yishai M; Parra, Andres; Bolton, M McLean

    2016-01-01

    We describe refinements in optogenetic methods for circuit mapping that enable measurements of functional synaptic connectivity with single-neuron resolution. By expanding a two-photon beam in the imaging plane using the temporal focusing method and restricting channelrhodopsin to the soma and proximal dendrites, we are able to reliably evoke action potentials in individual neurons, verify spike generation with GCaMP6s, and determine the presence or absence of synaptic connections with patch-clamp electrophysiological recording. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14193.001 PMID:27525487

  16. Characterization of a High Temporal Resolution TDLAS System for Measurements in a Shock Tube Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, F.; O'Byrne, Sean; Kleine, H.; Weigand, B.

    Transient heating and pressurization of a gas by shock waves can be useful for a variety of purposes, particularly for configurations involving shock wave focussing. Unless the geometry is particularly simple, the time history of temperature can be difficult to predict accurately. Hence, a non-intrusive measurement technique with high temporal resolution is required to record the time history of the very rapidly changing temperature of a shock-heated flow. One promising measurement techniques for these high-speed flows is Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS)

  17. Spatial and temporal resolutions of EEG: Is it really black and white? A scalp current density view

    PubMed Central

    Burle, Borís; Spieser, Laure; Roger, Clémence; Casini, Laurence; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Vidal, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Among the different brain imaging techniques, electroencephalography (EEG) is classically considered as having an excellent temporal resolution, but a poor spatial one. Here, we argue that the actual temporal resolution of conventional (scalp potentials) EEG is overestimated, and that volume conduction, the main cause of the poor spatial resolution of EEG, also distorts the recovered time course of the underlying sources at scalp level, and hence degrades the actual temporal resolution of EEG. While Current Source Density (CSD) estimates, through the Surface Laplacian (SL) computation, are well known to dramatically reduce volume conduction effects and hence improve EEG spatial resolution, its positive impact on EEG temporal resolution is much less recognized. In two simulation studies, we first show how volume conduction and reference electrodes distort the scalp potential time course, and how SL transform provides a much better spatio-temporal description. We then exemplify similar effects on two empirical datasets. We show how the time courses of the scalp potentials mis-estimate the latencies of the relevant brain events and that CSD provides a much richer, and much more accurate, view of the spatio-temporal dynamics of brain activity. PMID:25979156

  18. Following Dynamic Processes by X-ray Tomographic Microscopy with Sub-second Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mokso, R.; Marone, F.; Mikuljan, G.; Isenegger, A.; Haberthuer, D.; Schittny, J. C.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-09

    Several non-destructive imaging techniques offer the possibility to observe rapid phenomena in real time, yet most of these techniques fail when it comes to bulky samples and micrometer precision in three dimensions. Therefore there is clearly a need to develop approaches that address such conditions. We identified the large potential that lies in synchrotron-based x-rays as a probe and developed a direct-space tomographic instrument suitable to provide sub-second temporal resolution with several-micrometers spatial resolution. Selected applications from the field of biology and material science are shown in order to demonstrate the unique capabilities in generating three-dimensional images with very high quality making image segmentation and analysis possible for samples that could, until now, only be studied in two dimensions due to the occurrence of rapid structural changes.

  19. Impact of laser phase and amplitude noises on streak camera temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wlotzko, V.; Uhring, W.; Summ, P.

    2015-09-15

    Streak cameras are now reaching sub-picosecond temporal resolution. In cumulative acquisition mode, this resolution does not entirely rely on the electronic or the vacuum tube performances but also on the light source characteristics. The light source, usually an actively mode-locked laser, is affected by phase and amplitude noises. In this paper, the theoretical effects of such noises on the synchronization of the streak system are studied in synchroscan and triggered modes. More precisely, the contribution of band-pass filters, delays, and time walk is ascertained. Methods to compute the resulting synchronization jitter are depicted. The results are verified by measurement with a streak camera combined with a Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid state laser oscillator and also a fiber oscillator.

  20. Effects of temporal resolution on an inferential model of animal movement.

    PubMed

    Postlethwaite, Claire M; Dennis, Todd E

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in describing the behaviour of animals by fitting various movement models to tracking data. Despite this interest, little is known about how the temporal 'grain' of movement trajectories affects the outputs of such models, and how behaviours classified at one timescale may differ from those classified at other scales. Here, we present a study in which random-walk state-space models were fit both to nightly geospatial lifelines of common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) and synthetic trajectories parameterised from empirical observations. Observed trajectories recorded by GPS collars at 5-min intervals were sub-sampled at periods varying between 10 and 60 min, to approximate the effect of collecting data at lower sampling frequencies. Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo fitting techniques, using information about movement rates and turning angles between sequential fixes, were employed using a Bayesian framework to assign distinct behavioural states to individual location estimates. We found that in trajectories with higher temporal granularities behaviours could be clearly differentiated into 'slow-area-restricted' and 'fast-transiting' states, but for trajectories with longer inter-fix intervals this distinction was markedly less obvious. Specifically, turning-angle distributions varied from being highly peaked around either 0° or 180° at fine temporal scales, to being uniform across all angles at low sampling intervals. Our results highlight the difficulty of comparing model results amongst tracking-data sets that vary substantially in temporal grain, and demonstrate the importance of matching the observed temporal resolution of tracking devices to the timescales of behaviours of interest, otherwise inter-individual comparisons of inferred behaviours may be invalid, or important biological information may be obscured.

  1. Further improvement of temporal resolution of seismic data by autoregressive (AR) spectral extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karslı, Hakan

    2006-08-01

    Seismic data have still no enough temporal resolution because of band-limited nature of available data even if it is deconvolved. However, lower and higher frequency information belonging to seismic data is missing and it is not directly recovered from seismic data. In this paper, a method originally applied by Honarvar et al. [Honarvar, F., Sheikhzadeh, H., Moles, M., Sinclair, A.N., 2004. Improving the time-resolution and signal-noise ratio of ultrasonic NDE signals. Ultrasonics 41, 755-763.] which is the combination of the most widely used Wiener deconvolution and AR spectral extrapolation in frequency domain is briefly reviewed and is applied to seismic data to improve temporal resolution further. The missing frequency information is optimally recovered by forward and backward extrapolation based on the selection of a high signal-noise ratio (SNR) of signal spectrum deconvolved in signal processing technique. The combination of the two methods is firstly tested on a variety of synthetic examples and then applied to a stacked real trace. The selection of necessary parameters in Wiener filtering and in extrapolation are discussed in detail. It is used an optimum frequency windows between 3 and 10 dB drops by comparing results from these drops, while frequency windows are used as standard between 2.8 and 3.2 dB drops in study of Honarvar et al. [Honarvar, F., Sheikhzadeh, H., Moles, M., Sinclair, A.N., 2004. Improving the time-resolution and signal-noise ratio of ultrasonic NDE signals. Ultrasonics 41, 755-763.]. The results obtained show that the application of the purposed signal processing technique considerably improves temporal resolution of seismic data when compared with the original seismic data. Furthermore, AR based spectral extrapolated data can be almost considered as reflectivity sequence of layered medium. Consequently, the combination of Wiener deconvolution and AR spectral extrapolation can reveal some details of seismic data that cannot be

  2. Magnetic Particle Imaging for High Temporal Resolution Assessment of Aneurysm Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Andreas; Spallek, Johanna; Forkert, Nils D.; Faizy, Tobias D.; Werner, Franziska; Knopp, Tobias; Krause, Dieter; Fiehler, Jens; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the capability of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) to assess the hemodynamics in a realistic 3D aneurysm model obtained by additive manufacturing. MPI was compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Materials and Methods The aneurysm model was of saccular morphology (7 mm dome height, 5 mm cross-section, 3–4 mm neck, 3.5 mm parent artery diameter) and connected to a peristaltic pump delivering a physiological flow (250 mL/min) and pulsation rate (70/min). High-resolution (4 h long) 4D phase contrast flow quantification (4D pc-fq) MRI was used to directly assess the hemodynamics of the model. Dynamic MPI, MRI, and DSA were performed with contrast agent injections (3 mL volume in 3 s) through a proximally placed catheter. Results and Discussion 4D pc-fq measurements showed distinct pulsatile flow velocities (20–80 cm/s) as well as lower flow velocities and a vortex inside the aneurysm. All three dynamic methods (MPI, MRI, and DSA) also showed a clear pulsation pattern as well as delayed contrast agent dynamics within the aneurysm, which is most likely caused by the vortex within the aneurysm. Due to the high temporal resolution of MPI and DSA, it was possible to track the contrast agent bolus through the model and to estimate the average flow velocity (about 60 cm/s), which is in accordance with the 4D pc-fq measurements. Conclusions The ionizing radiation free, 4D high resolution MPI method is a very promising tool for imaging and characterization of hemodynamics in human. It carries the possibility of overcoming certain disadvantages of other modalities like considerably lower temporal resolution of dynamic MRI and limited 2D characteristics of DSA. Furthermore, additive manufacturing is the key for translating powerful pre-clinical techniques into the clinic. PMID:27494610

  3. High Resolution Spatial and Temporal Mapping of Traffic-Related Air Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Ganguly, Rajiv; Harbin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle traffic is one of the most significant emission sources of air pollutants in urban areas. While the influence of mobile source emissions is felt throughout an urban area, concentrations from mobile emissions can be highest near major roadways. At present, information regarding the spatial and temporal patterns and the share of pollution attributable to traffic-related air pollutants is limited, in part due to concentrations that fall sharply with distance from roadways, as well as the few monitoring sites available in cities. This study uses a newly developed dispersion model (RLINE) and a spatially and temporally resolved emissions inventory to predict hourly PM2.5 and NOx concentrations across Detroit (MI, USA) at very high spatial resolution. Results for annual averages and high pollution days show contrasting patterns, the need for spatially resolved analyses, and the limitations of surrogate metrics like proximity or distance to roads. Data requirements, computational and modeling issues are discussed. High resolution pollutant data enable the identification of pollutant “hotspots”, “project-level” analyses of transportation options, development of exposure measures for epidemiology studies, delineation of vulnerable and susceptible populations, policy analyses examining risks and benefits of mitigation options, and the development of sustainability indicators integrating environmental, social, economic and health information. PMID:25837345

  4. Comparison of spatio-temporal resolution of different flow measurement techniques for marine renewable energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Vincent; Wosnik, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy conversion devices are subject to a wide range of turbulent scales, either due to upstream bathymetry, obstacles and waves, or from wakes of upstream devices in array configurations. The commonly used, robust Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) are well suited for long term flow measurements in the marine environment, but are limited to low sampling rates due to their operational principle. The resulting temporal and spatial resolution is insufficient to measure all turbulence scales of interest to the device, e.g., ``blade-scale turbulence.'' The present study systematically characterizes the spatial and temporal resolution of ADCP, Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Measurements were conducted in a large cross section tow tank (3.7m × 2.4m) for several benchmark cases, including low and high turbulence intensity uniform flow as well as in the wake of a cylinder, to quantitatively investigate the flow scales which each of the instruments can resolve. The purpose of the study is to supply data for mathematical modeling to improve predictions from ADCP measurements, which can help lead to higher-fidelity energy resource assessment and more accurate device evaluation, including wake measurements. Supported by NSF-CBET grant 1150797.

  5. Ultra-High Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Microscopic Pathways of the Medial Temporal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Zeineh, Michael M.; Holdsworth, Samantha; Skare, Stefan; Atlas, Scott W.; Bammer, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Diseases involving the medial temporal lobes (MTL) such as Alzheimer’s disease and mesial temporal sclerosis pose an ongoing diagnostic challenge because of the difficulty in identifying conclusive imaging features, particularly in pre-clinical states. Abnormal neuronal connectivity may be present in the circuitry of the MTL, but current techniques cannot reliably detect those abnormalities. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown promise in defining putative abnormalities in connectivity, but DTI studies of the MTL performed to date have shown neither dramatic nor consistent differences across patient populations. Conventional DTI methodology provides an inadequate depiction of the complex microanatomy present in the medial temporal lobe because of a typically employed low isotropic resolution of 2.0–2.5mm, a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and echo-planar imaging (EPI) geometric distortions that are exacerbated by the inhomogeneous magnetic environment at the skull base. In this study, we pushed the resolving power of DTI to near-mm isotropic voxel size to achieve a detailed depiction of mesial temporal microstructure at 3T. High image fidelity and SNR at this resolution are achieved through several mechanisms: (1) acquiring multiple repetitions of the minimum field of view required for hippocampal coverage to boost SNR; (2) utilizing a single-refocused diffusion preparation to enhance SNR further; (3) performing a phase correction to reduce Rician noise; (4) minimizing distortion and maintaining left-right distortion symmetry with axial-plane parallel imaging; and (5) retaining anatomical and quantitative accuracy through the use of motion correction coupled with a higher-order eddy-current correction scheme. We combined this high-resolution methodology with a detailed segmentation of the MTL to identify tracks in all subjects that may represent the major pathways of the MTL, including the perforant pathway. Tractography performed on a subset of the data

  6. Role of High Resolution Computed Tomography in Evaluation of Pathologies of Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Thukral, Chuni Lal; Singh, Sunmeet; Sood, Arvinder Singh; Singh, Kunwarpal

    2015-01-01

    Background High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT), a modification of routine CT, provides a direct visual window in the temporal bone providing minute structural details. Purpose of the present study was to evaluate the normal variations, pathological processes (infections and congenital anomalies) and their extent involving the temporal bone along with their complications on HRCT and to correlate these imaging findings surgically, wherever available. Materials and Methods The prospective study included 50 patients who were referred to the radiology department with clinically suspected temporal bone or ear pathologies. After detailed clinical examination, the patients were subjected to high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) examination. The imaging findings were correlated with the surgical findings wherever available. The surgical findings were considered as final. Results From a total of 50 cases, 83.33% had cholesteatoma. The surgical and radiological findings showed a high level of sensitivity (89.29%) in the identification of cholesteatoma. HRCT provides a good sensitivity of 80.65% in the identification of changes to the ossicular chain despite the presence of surrounding soft tissue. HRCT was highly informative in identification of erosion of lateral semicircular canal. In diagnosis of facial canal dehiscence HRCT had a low sensitivity of 33.33%. In the evaluation of any congenital abnormality of the ear HRCT proved to be beneficial in depicting the anatomical details. Conclusion The clinical and radiological findings showed a high level sensitivity with intraoperative findings as regards to the presence of cholesteatoma, changes of the ossicular chain and erosion of the lateral semicircular canal. HRCT findings, in the treatment of any congenital abnormality of the ear were a good guide to the surgeon for planning and management. PMID:26500978

  7. Agro-hydrology and multi temporal high resolution remote sensing: toward an explicit spatial processes calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrant, S.; Gascoin, S.; Veloso, A.; Salmon-Monviola, J.; Claverie, M.; Rivalland, V.; Dedieu, G.; Demarez, V.; Ceschia, E.; Probst, J.-L.; Durand, P.; Bustillo, V.

    2014-07-01

    The recent and forthcoming availability of high resolution satellite image series offers new opportunities in agro-hydrological research and modeling. We investigated the perspective offered by improving the crop growth dynamic simulation using the distributed agro-hydrological model, Topography based Nitrogen transfer and Transformation (TNT2), using LAI map series derived from 105 Formosat-2 (F2) images during the period 2006-2010. The TNT2 model (Beaujouan et al., 2002), calibrated with discharge and in-stream nitrate fluxes for the period 1985-2001, was tested on the 2006-2010 dataset (climate, land use, agricultural practices, discharge and nitrate fluxes at the outlet). A priori agricultural practices obtained from an extensive field survey such as seeding date, crop cultivar, and fertilizer amount were used as input variables. Continuous values of LAI as a function of cumulative daily temperature were obtained at the crop field level by fitting a double logistic equation against discrete satellite-derived LAI. Model predictions of LAI dynamics with a priori input parameters showed an temporal shift with observed LAI profiles irregularly distributed in space (between field crops) and time (between years). By re-setting seeding date at the crop field level, we proposed an optimization method to minimize efficiently this temporal shift and better fit the crop growth against the spatial observations as well as crop production. This optimization of simulated LAI has a negligible impact on water budget at the catchment scale (1 mm yr-1 in average) but a noticeable impact on in-stream nitrogen fluxes (around 12%) which is of interest considering nitrate stream contamination issues and TNT2 model objectives. This study demonstrates the contribution of forthcoming high spatial and temporal resolution products of Sentinel-2 satellite mission in improving agro-hydrological modeling by constraining the spatial representation of crop productivity.

  8. The temporal resolution of neural codes: does response latency have a unique role?

    PubMed Central

    Oram, M W; Xiao, D; Dritschel, B; Payne, K R

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the nature of the neural code in non-human primate cortex and assesses the potential for neurons to carry two or more signals simultaneously. Neurophysiological recordings from visual and motor systems indicate that the evidence for a role for precisely timed spikes relative to other spike times (ca. 1-10 ms resolution) is inconclusive. This indicates that the visual system does not carry a signal that identifies whether the responses were elicited when the stimulus was attended or not. Simulations show that the absence of such a signal reduces, but does not eliminate, the increased discrimination between stimuli that are attended compared with when the stimuli are unattended. The increased accuracy asymptotes with increased gain control, indicating limited benefit from increasing attention. The absence of a signal identifying the attentional state under which stimuli were viewed can produce the greatest discrimination between attended and unattended stimuli. Furthermore, the greatest reduction in discrimination errors occurs for a limited range of gain control, again indicating that attention effects are limited. By contrast to precisely timed patterns of spikes where the timing is relative to other spikes, response latency provides a fine temporal resolution signal (ca. 10 ms resolution) that carries information that is unavailable from coarse temporal response measures. Changes in response latency and changes in response magnitude can give rise to different predictions for the patterns of reaction times. The predictions are verified, and it is shown that the standard method for distinguishing executive and slave processes is only valid if the representations of interest, as evidenced by the neural code, are known. Overall, the data indicate that the signalling evident in neural signals is restricted to the spike count and the precise times of spikes relative to stimulus onset (response latency). These coding issues have implications for our

  9. High temporal resolution and streak-free four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Shuai; Tang, Jie; Zambelli, Joseph; Nett, Brian; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2008-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been clinically used to verify patient position and to localize the target of treatment in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, when the chest and the upper abdomen are scanned, respiratory-induced motion blurring limits the utility of CBCT. In order to mitigate this blurring, respiratory-gated CBCT, i.e. 4D CBCT, was introduced. In 4D CBCT, the cone-beam projection data sets acquired during a gantry rotation are sorted into several respiratory phases. In these gated reconstructions, the number of projections for each respiratory phase is significantly reduced. Consequently, undersampling streaking artifacts are present in the reconstructed images, and the image contrast resolution is also significantly compromised. In this paper, we present a new method to simultaneously achieve both high temporal resolution (~100 ms) and streaking artifact-free image volumes in 4D CBCT. The enabling technique is a newly proposed image reconstruction method, i.e. prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS), which enables accurate image reconstruction using vastly undersampled cone-beam projections and a fully sampled prior image. Using PICCS, a streak-free image can be reconstructed from 10-20 cone-beam projections while the signal-to-noise ratio is determined by a denoising feature of the selected objective function and by the prior image, which is reconstructed using all of the acquired cone-beam projections. This feature of PICCS breaks the connection between the temporal resolution and streaking artifacts' level in 4D CBCT. Numerical simulations and experimental phantom studies have been conducted to validate the method.

  10. Changes in extreme precipitation and their dependence on temporal resolution and precipitation classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Peter; Haerter, Jan; Hagemann, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    At short temporal resolutions it has been found in the literature that the rate of increase of heavy precipitation with temperature may well exceed the increase of moisture holding capacity of the atmosphere, as described by the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. While this may point towards strong dynamical processes in the atmosphere leading to dramatic moisture convergence and subsequent rapid lifting of moist air, the explanation may also lie in a statistical superposition of distinct meteorological phenomena, namely the dominance of large-scale (frontal) precipitation at lower temperatures and in the winter months, and convective (thunderstorm like) events at high temperatures. A high resolution data set of precipitation measurements are used to study the scaling relations of probability distributions of precipitation intensity and the dependence on the temporal resolution of the data. We use a data set of five-minute resolution precipitation observations from six German stations, each with over 30 year long measurement records. In a first step, a cascade of averaging intervals is computed to obtain the behaviour of precipitation intensity from the instantaneous to the daily resolution. While the distribution of the shortest timescale displays a strict power-law tail, it acquires a more elaborate scaling when precipitation and dry periods are mixed at longer averaging intervals. The typical event size of all events are found to be between 30 and 60 minutes. Next, the precipitation data is classified into stratiform and convective precipitation types using the EECRA data base of WMO station synoptic observations, corresponding to the exact locations of our precipitation data. The synoptic observations are available at three hourly time steps, and the classification is assumed to be valid for one hour before and after the time of the observation. Statistical properties - such as the probability density function for precipitation intensities and event statistics and

  11. Development of a US Carbon Dioxide Emission Inventory with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, G. J.; Petron, G.; McKeen, S.; Capps, S.; Trainer, M.

    2006-12-01

    Power generation and transportation are responsible for about 40 percent and 33 percent, respectively, of the CO2 generated from US fossil fuel combustion. We are developing a US CO2 emission inventory of the power generation and on-road motor vehicle sectors that incorporates the high spatial and temporal resolution available in a variety of data sets. CO2 emission data with up to hourly resolution are measured by continuous emission monitors installed at most US power generation facilities. CO2 emissions from on-road motor vehicles are determined from annual Federal Highway Administration statistics on gasoline and diesel sales in every US state. These statewide data are spatially allocated to 4-km resolution using the EPA's National Emission Inventory estimates of NOx and CO emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel combustion. The inventory incorporating these highly resolved components is compared with other available bottom-up estimates of CO2 sources for the US. Comparisons are also made between this inventory and atmospheric measurements from air quality field studies during the past decade.

  12. Pushing spatial and temporal resolution for functional and diffusion MRI in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kamil; Xu, Junqian; Auerbach, Edward J.; Moeller, Steen; Vu, An; Duarte-Carvajalino, Julio M.; Lenglet, Christophe; Wu, Xiaoping; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre Francois; Strupp, John; Sapiro, Guillermo; De Martino, Federico; Wang, Dingxin; Harel, Noam; Garwood, Michael; Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David A.; Smith, Stephen M.; Miller, Karla L.; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Jbabdi, Saad; Andersson, Jesper L; Behrens, Timothy EJ; Glasser, Matthew F.; Van Essen, David; Yacoub, Essa

    2013-01-01

    The human connectome project (HCP) relies primarily on three complementary magnetic resonance (MR) methods. These are: 1) resting state functional MR imaging (rfMRI) which uses correlations in the temporal fluctuations in an fMRI time series to deduce ‘functional connectivity’; 2) diffusion imaging (dMRI), which provides the input for tractography algorithms used for the reconstruction of the complex axonal fiber architecture; and 3) task based fMRI (tfMRI), which is employed to identify functional parcellation in the human brain in order to assist analyses of data obtained with the first two methods. We describe technical improvements and optimization of these methods as well as instrumental choices that impact speed of acquisition of fMRI and dMRI images at 3 Tesla, leading to whole brain coverage with 2 mm isotropic resolution in 0.7 second for fMRI, and 1.25 mm isotropic resolution dMRI data for tractography analysis with three-fold reduction in total data acquisition time. Ongoing technical developments and optimization for acquisition of similar data at 7 Tesla magnetic field are also presented, targeting higher resolution, specificity of functional imaging signals, mitigation of the inhomogeneous radio frequency (RF) fields and power deposition. Results demonstrate that overall, these approaches represent a significant advance in MR imaging of the human brain to investigate brain function and structure. PMID:23702417

  13. Explore spatial-temporal relations: transient super-resolution with PMD sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chaosheng; Lin, Xing; Lin, Jingyu; Yan, Chenggang; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-11-01

    Transient imaging provides a direct view of how light travel in the scene, which leads to exciting applications such as looking around corners. Low-budget transient imagers, adapted from Time-of-Fight (ToF) cameras, reduce the barrier of entry for performing research of this new imaging modality. However, the image quality is far from satisfactory due to the limited resolution of PMD sensors. In this paper, we improve the resolution of transient images by modulating the illumination. We capture the scene under three linearly independent lighting conditions, and derive a theoretical model for the relationship between the time-profile and the corresponding 3D details of each pixel. Our key idea is that the light flight time in each pixel patch is proportional to the cross product of the illuminating direction and the surface normal. First we capture and reconstruct transient images by Fourier analysis at multiple illumination locations, and then fuse the data of acquired low-spatial resolution images to calculate the surface normal. Afterwards, we use an optimization procedure to split the pixels and finally enhance the image quality. We show that we can not only reveal the fine structure of the object but may also uncover the reflectance properties of different materials. We hope the idea of utilizing spatial-temporal relations will give new insights to the research and applications of transient imaging.

  14. Examining Spatio-Temporal Intensity-Frequency Variations in Extreme Monsoon Rainfall using High Resolution Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devak, M.; Rajendran, V.; C T, D.

    2015-12-01

    The study of extreme events has gained the attention of hydrologists in recent times. Though these events are rare, the effects are catastrophic. It is reported that the frequency of the occurrence of these events has increased in recent decades, and is attributed to the recent revelation of climate change. Numerous studies have pointed out significant changes in extremely heavy precipitation over India, using coarse resolution data. Though there are disagreements in the results and its spatial uniformity, all these studies emphasize the need of fine resolution analysis. Fine resolution analysis is necessary mainly due to the highly heterogeneous characteristics of Indian monsoon, and for the proper employment in flood hazard preparedness and water resources management. The present study aims to analyse the spatio-temporal variation and trends in the intensity and frequency of heavy precipitation during Indian monsoon using 0.25°×0.25° resolution gridded data for a period of 113 years (1901-2013). The exceedance threshold is fixed at 90th percentile of rainfall over 113 years and parameters are defined accordingly. The maximum intensity of each extreme rainfall episode of 30 year moving window has been modelled using Peak Over Threshold based Extreme Value Theory to compute return level (considered for intensity). In addition, the number of such episodes in a particular year has been termed as frequency. Non-parametric Mann-Kendall test has been carried out for both intensity and frequency, to compute the statistical trend. In addition, moving block bootstrap approach has been used to incorporate the serial correlation. The significance of the trend has been evaluated at different significance levels and finally, change in trend over last century has been examined.

  15. Geo-statistical model of Rainfall erosivity by using high temporal resolution precipitation data in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall erosivity (R-factor) is among the 6 input factors in estimating soil erosion risk by using the empirical Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). R-factor is a driving force for soil erosion modelling and potentially can be used in flood risk assessments, landslides susceptibility, post-fire damage assessment, application of agricultural management practices and climate change modelling. The rainfall erosivity is extremely difficult to model at large scale (national, European) due to lack of high temporal resolution precipitation data which cover long-time series. In most cases, R-factor is estimated based on empirical equations which take into account precipitation volume. The Rainfall Erosivity Database on the European Scale (REDES) is the output of an extensive data collection of high resolution precipitation data in the 28 Member States of the European Union plus Switzerland taking place during 2013-2014 in collaboration with national meteorological/environmental services. Due to different temporal resolutions of the data (5, 10, 15, 30, 60 minutes), conversion equations have been applied in order to homogenise the database at 30-minutes interval. The 1,541 stations included in REDES have been interpolated using the Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) model using as covariates the climatic data (monthly precipitation, monthly temperature, wettest/driest month) from WorldClim Database, Digital Elevation Model and latitude/longitude. GPR has been selected among other candidate models (GAM, Regression Kriging) due the best performance both in cross validation (R2=0.63) and in fitting dataset (R2=0.72). The highest uncertainty has been noticed in North-western Scotland, North Sweden and Finland due to limited number of stations in REDES. Also, in highlands such as Alpine arch and Pyrenees the diversity of environmental features forced relatively high uncertainty. The rainfall erosivity map of Europe available at 500m resolution plus the standard error

  16. Temporal resolution limit estimation of x-ray streak cameras using a CsI photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiang; Gu, Li; Zong, Fangke; Zhang, Jingjin; Yang, Qinlao

    2015-08-28

    A Monte Carlo model is developed and implemented to calculate the characteristics of x-ray induced secondary electron (SE) emission from a CsI photocathode used in an x-ray streak camera. Time distributions of emitted SEs are investigated with an incident x-ray energy range from 1 to 30 keV and a CsI thickness range from 100 to 1000 nm. Simulation results indicate that SE time distribution curves have little dependence on the incident x-ray energy and CsI thickness. The calculated time dispersion within the CsI photocathode is about 70 fs, which should be the temporal resolution limit of x-ray streak cameras that use CsI as the photocathode material.

  17. Noninvasive near infrared optical imaging of human brain function with subsecond temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Corballis, Paul M.

    1996-10-01

    Our understanding of human brain function can clearly benefit form neurophysiological techniques capable of providing dynamic maps of activity. A series of studies ins reviewed indicating that noninvasive near-infrared optical imaging methods can provide a unique combination of spatial an temporal resolution that could be used to derive dynamic maps of human brian activity. The noninvasive NIR optical data reviewed are based on the frequency-domain time- resolved measurement of photon migration parameters through brain tissue. These measurements are taken through the intact surface of the head. With these methods, tow distinct components of the optical response can be identified: the 'slow optical signal', presumably due to hemodynamic and metabolic changes, and the 'fast optical signal' occurring as early as 50 to 100 ms from stimulation, and probably due to neuronal activation.

  18. Ultrasonic Imaging of Propagation of Contraction and Relaxation in the Heart Walls at High Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiara, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Motonao

    2007-07-01

    Strain and strain rate imaging have been shown to be useful for the assessment of regional myocardial function. However, some of the mechanisms of transition in myocardial contraction/relaxation remain unclear. In this study, the RF echoes from the left ventricular (LV) wall were acquired in both the longitudinal-axis view and the apical view by scanning ultrasonic beams sparsely to improve the temporal resolution, and a frame rate of about 600 Hz was realized. The phased tracking method was applied to multiple points in the heart wall to estimate the strain rate. The spatial distribution of the strain rate measured about every 2 ms showed the continuous transition in the myocardium. In the apical view, the propagation speed of contraction from the apex to the base side in the interventricular septum was found to be about 0.8 m/s. These results indicate the potential of this method in the estimation of the physiological function of the myocardium.

  19. First radar measurements of ionospheric electric fields at sub-second temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Raymond A.; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Barnes, Robin; Ruohoniemi, J. Michael; Baker, Joseph; Talaat, Elsayed R.

    2008-02-01

    A new multipulse sounding technique currently being used at the Wallops Island and Goose Bay SuperDARN radars has produced significant improvements in the temporal resolution of Doppler velocity measurements from which plasma velocities and electric fields are determined. The new technique allows Doppler velocities to be determined from every 200 ms multipulse sequence transmitted by the radar (equivalent to a 5 Hz measurement rate). To our knowledge, this is the highest Doppler measurement rate that has ever been attained with ionospheric radars. Tests of the new technique with the Wallops radar and Ottawa magnetometer revealed bursts of subauroral electric and magnetic field pulsations with periods of 13-20 s during a substorm expansion phase. These results indicate that SuperDARN measurements can be used to study highly dynamic processes in the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system, including storm and substorm electrodynamics, short-period pulsations and short-term variability in Joule heating.

  20. Retrieving Crops Green Area Index from High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, A.; Demarez, V.; Ceschia, E.

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims at firstly evaluating the correspondence between Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) products from Formosat-2 (F2) and SPOT sensors and then to perform a comparative analysis of two methods for retrieving Green Area Index from high spatial and temporal resolution satellite data (F2 and SPOT). For this purpose, an empirical approach using NDVI plus field data and a Neural Network approach using the PROSAIL model are compared over four different crops: maize, soybean, sunflower and wheat. The performance of both methods were evaluated and compared with in-situ direct (destructive) and indirect (hemispherical photos) measurements. Results suggest better performances for the empirical approach (R², RMSE). Still the physically-based method leads to good results (R², RMSE). The latter seems to be more promising due to its portability and independence from field measurements. Therefore new perspectives to improve this approach are being envisaged.

  1. ePRISM: A case study in multiple proxy and mixed temporal resolution integration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Marci M.; Dowsett, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) Project, we present the ePRISM experiment designed I) to provide climate modelers with a reconstruction of an early Pliocene warm period that was warmer than the PRISM interval (similar to 3.3 to 3.0 Ma), yet still similar in many ways to modern conditions and 2) to provide an example of how best to integrate multiple-proxy sea surface temperature (SST) data from time series with varying degrees of temporal resolution and age control as we begin to build the next generation of PRISM, the PRISM4 reconstruction, spanning a constricted time interval. While it is possible to tie individual SST estimates to a single light (warm) oxygen isotope event, we find that the warm peak average of SST estimates over a narrowed time interval is preferential for paleoclimate reconstruction as it allows for the inclusion of more records of multiple paleotemperature proxies.

  2. Biases in southern hemisphere climate trends induced by coarsely specifying the temporal resolution of stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, R. R.; Marsh, D. R.; Smith, K. L.; Davis, S. M.; Polvani, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate models that do not include interactive middle atmosphere chemistry, such as most of those contributing to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, typically specify stratospheric ozone using monthly mean, zonal mean values and linearly interpolate to the time resolution of the model. We show that this method leads to significant biases in the simulated climate of the southern hemisphere (SH) over the late twentieth century. Previous studies have attributed similar biases in simulated SH climate change to the effect of the spatial smoothing of the specified ozone, i.e., to using zonal mean concentrations. We here show that the bias in climate trends due to undersampling of the rapid temporal changes in ozone during the seasonal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole is considerable and reaches all the way into the troposphere. Our results suggest that the bias can be substantially reduced by specifying daily ozone concentrations.

  3. Functional second harmonic generation microscopy probes molecular dynamics with high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Förderer, Moritz; Georgiev, Tihomir; Mosqueira, Matias; Fink, Rainer H. A.; Vogel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for label free ex vivo or in vivo imaging, widely used to investigate structure and organization of endogenous SHG emitting proteins such as myosin or collagen. Polarization resolved SHG microscopy renders supplementary information and is used to probe different molecular states. This development towards functional SHG microscopy is calling for new methods for high speed functional imaging of dynamic processes. In this work we present two approaches with linear polarized light and demonstrate high speed line scan measurements of the molecular dynamics of the motor protein myosin with a time resolution of 1 ms in mammalian muscle cells. Such a high speed functional SHG microscopy has high potential to deliver new insights into structural and temporal molecular dynamics under ex vivo or in vivo conditions. PMID:26977360

  4. Temporal resolution criterion for correctly simulating relativistic electron motion in a high-intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Arefiev, Alexey V.; Cochran, Ginevra E.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-15

    Particle-in-cell codes are now standard tools for studying ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions. Motivated by direct laser acceleration of electrons in sub-critical plasmas, we examine temporal resolution requirements that must be satisfied to accurately calculate electron dynamics in strong laser fields. Using the motion of a single electron in a perfect plane electromagnetic wave as a test problem, we show surprising deterioration of the numerical accuracy with increasing wave amplitude a{sub 0} for a given time-step. We go on to show analytically that the time-step must be significantly less than λ/ca{sub 0} to achieve good accuracy. We thus propose adaptive electron sub-cycling as an efficient remedy.

  5. Large-Scale, High-Resolution Neurophysiological Maps Underlying fMRI of Macaque Temporal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Papanastassiou, Alex M.; DiCarlo, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Maps obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are thought to reflect the underlying spatial layout of neural activity. However, previous studies have not been able to directly compare fMRI maps to high-resolution neurophysiological maps, particularly in higher level visual areas. Here, we used a novel stereo microfocal x-ray system to localize thousands of neural recordings across monkey inferior temporal cortex (IT), construct large-scale maps of neuronal object selectivity at subvoxel resolution, and compare those neurophysiology maps with fMRI maps from the same subjects. While neurophysiology maps contained reliable structure at the sub-millimeter scale, fMRI maps of object selectivity contained information at larger scales (>2.5 mm) and were only partly correlated with raw neurophysiology maps collected in the same subjects. However, spatial smoothing of neurophysiology maps more than doubled that correlation, while a variety of alternative transforms led to no significant improvement. Furthermore, raw spiking signals, once spatially smoothed, were as predictive of fMRI maps as local field potential signals. Thus, fMRI of the inferior temporal lobe reflects a spatially low-passed version of neurophysiology signals. These findings strongly validate the widespread use of fMRI for detecting large (>2.5 mm) neuronal domains of object selectivity but show that a complete understanding of even the most pure domains (e.g., faces vs nonface objects) requires investigation at fine scales that can currently only be obtained with invasive neurophysiological methods. PMID:24048850

  6. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Coverage of Earth from Commercial AVSTAR Systems in Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecompte, M. A.; Heaps, J. F.; Williams, F. H.

    Imaging the earth from Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) allows frequent updates of environmental conditions within an observable hemisphere at time and spatial scales appropriate to the most transient observable terrestrial phenomena. Coverage provided by current GEO Meteorological Satellites (METSATS) fails to fully exploit this advantage due primarily to obsolescent technology and also institutional inertia. With the full benefit of GEO based imaging unrealized, rapidly evolving phenomena, occurring at the smallest spatial and temporal scales that frequently have significant environmental impact remain unobserved. These phenomena may be precursors for the most destructive natural processes that adversely effect society. Timely distribution of information derived from "real-time" observations thus may provide opportunities to mitigate much of the damage to life and property that would otherwise occur. AstroVision International's AVStar Earth monitoring system is designed to overcome the current limitations if GEO Earth coverage and to provide real time monitoring of changes to the Earth's complete atmospheric, land and marine surface environments including fires, volcanic events, lightning and meteoritic events on a "live," true color, and multispectral basis. The understanding of severe storm dynamics and its coupling to the earth's electro-sphere will be greatly enhanced by observations at unprecedented sampling frequencies and spatial resolution. Better understanding of these natural phenomena and AVStar operational real-time coverage may also benefit society through improvements in severe weather prediction and warning. AstroVision's AVStar system, designed to provide this capability with the first of a constellation of GEO- based commercial environmental monitoring satellites to be launched in late 2003 will be discussed, including spatial and temporal resolution, spectral coverage with applications and an inventory of the potential benefits to society

  7. Decoding Multiple Sound Categories in the Human Temporal Cortex Using High Resolution fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengqing; Wang, Ji-Ping; Kim, Jieun; Parrish, Todd; Wong, Patrick C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Perception of sound categories is an important aspect of auditory perception. The extent to which the brain’s representation of sound categories is encoded in specialized subregions or distributed across the auditory cortex remains unclear. Recent studies using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of brain activations have provided important insights into how the brain decodes perceptual information. In the large existing literature on brain decoding using MVPA methods, relatively few studies have been conducted on multi-class categorization in the auditory domain. Here, we investigated the representation and processing of auditory categories within the human temporal cortex using high resolution fMRI and MVPA methods. More importantly, we considered decoding multiple sound categories simultaneously through multi-class support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (MSVM-RFE) as our MVPA tool. Results show that for all classifications the model MSVM-RFE was able to learn the functional relation between the multiple sound categories and the corresponding evoked spatial patterns and classify the unlabeled sound-evoked patterns significantly above chance. This indicates the feasibility of decoding multiple sound categories not only within but across subjects. However, the across-subject variation affects classification performance more than the within-subject variation, as the across-subject analysis has significantly lower classification accuracies. Sound category-selective brain maps were identified based on multi-class classification and revealed distributed patterns of brain activity in the superior temporal gyrus and the middle temporal gyrus. This is in accordance with previous studies, indicating that information in the spatially distributed patterns may reflect a more abstract perceptual level of representation of sound categories. Further, we show that the across-subject classification performance can be significantly improved by averaging the f

  8. Sensitivity of snow models to the spatial and temporal resolution of meteorological forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzago, Silvia; von Hardenberg, Jost; Palazzi, Elisa; Cassardo, Claudio; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Provenzale, Antonello

    2014-05-01

    The simulation of snowpack dynamics in high elevation environments is facing the problem of the uncertainty and the spatial representativeness of the input data, owing to a high spatial variability of meteorological parameters in complex topography. In this study we evaluate the land-surface model UTOPIA (University of TOrino land Process Interaction in Atmosphere) single-layer snow scheme in order to assess its capability in reproducing the snow dynamics, i.e. the accumulation/melting processes and the snow depth temporal variability, and we compare it to the snow module of the Hydrology-Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchange over Land (HTESSEL) of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The validation is performed using high-quality datasets provided by the two experimental snow-meteorological observation sites in Torgnon (2150 m a.s.l.) and Col de Porte (1325 m a.s.l.), located in the Italian and French Alps respectively. We assess the sensitivity of the models to the spatial and temporal resolution of the input data, comparing the case in which high-quality and high-frequency data are provided by individual stations at specific observation sites, as those employed in this study for validation, to the case in which data are provided by gridded datasets based on the spatial-temporal interpolation of surface station measurements. Interpolation, in its various forms, represents a source of uncertainty in the final gridded product, thus we evaluate the quality of the models estimates in case of increasing uncertainty in the input data.

  9. Decoding multiple sound categories in the human temporal cortex using high resolution fMRI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengqing; Wang, Ji-Ping; Kim, Jieun; Parrish, Todd; Wong, Patrick C M

    2015-01-01

    Perception of sound categories is an important aspect of auditory perception. The extent to which the brain's representation of sound categories is encoded in specialized subregions or distributed across the auditory cortex remains unclear. Recent studies using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of brain activations have provided important insights into how the brain decodes perceptual information. In the large existing literature on brain decoding using MVPA methods, relatively few studies have been conducted on multi-class categorization in the auditory domain. Here, we investigated the representation and processing of auditory categories within the human temporal cortex using high resolution fMRI and MVPA methods. More importantly, we considered decoding multiple sound categories simultaneously through multi-class support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (MSVM-RFE) as our MVPA tool. Results show that for all classifications the model MSVM-RFE was able to learn the functional relation between the multiple sound categories and the corresponding evoked spatial patterns and classify the unlabeled sound-evoked patterns significantly above chance. This indicates the feasibility of decoding multiple sound categories not only within but across subjects. However, the across-subject variation affects classification performance more than the within-subject variation, as the across-subject analysis has significantly lower classification accuracies. Sound category-selective brain maps were identified based on multi-class classification and revealed distributed patterns of brain activity in the superior temporal gyrus and the middle temporal gyrus. This is in accordance with previous studies, indicating that information in the spatially distributed patterns may reflect a more abstract perceptual level of representation of sound categories. Further, we show that the across-subject classification performance can be significantly improved by averaging the f

  10. Multi-resolution analysis of high density spatial and temporal cloud inhomogeneity fields from HOPE campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Madhavan, Bomidi; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Clouds are the most complex structures in both spatial and temporal scales of the Earth's atmosphere that effect the downward surface reaching fluxes and thus contribute to large uncertainty in the global radiation budget. Within the framework of High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high density network of 99 pyranometer stations was set up around Jülich, Germany (~ 10 × 12 km2 area) during April to July 2013 to capture the small-scale variability in cloud induced radiation fields at the surface. In this study, we perform multi-resolution analysis of the downward solar irradiance variability at the surface from the pyranometer network to investigate the dependence of temporal and spatial averaging scales on the variance and spatial correlation for different cloud regimes. Preliminary results indicate that correlation is strongly scale-dependent where as the variance is dependent on the length of averaging period. Implications of our findings will be useful for quantifying the effect of spatial collocation while validating the satellite inferred solar irradiance estimates, and also to explore the link between cloud structure and radiation. We will present the details of our analysis and results.

  11. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y L; Yu, D L; Liu, L; Ida, K; von Hellermann, M; Cao, J Y; Sun, A P; Ma, Q; Chen, W J; Liu, Yi; Yan, L W; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ∼1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8-7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode).

  12. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L.; Liu, L.; Ida, K.; von Hellermann, M.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ˜1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8-7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode).

  13. Monitoring with high temporal resolution to search for optical transients in the wide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Ivanov, Evgeny; Karpov, Sergey; Katkova, Elena; Pozanenko, Alexei; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Greco, Giuseppe; Molinari, Emilio; Covino, Stefano

    2008-02-01

    In order to detect and investigate short stochastic optical flares from a number of variable astrophysical objects (GRBs, SNs, flare stars, CVs, X-Ray binaries) of unknown localizations as well as near-earth objects (NEOs), both natural and artificial, it is necessary to perform the systematic monitoring of large regions of the sky with high temporal resolution. Here we describe the design of a system able to perform such a task, which consists of a wide-field camera with high time resolution able to detect and classify the transient events on a subsecond time scale, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their detailed investigation. In a last few years we've created the prototype FAVOR wide-field camera, placed at North Caucasus near Russian 6-m telescope, and a complete two-telescope complex TORTOREM, combining TORTORA wide-field camera with REM robotic telescope and placed at La Silla ESO observatory. Its technical parameters and first results of operation are described.

  14. A novel sensor to map auxin response and distribution at high spatio-temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Brunoud, Géraldine; Wells, Darren M; Oliva, Marina; Larrieu, Antoine; Mirabet, Vincent; Burrow, Amy H; Beeckman, Tom; Kepinski, Stefan; Traas, Jan; Bennett, Malcolm J; Vernoux, Teva

    2012-01-15

    Auxin is a key plant morphogenetic signal but tools to analyse dynamically its distribution and signalling during development are still limited. Auxin perception directly triggers the degradation of Aux/IAA repressor proteins. Here we describe a novel Aux/IAA-based auxin signalling sensor termed DII-VENUS that was engineered in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The VENUS fast maturing form of yellow fluorescent protein was fused in-frame to the Aux/IAA auxin-interaction domain (termed domain II; DII) and expressed under a constitutive promoter. We initially show that DII-VENUS abundance is dependent on auxin, its TIR1/AFBs co-receptors and proteasome activities. Next, we demonstrate that DII-VENUS provides a map of relative auxin distribution at cellular resolution in different tissues. DII-VENUS is also rapidly degraded in response to auxin and we used it to visualize dynamic changes in cellular auxin distribution successfully during two developmental responses, the root gravitropic response and lateral organ production at the shoot apex. Our results illustrate the value of developing response input sensors such as DII-VENUS to provide high-resolution spatio-temporal information about hormone distribution and response during plant growth and development.

  15. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L. Liu, L.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong; Ida, K.; Hellermann, M. von

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ~1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8–7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode)

  16. Optophysiological Approach to Resolve Neuronal Action Potentials with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Stéphane; Côté, Daniel; De Koninck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm). Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser-scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (>10% of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization) and time response (sub millisecond) of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs) even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive, and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms) resolution and high spatial (μm) resolution. PMID:22016723

  17. Searching for fast optical transients by means of a wide-field monitoring observations with high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Perkov, A.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  18. Estimating and Mapping Urban Impervious Surfaces: Reflection on Spectral, Spatial, and Temporal Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Q.

    2007-12-01

    Impervious surface is a key indicator of urban environmental quality and urbanization degree. Therefore, estimation and mapping of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted more and more attention recently by using remote sensing digital images. In this paper, satellite images with various spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions are employed to examine the effects of these remote sensing data characteristics on mapping accuracy of urban impervious surfaces. The study area was the city proper of Indianapolis (Marion County), Indiana, United States. Linear spectral mixture analysis was applied to generate high albedo, low albedo, vegetation, and soil fraction images (endmembers) from the satellite images, and impervious surfaces were then estimated by adding high albedo and low albedo fraction images. A comparison of EO-1 ALI (multispectral) and Hyperion (hyperspectral) images indicates that the Hyperion image was more effective in discerning low albedo surface materials, especially the spectral bands in the mid-infrared region. Linear spectral mixing modeling was found more useful for medium spatial resolution images, such as Landsat TM/ETM+ and ASTER images, due to the existence of a large amount of mixed pixels in the urban areas. The model, however, may not be suitable for high spatial resolution images, such as IKONOS images, because of less influence from the mixing pixel. The shadow problem in the high spatial resolution images, caused by tall buildings and large tree crowns, is a challenge in impervious surface extraction. Alternative image processing algorithms such as decision tree classifier may be more appropriate to achieve high mapping accuracy. For mid-latitude cities, seasonal vegetation phenology has a significant effect on the spectral response of terrestrial features, and therefore, image analysis must take into account of this environmental characteristic. Three ASTER images, acquired on April 5, 2004, June 16, 2001, and October 3, 2000

  19. Estimation of crops biomass and evapotranspiration from high spatial and temporal resolutions remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, Martin; Demarez, Valérie; Duchemin, Benoît.; Ceschia, Eric; Hagolle, Olivier; Ducrot, Danielle; Keravec, Pascal; Beziat, Pierre; Dedieu, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Carbon and water cycles are closely related to agricultural activities. Agriculture has been indeed identified by IPCC 2007 report as one of the options to sequester carbon in soil. Concerning the water resources, their consumptions by irrigated crops are called into question in view of demographic pressure. In the prospect of an assessment of carbon production and water consumption, the use of crop models at a regional scale is a challenging issue. The recent availability of high spatial resolution (10 m) optical sensors associated to high temporal resolution (1 day) such as FORMOSAT-2 and, in the future, Venµs and SENTINEL-2 will offer new perspectives for agricultural monitoring. In this context, the objective of this work is to show how multi-temporal satellite observations acquired at high spatial resolution are useful for a regional monitoring of following crops biophysical variables: leaf area index (LAI), aboveground biomass (AGB) and evapotranspiration (ET). This study focuses on three summer crops dominant in South-West of France: maize, sunflower and soybean. A unique images data set (82 FORMOSAT-2 images over four consecutive years, 2006-2009) was acquired for this project. The experimental data set includes LAI and AGB measurements over eight agricultural fields. Two fields were intensively monitored where ET flux were measured with a 30 minutes time step using eddy correlation methods. The modelisation approach is based on FAO-56 method coupled with a vegetation functioning model based on Monteith theory: the SAFY model [5]. The model operates at a daily time step model to provide estimates of plant characteristics (LAI, AGB), soil conditions (soil water content) and water use (ET). As a key linking variable, LAI is deduced from FORMOSAT-2 reflectances images, and then introduced into the SAFY model to provide spatial and temporal estimates of these biophysical variables. Most of the SAFY parameters are crop related and have been fixed according to

  20. From runoff to rainfall: inverse rainfall-runoff modelling in a high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrnegger, M.; Nachtnebel, H. P.; Schulz, K.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel technique to calculate mean areal rainfall in a high temporal resolution of 60 min on the basis of an inverse conceptual rainfall-runoff model and runoff observations. Rainfall exhibits a large spatio-temporal variability, especially in complex alpine terrain. Additionally, the density of the monitoring network in mountainous regions is low and measurements are subjected to major errors, which lead to significant uncertainties in areal rainfall estimates. The most reliable hydrological information available refers to runoff, which in the presented work is used as input for a rainfall-runoff model. Thereby a conceptual, HBV-type model is embedded in an iteration algorithm. For every time step a rainfall value is determined, which results in a simulated runoff value that corresponds to the observation. To verify the existence, uniqueness and stability of the inverse rainfall, numerical experiments with synthetic hydrographs as inputs into the inverse model are carried out successfully. The application of the inverse model with runoff observations as driving input is performed for the Krems catchment (38.4 km2), situated in the northern Austrian Alpine foothills. Compared to station observations in the proximity of the catchment, the inverse rainfall sums and time series have a similar goodness of fit, as the independent INCA rainfall analysis of Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG). Compared to observations, the inverse rainfall estimates show larger rainfall intensities. Numerical experiments show, that cold state conditions in the inverse model do not influence the inverse rainfall estimates, when considering an adequate spin-up time. The application of the inverse model is a feasible approach to obtain improved estimates of mean areal rainfall. These can be used to enhance interpolated rainfall fields, e.g. for the estimation of rainfall correction factors, the parameterisation of elevation dependency or the

  1. Monitoring powdery mildew of winter wheat by using moderate resolution multi-temporal satellite imagery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingcheng; Pu, Ruiliang; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jihua; Huang, Wenjiang; Yang, Guijun

    2014-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most serious diseases that have a significant impact on the production of winter wheat. As an effective alternative to traditional sampling methods, remote sensing can be a useful tool in disease detection. This study attempted to use multi-temporal moderate resolution satellite-based data of surface reflectances in blue (B), green (G), red (R) and near infrared (NIR) bands from HJ-CCD (CCD sensor on Huanjing satellite) to monitor disease at a regional scale. In a suburban area in Beijing, China, an extensive field campaign for disease intensity survey was conducted at key growth stages of winter wheat in 2010. Meanwhile, corresponding time series of HJ-CCD images were acquired over the study area. In this study, a number of single-stage and multi-stage spectral features, which were sensitive to powdery mildew, were selected by using an independent t-test. With the selected spectral features, four advanced methods: mahalanobis distance, maximum likelihood classifier, partial least square regression and mixture tuned matched filtering were tested and evaluated for their performances in disease mapping. The experimental results showed that all four algorithms could generate disease maps with a generally correct distribution pattern of powdery mildew at the grain filling stage (Zadoks 72). However, by comparing these disease maps with ground survey data (validation samples), all of the four algorithms also produced a variable degree of error in estimating the disease occurrence and severity. Further, we found that the integration of MTMF and PLSR algorithms could result in a significant accuracy improvement of identifying and determining the disease intensity (overall accuracy of 72% increased to 78% and kappa coefficient of 0.49 increased to 0.59). The experimental results also demonstrated that the multi-temporal satellite images have a great potential in crop diseases mapping at a regional scale.

  2. Interpretation of tropospheric ozone variability in data with different vertical and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Disterhoft, P.; Johnson, B. J.; Rieder, H. E.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W.

    2012-12-01

    This work attributes tropospheric ozone variability derived from the ground-based Dobson and Brewer Umkehr measurements and from ozone sonde data to local sources and transport. It assesses capability and limitations in both types of measurements that are often used to analyze long- and short-term variability in tropospheric ozone time series. We will address the natural and instrument-related contribution to the variability found in both Umkehr and sonde data. Validation of Umkehr methods is often done by intercomparisons against independent ozone measuring techniques such as ozone sounding. We will use ozone-sounding in its original and AK-smoothed vertical profiles for assessment of ozone inter-annual variability over Boulder, CO. We will discuss possible reasons for differences between different ozone measuring techniques and its effects on the derived ozone trends. Next to standard evaluation techniques we utilize a STL-decomposition method to address temporal variability and trends in the Boulder Umkehr data. Further, we apply a statistical modeling approach to the ozone data set to attribute ozone variability to individual driving forces associated with natural and anthropogenic causes. To this aim we follow earlier work applying a backward selection method (i.e., a stepwise elimination procedure out of a set of total 44 explanatory variables) to determine those explanatory variables which contribute most significantly to the observed variability. We will present also some results associated with completeness (sampling rate) of the existing data sets. We will also use MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications) re-analysis results selected for Boulder location as a transfer function in understanding of the effects that the temporal sampling and vertical resolution bring into trend and ozone variability analysis. Analyzing intra-annual variability in ozone measurements over Boulder, CO, in relation to the upper tropospheric

  3. Monitoring Powdery Mildew of Winter Wheat by Using Moderate Resolution Multi-Temporal Satellite Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingcheng; Pu, Ruiliang; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jihua; Huang, Wenjiang; Yang, Guijun

    2014-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most serious diseases that have a significant impact on the production of winter wheat. As an effective alternative to traditional sampling methods, remote sensing can be a useful tool in disease detection. This study attempted to use multi-temporal moderate resolution satellite-based data of surface reflectances in blue (B), green (G), red (R) and near infrared (NIR) bands from HJ-CCD (CCD sensor on Huanjing satellite) to monitor disease at a regional scale. In a suburban area in Beijing, China, an extensive field campaign for disease intensity survey was conducted at key growth stages of winter wheat in 2010. Meanwhile, corresponding time series of HJ-CCD images were acquired over the study area. In this study, a number of single-stage and multi-stage spectral features, which were sensitive to powdery mildew, were selected by using an independent t-test. With the selected spectral features, four advanced methods: mahalanobis distance, maximum likelihood classifier, partial least square regression and mixture tuned matched filtering were tested and evaluated for their performances in disease mapping. The experimental results showed that all four algorithms could generate disease maps with a generally correct distribution pattern of powdery mildew at the grain filling stage (Zadoks 72). However, by comparing these disease maps with ground survey data (validation samples), all of the four algorithms also produced a variable degree of error in estimating the disease occurrence and severity. Further, we found that the integration of MTMF and PLSR algorithms could result in a significant accuracy improvement of identifying and determining the disease intensity (overall accuracy of 72% increased to 78% and kappa coefficient of 0.49 increased to 0.59). The experimental results also demonstrated that the multi-temporal satellite images have a great potential in crop diseases mapping at a regional scale. PMID:24691435

  4. Pan-Tropical Forest Mapping by Exploiting Textures of Multi-Temporal High Resolution SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, R.; Eckardt, R.; Richter, N.; Schmullius, C.

    2012-12-01

    radar images were processed using an operational processing chain that includes radiometric transformation, noise reduction, and georeferencing of the SAR data. In places with pronounced topography both satellites were used as single pass interferometer to derive a digital surface model in order to perform an orthorectification followed by a topographic normalization of the SAR backscatter values. As prescribed by the FAO, the final segment-based classification algorithm was fed by multi-temporal backscatter information, a set of textural features, and information on the degree of coherence between the multi-temporal acquisitions. Validation with available high resolution optical imagery suggests that the produced forest maps possess an overall accuracy of 75 percent or higher.

  5. Implications of the Temporal Resolution of Fire Emissions on Direct and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmenov, A.; Barahona, D.; Kim, K. M.; da Silva, A.; Colarco, P. R.; Govindaraju, R.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of particulates and trace gases and a major element of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Well constrained emissions from open vegetation fires in both time and space are needed to model direct and indirect effect of biomass burning aerosols, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere and perform credible integrated earth system analysis, climate and air pollution studies. However representing fires in regional and global numerical models is challenging because of the subgrid scales at which fire processes operate. An example of apparent discrepancy in scales is the use of monthly- or seasonal-mean fire emissions which given the stochastic nature of fires means that at certain spatial scales the temporal behavior of emissions becomes influenced by individual fire events and becomes more variable. The present study aims at investigating the impact of monthly-mean fire emissions on direct and indirect aerosol effects. Key element of our work is the use of fire radiative power (FRP) based emissions and a global fully interactive cloud-aerosol-radiation modeling system. We used the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) with two moment cloud microphysics and explicit cloud droplet activation and ice nucleation. GEOS-5 is coupled with an online version of the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. Biomass burning emissions used in this study are from the Quick Fire Emission Dataset (QFED) available daily at up to 0.1 degrees horizontal resolution. We performed experiments with daily-mean and monthly-mean QFED emissions at two degree horizontal resolutions and report differences in aerosol burden and radiative forcing, for example we found that regional differences of clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere in MAM and JJA can be as high as 4 Wm-2 and 3 Wm-2, respectively.

  6. High Resolution Satellite Multi-Temporal Interferometry for Landslide and Subsidence Hazard Assessment: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowski, J.; Bovenga, F.; Nitti, D. O.; Nutricato, R.; Chiaradia, M.

    2014-12-01

    The new and planned satellite missions can not only provide global capacity for research-oriented and practical applications such as mapping, characterizing and monitoring of areas affected by slope and subsidence hazards, but also offer a possibility to push the research frontier and prompt innovative detailed-scale studies on ground movement dynamics and processes. Among a number of emerging space-based remote sensing techniques, synthetic aperture radar (SAR), multi-temporal interferometry (MTI) seems the most promising for important innovation in landslide and subsidence hazards assessment and monitoring. MTI is appealing to those concerned with terrain instability hazards because it can provide very precise information on slow displacements of the ground surface over vast areas with limited vegetation cover. Although MTI techniques are considered to have already reached the operational level, it is apparent that in both research and practice we are at present only beginning to benefit from the high-resolution imagery that is currently acquired by the new generation radar satellites (e.g. COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X). In this overview we illustrate the great potential of high resolution MTI and explain what this technique can deliver in terms of detection and monitoring of slope and subsidence hazards. This is done by considering different areas characterized by a wide range of geomorphic, climatic and vegetation conditions, and presenting selected case study examples of local to regional scale MTI applications from Europe, China and Haiti. We envision that the current approach to assessment of hazard can be transformed by capitalizing more on the presently underexploited advantage of the MTI technique, i.e. the capability to provide regularly spatially-dense quantitative information for large areas currently unaffected by instabilities, but where the terrain geomorphology and geology may indicate potential for future ground failures.

  7. Detecting and tracking dust outbreaks by using high temporal resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannazzaro, Filomena; Marchese, Francesco; Filizzola, Carolina; Tramutoli, Valerio; Pergola, Nicola; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Paciello, Rossana

    2013-04-01

    A dust storm is a meteorological phenomenon generated by the action of wind, mainly in arid and semi-arid regions of the planet, particularly at subtropical latitudes. Dust outbreaks, of which frequency increases from year to year concurrently with climate change and reduction of moisture in the soil, may strongly impact on human activity as well as on environment and climate. Efficient early warning systems are then required to monitor them and to mitigate their effects. Satellite remote sensing thanks to a global coverage, to a high frequency of observation and low costs of data represents an important tool for studying and monitoring dust outbreaks. Several techniques have been then proposed to detect and monitor these phenomena from space, analyzing signal in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, methods based on the reverse absorption behaviour of silicate particles in comparison with ice crystals and water droplets, at 11 and 12 micron wavelengths, have been largely employed for detecting dust, although some important issues both in terms of reliability and sensitivity still remain. In this work, an optimized configuration of an innovative algorithm for dust detection, based on the largely accepted Robust Satellite Techniques (RST) multi-temporal approach, is then presented. This optimized algorithm configuration is tested here on Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) data, analyzing some important dust events affecting Mediterranean basin in recent years. Results of this study, assessed on the basis of independent satellite-based aerosol products, generated by using the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, show that when the spectral resolution of SEVIRI is properly exploited dust and meteorological clouds may be better discriminated. These results encourage further experimentations of the proposed

  8. High temporal resolution tracing of xylem CO2 transport in oak trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Jasper; Ingrisch, Johannes; Bahn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation defines the flows of C between plant organs and their storage pools and metabolic processes and is therefore considered as an important determinant of forest C budgets and their responses to climate change. In trees, assimilates derived from leaf photosynthesis are transported via the phloem to above- and belowground sink tissues, where partitioning between growth, storage, and respiration occurs. At the same time, root- and aboveground respired CO2 can be dissolved in water and transported in the xylem tissue, thereby representing a C flux of large magnitude whose role in C allocation yet is unresolved. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the stem base of five year old potted oak (Quercus rubra) trees as a surrogate for respired CO2 to investigate the role of respired CO2 transport in trees in C allocation. We used high-resolution laser-based measurements of the isotopic composition of stem and soil CO2 efflux combined with stem gas probes to monitor the transport of 13C label. The high enrichment of the gas probes in the stem at the bottom of the canopy showed that the label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and lost to the atmosphere at stem level, as was observed using the stem CO2 efflux laser-based measurements. This study is the first to show results from tracing xylem CO2 transport in trees at high temporal resolution using a 13C labeling approach. Moreover, they extend results from previous studies on internal CO2 transport in species with high transpiration rates like poplar to species with lower transpiration rates like oak. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the current concepts of the tree C allocation need to be revisited, as they show that current gas exchange approach to estimating above- and belowground autotrophic respiration is inadequate.

  9. The Medial Temporal Lobe and the Left Inferior Prefrontal Cortex Jointly Support Interference Resolution in Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztekin, Ilke; Curtis, Clayton E.; McElree, Brian

    2009-01-01

    During working memory retrieval, proactive interference (PI) can be induced by semantic similarity and episodic familiarity. Here, we used fMRI to test hypotheses about the role of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and the medial temporal lobe (MTL) regions in successful resolution of PI. Participants studied six-word lists and responded to a…

  10. Improving spatio-temporal resolution of infrared images to detect thermal activity of defect at the surface of inorganic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvec, Guillaume; Robin, Eric; Le Cam, Jean-Benoît; Sangleboeuf, Jean-Christophe; Lucas, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a noise suppression methodology to improve the spatio-temporal resolution of infrared images. The methodology is divided in two steps. The first one consists in removing the noise from the temporal signal at each pixel. Three basic temporal filters are considered for this purpose: average filter, cost function minimization (FIT) and short time Fast Fourier Transform approach (STFFT). But while this step effectively reduces the temporal signal noise at each pixel, the infrared images may still appear noisy. This is due to a random distribution of a residual offset value of pixels signal. Hence in the second step, the residual offset is identified by considering thermal images for which no mechanical loading is applied. In this case, the temperature variation field is homogeneous and the value of temperature variation at each pixel is theoretically equal to zero. The method is first tested on synthetic images built from infrared computer-generated images combined with experimental noise. The results demonstrate that this approach permits to keep the spatial resolution of infrared images equal to 1 pixel. The methodology is then applied to characterize thermal activity of a defect at the surface of inorganic glass submitted to cyclic mechanical loading. The three basic temporal filters are quantitatively compared and contrasted. Results obtained demonstrate that, contrarily to a basic spatio-temporal approach, the denoising method proposed is suitable to characterize low thermal activity combined to strong spatial gradients induced by cyclic heterogeneous deformations.

  11. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  12. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible.

  13. Remote-controlling chemical reactions by light: towards chemistry with high spatio-temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Göstl, Robert; Senf, Antti; Hecht, Stefan

    2014-03-21

    The foundation of the chemical enterprise has always been the creation of new molecular entities, such as pharmaceuticals or polymeric materials. Over the past decades, this continuing effort of designing compounds with improved properties has been complemented by a strong effort to render their preparation (more) sustainable by implementing atom as well as energy economic strategies. Therefore, synthetic chemistry is typically concerned with making specific bonds and connections in a highly selective and efficient manner. However, to increase the degree of sophistication and expand the scope of our work, we argue that the modern aspiring chemist should in addition be concerned with attaining (better) control over when and where chemical bonds are being made or broken. For this purpose, photoswitchable molecular systems, which allow for external modulation of chemical reactions by light, are being developed and in this review we are covering the current state of the art of this exciting new field. These "remote-controlled synthetic tools" provide a remarkable opportunity to perform chemical transformations with high spatial and temporal resolution and should therefore allow regulating biological processes as well as material and device performance.

  14. Determination of the temporal resolution required for the HEDR dose code

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the radiation doses that may have-been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 008) examined the potential for changes in the uncertainty distributions of potential doses from releases in the year 1945 as a function of temporal resolution of the intermediate data storage. This study builds on the work initiated in the fifth scoping calculation, which addressed the uncertainty of the dose estimates at a point; the sixth calculation, which extrapolated the doses throughout the atmospheric transport domain; and the seventh, which evaluated the spatial scales across the domain. A projection of dose to representative individuals throughout the proposed HEDR atmospheric transport domain was prepared on the basis of the HEDR source term. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to iodine-131 thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and ingestion of cow's milk.

  15. Action potential propagation imaged with high temporal resolution near-infrared video microscopy and polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Schei, Jennifer L.; McCluskey, Matthew D.; Foust, Amanda J.; Yao, Xin-Cheng; Rector, David M.

    2008-01-01

    To identify the neural constituents responsible for generating polarized light changes, we created spatially resolved movies of propagating action potentials from stimulated lobster leg nerves using both reflection and transmission imaging modalities. Changes in light polarization are associated with membrane depolarization and provide sub-millisecond temporal resolution. Typically, signals are detected using light transmitted through tissue; however, because we eventually would like to apply polarization techniques in-vivo, reflected light is required. In transmission mode, the optical signal was largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. In support of these observations, an optical model of the tissue showed that the outer sheath is more reflective while the inner nerve bundle is more transmissive. In order to apply these techniques in-vivo, we must consider that brain tissue does not have a regular orientation of processes as in the lobster nerve. We tested the effect of randomizing cell orientation by tying the nerve in an overhand knot prior to imaging, producing polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. PMID:18272402

  16. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible. PMID:27391526

  17. Measurement of DNA Translocation Dynamics in a Solid-State Nanopore at 100 ns Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Shekar, Siddharth; Niedzwiecki, David J; Chien, Chen-Chi; Ong, Peijie; Fleischer, Daniel A; Lin, Jianxun; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Drndić, Marija; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2016-07-13

    Despite the potential for nanopores to be a platform for high-bandwidth study of single-molecule systems, ionic current measurements through nanopores have been limited in their temporal resolution by noise arising from poorly optimized measurement electronics and large parasitic capacitances in the nanopore membranes. Here, we present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) nanopore (CNP) amplifier capable of low noise recordings at an unprecedented 10 MHz bandwidth. When integrated with state-of-the-art solid-state nanopores in silicon nitride membranes, we achieve an SNR of greater than 10 for ssDNA translocations at a measurement bandwidth of 5 MHz, which represents the fastest ion current recordings through nanopores reported to date. We observe transient features in ssDNA translocation events that are as short as 200 ns, which are hidden even at bandwidths as high as 1 MHz. These features offer further insights into the translocation kinetics of molecules entering and exiting the pore. This platform highlights the advantages of high-bandwidth translocation measurements made possible by integrating nanopores and custom-designed electronics. PMID:27332998

  18. Measurement of DNA Translocation Dynamics in a Solid-State Nanopore at 100 ns Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Shekar, Siddharth; Niedzwiecki, David J; Chien, Chen-Chi; Ong, Peijie; Fleischer, Daniel A; Lin, Jianxun; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Drndić, Marija; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2016-07-13

    Despite the potential for nanopores to be a platform for high-bandwidth study of single-molecule systems, ionic current measurements through nanopores have been limited in their temporal resolution by noise arising from poorly optimized measurement electronics and large parasitic capacitances in the nanopore membranes. Here, we present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) nanopore (CNP) amplifier capable of low noise recordings at an unprecedented 10 MHz bandwidth. When integrated with state-of-the-art solid-state nanopores in silicon nitride membranes, we achieve an SNR of greater than 10 for ssDNA translocations at a measurement bandwidth of 5 MHz, which represents the fastest ion current recordings through nanopores reported to date. We observe transient features in ssDNA translocation events that are as short as 200 ns, which are hidden even at bandwidths as high as 1 MHz. These features offer further insights into the translocation kinetics of molecules entering and exiting the pore. This platform highlights the advantages of high-bandwidth translocation measurements made possible by integrating nanopores and custom-designed electronics.

  19. High spatial and temporal resolution wide-field imaging of neuron activity using quantum NV-diamond

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L. T.; Beart, G. C. G.; Thomas, E. A.; Simpson, D. A.; McGuinness, L. P.; Cole, J. H.; Manton, J. H.; Scholten, R. E.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Petrou, S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of biological neural networks is fundamental to gaining insight into information processing in the brain. While techniques exist to measure spatial or temporal properties of these networks, it remains a significant challenge to resolve the neural dynamics with subcellular spatial resolution. In this work we consider a fundamentally new form of wide-field imaging for neuronal networks based on the nanoscale magnetic field sensing properties of optically active spins in a diamond substrate. We analyse the sensitivity of the system to the magnetic field generated by an axon transmembrane potential and confirm these predictions experimentally using electronically-generated neuron signals. By numerical simulation of the time dependent transmembrane potential of a morphologically reconstructed hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that the imaging system is capable of imaging planar neuron activity non-invasively at millisecond temporal resolution and micron spatial resolution over wide-fields. PMID:22574249

  20. Combining high temporal and high spatial resolution thermal infrared datasets to detect volcanic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Dehn, J.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Most volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to an eruption. In certain cases, the precursors can be interpreted to make forecasts about the time and magnitude of the impending eruption. Furthermore, subtle changes in this activity can be used to determine the style of an eruption at volcanoes known for differing eruption types. This study focuses on the effectiveness of using thermal infrared (TIR) spaceborne sensors to track volcanic precursors from thermal changes at the summit of volcanoes using data from both the ASTER and AVHRR sensors by focusing on the Kamchatka (Russia) region. At Bezymianny volcano, a clear increase in activity commonly occurs before an eruption, which has allowed predictions to be made months ahead of time. In other cases, such as the Tolbachik eruption in 2012, no precursors were detected before the large scale effusive eruption. However, most volcanoes do not fall into these extremes, as is the case with Kliuchevskoi volcano. Three large eruptions (e.g., 2005, 2007, 2009) have occurred at Kliuchevskoi in the past decade. Before each of these eruptions, AVHRR and ASTER detected thermal anomalies (pixels with radiant energy significantly above the background). High temporal but low spatial resolution (i.e., hours; 1 km) AVHRR data are ideal for detecting high energy events occurring over short time periods. In contrast, high spatial but low temporal resolution (i.e., days to weeks; 90 m) ASTER data enables the detection of much lower levels of activity. These smaller thermal anomalies are more commonly associated with the longer time scale pre-eruptive phase at Kliuchevskoi. The problem occurs where attempting to detect patterns in these anomalies over time. Only volcanic activity that produces a large amount of radiant energy can be seen with the relatively poor spatial resolution of AVHRR, and ASTER will commonly miss shorter duration activity. In this study, we use ASTER data to track low-level anomalies months prior

  1. Digital elevation models in 10 minute time steps - a status report on 4D monitoring of an active erosional scar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Hass, Erik; Jose, Steffen; Haas, Florian; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    In erosional research a variety of processes are well understood and have been mimicked under laboratory conditions. In complex natural systems such as Alpine environments a multitude of influencing factors tend to superimpose single processes in a mixed signal which impedes a reliable interpretation. These mixed signals can already be captured by geoscientific research approaches such as sediment collectors, erosion pins or remote sensing surveys. Nevertheless, they fail to distinguish between single processes and their individual impact on slope morphology. Throughout the last two years a highly active slope of unsorted glacial deposits in the northern Alps has been monitored by repeated terrestrial laser scans roughly every three months. Resulting high resolution digital elevation models of difference were produced to identify possible seasonal patterns. By reproducing the TLS results with a physically based erosion model (EROSION 3D) ran with in situ input data from rainfall simulations and a climate station a better understanding of individual mechanism could be achieved. However, the already elaborate combination of soil science and close range remote sensing could not answer all questions concerning the slopes behaviour, especially not for freeze and thaw cycles and the winter period. Therefore, an array of three fully automatic synchronised cameras was setup to generate continuous 3D surface models. Among the main challenges faced for the system were the energy supply and durability, perspectives of the cameras to avoid shadowing and to guarantee sufficient overlap, a certain robustness to withstand rough alpine weather conditions, the scaling of each 3D model by tracked ground control points and the automatic data handling. First results show individual processes sculpting the slope's morphology but further work is required to improve automatic point cloud creation and change monitoring.

  2. A high resolution method for soil moisture mapping at large spatial and temporal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    moreno, D.; Sayde, C.; Ochsner, T. E.; Sorin, C.; Selker, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture is a critical component of the planet's water budget, yet precise measurement of its dynamics across the critical scales of 0.1-1,000 m continues to be an area of great uncertainty. Here we present the preliminary results for a large scale installation of soil moisture quantification based on the work of Sayde et al. (2010) using actively heated fiber optic with a DTS system capable of soil moisture measurements at high spatial (reporting every 0.125 m) and temporal resolution (read as frequently as each 15 min)). The fiber optic (FO) sensing cables were installed in 2 sections: 1) a highly resolved multi-scale spiral 75m x 65m in size, 530 m total path length, and 2) a 770 m transect in the foot print of the cosmos cosmic ray probe installed at the site. In each of those 2 sections, the FO cables were deployed at 3 depths: 5, 10, and 15 cm. In this system the FO sensing system provides measurements of soil moisture at >39,000 locations simultaneously for each heat pulse. In addition, six soil monitoring stations along the fiber optic path were installed to provide additional validation and calibration of the DTS data. Finally, gravimetric soil moisture and soil thermal samplings were performed periodically to provide additional distributed validation and calibration of the DTS data. The ability of this DTS FO system to provide soil moisture measurements over four orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1 - 1,000m) will allow better understanding of the spatio-temporal variability in soil moisture in the field, which is essential to develop protocols for calibration and validation of large scale soil moisture remote sensing data (such as NASA airMOSS soil moisture air flights). The material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AP58G, with equipment and assistance also provided by CTEMPs.org with support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1129003. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed

  3. Soil wetting processes at high temporal resolution in a semiarid mediterranean watershed with scattered tree cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Parra, Javier; van Schaik, Loes; Schnabel, Susanne; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Soil wetting processes play a key role for the distribution of water and solutes and thereby for the water availability for plants. However, characterization of such processes (from slower to faster flows), frequency of occurrence, and factors that cause them, are still poorly known. This characterization is important in hydrological studies because enables a better understanding of spatio-temporal variability of water resources and allows improving the design of models. Using a method based on the maximal soil water increase registered by a sensor over a minimum given time interval during a rainfall event, types of soil wetting processes were classified and quantified. For this, capacitance sensors which registered the volumetric water content at high temporal resolution (30-min) along of more than two hydrological years (mainly for 2010-2011 and 2011-2012), were installed in soil profiles at 5, 15 cm, and 5 cm above the bedrock and depending on soil depth. This distribution along the soil profile is justified because soils are generally very shallow and most of the roots are concentrated in the upper layer. The sensors were gathered in 9 soil moisture stations characterized by lithology, topographic position, as well as by different vegetation covers: under tree canopy, under shrub, and in open spaces or grasslands. Besides, the data mining technique Multivariate Adaptive Regression Spline (MARS) was used to identify and rank the factors influencing flow types as well as modelling their occurrence. The work was carried out in an experimental catchment of the Spanish region of Extremadura. Results indicated that there is a general behavior or pattern of soil moisture dynamics in the catchment with a dominant occurrence of slower soil wetting processes (>50%), which may be considered as matrix flows, and a low occurrence of those faster processes (<30%), considered as preferential flows. Nevertheless, when the total volume of water is considered then preferential

  4. High-resolution (spatial and temporal) Hydrodynamic Modeling in the Lower Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadogan, E.; Danchuk, S.; Berger, C.; Brown, G.; Willson, C.

    2007-12-01

    The lower Mississippi River is a highly engineered system existing in one of the world's largest deltas. This system is subject to a variety of spatial and temporal forcings due to its large watershed (drains about 41% of the continental U.S.) and from the Gulf of Mexico. Future perturbations on this system are anticipated due to the impacts of global climate change (e.g., rising eustatic sea level, changes in weather patterns) and from proposed modifications to the system such as diversion structures aimed at providing freshwater nutrients and sediments to the rapidly degrading coastal wetlands. Numerical modeling will play a large role in improving our understanding and management of the system and the ability to properly design future structural features. These models will need to have the necessary spatial and temporal resolution to account for the many important processes in the river, the Gulf of Mexico, and in the wetland areas where small distributary channels will form and wetting/drying must be accounted for. This paper will investigate the ability of a 2D shallow water and sediment model to reproduce the complex distributary development associated with flow diversions into quiescent bays. A reach of the Lower Mississippi River from Point a la Hache to the Gulf of Mexico was used as a test domain to evaluate the performance and capabilities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ADaptive Hydraulics (ADH) model. ADH is an unstructured finite element modeling system that includes unsaturated Richards' equations for groundwater, Navier Stokes for nonhydrostatic flow calculations, and Shallow Water equations. ADH conducts automated refinement and coarsening of the mesh based upon flow characteristics. In this case the 2D shallow water model is being used. It includes coupled flow and sedimentation. An unstructured mesh was developed for the study area which includes detailed bathymetry and topography from available survey data. The mesh is fine enough to capture

  5. Splitting attention reduces temporal resolution from 7 Hz for tracking one object to <3 Hz when tracking three.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Alex O; Chen, Wei-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Overall performance when tracking moving targets is known to be poorer for larger numbers of targets, but the specific effect on tracking's temporal resolution has never been investigated. We document a broad range of display parameters for which visual tracking is limited by temporal frequency (the interval between when a target is at each location and a distracter moves in and replaces it) rather than by object speed. We tested tracking of one, two, and three moving targets while the eyes remained fixed. Variation of the number of distracters and their speed revealed both speed limits and temporal frequency limits on tracking. The temporal frequency limit fell from 7 Hz with one target to 4 Hz with two targets and 2.6 Hz with three targets. The large size of this performance decrease implies that in the two-target condition participants would have done better by tracking only one of the two targets and ignoring the other. These effects are predicted by serial models involving a single tracking focus that must switch among the targets, sampling the position of only one target at a time. If parallel processing theories are to explain why dividing the tracking resource reduces temporal resolution so markedly, supplemental assumptions will be required.

  6. Behavioral measures of cochlear compression and temporal resolution as predictors of speech masking release in hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Gregan, Melanie J; Nelson, Peggy B; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2013-10-01

    Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often show less masking release (MR) than normal-hearing listeners when temporal fluctuations are imposed on a steady-state masker, even when accounting for overall audibility differences. This difference may be related to a loss of cochlear compression in HI listeners. Behavioral estimates of compression, using temporal masking curves (TMCs), were compared with MR for band-limited (500-4000 Hz) speech and pure tones in HI listeners and age-matched, noise-masked normal-hearing (NMNH) listeners. Compression and pure-tone MR estimates were made at 500, 1500, and 4000 Hz. The amount of MR was defined as the difference in performance between steady-state and 10-Hz square-wave-gated speech-shaped noise. In addition, temporal resolution was estimated from the slope of the off-frequency TMC. No significant relationship was found between estimated cochlear compression and MR for either speech or pure tones. NMNH listeners had significantly steeper off-frequency temporal masking recovery slopes than did HI listeners, and a small but significant correlation was observed between poorer temporal resolution and reduced MR for speech. The results suggest either that the effects of hearing impairment on MR are not determined primarily by changes in peripheral compression, or that the TMC does not provide a sufficiently reliable measure of cochlear compression. PMID:24116426

  7. High temporal Resolution Fire History in Eastern Africa: the Last 16 kyr cal. BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanniere, B.; Carcaillet, C.; Garcin, Y.; Vullien, A.; Williamson, D.

    2004-12-01

    Charcoal series, based on a high temporal resolution analysis, at Lake Massoko (9°20' S, 33° 45' E, 770 a.s.l., SW Tanzania) reveals numerous changes of fire regime over the last 16 kyr cal BP. Data are based on the tallying of charcoal from 700 continuous 1 cm thick samples along a 7m long sequence. The structure of charcoal particles is well preserved with an length:width ratio superior to 5; this appears to testify to the local provenance of the material studied and to the rapid transport of particles to the lake. The majority of particles belongs to herbaceous cuticles produced by savanna or bush fires. Time control is supported by 14 radiocarbon dates. Mean time resolution per sample of 17 yr provides the first long detailed biomass burning record in Africa. This record evidences frequent fires events during the last 16 kyr, indicating that fire is a key component of east African ecosystems since, at least, the last glacial stage up to present. From 16 to 12 kyr cal BP, the charcoal influx into the lake is low except during two specific sequences, between 13.5-12.5 kyr cal BP and 14.5-14 kyr cal BP. These may correspond to more arid or more biomass-available phases. Around 10 kyr cal BP, at the early Holocene a greater influx of charcoal is recorded in the lake, probably as a result of a high fire regime likely triggered by severe droughts. Between 8.3 and 1.7 kyr cal BP, the charcoal influx displays a cyclic fire history of ca. 500 yr. Low fire regime, between 3.5-2.5, 5.5-5 and 7.5-7 kyr cal BP, correspond to wetter periods. About 12 sequences of fire increase and decrease are highlighted, which appears to support a high climatic variability during the middle-Holocene. After 1.7 kyr BP, there is a long lasting increase of charcoal influx into the lake, as observed by black carbon analysis (Thevenon et al., 2003). This particular period, without analog since 16 kyr cal BP, is consistent with the development of Iron Age settlements in the region, slash

  8. High temporal and high spatial resolution MR angiography (4D-MRA).

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh, D R; Marx, C; Gieseke, J; Schild, H H; Willinek, W A

    2014-09-01

    In the first decade of the twenty-first century, whole-body magnetic resonance scanners with high field strengths (and thus potentially better signal-to-noise ratios) were developed. At the same time, parallel imaging and "echo-sharing" techniques were refined to allow for increasingly high spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic magnetic resonance angiography ("time-resolved" = TR-MRA). This technological progress facilitated tracking the passage of intra-venously administered contrast agent boluses as well as the acquisition of volume data sets at high image refresh rates ("4D-MRA"). This opened doors for many new applications in non-invasive vascular imaging, including simultaneous anatomic and functional analysis of many vascular pathologies including arterio-venous malformations. Different methods were established to acquire 4D-MRA using various strategies to acquire k-space trajectories over time in order to optimize imaging according to clinical needs. These include "keyhole"-based techniques (e. g. 4D-TRAK), TRICKS - both with and without projection - and HYPR-reconstruction, TREAT, and TWIST. Some of these techniques were first introduced in the 1980 s and 1990 s, were later enhanced and modified, and finally implemented in the products of major vendors. In the last decade, a large number of studies on the clinical applications of TR-MRA was published. This manuscript provides an overview of the development of TR-MRA methods and the 4D-MRA techniques as they are currently used in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of vascular diseases in various parts of the body. PMID:24955647

  9. High Temporal Resolution Measurements and Modeling of the Isotopic Composition of Methane in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, E.; Röckmann, T.; Eyer, S.; van der Veen, C.; Tuzson, B.; Monteil, G.; Houweling, S.; Harris, E. J.; Brunner, D.; Fischer, H.; Fisher, R. E.; Lowry, D.; Nisbet, E. G.; Emmenegger, L.; Mohn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Isotope measurements can help constraining the atmospheric budget of methane because different sources emit methane with slightly different isotopic composition. In the past, high precision isotope measurements have primarily been carried out by isotope ratio mass spectrometry on flask samples that are usually collected at relatively low temporal resolution. During the EU project INGOS, we have deployed a fully automated gas chromatography - isotope ratio mass spectrometry system (GC-IRMS), together with two laser instruments, during a 4-months campaign in the field at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR). More than 1600 measurements for δ13C and δD were obtained with IRMS during this period. Measurements show clear isotope signals associated with methane elevations both on the diurnal as well as the synoptic scale. In order to assess the added value of such measurements for constraining the CH4 budget, we performed coupled simulations of CH4 and δ13C-CH4 using the chemistry transport model TM5. We specifically assessed the relative impact of uncertainties in i) CH4 emissions, ii) CH4 isotope source signatures and iii) methane transport and chemistry throughout the atmosphere. By randomly perturbing CH4 emissions and δ13C source signatures, we identified areas where simulated variations are dominated by uncertainties in the emission strength and areas where uncertainties in the isotope signatures dominate. At observation sites where the uncertainties in CH4 emissions dominate the other sources of uncertainty, isotope observations should provide useful additional constraints on CH4 emissions. At locations where uncertainties in the isotope signatures dominate, the isotope measurements will be useful to better constrain the source signatures themselves.

  10. Monitoring Spring Phenology in Southeast Deciduous Forests: Influence of Temporal Resolution and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, J. J.; Bausch, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    To predict the effects that a changing climate will have on ecosystem water and carbon fluxes, we must understand how growing season length is influenced by environmental factors such as air and soil temperature. The date of spring leaf onset or flush, the rate of green-up, and maximum greenness have all been measured in the field and by satellite to describe temperate deciduous spring phenology. We identify these key phenological events using near daily satellite images and compare our results with other available MODIS products, concurrent field measurements, and a suite of detailed environmental variables. We created NDVI from MODIS Surface Reflectance (MOD09GQ V5) and applied a Savitzky-Golay filter and a segmented regression technique to identify spring onset and NDVI maximum; we attained an average of an image every 2 to 3 days for the 5 month spring period. Across four years, we compared our spring events to other MODIS products (16-day composites of LAI, EVI, NDVI, the phenology MODIS4NACP product), and to one year of weekly LAI field measurements (LAI2000) at four sites. Among different years and sites in central North Carolina, we found that spring onset varied as much as 15 days among sites for a given year (sites are within 70 km of each other), and the same site could have as much as 20 days difference in spring onset among the four years of data collection. For three years of spring onset dates, we examined the relationship with detailed environmental variables for one site (Ameriflux), and found that soil moisture and days since last freeze were the most significant drivers of spring phenology. In linking environmental drivers with spring onset over time, we conclude that using imagery and field measurements of the highest temporal resolution possible is necessary for precise depiction of phenological events and thereby establishing links with environmental drivers.

  11. High-resolution mycorrhizal hyphae dynamics: temporal variation, biophysical controls, and global environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. R.; Allen, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Soils are the largest terrestrial carbon (C) repository in the global C cycle, storing 4.5 times more C than aboveground vegetation. Mycorrhizal fungi are critical edaphic organisms that influence soil C dynamics at both microscopic and ecosystem scales. Understanding the production and turnover of these organisms is critical for accurate ecosystem C budgets and predictive models incorporating changes in climate. This study seeks to quantify high-resolution mycorrhizal hyphae dynamics at various temporal scales in a mixed conifer forest (UC James Reserve, CA) using novel technologies including automated minirhizotrons, embedded soil sensor networks, and environmental software (i.e., Rootfly). We found that hyphae elongation and dieback rates in May 2009 varied significantly across 6-h diel time intervals and were greatest between 12:00 pm and 6:00 pm, when soil temperature and modeled CO2 flux is maximum. Seasonal dynamics revealed peak hyphae biomass in mid-April and rapid hyphae length decline from mid-April through June. Seasonal hyphae dynamism is tightly coupled with biophysical controls, namely, soil water content, which is positively related to hyphae production, and soil temperature. Interestingly, 14 °C may be a threshold for hyphae growth in this system as soil temperatures exceeding this value are coupled with rapid hyphae mortality. This study suggests that human-mediated changes to biophysical controls may modulate seasonal hyphae growth regimes, possibly reducing growth season duration or initiating early mortality. In this scenario, mycorrhizal hyphae mortality may act as a positive feedback to increasing CO2 levels, by releasing large amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere.

  12. How can audiovisual pathways enhance the temporal resolution of time-compressed speech in blind subjects?

    PubMed

    Hertrich, Ingo; Dietrich, Susanne; Ackermann, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    In blind people, the visual channel cannot assist face-to-face communication via lipreading or visual prosody. Nevertheless, the visual system may enhance the evaluation of auditory information due to its cross-links to (1) the auditory system, (2) supramodal representations, and (3) frontal action-related areas. Apart from feedback or top-down support of, for example, the processing of spatial or phonological representations, experimental data have shown that the visual system can impact auditory perception at more basic computational stages such as temporal signal resolution. For example, blind as compared to sighted subjects are more resistant against backward masking, and this ability appears to be associated with activity in visual cortex. Regarding the comprehension of continuous speech, blind subjects can learn to use accelerated text-to-speech systems for "reading" texts at ultra-fast speaking rates (>16 syllables/s), exceeding by far the normal range of 6 syllables/s. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study has shown that this ability, among other brain regions, significantly covaries with BOLD responses in bilateral pulvinar, right visual cortex, and left supplementary motor area. Furthermore, magnetoencephalographic measurements revealed a particular component in right occipital cortex phase-locked to the syllable onsets of accelerated speech. In sighted people, the "bottleneck" for understanding time-compressed speech seems related to higher demands for buffering phonological material and is, presumably, linked to frontal brain structures. On the other hand, the neurophysiological correlates of functions overcoming this bottleneck, seem to depend upon early visual cortex activity. The present Hypothesis and Theory paper outlines a model that aims at binding these data together, based on early cross-modal pathways that are already known from various audiovisual experiments on cross-modal adjustments during space, time, and object recognition. PMID

  13. Evaluation of Temporal Bone Cholesteatoma and the Correlation Between High Resolution Computed Tomography and Surgical Finding

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Mohammed A.; Abdel Karim, Abdel Rahim A.; Abdel Ghany, Hosny S.; Elhiny, Ahmed A.; Sadek, Ahmed A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acquired cholesteatomas are commonly seen in patients less than 30 years. There is a typical history of recurrent middle ear infections with tympanic membrane perforation. The diagnosis of cholesteatoma is usually made on otologic examination. Objective The aim of the work was to study the role of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in detecting, evaluating, and diagnosing middle ear cholesteatoma. Patients and methods This was a prospective study that included 56 consecutive patients with chronic suppurative otitis media, unsafe type cholesteatomas. Each patient was subjected to full clinical evaluation, and HRCT examination. Intravenous contrast media was used in some patients with suspected intracranial complication. Preoperative radiological data were correlated with data related to surgical findings. Results The study showed that a high incidence of cholesteatoma in the third decade of life. The scutum and lateral attic wall were the most common bony erosions in the middle ear bony wall (64.3%), and the incus was the most eroded ossicle in the middle ear (88.2%). Sclerosing of mastoid air cells were encountered in 60.7% of patients and the lateral semicircular canal was affected in 9%, while facial canal erosion was found in 21.4%. Temporal bone complications are more common than intracranial complications. HRCT findings were compared with operative features; the comparative study included the accuracy and sensitivity of HRCT in detecting cholesteatoma (92.8%), its location and extension (96.4%), ossicular chain erosion (98%), labyrinthine fistula and intracranial complications (100%). Conclusion The important role of HRCT scannig lies on the early detection of cholesteatoma, and more conservative surgical procedures can be used to eradicate the disease. PMID:24179410

  14. C-arm cone beam CT perfusion imaging using the SMART-RECON algorithm to improve temporal sampling density and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Niu, Kai; Li, Ke; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a newly developed reconstruction algorithm, Synchronized MultiArtifact Reduction with Tomographic RECONstruction (SMART-RECON), was applied to C-arm cone beam CT perfusion (CBCTP) imaging. This algorithm contains a special rank regularizer, designed to reduce limited-view artifacts associated with super- short scan reconstructions. As a result, high temporal sampling and temporal resolution image reconstructions were achieved using an interventional C-arm x-ray system. The algorithm was evaluated in terms of the fidelity of the dynamic contrast update curves and the accuracy of perfusion parameters through numerical simulation studies. Results shows that, not only were the dynamic curves accurately recovered (relative root mean square error ∈ [3%, 5%] compared with [13%, 22%] for FBP), but also the noise in the final perfusion maps was dramatically reduced. Compared with filtered backprojection, SMART-RECON generated CBCTP maps with much improved capability in differentiating lesions with perfusion deficits from the surrounding healthy brain tissues.

  15. Investigation of spatial resolution and temporal performance of SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) with integrated electrostatic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaduto, David A.; Lubinsky, Anthony R.; Rowlands, John A.; Kenmotsu, Hidenori; Nishimoto, Norihito; Nishino, Takeshi; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Zhao, Wei

    2014-03-01

    We have previously proposed SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout), a novel detector concept with potentially superior spatial resolution and low-dose performance compared with existing flat-panel imagers. The detector comprises a scintillator that is optically coupled to an amorphous selenium photoconductor operated with avalanche gain, known as high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP). High resolution electron beam readout is achieved using a field emitter array (FEA). This combination of avalanche gain, allowing for very low-dose imaging, and electron emitter readout, providing high spatial resolution, offers potentially superior image quality compared with existing flat-panel imagers, with specific applications to fluoroscopy and breast imaging. Through the present collaboration, a prototype HARP sensor with integrated electrostatic focusing and nano- Spindt FEA readout technology has been fabricated. The integrated electron-optic focusing approach is more suitable for fabricating large-area detectors. We investigate the dependence of spatial resolution on sensor structure and operating conditions, and compare the performance of electrostatic focusing with previous technologies. Our results show a clear dependence of spatial resolution on electrostatic focusing potential, with performance approaching that of the previous design with external mesh-electrode. Further, temporal performance (lag) of the detector is evaluated and the results show that the integrated electrostatic focusing design exhibits comparable or better performance compared with the mesh-electrode design. This study represents the first technical evaluation and characterization of the SAPHIRE concept with integrated electrostatic focusing.

  16. Dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon by high spatial and temporal resolution imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, X.; Jia, T. Q. Peng, N. N.; Feng, D. H.; Zhang, S. A.; Sun, Z. R.

    2014-04-14

    The formation dynamics of periodic ripples induced by femtosecond laser pulses (pulse duration τ = 50 fs and central wavelength λ = 800 nm) are studied by a collinear pump-probe imaging technique with a temporal resolution of 1 ps and a spatial resolution of 440 nm. The ripples with periods close to the laser wavelength begin to appear upon irradiation of two pump pulses at surface defects produced by the prior one. The rudiments of periodic ripples emerge in the initial tens of picoseconds after fs laser irradiation, and the ripple positions keep unmoved until the formation processes complete mainly in a temporal span of 1500 ps. The results suggest that the periodic deposition of laser energy during the interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and sample surface plays a dominant role in the formation of periodic ripples.

  17. Efficient data extraction method for near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) systems with high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Kwan; Choi, Min-Gyu; Kim, Jae-Myoung; Bae, Hyeon-Min

    2013-04-01

    An hardware-efficient method for the extraction of hemodynamic responses in near-infrared spectroscopy systems is proposed to increase the spatial and temporal resolution. The performance improvement is attributed to high signal-to-noise ratio receivers, a modulation scheme, and a multi-input-multi-output based data extraction algorithm. The proposed system shows more than twofold improvement in the figure of merit compared to conventional designs. Experimental results support the validity of the proposed system. PMID:23853299

  18. Reconstruction of high temporal resolution Thomson scattering data during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating using conditional averaging.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Ida, K; Itoh, K; Yoshinuma, M; Moon, C; Inagaki, S; Yamada, I; Funaba, H; Yasuhara, R; Tsuchiya, H; Ohdachi, S; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Shimozuma, T; Kubo, S; Tsujimura, T I

    2016-04-01

    This paper provides a software application of the sampling scope concept for fusion research. The time evolution of Thomson scattering data is reconstructed with a high temporal resolution during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) phase. The amplitude profile and the delay time profile of the heat pulse propagation are obtained from the reconstructed signal for discharges having on-axis and off-axis MECH depositions. The results are found to be consistent with the MECH deposition.

  19. Autonomous agricultural remote sensing systems with high spatial and temporal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Haitao

    In this research, two novel agricultural remote sensing (RS) systems, a Stand-alone Infield Crop Monitor RS System (SICMRS) and an autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) based RS system have been studied. A high-resolution digital color and multi-spectral camera was used as the image sensor for the SICMRS system. An artificially intelligent (AI) controller based on artificial neural network (ANN) and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was developed. Morrow Plots corn field RS images in the 2004 and 2006 growing seasons were collected by the SICMRS system. The field site contained 8 subplots (9.14 m x 9.14 m) that were planted with corn and three different fertilizer treatments were used among those subplots. The raw RS images were geometrically corrected, resampled to 10cm resolution, removed soil background and calibrated to real reflectance. The RS images from two growing seasons were studied and 10 different vegetation indices were derived from each day's image. The result from the image processing demonstrated that the vegetation indices have temporal effects. To achieve high quality RS data, one has to utilize the right indices and capture the images at the right time in the growing season. Maximum variations among the image data set are within the V6-V10 stages, which indicated that these stages are the best period to identify the spatial variability caused by the nutrient stress in the corn field. The derived vegetation indices were also used to build yield prediction models via the linear regression method. At that point, all of the yield prediction models were evaluated by comparing the R2-value and the best index model from each day's image was picked based on the highest R 2-value. It was shown that the green normalized difference vegetation (GNDVI) based model is more sensitive to yield prediction than other indices-based models. During the VT-R4 stages, the GNDVI based models were able to explain more than 95% potential corn yield

  20. High-resolution imaging-guided electroencephalography source localization: temporal effect regularization incorporation in LORETA inverse solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughariou, Jihene; Zouch, Wassim; Slima, Mohamed Ben; Kammoun, Ines; Hamida, Ahmed Ben

    2015-11-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are noninvasive neuroimaging modalities. They are widely used and could be complementary. The fusion of these modalities may enhance some emerging research fields targeting the exploration better brain activities. Such research attracted various scientific investigators especially to provide a convivial and helpful advanced clinical-aid tool enabling better neurological explorations. Our present research was, in fact, in the context of EEG inverse problem resolution and investigated an advanced estimation methodology for the localization of the cerebral activity. Our focus was, therefore, on the integration of temporal priors to low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) formalism and to solve the inverse problem in the EEG. The main idea behind our proposed method was in the integration of a temporal projection matrix within the LORETA weighting matrix. A hyperparameter is the principal fact for such a temporal integration, and its importance would be obvious when obtaining a regularized smoothness solution. Our experimental results clearly confirmed the impact of such an optimization procedure adopted for the temporal regularization parameter comparatively to the LORETA method.

  1. Spectral sensitivity, luminous sensitivity, and temporal resolution of the visual systems in three sympatric temperate coastal shark species.

    PubMed

    Kalinoski, Mieka; Hirons, Amy; Horodysky, Andrij; Brill, Richard

    2014-12-01

    We used electroretinography (ERG) to determine spectral and luminous sensitivities, and the temporal resolution (flicker fusion frequency, FFF) in three sympatric (but phylogenetically distant) coastal shark species: Carcharhinus plumbeus (sandbar shark), Mustelus canis (smooth dogfish), and Squalus acanthias (spiny dogfish). Spectral sensitivities were similar (range ~400-600 nm, peak sensitivity ~470 nm), with a high likelihood of rod/cone dichromacy enhancing contrast discrimination. Spiny dogfish were significantly less light sensitive than the other species, whereas their FFF was ~19 Hz at maximum intensities; a value equal to that of sandbar shark and significantly above that of smooth dogfish (~9-12 Hz). This occurred even though experiments on spiny dogfish were conducted at 12 versus 25 °C and 20 °C for experiments on sandbar shark and smooth dogfish, respectively. Although spiny dogfish have a rod-dominated retina (rod:cone ratio 50:1), their visual system appears to have evolved for a relatively high temporal resolution (i.e., high FFF) through a short integration time, with the requisite concomitant reduction in luminous sensitivity. Our results suggest adaptive plasticity in the temporal resolution of elasmobranch visual systems which reflects the importance of the ability to track moving objects such as mates, predators, or prey. PMID:25319537

  2. Effect of Temporal and Spatial Rainfall Resolution on HSPF Predictive Performance and Parameter Estimation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed scale rainfall‐runoff models are used for environmental management and regulatory modeling applications, but their effectiveness are limited by predictive uncertainties associated with model input data. This study evaluated the effect of temporal and spatial rainfall re...

  3. Temporally-quantized theory of exponential radioactive decay: Resolution of Zeno's paradox of quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Sidney

    1995-02-01

    As characterized experimentally by Rutherford, an essential feature of radioactive decompositions is their being constituted of randomly occurring events in terms of which the decomposing systems exhibit exponential temporal decay behavior with associated characteristic half-lives. This feature is rigorously accounted for generally by the recent temporally-quantized dynamical theory of strictly-irreversible evolution of isolated and localized non-relativistic quantum systems, which theory also obviates the celebrated Zeno's paradox of conventional quantum theory.

  4. Evaluating Climate Causation of Conflict in Darfur Using Multi-temporal, Multi-resolution Satellite Image Datasets With Novel Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, I.; Wennbom, M.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change, population growth and changes in traditional lifestyles have led to instabilities in traditional demarcations between neighboring ethic and religious groups in the Sahel region. This has resulted in a number of conflicts as groups resort to arms to settle disputes. Such disputes often centre on or are justified by competition for resources. The conflict in Darfur has been controversially explained by resource scarcity resulting from climate change. Here we analyse established methods of using satellite imagery to assess vegetation health in Darfur. Multi-decadal time series of observations are available using low spatial resolution visible-near infrared imagery. Typically normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) analyses are produced to describe changes in vegetation ';greenness' or ';health'. Such approaches have been widely used to evaluate the long term development of vegetation in relation to climate variations across a wide range of environments from the Arctic to the Sahel. These datasets typically measure peak NDVI observed over a given interval and may introduce bias. It is furthermore unclear how the spatial organization of sparse vegetation may affect low resolution NDVI products. We develop and assess alternative measures of vegetation including descriptors of the growing season, wetness and resource availability. Expanding the range of parameters used in the analysis reduces our dependence on peak NDVI. Furthermore, these descriptors provide a better characterization of the growing season than the single NDVI measure. Using multi-sensor data we combine high temporal/moderate spatial resolution data with low temporal/high spatial resolution data to improve the spatial representativity of the observations and to provide improved spatial analysis of vegetation patterns. The approach places the high resolution observations in the NDVI context space using a longer time series of lower resolution imagery. The vegetation descriptors

  5. Bipolar high temporal resolution measurements of snow UV albedo in Sodankylä and Marambio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinander, Outi; Kontu, Anna; Asmi, Eija; Sanchez, Ricardo; Mei, Miguel; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview of our high temporal resolution polar snow UV albedo data from Arctic Sodankylä, and from Marambio, Antarctica. These both are WMO GAW stations with many measurement parameters relevant to the albedo data usage. We will also describe our campaign based polar albedo data (SNORTEX and SOS campaigns), and an important data set of light absorbing impurities (BC) in the Arctic snow. The black carbon (BC) has been estimated to be the second most important human emission after carbon dioxide, in terms of its climate forcing in the present-day atmosphere. The reflectance effect of BC deposited on snow surface is the bigger the smaller the wavelength, i.e. the albedo effect of BC is the biggest at UV. This is also shown in SNICAR-model simulated albedo values. In Sodankylä, our bipolar snow ultraviolet (UV) albedo research started within the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. In 2007, the continuous Sodankylä snow UV albedo measurements were installed in Sodankylä, in the operational albedo field of the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Center (FMI-ARC). These Sodankylä 1-min data during snow time were soon compared with the German Antarctic Neumayer Station UV albedo data, also with the same sensor type. In both data we found an up to 10 % decrease in albedo as a function of time within a day, ranging from 0.77 to 0.67 in Sodankylä and from 0.96 to 0.86 in Neumeyer. Physical explanations to asymmetry were found for cases with high relative humidity and low surface temperature during the previous night, favorable to frost and higher albedo on the next morning; new snow on the previous night; snow melting during day time and refreezing during night. In Marambio, in the beginning of 2013, our new continuous Finnish-Argentinian co-operation snow UV albedo measurements were installed and started as part of a larger continuous meteorological and environmental instrumentation. These new UV radiation data

  6. Mapping global land cover in 2001 and 2010 with spatial-temporal consistency at 250 m resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Congcong; Yu, Le; Liu, Desheng; Gong, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Global land cover types in 2001 and 2010 were mapped at 250 m resolution with multiple year time series Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data. The map for each single year was produced not only from data of that particular year but also from data acquired in the preceding and subsequent years as temporal context. Slope data and geographical coordinates of pixels were also used. The classification system was derived from the finer resolution observation and monitoring of global land cover (FROM-GLC) project. Samples were based on the 2010 FROM-GLC project and samples for other years were obtained by excluding those changed from 2010. A random forest classifier was used to obtain original class labels and to estimate class probabilities for 2000-2002, and 2009-2011. The overall accuracies estimated from cross validation of samples are 74.93% for 2001 and 75.17% for 2010. The classification results were further improved through post processing. A spatial-temporal consistency model, Maximum a Posteriori Markov Random Fields (MAP-MRF), was first applied to improve land cover classification for each 3 consecutive years. The MRF outputs for 2001 and 2010 were then processed with a rule-based label adjustment method with MOD44B, slope and composited EVI series as auxiliary data. The label adjustment process relabeled the over-classified forests, water bodies and barren lands to alternative classes with maximum probabilities.

  7. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of High-Resolution Animal Networks: What Can We Learn from Domestic Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi; Ilany, Amiyaal; White, Brad J.; Sanderson, Michael W.; Lanzas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Animal social network is the key to understand many ecological and epidemiological processes. We used real-time location system (RTLS) to accurately track cattle position, analyze their proximity networks, and tested the hypothesis of temporal stationarity and spatial homogeneity in these networks during different daily time periods and in different areas of the pen. The network structure was analyzed using global network characteristics (network density), subgroup clustering (modularity), triadic property (transitivity), and dyadic interactions (correlation coefficient from a quadratic assignment procedure) at hourly level. We demonstrated substantial spatial-temporal heterogeneity in these networks and potential link between indirect animal-environment contact and direct animal-animal contact. But such heterogeneity diminished if data were collected at lower spatial (aggregated at entire pen level) or temporal (aggregated at daily level) resolution. The network structure (described by the characteristics such as density, modularity, transitivity, etc.) also changed substantially at different time and locations. There were certain time (feeding) and location (hay) that the proximity network structures were more consistent based on the dyadic interaction analysis. These results reveal new insights for animal network structure and spatial-temporal dynamics, provide more accurate descriptions of animal social networks, and allow more accurate modeling of multiple (both direct and indirect) disease transmission pathways. PMID:26107251

  8. Two-photon imaging of spatially extended neuronal network dynamics with high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Kyle P.; Eng, Alfred; White, John A.; Mertz, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple two-photon fluorescence imaging strategy, called targeted path scanning (TPS), to monitor the dynamics of spatially extended neuronal networks with high spatiotemporal resolution. Our strategy combines the advantages of mirror-based scanning, minimized dead time, ease of implementation, and compatibility with high-resolution low-magnification objectives. To demonstrate the performance of TPS, we monitor the calcium dynamics distributed across an entire juvenile rat hippocampus (>1.5mm), at scan rates of 100Hz, with single cell resolution and single action potential sensitivity. Our strategy for fast, efficient two-photon microscopy over spatially extended regions provides a particularly attractive solution for monitoring neuronal population activity in thick tissue, without sacrificing the signal to noise ratio or high spatial resolution associated with standard two-photon microscopy. Finally, we provide the code to make our technique generally available. PMID:18539336

  9. Generating high temporal and spatial resolution thermal band imagery using robust sharpening approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal infrared band imagery provides key information for detecting wild fires, mapping land surface energy fluxes and evapotranspiration, monitoring urban heat fluxes and drought monitoring. Thermal infrared (TIR) imagery at fine resolution is required for field scale applications. However, therma...

  10. Spatial and temporal variability in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived surface albedo over global arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetsinskaya, Elena A.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.; Dickinson, Robert E.

    2006-10-01

    We derive spectral and broadband surface albedo for global arid regions from data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra spacecraft, at 1 km spatial resolution for 2001. MODIS data show considerable spatial variability both across various arid regions of the globe (from the bright deserts of northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula to substantially less reflective American and Asian deserts) and within regions (variability related to soil and rock types). For example, over arid northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula, albedo in the visible broadband varies by a factor of over 2, from the brightest sand sheets to the darkest luvisols. Few, if any, global and regional land-atmosphere models capture this observed spatial variability in surface albedo over arid regions. We suggest a scheme that relates soil groups (based on the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil classification) to MODIS-derived surface albedo statistics. This approach allows for an efficient representation in climate and weather forecasting models of the observed spatial and temporal variability in surface albedo over global deserts. Observed variability in albedo was reduced to a small (1-13, depending on the region) number of soil-related classes (end-members) that could be used in climate models. We also addressed the temporal evolution of albedo during 2001 over global deserts. Regions/soils of stable albedo with very low temporal variability were identified. For other regions/soils, temporal signals in albedo were related to ephemeral inundation with water or variations in sample size.

  11. IN SITU HIGH TEMPORAL RESOLUTION ANALYSIS OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY IN NATURAL WATER (R827915)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Volatilization of elemental Hg represents an important Hg flux for many aquatic systems. In order to model this flux accurately, it is necessary to measure elemental Hg concentrations in air and water, as well as meteorological variables. Up to now, temporal r...

  12. Analysis of solar radiation on the surface estimated from GWNU solar radiation model with temporal resolution of satellite cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zo, Il-Sung; Jee, Joon-Bum; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Bu-Yo

    2016-08-01

    Preliminary analysis with a solar radiation model is generally performed for photovoltaic power generation projects. Therefore, model accuracy is extremely important. The temporal and spatial resolutions used in previous studies of the Korean Peninsula were 1 km × 1 km and 1-h, respectively. However, calculating surface solar radiation at 1-h intervals does not ensure the accuracy of the geographical effects, and this parameter changes owing to atmospheric elements (clouds, aerosol, ozone, etc.). Thus, a change in temporal resolution is required. In this study, one-year (2013) analysis was conducted using Chollian geostationary meteorological satellite data from observations recorded at 15-min intervals. Observation data from the intensive solar site at Gangneung-Wonju National University (GWNU) showed that the coefficient of determination (R²), which was estimated for each month and season, increased, whereas the standard error (SE) decreased when estimated in 15-min intervals over those obtained in 1-h intervals in 2013. When compared with observational data from 22 solar sites of the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA), R2 was 0.9 or higher on average, and over- or under-simulated sites did not exceed 3 sites. The model and 22 solar sites showed similar values of annual accumulated solar irradiation, and their annual mean was similar at 4,998 MJ m-2 (3.87 kWh m-2). These results show a difference of approximately ± 70 MJ m-2 (± 0.05 kWh m-2) from the distribution of the Korean Peninsula estimated in 1-h intervals and a higher correlation at higher temporal resolution.

  13. New insights from improved temporal resolution of groundwater-surface-water exchange (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberry, D. O.; Naftz, D. L.; Kochevar, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Direct measurement of exchange between groundwater and surface water with the use of standard seepage meters involves integration of seepage rates over the duration of the measurement. Measurement duration usually depends on the seepage rate; very slow seepage requires measurement periods of hours to days and very fast seepage can require measurement periods of less than one to several minutes. No matter the measurement duration, temporal variability is masked during each single, time-integrated measurement. As a result, seepage rates commonly are interpreted to be constant at any given location and variance among multiple measurements usually is ascribed to measurement error. Automated seepage meters incorporate flowmeters that can log seepage rates over periods of seconds to several minutes. These devices have been used primarily in marine settings where seepage rates commonly are related to tidally driven changes in surface-water stage. Recent seepage measurements in freshwater settings using automated sensors indicate that temporal variability is substantial in many settings. Measurements from several lake settings across the US indicate that seepage varies over multiple temporal scales; ranging from seconds (in response to wave action), to minutes to hours (in response to rain storms or wind-driven seiches), to diurnally (in response to evapotranspiration), and to weekly (in response to changing hydraulic gradients over larger spatial scales). Failure to account for temporal variability in seepage rates can lead to misinterpretation of hydrologic fluxes and associated chemical fluxes. In some instances, manual measurements would have missed substantial changes in seepage rates, including reversals in seepage direction. These results indicate that seepage in many locations is more dynamic than previously realized and that temporal variability needs to be considered when scaling seepage measurements to represent conditions over longer periods of time.

  14. An investigation into the effects of temporal resolution on hepatic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in volunteers and in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Andrew B.; Black, Richard T.; Bowden, David J.; Priest, Andrew N.; Graves, Martin J.; Lomas, David J.

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal resolution on the dual-input pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data from normal volunteer livers and from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Eleven volunteers and five patients were examined at 3 T. Two sections, one optimized for the vascular input functions (VIF) and one for the tissue, were imaged within a single heart-beat (HB) using a saturation-recovery fast gradient echo sequence. The data was analysed using a dual-input single-compartment PK model. The VIFs and/or uptake curves were then temporally sub-sampled (at interval ▵t = [2-20] s) before being subject to the same PK analysis. Statistical comparisons of tumour and normal tissue PK parameter values using a 5% significance level gave rise to the same study results when temporally sub-sampling the VIFs to HB < ▵t <4 s. However, sub-sampling to ▵t > 4 s did adversely affect the statistical comparisons. Temporal sub-sampling of just the liver/tumour tissue uptake curves at ▵t ≤ 20 s, whilst using high temporal resolution VIFs, did not substantially affect PK parameter statistical comparisons. In conclusion, there is no practical advantage to be gained from acquiring very high temporal resolution hepatic DCE-MRI data. Instead the high temporal resolution could be usefully traded for increased spatial resolution or SNR.

  15. Encoding and decoding spatio-temporal information for super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lanzanò, Luca; Coto Hernández, Iván; Castello, Marco; Gratton, Enrico; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of increasing the spatial resolution of an optical microscope beyond the diffraction limit can be reduced to a spectroscopy task by proper manipulation of the molecular states. The nanoscale spatial distribution of the molecules inside the detection volume of a scanning microscope can be encoded within the fluorescence dynamics and decoded by resolving the signal into its dynamics components. Here we present a robust and general method to decode this information using phasor analysis. As an example of the application of this method, we optically generate spatially controlled gradients in the fluorescence lifetime by stimulated emission. Spatial resolution can be increased indefinitely by increasing the number of resolved dynamics components up to a maximum determined by the amount of noise. We demonstrate that the proposed method provides nanoscale imaging of subcellular structures, opening new routes in super-resolution microscopy based on the encoding/decoding of spatial information through manipulation of molecular dynamics. PMID:25833391

  16. Proxy-to-proxy calibration: Increasing the temporal resolution of quantitative climate reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    von Gunten, Lucien; D'Andrea, William J.; Bradley, Raymond S.; Huang, Yongsong

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution paleoclimate reconstructions are often restricted by the difficulties of sampling geologic archives in great detail and the analytical costs of processing large numbers of samples. Using sediments from Lake Braya Sø, Greenland, we introduce a new method that provides a quantitative high-resolution paleoclimate record by combining measurements of the alkenone unsaturation index () with non-destructive scanning reflectance spectroscopic measurements in the visible range (VIS-RS). The proxy-to-proxy (PTP) method exploits two distinct calibrations: the in situ calibration of to lake water temperature and the calibration of scanning VIS-RS data to down core data. Using this approach, we produced a quantitative temperature record that is longer and has 5 times higher sampling resolution than the original time series, thereby allowing detection of temperature variability in frequency bands characteristic of the AMO over the past 7,000 years. PMID:22934132

  17. Design and fabrication of a direction sensitive MEMS shear stress sensor with high spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, A. V.; Haque, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    Shear stress at the fluid-wall interface is one of the most frequently studied parameters in fluid dynamics. It is also a parameter of very small magnitude and calls for high resolution force sensors. Macroscopic sensors compromise dynamic bandwidth for the required high resolution and therefore cannot resolve shear stress data in space and/or time, which is very important for fundamental understanding in non-laminar fluid dynamics. We exploit the linear reduction in stiffness accompanied by cubic reduction in mass by miniaturization to design and fabricate a novel micro-electro-mechanical sensor (MEMS) for direct measurement of shear stress along and across the direction of fluid flow, with 0.01 Pa resolution and 50 kHz bandwidth along the flow. The mechanical component of the sensor is a floating beam element and capacitive comb drives supported by an in-plane torsional spring. A resonant RLC circuit, capable of sub-femtofarad capacitive sensing, is used to sense the displacement in the floating beam under shear. Fabrication of the sensor is demonstrated using silicon-on wafer (SOI) technology. The small overall size of the sensor, wide range of measurement, large bandwidth and high spatial and temporal resolution will make it useful in a wide variety of civil and military applications such as aerospace, automotive, marine and biomedical.

  18. Super-resolution of dense nanoscale emitters beyond the diffraction limit using spatial and temporal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsic, Anthony; Piestun, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    We propose a super-resolution technique for dense clusters of blinking emitters. The method relies on two basic assumptions: the emitters are statistically independent and a model of the imaging system is known. We numerically analyze the performance limits of the method as a function of emitter density and noise level. Numerical simulations show that five closely packed emitters can be resolved and localized to a precision of 17 nm. The experimental resolution of five quantum dots located within a diffraction-limited spot confirms the applicability of this approach. Statistical tests validate the independence of our quantum dots separated by nanoscale distances.

  19. Harmful algal bloom characterization at ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution using small unmanned aircraft systems.

    PubMed

    Van der Merwe, Deon; Price, Kevin P

    2015-04-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI) that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV). Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r(2)-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level. PMID:25826055

  20. Harmful algal bloom characterization at ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution using small unmanned aircraft systems.

    PubMed

    Van der Merwe, Deon; Price, Kevin P

    2015-03-27

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI) that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV). Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r(2)-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level.

  1. Harmful Algal Bloom Characterization at Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Using Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    PubMed Central

    Van der Merwe, Deon; Price, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI) that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV). Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r2-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level. PMID:25826055

  2. Higher temporal resolution is necessary for continuous-wave near -infrared spectrophotometric monitors in both cerebral and muscular tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, Eiichi; Shiga, Toshikazu; Tanabe, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshifumi

    1997-12-01

    Conventional near infrared spectrophotometric monitors have temporal resolution of less than about 1 Hz. However, physiological Hb signals such as pulsation and muscle contraction have higher frequency than 1 Hz. Insufficient sampling rates inevitably lead aliasing of the recorded signals in tissue oximetry for both brain and muscle. Cerebral Hb signals (57 y.o. female artificially ventilated under general anesthesia) and thigh muscle (22 y.o. male with 20 W - 240 W exercise at 1 Hz cycling in semirecumbent ergometer) were measured with NIRS monitor with temporal resolution of 10 Hz (OMRON Co. Ltd., Japan). The detail of physiological fluctuations such as pulsation, ventilation, and muscle pumping was clearly recognized with a 10 Hz sampling. The comparison with recalculated waveforms at slower sampling rate (0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 2 Hz) revealed that with slower sampling than 1 Hz cerebral respiratory waves were deformed by pulsation, and that magnitudes of muscle pumping could not be properly evaluated in dynamic exercise. In both pulsatile and muscle contractile cycle a phase delay between oxygenated component and deoxygenated one was also detected, which has been overlooked by conventional NIRS monitoring.

  3. Higher temporal resolution is necessary for continuous-wave near -infrared spectrophotometric monitors in both cerebral and muscular tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, Eiichi; Shiga, Toshikazu; Tanabe, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshifumi

    1998-01-01

    Conventional near infrared spectrophotometric monitors have temporal resolution of less than about 1 Hz. However, physiological Hb signals such as pulsation and muscle contraction have higher frequency than 1 Hz. Insufficient sampling rates inevitably lead aliasing of the recorded signals in tissue oximetry for both brain and muscle. Cerebral Hb signals (57 y.o. female artificially ventilated under general anesthesia) and thigh muscle (22 y.o. male with 20 W - 240 W exercise at 1 Hz cycling in semirecumbent ergometer) were measured with NIRS monitor with temporal resolution of 10 Hz (OMRON Co. Ltd., Japan). The detail of physiological fluctuations such as pulsation, ventilation, and muscle pumping was clearly recognized with a 10 Hz sampling. The comparison with recalculated waveforms at slower sampling rate (0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 2 Hz) revealed that with slower sampling than 1 Hz cerebral respiratory waves were deformed by pulsation, and that magnitudes of muscle pumping could not be properly evaluated in dynamic exercise. In both pulsatile and muscle contractile cycle a phase delay between oxygenated component and deoxygenated one was also detected, which has been overlooked by conventional NIRS monitoring.

  4. Decoding Overlapping Memories in the Medial Temporal Lobes Using High-Resolution fMRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Martin J.; Hassabis, Demis; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampus is proposed to process overlapping episodes as discrete memory traces, although direct evidence for this in human episodic memory is scarce. Using green-screen technology we created four highly overlapping movies of everyday events. Participants were scanned using high-resolution fMRI while recalling the movies. Multivariate…

  5. Influence of model resolution on spatial and temporal variability of clouds and precipitation over Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthlott, Christian; Hoose, Corinna

    2014-05-01

    To improve our understanding of cloud and precipitation processes and their implication for climate prediction, the research initiative High Definition Clouds and Precipitation (HDCP^2) has been started. Besides the development of a new model system capable of very high-resolution simulations over domains of 1000 km, a fundamental part of the project was a large measurement campaign near Jülich in western Germany which was conducted in spring 2013. These measurements enable a critical model evaluation at the scale of the model simulations and provide information on sub grid variability and microphysical properties that are subject to parameterizations. In order to explore the resolution dependence of clouds and precipitation in that area, numerical simulations with the Consortium for small-scale modeling (COSMO) model were conducted with horizontal grid spacings of 2.8 km, 1 km, 500 m, and 250 m. To analyze different synoptic conditions, simulations were performed for six intensive observation periods of the measurement campaign. It is found that although the representation of a number of processes is enhanced with resolution (e.g. boundary-layer thermals, convergence zones, gravity waves), their influence on the daily precipitation amount is rather weak. Probability density functions of convection- and cloud-relevant parameters are analyzed to investigate their dependence on model resolution and their impact on cloud formation and subsequent precipitation. Furthermore, first comparisons with radar-derived precipitation are shown.

  6. Human-Impacted Waters: Temporal Evolution of Human Proximity to Rivers from Global High Resolution Nighttime Lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, A.; Ceola, S.; Laio, F.

    2015-12-01

    The human presence close to streams and rivers is known to have consistently increased worldwide, therefore introducing dramatic anthropogenic and environmental changes. However, a spatio-temporal detailed analysis is missing to date. In this analysis, we propose a novel method to quantify the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of the anthropogenic presence along streams and rivers and in their immediate proximity at the global scale and at a high spatial resolution (i.e., nearly 1 km at the equator). We use satellite images of nocturnal lights, available as yearly snapshots from 1992 to 2013, and identify five distinct distance classes from the river network position. Our results show a temporal enhancement of human presence across the considered distance classes. In particular, we observed a higher human concentration in the vicinity of the river network, even though the frequency distribution of human beings in space has not significantly changed in the last two decades. Our results prove that fine scale remotely sensed data, as nightlights, may provide new perspectives in water science, improving our understanding of the human impact on water resources and water-related environments.

  7. Development of a spatio-temporal disaggregation method (DisNDVI) for generating a time series of fine resolution NDVI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhu, V. M.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-03-01

    Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a key parameter in understanding the vegetation dynamics, has high spatial and temporal variability. However, continuous monitoring of NDVI is not feasible at fine spatial resolution (<60 m) owing to the long revisit time needed by the satellites to acquire the fine spatial resolution data. Further, the study attains significance in the case of humid tropical regions of the earth, where the prevailing atmospheric conditions restrict availability of fine resolution cloud free images at a high temporal frequency. As an alternative to the lack of high resolution images, the current study demonstrates a novel disaggregation method (DisNDVI) which integrates the spatial information from a single fine resolution image and temporal information in terms of crop phenology from time series of coarse resolution images to generate estimates of NDVI at fine spatial and temporal resolution. The phenological variation of the pixels captured at the coarser scale provides the basis for relating the temporal variability of the pixel with the NDVI available at fine resolution. The proposed methodology was tested over a 30 km × 25 km spatially heterogeneous study area located in the south of Tamil Nadu, India. The robustness of the algorithm was assessed by an independent comparison of the disaggregated NDVI and observed NDVI obtained from concurrent Landsat ETM+ imagery. The results showed good spatial agreement across the study area dominated with agriculture and forest pixels, with a root mean square error of 0.05. The validation done at the coarser scale showed that disaggregated NDVI spatially averaged to 240 m compared well with concurrent MODIS NDVI at 240 m (R2 > 0.8). The validation results demonstrate the effectiveness of DisNDVI in improving the spatial and temporal resolution of NDVI images for utility in fine scale hydrological applications such as crop growth monitoring and estimation of evapotranspiration.

  8. Integrating Real-time and Manual Monitored Soil Moisture Data to Predict Hillslope Soil Moisture Variations with High Temporal Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing; Lv, Ligang; Zhou, Zhiwen; Liao, Kaihua

    2016-04-01

    Spatial-temporal variability of soil moisture 15 has been remaining an challenge to be better understood. A trade-off exists between spatial coverage and temporal resolution when using the manual and real-time soil moisture monitoring methods. This restricted the comprehensive and intensive examination of soil moisture dynamics. In this study, we aimed to integrate the manual and real-time monitored soil moisture to depict the hillslope dynamics of soil moisture with good spatial coverage and temporal resolution. Linear (stepwise multiple linear regression-SMLR) and non-linear models (support vector machines-SVM) were used to predict soil moisture at 38 manual sites (collected 1-2 times per month) with soil moisture automatically collected at three real-time monitoring sites (collected every 5 mins). By comparing the accuracies of SMLR and SVM for each manual site, optimal soil moisture prediction model of this site was then determined. Results show that soil moisture at these 38 manual sites can be reliably predicted (root mean square errors<0.035 m3 m-3) using this approach. Absence or occurrence of subsurface flow can probably influence the choosing of SMLR or SVM in the prediction, respectively. Depth to bedrock, elevation, topographic wetness index, profile curvature, and relative difference of soil moisture and its standard deviation influenced the selection of prediction model since they related to the dynamics of soil water distribution and movement. By using this approach, hillslope soil moisture spatial distributions at un-sampled times and dates were predicted after a typical rainfall event. Missing information of hillslope soil moisture dynamics was then acquired successfully. This can be benefit for determining the hot spots and moments of soil water movement, as well as designing the proper soil moisture monitoring plan at the field scale.

  9. Prediction of high spatio-temporal resolution land surface temperature under cloudy conditions using microwave vegetation index and ANN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, H. R.; Kumar, D. Nagesh

    2016-07-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) with high spatio-temporal resolution is in demand for hydrology, climate change, ecology, urban climate and environmental studies, etc. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the most commonly used sensors owing to its high spatial and temporal availability over the globe, but is incapable of providing LST data under cloudy conditions, resulting in gaps in the data. In contrast, microwave measurements have a capability to penetrate under clouds. The current study proposes a methodology by exploring this property to predict high spatio-temporal resolution LST under cloudy conditions during daytime and nighttime without employing in-situ LST measurements. To achieve this, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) based models are employed for different land cover classes, utilizing Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) at finer resolution with ancillary data. MPDI was derived using resampled (from 0.25° to 1 km) brightness temperatures (Tb) at 36.5 GHz channel of dual polarization from Advance Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR)-Earth Observing System and AMSR2 sensors. The proposed methodology is tested over Cauvery basin in India and the performance of the model is quantitatively evaluated through performance measures such as correlation coefficient (r), Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). Results revealed that during daytime, AMSR-E(AMSR2) derived LST under clear sky conditions corresponds well with MODIS LST resulting in values of r ranging from 0.76(0.78) to 0.90(0.96), RMSE from 1.76(1.86) K to 4.34(4.00) K and NSE from 0.58(0.61) to 0.81(0.90) for different land cover classes. During nighttime, r values ranged from 0.76(0.56) to 0.87(0.90), RMSE from 1.71(1.70) K to 2.43(2.12) K and NSE from 0.43(0.28) to 0.80(0.81) for different land cover classes. RMSE values found between predicted LST and MODIS LST during daytime under clear sky conditions were within acceptable

  10. Retrieving Aerosol in a Cloudy Environment: Aerosol Availability as a Function of Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.; Heidinger, Andrew; Pierce, R. Bradley; Chin, Mian

    2011-01-01

    The challenge of using satellite observations to retrieve aerosol properties in a cloudy environment is to prevent contamination of the aerosol signal from clouds, while maintaining sufficient aerosol product yield to satisfy specific applications. We investigate aerosol retrieval availability at different instrument pixel resolutions, using the standard MODIS aerosol cloud mask applied to MODIS data and a new GOES-R cloud mask applied to GOES data for a domain covering North America and surrounding oceans. Aerosol availability is not the same as the cloud free fraction and takes into account the technqiues used in the MODIS algorithm to avoid clouds, reduce noise and maintain sufficient numbers of aerosol retrievals. The inherent spatial resolution of each instrument, 0.5x0.5 km for MODIS and 1x1 km for GOES, is systematically degraded to 1x1 km, 2x2 km, 4x4 km and 8x8 km resolutions and then analyzed as to how that degradation would affect the availability of an aerosol retrieval, assuming an aerosol product resolution at 8x8 km. The results show that as pixel size increases, availability decreases until at 8x8 km 70% to 85% of the retrievals available at 0.5 km have been lost. The diurnal pattern of aerosol retrieval availability examined for one day in the summer suggests that coarse resolution sensors (i.e., 4x4 km or 8x8 km) may be able to retrieve aerosol early in the morning that would otherwise be missed at the time of current polar orbiting satellites, but not the diurnal aerosol properties due to cloud cover developed during the day. In contrast finer resolution sensors (i.e., 1x1 km or 2x2 km) have much better opportunity to retrieve aerosols in the partly cloudy scenes and better chance of returning the diurnal aerosol properties. Large differences in the results of the two cloud masks designed for MODIS aerosol and GOES cloud products strongly reinforce that cloud masks must be developed with specific purposes in mind and that a generic cloud mask

  11. From AWE-GEN to AWE-GEN-2d: a high spatial and temporal resolution weather generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    A new weather generator, AWE-GEN-2d (Advanced WEather GENerator for 2-Dimension grid) is developed following the philosophy of combining physical and stochastic approaches to simulate meteorological variables at high spatial and temporal resolution (e.g. 2 km x 2 km and 5 min for precipitation and cloud cover and 100 m x 100 m and 1 h for other variables variable (temperature, solar radiation, vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure and near-surface wind). The model is suitable to investigate the impacts of climate variability, temporal and spatial resolutions of forcing on hydrological, ecological, agricultural and geomorphological impacts studies. Using appropriate parameterization the model can be used in the context of climate change. Here we present the model technical structure of AWE-GEN-2d, which is a substantial evolution of four preceding models (i) the hourly-point scale Advanced WEather GENerator (AWE-GEN) presented by Fatichi et al. (2011, Adv. Water Resour.) (ii) the Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation (STREAP) model introduced by Paschalis et al. (2013, Water Resour. Res.), (iii) the High-Resolution Synoptically conditioned Weather Generator developed by Peleg and Morin (2014, Water Resour. Res.), and (iv) the Wind-field Interpolation by Non Divergent Schemes presented by Burlando et al. (2007, Boundary-Layer Meteorol.). The AWE-GEN-2d is relatively parsimonious in terms of computational demand and allows generating many stochastic realizations of current and projected climates in an efficient way. An example of model application and testing is presented with reference to a case study in the Wallis region, a complex orography terrain in the Swiss Alps.

  12. A Spatio-temporal disaggregation method to derive time series of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and Land Surface Temperature at fine spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhu, V. M.; Narasimhan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) from remote sensing based energy balance models have evolved as a promising tool in the field of water resources management. Performance of energy balance models and reliability of ET estimates is decided by the availability of remote sensing data at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However huge tradeoff in the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite images act as major constraints in deriving ET at fine spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing based energy balance models. Hence a need exists to derive finer resolution data from the available coarse resolution imagery, which could be applied to deliver ET estimates at scales to the range of individual fields. The current study employed a spatio-temporal disaggregation method to derive fine spatial resolution (60 m) images of NDVI by integrating the information in terms of crop phenology derived from time series of MODIS NDVI composites with fine resolution NDVI derived from a single AWiFS data acquired during the season. The disaggregated images of NDVI at fine resolution were used to disaggregate MODIS LST data at 960 m resolution to the scale of Landsat LST data at 60 m resolution. The robustness of the algorithm was verified by comparison of the disaggregated NDVI and LST with concurrent NDVI and LST images derived from Landsat ETM+. The results showed that disaggregated NDVI and LST images compared well with the concurrent NDVI and LST derived from ETM+ at fine resolution with a high Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency and low Root Mean Square Error. The proposed disaggregation method proves promising in generating time series of ET at fine resolution for effective water management.

  13. High-resolution temporal analysis of deep subseafloor microbial communities inhabiting basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungbluth, S.; Lin, H. T.; Hsieh, C. C.; Rappe, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The temporal variation in microbial communities inhabiting the anoxic, sediment-covered basaltic ocean basement is largely uncharacterized due to the inaccessible nature of the environment and difficulties associated with collection of samples from low-biomass microbial habitats. Here, a deep sea instrumented platform was employed on the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the summer of 2013 to collect 46 samples of basement fluids from the most recent generation of borehole observatories (U1362A and B), which feature multiple sampling horizons at a single location and fluid delivery lines manufactured using stainless steel or inert polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) parts. Included were three time-series deployments of the GEOmicrobe sled meant to resolve the fine-scale (i.e. hourly) temporal variation within in situ crustal microbial communities. Illumina technology was used to sequence small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene fragments from sediment, seawater, and subseafloor fluids. Similar to has been reported previously, basic differences in the three environments was observed. Fluid samples from depth horizons extending 30, 70, and ~200 meters sub-basement revealed differences in the observed microbial communities, indicating potential depth-specific zonation of microorganisms in the basaltic basement fluids. Extensive overlap between microorganisms collected from a single depth horizon but using two fluid delivery lines manufactured with different materials was observed, though some differences were also noted. Several archaeal (e.g. THSCG, MCG, MBGE, Archaeoglobus) and bacterial (e.g. Nitrospiraceae, OP8, KB1) lineages detected in previous years of basement fluid sampling nearby were found here, which further supports the notion that these microorganisms are stable residents of anoxic basaltic subseafloor fluids. Direct cell enumeration of samples collected from U1362A and U1362B revealed an elevated biomass compared to samples at these locations from previous years

  14. Imaging Shock Waves in Diamond with Both High Temporal and Spatial Resolution at an XFEL.

    PubMed

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G; Beckwith, Martha A; Collins, Gilbert W; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B; Schroer, Christian G

    2015-01-01

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.

  15. Imaging Shock Waves in Diamond with Both High Temporal and Spatial Resolution at an XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2015-06-01

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.

  16. Measuring Absolute RNA Copy Numbers at High Temporal Resolution Reveals Transcriptome Kinetics in Development.

    PubMed

    Owens, Nick D L; Blitz, Ira L; Lane, Maura A; Patrushev, Ilya; Overton, John D; Gilchrist, Michael J; Cho, Ken W Y; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-01-26

    Transcript regulation is essential for cell function, and misregulation can lead to disease. Despite technologies to survey the transcriptome, we lack a comprehensive understanding of transcript kinetics, which limits quantitative biology. This is an acute challenge in embryonic development, where rapid changes in gene expression dictate cell fate decisions. By ultra-high-frequency sampling of Xenopus embryos and absolute normalization of sequence reads, we present smooth gene expression trajectories in absolute transcript numbers. During a developmental period approximating the first 8 weeks of human gestation, transcript kinetics vary by eight orders of magnitude. Ordering genes by expression dynamics, we find that "temporal synexpression" predicts common gene function. Remarkably, a single parameter, the characteristic timescale, can classify transcript kinetics globally and distinguish genes regulating development from those involved in cellular metabolism. Overall, our analysis provides unprecedented insight into the reorganization of maternal and embryonic transcripts and redefines our ability to perform quantitative biology.

  17. High-resolution temporal analysis reveals a functional timeline for the molecular regulation of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Tim; Jordan, Shawn N; Chand, Vandana; Sees, Jennifer A; Laband, Kimberley; Carvalho, Ana X; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi; Kovar, David R; Dumont, Julien; Canman, Julie C

    2014-07-28

    To take full advantage of fast-acting temperature-sensitive mutations, thermal control must be extremely rapid. We developed the Therminator, a device capable of shifting sample temperature in ~17 s while simultaneously imaging cell division in vivo. Applying this technology to six key regulators of cytokinesis, we found that each has a distinct temporal requirement in the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote. Specifically, myosin-II is required throughout cytokinesis until contractile ring closure. In contrast, formin-mediated actin nucleation is only required during assembly and early contractile ring constriction. Centralspindlin is required to maintain division after ring closure, although its GAP activity is only required until just prior to closure. Finally, the chromosomal passenger complex is required for cytokinesis only early in mitosis, but not during metaphase or cytokinesis. Together, our results provide a precise functional timeline for molecular regulators of cytokinesis using the Therminator, a powerful tool for ultra-rapid protein inactivation.

  18. High-resolution temporal analysis reveals a functional timeline for the molecular regulation of cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Tim; Jordan, Shawn N.; Chand, Vandana; Sees, Jennifer A.; Laband, Kimberley; Carvalho, Ana; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi; Kovar, David R.; Dumont, Julien; Canman, Julie C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary To take full advantage of fast-acting temperature-sensitive mutations, thermal control must be extremely rapid. We developed the Therminator, a device capable of shifting sample temperature in ~17s while simultaneously imaging cell division in vivo. Applying this technology to six key regulators of cytokinesis, we found that each has a distinct temporal requirement in the C. elegans zygote. Specifically, myosin-II is required throughout cytokinesis until contractile ring closure. In contrast, formin-mediated actin nucleation is only required during assembly and early contractile ring constriction. Centralspindlin is required to maintain division after ring closure, though its GAP activity is only required until just prior to closure. Finally, the Chromosomal Passenger Complex is required for cytokinesis only early in mitosis, but not during metaphase or cytokinesis. Together, our results provide a precise functional timeline for molecular regulators of cytokinesis using the Therminator, a powerful tool for ultra-rapid protein inactivation. PMID:25073157

  19. Imaging Shock Waves in Diamond with Both High Temporal and Spatial Resolution at an XFEL

    PubMed Central

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions. PMID:26086176

  20. Overview of selected surrogate technologies for high-temporal resolution suspended-sediment monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional methods for characterizing selected properties of suspended sediments in rivers are being augmented and in some cases replaced by cost-effective surrogate instruments and methods that produce a temporally dense time series of quantifiably accurate data for use primarily in sediment-flux computations. Turbidity is the most common such surrogate technology, and the first to be sanctioned by the U.S. Geological Survey for use in producing data used in concert with water-discharge data to compute sediment concentrations and fluxes for storage in the National Water Information System. Other technologies, including laser-diffraction, digital photo-optic, acoustic-attenuation and backscatter, and pressure-difference techniques are being evaluated for producing reliable sediment concentration and, in some cases, particle-size distribution data. Each technology addresses a niche for sediment monitoring. Their performances range from compelling to disappointing. Some of these technologies have the potential to revolutionize fluvial-sediment data collection, analysis, and availability.

  1. Imaging shock waves in diamond with both high temporal and spatial resolution at an XFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S.; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C.; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B.; Schroer, Christian G.

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.

  2. A high spatio-temporal resolution optical pyrometer at the ORION laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, Emma; Gumbrell, Edward T.; Fyrth, Jim; Luis, James D.; Skidmore, Jonathan W.; Patankar, Siddharth; Giltrap, Samuel; Smith, Roland

    2016-11-01

    A streaked pyrometer has been designed to measure the temperature of ≈100 μm diameter heated targets in the warm dense matter region. The diagnostic has picosecond time resolution. Spatial resolution is limited by the streak camera to 4 μm in one dimension; the imaging system has superior resolution of 1 μm. High light collection efficiency means that the diagnostic can transmit a measurable quantity of thermal emission at temperatures as low as 1 eV to the detector. This is achieved through the use of an f/1.4 objective, and a minimum number of reflecting and refracting surfaces to relay the image over 8 m with no vignetting over a 0.4 mm field of view with 12.5× magnification. All the system optics are highly corrected, to allow imaging with minimal aberrations over a broad spectral range. The detector is a highly sensitive Axis Photonique streak camera with a P820PSU streak tube. For the first time, two of these cameras have been absolutely calibrated at 1 ns and 2 ns sweep speeds under full operational conditions and over 8 spectral bands between 425 nm and 650 nm using a high-stability picosecond white light source. Over this range the cameras had a response which varied between 47 ± 8 and 14 ± 4 photons/count. The calibration of the optical imaging system makes absolute temperature measurements possible. Color temperature measurements are also possible due to the wide spectral range over which the system is calibrated; two different spectral bands can be imaged onto different parts of the photocathode of the same streak camera.

  3. A Global Climate Model Agent for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Lynn S.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Henry, Michael J.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Dazlich, Donald A.; Heikes, Ross P.; Randall, David

    2015-02-01

    Fine cell granularity in modern climate models can produce terabytes of data in each snapshot, causing significant I/O overhead. To address this issue, a method of reducing the I/O latency of high-resolution climate models by identifying and selectively outputting regions of interest is presented. Working with a Global Cloud Resolving Model and running with up to 10240 processors on a Cray XE6, this method provides significant I/O bandwidth reduction depending on the frequency of writes and size of the region of interest. The implementation challenges of determining global parameters in a strictly core-localized model and properly formatting output files that only contain subsections of the global grid are addressed, as well as the overall bandwidth impact and benefits of the method. The gains in I/O throughput provided by this method allow dual output rates for high-resolution climate models: a low-frequency global snapshot as well as a high-frequency regional snapshot when events of particular interest occur.

  4. X-ray pulse preserving single-shot optical cross-correlation method for improved experimental temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Beye, M.; Krupin, O.; Hays, G.; Jong, S. de; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Holmes, M. R.; Fry, A. R.; White, W. E.; Bostedt, C.; Schlotter, W. F.; Reid, A. H.; Rupp, D.; Lee, W.-S.; Scherz, A. O.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Foehlisch, A.; Durr, H. A.

    2012-03-19

    We measured the relative arrival time between an optical pulse and a soft x-ray pulse from a free-electron laser. This femtosecond cross-correlation measurement was achieved by observing the change in optical reflectivity induced through the absorption of a fraction of the x-ray pulse. The main x-ray pulse energy remained available for an independent pump-probe experiment where the sample may be opaque to soft x-rays. The method was employed to correct the two-pulse delay data from a canonical pump-probe experiment and demonstrate 130 {+-} 20 fs (FWHM) temporal resolution. We further analyze possible timing jitter sources and point to future improvements.

  5. Efficacy of two iso-propanol-based skin antiseptics applied to human skin with many sebaceous glands for 2 and 10 minutes

    PubMed Central

    Kampf, Günter; Sammann, Andreas; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Christiansen, Bärbel; Heeg, Peter; Nowak, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent research suggests that specific ethanol-based skin antiseptics exhibit their efficacy on the resident skin flora of the forehead in only 2.5 minutes. We have now looked at the efficacy of two skin antiseptics based on 63% (w/w) propan-2-ol (iso-propanol) and applied for 10 and 2 minutes on skin with a high density of sebaceous glands. Methods: Each experiment was performed in a reference-controlled cross-over design with at least 20 participants. Application of isopropanol (70%, v/v) for 10 minutes to the forehead served as the reference treatment. Pre-values and post-values (immediately after the application and after 30 min) were obtained by swabbing a marked area of 5 cm2 for about 10 s. Swabs were vortexed in tryptic soy broth containing valid neutralizing agents. After serial dilution aliquots were spread on tryptic soy agar. Colonies were counted after incubation of plates at 36°C for 48 h. The mean log10 reduction of bacteria was calculated. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used for a comparison of treatments. Results: Skin antiseptic A applied for 10 min (one experiment) was equally effective to the reference treatment. When applied for 2 min (two experiments) it was still equally effective to the reference treatment immediately after application (e.g. 1.6 versus 1.4 log10 reduction) and after 30 min (1.7 versus 1.4 log10 reduction). Skin antiseptic B applied for 10 and 2 min (one experiment each) was also equally effective to the reference treatment both immediately after application and after 30 min. Conclusions: The clear and coloured skin antiseptics applied for 2 min on the skin of the forehead fulfilled the national efficacy requirements for skin antisepsis. The shorter application time on skin with a high density of sebaceous glands will allow acting more efficiently in clinical practice. PMID:24653974

  6. Temporal Correlations in Vortex Channel Flow Studied Using High-Resolution Hall Probes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S.; Field, S. B.; Shtrikman, H.; Hong, K.; Reich, D. H.

    1998-03-01

    The dynamics of vortices near the depinning transition can be quite complex, with vortices moving via channel-like flow configurations in a manner which is not fully understood. We have investigated this system using single and multiple GaAs heterojunction Hall probes fixed to a current-carrying Nb strip. A single 1μm fixed probe reveals that the (time-averaged) flux beneath it changes in a discrete fashion at evidently random times. The flux may remain at a particular value for up to several seconds before changing, during which time millions of vortices pass under the probe. This suggests that the vortices flow along very long-lived channels which occasionally rearrange themselves, perhaps due to thermal activation of pinned vortices. An extension of the investigation using a linear array of 16 Hall probes arranged perpendicular to the vortex flow will further reveal spatial and temporal correlations in this channel flow. The array consists of a 1μm-wide bar along which adjoin 16 pairs of 1μm-wide voltage leads at 1μm intervals. A 16 channel digital lockin technique has been developed to record the data.

  7. Imaging shock waves in diamond with both high temporal and spatial resolution at an XFEL

    DOE PAGES

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; et al

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnifiedmore » x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.« less

  8. SpaciMS: spatial and temporal operando resolution of reactions within catalytic monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Sa, Jacinto; Fernandes, Daniel; Aiouache, Farid; Goguet, Alexandre; Hardacdre, Christopher; Lundie, David; Naeem, Wasif; Partridge Jr, William P; Stere, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic catalysts are widely used as structured catalysts, especially in the abatement of pollutants. Probing what happens inside these monoliths during operation is, therefore, vital for modelling and prediction of the catalyst behavior. SpaciMS is a spatially resolved capillary-inlet mass spectroscopy system allowing for the generation of spatially resolved maps of the reactions within monoliths. In this study SpaciMS results combined with 3D CFD modelling demonstrate that SpaciMS is a highly sensitive and minimally invasive technique that can provide reaction maps as well as catalytic temporal behavior. Herein we illustrate this by examining kinetic oscillations during a CO oxidation reaction over a Pt/Rh on alumina catalyst supported on a cordierite monolith. These oscillations were only observed within the monolith by SpaciMS between 30 and 90% CO conversion. Equivalent experiments performed in a plug-flow reactor using this catalyst in a crushed form over a similar range of reaction conditions did not display any oscillations demonstrating the importance of intra monolith analysis. This work demonstrates that the SpaciMS offers an accurate and comprehensive picture of structured catalysts under operation.

  9. Using large-scale neural models to interpret connectivity measures of cortico-cortical dynamics at millisecond temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arpan; Pillai, Ajay S.; Horwitz, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades numerous functional imaging studies have shown that higher order cognitive functions are crucially dependent on the formation of distributed, large-scale neuronal assemblies (neurocognitive networks), often for very short durations. This has fueled the development of a vast number of functional connectivity measures that attempt to capture the spatiotemporal evolution of neurocognitive networks. Unfortunately, interpreting the neural basis of goal directed behavior using connectivity measures on neuroimaging data are highly dependent on the assumptions underlying the development of the measure, the nature of the task, and the modality of the neuroimaging technique that was used. This paper has two main purposes. The first is to provide an overview of some of the different measures of functional/effective connectivity that deal with high temporal resolution neuroimaging data. We will include some results that come from a recent approach that we have developed to identify the formation and extinction of task-specific, large-scale neuronal assemblies from electrophysiological recordings at a ms-by-ms temporal resolution. The second purpose of this paper is to indicate how to partially validate the interpretations drawn from this (or any other) connectivity technique by using simulated data from large-scale, neurobiologically realistic models. Specifically, we applied our recently developed method to realistic simulations of MEG data during a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) task condition and a passive viewing of stimuli condition using a large-scale neural model of the ventral visual processing pathway. Simulated MEG data using simple head models were generated from sources placed in V1, V4, IT, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) for the passive viewing condition. The results show how closely the conclusions obtained from the functional connectivity method match with what actually occurred at the neuronal network level. PMID:22291621

  10. MPI as high temporal resolution imaging technique for in vivo bolus tracking of Ferucarbotran in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C.; Salamon, J.; Hofmann, M.; Kaul, M. G.; Adam, G.; Ittrich, H.; Knopp, T.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to achieve a real time 3D visualisation of the murine cardiovascular system by intravenously injected superparamagnetic nanoparticles using Magnetic particle imaging (MPI). Material and Methods: MPI scans of FVB mice were performed using a 3D imaging sequence (1T/m gradient strength, 10mT drive-field strength). A dynamic scan with a temporal resolution of 21.5ms per 3D volume acquisition was performed. 50μl ferucarbotran (Resovist®, Bayer Healthcare AG) were injected into the tail vein after baseline MPI measurements. As MPI delivers no anatomic information, MRI scans at a 7T ClinScan (Bruker) were performed using a T2-weighted 2D TSE sequence. The reconstruction of the MPI data was performed on the MPI console (ParaVision 6.0/MPI, Bruker). Image fusion was done using additional image processing software (Imalytics, Philips). The dynamic information was extracted using custom software developed in the Julia programming environment. Results: The combined MRI-MPI measurements were carried out successfully. MPI data clearly demonstrated the passage of the SPIO tracer through the inferior vena cava, the heart and finally the liver. By co-registration with MRI the anatomical regions were identified. Due to the volume frame rate of about 46 volumes per second a signal modulation with the frequency of the heart beat was detectable and a heart beat of 520 beats per minute (bpm) has been assumed. Moreover, the blood flow velocity of approximately 5cm/s in the vena cava has been estimated. Conclusions: The high temporal resolution of MPI allows real-time imaging and bolus tracking of intravenous injected nanoparticles and offers a real time tool to assess blood flow velocity.

  11. A new CT system architecture for high temporal resolution with applications to improved geometric dose efficiency and sparse sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2015-03-01

    A new scalable CT system architecture is introduced with the potential to achieve much higher temporal resolution than is possible with current CT designs while maintaining the flux per rotation near today's levels. Higher effective rotation speeds can be achieved leveraging today's x-ray tube designs and capabilities. The new CT architecture comprises the following elements: (1) decoupling of the source rotation from the detector rotation through the provision of two independent, coaxial and coplanar rotating gantries (drums); (2) observation of a source at a range of azimuthal angles with respect to a given detector cell; (3) utilization of a multiplicity of x-ray sources; (4) use of a wide-angle iso-centered detector mounted on the independent detector drum; (5) the detector drum presents a wide angular aperture allowing x-rays from the various sources to pass through, with the active detector cells occupying about 240-degrees in one configuration, and the wide aperture the complementary 120-degrees; (6) anti-scatter grids with absorbing lamellas oriented substantially parallel to the main gantry plane; (7) optional sparse view acquisition in "bunches," a unique sparse sampling pattern potentially enabling further data acquisition speed-up for specific applications. Temporal resolution gains are achieved when multiple sources are simultaneously in view of the extended detector. Accurate data acquisition then relies on multiplexing in space, time, or spectra. Thus the use of an energy-discriminating detector, such as a photon-counting detector, and of tube pulsing will be advantageous. Volume-based scatter correction methods have the potential to apply when space multiplexing is used.

  12. High spatio-temporal resolution observations of crater lake temperatures at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Caudron, Corentin; van Hinsberg, Vincent J.; Hilley, George E.

    2016-08-01

    The crater lake of Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia, has displayed large and rapid changes in temperature at point locations during periods of unrest, but measurement techniques employed to date have not resolved how the lake's thermal regime has evolved over both space and time. We applied a novel approach for mapping and monitoring variations in crater lake apparent surface ("skin") temperatures at high spatial (˜32 cm) and temporal (every 2 min) resolution at Kawah Ijen on 18 September 2014. We used a ground-based FLIR T650sc camera with digital and thermal infrared (TIR) sensors from the crater rim to collect (1) a set of visible imagery around the crater during the daytime and (2) a time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one location from pre-dawn to daytime. We processed daytime visible imagery with the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which the time series of TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Lake apparent skin temperatures typically ranged from ˜21 to 33 °C. At two locations, apparent skin temperatures were ˜4 and 7 °C less than in situ lake temperature measurements at 1.5 and 5-m depth, respectively. These differences, as well as the large spatio-temporal variations observed in skin temperatures, were likely largely associated with atmospheric effects such as the evaporative cooling of the lake surface and infrared absorption by water vapor and SO2. Calculations based on orthorectified TIR imagery thus yielded underestimates of volcanic heat fluxes into the lake, whereas volcanic heat fluxes estimated based on in situ temperature measurements (68 to 111 MW) were likely more representative of Kawah Ijen in a quiescent state. The ground-based imaging technique should provide a valuable tool to continuously monitor crater lake temperatures and contribute insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of these temperatures associated with volcanic activity.

  13. SU-E-J-126: Respiratory Gating Quality Assurance: A Simple Method to Achieve Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, B; Wiersma, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Low temporal latency between a gating on/off signal and a linac beam on/off during respiratory gating is critical for patient safety. Although, a measurement of temporal lag is recommended by AAPM Task Group 142 for commissioning and annual quality assurance, there currently exists no published method. Here we describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to precisely measure gating lag at millisecond resolutions. Methods: A Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) gating simulator with rotating disk was modified with a resistive flex sensor (Spectra Symbol) attached to the gating box platform. A photon diode was placed at machine isocenter. Output signals of the flex sensor and diode were monitored with a multichannel oscilloscope (Tektronix™ DPO3014). Qualitative inspection of the gating window/beam on synchronicity were made by setting the linac to beam on/off at end-expiration, and the oscilloscope's temporal window to 100 ms to visually examine if the on/off timing was within the recommended 100-ms tolerance. Quantitative measurements were made by saving the signal traces and analyzing in MatLab™. The on and off of the beam signal were located and compared to the expected gating window (e.g. 40% to 60%). Four gating cycles were measured and compared. Results: On a Varian TrueBeam™ STx linac with RPM gating software, the average difference in synchronicity at beam on and off for four cycles was 14 ms (3 to 30 ms) and 11 ms (2 to 32 ms), respectively. For a Varian Clinac™ 21EX the average difference at beam on and off was 127 ms (122 to 133 ms) and 46 ms (42 to 49 ms), respectively. The uncertainty in the synchrony difference was estimated at ±6 ms. Conclusion: This new gating QA method is easy to implement and allows for fast qualitative inspection and quantitative measurements for commissioning and TG-142 annual QA measurements.

  14. Improved estimates of boreal Fire Radiative Energy using high temporal resolution data and a modified active fire detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    Reliable estimates of biomass combusted during wildfires can be obtained from satellite observations of fire radiative power (FRP). Total fire radiative energy (FRE) is typically estimated by integrating instantaneous measurements of fire radiative power (FRP) at the time of orbital satellite overpass or geostationary observation. Remotely-sensed FRP products from orbital satellites are usually global in extent, requiring several thresholding and filtering operations to reduce the number of false fire detections. Some filters required for a global product may not be appropriate to fire detection in the boreal forest resulting in errors of omission and increased data processing times. We evaluate the effect of a boreal-specific active fire detection algorithm and estimates of FRP/FRE. Boreal fires are more likely to escape detection due to lower intensity smouldering combustion and sub canopy fires, therefore improvements in boreal fire detection could substantially reduce the uncertainty of emissions from biomass combustion in the region. High temporal resolution data from geostationary satellites have led to improvements in FRE estimation in tropical and temperate forests, but such a perspective is not possible for high latitude ecosystems given the equatorial orbit of geostationary observation. The increased density of overpasses in high latitudes from polar-orbiting satellites, however, may provide adequate temporal sampling for estimating FRE.

  15. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters - exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C; Keller, Virginie D J; Williams, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ~6 x 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production.Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L(-1) nano silver and 1.5 ng L(-1) nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L(-1) and 150 ng L(-1), respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July. PMID:25463731

  16. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters - exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C; Keller, Virginie D J; Williams, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ~6 x 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production.Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L(-1) nano silver and 1.5 ng L(-1) nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L(-1) and 150 ng L(-1), respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July.

  17. From runoff to rainfall: inverse rainfall-runoff modelling in a high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrnegger, M.; Nachtnebel, H. P.; Schulz, K.

    2015-11-01

    Rainfall exhibits a large spatio-temporal variability, especially in complex alpine terrain. Additionally, the density of the monitoring network in mountainous regions is low and measurements are subjected to major errors, which lead to significant uncertainties in areal rainfall estimates. In contrast, the most reliable hydrological information available refers to runoff, which in the presented work is used as input for an inverted HBV-type rainfall-runoff model that is embedded in a root finding algorithm. For every time step a rainfall value is determined, which results in a simulated runoff value closely matching the observed runoff. The inverse model is applied and tested to the Schliefau and Krems catchments, situated in the northern Austrian Alpine foothills. The correlations between inferred rainfall and station observations in the proximity of the catchments are of similar magnitude compared to the correlations between station observations and independent INCA (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis) rainfall analyses provided by the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG). The cumulative precipitation sums also show similar dynamics. The application of the inverse model is a promising approach to obtain additional information on mean areal rainfall. This additional information is not solely limited to the simulated hourly data but also includes the aggregated daily rainfall rates, which show a significantly higher correlation to the observed values. Potential applications of the inverse model include gaining additional information on catchment rainfall for interpolation purposes, flood forecasting or the estimation of snowmelt contribution. The application is limited to (smaller) catchments, which can be represented with a lumped model setup, and to the estimation of liquid rainfall.

  18. Agro-hydrology and multi-temporal high-resolution remote sensing: toward an explicit spatial processes calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrant, S.; Gascoin, S.; Veloso, A.; Salmon-Monviola, J.; Claverie, M.; Rivalland, V.; Dedieu, G.; Demarez, V.; Ceschia, E.; Probst, J.-L.; Durand, P.; Bustillo, V.

    2014-12-01

    The growing availability of high-resolution satellite image series offers new opportunities in agro-hydrological research and modeling. We investigated the possibilities offered for improving crop-growth dynamic simulation with the distributed agro-hydrological model: topography-based nitrogen transfer and transformation (TNT2). We used a leaf area index (LAI) map series derived from 105 Formosat-2 (F2) images covering the period 2006-2010. The TNT2 model (Beaujouan et al., 2002), calibrated against discharge and in-stream nitrate fluxes for the period 1985-2001, was tested on the 2005-2010 data set (climate, land use, agricultural practices, and discharge and nitrate fluxes at the outlet). Data from the first year (2005) were used to initialize the hydrological model. A priori agricultural practices obtained from an extensive field survey, such as seeding date, crop cultivar, and amount of fertilizer, were used as input variables. Continuous values of LAI as a function of cumulative daily temperature were obtained at the crop-field level by fitting a double logistic equation against discrete satellite-derived LAI. Model predictions of LAI dynamics using the a priori input parameters displayed temporal shifts from those observed LAI profiles that are irregularly distributed in space (between field crops) and time (between years). By resetting the seeding date at the crop-field level, we have developed an optimization method designed to efficiently minimize this temporal shift and better fit the crop growth against both the spatial observations and crop production. This optimization of simulated LAI has a negligible impact on water budgets at the catchment scale (1 mm yr-1 on average) but a noticeable impact on in-stream nitrogen fluxes (around 12%), which is of interest when considering nitrate stream contamination issues and the objectives of TNT2 modeling. This study demonstrates the potential contribution of the forthcoming high spatial and temporal resolution

  19. Multi-temporal high resolution monitoring of debris-covered glaciers using unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijenbrink, Philip; Immerzeel, Walter; de Jong, Steven; Shea, Joseph; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Meijer, Sander; Shresta, Arun

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers in the Himalayas are relatively unstudied due to the difficulties in fieldwork caused by the inaccessible terrain and the presence of debris layers, which complicate in situ measurements. To overcome these difficulties an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) has been deployed multiple times over two debris covered glaciers in the Langtang catchment, located in the Nepalese Himalayas. Using differential GPS measurements and the Structure for Motion algorithm the UAV imagery was processed into accurate high-resolution digital elevation models and orthomosaics for both pre- and post-monsoon periods. These data were successfully used to estimate seasonal surface flow and mass wasting by using cross-correlation feature tracking and DEM differencing techniques. The results reveal large heterogeneity in mass loss and surface flow over the glacier surfaces, which are primarily caused by the presence of surface features such as ice cliffs and supra-glacial lakes. Accordingly, we systematically analyze those features using an object-based approach and relate their characteristics to the observed dynamics. We show that ice cliffs and supra-glacial lakes are contributing to a significant portion of the melt water of debris covered glaciers and we conclude that UAVs have great potential in understanding the key surface processes that remain largely undetected by using satellite remote sensing.

  20. High Resolution Temporal and Spectral Monitoring of Eta Carinae's X-Ray Emission the June Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Henley, D.; Pittard, J. M.; Gull, T. R.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    The supermassive and luminous star Eta Carinae undergoes strong X-ray variations every 5.5 years when its 2-10 keV X-ray emission brightens rapidly with wild fluctuations before dropping by a factor of 100 to a minimum lasting 3 months. The most recent X-ray "eclipse" began in June 2003 and during this time Eta Carinae was intensely observed throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. Here we report the first results of frequent monitoring of the 2-10 keV band X-ray emission by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer along wit high resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the transmission gratings on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We compare these observations to those results obtained during the previous X-ray eclipse in 1998, and interpret the variations in the X-ray brightness, in the amount of absorption, in the X-ray emission measure and in the K-shell emission lines in terms of a colliding wind binary model.

  1. Model-free uncertainty estimation in stochastical optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) leads to a doubled temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Wim; Duwé, Sam; Leutenegger, Marcel; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Krajnik, Bartosz; Lasser, Theo; Dedecker, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a super-resolution fluorescence imaging technique that makes use of stochastic fluctuations in the emission of the fluorophores. During a SOFI measurement multiple fluorescence images are acquired from the sample, followed by the calculation of the spatiotemporal cumulants of the intensities observed at each position. Compared to other techniques, SOFI works well under conditions of low signal-to-noise, high background, or high emitter densities. However, it can be difficult to unambiguously determine the reliability of images produced by any superresolution imaging technique. In this work we present a strategy that enables the estimation of the variance or uncertainty associated with each pixel in the SOFI image. In addition to estimating the image quality or reliability, we show that this can be used to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of SOFI images by including multiple pixel combinations in the cumulant calculation. We present an algorithm to perform this optimization, which automatically takes all relevant instrumental, sample, and probe parameters into account. Depending on the optical magnification of the system, this strategy can be used to improve the SNR of a SOFI image by 40% to 90%. This gain in information is entirely free, in the sense that it does not require additional efforts or complications. Alternatively our approach can be applied to reduce the number of fluorescence images to meet a particular quality level by about 30% to 50%, strongly improving the temporal resolution of SOFI imaging.

  2. High spatio-temporal resolution PIV of laminar boundary layer relaxation instability at the free surface of a jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Matthieu; Bardet, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    In high-speed free surface flows, microscale instabilities can lead to dramatic macroscale effects such as waves, breakup, or air entrainment. The importance of jets in practical applications requires a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to these instabilities. This experimental study focuses on laminar boundary layer relaxation (LBLR) instability. This has received fewer attention than other instabilities due to the small scale, the high Reynolds number and the proximity of an interface. The experiment features a 20 . 3 mm × 146 . 0 mm laminar slab wall jet exiting a nozzle into quiescent air (Re= 3 . 1 ×104 to 1 . 6 ×105). The free surface is flat near the nozzle exit then the LBLR leads to 2D capillary waves which can become very steep eventually resulting in primary breakup and air entrainment. The inception and growth of the capillaries are investigated using time-resolved PIV coupled with PLIF to track the free surface. A magnification of 4 allows a spatial and temporal resolution better than 0.1mm and 0.1ms, respectively. These high resolution results show the role of vortices -created by the roll-up of the shear layer below the surface- in the formation of capillaries. Vortices and waves are a coupled system; the waves can sustain, damp, or amplify. This study has been supported by the start-up funds from The George Washington University to Dr. Bardet.

  3. Model-free uncertainty estimation in stochastical optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) leads to a doubled temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Wim; Duwé, Sam; Leutenegger, Marcel; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Krajnik, Bartosz; Lasser, Theo; Dedecker, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a super-resolution fluorescence imaging technique that makes use of stochastic fluctuations in the emission of the fluorophores. During a SOFI measurement multiple fluorescence images are acquired from the sample, followed by the calculation of the spatiotemporal cumulants of the intensities observed at each position. Compared to other techniques, SOFI works well under conditions of low signal-to-noise, high background, or high emitter densities. However, it can be difficult to unambiguously determine the reliability of images produced by any superresolution imaging technique. In this work we present a strategy that enables the estimation of the variance or uncertainty associated with each pixel in the SOFI image. In addition to estimating the image quality or reliability, we show that this can be used to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of SOFI images by including multiple pixel combinations in the cumulant calculation. We present an algorithm to perform this optimization, which automatically takes all relevant instrumental, sample, and probe parameters into account. Depending on the optical magnification of the system, this strategy can be used to improve the SNR of a SOFI image by 40% to 90%. This gain in information is entirely free, in the sense that it does not require additional efforts or complications. Alternatively our approach can be applied to reduce the number of fluorescence images to meet a particular quality level by about 30% to 50%, strongly improving the temporal resolution of SOFI imaging. PMID:26977356

  4. Increasing the accuracy and temporal resolution of two-filter radon-222 measurements by correcting for the instrument response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Alan D.; Chambers, Scott D.; Williams, Alastair G.; Werczynski, Sylvester

    2016-06-01

    Dual-flow-loop two-filter radon detectors have a slow time response, which can affect the interpretation of their output when making continuous observations of near-surface atmospheric radon concentrations. While concentrations are routinely reported hourly, a calibrated model of detector performance shows that ˜ 40 % of the signal arrives more than an hour after a radon pulse is delivered. After investigating several possible ways to correct for the detector's slow time response, we show that a Bayesian approach using a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler is an effective method. After deconvolution, the detector's output is redistributed into the appropriate counting interval and a 10 min temporal resolution can be achieved under test conditions when the radon concentration is controlled. In the case of existing archived observations, collected under less ideal conditions, the data can be retrospectively reprocessed at 30 min resolution. In one case study, we demonstrate that a deconvolved radon time series was consistent with the following: measurements from a fast-response carbon dioxide monitor; grab samples from an aircraft; and a simple mixing height model. In another case study, during a period of stable nights and days with well-developed convective boundary layers, a bias of 18 % in the mean daily minimum radon concentration was eliminated by correcting for the instrument response.

  5. Accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography in locating facial nerve injury sites in temporal bone trauma.

    PubMed

    Rajati, Mohsen; Pezeshki Rad, Masoud; Irani, Shirin; Khorsandi, Mohammad Taghi; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud

    2014-08-01

    In this study, high-resolution, multislice computed tomography findings are compared with surgical findings in terms of the fracture location in patients with traumatic facial paralysis. Patients with traumatic facial paralysis with grade VI House-Brackmann scale who met the criteria for surgical decompression between 2008 and 2012 were included in this study. All the patients underwent a multislice high-resolution, multislice computed tomography (HRCT) using 1-mm-thick slices with a bone window algorithm. The anatomical areas of the temporal bone (including the Fallopian canal) were assessed by CT and during the surgery (separately by the radiologist and the surgeon), and fracture line involvement was recorded. Forty-one patients entered this study. The perigeniculate area was the most commonly involved region (46.34 %) of the facial nerve. The sensitivity and specificity of HRCT to detect a fracture line seems to be different in various sites, but the overall sensitivity and specificity were 77.5 and 77.7 %, respectively. Although HRCT is the modality of choice in traumatic facial paralysis, the diagnostic value may differ according to the fracture location. The results of HRCT should be considered with caution in certain areas.

  6. High temporal resolution water chemistry information for catchment understanding and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaney, S. M.; Deasy, C.; Ockenden, M.; Perks, M.; Quinton, J.

    2013-12-01

    Many rivers and lakes are currently not meeting their full ecological potential due to environmental pressures including non-point source pollution from the catchment. These pressures include sediment, nitrogen and phosphorus from agriculture and other sources. Each of these pollutants is transferred through the landscape with different hydrological processes and along different pathways. Therefore, to effectively select and spatially target mitigation actions in the landscape, an understanding of the dominant hydrological processes and dynamics which are causing the transfer of material is required. Recent advances in environmental monitoring have enabled the collection of new rich datasets with a high temporal sampling frequency. In the UK, these techniques have been implemented in the Defra Demonstration Test Catchments project and with Natural England for targeted site investigations. Measurements include weather, hydrological flows, sediment, oxygen isotopes, nitrogen and phosphorus from a combination of in-field labs, water chemistry sondes and storm samplers. The detailed time series data can then be analysed to give insights into catchment processes through the analysis of the measured process dynamics. For example, evidence of the transfer of material along surface (or pipe) flow paths can be found from the co-incident timing of the sediment and flow record, or the timing of temperature variations after a storm event can give insight into the contribution of shallow groundwater. Given this evidence of catchment hydrological dynamics it is possible to determine the probable pathways which are transferring pollutants and hence it is possible to select suitable mitigation options in the landscape to improve the river or lake. For example, evidence of a pollutant transfer occurring as shallow soil flows suggests that buffer strips would not be an effective solution since these measures intercept surface pathways. Information on catchment residence time not

  7. Using high resolution satellite multi-temporal interferometry for landslide hazard detection in tropical environments: the case of Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowski, Janusz; Nutricato, Raffaele; Nitti, Davide Oscar; Bovenga, Fabio; Chiaradia, Maria Teresa; Piard, Boby Emmanuel; Mondesir, Philemon

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) multi-temporal interferometry (MTI) is one of the most promising satellite-based remote sensing techniques for fostering new opportunities in landslide hazard detection and assessment. MTI is attractive because it can provide very precise quantitative information on slow slope displacements of the ground surface over huge areas with limited vegetation cover. Although MTI is a mature technique, we are only beginning to realize the benefits of the high-resolution imagery that is currently acquired by the new generation radar satellites (e.g., COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X). In this work we demonstrate the potential of high resolution X-band MTI for wide-area detection of slope instability hazards even in tropical environments that are typically very harsh (eg. coherence loss) for differential interferometry applications. This is done by presenting an example from the island of Haiti, a tropical region characterized by dense and rapidly growing vegetation, as well as by significant climatic variability (two rainy seasons) with intense precipitation events. Despite the unfavorable setting, MTI processing of nearly 100 COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) mages (2011-2013) resulted in the identification of numerous radar targets even in some rural (inhabited) areas thanks to the high resolution (3 m) of CSK radar imagery, the adoption of a patch wise processing SPINUA approach and the presence of many man-made structures dispersed in heavily vegetated terrain. In particular, the density of the targets resulted suitable for the detection of some deep-seated and shallower landslides, as well as localized, very slow slope deformations. The interpretation and widespread exploitation of high resolution MTI data was facilitated by Google EarthTM tools with the associated high resolution optical imagery. Furthermore, our reconnaissance in situ checks confirmed that MTI results provided useful information on landslides and marginally stable slopes that can represent a

  8. High-resolution δ13CO2 soil efflux monitoring in tree girdling experiment exposes large temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Risk, D. A.; Nickerson, N. R.

    2011-12-01

    13CO2 as compared to the control plot. Overall it was clear that girdling did not have the characteristic effect of decreasing respiratory activity, or shifting the isotopic signature cleanly in one direction. The resolution of the Iso-FD technique was useful, however, in exposing substantial temporal variability, and avoiding possible errors that could have accounted for the variation observed in other oft-cited studies.

  9. Fine-Scale Temporal Resolution of Sediment Source by Be-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubblefield, A. P.; Whiting, P. J.; Fondran, C. L.; Matisoff, G.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding of erosional processes occurring at fine scales (cm) and over short time periods (min) in agricultural settings is essential for efforts to minimize landscape scarring, conserve surface nutrients, and reduce off-site impacts. Cosmogenic and fallout radionuclides have been successfully used in a variety of settings to determine sediment source and sediment transport processes. In this study we used the short-lived radionuclide Be-7 (t1/2= 53 d) to investigate erosional processes occurring during runoff from a 4 m by 9 m erosion plot. The plot was established in a 9.8% slope no-till corn field at the USDA ARS Deep Loess Research Station in Treynor, Iowa. Before and after the rainfall, fine resolution soil profiles were collected to determine the distribution of radionuclides and soil nutrients with depth. Be-7 was concentrated near the soil surface. Prior to the rainfall event, rare earth tagged soil particles were applied in three discrete strips, 0.5 m wide, along the contour. Forty runoff samples were collected during the course of a 5.7 cm thunderstorm event. Runoff efficiency was 25% and sediment yield was 0.234 kg m-2. Be-7 activities in runoff varied with hydrologic conditions and rainfall intensity, ranging from 0.06-0.6 Bq gm-1. Dominant erosional processes observed were rain splash erosion, overland flow and rill transport. Be-7 rich sediment was delivered at times corresponding corresponded to peaks in rainfall intensity, onset of overland flow, and development of hydrologic connectivity. Sediment had lower Be-7 activity during peak sediment delivery, probably due to dilution by large volumes of Be-7 poor sediment derived from deeper rill erosion. Soil tagged with the rare earth elements Ho, Tb, and Eu showed downslope movement in interrill areas, supporting conclusion of rain splash and sheetflow erosive mechanisms.

  10. High spatial and temporal resolution retrospective cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance from shortened free breathing real-time acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is challenging in patients who cannot perform repeated breath holds. Real-time, free-breathing acquisition is an alternative, but image quality is typically inferior. There is a clinical need for techniques that achieve similar image quality to the segmented cine using a free breathing acquisition. Previously, high quality retrospectively gated cine images have been reconstructed from real-time acquisitions using parallel imaging and motion correction. These methods had limited clinical applicability due to lengthy acquisitions and volumetric measurements obtained with such methods have not previously been evaluated systematically. Methods This study introduces a new retrospective reconstruction scheme for real-time cine imaging which aims to shorten the required acquisition. A real-time acquisition of 16-20s per acquired slice was inputted into a retrospective cine reconstruction algorithm, which employed non-rigid registration to remove respiratory motion and SPIRiT non-linear reconstruction with temporal regularization to fill in missing data. The algorithm was used to reconstruct cine loops with high spatial (1.3-1.8 × 1.8-2.1 mm2) and temporal resolution (retrospectively gated, 30 cardiac phases, temporal resolution 34.3 ± 9.1 ms). Validation was performed in 15 healthy volunteers using two different acquisition resolutions (256 × 144/192 × 128 matrix sizes). For each subject, 9 to 12 short axis and 3 long axis slices were imaged with both segmented and real-time acquisitions. The retrospectively reconstructed real-time cine images were compared to a traditional segmented breath-held acquisition in terms of image quality scores. Image quality scoring was performed by two experts using a scale between 1 and 5 (poor to good). For every subject, LAX and three SAX slices were selected and reviewed in the random order. The reviewers were blinded to the reconstruction approach and

  11. High temporal resolution measurements of biomass burning events during summertime in the Eastern Mediterranean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Zarmpas, Pavlos; Theodosi, Christina; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Canonaco, Francesco; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2013-04-01

    Several major wildfires occurred at the Greek islands of Chios, Euboea and Andros during the summer of 2012. The corresponding biomass burning-influenced air masses were studied at the remote background site of Finokalia, Crete. The smoke was transported several hundreds of kilometers, arriving at the measurement station after approximately half a day of atmospheric processing, mostly during night-time. The origin of air masses was confirmed by back-trajectory analyses and the chemical composition of the particulate matter was studied by different high-resolution measurements, including an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM), and a seven wavelengths aethalometer. Despite the distance between the islands and the travel time, a clear biomass burning profile containing characteristic markers could be derived from BC measurements and exploiting the statistical tool Multilinear Engine (ME-2). During these events aerosol particles contained a noteworthy amount of black carbon, ranging from 2.8 up to 5 μg m-3, which exceeds typical background values by a factor of 8 or more. Simultaneously organic matter concentrations increased significantly. In the case of the island of Chios fires the fine PM levels exceeded background values by a factor of 4 ranging from 2.9 to11.6 μg m-3. PMF is a statistical tool used to deconvolve the organic aerosol spectral matrix measured by the Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM), resulting in a number of components/factors that are a posteriori validated as possible sources. A successful unconstrained run (PMF) within the Multilinear Engine (ME-2) over the fire events only, lead to a clear biomass burning profile which correlates well with reference biomass burning spectra (R2=0.9). The model was rerun over the entire period by constraining this biomass burning profile and the fire events were all well-represented. More than 70% of the measured OA is "aged", oxidized organic aerosol, which correlates well with reference OOA

  12. The Effect of Spatial and Temporal Resolution of Cine Phase Contrast MRI on Wall Shear Stress and Oscillatory Shear Index Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Gijsen, Frank J.; Marquering, Henk; van Ooij, Pim; vanBavel, Ed; Wentzel, Jolanda J.; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) are associated with atherosclerotic disease. Both parameters are derived from blood velocities, which can be measured with phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI). Limitations in spatiotemporal resolution of PC-MRI are known to affect these measurements. Our aim was to investigate the effect of spatiotemporal resolution using a carotid artery phantom. Methods A carotid artery phantom was connected to a flow set-up supplying pulsatile flow. MRI measurement planes were placed at the common carotid artery (CCA) and internal carotid artery (ICA). Two-dimensional PC-MRI measurements were performed with thirty different spatiotemporal resolution settings. The MRI flow measurement was validated with ultrasound probe measurements. Mean flow, peak flow, flow waveform, WSS and OSI were compared for these spatiotemporal resolutions using regression analysis. The slopes of the regression lines were reported in %/mm and %/100ms. The distribution of low and high WSS and OSI was compared between different spatiotemporal resolutions. Results The mean PC-MRI CCA flow (2.5±0.2mL/s) agreed with the ultrasound probe measurements (2.7±0.02mL/s). Mean flow (mL/s) depended only on spatial resolution (CCA:-13%/mm, ICA:-49%/mm). Peak flow (mL/s) depended on both spatial (CCA:-13%/mm, ICA:-17%/mm) and temporal resolution (CCA:-19%/100ms, ICA:-24%/100ms). Mean WSS (Pa) was in inverse relationship only with spatial resolution (CCA:-19%/mm, ICA:-33%/mm). OSI was dependent on spatial resolution for CCA (-26%/mm) and temporal resolution for ICA (-16%/100ms). The regions of low and high WSS and OSI matched for most of the spatiotemporal resolutions (CCA:30/30, ICA:28/30 cases for WSS; CCA:23/30, ICA:29/30 cases for OSI). Conclusion We show that both mean flow and mean WSS are independent of temporal resolution. Peak flow and OSI are dependent on both spatial and temporal resolution. However, the magnitude of mean and peak flow, WSS and

  13. Design and evaluation of an innovative MRI-compatible Braille stimulator with high spatial and temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Debowska, Weronika; Wolak, Tomasz; Soluch, Pawel; Orzechowski, Mateusz; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2013-02-15

    Neural correlates of Braille reading have been widely studied with different neuroimaging techniques. Nevertheless, the exact brain processes underlying this unique activity are still unknown, due to suboptimal accuracy of imaging and/or stimuli delivery methods. To study somatosensory perception effectively, the stimulation must reflect parameters of the natural stimulus and must be applied with precise timing. In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) providing these characteristics requires technologically advanced solutions and there have been several successful direct tactile stimulation devices designed that allow investigation of somatotopic organization of brain sensory areas. They may, however, be of limited applicability in studying brain mechanisms related to such distinctive tactile activity as Braille reading. In this paper we describe the design and experimental evaluation of an innovative MRI-compatible Braille Character Stimulator (BCS) enabling precise and stable delivery of standardized Braille characters with high temporal resolution. Our device is fully programmable, flexible in stimuli delivery and can be easily implemented in any research unit. The Braille Character Stimulator was tested with a same-different discrimination task on Braille characters during an event-related fMRI experiment in eleven right-handed sighted adult subjects. The results show significant activations in several cortical areas, including bilateral primary (SI) and secondary somatosensory (SII) cortices, bilateral premotor and supplementary motor areas, inferior frontal gyri, inferior temporal gyri and precuneus, as well as contralateral (to the stimulated hand) thalamus. The results validate the use of the BCS as a method of effective stimuli application in fMRI studies, in both sighted and visually impaired subjects.

  14. The influence of vegetation covers on soil moisture dynamics at high temporal resolution in scattered tree woodlands of Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Parra, Javier; Schnabel, Susanne; Ceballos-Barbancho, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Soil water is a key factor that controls the organization and functioning of dryland ecosystems. However, in spite of its great importance in ecohydrological processes, most of the studies focus on daily or longer timescales, while its dynamics at shorter timescales are very little known. The main objective of this work was to determine the role of vegetation covers (grassland and tree canopy) in the soil hydrological response using measurements with high temporal resolution in evergreen oak woodland with Mediterranean climate. For this, soil water content was monitored continuously with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes and by means of capacitance sensors, mainly for the hydrological years 2010-2011 and 2011-2012. They were installed at 5, 10 and 15 cm, and 5 cm above the bedrock and depending on soil profile. This distribution along the soil profile is justified because soils are generally very shallow and most of the roots are concentrated in the upper layer. The sensors were gathered in 8 soil moisture stations in two contrasting situations characterized by different vegetation covers: under tree canopy and in open spaces or grasslands. Soil moisture variations were calculated at rainfall event scale at top soil layer and deepest depth by the difference between the final and initial soil moisture registered by a sensor at the finish and the beginning of the rainfall event, respectively. Besides, as soil moisture changes are strongly influenced by antecedent conditions, different antecedent soil moisture conditions or states, from driest to wettest, were also defined. The works were carried out in 3 experimental farms of the Spanish region of Extremadura. Results obtained revealed that rainwater amount bypassing vegetation covers and reaching the soil may temporarily be modified by covers according to precipitation properties and antecedent environmental conditions (from dry to wet) before the rain episode. Rainfall amounts triggering a positive soil

  15. Rainfall Erosivity Database on the European Scale (REDES): A product of a high temporal resolution rainfall data collection in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the R-factor in the (R)USLE model. The R-factor is calculated from a series of single storm events by multiplying the total storm kinetic energy with the measured maximum 30-minutes rainfall intensity. This estimation requests high temporal resolution (e.g. 30 minutes) rainfall data for sufficiently long time periods (i.e. 20 years) which are not readily available at European scale. The European Commission's Joint Research Centre(JRC) in collaboration with national/regional meteorological services and Environmental Institutions made an extensive data collection of high resolution rainfall data in the 28 Member States of the European Union plus Switzerland in order to estimate rainfall erosivity in Europe. This resulted in the Rainfall Erosivity Database on the European Scale (REDES) which included 1,541 rainfall stations in 2014 and has been updated with 134 additional stations in 2015. The interpolation of those point R-factor values with a Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) model has resulted in the first Rainfall Erosivity map of Europe (Science of the Total Environment, 511, 801-815). The intra-annual variability of rainfall erosivity is crucial for modelling soil erosion on a monthly and seasonal basis. The monthly feature of rainfall erosivity has been added in 2015 as an advancement of REDES and the respective mean annual R-factor map. Almost 19,000 monthly R-factor values of REDES contributed to the seasonal and monthly assessments of rainfall erosivity in Europe. According to the first results, more than 50% of the total rainfall erosivity in Europe takes place in the period from June to September. The spatial patterns of rainfall erosivity have significant differences between Northern and Southern Europe as summer is the most erosive period in Central and Northern Europe and autumn in the

  16. High spatio-temporal resolution observations of crater-lake temperatures at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Corentin Caudron,; Vincent van Hinsberg,; George Hilley,

    2016-01-01

    The crater lake of Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia, has displayed large and rapid changes in temperature at point locations during periods of unrest, but measurement techniques employed to-date have not resolved how the lake’s thermal regime has evolved over both space and time. We applied a novel approach for mapping and monitoring variations in crater-lake apparent surface (“skin”) temperatures at high spatial (~32 cm) and temporal (every two minutes) resolution at Kawah Ijen on 18 September 2014. We used a ground-based FLIR T650sc camera with digital and thermal infrared (TIR) sensors from the crater rim to collect (1) a set of visible imagery around the crater during the daytime and (2) a time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one location from pre-dawn to daytime. We processed daytime visible imagery with the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which the time series of TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Lake apparent skin temperatures typically ranged from ~21 to 33oC. At two locations, apparent skin temperatures were ~ 4 and 7 oC less than in-situ lake temperature measurements at 1.5 and 5 m depth, respectively. These differences, as well as the large spatio-temporal variations observed in skin temperatures, were likely largely associated with atmospheric effects such as evaporative cooling of the lake surface and infrared absorption by water vapor and SO2. Calculations based on orthorectified TIR imagery thus yielded underestimates of volcanic heat fluxes into the lake, whereas volcanic heat fluxes estimated based on in-situ temperature measurements (68 to 111 MW) were likely more representative of Kawah Ijen in a quiescent state. The ground-based imaging technique should provide a valuable tool to continuously monitor crater-lake temperatures and contribute insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of these temperatures associated with volcanic activity.

  17. Framework for automated spatio-temporal enhancement of coarse resolution leaf area index (FASE-LAI) – Application to MODIS LAI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-scale satellite-based Framework for Automated Spatio-temporal Enhancement of coarse-resolution leaf area index (LAI) products (FASE-LAI) has ben established to generate 4-day time-series of Landsat-scale LAI, thereby meeting the critical demands of applications needing frequent and high spat...

  18. Cardiac imaging with multi-sector data acquisition in volumetric CT: variation of effective temporal resolution and its potential clinical consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang; Taha, Basel H.; Vass, Melissa L.; Seamans, John L.; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2009-02-01

    With increasing longitudinal detector dimension available in diagnostic volumetric CT, step-and-shoot scan is becoming popular for cardiac imaging. In comparison to helical scan, step-and-shoot scan decouples patient table movement from cardiac gating/triggering, which facilitates the cardiac imaging via multi-sector data acquisition, as well as the administration of inter-cycle heart beat variation (arrhythmia) and radiation dose efficiency. Ideally, a multi-sector data acquisition can improve temporal resolution at a factor the same as the number of sectors (best scenario). In reality, however, the effective temporal resolution is jointly determined by gantry rotation speed and patient heart beat rate, which may significantly lower than the ideal or no improvement (worst scenario). Hence, it is clinically relevant to investigate the behavior of effective temporal resolution in cardiac imaging with multi-sector data acquisition. In this study, a 5-second cine scan of a porcine heart, which cascades 6 porcine cardiac cycles, is acquired. In addition to theoretical analysis and motion phantom study, the clinical consequences due to the effective temporal resolution variation are evaluated qualitative or quantitatively. By employing a 2-sector image reconstruction strategy, a total of 15 (the permutation of P(6, 2)) cases between the best and worst scenarios are studied, providing informative guidance for the design and optimization of CT cardiac imaging in volumetric CT with multi-sector data acquisition.

  19. Export of dissolved organic carbon and nitrate from grassland in winter using high temporal resolution, in situ UV sensing.

    PubMed

    Sandford, Richard C; Hawkins, Jane M B; Bol, Roland; Worsfold, Paul J

    2013-07-01

    Co-deployment of two reagentless UV sensors for high temporal resolution (15 min) real time determination of wintertime DOC and nitrate-N export from a grassland lysimeter plot (North Wyke, Devon, UK) is reported. They showed rapid, transient but high impact perturbations of DOC (5.3-23 mg CL(-1)) and nitrate-N export after storm/snow melt which discontinuous sampling would not have observed. During a winter freeze/thaw cycle, DOC export (1.25 kg Cha(-1)d(-1)) was significantly higher than typical UK catchment values (maximum 0.25 kg Chad(-1)) and historical North Wyke data (0.7 kg Cha(-1)d(-1)). DOC concentrations were inversely correlated with the key DOC physico-chemical drivers of pH (January r=-0.65), and conductivity (January r=-0.64). Nitrate-N export (0.8-1.5 mg NL(-1)) was strongly correlated with DOC export (r ≥ 0.8). The DOC:NO3-N molar ratios showed that soil microbial N assimilation was not C limited and therefore high N accrual was not promoted in the River Taw, which is classified as a nitrate vulnerable zone (NVZ). The sensor was shown to be an effective sentinel device for identifying critical periods when rapid ecosystem N accumulation could be triggered by a shift in resource stoichiometry. It is therefore a useful tool to help evaluate land management strategies and impacts from climate change and intensive agriculture. PMID:23628487

  20. Export of dissolved organic carbon and nitrate from grassland in winter using high temporal resolution, in situ UV sensing.

    PubMed

    Sandford, Richard C; Hawkins, Jane M B; Bol, Roland; Worsfold, Paul J

    2013-07-01

    Co-deployment of two reagentless UV sensors for high temporal resolution (15 min) real time determination of wintertime DOC and nitrate-N export from a grassland lysimeter plot (North Wyke, Devon, UK) is reported. They showed rapid, transient but high impact perturbations of DOC (5.3-23 mg CL(-1)) and nitrate-N export after storm/snow melt which discontinuous sampling would not have observed. During a winter freeze/thaw cycle, DOC export (1.25 kg Cha(-1)d(-1)) was significantly higher than typical UK catchment values (maximum 0.25 kg Chad(-1)) and historical North Wyke data (0.7 kg Cha(-1)d(-1)). DOC concentrations were inversely correlated with the key DOC physico-chemical drivers of pH (January r=-0.65), and conductivity (January r=-0.64). Nitrate-N export (0.8-1.5 mg NL(-1)) was strongly correlated with DOC export (r ≥ 0.8). The DOC:NO3-N molar ratios showed that soil microbial N assimilation was not C limited and therefore high N accrual was not promoted in the River Taw, which is classified as a nitrate vulnerable zone (NVZ). The sensor was shown to be an effective sentinel device for identifying critical periods when rapid ecosystem N accumulation could be triggered by a shift in resource stoichiometry. It is therefore a useful tool to help evaluate land management strategies and impacts from climate change and intensive agriculture.

  1. Volumetric analysis of medial temporal lobe subregions in developmental amnesia using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Palombo, Daniela J; Rabin, Jennifer S; Levine, Brian; Ryan, Jennifer D; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2013-10-01

    There is great interest in the cognitive consequences of hippocampal volume loss in developmental amnesia (DA). In many DA cases, volume loss occurs before the hippocampus is fully developed, and yet little is known about the locus, extent, and distribution of damage in these cases. We used high-resolution MRI to manually segment the medial temporal lobe (MTL) subregions in H.C., an adult with DA, and a group of sex-, age- and education-matched control participants (n = 10). The hippocampus was defined and divided into anterior (head) and posterior (body and tail) segments. Within the body of the hippocampus, the subregions (CA1 , DG/CA2/3 , and subiculum) were defined. Finally, the entorhinal (ERC), perirhinal (PRC), and parahippocampal (PHC) cortices were segmented. Anterior hippocampus was reduced bilaterally and posterior hippocampus was significantly reduced on the right. In the body of the hippocampus, all three subregions were reduced in the left hemisphere, whereas CA1 and subiculum were reduced in the right hemisphere. No group differences were observed in the PRC and ERC, whereas left PHC volume was marginally increased in H.C. compared to controls. These results can be used to inform patterns of spared and impaired cognitive abilities in DA and perhaps in amnesia more generally.

  2. Temporal measurement and analysis of high-resolution spectral signatures of plants and relationships to biophysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Rebbman, Jan; Hall, Carlton; Provancha, Mark; Vieglais, David

    1995-11-01

    Measurements of temporal reflectance signatures as a function of growing season for sand live oak (Quercus geminata), myrtle oak (Q. myrtifolia, and saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) were collected during a two year study period. Canopy level spectral reflectance signatures, as a function of 252 channels between 368 and 1115 nm, were collected using near nadir viewing geometry and a consistent sun illumination angle. Leaf level reflectance measurements were made in the laboratory using a halogen light source and an environmental optics chamber with a barium sulfate reflectance coating. Spectral measurements were related to several biophysical measurements utilizing optimal passive ambient correlation spectroscopy (OPACS) technique. Biophysical parameters included percent moisture, water potential (MPa), total chlorophyll, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen. Quantitative data processing techniques were used to determine optimal bands based on the utilization of a second order derivative or inflection estimator. An optical cleanup procedure was then employed that computes the double inflection ratio (DIR) spectra for all possible three band combinations normalized to the previously computed optimal bands. These results demonstrate a unique approach to the analysis of high spectral resolution reflectance signatures for estimation of several biophysical measures of plants at the leaf and canopy level from optimally selected bands or bandwidths.

  3. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  4. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  5. Unified treatment and measurement of the spectral resolution and temporal effects in frequency-resolved sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    SciTech Connect

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-12-14

    The emergence of sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BBSFG-VS) [Velarde et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 241102] has offered new opportunities in obtaining and understanding the spectral lineshape and temporal effects on the surface vibrational spectroscopy. Particularly, the high accuracy in the HR-BBSFG-VS spectral lineshape measurement provides detailed information on the complex coherent vibrational dynamics through spectral measurement. Here we present a unified formalism of the theoretical and experimental approaches for obtaining the accurate lineshape of the SFG response, and then present a analysis on the higher and lower spectral resolution SFG spectra as well as their temporal effects of the cholesterol molecules at the air/water interface. With the high spectral resolution and accurate lineshape, it is shown that the parameters from the sub-wavenumber resolution SFG spectra can be used not only to understand but also to quantitatively reproduce the temporal effects in the lower resolution SFG measurement. These not only provide a unified picture in understanding both the frequency-domain and the time-domain SFG response of the complex molecular interface, but also provide novel experimental approaches that can directly measure them.

  6. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, Scott; Forgeron, Jeff; Rella, Chris; Franz, Patrick; Jacobson, Gloria; Chiao, Sen; Saad, Nabil

    2013-04-01

    The ability to quantify sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and methane on the urban scale is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. In the 'top-down' approach, overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to 'bottom-up' predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. This approach, which has proven to be effective at continental scales, becomes challenging to implement at urban scales, due to poorly understood atmospheric transport models and high variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, green spaces) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, and diurnal and seasonal variation in residential energy use). New measurement and analysis techniques are required to make sense of the carbon dioxide signal in cities. Here we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal- resolution greenhouse gas measurements made by multiple Picarro-CRDS analyzers in Silicon Valley in California. Real-time carbon dioxide data from a 20-month period are combined with real-time carbon monoxide, methane, and acetylene to partition the observed carbon dioxide concentrations between different anthropogenic sectors (e.g., transport, residential) and biogenic sources. Real-time wind rose data are also combined with real-time methane data to help identify the direction of local emissions of methane. High resolution WRF models are also included to better understand the dynamics of the boundary layer. The ratio between carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is shown to vary over more than a factor of two from season to season or even from day to night, indicating rapid but frequent shifts in the balance between different carbon dioxide sources. Additional information is given by acetylene, a fossil fuel

  7. Bi-Temporal Analysis of High-Resolution Satellite Imagery in Support of a Forest Conservation Program in Western Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.; Lambin, E.; Audy, R.; Biryahwaho, B.; de Laat, J.; Jayachandran, S.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies in land use sustainability have shown the conservation value of even small forest fragments in tropical smallholder agricultural regions. Forest patches provide important ecosystem services, wildlife habitat, and support human livelihoods. Our study incorporates multiple dates of high-resolution Quickbird imagery to map forest disturbance and regrowth in a smallholder agricultural landscape in western Uganda. This work is in support of a payments for ecosystem services (PES) project which uses a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of PES for enhancing forest conservation. The research presented here details the remote sensing phase of this project. We developed an object-based methodology for detecting forest change from high-resolution imagery that calculates per class image reflectance and change statistics to determine persistent forest, non-forest, forest gain, and forest loss classes. The large study area (~ 2,400 km2) necessitated using a combination of 10 different image pairs of varying seasonality, sun angle, and viewing angle. We discuss the impact of these factors on mapping results. Reflectance data was used in conjunction with texture measures and knowledge-driven modeling to derive forest change maps. First, baseline Quickbird images were mapped into tree cover and non-tree categories based on segmented image objects and field inventory data, applied through a classification and regression tree (CART) classifier. Then a bi-temporal segmentation layer was generated and a series of object metrics from both image dates were extracted. A sample set of persistent forest objects that remained undisturbed was derived from the tree cover map and the red band (B3) change values. We calculated a variety of statistical indices for these persistent tree cover objects from the post- survey imagery to create maps of both forest cover loss and forest cover gain. These results are compared to visually assessed image objects in addition

  8. Analysing the Advantages of High Temporal Resolution Geostationary MSG SEVIRI Data Compared to Polar Operational Environmental Satellite Data for Land Surface Monitoring in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fensholt, R.; Anyamba, A.; Huber, S.; Proud, S. R.; Tucker, C. J.; Small, J.; Pak, E.; Rasmussen, M. O.; Sandholt, I.; Shisanya, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1972, satellite remote sensing of the environment has been dominated by polar-orbiting sensors providing useful data for monitoring the earth s natural resources. However their observation and monitoring capacity are inhibited by daily to monthly looks for any given ground surface which often is obscured by frequent and persistent cloud cover creating large gaps in time series measurements. The launch of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite into geostationary orbit has opened new opportunities for land surface monitoring. The Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument on-board MSG with an imaging capability every 15 minutes which is substantially greater than any temporal resolution that can be obtained from existing polar operational environmental satellites (POES) systems currently in use for environmental monitoring. Different areas of the African continent were affected by droughts and floods in 2008 caused by periods of abnormally low and high rainfall, respectively. Based on the effectiveness of monitoring these events from Earth Observation (EO) data the current analyses show that the new generation of geostationary remote sensing data can provide higher temporal resolution cloud-free (less than 5 days) measurements of the environment as compared to existing POES systems. SEVIRI MSG 5-day continental scale composites will enable rapid assessment of environmental conditions and improved early warning of disasters for the African continent such as flooding or droughts. The high temporal resolution geostationary data will complement existing higher spatial resolution polar-orbiting satellite data for various dynamic environmental and natural resource applications of terrestrial ecosystems.

  9. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgeron, J.; Yasuhara, S.; Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; Chiao, S.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment Jeff Forgeron1,2, Scott Yasuhara1,2, Chris Rella1, Gloria Jacobson1, Sen Chiao2 1Picarro Inc., 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara California 95054 USA 2San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose California USA JeffAForgeron@gmail.com The ability to quantify sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and methane on the urban scale is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. In the 'top-down' approach, overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to 'bottom-up' predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. This approach, which has proven to be effective at continental scales, becomes challenging to implement at urban scales, due to poorly understood atmospheric transport models and high variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, green spaces) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, and diurnal and seasonal variation in residential energy use). New measurement and analysis techniques are required to make sense of the carbon dioxide signal in cities. Here we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal- resolution greenhouse gas measurements made by multiple Picarro-CRDS analyzers in Silicon Valley in California. Real-time carbon dioxide data from a 12-month period are combined with real-time carbon monoxide, methane, acetylene, and carbon-13 measurements to partition the observed carbon dioxide concentrations between different anthropogenic sectors (e.g., transport, residential) and biogenic sources. Real-time wind rose data are also combined with real-time methane data to help identify the direction of local emissions of methane

  10. In-situ, high spatio-temporal resolution measurements of CO2 flux and isotopic composition on Mammoth Mountain, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.; Marino, B.; Bergfeld, D.; Fischer, M. L.; Hancyk, J.; Xu, L.

    2010-12-01

    Measurement of CO2 emissions from volcano flanks and in ground waters has become an integral part of many monitoring programs, as spatial and temporal variations in these emissions may be indicative of volcanic unrest. The source and magnitude of CO2 emissions have been intensely studied at Mammoth Mountain, a dacitic volcano located on the rim of Long Valley caldera, California. These observations, combined with multiple geophysical data sets, suggest that unrest at Mammoth Mountain is driven by periodic release of CO2-rich magmatic fluid derived from basaltic dikes and sills at mid-crustal depths. While measurements of CO2 flux and determination of CO2 sources at volcanoes can place important constraints on gas transport and its relationship to volcanic activity, the spatio-temporal resolution of these measurements has been limited by the time and cost associated with making “point” CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber (AC) method and sample collection and analysis of isotopic (14C-CO2 and 13C-CO2) compositions. We present a novel instrument platform for real-time monitoring of spatio-temporal distribution, emission rate and source of CO2 in volcanic systems. Time and space averaged CO2 fluxes are measured every half hour by the eddy covariance (EC) method. Least-squares inversions of EC data and modeled footprint functions provide estimates of CO2 emission rate and surface flux spatial distribution. AC measurements of soil CO2 flux yield detailed maps of flux spatial distribution and comparative emission rate estimates. A new field-portable isotopic analyzer provides, for the first time, in-situ, high frequency measurements of 14C and 13C compositions of CO2 in the atmosphere, soil gas, and dissolved in ground water. We tested the CO2 flux-monitoring component of this platform at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill area on Mammoth Mountain from 8 September to 24 October 2006. EC CO2 fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m-2d-1. Maps of surface CO2 flux

  11. High temporal resolution ecosystem CH4, CO2 and H2O flux data measured with a novel chamber technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Riis Christiansen, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is commonly measured with closed static chambers (Pihlatie et al., 2013) with off-site gas chromatographic (GC) analysis for CH4 and N2O. Static chambers are widely used to observe in detail the effect of experimental manipulations, like climate change experiments, on GHG exchange (e.g. Carter et al., 2012). However, the low sensitivity of GC systems necessitates long measurement times and manual sampling, which increases the disturbance of the exchange of GHGs and leads to potential underestimation of fluxes (Christiansen et al., 2011; Creelman et al., 2013). The recent emergence of field proof infrared lasers using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) have increased frequency and precision of concentration measurements and enabled better estimates of GHG fluxes (Christiansen et al., 2015) due to shorter chamber enclosure times. This minimizes the negative impact of the chamber enclosure on the soil-atmosphere gas exchange rate. Secondly, an integral aspect of understanding GHG exchange in terrestrial ecosystem is to achieve high temporal coverage. This is needed to capture the often dynamic behavior where fluxes can change rapidly over the course of days or even a few hours in response to e.g. rain events. Consequently, low temporal coverage in measurements of GHG exchange have in many past investigations led to highly uncertain annual budgets which severely limits our understanding of the ecosystem processes interacting with the climate system through GHG exchange. Real-time field measurements at high temporal resolution are needed to obtain a much more detailed understanding of the processes governing ecosystem CH4 exchange as well as for better predicting the effects of climate and environmental changes. We combined a state-of-the-art field applicable CH4 sensor (Los Gatos UGGA) with a newly developed ecosystem-level automatic chamber controlled by a LI-COR 8100/8150 system. The chamber is capable of

  12. Review of the Literature on Temporal Resolution in Listeners With Cochlear Hearing Impairment: A Critical Assessment of the Role of Suprathreshold Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Charlotte M.; Braida, Louis D.; Zurek, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    A critical review of studies of temporal resolution in listeners with cochlear hearing impairment is presented with the aim of assessing evidence for suprathreshold deficits. Particular attention is paid to the roles of variables—such as stimulus audibility, overall stimulus level, and participant's age—which may complicate the interpretation of experimental findings in comparing the performance of hearing-impaired (HI) and normal-hearing (NH) listeners. On certain temporal tasks (e.g., gap detection), the performance of HI listeners appears to be degraded relative to that of NH listeners when compared at equal SPL (sound pressure level). For other temporal tasks (e.g., forward masking), HI performance is degraded relative to that of NH listeners when compared at equal sensation level. A relatively small group of studies exists, however, in which the effects of stimulus audibility and level (and occasionally participant's age) have been controlled through the use of noise-masked simulation of hearing loss in NH listeners. For some temporal tasks (including gap-detection, gap-duration discrimination, and detection of brief tones in modulated noise), the performance of HI listeners is well reproduced in the results of noise-masked NH listeners. For other tasks (i.e., temporal integration), noise-masked hearing-loss simulations do not reproduce the results of HI listeners. In three additional areas of temporal processing (duration discrimination, detection of temporal modulation in noise, and various temporal-masking paradigms), further studies employing control of stimulus audibility and level, as well as age, are necessary for a more complete understanding of the role of suprathreshold deficits in the temporal-processing abilities of HI listeners. PMID:19074452

  13. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  14. Combining High Temporal Resolution Gas Composition and Seismic Data to Identify Subsurface Fluid Movement within the Katmai Volcanic Complex, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, T. M.; West, M. E.; Aiuppa, A.; Holtkamp, S. G.; Giudice, G.; Whittaker, S.; Capecchiacci, F.; Ketner, D. M.; Tassi, F.; Paskievitch, J.; Chiodini, G.; Fiebig, J.; Rizzo, A. L.; Caliro, S.

    2015-12-01

    Volcano seismicity is often attributed to subsurface fluid movement; however the type of fluid (i.e. magma, volatiles, or hydrothermal waters) cannot be uniquely identified using seismic data alone. The chemical composition of volcanic gases released from active volcanoes can be used to distinguish magmatic from hydrothermal degassing, and to identify magma recharge from depth. In this project we use complementary geochemical and seismic datasets from three hydrothermally and seismically active volcanoes within the Katmai Volcanic Cluster, Alaska, in an effort to constrain seismic signatures of subsurface fluid movement. We combine new data collected in July and August 2013 from Mount Martin Volcano, with previously presented gas and seismic data from the nearby volcanoes of Mount Mageik and Trident. High temporal resolution (~1 Hz) major-species (e.g. H2O, CO2, SO2, H2S) gas composition measurements were collected over four ~30 minute sample periods each day for 2-4 week periods from the target volcanoes using campaign MultiGas instruments located adjacent to the primary degassing sources. These instruments were complemented by co-located broadband seismometers on the crater rims of Mount Martin and Mount Mageik, as well as by the Alaska Volcano Observatory Katmai seismic network, which consists of nine short-period and two broadband seismometers located within 30 km of the target volcanoes. Here we apply template-matching techniques to identify repeating earthquakes, and compare changes in shallow seismicity with changes in gas composition. Preliminary results from Trident suggest a potential link between an ~5 day SO2 gas pulse, presumed to reflect magma degassing, and shallow repeating earthquakes. In this study, we present analysis of ~4 weeks of new gas and seismic data from Mount Martin and expand on the analyses at Trident in an effort to provide robust correlations between potential geochemical and geophysical signals of subsurface fluid movement.

  15. Spatial and temporal resolution requirements for quench detection in (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox magnets using Rayleigh-scattering-based fiber optic distributed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, W. K.; Flanagan, G.; Schwartz, J.

    2013-10-01

    One of the key remaining challenges to safe and reliable operation of large, high temperature superconductor (HTS)-based magnet systems is quench detection and protection. Due to the slow quench propagation in HTS systems, the conventional discrete voltage-tap approach developed for NbTi and Nb3Sn magnets may not be sufficient. In contrast, a distributed temperature profile, generated by a distributed temperature sensor and facilitating continuous monitoring of the temperature at any monitored locations within a magnet with high spatial resolution, may be required. One such distributed temperature sensing option is the use of Rayleigh-based fiber optic sensors (FOS), which are immune to electromagnetic interference. The detection of a quench via Rayleigh-based FOS relies on converting the spectral shifts in the Rayleigh scattering spectra into temperature variations. As a result, the higher the spatial sampling resolution the larger the data processing volume, and thus the lower the temporal sampling resolution. So, for effective quench detection, which requires the quick and accurate identification of a hot spot, it is important to find a balance between the spatial and temporal resolutions executable on a given data acquisition and processing (DAQ) system. This paper discusses a method for finding an appropriate DAQ technology that matches the characteristic of a superconducting coil, and determining the acceptable resolutions for efficient and safe quench detection. A quench detection algorithm based on distributed temperature sensing is proposed and its implementation challenges are discussed.

  16. Enhancement of temporal resolution and BOLD sensitivity in real-time fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Rick, Jochen; Shane, Matthew; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver

    2012-05-15

    In this study, a new approach to high-speed fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (EVI) is developed that minimizes geometrical image distortion and spatial blurring, and enables nonaliased sampling of physiological signal fluctuation to increase BOLD sensitivity compared to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI). Real-time fMRI using whole brain 4-slab EVI with 286 ms temporal resolution (4mm isotropic voxel size) and partial brain 2-slab EVI with 136 ms temporal resolution (4×4×6 mm(3) voxel size) was performed on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI scanner equipped with 12-channel head coil. Four-slab EVI of visual and motor tasks significantly increased mean (visual: 96%, motor: 66%) and maximum t-score (visual: 263%, motor: 124%) and mean (visual: 59%, motor: 131%) and maximum (visual: 29%, motor: 67%) BOLD signal amplitude compared with EPI. Time domain moving average filtering (2s width) to suppress physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations further improved mean (visual: 196%, motor: 140%) and maximum (visual: 384%, motor: 200%) t-scores and increased extents of activation (visual: 73%, motor: 70%) compared to EPI. Similar sensitivity enhancement, which is attributed to high sampling rate at only moderately reduced temporal signal-to-noise ratio (mean: -52%) and longer sampling of the BOLD effect in the echo-time domain compared to EPI, was measured in auditory cortex. Two-slab EVI further improved temporal resolution for measuring task-related activation and enabled mapping of five major resting state networks (RSNs) in individual subjects in 5 min scans. The bilateral sensorimotor, the default mode and the occipital RSNs were detectable in time frames as short as 75 s. In conclusion, the high sampling rate of real-time multi-slab EVI significantly improves sensitivity for studying the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic responses and for characterizing functional networks at high field strength in short measurement times.

  17. Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric reanalyses: the ANATEM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathevet, T.; Gailhard, J.; Kuentz, A.; Hingray, B.

    2015-12-01

    Efforts to improve the understanding of past climatic or hydrologic variability have received a great deal of attention in various fields of geosciences such as glaciology, dendrochronology, sedimentology and hydrology. Based on different proxies, each research community produces different kinds of climatic or hydrologic reanalyses at different spatio-temporal scales and resolutions. When considering climate or hydrology, many studies have been devoted to characterising variability, trends or breaks using observed time series representing different regions or climates of the world. However, in hydrology, these studies have usually been limited to short temporal scales (mainly a few decades and more rarely a century) because they require observed time series (which suffer from a limited spatio-temporal density). This paper introduces ANATEM, a method that combines local observations and large-scale climatic information (such as the 20CR Reanalysis) to build long-term probabilistic air temperature and precipitation time series with a high spatio-temporal resolution (1 day and a few km2). ANATEM was tested on the reconstruction of air temperature and precipitation time series of 22 watersheds situated in the Durance River basin, in the French Alps. Based on a multi-criteria and multi-scale diagnosis, the results show that ANATEM improves the performance of classical statistical models - especially concerning spatial homogeneity - while providing an original representation of uncertainties which are conditioned by atmospheric circulation patterns. The ANATEM model has been also evaluated for the regional scale against independent long-term time series and was able to capture regional low-frequency variability over more than a century (1883-2010). Citation: Kuentz, A., Mathevet, T., Gailhard, J., and Hingray, B.: Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric

  18. Temporal and spectral resolution of hearing in patients with precipitous hearing loss: Gap release of masking (GRM) and the role of cognitive function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, Martin D.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to measure temporal acuity and spectral resolution of hearing in new hearing-aid users over a period of time post-fitting, and to demonstrate the extent to which performance might change over time. For one-octave wide maskers with and without spectral and temporal gaps, masking was measured repeatedly over 3 months post-fitting. GRM was characterized as the release from masking under the gap conditions. The cognitive skills of the participants were assessed with two tests for measuring working memory capacity and lexical vigilance. The results showed that while the masking by one-octave wide noise maskers without any gaps was constant over time, GRM increased over time for maskers involving a temporal gap. Moreover, at low frequencies where the subjects had normal hearing-threshold levels, they performed as hearing-impaired for the spectral-gap condition. For the temporal-gap condition, they performed as normally hearing at both low and high frequencies. These results suggest that patients with precipitous hearing loss do not maintain normal spectral resolution through the low-frequency region, in which the hearing threshold levels are otherwise normal. Surprisingly, the results also showed moderate though highly significant correlation between lexical vigilance and GRM. [Work supported by the William Demant Foundation.] a)Currently at CNBH, Dept. Physiol., University of Cambridge, CB2 3EG Cambridge, UK.

  19. Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric reanalyses: the ANATEM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuentz, A.; Mathevet, T.; Gailhard, J.; Hingray, B.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the understanding of past climatic or hydrologic variability has received a large attention in different fields of geosciences, such as glaciology, dendrochronology, sedimentology or hydrology. Based on different proxies, each research community produces different kind of climatic or hydrologic reanalyses, at different spatio-temporal scales and resolution. When considering climate or hydrology, numerous studies aim at characterising variability, trends or breaks using observed time-series of different regions or climate of world. However, in hydrology, these studies are usually limited to reduced temporal scale (mainly few decades, seldomly a century) because they are limited to observed time-series, that suffers from a limited spatio-temporal density. This paper introduces a new model, ANATEM, based on a combination of local observations and large scale climatic informations (such as 20CR Reanalysis). This model allow to build long-term air temperature and precipitation time-series, with a high spatio-temporal resolution (daily time-step, few km2). ANATEM was tested on the air temperature and precipitation time-series of 22 watersheds situated on the Durance watershed, in the french Alps. Based on a multi-criteria and multi-scale diagnostic, the results show that ANATEM improves the performances of classical statistical models. ANATEM model have been validated on a regional level, improving spatial homogeneity of performances and on independent long-term time-series, being able to capture the regional low-frequency variabilities over more than a century (1883-2010).

  20. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Gourab Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2014-01-15

    A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is typically of the order of the pulsewidth, limited by the laser intensity contrast, whereas a spatial resolution of a few μm is achieved by this optical technique. High-harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The μm-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  1. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, C.; Jacobson, G.

    2012-04-01

    The ability to quantify the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide on the urban scale is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. In the 'top-down' approach, overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to "bottoms-up" predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. This approach, which has been proven to be effective at continental scales, becomes challenging to implement at the urban scale, due to poorly understood micrometeorological atmospheric transport models and high variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, residences) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, residential energy usage variability during the day and over the year). New measurement and analysis techniques are required to make sense of the carbon dioxide signal in cities. Here we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal-resolution greenhouse gas measurements in Silicon Valley in California. The synthesis of two experimental campaigns is presented: real-time measurements from two ten-meter urban 'towers,' and ground-based mobile mapping measurements. Real-time carbon dioxide data from a nine-month period are combined with real-time carbon monoxide, methane, acetylene, and carbon 13 measurements to partition the observed CO2 concentrations between different anthropogenic sectors (e.g., transport, residential) and biogenic sources. The carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide ratio is shown to vary over more than a factor of two from season to season or even from day to night, indicating rapid and frequent shifts in the balance between different carbon dioxide sources. Clear differences are seen between the two urban sites, which are separated by 7 km. Further information is given by the carbon 13 signature

  2. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; Crosson, E.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to take inventory of critical greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane and quantify their sources and sinks is essential for understanding the atmospheric drivers to global climate change. "Top down" inversion measurements and models are used to quantify net carbon fluxes into the atmosphere. The overall carbon fluxes are determined by combining remote measurements of carbon dioxide concentrations with complex atmospheric transport models, and these emissions measurements are compared to "bottoms-up" predictions based on detailed inventories of the sources and sinks of carbon, both anthropogenic and biogenic in nature. At smaller distance scales, such as that of a city or even smaller, the basic framework underpinning the inversion modeling technique begins to break down: atmospheric transport models, which are well understood at a length scale of 100 km, work poorly or not at all at a 100m distance scale. Furthermore, the variability of the emissions sources in space (e.g., factories, highways, residences) and time (rush hours, factory shifts and shutdowns, residential energy usage variability during the day and over the year) complicate the interpretation of the measured signals. In this paper we present detailed, high spatial- and temporal-resolution greenhouse gas measurements in Silicon Valley, CA. The results of two experimental campaigns are presented: a 10m urban 'tower' and ground-based mobile mapping measurements. In both campaigns, real-time carbon dioxide data are combined with real-time carbon monoxide measurements to partition the observed CO2 concentrations between anthropogenic and biogenic sources . The urban tower measurements are made continuously over a period of many weeks. The mobile maps of the vicinity of the urban tower are taken repeatedly over a period of several days, and at different times of the day and under different atmospheric conditions, to assess the robustness and repeatability of the maps. Initial

  3. A High-Resolution Study of Hippocampal and Medial Temporal Lobe Correlates of Spatial Context and Prospective Overlapping Route Memory

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thackery I.; Hasselmo, Michael E.; Stern, Chantal E.

    2015-01-01

    When navigating our world we often first plan or retrieve an ideal route to our goal, avoiding alternative paths that lead to other destinations. The medial temporal lobe (MTL) has been implicated in processing contextual information, sequence memory, and uniquely retrieving routes that overlap or “cross paths.” However, the identity of subregions of the hippocampus and neighboring cortex that support these functions in humans remains unclear. The present study used high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (hr-fMRI) in humans to test whether the CA3/DG hippocampal subfield and para-hippocampal cortex are important for processing spatial context and route retrieval, and whether the CA1 subfield facilitates prospective planning of mazes that must be distinguished from alternative overlapping routes. During hr-fMRI scanning, participants navigated virtual mazes that were well-learned from prior training while also learning new mazes. Some routes learned during scanning shared hallways with those learned during pre-scan training, requiring participants to select between alternative paths. Critically, each maze began with a distinct spatial contextual Cue period. Our analysis targeted activity from the Cue period, during which participants identified the current navigational episode, facilitating retrieval of upcoming route components and distinguishing mazes that overlap. Results demonstrated that multiple MTL regions were predominantly active for the contextual Cue period of the task, with specific regions of CA3/DG, parahippocampal cortex, and perirhinal cortex being consistently recruited across trials for Cue periods of both novel and familiar mazes. During early trials of the task, both CA3/DG and CA1 were more active for overlapping than non-overlapping Cue periods. Trial-by-trial Cue period responses in CA1 tracked subsequent overlapping maze performance across runs. Together, our findings provide novel insight into the contributions of MTL

  4. Functional MR imaging of visual and motor cortex stimulation at high temporal resolution using a FLASH technique on a standard 1.5 Tesla scanner.

    PubMed

    Wiener, E; Schad, L R; Baudendistel, K T; Essig, M; Müller, E; Lorenz, W J

    1996-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed on a conventional 1.5 T scanner by means of a modified FLASH-technique at temporal resolutions of 80 and 320 ms. The method's stability was assessed by phantom measurements and by investigation of three volunteers resulting in a low amplitude (3%) periodic (4 s) signal modulation for the in vivo measurements, which was not observable in the phantom experiments. fMRI activation studies of motor and visual cortices of four adjacent slices were carried out on 12 healthy right-handed volunteers. Stimulation was performed by a triggered single white light flash or single finger-to-thumb opposition movement, respectively. Event-related response of visual and motor activation was traced over 10.24 s with a temporal resolution of 320 ms for the four slice measurements. Brain activation maps were calculated by correlation of measured signal time course with a time-shifted boxcar function. Activation was quantified by calculation of percentual signal change in relation to the baseline. Observed signal magnitudes were about 5-7% in visual and about 8-12% in primary motor cortex. While photic response was delayed by about 2 s, motor stimulation showed an instantaneous increase of the MR signal. MR signal responses for both stimuli had decayed completely after about 5 s. Our results show that event-related fMRI enables mapping of brain function at sufficient spatial resolution with a temporal resolution of up to 80 ms on a conventional scanner.

  5. Improving the spatial and temporal resolution with quantification of uncertainty and errors in earth observation data sets using Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Serafy, Ghada; Gaytan Aguilar, Sandra; Ziemba, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing use of process-based models in the investigation of ecological systems and scenario predictions. The accuracy and quality of these models are improved when run with high spatial and temporal resolution data sets. However, ecological data can often be difficult to collect which manifests itself through irregularities in the spatial and temporal domain of these data sets. Through the use of Data INterpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions(DINEOF) methodology, earth observation products can be improved to have full spatial coverage within the desired domain as well as increased temporal resolution to daily and weekly time step, those frequently required by process-based models[1]. The DINEOF methodology results in a degree of error being affixed to the refined data product. In order to determine the degree of error introduced through this process, the suspended particulate matter and chlorophyll-a data from MERIS is used with DINEOF to produce high resolution products for the Wadden Sea. These new data sets are then compared with in-situ and other data sources to determine the error. Also, artificial cloud cover scenarios are conducted in order to substantiate the findings from MERIS data experiments. Secondly, the accuracy of DINEOF is explored to evaluate the variance of the methodology. The degree of accuracy is combined with the overall error produced by the methodology and reported in an assessment of the quality of DINEOF when applied to resolution refinement of chlorophyll-a and suspended particulate matter in the Wadden Sea. References [1] Sirjacobs, D.; Alvera-Azcárate, A.; Barth, A.; Lacroix, G.; Park, Y.; Nechad, B.; Ruddick, K.G.; Beckers, J.-M. (2011). Cloud filling of ocean colour and sea surface temperature remote sensing products over the Southern North Sea by the Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions methodology. J. Sea Res. 65(1): 114-130. Dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seares.2010.08.002

  6. A simulation to study the feasibility of improving the temporal resolution of LAGEOS geodynamic solutions by using a sequential process noise filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Brian Davis

    1995-01-01

    A key drawback to estimating geodetic and geodynamic parameters over time based on satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations is the inability to accurately model all the forces acting on the satellite. Errors associated with the observations and the measurement model can detract from the estimates as well. These 'model errors' corrupt the solutions obtained from the satellite orbit determination process. Dynamical models for satellite motion utilize known geophysical parameters to mathematically detail the forces acting on the satellite. However, these parameters, while estimated as constants, vary over time. These temporal variations must be accounted for in some fashion to maintain meaningful solutions. The primary goal of this study is to analyze the feasibility of using a sequential process noise filter for estimating geodynamic parameters over time from the Laser Geodynamics Satellite (LAGEOS) SLR data. This evaluation is achieved by first simulating a sequence of realistic LAGEOS laser ranging observations. These observations are generated using models with known temporal variations in several geodynamic parameters (along track drag and the J(sub 2), J(sub 3), J(sub 4), and J(sub 5) geopotential coefficients). A standard (non-stochastic) filter and a stochastic process noise filter are then utilized to estimate the model parameters from the simulated observations. The standard non-stochastic filter estimates these parameters as constants over consecutive fixed time intervals. Thus, the resulting solutions contain constant estimates of parameters that vary in time which limits the temporal resolution and accuracy of the solution. The stochastic process noise filter estimates these parameters as correlated process noise variables. As a result, the stochastic process noise filter has the potential to estimate the temporal variations more accurately since the constraint of estimating the parameters as constants is eliminated. A comparison of the temporal

  7. Detection of Successful and Unsuccessful Pregnancies in Mice within Hours of Pairing through Frequency Analysis of High Temporal Resolution Core Body Temperature Data.

    PubMed

    Smarr, Benjamin L; Zucker, Irving; Kriegsfeld, Lance J

    2016-01-01

    Many controllable factors negatively impact fetal development, underscoring the importance of early pregnancy detection and identification of events that reliably predict potential complications. Clinically, core body temperature (CBT) is used to aid family planning and pregnancy detection. However, such temperature data typically are gathered in single, daily measurements. In animal studies, interventions or cell/tissue harvesting at defined stages of fetal development are arduous, requiring timed mating by trained observers. The value of continuous temperature measurements remains largely unexplored, but the advent of small, inexpensive, and increasingly ubiquitous, accurate sensor devices makes continuous measures feasible. Here, using a mouse model, we show that continuous, 1-min resolution CBT measurements reliably allow for the earliest and most accurate detection of pregnancy (100%, within 14 h of initial pairing), without requiring interaction with the animal for data collection. This method also reveals a subset of females that exhibit a pregnancy-like response following pairing that persists for a variable number of days. Application of wavelet analysis that permits frequency analysis while preserving temporal resolution, uncovers significant differences in ultradian frequencies of CBT; these rhythms are significantly increased in the 12 h after the day of pairing for pregnancies carried to term compared to apparent pregnancies that failed. High temporal resolution CBT and wavelet analysis permit strikingly early detection and separation of successful pregnancies and pregnancy-like events. PMID:27467519

  8. Detection of Successful and Unsuccessful Pregnancies in Mice within Hours of Pairing through Frequency Analysis of High Temporal Resolution Core Body Temperature Data

    PubMed Central

    Smarr, Benjamin L.; Zucker, Irving; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.

    2016-01-01

    Many controllable factors negatively impact fetal development, underscoring the importance of early pregnancy detection and identification of events that reliably predict potential complications. Clinically, core body temperature (CBT) is used to aid family planning and pregnancy detection. However, such temperature data typically are gathered in single, daily measurements. In animal studies, interventions or cell/tissue harvesting at defined stages of fetal development are arduous, requiring timed mating by trained observers. The value of continuous temperature measurements remains largely unexplored, but the advent of small, inexpensive, and increasingly ubiquitous, accurate sensor devices makes continuous measures feasible. Here, using a mouse model, we show that continuous, 1-min resolution CBT measurements reliably allow for the earliest and most accurate detection of pregnancy (100%, within 14 h of initial pairing), without requiring interaction with the animal for data collection. This method also reveals a subset of females that exhibit a pregnancy-like response following pairing that persists for a variable number of days. Application of wavelet analysis that permits frequency analysis while preserving temporal resolution, uncovers significant differences in ultradian frequencies of CBT; these rhythms are significantly increased in the 12 h after the day of pairing for pregnancies carried to term compared to apparent pregnancies that failed. High temporal resolution CBT and wavelet analysis permit strikingly early detection and separation of successful pregnancies and pregnancy-like events. PMID:27467519

  9. Soil moisture mapping over West Africa with a 30-min temporal resolution using AMSR-E observations and a satellite-based rainfall product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellarin, T.; Tran, T.; Cohard, J.-M.; Galle, S.; Laurent, J.-P.; de Rosnay, P.; Vischel, T.

    2009-10-01

    An original and simple method to map surface soil moisture over large areas has been developed to obtain data with a high temporal and spatial resolution for the study of possible feedback mechanisms between soil moisture and convection in West Africa. A rainfall estimation product based on Meteosat geostationary satellite measurements is first used together with a simple Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) model to produce soil moisture maps at a spatial resolution of 10×10 km2 and a temporal resolution of 30-min. However, given the uncertainty of the satellite-based rainfall estimation product, the resulting soil moisture maps are not sufficiently accurate. For this reason, a technique based on assimilating AMSR-E C-band measurements into a microwave emission model was developed in which the estimated rainfall rates between two successive AMSR-E brightness temperature (TB) measurements are adjusted by multiplying them by a factor between 0 and 7 that minimizes the difference between simulated and observed TBs. Ground-based soil moisture measurements obtained at three sites in Niger, Mali and Benin were used to assess the method which was found to improve the soil moisture estimates on all three sites.

  10. Building long-term and high spatio-temporal resolution precipitation and air temperature reanalyses by mixing local observations and global atmospheric reanalyses: the ANATEM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuentz, A.; Mathevet, T.; Gailhard, J.; Hingray, B.

    2015-06-01

    Efforts to improve the understanding of past climatic or hydrologic variability have received a great deal of attention in various fields of geosciences such as glaciology, dendrochronology, sedimentology and hydrology. Based on different proxies, each research community produces different kinds of climatic or hydrologic reanalyses at different spatio-temporal scales and resolutions. When considering climate or hydrology, many studies have been devoted to characterising variability, trends or breaks using observed time series representing different regions or climates of the world. However, in hydrology, these studies have usually been limited to short temporal scales (mainly a few decades and more rarely a century) because they require observed time series (which suffer from a limited spatio-temporal density). This paper introduces ANATEM, a method that combines local observations and large-scale climatic information (such as the 20CR Reanalysis) to build long-term probabilistic air temperature and precipitation time series with a high spatio-temporal resolution (1 day and a few km2). ANATEM was tested on the reconstruction of air temperature and precipitation time series of 22 watersheds situated in the Durance River basin, in the French Alps. Based on a multi-criteria and multi-scale diagnosis, the results show that ANATEM improves the performance of classical statistical models - especially concerning spatial homogeneity - while providing an original representation of uncertainties which are conditioned by atmospheric circulation patterns. The ANATEM model has been also evaluated for the regional scale against independent long-term time series and was able to capture regional low-frequency variability over more than a century (1883-2010).

  11. Collection of nanoliter microdiaysate fractions in plugs for off-line in vivo chemical monitoring with up to 2 s temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Slaney, Thomas; Mabrouk, Omar; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    An off-line in vivo neurochemical monitoring approach was developed based on collecting nanoliter microdialysate fractions as an array of “plugs” segmented by immiscible oil in a piece of Teflon tubing. The dialysis probe was integrated with the plug generator in a polydimethlysiloxane microfluidic device that could be mounted on the subject. The microfluidic device also allowed derivatization reagents to be added to the plugs for fluorescence detection of analytes. Using the device, 2 nL fractions corresponding to 1–20 ms sampling times depending upon dialysis flow rate, were collected. Because axial dispersion was prevented between them, each plug acted as a discrete sample collection vial and temporal resolution was not lost by mixing or diffusion during transport. In vitro tests of the system revealed that the temporal resolution of the system was as good as 2 s and was limited by mass transport effects within the dialysis probe. After collection of dialysate fractions, they were pumped into a glass microfluidic chip that automatically analyzed the plugs by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence at 50 s intervals. By using a relatively low flow rate during transfer to the chip, the temporal resolution of the samples could be preserved despite the relatively slow analysis time. The system was used to detect rapid dynamics in neuroactive amino acids evoked by microinjecting the glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) or K+ into the striatum of anesthetized rats. The resulted showed increases in neurotransmitter efflux that reached a peak in 20 s for PDC and 13 s for K+. PMID:20447417

  12. High-speed angle-resolved imaging of a single gold nanorod with microsecond temporal resolution and one-degree angle precision.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Sawako; Iino, Ryota; Niitani, Yamato; Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Tomishige, Michio; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-17

    We developed two types of high-speed angle-resolved imaging methods for single gold nanorods (SAuNRs) using objective-type vertical illumination dark-field microscopy and a high-speed CMOS camera to achieve microsecond temporal and one-degree angle resolution. These methods are based on: (i) an intensity analysis of focused images of SAuNR split into two orthogonally polarized components and (ii) the analysis of defocused SAuNR images. We determined the angle precision (statistical error) and accuracy (systematic error) of the resultant SAuNR (80 nm × 40 nm) images projected onto a substrate surface (azimuthal angle) in both methods. Although both methods showed a similar precision of ∼1° for the azimuthal angle at a 10 μs temporal resolution, the defocused image analysis showed a superior angle accuracy of ∼5°. In addition, the polar angle was also determined from the defocused SAuNR images with a precision of ∼1°, by fitting with simulated images. By taking advantage of the defocused image method's full revolution measurement range in the azimuthal angle, the rotation of the rotary molecular motor, F1-ATPase, was measured with 3.3 μs temporal resolution. The time constants of the pauses waiting for the elementary steps of the ATP hydrolysis reaction and the torque generated in the mechanical steps have been successfully estimated. The high-speed angle-resolved SAuNR imaging methods will be applicable to the monitoring of the fast conformational changes of many biological molecular machines.

  13. Evaluation of High-Temporal-Resolution Bedload Sensors for Tracking Channel Bed Movement and Transport Thresholds in Forested Mountain Headwater Catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Conklin, M. H.; Bales, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    High temporal resolution data is required to take channel bed movement data beyond time integrated changes between measurements where many of the subtleties of bedload movement patterns are often missed. This study used continuous bedload scour sensors (flexible, fluid-filled pans connected to a pressure transducer) to collect high temporal resolution, long term bedload movement data for 4 high elevation (1500-1800 m) Sierra Nevada headwater streams draining 1 km2 catchments and to investigate the physical channel characteristics under which they perform best. Data collected by the scour sensors were used to investigate the disturbance and recovery patterns of these streams, to relate the observed patterns to channel bed stability, and to evaluate whether the channel bed is acting as a sediment source, sink, or storage across various temporal scales. Finally, attempts are made to identify discharge thresholds for bed movement from scour sensor and discharge data and to compare these threshold values to observed changes in the channel bed. Bedload scour data, turbidity data, and stream discharge data were collected at 15 minute intervals for (WY 2011 to WY 2014), including both above average (2011) and below average (2012, 2013, 2014) water years. Bedload scour sensors were found to have a relatively high (60%) failure rate in these systems. In addition, they required in situ calibrations as the factory and laboratory calibrations did not translate well to the field deployments. Data from the working sensors, showed patterns of abrupt channel bed disturbance (scour and/or fill) on an hour to day temporal scale followed by gradual recovery on a day to month scale back to a stable equilibrium bed surface elevation. These observed patterns suggest the bed acts as a short term source or sink for sediment, but is roughly sediment neutral over longer time periods implying the changes in bed elevation are reflective of fluctuations in storage rather than a true source or

  14. The Multi-Temporal Database of High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) and Planetary Images of Mars (MUTED): A Tool to Support the Identification of Surface Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkeling, G.; Luesebrink, D.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.; Jaumann, R.

    2015-10-01

    Image data transmitted to Earth by Martian spacecraft since the 1970s, for example by Mariner and Viking, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Express (MEx) and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) showed, that the surface of Mars has changed dramatically and actually is continually changing [e.g., 1-8]. The changes are attributed to a large variety of atmospherical, geological and morphological processes, including eolian processes [9,10], mass wasting processes [11], changes of the polar caps [12] and impact cratering processes [13]. The detection of surface changes in planetary image data is closely related to the spatial and temporal availability of images in a specific region. While previews of the images are available at ESA's Planetary Science Archive (PSA), through the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) and via other less frequently used databases, there is no possibility to quickly and conveniently see the spatial and temporal availability of HRSC images and other planetary image data in a specific region, which is important to detect the surface changes that occurred between two or more images. In addition, it is complicated to get an overview of the image quality and label information for images covering the same area. However, the investigation of surface changes represents a key element in martian research and has implications for the geologic, morphologic and climatic evolution of Mars. In order to address these issues, we developed the "Multi- Temporal Database of High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) Images" (MUTED), which represents a tool for the identification of the spatial and multi-temporal coverage of planetary image data from Mars. Scientists will be able to identify the location, number, and time range of acquisition of overlapping HRSC images. MUTED also includes images of other planetary image datasets such as those of the Context Camera (CTX), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and the High Resolution

  15. Comparison of pixel and sub-pixel based techniques to separate Pteronia incana invaded areas using multi-temporal high resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odindi, John; Kakembo, Vincent

    2009-08-01

    Remote Sensing using high resolution imagery (HRI) is fast becoming an important tool in detailed land-cover mapping and analysis of plant species invasion. In this study, we sought to test the separability of Pteronia incana invader species by pixel content aggregation and pixel content de-convolution using multi-temporal infrared HRI. An invaded area in Eastern Cape, South Africa was flown in 2001, 2004 and 2006 and HRI of 1x1m resolution captured using a DCS 420 colour infrared camera. The images were separated into bands, geo-rectified and radiometrically corrected using Idrisi Kilimanjaro GIS. Value files were extracted from the bands in order to compare spectral values for P. incana, green vegetation and bare surfaces using the pixel based Perpendicular Vegetation Index (PVI), while Constrained Linear Spectral Unmixing (CLSU) surface endmembers were used to generate sub-pixel land surface image fractions. Spectroscopy was used to validate spectral trends identified from HRI. The PVI successfully separated the multi-temporal imagery surfaces and was consistent with the unmixed surface image fractions from CLSU. Separability between the respective surfaces was also achieved using reflectance measurements.

  16. The use of spaceborne X-band radar to measure high spatial and temporal resolution volcanic processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, J.; Wadge, G.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Parks, M.; Muller, C.

    2012-12-01

    InSAR has been frequently used to measure the pressurisation of magma reservoirs, which typically deforms the ground surface over distances of tens of kilometres and lasts for several years. Yet, there are other deformation signals on volcanoes that are smaller in scale and occur more rapidly for which the current use of C-band and L-band satellites is poorly suited but which may be accessible using the new generations of high resolution X-band satellites. We use TerraSAR-X which produces images with 2 m resolution every 11 days to target a range of volcanoes which are either frequently erupting, displaying signs of unrest or edifice stability. We assess the suitability of the data in terms of coherence and geometric distortion and compare it to ground-based observations including GPS and tilt. The current limiting factor for volcano applications is the availability of a high resolution Digital Elevation Model. We will present results from Arenal, Tungurahua, Galeras, Santorini, Alutu and Soufriere Hills and demonstrate the ability of high resolution X-band InSAR to detect a wide range of processes over various timescales.

  17. An Improved STARFM with Help of an Unmixing-Based Method to Generate High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Complex Heterogeneous Regions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dengfeng; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhu, Xiufang; Pan, Yaozhong; Liu, Hongli; Yuan, Zhoumiqi; Yun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing technology plays an important role in monitoring rapid changes of the Earth's surface. However, sensors that can simultaneously provide satellite images with both high temporal and spatial resolution haven't been designed yet. This paper proposes an improved spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (STARFM) with the help of an Unmixing-based method (USTARFM) to generate the high spatial and temporal data needed for the study of heterogeneous areas. The results showed that the USTARFM had higher accuracy than STARFM methods in two aspects of analysis: individual bands and of heterogeneity analysis. Taking the predicted NIR band as an example, the correlation coefficients (r) for the USTARFM, STARFM and unmixing methods were 0.96, 0.95, 0.90, respectively (p-value < 0.001); Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values were 0.0245, 0.0300, 0.0401, respectively; and ERGAS values were 0.5416, 0.6507, 0.8737, respectively. The USTARM showed consistently higher performance than STARM when the degree of heterogeneity ranged from 2 to 10, highlighting that the use of this method provides the capacity to solve the data fusion problems faced when using STARFM. Additionally, the USTARFM method could help researchers achieve better performance than STARFM at a smaller window size from its heterogeneous land surface quantitative representation.

  18. An Improved STARFM with Help of an Unmixing-Based Method to Generate High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Complex Heterogeneous Regions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dengfeng; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhu, Xiufang; Pan, Yaozhong; Liu, Hongli; Yuan, Zhoumiqi; Yun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing technology plays an important role in monitoring rapid changes of the Earth's surface. However, sensors that can simultaneously provide satellite images with both high temporal and spatial resolution haven’t been designed yet. This paper proposes an improved spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (STARFM) with the help of an Unmixing-based method (USTARFM) to generate the high spatial and temporal data needed for the study of heterogeneous areas. The results showed that the USTARFM had higher accuracy than STARFM methods in two aspects of analysis: individual bands and of heterogeneity analysis. Taking the predicted NIR band as an example, the correlation coefficients (r) for the USTARFM, STARFM and unmixing methods were 0.96, 0.95, 0.90, respectively (p-value < 0.001); Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values were 0.0245, 0.0300, 0.0401, respectively; and ERGAS values were 0.5416, 0.6507, 0.8737, respectively. The USTARM showed consistently higher performance than STARM when the degree of heterogeneity ranged from 2 to 10, highlighting that the use of this method provides the capacity to solve the data fusion problems faced when using STARFM. Additionally, the USTARFM method could help researchers achieve better performance than STARFM at a smaller window size from its heterogeneous land surface quantitative representation. PMID:26861334

  19. An Improved STARFM with Help of an Unmixing-Based Method to Generate High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Complex Heterogeneous Regions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dengfeng; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhu, Xiufang; Pan, Yaozhong; Liu, Hongli; Yuan, Zhoumiqi; Yun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing technology plays an important role in monitoring rapid changes of the Earth's surface. However, sensors that can simultaneously provide satellite images with both high temporal and spatial resolution haven't been designed yet. This paper proposes an improved spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (STARFM) with the help of an Unmixing-based method (USTARFM) to generate the high spatial and temporal data needed for the study of heterogeneous areas. The results showed that the USTARFM had higher accuracy than STARFM methods in two aspects of analysis: individual bands and of heterogeneity analysis. Taking the predicted NIR band as an example, the correlation coefficients (r) for the USTARFM, STARFM and unmixing methods were 0.96, 0.95, 0.90, respectively (p-value < 0.001); Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values were 0.0245, 0.0300, 0.0401, respectively; and ERGAS values were 0.5416, 0.6507, 0.8737, respectively. The USTARM showed consistently higher performance than STARM when the degree of heterogeneity ranged from 2 to 10, highlighting that the use of this method provides the capacity to solve the data fusion problems faced when using STARFM. Additionally, the USTARFM method could help researchers achieve better performance than STARFM at a smaller window size from its heterogeneous land surface quantitative representation. PMID:26861334

  20. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: Image reconstruction and assessment of image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, Thomas G.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; Allmendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. Methods: With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. Results: No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6{<=}pitch{<=}3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch=3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving

  1. A New Hybrid Spatio-temporal Model for Estimating Daily Multi-year PM2.5 Concentrations Across Northeastern USA Using High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra A.; Just, Allan C.; Nordio, Francesco; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The use of satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) to estimate fine particulate matter PM(sub 2.5) for epidemiology studies has increased substantially over the past few years. These recent studies often report moderate predictive power, which can generate downward bias in effect estimates. In addition, AOD measurements have only moderate spatial resolution, and have substantial missing data. We make use of recent advances in MODIS satellite data processing algorithms (Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC), which allow us to use 1 km (versus currently available 10 km) resolution AOD data.We developed and cross validated models to predict daily PM(sub 2.5) at a 1X 1 km resolution across the northeastern USA (New England, New York and New Jersey) for the years 2003-2011, allowing us to better differentiate daily and long term exposure between urban, suburban, and rural areas. Additionally, we developed an approach that allows us to generate daily high-resolution 200 m localized predictions representing deviations from the area 1 X 1 km grid predictions. We used mixed models regressing PM(sub 2.5) measurements against day-specific random intercepts, and fixed and random AOD and temperature slopes. We then use generalized additive mixed models with spatial smoothing to generate grid cell predictions when AOD was missing. Finally, to get 200 m localized predictions, we regressed the residuals from the final model for each monitor against the local spatial and temporal variables at each monitoring site. Our model performance was excellent (mean out-of-sample R(sup 2) = 0.88). The spatial and temporal components of the out-of-sample results also presented very good fits to the withheld data (R(sup 2) = 0.87, R(sup)2 = 0.87). In addition, our results revealed very little bias in the predicted concentrations (Slope of predictions versus withheld observations = 0.99). Our daily model results show high predictive accuracy at high spatial resolutions

  2. Regional downscaling of temporal resolution in near-surface wind from statistically downscaled Global Climate Models (GCMs) for use in San Francisco Bay coastal flood modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, A.; Erikson, L. H.; Barnard, P.

    2013-12-01

    While Global Climate Models (GCMs) provide useful projections of near-surface wind vectors into the 21st century, resolution is not sufficient enough for use in regional wave modeling. Statistically downscaled GCM projections from Multivariate Adaptive Constructed Analogues (MACA) provide daily near-surface winds at an appropriate spatial resolution for wave modeling within San Francisco Bay. Using 30 years (1975-2004) of climatological data from four representative stations around San Francisco Bay, a library of example daily wind conditions for four corresponding over-water sub-regions is constructed. Empirical cumulative distribution functions (ECDFs) of station conditions are compared to MACA GFDL hindcasts to create correction factors, which are then applied to 21st century MACA wind projections. For each projection day, a best match example is identified via least squares error among all stations from the library. The best match's daily variation in velocity components (u/v) is used as an analogue of representative wind variation and is applied at 3-hour increments about the corresponding sub-region's projected u/v values. High temporal resolution reconstructions using this methodology on hindcast MACA fields from 1975-2004 accurately recreate extreme wind values within the San Francisco Bay, and because these extremes in wind forcing are of key importance in wave and subsequent coastal flood modeling, this represents a valuable method of generating near-surface wind vectors for use in coastal flood modeling.

  3. Evaluation of TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) performance in the Central Andes region and its dependency on spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, M. L. M.; Rohrer, M.; Huggel, Ch.; Santos Villar, D.; Silvestre, E.; Huffman, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    Climate time series are of major importance for base line studies for climate change impact and adaptation projects. However, for instance, in mountain regions and in developing countries there exist significant gaps in ground based climate records in space and time. Specifically, in the Peruvian Andes spatially and temporally coherent precipitation information is a prerequisite for ongoing climate change adaptation projects in the fields of water resources, disasters and food security. The present work aims at evaluating the ability of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) to estimate precipitation rates at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale in the Central Andes and the dependency of the estimate performance on changing spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the TMPA product with gauge measurements in the regions of Cuzco, Peru and La Paz, Bolivia were carried out and analysed statistically. Large biases are identified in both investigation areas in the estimation of daily precipitation amounts. The occurrence of strong precipitation events was well assessed, but their intensities were underestimated. TMPA estimates for La Paz show high false alarm ratio. The dependency of the TMPA estimate quality with changing resolution was analysed by comparisons of 1-, 7-, 15- and 30-day sums for Cuzco, Peru. The correlation of TMPA estimates with ground data increases strongly and almost linearly with temporal aggregation. The spatial aggregation to 0.5°, 0.75° and 1° grid box averaged precipitation and its comparison to gauge data of the same areas revealed no significant change in correlation coefficients and estimate performance. In order to profit from the TMPA combination product on a daily basis, a procedure to blend it with daily precipitation gauge measurements is proposed. Different sources of errors and uncertainties introduced by the sensors, sensor-specific algorithm aspects and the TMPA processing scheme

  4. Evaluation of TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) performance in the Central Andes region and its dependency on spatial and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, M. L. M.; Rohrer, M.; Huggel, C.; Santos Villar, D.; Silvestre, E.; Huffman, G. J.

    2010-10-01

    Climate time series are of major importance for base line studies for climate change impact and adaptation projects. However, in mountain regions and in developing countries there exist significant gaps in ground based climate records in space and time. Specifically, in the Peruvian Andes spatially and temporally coherent precipitation information is a prerequisite for ongoing climate change adaptation projects in the fields of water resources, disasters and food security. The present work aims at evaluating the ability of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) to estimate precipitation rates at daily 0.25° × 0.25° scale in the Central Andes and the dependency of the estimate performance on changing spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the TMPA product with gauge measurements in the regions of Cuzco, Peru and La Paz, Bolivia were carried out and analysed statistically. Large biases are identified in both investigation areas in the estimation of daily precipitation amounts. The occurrence of strong precipitation events was well assessed, but their intensities were underestimated. TMPA estimates for La Paz show high false alarm ratio. The dependency of the TMPA estimate quality with changing resolution was analysed by comparisons of 1-, 7-, 15- and 30-day sums for Cuzco, Peru. The correlation of TMPA estimates with ground data increases strongly and almost linearly with temporal aggregation. The spatial aggregation to 0.5°, 0.75° and 1° grid box averaged precipitation and its comparison to gauge data of the same areas revealed no significant change in correlation coefficients and estimate performance. In order to profit from the TMPA combination product on a daily basis, a procedure to blend it with daily precipitation gauge measurements is proposed. Different sources of errors and uncertainties introduced by the sensors, sensor-specific algorithm aspects and the TMPA processing scheme are discussed

  5. Monitoring of the Spatial Distribution and Temporal Dynamics of the Green Vegetation Fraction of Croplands in Southwest Germany Using High-Resolution RapidEye Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imukova, Kristina; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    The green vegetation fraction (GVF) is a key input variable to the evapotranspiration scheme applied in the widely used NOAH land surface model (LSM). In standard applications of the NOAH LSM, the GVF is taken from a global map with a 15 km×15 km resolution. The central objective of the present study was (a) to derive gridded GVF data in a high spatial and temporal resolution from RapidEye images for a region in Southwest Germany, and (b) to improve the representation of the GVF dynamics of croplands in the NOAH LSM for a better simulation of water and energy exchange between land surface and atmosphere. For the region under study we obtained monthly RapidEye satellite images with a resolution 5 m×5 m by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The images hold five spectral bands: blue, green, red, red-edge and near infrared (NIR). The GVF dynamics were determined based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) calculated from the red and near-infrared bands of the satellite images. The satellite GVF data were calibrated and validated against ground truth measurements. Digital colour photographs above the canopy were taken with a boom-mounted digital camera at fifteen permanently marked plots (1 m×1 m). Crops under study were winter wheat, winter rape and silage maize. The GVF was computed based on the red and the green band of the photographs according to Rundquist's method (2002). Based on the obtained calibration scheme GVF maps were derived in a monthly resolution for the region. Our results confirm a linear relationship between GVF and NDVI and demonstrate that it is possible to determine the GVF of croplands from RapidEye images based on a simple two end-member mixing model. Our data highlight the high variability of the GVF in time and space. At the field scale, the GVF was normally distributed with a coefficient of variation of about 32%. Variability was mainly caused by soil heterogeneities and management differences. At the regional scale the GVF

  6. 10 Yr Spatial and Temporal Trends of PM2.5 Concentrations in the Southeastern US Estimated Using High-resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term PM2.5 exposure has been reported to be associated with various adverse health outcomes. However, most ground monitors are located in urban areas, leading to a potentially biased representation of the true regional PM2.5 levels. To facilitate epidemiological studies, accurate estimates of spatiotemporally continuous distribution of PM2.5 concentrations are essential. Satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been widely used for PM2.5 concentration estimation due to its comprehensive spatial coverage. Nevertheless, an inherent disadvantage of current AOD products is their coarse spatial resolutions. For instance, the spatial resolutions of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) are 10 km and 17.6 km, respectively. In this paper, a new AOD product with 1 km spatial resolution retrieved by the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm was used. A two-stage model was developed to account for both spatial and temporal variability in the PM2.5-AOD relationship by incorporating the MAIAC AOD, meteorological fields, and land use variables as predictors. Our study area is in the southeastern US, centered at the Atlanta Metro area, and data from 2001 to 2010 were collected from various sources. The model was fitted for each year individually, and we obtained model fitting R2 ranging from 0.71 to 0.85, MPE from 1.73 to 2.50 g m3, and RMSPE from 2.75 to 4.10 g m3. In addition, we found cross validation R2 ranging from 0.62 to 0.78, MPE from 2.00 to 3.01 g m3, and RMSPE from 3.12 to 5.00 g m3, indicating a good agreement between the estimated and observed values. Spatial trends show that high PM2.5 levels occurred in urban areas and along major highways, while low concentrations appeared in rural or mountainous areas. A time series analysis was conducted to examine temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the study area from 2001 to 2010. The results showed

  7. Using high-resolution soil moisture modelling to assess the uncertainty of microwave remotely sensed soil moisture products at the correct spatial and temporal support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanders, N.; Karssenberg, D.; Bierkens, M. F. P.; Van Dam, J. C.; De Jong, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in the hydrological cycle and important in hydrological modelling. When assimilating soil moisture into flood forecasting models, the improvement of forecasting skills depends on the ability to accurately estimate the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture content throughout the river basin. Space-borne remote sensing may provide this information with a high temporal and spatial resolution and with a global coverage. Currently three microwave soil moisture products are available: AMSR-E, ASCAT and SMOS. The quality of these satellite-based products is often assessed by comparing them with in-situ observations of soil moisture. This comparison is however hampered by the difference in spatial and temporal support (i.e., resolution, scale), because the spatial resolution of microwave satellites is rather low compared to in-situ field measurements. Thus, the aim of this study is to derive a method to assess the uncertainty of microwave satellite soil moisture products at the correct spatial support. To overcome the difference in support size between in-situ soil moisture observations and remote sensed soil moisture, we used a stochastic, distributed unsaturated zone model (SWAP, van Dam (2000)) that is upscaled to the support of different satellite products. A detailed assessment of the SWAP model uncertainty is included to ensure that the uncertainty in satellite soil moisture is not overestimated due to an underestimation of the model uncertainty. We simulated unsaturated water flow up to a depth of 1.5m with a vertical resolution of 1 to 10 cm and on a horizontal grid of 1 km2 for the period Jan 2010 - Jun 2011. The SWAP model was first calibrated and validated on in-situ data of the REMEDHUS soil moisture network (Spain). Next, to evaluate the satellite products, the model was run for areas in the proximity of 79 meteorological stations in Spain, where model results were aggregated to the correct support of the satellite

  8. Feasibility study for reconstructing the spatial-temporal structure of TIDs from high-resolution backscatter ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickisch, L. J.; Fridman, Sergey; Hausman, Mark; San Antonio, Geoffrey S.

    2016-05-01

    Over-the-horizon radar (OTHR) utilizes the reflective "sky wave" property of the ionosphere for high-frequency radiowaves to illuminate targets at ranges extending to several thousand kilometers. However, the ionospheric "mirror" is not static but exhibits geographic, diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle variations. NorthWest Research Associates has developed an ionospheric data assimilation capability called Global Positioning Satellite Ionospheric Inversion (GPSII; pronounced "gypsy") that allows real-time modeling of the ionospheric structure for the purpose of accurate coordinate registration (CR; OTHR geolocation). However, the ionosphere is routinely subjected to traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), and the deflection of HF sky wave signals by unmodeled TIDs remains a troubling source of CR errors (tens of kilometers). Traditional OTHR tools for ionospheric sounding (vertical and backscatter ionograms) do not resolve the fine spatial structure associated with TIDs. The collection of backscatter ionograms using the full aperture of the OTHR was recently demonstrated, thus providing enhanced resolution in radar azimuth in comparison with conventional OTHR backscatter soundings that utilize only a fraction of the OTHR receiver array. Leading edges of such backscatter ionograms demonstrate prominent spatial features associated with TIDs. We investigate the feasibility of recovering TID perturbations of ionospheric electron density from high-resolution backscatter ionograms. We incorporated a model of naturally occurring TIDs into a numerical ray tracing code that allows the generation of synthetic OTHR data. We augmented GPSII to assimilate time series of full-aperture backscatter ionogram leading edge data. Results of the simulation show that GPSII is able to reproduce the TID structure used to generate the backscatter ionograms reasonably well.

  9. Stimulating the brain's language network: syntactic ambiguity resolution after TMS to the inferior frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Daniel J; Hagoort, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The posterior middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) are two critical nodes of the brain's language network. Previous neuroimaging evidence has supported a dissociation in language comprehension in which parts of the MTG are involved in the retrieval of lexical syntactic information and the IFG in unification operations that maintain, select, and integrate multiple sources of information over time. In the present investigation, we tested for causal evidence of this dissociation by modulating activity in IFG and MTG using an offline TMS procedure: continuous theta-burst stimulation. Lexical-syntactic retrieval was manipulated by using sentences with and without a temporarily word-class (noun/verb) ambiguity (e.g., run). In one group of participants, TMS was applied to the IFG and MTG, and in a control group, no TMS was applied. Eye movements were recorded and quantified at two critical sentence regions: a temporarily ambiguous region and a disambiguating region. Results show that stimulation of the IFG led to a modulation of the ambiguity effect (ambiguous-unambiguous) at the disambiguating sentence region in three measures: first fixation durations, total reading times, and regressive eye movements into the region. Both IFG and MTG stimulation modulated the ambiguity effect for total reading times in the temporarily ambiguous sentence region relative to the control group. The current results demonstrate that an offline repetitive TMS protocol can have influences at a different point in time during online processing and provide causal evidence for IFG involvement in unification operations during sentence comprehension.

  10. Automated Wetland Delineation from Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarized SAR Images in High Temporal and Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, L.; Schmitt, A.; Wendleder, A.

    2016-06-01

    Water scarcity is one of the main challenges posed by the changing climate. Especially in semi-arid regions where water reservoirs are filled during the very short rainy season, but have to store enough water for the extremely long dry season, the intelligent handling of water resources is vital. This study focusses on Lac Bam in Burkina Faso, which is the largest natural lake of the country and of high importance for the local inhabitants for irrigated farming, animal watering, and extraction of water for drinking and sanitation. With respect to the competition for water resources an independent area-wide monitoring system is essential for the acceptance of any decision maker. The following contribution introduces a weather and illumination independent monitoring system for the automated wetland delineation with a high temporal (about two weeks) and a high spatial sampling (about five meters). The similarities of the multispectral and multi-polarized SAR acquisitions by RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X are studied as well as the differences. The results indicate that even basic approaches without pre-classification time series analysis or post-classification filtering are already enough to establish a monitoring system of prime importance for a whole region.

  11. Ranging Behaviour of Verreaux’s Eagles during the Pre-Breeding Period Determined through the Use of High Temporal Resolution Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Les G.; Bouten, Willem; Amar, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Information on movement ecology is key in understanding the drivers and limitations of life history traits and has a potential role in indicating environmental change. Currently we have a limited understanding of the parameters of movement of territory-bound raptors, which are sensitive to environmental change. In this study we used GPS tracking technology to obtain spatially (within 3 m) and temporally (c. 3 mins) high-resolution movement data on a small sample of Verreaux’s eagle Aquila verreauxii during the pre-laying period (n = 4) with one additional example during the chick rearing period. We present GPS-derived home range estimates for this species and we examine temporal (timing, duration, frequency and speed) and spatial (total path length and maximum distance from nest) patterns of trips away from the nest. For eagles tagged in the agriculturally developed Sandveld region (n = 3), which is made up of a mosaic of land use types, we also undertook a habitat selection analysis. Home ranges were small and largely mutually exclusive. Trip activity was centred around midday, which is likely to be related to lift availability. Our habitat selection analysis found that eagles selected for near-natural and degraded habitat over natural or completely modified areas, suggesting that these eagles may have benefitted from some of the agricultural development in this region. Although our sample sizes are small, the resolution of our tracking data was essential in deriving this data over a relatively short time period and paves the way for future research. PMID:27723832

  12. High temporal resolution for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitters in awake epileptic rats using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Riban, Véronique; Depaulis, Antoine; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-12-30

    A method for high temporal resolution monitoring of five neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (L-Asp), in freely-moving rats using microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) was developed. An on-line device, including microdialysis and derivatization with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, mixes the dialysate with derivatization reagents directly in the collection tube, i.e. with no reactor. Thereafter, collected derivatized samples are analyzed off-line with an automated CE system coupled to a LIFD using a 442 nm excitation. The sampling time was limited by the minimal volume required for the analysis by the automated CE system used: neurotransmitters could be determined in 667 nl dialysates (940 nl after derivatization), i.e. in samples collected every 20 s with a flow rate of 2 microl/min. The detection limits at the dialysis probe were 3 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-9), 1.9 x 10(-8), 4.2 x 10(-7), 2.1 x 10(-7) mol/l for DA, NA, GABA, Glu and L-Asp, respectively. The protocol was validated using in vitro/in vivo tests and the performances--repeatability, linearity, characteristics of the probes--were determined. Finally, the high temporal resolution allowed the simultaneous monitoring of these neurotransmitters in rats with genetic absence epilepsy and revealed, for the first time, increases in GABA concentrations concomitantly with the seizures, detected when our new microdialysis method was combined to electroencephalographic recordings.

  13. Forest fuel treatment detection using multi-temporal airborne Lidar data and high resolution aerial imagery ---- A case study at Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Guo, Q.; Collins, B.; Fry, D.; Kelly, M.

    2014-12-01

    Forest fuel treatments (FFT) are often employed in Sierra Nevada forest (located in California, US) to enhance forest health, regulate stand density, and reduce wildfire risk. However, there have been concerns that FFTs may have negative impacts on certain protected wildlife species. Due to the constraints and protection of resources (e.g., perennial streams, cultural resources, wildlife habitat, etc.), the actual FFT extents are usually different from planned extents. Identifying the actual extent of treated areas is of primary importance to understand the environmental influence of FFTs. Light detection and ranging (Lidar) is a powerful remote sensing technique that can provide accurate forest structure measurements, which provides great potential to monitor forest changes. This study used canopy height model (CHM) and canopy cover (CC) products derived from multi-temporal airborne Lidar data to detect FFTs by an approach combining a pixel-wise thresholding method and a object-of-interest segmentation method. We also investigated forest change following the implementation of landscape-scale FFT projects through the use of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and standardized principle component analysis (PCA) from multi-temporal high resolution aerial imagery. The same FFT detection routine was applied on the Lidar data and aerial imagery for the purpose of comparing the capability of Lidar data and aerial imagery on FFT detection. Our results demonstrated that the FFT detection using Lidar derived CC products produced both the highest total accuracy and kappa coefficient, and was more robust at identifying areas with light FFTs. The accuracy using Lidar derived CHM products was significantly lower than that of the result using Lidar derived CC, but was still slightly higher than using aerial imagery. FFT detection results using NDVI and standardized PCA using multi-temporal aerial imagery produced almost identical total accuracy and kappa coefficient

  14. Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence from high-resolution imaging spectroscopy data to quantify spatio-temporal patterns of photosynthetic function in crop canopies.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Francisco; Damm, Alexander; Schickling, Anke; Panigada, Cinzia; Cogliati, Sergio; Müller-Linow, Mark; Balvora, Agim; Rascher, Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Passive detection of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) using spectroscopy has been proposed as a proxy to quantify changes in photochemical efficiency at canopy level under natural light conditions. In this study, we explored the use of imaging spectroscopy to quantify spatio-temporal dynamics of SIF within crop canopies and its sensitivity to track patterns of photosynthetic activity originating from the interaction between vegetation structure and incoming radiation as well as variations in plant function. SIF was retrieved using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principle from imaging spectroscopy data acquired at different time scales a few metres above several crop canopies growing under natural illumination. We report the first maps of canopy SIF in high spatial resolution. Changes of SIF were monitored at different time scales ranging from quick variations under induced stress conditions to seasonal dynamics. Natural changes were primarily determined by varying levels and distribution of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). However, this relationship changed throughout the day demonstrating an additional physiological component modulating spatio-temporal patterns of SIF emission. We successfully used detailed SIF maps to track changes in the canopy's photochemical activity under field conditions, providing a new tool to evaluate complex patterns of photosynthesis within the canopy. PMID:26763162

  15. Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide in surface waters – Exposure estimation for Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Egon; Johnson, Andrew C.; Keller, Virginie D.J.; Williams, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Nano silver and nano zinc-oxide monthly concentrations in surface waters across Europe were modeled at ∼6 × 9 km spatial resolution. Nano-particle loadings from households to rivers were simulated considering household connectivity to sewerage, sewage treatment efficiency, the spatial distribution of sewage treatment plants, and their associated populations. These loadings were used to model temporally varying nano-particle concentrations in rivers, lakes and wetlands by considering dilution, downstream transport, water evaporation, water abstraction, and nano-particle sedimentation. Temporal variability in concentrations caused by weather variation was simulated using monthly weather data for a representative 31-year period. Modeled concentrations represent current levels of nano-particle production. Two scenarios were modeled. In the most likely scenario, half the river stretches had long-term average concentrations exceeding 0.002 ng L−1 nano silver and 1.5 ng L−1 nano zinc oxide. In 10% of the river stretches, these concentrations exceeded 0.18 ng L−1 and 150 ng L−1, respectively. Predicted concentrations were usually highest in July. PMID:25463731

  16. Sensitivity of honeybee hygroreceptors to slow humidity changes and temporal humidity variation detected in high resolution by mobile measurements.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The moist cell and the dry cell on the antenna of the male honeybee were exposed to humidities slowly rising and falling at rates between -1.5%/s and +1.5%/s and at varying amplitudes in the 10 to 90% humidity range. The two cells respond to these slow humidity oscillations with oscillations in impulse frequency which depend not only on instantaneous humidity but also on the rate with which humidity changes. The impulse frequency of each cell was plotted as a function of these two parameters and regression planes were fitted to the data points of single oscillation periods. The regression slopes, which estimate sensitivity, rose with the amplitude of humidity oscillations. During large-amplitude oscillations, moist and dry cell sensitivity for instantaneous humidity and its rate of change was high. During small-amplitude oscillations, their sensitivity for both parameters was low, less exactly reflecting humidity fluctuations. Nothing is known about the spatial and temporal humidity variations a honeybee may encounter when flying through natural environments. Microclimatic parameters (absolute humidity, temperature, wind speed) were measured from an automobile traveling through different landscapes of Lower Austria. Landscape type affected extremes and mean values of humidity. Differences between peaks and troughs of humidity fluctuations were generally smaller in open grassy fields or deciduous forests than in edge habitats or forest openings. Overall, fluctuation amplitudes were small. In this part of the stimulus range, hygroreceptor sensitivity is not optimal for encoding instantaneous humidity and the rate of humidity change. It seems that honeybee's hygroreceptors are specialized for detecting large-amplitude fluctuations that are relevant for a specific behavior, namely, maintaining a sufficiently stable state of water balance. The results suggest that optimal sensitivity of both hygroreceptors is shaped not only by humidity oscillation amplitudes but also

  17. Sensitivity of Honeybee Hygroreceptors to Slow Humidity Changes and Temporal Humidity Variation Detected in High Resolution by Mobile Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, Harald; Kallina, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The moist cell and the dry cell on the antenna of the male honeybee were exposed to humidities slowly rising and falling at rates between –1.5%/s and +1.5%/s and at varying amplitudes in the 10 to 90% humidity range. The two cells respond to these slow humidity oscillations with oscillations in impulse frequency which depend not only on instantaneous humidity but also on the rate with which humidity changes. The impulse frequency of each cell was plotted as a function of these two parameters and regression planes were fitted to the data points of single oscillation periods. The regression slopes, which estimate sensitivity, rose with the amplitude of humidity oscillations. During large-amplitude oscillations, moist and dry cell sensitivity for instantaneous humidity and its rate of change was high. During small-amplitude oscillations, their sensitivity for both parameters was low, less exactly reflecting humidity fluctuations. Nothing is known about the spatial and temporal humidity variations a honeybee may encounter when flying through natural environments. Microclimatic parameters (absolute humidity, temperature, wind speed) were measured from an automobile traveling through different landscapes of Lower Austria. Landscape type affected extremes and mean values of humidity. Differences between peaks and troughs of humidity fluctuations were generally smaller in open grassy fields or deciduous forests than in edge habitats or forest openings. Overall, fluctuation amplitudes were small. In this part of the stimulus range, hygroreceptor sensitivity is not optimal for encoding instantaneous humidity and the rate of humidity change. It seems that honeybee's hygroreceptors are specialized for detecting large-amplitude fluctuations that are relevant for a specific behavior, namely, maintaining a sufficiently stable state of water balance. The results suggest that optimal sensitivity of both hygroreceptors is shaped not only by humidity oscillation amplitudes but also

  18. Impact of temporal resolution of inputs on hydrological model performance: An analysis based on 2400 flood events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficchì, Andrea; Perrin, Charles; Andréassian, Vazken

    2016-07-01

    Hydro-climatic data at short time steps are considered essential to model the rainfall-runoff relationship, especially for short-duration hydrological events, typically flash floods. Also, using fine time step information may be beneficial when using or analysing model outputs at larger aggregated time scales. However, the actual gain in prediction efficiency using short time-step data is not well understood or quantified. In this paper, we investigate the extent to which the performance of hydrological modelling is improved by short time-step data, using a large set of 240 French catchments, for which 2400 flood events were selected. Six-minute rain gauge data were available and the GR4 rainfall-runoff model was run with precipitation inputs at eight different time steps ranging from 6 min to 1 day. Then model outputs were aggregated at seven different reference time scales ranging from sub-hourly to daily for a comparative evaluation of simulations at different target time steps. Three classes of model performance behaviour were found for the 240 test catchments: (i) significant improvement of performance with shorter time steps; (ii) performance insensitivity to the modelling time step; (iii) performance degradation as the time step becomes shorter. The differences between these groups were analysed based on a number of catchment and event characteristics. A statistical test highlighted the most influential explanatory variables for model performance evolution at different time steps, including flow auto-correlation, flood and storm duration, flood hydrograph peakedness, rainfall-runoff lag time and precipitation temporal variability.

  19. High spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery for mapping NDVI and its relationship to temporal urban landscape evapotranspiration factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nouri, Hamideh; Beecham, Simon; Anderson, Sharolyn; Nagler, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Evapotranspiration estimation has benefitted from recent advances in remote sensing and GIS techniques particularly in agricultural applications rather than urban environments. This paper explores the relationship between urban vegetation evapotranspiration (ET) and vegetation indices derived from newly-developed high spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery. The study site was Veale Gardens in Adelaide, Australia. Image processing was applied on five images captured from February 2012 to February 2013 using ERDAS Imagine. From 64 possible two band combinations of WorldView-2, the most reliable one (with the maximum median differences) was selected. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values were derived for each category of landscape cover, namely trees, shrubs, turf grasses, impervious pavements, and water bodies. Urban landscape evapotranspiration rates for Veale Gardens were estimated through field monitoring using observational-based landscape coefficients. The relationships between remotely sensed NDVIs for the entire Veale Gardens and for individual NDVIs of different vegetation covers were compared with field measured urban landscape evapotranspiration rates. The water stress conditions experienced in January 2013 decreased the correlation between ET and NDVI with the highest relationship of ET-Landscape NDVI (Landscape Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) for shrubs (r2 = 0.66) and trees (r2 = 0.63). However, when the January data was excluded, there was a significant correlation between ET and NDVI. The highest correlation for ET-Landscape NDVI was found for the entire Veale Gardens regardless of vegetation type (r2 = 0.95, p > 0.05) and the lowest one was for turf (r2 = 0.88, p > 0.05). In support of the feasibility of ET estimation by WV2 over a longer period, an algorithm recently developed that estimates evapotranspiration rates based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from MODIS was employed. The results revealed a significant positive

  20. Linking innovative measurement technologies (ConMon and Dataflow© systems) for high-resolution temporal and spatial dissolved oxygen criteria assessment.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, C A; Perry, E; Bayard, A; Wainger, L; Boynton, W R

    2015-10-01

    One consequence of nutrient-induced eutrophication in shallow estuarine waters is the occurrence of hypoxia and anoxia that has serious impacts on biota, habitats, and biogeochemical cycles of important elements. Because of the important role of dissolved oxygen (DO) on these ecosystem features, a variety of DO criteria have been established as indicators of system condition. However, DO dynamics are complex and vary on time scales ranging from diel to decadal and spatial scales from meters to multiple kilometers. Because of these complexities, determining DO criteria attainment or failure remains difficult. We propose a method for linking two common measurement technologies for shallow water DO criteria assessment using a Chesapeake Bay tributary as a test case. Dataflow© is a spatially intensive (30-60-m collection intervals) system used to map surface water conditions at the whole estuary scale, and ConMon is a high-frequency (15-min collection intervals) fixed station approach. The former technology is effective with spatial descriptions but poor regarding temporal resolution, while the latter provides excellent temporal but very limited spatial resolution. Our methodology for combining the strengths of these measurement technologies involved a sequence of steps. First, a statistical model of surface water DO dynamics, based on temporally intense ConMon data, was developed. The results of this model were used to calculate daily DO minimum concentrations. Second, this model was then inserted into Dataflow©-generated spatial maps of DO conditions and used to adjust measured DO concentrations to daily minimum concentrations. This information was used to assess DO criteria compliance at the full tributary scale. Model results indicated that it is vital to consider the short-term time scale DO criteria across both space and time concurrently. Large fluctuations in DO occurred within a 24-h time period, and DO dynamics varied across the length and width of the

  1. Analyses of the temporal and spatial structures of heavy rainfall from a catalog of high-resolution radar rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Smith, James A.; Baeck, Mary Lynn; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we develop a storm catalog of heavy rainfall events for a region centered on the Milwaukee, Wisconsin WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler) radar. The study region includes portions of southern Wisconsin, northern Illinois and Lake Michigan. The long-term objective of this study is to develop rainfall frequency analysis methods based on a storm catalog of major rain events. The specific objectives of this study are to develop a long-term catalog of high-resolution radar rainfall fields and characterize key features of the space-time variability of rainfall. The research questions that underlie these objectives are: 1) What are the spatial heterogeneities of rainfall over the study region for major flood-producing storm systems? 2) What are the key elements of storm evolution that control the scale-dependent properties of extreme rainfall? The storm catalog contains a record of the 50 “largest” storm days during the 1996-2011 observation period. We show that mean rainfall for the 50 largest storm days exhibits pronounced spatial heterogeneity with a broad maximum in western Wisconsin and a minimum in the eastern portion of the study region over Lake Michigan. We also show that there is a narrow line of maximum mean rainfall extending from west to east along the Wisconsin-Illinois border. This feature is tied to a maximum in the probability of daily rainfall exceeding 100 mm. There are characteristic elements to the storm life cycle of heavy rainfall days that relate to size, structure and evolution of heavy rainfall. Extreme rainfall is also linked with severe weather (tornados, large hail and damaging wind). The diurnal cycle of rainfall for heavy rain days is characterized by an early peak in the largest rainfall rates, an afternoon-evening peak in rain area exceeding 25 mm h- 1 and development of a large stratiform rain area during the night and early morning.

  2. The potential origins and palaeoenvironmental implications of high temporal resolution δ 18O heterogeneity in coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Nicola; Finch, Adrian A.; EIMF

    2010-10-01

    δ 18O was determined at high spatial resolution (beam diameter ˜30 μm) by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) across 1-2 year sections of 2 modern Porites lobata coral skeletons from Hawaii. We observe large (>2‰) cyclical δ 18O variations that typically cover skeletal distances equivalent to periods of ˜20-30 days. These variations do not reflect seawater temperature or composition and we conclude that skeletal δ 18O is principally controlled by other processes. Calcification site pH in one coral record was estimated from previous SIMS measurements of skeletal δ 11B. We model predicted skeletal δ 18O as a function of calcification site pH, DIC residence time at the site and DIC source (reflecting the inputs of seawater and molecular CO 2 to the site). We assume that oxygen isotopic equilibration proceeds at the rates observed in seawater and that only the aqueous carbonate ion is incorporated into the precipitating aragonite. We reproduce successfully the observed skeletal δ 18O range by assuming that DIC is rapidly utilised at the calcification site (within 1 h) and that ˜80% of the skeletal carbonate is derived from seawater. If carbonic anhydrase catalyses the reversible hydration of CO 2 at the calcification site, then oxygen isotopic equilibration times may be substantially reduced and a larger proportion of the skeletal carbonate could be derived from molecular CO 2. Seasonal skeletal δ 18O variations are most pronounced in the skeleton deposited from late autumn to winter (and coincide with the high density skeletal bands) and are dampened in skeleton deposited from spring to summer. We observed no annual pattern in sea surface temperature or photosynthetically active radiation variability which could potentially correlate with the coral δ 18O. At present we are unable to resolve an environmental cue to drive seasonal patterns of short term skeletal δ 18O heterogeneity.

  3. Analysis of the seasonal and interannual evolution of Jakobshavn Isbrae from 2010-2013 using high spatial/temporal resolution DEM and velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, D. E.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.; Moratto, Z. M.; Alexandrov, O.; Floricioiu, D.; Morin, P. J.; Porter, C. C.; Beyer, R. A.; Fong, T.

    2013-12-01

    Greenland's large marine-terminating outlet glaciers have displayed marked retreat, speedup, and thinning in recent decades. Jakobshavn Isbrae, one of Greenland's largest outlet glaciers, has retreated ~15 km, accelerated ~150%, and thinned ~200 m since the early 1990s. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of high spatial (~2-5 m/px) and temporal (daily-monthly) resolution elevation and velocity data for Jakobshavn from 7/2010 to 7/2013. We have developed an automated processing pipeline using open-source software (Ames Stereo Pipeline, GDAL/OGR, NumPy/SciPy, etc.) to produce orthoimage, digital elevation model (DEM), and surface velocity products from DigitalGlobe WorldView-1/2 stereo imagery (~0.5 m/px, ~17 km swath width). Our timeseries consists of 35 WV DEMs (~2-4 m/px) covering the lower trunks of the main+north branches and fjord, but also extending >110 km inland. We supplement this record with 7 TanDEM-X DEMs (~5 m/px, ~35 km swath width) between 6/2011-9/2012. Elevation data from IceBridge ATM/LVIS, ICESat GLAS, and GPS campaigns provide absolute control data over fixed surfaces (i.e., exposed bedrock). Observed WV DEM offsets are consistent with DigitalGlobe's published value of 5.0 m CE90/LE90 horizontal/vertical accuracy. After DEM co-registration, we observe sub-meter horizontal and vertical absolute accuracy. Velocity data are derived from TerraSAR-X data with 11 day repeat interval. Supplemental velocity data are derived through correlation of high-resolution WV DEM/image data. The contemporaneous DEM and velocity data provide full 3D displacement vectors for each time interval, allowing for the analysis of both Eulerian and Lagrangian elevation change. The lower trunk of Jakobshavn displays significant seasonal velocity variations, with recent rates of ~8 km/yr during winter to >17 km/yr during summer. DEM data show corresponding elevation changes of -30 to -45 m in summer and +15 to +20 m in winter, corresponding to integrated volumes

  4. 10-year spatial and temporal trends of PM2.5 concentrations in the southeastern US estimated using high-resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Waller, L. A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Long-term PM2.5 exposure has been associated with various adverse health outcomes. However, most ground monitors are located in urban areas, leading to a potentially biased representation of true regional PM2.5 levels. To facilitate epidemiological studies, accurate estimates of the spatiotemporally continuous distribution of PM2.5 concentrations are important. Satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been increasingly used for PM2.5 concentration estimation due to its comprehensive spatial coverage. Nevertheless, previous studies indicated that an inherent disadvantage of many AOD products is their coarse spatial resolution. For instance, the available spatial resolutions of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) AOD products are 10 and 17.6 km, respectively. In this paper, a new AOD product with 1 km spatial resolution retrieved by the multi-angle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm based on MODIS measurements was used. A two-stage model was developed to account for both spatial and temporal variability in the PM2.5-AOD relationship by incorporating the MAIAC AOD, meteorological fields, and land use variables as predictors. Our study area is in the southeastern US centered at the Atlanta metro area, and data from 2001 to 2010 were collected from various sources. The model was fitted annually, and we obtained model fitting R2 ranging from 0.71 to 0.85, mean prediction error (MPE) from 1.73 to 2.50 μg m-3, and root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) from 2.75 to 4.10 μg m-3. In addition, we found cross-validation R2 ranging from 0.62 to 0.78, MPE from 2.00 to 3.01 μg m-3, and RMSPE from 3.12 to 5.00 μg m-3, indicating a good agreement between the estimated and observed values. Spatial trends showed that high PM2.5 levels occurred in urban areas and along major highways, while low concentrations appeared in rural or mountainous areas. Our time

  5. Sensitivity of advective transfer times across the North Atlantic Ocean to the temporal and spatial resolution of model velocity data: Implication for European eel larval transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Bruno; Bonhommeau, Sylvain; Grima, Nicolas; Drillet, Yann

    2012-05-01

    European eel (Anguilla anguilla) larvae achieve one of the longest larval migrations of the marine realm, i.e., more than 6000 km from their spawning grounds in the Sargasso Sea to European continental shelves. The duration of this migration remains debated, between 7 months and 3 years. This information is, however, crucial since it determines the period over which larvae are affected by environmental conditions and hence the subsequent recruitment success. We investigate the pathways and duration of trans-Atlantic connections using 3 years of high-resolution (daily, 1/12°) velocity fields available from a Mercator-Océan model configuration without data assimilation. We study specifically the effect of spatial and temporal resolutions on our estimates by applying various filters in time (from daily to 12-day averages) and space (from 1/12° to 1° gridcell aggregation) to the nominal model outputs. Numerical particles are released in the presumed European eel spawning area and considered as passive tracers at three specific depths (around 0, 50, and 200 m). We diagnose particularly the intensity of the water transfer between suitable control sections that encompass the eel larva distribution. Transit ages are also investigated, with a particular focus on the pathways that minimize the connection times between the western and eastern North Atlantic. We show that small-scale structures (eddies and filaments) contribute to faster connections though they also correspond to additional complexity in trajectories. The shortest pathways mostly follow the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic Drift, whereas interior connections require longer transfers that prove less compatible with biological observations.

  6. A processing-modeling routine to use rough data from automatic weather stations in snowpack mass dynamics modeling at fine temporal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; De Michele, Carlo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Jommi, Cristina; Pepe, Monica

    2015-04-01

    We discuss a proposal of coupled routine to process rough data from automatic weather stations at an hourly resolution and to model snowpack mass dynamics. Seasonal snow represents an important component of the water cycle in mountain environment, and the modeling of its mass dynamics is a living topic in modern hydrology, given the expected modifications of the climate in the near future. Nevertheless, model forcing, calibration and evaluation operations are often hampered by the noisiness of rough data from automatic weather stations. The noise issue include, among others, non-physical temperature-based fluctuations of the signal or gauge under-catch. Consequently, it can be difficult to quantify precipitation inputs, accumulation/ablation periods or melt-runoff timing and amounts. This problem is particularly relevant at fine temporal resolution (e.g., the hourly one). To tackle this issue, 40 SNOTEL sites from western US are here considered, and the proposed processing-modeling routine is applied on multi-year datasets to assess its performances to both process hourly data and model snowpack dynamics. A simple one-layer snowpack model is used for this purpose. Specific attention is paid to remove sub-daily erroneous oscillations of snow depth. Under these assumptions, we can separate events of different types and recover catch deficiency by means of a data-fusion procedure that relies on the mass conservation law, instead of site- or instrument-specific relations. Since the considered model needs the calibration of two parameters, and given that sub-daily physical oscillations in snow depth data are difficult to be separated from instrument noise, a coupled processing-modeling procedure has been designed. Results prove that noise can be successfully removed from data, and that sub-daily data-series can be exploited as useful sources to model snowpack dynamics.

  7. Determination of the temporal resolution required for the HEDR dose code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 008

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the radiation doses that may have-been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 008) examined the potential for changes in the uncertainty distributions of potential doses from releases in the year 1945 as a function of temporal resolution of the intermediate data storage. This study builds on the work initiated in the fifth scoping calculation, which addressed the uncertainty of the dose estimates at a point; the sixth calculation, which extrapolated the doses throughout the atmospheric transport domain; and the seventh, which evaluated the spatial scales across the domain. A projection of dose to representative individuals throughout the proposed HEDR atmospheric transport domain was prepared on the basis of the HEDR source term. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to iodine-131 thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and ingestion of cow`s milk.

  8. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiacker, K.; McKeown, J. T.; Liu, C.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.

    2016-08-01

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of the metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ˜1.3 m s-1 to ˜2.5 m s-1 during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s-1 have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. Using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.

  9. Differential dynamics of amino acid release in the amygdala and olfactory cortex during odor fear acquisition as revealed with simultaneous high temporal resolution microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Sevelinges, Yannick; Thévenet, Marc; Gervais, Rémi; Parrot, Sandrine; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2009-11-01

    Although the amygdala seems to be essential to the formation and storage of fear memories, it might store only some aspects of the aversive event and facilitate the storage of more specific sensory aspects in cortical areas. We addressed the time course of amygdala and cortical activation in the context of odor fear conditioning in rats. Using high temporal resolution (1-min sampling) intracerebral microdialysis, we investigated the dynamics of glutamate and GABA fluctuations simultaneously in basolateral amygdala (BLA) and posterior piriform cortex (pPCx) during the course of the acquisition session, which consisted of six odor (conditioned stimulus)-footshock (unconditioned stimulus) pairings. In BLA, we observed a transient increase in amino acid concentrations following the first odor-shock pairing, after which concentrations returned to baseline levels or slightly below. In pPCx, transient increases were seen after each pairing and were also observed after the last odor-shock pairing, corresponding to the predicted times of anticipated trials. Furthermore, we observed that for the first pairing, the increase in BLA occurred earlier than the increase in pPCx. These data suggest that the amygdala is engaged early during acquisition and precedes the activation of the olfactory cortex, which is maintained until the end of the session. In addition, our data raise the challenging idea that the olfactory cortex might store certain aspects of fear conditioning related to the timing of the associations.

  10. Progress in diagnostics of pump-driven UH turbulence of the ionosphere by measurements of the SEE electromagnetic emissions with a high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Thidé, B.; Kotov, P. V.; Norin, L.

    The upper hybrid UH turbulence high frequency UH and Bernstein plasma waves and geomagnetic field aligned small-scale plasma density irregularities striations of the ionosphere illuminated by powerful HF radio wave dominates upon the F -region after long pumping gtrsim 10 s At this stage stimulated electromagnetic emission SEE a secondary radiation from the pumped volume of the ionosphere contains several prominent spectral features In the paper we present a review of recent results concerning understanding of physical processes occurring in the pumped volume and diagnostics of the UH turbulence parameters The results are obtained by SEE measurements with a high temporal resolution performed during pumping of the ionosphere with special diagnostic schedules allowing to emphasize or to suppress certain plasma processes responsible to the UH turbulence formation Thus fast sweeping of the pump wave frequency through electron gyroharmonics allowed i to distinguish between different generation models for SEE spectral features such as downshifted maxima DM and 2DM and upshifted maximum UM related to nonlinear interaction between UH and lower hybrid waves ii to reveal additional proofs for origin of broad upshifted maximum BUM SEE feature from UH waves with frequencies exceeding gyroharmonics iii to increase an accuracy of electron cyclotron frequency determination from SEE measurements An alternation of quasi-continuous pumping sim 100 -- 200 ms on sim 20 -- 30 ms off during few tens of seconds and low

  11. Quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy system with a servo-motor-driven channel-cut monochromator with a temporal resolution of 10 ms

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, T.; Dohmae, K.; Araki, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Hirose, Y.; Uruga, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Tanida, H.; Goto, S.

    2012-08-15

    We have developed a quick-scanning x-ray absorption fine structure (QXAFS) system and installed it at the recently constructed synchrotron radiation beamline BL33XU at the SPring-8. Rapid acquisition of high-quality QXAFS data was realized by combining a servo-motor-driven Si channel-cut monochromator with a tapered undulator. Two tandemly aligned monochromators with channel-cut Si(111) and Si(220) crystals covered energy ranges of 4.0-28.2 keV and 6.6-46.0 keV, respectively. The system allows the users to adjust instantly the energy ranges of scans, the starting angles of oscillations, and the frequencies. The channel-cut crystals are cooled with liquid nitrogen to enable them to withstand the high heat load from the undulator radiation. Deformation of the reflecting planes is reduced by clamping each crystal with two cooling blocks. Performance tests at the Cu K-edge demonstrated sufficiently high data quality for x-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended x-ray absorption fine-structure analyses with temporal resolutions of up to 10 and 25 ms, respectively.

  12. Towards high temporal and moderate spatial resolutions in the remote sensing retrieval of evapotranspiration by combining geostationary and polar orbit satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, José Miguel; Ghilain, Nicolas; Arboleda, Alirio; Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the water flux going from the surface into the atmosphere as result of soil and surface water evaporation and plant transpiration. It constitutes a key component of the water cycle and its quantification is of crucial importance for a number of applications like water management, climatic modelling, agriculture monitoring and planning, etc. Estimating ET is not an easy task; specially if large areas are envisaged and various spatio-temporal patterns of ET are present as result of heterogeneity in land cover, land use and climatic conditions. In this respect, spaceborne remote sensing (RS) provides the only alternative to continuously measure surface parameters related to ET over large areas. The Royal Meteorological Institute (RMI) of Belgium, in the framework of EUMETSAT's "Land Surface Analysis-Satellite Application Facility" (LSA-SAF), has developed a model for the estimation of ET. The model is forced by RS data, numerical weather predictions and land cover information. The RS forcing is derived from measurements by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite. This ET model is operational and delivers ET estimations over the whole field of view of the MSG satellite (Europe, Africa and Eastern South America) (http://landsaf.meteo.pt) every 30 minutes. The spatial resolution of MSG is 3 x 3 km at subsatellite point and about 4 x 5 km in continental Europe. The spatial resolution of this product may constrain its full exploitation as the interest of potential users (farmers and natural resources scientists) may lie on smaller spatial units. This study aimed at testing methodological alternatives to combine RS imagery (geostationary and polar orbit satellites) for the estimation of ET such that the spatial resolution of the final product is improved. In particular, the study consisted in the implementation of two approaches for combining the current ET estimations with

  13. High-resolution observations of the Evershed effect in sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shine, R. A.; Title, A. M.; Tarbell, T. D.; Smith, K.; Frank, Z. A.; Scharmer, Goran

    1994-01-01

    High spatial resolution movies of sunspots taken at the Swedish Solar Observatory on La Palma reveal that the Evershed effect is time dependent. Outward proper motions are visible in both the continuum and Dopplergrams. These can be tracked over most of the width of the penumbra and overlap regions that show inward moving penubral grains. The radial spacing between the moving structures is about 2000 km, and they exhibit irregular repetitive behavior with a typical interval of 10 minutes. These are probably the cause of 10 minutes oscillations sometimes seen in a penumbral power spectra. Higher velocities are spatially correlated with the relatively darker regions between bright filaments. Regions with a strong variation in the Doppler signal show peak-to-peak modulations of 1 km/s on an average velocity of about 3-4 km/s. The proper motion velocity is approximately constant from the iner penumbra and generally larger than the Doppler velocity when both are interpreted as projections of horizontal motion. Regions where thay are consistent suggest a typical horizontal velocity of 3.5 km/s. Some proper motion velocites as high as 7 km/s are seen, but these are less certain. The temporal behavoir shows a correlation between increased Doppler signal and increased continuum intensity, the opposite of the spatial correlation. When spatially averaged across filaments and over time, the averaged Evershed effect has a peak horizontal component near the outer edge of the penumbra of 2.0 km/s with evidence for a 200-400 m/s upward component. The latter depends on an uncertain absolute velocity calibration. If real it could be an actual upward component or a penumbral analogue of the convective blueshift seen in the quiet Sun.

  14. High-resolution observations of the Evershed effect in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, R. A.; Title, A. M.; Tarbell, T. D.; Smith, K.; Frank, Z. A.; Scharmer, Goran

    1994-07-01

    High spatial resolution movies of sunspots taken at the Swedish Solar Observatory on La Palma reveal that the Evershed effect is time dependent. Outward proper motions are visible in both the continuum and Dopplergrams. These can be tracked over most of the width of the penumbra and overlap regions that show inward moving penubral grains. The radial spacing between the moving structures is about 2000 km, and they exhibit irregular repetitive behavior with a typical interval of 10 minutes. These are probably the cause of 10 minutes oscillations sometimes seen in a penumbral power spectra. Higher velocities are spatially correlated with the relatively darker regions between bright filaments. Regions with a strong variation in the Doppler signal show peak-to-peak modulations of 1 km/s on an average velocity of about 3-4 km/s. The proper motion velocity is approximately constant from the iner penumbra and generally larger than the Doppler velocity when both are interpreted as projections of horizontal motion. Regions where thay are consistent suggest a typical horizontal velocity of 3.5 km/s. Some proper motion velocites as high as 7 km/s are seen, but these are less certain. The temporal behavoir shows a correlation between increased Doppler signal and increased continuum intensity, the opposite of the spatial correlation. When spatially averaged across filaments and over time, the averaged Evershed effect has a peak horizontal component near the outer edge of the penumbra of 2.0 km/s with evidence for a 200-400 m/s upward component. The latter depends on an uncertain absolute velocity calibration. If real it could be an actual upward component or a penumbral analogue of the convective blueshift seen in the quiet Sun.

  15. Final Technical Report for "High-resolution temporal variations in groundwater chemistry: Tracing the links between climate, hydrology, and element mobility in the vadose zone"

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Banner

    2002-04-23

    In spite of a developing emphasis on geochemical methods in studies of modern hydrologic systems, there have been few attempts to examine temporal fluctuations in groundwater chemistry and element mobility in the near-surface environment. Relatively little is known regarding how groundwaters evolve over 10 to 10,000 year scales, yet this knowledge provides a critical framework for understanding the links between climate and hydrology, the evolution of soils, and element migration in the vadose environment. Recent analytical advances allow U-series measurements to be applied to developing high-resolution chronologies of Pleistocene and Holocene carbonates. The potential of these new tools is examined through an analysis of two well-defined, active karst systems in (1) Barbados and (2) Texas. (1) The research effort on Barbados has developed methods of estimating recharge and inferring the spatial and seasonal distribution of recharge to the Pleistocene limestone aquifer on Barbados. A new method has been developed to estimate recharge based on oxygen isotope variations in rainwater and groundwater. Inter-annual recharge variations indicate that recharge is dependent on the distribution of rainfall throughout the year rather than total annual rainfall. Consequently, a year when rainfall occurs primarily during the peak wet season months (August through November) may have more recharge than a year when rainfall is more evenly distributed through the year. These results lay important groundwork for analysis of rainfall/recharge variations over different time scales based on isotopic records presently being constructed using Barbados speleothems from the same aquifer. (2) The chronology of speleothems (cave calcite deposits) from three caves across 130 kilometers in central Texas provides a 71,000-year record of temporal changes in hydrology and climate. Fifty-three ages were determined by mass spectrometric 238U - 230Th and 235U - 231Pa analyses. The accuracy of the

  16. Inferring runoff generation processes through high resolution spatial and temporal UV-Vis absorbance measurements in a mountainous headwater catchment in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, David; Schob, Sarah; Zang, Carina; Crespo, Patricio; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The alpine grassland páramo - typically occurring in the headwater catchments of the Andes - plays an important role in flow regulation, hydropower generation and local water supply. However, hydrological and hydro-biogeochemical processes in the páramo and their potential reactions to climate and land use change are largely unknown. Therefore, we used a UV-Vis absorbance spectrometer to investigate fluxes of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity and nitrate (NO3-N) in a small headwater catchment (91.31 km²) in the páramo in south Ecuador on a 5 min temporal and 100 m spatial resolution to gain first insights in its hydrological functioning. Spatial sampling was realized during three snapshot sampling campaigns along the 14.2 km long stream between October 2013 and January 2014, while temporal sampling took place at a permanent sampling site within the catchment between February and June 2014. To identify the runoff generation processes the spatial patterns have been associated with local site specific (e.g. fish ponds) and sub-catchment wide (e.g. land use) characteristics. Storm flow events within the time series allowed to further study temporal changes and rotational patterns of concentration-discharge relations (hysteresis). In total, 35 events were identified to be suitable for analyzing hysteresis effects of BOD, COD, and turbidity. Nitrate concentrations could be studied for 20 events. Regardless of the flow conditions nitrate leaching increased with a growing share of non-native pine forests or pastures in the study area. During low flow conditions, the high water holding capacity of the upstream páramo areas ensured a continuous supply of BOD to the stream. Pasture and pine forest sites, mostly occurring in the downstream section of the stream, contributed to BOD only during discharge events. Contradicting the expectations the trout farms along the lower part of the streams had a relatively closed nutrient cycle and

  17. The annual cycle of vertical mixing and restratification in the Northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba (Red Sea) based on high temporal and vertical resolution observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Daniel F.; Fredj, Erick; Gildor, Hezi

    2014-02-01

    The stratification in the Northern Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba follows a well-known annual cycle of well-mixed conditions in winter, surface warming in spring and summer, maximum vertical temperature gradient in late summer, and erosion of stratification in fall. The strength and structure of the stratification influences the diverse coral reef ecosystem and also affects the strength of the semi-diurnal tidal currents. Long-term (13 months) moored thermistor data, combined with high temporal and vertical resolution density profiles in deep water, show that transitions from summer to fall and winter to spring/summer occur in unpredictable, pulses and are not slow and gradual, as previously deduced from monthly hydrographic measurements and numerical simulations forced by monthly climatologies. The cooling and deepening of the surface layer in fall is marked by a transition to large amplitude, semi-diurnal isotherm displacements in the stratified intermediate layer. Stratification is rebuilt in spring and summer by intermittent pulses of warm, buoyant water that can increase the upper 100-150 m by 2 °C that force surface waters down 100-150 m over a matter of days. The stratification also varies in response to short-lived eddies and diurnal motions during winter. Thus, the variability in the stratification exhibits strong depth and seasonal dependence and occurs over range of timescales: from tidal to seasonal. We show that monthly or weekly single-cast hydrographic data under-samples the variability of the stratification in the Gulf and we estimate the error associated with single-cast assessments of the stratification.

  18. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zweiacker, K.; McKeown, J. T.; Liu, C.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.

    2016-08-04

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of themore » metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ~1.3 m s–1 to ~2.5 m s–1 during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s–1 have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. As a result, using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.« less

  19. Statistical modelling of particle number concentration in Zurich at high spatio-temporal resolution utilizing data from a mobile sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M. D.; Hasenfratz, David; Saukh, Olga; Fierz, Martin; Hueglin, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Highly resolved pollution maps are a valuable resource for many issues related to air quality including exposure modelling and urban planning. We present an approach for their generation based on data from a mobile sensor network and statistical modelling. An extensive record of particle number concentrations (PNCs) spanning more than 1.5 years was compiled by the tram-based OpenSense mobile sensor network in the City of Zurich. The sensor network consists of 10 sensor nodes installed on the roof of trams operating on different services according to their regular operation schedules. We developed a statistical modelling approach based on Generalized Additive models (GAMs) utilizing the PNC data obtained along the tram tracks as well as georeferenced information as predictor variables. Our approach includes a variable selection algorithm to ensure that individual models rely on the optimal set of predictor variables. Our models have high temporal and spatial resolutions of 30 min and 10 m by 10 m, respectively, and allow the spatial prediction of PNC in the municipal area of Zurich. We applied our approach to PNC data from two dedicated time periods: July-Sept. 2013 and Dec. 2013-Feb. 2014. The models strongly rely on traffic related predictor variables (vehicle counts) and, due to the hilly topography of Zurich, on elevation. We assessed the model performance by leave-one-out cross-validation and by comparing PNC predictions to measurements at fixed reference sites and to PNC measurements obtained by pedestrians. Model predictions reproduce well the main features of the PNC field in environment types similar to those passed by individual trams. Model performance is worse at elevated background locations probably due to the weak coverage of similar spots by the tram network. We end the paper by outlining a route finding algorithm which utilizes the highly resolved PNC maps providing the exposure minimal route for cyclists.

  20. Polarity and Temporality of High-Resolution Y-Chromosome Distributions in India Identify Both Indigenous and Exogenous Expansions and Reveal Minor Genetic Influence of Central Asian Pastoralists

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; King, Roy; Mehdi, S. Q.; Edmonds, Christopher A.; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T.; Lin, Alice A.; Mitra, Mitashree; Sil, Samir K.; Ramesh, A.; Usha Rani, M. V.; Thakur, Chitra M.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Majumder, Partha P.; Underhill, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    Although considerable cultural impact on social hierarchy and language in South Asia is attributable to the arrival of nomadic Central Asian pastoralists, genetic data (mitochondrial and Y chromosomal) have yielded dramatically conflicting inferences on the genetic origins of tribes and castes of South Asia. We sought to resolve this conflict, using high-resolution data on 69 informative Y-chromosome binary markers and 10 microsatellite markers from a large set of geographically, socially, and linguistically representative ethnic groups of South Asia. We found that the influence of Central Asia on the pre-existing gene pool was minor. The ages of accumulated microsatellite variation in the majority of Indian haplogroups exceed 10,000–15,000 years, which attests to the antiquity of regional differentiation. Therefore, our data do not support models that invoke a pronounced recent genetic input from Central Asia to explain the observed genetic variation in South Asia. R1a1 and R2 haplogroups indicate demographic complexity that is inconsistent with a recent single history. Associated microsatellite analyses of the high-frequency R1a1 haplogroup chromosomes indicate independent recent histories of the Indus Valley and the peninsular Indian region. Our data are also more consistent with a peninsular origin of Dravidian speakers than a source with proximity to the Indus and with significant genetic input resulting from demic diffusion associated with agriculture. Our results underscore the importance of marker ascertainment for distinguishing phylogenetic terminal branches from basal nodes when attributing ancestral composition and temporality to either indigenous or exogenous sources. Our reappraisal indicates that pre-Holocene and Holocene-era—not Indo-European—expansions have shaped the distinctive South Asian Y-chromosome landscape. PMID:16400607

  1. Coded aperture compressive temporal imaging.

    PubMed

    Llull, Patrick; Liao, Xuejun; Yuan, Xin; Yang, Jianbo; Kittle, David; Carin, Lawrence; Sapiro, Guillermo; Brady, David J

    2013-05-01

    We use mechanical translation of a coded aperture for code division multiple access compression of video. We discuss the compressed video's temporal resolution and present experimental results for reconstructions of > 10 frames of temporal data per coded snapshot.

  2. GHG emissions quantification at high spatial and temporal resolution at urban scale: the case of the town of Sassari (NW Sardinia - Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Laura; Ferrara, Roberto; Zara, Pierpaolo; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2014-05-01

    The European Union has set as priorities the fight against climate change related to greenhouse gas releases. The largest source of these emissions comes from human activities in urban areas that account for more than 70% of the world's emissions and several local governments intend to support the European strategic policies in understanding which crucial sectors drive GHG emissions in their city. Planning for mitigation actions at the community scale starts with the compilation of a GHG inventories that, among a wide range of measurement tools, provide information on the current status of GHG emissions across a specific jurisdiction. In the framework of a regional project for quantitative estimate of the net exchange of CO2 (emissions and sinks) at the municipal level in Sardinia, the town of Sassari represents a pilot site where a spatial and temporal high resolution GHG emissions inventory is built in line with European and international standard protocols to establish a baseline for tracking emission trends. The specific purpose of this accurate accounting is to obtain an appropriate allocation of CO2 and other GHG emissions at the fine building and hourly scale. The aim is to test the direct measurements needed to enable the construction of future scenarios of these emissions and for assessing possible strategies to reduce their impact. The key element of the methodologies used to construct this GHG emissions inventory is the Global Protocol for Community-Scale Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GPC) (March 2012) that identifies four main types of emission sources: (i) Stationary Units, (ii) Mobile Units, (iii) Waste, and (iv) Industrial Process and Product Use Emissions. The development of the GHG emissions account in Sassari consists in the collection of a range of alternative data sources (primary data, IPCC emission factors, national and local statistic, etc.) selected on the base on relevance and completeness criteria performed for 2010, as baseline year, using

  3. Survival of the 1%: Consequences of a Two-Phase Dynamic of Aragonitic Shell Loss and Stabilization for the Temporal Resolution of Proxy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, S. M.; Tomasovych, A.; Alexander, C. R., Jr.; Kaufman, D. S.; leonard-Pingel, J.

    2014-12-01

    of shell microstructure, all within the mixed layer, and the coarser temporal resolution of permanently buried shell assemblages, underscore the need to acquire a suite of replicate measurements per increment and to assume that some porewater equilibration of original shell has likely occurred.

  4. Long-Term Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution over CONUS: Bias-Adjustment of the Radar-Only National Mosaic and Multi-sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis (2001-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Olivier; Nelson, Brian; Stevens, Scott; Seo, Dong-Jun; Kim, Beomgeun

    2015-04-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2001 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Several in-situ datasets are available to assess the biases of the radar-only product and to adjust for those biases to provide a multi-sensor QPE. The rain gauge networks that are used such as the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily (GHCN-D), the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), and the Climate Reference Network (CRN), have different spatial density and temporal resolution. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. The objective of this work is threefold. First, we investigate how the different in-situ networks can impact the precipitation estimates as a function of the spatial density, sensor type, and temporal resolution. Second, we assess conditional and un-conditional biases of the radar-only QPE for various time scales (daily, hourly, 5-min) using in-situ precipitation observations. Finally, after assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are using a unique in-situ dataset merging the different RG networks (CRN, ASOS, HADS, GHCN-D) to

  5. Temporal resolution of misfolded prion protein transport, accumulation, glial activation, and neuronal death in the retinas of mice inoculated with scrapie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the respon...

  6. High resolution cloud feature tracking on Venus by Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toigo, Anthony; Gierasch, Peter J.; Smith, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The Venus cloud deck was monitored in February 1990 for 16 hours at 400 nanometers wavelength by the Galileo imaging system, with a spatial resolution of about 15 km and with image time separations as small as 10 minutes. Velocities are deduced by following the motion of small cloud features. In spite of the high temporal frequence is capable of being detected, no dynamical phenomena are apparent in the velocity data except the already well-known solar tides, possibly altered by the slow 4-day wave and the Hadley circulation. There is no evidence, to a level of approximately 4 m/s, of eddy or wavelike activity. The dominant size of sub-global scale albedo features is 200-500 km, and their contrast is approximately 5%. At low altitudes there are patches of blotchy, cell-like structures but at most locations the markings are streaky. The patterns are similar to those discovered by Mariner 10 and Pioneer Venus (M. J. S. Belton et al., 1976, W. B. Rossow et al., 1980). Scaling arguments are presented to argue that the mesoscale blotchy cell-like cloud patterns are caused by local dynamics driven in a shallow layer by differential absorption of sunlight. It is also argued that mesoscale albedo features are either streaky or cell-like simply depending on whether the horizontal shear of the large scale flow exceeds a certain critical value.

  7. Synergistic Exploitation of Hyper- and Multispectral Sentinel-Measurements to Determine Phytoplankton Functional Types at Best Spatial and Temporal Resolution (SynSenPFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soppa, M. A.; Brancher, A.; Dinter, T.; Rozanov, V.; Bricaud, A.; Brewin, R.

    2015-12-01

    To overcome the short-comings of current multispectral PFT products (supplying either knowledge on dominant groups or size fractions only, data products with strong linkage to a-priori-information) and PhytoDOAS data products (with only low temporal and spatial coverage), this ESA SEOM project's objective is a substantial improvement of retrieving phytoplankton groups with defined accuracy and good spatial and temporal coverage. This shall be done by developing a synergistic product which contains the Chl-a (biomass) of several PFT by using complementary information from multi- and hyper-spectral satellite ocean colour data. The algorithm can be later applied to produce a synergistic PFT product from TROPOMI (on Sentinel-5-Precursor, Sentinel-4, Sentinel-5) and OLCI (on Sentinel-3). The project started in December 2014. Here we present the main aspects of the project, including development and validation of the synergistic product.

  8. Development of Global 30m Resolution Water Body Map with Permanent/Temporal Water Body Separation Using Satellite Acquired Images of Landsat GLS Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshima, D.; Yamazaki, D.; Yoshikawa, S.; Kanae, S.

    2015-12-01

    The specification of worldwide water body distribution is important for discovering hydrological cycle. Global 3-second Water Body Map (G3WBM) is a global scale map, which indicates the distribution of water body in 90m resolutions (http://hydro.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~yamadai/G3WBM/index.html). This dataset was mainly built to identify the width of river channels, which is one of major uncertainties of continental-scale river hydrodynamics models. To survey the true width of the river channel, this water body map distinguish Permanent Water Body from Temporary Water Body, which means separating river channel and flood plain. However, rivers with narrower width, which is a major case in usual river, could not be observed in this map. To overcome this problem, updating the algorithm of G3WBM and enhancing the resolutions to 30m is the goal of this research. Although this 30m-resolution water body map uses similar algorithm as G3WBM, there are many technical issues attributed to relatively high resolutions. Those are such as lack of same high-resolution digital elevation map, or contamination problem of sub-pixel scale object on satellite acquired image, or invisibility of well-vegetated water body such as swamp. To manage those issues, this research used more than 30,000 satellite images of Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS), and lately distributed topography data of Shuttle Rader Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-second (30m) digital elevation map. Also the effect of aerosol, which would scatter the sun reflectance and disturb the acquired result image, was considered. Due to these revises, the global water body distribution was established in more precise resolution.

  9. Errors on interrupter tasks presented during spatial and verbal working memory performance are linearly linked to large-scale functional network connectivity in high temporal resolution resting state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Matthew Evan; Thompson, Garth John; Schwarb, Hillary; Pan, Wen-Ju; McKinley, Andy; Schumacher, Eric H; Keilholz, Shella Dawn

    2015-12-01

    The brain is organized into networks composed of spatially separated anatomical regions exhibiting coherent functional activity over time. Two of these networks (the default mode network, DMN, and the task positive network, TPN) have been implicated in the performance of a number of cognitive tasks. To directly examine the stable relationship between network connectivity and behavioral performance, high temporal resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected during the resting state, and behavioral data were collected from 15 subjects on different days, exploring verbal working memory, spatial working memory, and fluid intelligence. Sustained attention performance was also evaluated in a task interleaved between resting state scans. Functional connectivity within and between the DMN and TPN was related to performance on these tasks. Decreased TPN resting state connectivity was found to significantly correlate with fewer errors on an interrupter task presented during a spatial working memory paradigm and decreased DMN/TPN anti-correlation was significantly correlated with fewer errors on an interrupter task presented during a verbal working memory paradigm. A trend for increased DMN resting state connectivity to correlate to measures of fluid intelligence was also observed. These results provide additional evidence of the relationship between resting state networks and behavioral performance, and show that such results can be observed with high temporal resolution fMRI. Because cognitive scores and functional connectivity were collected on nonconsecutive days, these results highlight the stability of functional connectivity/cognitive performance coupling. PMID:25563228

  10. Use of Aerial high resolution visible imagery to produce large river bathymetry: a multi temporal and spatial study over the by-passed Upper Rhine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béal, D.; Piégay, H.; Arnaud, F.; Rollet, A.; Schmitt, L.

    2011-12-01

    Aerial high resolution visible imagery allows producing large river bathymetry assuming that water depth is related to water colour (Beer-Bouguer-Lambert law). In this paper we aim at monitoring Rhine River geometry changes for a diachronic study as well as sediment transport after an artificial injection (25.000 m3 restoration operation). For that a consequent data base of ground measurements of river depth is used, built on 3 different sources: (i) differential GPS acquisitions, (ii) sounder data and (iii) lateral profiles realized by experts. Water depth is estimated using a multi linear regression over neo channels built on a principal component analysis over red, green and blue bands and previously cited depth data. The study site is a 12 km long reach of the by-passed section of the Rhine River that draws French and German border. This section has been heavily impacted by engineering works during the last two centuries: channelization since 1842 for navigation purposes and the construction of a 45 km long lateral canal and 4 consecutive hydroelectric power plants of since 1932. Several bathymetric models are produced based on 3 different spatial resolutions (6, 13 and 20 cm) and 5 acquisitions (January, March, April, August and October) since 2008. Objectives are to find the optimal spatial resolution and to characterize seasonal effects. Best performances according to the 13 cm resolution show a 18 cm accuracy when suspended matters impacted less water transparency. Discussions are oriented to the monitoring of the artificial reload after 2 flood events during winter 2010-2011. Bathymetric models produced are also useful to build 2D hydraulic model's mesh.

  11. Temporal Resolution of Misfolded Prion Protein Transport, Accumulation, Glial Activation, and Neuronal Death in the Retinas of Mice Inoculated with Scrapie.

    PubMed

    West Greenlee, M Heather; Lind, Melissa; Kokemuller, Robyn; Mammadova, Najiba; Kondru, Naveen; Manne, Sireesha; Smith, Jodi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Greenlee, Justin

    2016-09-01

    Currently, there is a lack of pathological landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. Our goal was to use an experimental model to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrP(Sc) in the retina, the response of the surrounding retinal tissue, and loss of neurons. Retinal samples from mice inoculated with RML scrapie were collected at 30, 60, 90, 105, and 120 days post inoculation (dpi) or at the onset of clinical signs of disease (153 dpi). Retinal homogenates were tested for prion seeding activity. Antibody staining was used to assess accumulation of PrP(Sc) and the resulting response of retinal tissue. Loss of photoreceptors was used as a measure of neuronal death. PrP(Sc) seeding activity was first detected in all samples at 60 dpi. Accumulation of PrP(Sc) and coincident activation of retinal glia were first detected at 90 dpi. Activation of microglia was first detected at 105 dpi, but neuronal death was not detectable until 120 dpi. Our results demonstrate that by using the retina we can resolve the temporal separation between several key events in the pathogenesis of prion disease. PMID:27521336

  12. IDE spatio-temporal impact fluxes and high time-resolution studies of multi-impact events and long-lived debris clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, J. Derral; Singer, S. Fred; Oliver, John P.; Weinberg, Jerry L.; Cooke, William J.; Montague, Nancy L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Kassel, Phillip C.; Kinard, William H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was to sample the cosmic dust environment and to use the spatio-temporal aspect of the experiment to distinguish between the various components of the environment: zodiacal cloud, beta meteoroids, meteor streams, interstellar dust, and orbital debris. It was found that the introduction of precise time and even rudimentary directionality as co-lateral observables in sampling the particulate environment in near-Earth space produces an enormous qualitative improvement in the information content of the impact data. The orbital debris population is extremely clumpy, being dominated by persistent clouds in which the fluxes may rise orders of magnitude above the background. The IDE data suggest a strategy to minimize the damage to sensitive spacecraft components, using the observed characteristics of cloud encounters.

  13. Annual to sub-annual 3D surface evolution of an Antarctic blue-ice moraine using multi-platform, multi-temporal high resolution topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westoby, Matthew; Dunning, Stuart; Woodward, John; Hein, Andrew; Marrero, Shasta; Winter, Kate; Sugden, David

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution topographic data products are now routinely used for the geomorphological characterisation of Earth surface landforms and landscapes, whilst the acquisition and differencing of such datasets are swiftly becoming the preferred method for quantifying the transfer of mass through landscapes at the spatial scales of observation at which many processes operate. In this research, we employ 3-D differencing of repeat high-resolution topography to quantify the surface evolution of a 0.3 km2 blue-ice moraine complex in front of Patriot Hills, Antarctica. We used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to acquire multiple overlapping 3D datasets of the moraine surface at the beginning and end of the austral summer season in 2012/2013 and during a resurvey campaign in 2014. An additional topographic dataset was acquired at the end of season 1 through the application of a Structure-from-Motion with Multi-View Stereo (SfM-MVS) workflow to a set of aerial photographs acquired during a single unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) sortie. 3D cloud-to-cloud differencing was undertaken using the M3C2 algorithm. The results of 3D differencing revealed net uplift (median ~0.05 m) and lateral (xy) movement (median 0.02 m) of the moraine crests within season 1. Analysis of results from the longest differencing epoch (start of season 1 to season 2) suggests gradual but persistent surface uplift (median ~0.11 m) and sustained lateral movement (median ~0.05 m). Locally, lowering of a similar magnitude to uplift was observed in inter-moraine troughs and close to the current ice margin. This research demonstrates that it is possible to detect dynamic surface topographic change across glacial moraines over short timescales through the acquisition and differencing of high-resolution topographic datasets. Such data and methods of analysis offer new opportunities to understand glaciological and geomorphological process linkages in remote glacial environments.

  14. The Spatial and Temporal Variability of a High-Energy Beach: Insight Gained From Over 50 High-Resolution Sub-aerial Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.

    2008-12-01

    Since April 2004 a monitoring program of 7 km-long Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, has led to the completion of 55 Global Positioning System topographic surveys of the sub-aerial beach. The four-year timeseries contains over 1 million beach elevation measurements and documents detailed changes of the beach over a variety of spatial, temporal, and physical forcing scales. The goal of this ongoing data collection is to understand the variability in beach response as a function of wave forcing and offshore morphology which will ultimately aid in sediment management and erosion mitigation efforts. Several statistical methods are used to describe and account for the observed beach change, including empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) and linear regression. Results from the EOF analysis show that the first mode, and approximately 50% of the observed variance of either the mean high water (MHW) or mean sea level (MSL) position, is explained by the seasonal movement of sediment on and offshore. The second mode, and approximately 15% of the variance, is dominated by alongshore variability, possibly corresponding to the position of cusps and embayments. Higher level modes become increasingly variable in the alongshore direction and each explain little of the observed variance. In both cases the first temporal mode is well correlated (R2~=0.7) with offshore significant wave height averaged over the previous 80 to 110 days, suggesting that seasonal wave height variations are the primary driver of intra-annual shoreline position. No other modes exhibit good correlation with offshore wave parameters regardless of the averaging time. The observed seasonal change is superimposed on a longer term trend of net annual accretion at the north end of Ocean Beach and erosion at the south end. Areas at the northern end have seen as much as 60 m of cumulative shoreline progradation since 2004, while some areas of the southern portion have retrograded nearly as much. This pattern shows an

  15. IDE spatio-temporal impact fluxes and high time-resolution studies of multi-impact events and long-lived debris clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, J. Derral; Singer, S. Fred; Oliver, John P.; Weinberg, Jerry L.; Cooke, William J.; Kassel, Philip C.; Wortman, Jim J.; Montague, Nancy L.; Kinard, William H.

    1991-01-01

    During the first 12 months of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission, the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) recorded over 15,000 total impacts on six orthogonal faces with a time resolution on the order of 15 to 20 seconds. When combined with the orbital data and the stabilized configuration of the spacecraft, this permits a detailed analysis of the micro-particulate environment. The functional status of each of the 459 detectors was monitored every 2.4 hours, and post-flight analyses of these data has now permitted an evaluation of the effective active detection area as a function of time, panel by panel and separately for the two sensitivity levels. Thus, total impacts were transformed into areal fluxes, and are presented here for the first time. Also discussed are possible effects of these fluxes on previously announced results: apparent debris events, meteor stream detections, and beta meteoroids in observationally significant numbers.

  16. Spatial and temporal variability of column-integrated CO2: identifying drivers and variations from high-resolution model simulations and OCO-2 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Ott, L.; Wennberg, P. O.; Kawa, S. R.; O'Dell, C.; Osterman, G. B.; Wunch, D.

    2015-12-01

    Isolating the drivers and variations in column-averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) is essential for mining information from space-based remote-sensing observations, such as those available from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2). Contrary to the large number of studies analyzing the variability of surface CO2 concentrations, studies analyzing the spatiotemporal variability of XCO2 are relatively limited. More importantly, these results are either based on a sparse network of ground-based total column observations (i.e., from the Total Column Carbon Observing Network - TCCON) or derived from low-resolution model simulations. In this study, using the high-resolution (~7 km) GEOS-5 model simulated fields and the high-density observations from OCO-2, we investigate how variability in surface fluxes and/or meteorological drivers impact the observed XCO2 variability across a range of scales. The study focuses on ~13:30 LT and is designed to highlight the significant contributors to local and regional scale XCO2 variability from daily to seasonal timescales. In collaboration with the OCO-2 Validation team, the variability information is also being used to identify small geographical areas (<1° or ~100km) where the XCO2 is expected to be relatively constant. These small areas then serve as target regions for examining the potential of external variables (for e.g., surface reflectance, aerosol) to generate biases (variability) in the XCO2 retrievals in those regions. We will also show comparison results of the model-based variability analyses with the variability statistics derived from actual OCO-2 retrievals. This comparison serves as an important consistency check for the simulated fields from the GEOS-5 model. Finally, we will review these results in terms of assessing and quantifying representation errors as well as developing and implementing data thinning/'superobbing' algorithms for OCO-2 retrievals.

  17. An Efficient Single-Molecule Resolution Method for Simulating Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Protein Interaction Networks that Involve the Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    A significant number of the cellular protein interaction networks, such as the receptor mediated signaling and vesicle trafficking pathways, includes membranes as a molecular assembly platform. Computer simulations can provide insight into the dynamics of complex formation and help identify the principles that govern recruitment and assembly on the membranes. Here, we introduce the Free-Propagator Re-weighting (FPR) algorithm, a recently developed method that efficiently simulates the spatio-temporal dynamics of multiprotein complex formation both in the solution and on the membranes. In the FPR, the position of each protein is propagated using the Brownian motion and the reactions between pairs of proteins can occur upon collisions. Depending on the dimensionality of the interaction, the association probabilities are determined by solving the Smoluchowski diffusion equations in 2D or 3D and trajectory reweighting allows us to obtain the exact association rates for all the reactive pairs. Using the FPR, in this presentation, we investigate the interaction dynamics of the receptor mediated endocytic network as a case study and discuss the possible effects of membrane binding and molecular crowding on the formation of complexes. Supported by the NIGMS/NIH under R00GM098371.

  18. Language Smarts: 10-Minute Word Activities. Book A-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Randy

    This workbook offers a variety of quick language activities that are designed to develop grade 2-4 students' associative-reasoning and problem-solving skills. The activities in the workbook cover vocabulary development, classifying, sequencing, following directions, and word recognition. Sections of the workbook are Categories; Ordering;…

  19. A 10-Minute Lesson in Technology Grant Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sliger, Bruce; McLeod, Terry

    1997-01-01

    Gives advice for writing proposals seeking technology funding, including development of a technology plan and information gathering about potential funders. Includes a list of Web sites listing funding sources. (JOW)

  20. Application of multi-temporal high-resolution imagery and GPS in a study of the motion of a canyon rim landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, John; Dorsch, Stephen; Glenn, Nancy; Thackray, Glenn; Shilling, Karen

    Change detection techniques using co-registered high-resolution satellite imagery and archival digital aerial photographs have been used in conjunction with GPS to constrain the magnitude and timing of previously undocumented historical motion of the Salmon Falls landslide in south-central Idaho, USA. The landslide has created natural dams of Salmon Falls Creek, resulting in the development of large lakes and a potential flooding hazard. Rapid motion (cm/year-m/year) of the relatively remote landslide was first reported in 1999, but significant horizontal motion (up to 10.8 m) is demonstrated between 1990 and 1998 by measuring changes in the locations of ground control points in a time-series of images. The total (three-dimensional) motion of the landslide prior to 2002 was calculated using the horizontal (two-dimensional) velocities obtained in the image change detection study and horizontal-to-vertical ratios of motion derived for the landslide in 2003-2004 collected from a network of autonomous GPS stations. The total historical motion that was estimated using this method averages about 12 m, which is in agreement with field observations.

  1. Spatial and temporal changes in household structure locations using high-resolution satellite imagery for population assessment: an analysis in southern Zambia, 2006-2011.

    PubMed

    Shields, Timothy; Pinchoff, Jessie; Lubinda, Jailos; Hamapumbu, Harry; Searle, Kelly; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Thuma, Philip E; Moss, William J; Curriero, Frank C

    2016-05-31

    Satellite imagery is increasingly available at high spatial resolution and can be used for various purposes in public health research and programme implementation. Comparing a census generated from two satellite images of the same region in rural southern Zambia obtained four and a half years apart identified patterns of household locations and change over time. The length of time that a satellite image-based census is accurate determines its utility. Households were enumerated manually from satellite images obtained in 2006 and 2011 of the same area. Spatial statistics were used to describe clustering, cluster detection, and spatial variation in the location of households. A total of 3821 household locations were enumerated in 2006 and 4256 in 2011, a net change of 435 houses (11.4% increase). Comparison of the images indicated that 971 (25.4%) structures were added and 536 (14.0%) removed. Further analysis suggested similar household clustering in the two images and no substantial difference in concentration of households across the study area. Cluster detection analysis identified a small area where significantly more household structures were removed than expected; however, the amount of change was of limited practical significance. These findings suggest that random sampling of households for study participation would not induce geographic bias if based on a 4.5-year-old image in this region. Application of spatial statistical methods provides insights into the population distribution changes between two time periods and can be helpful in assessing the accuracy of satellite imagery.

  2. Grazer Effects on Stream Primary Production and Nitrate Utilization: Estimating Feedbacks Under Reduced Nitrate Levels at High-Temporal Resolutions from the Patch to Reach-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijo, C. J.; Cohen, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    While nutrient enrichment is often identified as the leading cause for changes in stream gross primary production (GPP) and shifts in vegetative communities, other factors such as grazers influence overall stream structure and function. Evidence shows that grazers are a top-down control on algae in streams; however, the specific feedbacks between overall stream metabolism, grazer effects, and nutrient cycling have been variable and little is known about these interactions at nutrient levels below ambient. To further our understanding of these linkages, a nutrient depletion chamber was created and paired with high-resolution in situ sensors to estimate stream metabolism and characterize nitrate uptake (UNO3) pathways (i.e. plant uptake and denitrification). The Plexiglas chamber blocks flow and nutrient supply, inserts into upper sediments, allows light in and sediment-water-air interactions to occur. At Gum Slough Springs, FL, nitrate was reduced from ambient levels (1.40 mg N/L) to below regulatory thresholds (ca. 0.20 mg N/L) within one week. Paired chambers with and without the presence of snails (Elimia floridensis) were deployed across submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV; Vallisneria americana) and algae (Lyngbya) substrates. Results show that GPP and UNO3 were higher under SAV (70 g O2/m2/d and 300 mg NO3/m2/d, respectively) and a general lack of nutrient limitation even at low [NO3]. Grazer effects differed by vegetation type as it alleviated the reduction of NO3 levels and GPP under SAV but enhanced the decrease of algal GPP and NO3 levels over time. Continued work includes estimating grazer effects on denitrification, quantifying snail nutrient excretion contributions, and scaling up all estimates from the patch to reach level. Overall, this study will further our understanding of grazer-production-nutrient interactions within stream systems, making it possible to predict changes in feedbacks when one part of the biotic or abiotic ecosystem is altered.

  3. Long-Term Large-Scale Bias-Adjusted Precipitation Estimates at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Derived from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) Precipitation Reanalysis over CONUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.

    2014-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over Continental United States (CONUS) is nearly completed for the period covering from 2000 to 2012. This important milestone constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at a 1-km spatial resolution for a 5-min temporal resolution. However, in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications, the radar-only product needs to be bias-adjusted and merged with in-situ rain gauge information. Rain gauge networks such as the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS), the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS), the Climate Reference Network (CRN), and the Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-D) are used to adjust for those biases and to merge with the radar only product to provide a multi-sensor estimate. The challenges related to incorporating non-homogeneous networks over a vast area and for a long-term record are enormous. Among the challenges we are facing are the difficulties incorporating differing resolution and quality surface measurements to adjust gridded estimates of precipitation. Another challenge is the type of adjustment technique. After assessing the bias and applying reduction or elimination techniques, we are investigating the kriging method and its variants such as simple kriging (SK), ordinary kriging (OK), and conditional bias-penalized Kriging (CBPK) among others. In addition we hope to generate estimates of uncertainty for the gridded estimate. In this work the methodology is presented as well as a comparison between the radar-only product and the final multi-sensor QPE product. The comparison is performed at various time scales from the sub-hourly, to annual. In addition, comparisons over the same period with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar

  4. Test-Retest Reliability of High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging Acquisition within Medial Temporal Lobe Connections Assessed via Tract Based Spatial Statistics, Probabilistic Tractography and a Novel Graph Theory Metric

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, T.; Gullett, J. M.; Nguyen, P.; Boutzoukas, A. E.; Ford, A.; Colon-Perez, L. M.; Triplett, W.; Carney, P.R.; Mareci, T. H.; Price, C. C.; Bauer, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study examined the reliability of high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (HARDI) data collected on a single individual across several sessions using the same scanner. Methods HARDI data was acquired for one healthy adult male at the same time of day on ten separate days across a one-month period. Environmental factors (e.g. temperature) were controlled across scanning sessions. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) was used to assess session-to-session variability in measures of diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). To address reliability within specific structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL; the focus of an ongoing investigation), probabilistic tractography segmented the Entorhinal cortex (ERc) based on connections with Hippocampus (HC), Perirhinal (PRc) and Parahippocampal (PHc) cortices. Streamline tractography generated edge weight (EW) metrics for the aforementioned ERc connections and, as comparison regions, connections between left and right rostral and caudal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Coefficients of variation (CoV) were derived for the surface area and volumes of these ERc connectivity-defined regions (CDR) and for EW across all ten scans, expecting that scan-to-scan reliability would yield low CoVs. Results TBSS revealed no significant variation in FA or MD across scanning sessions. Probabilistic tractography successfully reproduced histologically-verified adjacent medial temporal lobe circuits. Tractography-derived metrics displayed larger ranges of scanner-to-scanner variability. Connections involving HC displayed greater variability than metrics of connection between other investigated regions. Conclusions By confirming the test retest reliability of HARDI data acquisition, support for the validity of significant results derived from diffusion data can be obtained. PMID:26189060

  5. Test-retest reliability of high angular resolution diffusion imaging acquisition within medial temporal lobe connections assessed via tract based spatial statistics, probabilistic tractography and a novel graph theory metric.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, T; Gullett, J M; Nguyen, P; Boutzoukas, A E; Ford, A; Colon-Perez, L M; Triplett, W; Carney, P R; Mareci, T H; Price, C C; Bauer, R M

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the reliability of high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging (HARDI) data collected on a single individual across several sessions using the same scanner. HARDI data was acquired for one healthy adult male at the same time of day on ten separate days across a one-month period. Environmental factors (e.g. temperature) were controlled across scanning sessions. Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) was used to assess session-to-session variability in measures of diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). To address reliability within specific structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL; the focus of an ongoing investigation), probabilistic tractography segmented the Entorhinal cortex (ERc) based on connections with Hippocampus (HC), Perirhinal (PRc) and Parahippocampal (PHc) cortices. Streamline tractography generated edge weight (EW) metrics for the aforementioned ERc connections and, as comparison regions, connections between left and right rostral and caudal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Coefficients of variation (CoV) were derived for the surface area and volumes of these ERc connectivity-defined regions (CDR) and for EW across all ten scans, expecting that scan-to-scan reliability would yield low CoVs. TBSS revealed no significant variation in FA or MD across scanning sessions. Probabilistic tractography successfully reproduced histologically-verified adjacent medial temporal lobe circuits. Tractography-derived metrics displayed larger ranges of scanner-to-scanner variability. Connections involving HC displayed greater variability than metrics of connection between other investigated regions. By confirming the test retest reliability of HARDI data acquisition, support for the validity of significant results derived from diffusion data can be obtained.

  6. From daily to sub-daily time steps - Creating a high temporal and spatial resolution climate reference data set for hydrological modeling and bias-correction of RCM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willkofer, Florian; Wood, Raul R.; Schmid, Josef; von Trentini, Fabian; Ludwig, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    The ClimEx project (Climate change and hydrological extreme events - risks and perspectives for water management in Bavaria and Québec) focuses on the effects of climate change on hydro-meteorological extreme events and their implications for water management in Bavaria and Québec. It builds on the conjoint analysis of a large ensemble of the CRCM5, driven by 50 members of the CanESM2, and the latest information provided through the CORDEX-initiative, to better assess the influence of natural climate variability and climatic change on the dynamics of extreme events. A critical point in the entire project is the preparation of a meteorological reference dataset with the required temporal (1-6h) and spatial (500m) resolution to be able to better evaluate hydrological extreme events in mesoscale river basins. For Bavaria a first reference data set (daily, 1km) used for bias-correction of RCM data was created by combining raster based data (E-OBS [1], HYRAS [2], MARS [3]) and interpolated station data using the meteorological interpolation schemes of the hydrological model WaSiM [4]. Apart from the coarse temporal and spatial resolution, this mosaic of different data sources is considered rather inconsistent and hence, not applicable for modeling of hydrological extreme events. Thus, the objective is to create a dataset with hourly data of temperature, precipitation, radiation, relative humidity and wind speed, which is then used for bias-correction of the RCM data being used as driver for hydrological modeling in the river basins. Therefore, daily data is disaggregated to hourly time steps using the 'Method of fragments' approach [5], based on available training stations. The disaggregation chooses fragments of daily values from observed hourly datasets, based on similarities in magnitude and behavior of previous and subsequent events. The choice of a certain reference station (hourly data, provision of fragments) for disaggregating daily station data (application

  7. Dryland Precipitation Variability and Desertification Processes: An Assessment of Spatial and Temporal Rain Variability within the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caster, J.; Sankey, J. B.; Draut, A.; Fairley, H.; Collins, B. D.; Bedford, D.

    2014-12-01

    In drylands, spatial and temporal rain variability can result from natural climatic cycles, weather patterns, and physiographic factors. In these environments, minor differences in rainfall distribution can invoke significant ecosystem response. The Grand Canyon, Arizona is an iconic dryland environment that receives less than 430 mm of annual rainfall. Recent monitoring of desertification processes at culturally sensitive landscapes in Grand Canyon has examined variability in vegetation, soil crusts, and runoff induced erosion, and identified a lack of knowledge about the nature, drivers and effects of local rainfall variability. We examine rainfall variability using five years of high resolution data collected from 11 weather stations distributed along the Colorado River within Grand Canyon, coupled with 60 years of lower resolution data from National Weather Service Cooperative Observer (NOAA COOP) stations. We characterize spatial and temporal variability in 10-minute rainfall intensity, an important predictor of soil erosion, and daily rainfall depth, an important predictor of biotic cover. We quantify the intensity-daily depth relationship to infer long-term variability in rainfall intensity from the NOAA COOP data that only record rainfall depth. Results confirm findings from previous studies showing a bi-seasonally rainfall pattern with longer duration-lower intensity storms in the cool season and shorter duration-higher intensity storms during the North American Monsoon (NAM).Seasonal differences in rainfall intensity-depth relationships are significant, and suggest NAM storms have greater potential to produce erosion-generating intensities. As NAM rainfall is spatially and inter-annually more variable than cool season rain, yearly rain depths are strongly influenced by NAM fluctuations. These findings will be useful in future efforts to track desertification processes in this and other drylands characterized by complex topography and extreme rainfall

  8. Development of a high temporal-spatial resolution vehicle emission inventory based on NRT traffic data and its impact on air pollution in Beijing - Part 2: Impact of vehicle emission on urban air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Wu, L.; Mao, H. J.; Liu, H. L.; Jing, B. Y.; Yu, Y.; Ren, P. P.; Feng, C.; Liu, X. H.

    2015-07-01

    In a companion paper (Jing et al., 2015), a high temporal-spatial resolution vehicle emission inventory (HTSVE) for 2013 in Beijing has been established based on near real time (NRT) traffic data and bottom up methodology. In this study, based on the sensitivity analysis method of switching on/off pollutant emissions in the Chinese air quality forecasting model CUACE, a modeling study was carried out to evaluate the contributions of vehicle emission to the air pollution in Beijing main urban areas in the periods of summer (July) and winter (December) 2013. Generally, CUACE model had good performance of pollutants concentration simulation. The model simulation has been improved by using HTSVE. The vehicle emission contribution (VEC) to ambient pollutant concentrations not only changes with seasons but also changes over moment. The mean VEC, affected by regional pollutant transports significantly, is 55.4 and 48.5 % for NO2, while 5.4 and 10.5 % for PM2.5 in July and December 2013, respectively. Regardless of regional transports, relative vehicle emission contribution (RVEC) to NO2 is 59.2 and 57.8 % in July and December 2013, while 8.7 and 13.9 % for PM2.5. The RVEC to PM2.5 is lower than PM2.5 contribution rate for vehicle emission in total emission, which may be caused by easily dry deposition of PM2.5 from vehicle emission in near-surface layer compared to elevated source emission.

  9. Development of a vehicle emission inventory with high temporal-spatial resolution based on NRT traffic data and its impact on air pollution in Beijing - Part 1: Development and evaluation of vehicle emission inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Boyu; Wu, Lin; Mao, Hongjun; Gong, Sunning; He, Jianjun; Zou, Chao; Song, Guohua; Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Zhong

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a bottom-up methodology based on the local emission factors, complemented with the widely used emission factors of Computer Programme to Calculate Emissions from Road Transport (COPERT) model and near-real-time traffic data on road segments to develop a vehicle emission inventory with high temporal-spatial resolution (HTSVE) for the Beijing urban area. To simulate real-world vehicle emissions accurately, the road has been divided into segments according to the driving cycle (traffic speed) on this road segment. The results show that the vehicle emissions of NOx, CO, HC and PM were 10.54 × 104, 42.51 × 104 and 2.13 × 104 and 0.41 × 104 Mg respectively. The vehicle emissions and fuel consumption estimated by the model were compared with the China Vehicle Emission Control Annual Report and fuel sales thereafter. The grid-based emissions were also compared with the vehicular emission inventory developed by the macro-scale approach. This method indicates that the bottom-up approach better estimates the levels and spatial distribution of vehicle emissions than the macro-scale method, which relies on more information. Based on the results of this study, improved air quality simulation and the contribution of vehicle emissions to ambient pollutant concentration in Beijing have been investigated in a companion paper (He et al., 2016).

  10. Transient electrochemistry: beyond simply temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X-S; Mao, B-W; Amatore, C; Compton, R G; Marignier, J-L; Mostafavi, M; Nierengarten, J-F; Maisonhaute, E

    2016-01-01

    Some physicochemical intrigues for which transient electrochemistry was necessary to solve the problem are summarized in this feature article. First, we highlight the main constraints to be aware of to access to low time scales, and particularly focus on the effects of stray capacitances. Then, the electron transfer rate constant measured for redox molecules in a self-assembled monolayer configuration is compared to the conductance measured through the same systems, but at the single molecule level. This evidences strong conformational changes when molecules are trapped in the nanogap created between both electrodes. We also report about dendrimers, for which a short electrochemical perturbation induces creation of a diffusion layer within the molecule, allowing the electron hopping rate to be measured and analyzed in terms of molecular motions of the redox centers. Finally, we show that transient electrochemistry provides also useful information when coupled to other methodologies. For example, when an ultrasonic field drives very fast movements of a bubble situated above the electrode surface, the motion can be detected indirectly through a modification of the diffusion flux. Another field concerns pulse radiolysis, and we describe how the reactivity (at the electrode or within the solution) of radicals created by a radiolytic pulse can be quantified, widening the possibilities of electrochemistry to operate in biological media.

  11. Estimation of yield and water requirements of maize crops combining high spatial and temporal resolution images with a simple crop model, in the perspective of the Sentinel-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battude, Marjorie; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Brut, Aurore; Cros, Jérôme; Dejoux, Jean-François; Huc, Mireille; Marais Sicre, Claire; Tallec, Tiphaine; Demarez, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    Water resources are under increasing pressure as a result of global change and of a raising competition among the different users (agriculture, industry, urban). It is therefore important to develop tools able to estimate accurately crop water requirements in order to optimize irrigation while maintaining acceptable production. In this context, remote sensing is a valuable tool to monitor vegetation development and water demand. This work aims at developing a robust and generic methodology mainly based on high resolution remote sensing data to provide accurate estimates of maize yield and water needs at the watershed scale. Evapotranspiration (ETR) and dry aboveground biomass (DAM) of maize crops were modeled using time series of GAI images used to drive a simple agro-meteorological crop model (SAFYE, Duchemin et al., 2005). This model is based on a leaf partitioning function (Maas, 1993) for the simulation of crop biomass and on the FAO-56 methodology for the ETR simulation. The model also contains a module to simulate irrigation. This study takes advantage of the SPOT4 and SPOT5 Take5 experiments initiated by CNES (http://www.cesbio.ups-tlse.fr/multitemp/). They provide optical images over the watershed from February to May 2013 and from April to August 2015 respectively, with a temporal and spatial resolution similar to future images from the Sentinel-2 and VENμS missions. This dataset was completed with LandSat8 and Deimos1 images in order to cover the whole growing season while reducing the gaps in remote sensing time series. Radiometric, geometric and atmospheric corrections were achieved by the THEIA land data center, and the KALIDEOS processing chain. The temporal dynamics of the green area index (GAI) plays a key role in soil-plant-atmosphere interactions and in biomass accumulation process. Consistent seasonal dynamics of the remotely sensed GAI was estimated by applying a radiative transfer model based on artificial neural networks (BVNET, Baret

  12. Development of a vehicle emission inventory with high temporal-spatial resolution based on NRT traffic data and its impact on air pollution in Beijing - Part 2: Impact of vehicle emission on urban air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianjun; Wu, Lin; Mao, Hongjun; Liu, Hongli; Jing, Boyu; Yu, Ye; Ren, Peipei; Feng, Cheng; Liu, Xuehao

    2016-03-01

    A companion paper developed a vehicle emission inventory with high temporal-spatial resolution (HTSVE) with a bottom-up methodology based on local emission factors, complemented with the widely used emission factors of COPERT model and near-real-time (NRT) traffic data on a specific road segment for 2013 in urban Beijing (Jing et al., 2016), which is used to investigate the impact of vehicle pollution on air pollution in this study. Based on the sensitivity analysis method of switching on/off pollutant emissions in the Chinese air quality forecasting model CUACE, a modelling study was carried out to evaluate the contributions of vehicle emission to the air pollution in Beijing's main urban areas in the periods of summer (July) and winter (December) 2013. Generally, the CUACE model had good performance of the concentration simulation of pollutants. The model simulation has been improved by using HTSVE. The vehicle emission contribution (VEC) to ambient pollutant concentrations not only changes with seasons but also changes with time. The mean VEC, affected by regional pollutant transports significantly, is 55.4 and 48.5 % for NO2 and 5.4 and 10.5 % for PM2.5 in July and December 2013 respectively. Regardless of regional transports, relative vehicle emission contribution (RVEC) to NO2 is 59.2 and 57.8 % in July and December 2013, while it is 8.7 and 13.9 % for PM2.5. The RVEC to PM2.5 is lower than the PM2.5 contribution rate for vehicle emission in total emission, which may be due to dry deposition of PM2.5 from vehicle emission in the near-surface layer occuring more easily than from elevated source emission.

  13. Development of a high temporal-spatial resolution vehicle emission inventory based on NRT traffic data and its impact on air pollution in Beijing - Part 1: Development and evaluation of vehicle emission inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, B. Y.; Wu, L.; Mao, H. J.; Gong, S. L.; He, J. J.; Zou, C.; Song, G. H.; Li, X. Y.; Wu, Z.

    2015-10-01

    As the ownership of vehicles and frequency of utilization increase, vehicle emissions have become an important source of air pollution in Chinese cities. An accurate emission inventory for on-road vehicles is necessary for numerical air quality simulation and the assessment of implementation strategies. This paper presents a bottom-up methodology based on the local emission factors, complemented with the widely used emission factors of Computer Programme to Calculate Emissions from Road Transport (COPERT) model and near real time (NRT) traffic data on road segments to develop a high temporal-spatial resolution vehicle emission inventory (HTSVE) for the urban Beijing area. To simulate real-world vehicle emissions accurately, the road has been divided into segments according to the driving cycle (traffic speed) on this road segment. The results show that the vehicle emissions of NOx, CO, HC and PM were 10.54 × 104, 42.51 × 104 and 2.13 × 104 and 0.41 × 104 Mg, respectively. The vehicle emissions and fuel consumption estimated by the model were compared with the China Vehicle Emission Control Annual Report and fuel sales thereafter. The grid-based emissions were also compared with the vehicular emission inventory developed by the macro-scale approach. This method indicates that the bottom-up approach better estimates the levels and spatial distribution of vehicle emissions than the macro-scale method, which relies on more information. Additionally, the on-road vehicle emission inventory model and control effect assessment system in Beijing, a vehicle emission inventory model, was established based on this study in a companion paper (He et al., 2015).

  14. Using the Sonoran and Libyan Desert test sites to monitor the temporal stability of reflective solar bands for Landsat 7 enhanced thematic mapper plus and Terra moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angal, Amit; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Choi, Tae-young; Chander, Gyanesh; Wu, Aisheng

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing imagery is effective for monitoring environmental and climatic changes because of the extent of the global coverage and long time scale of the observations. Radiometric calibration of remote sensing sensors is essential for quantitative & qualitative science and applications. Pseudo-invariant ground targets have been extensively used to monitor the long-term radiometric calibration stability of remote sensing sensors. This paper focuses on the use of the Sonoran Desert site to monitor the radiometric stability of the Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors. The results are compared with the widely used Libya 4 Desert site in an attempt to evaluate the suitability of the Sonoran Desert site for sensor inter-comparison and calibration stability monitoring. Since the overpass times of ETM+ and MODIS differ by about 30 minutes, the impacts due to different view geometries or test site Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) are also presented. In general, the long-term drifts in the visible bands are relatively large compared to the drift in the near-infrared bands of both sensors. The lifetime Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance trends from both sensors over 10 years are extremely stable, changing by no more than 0.1% per year (except ETM+ Band 1 and MODIS Band 3) over the two sites used for the study. The use of a semi-empirical BRDF model can reduce the impacts due to view geometries, thus enabling a better estimate of sensor temporal drifts.

  15. Dilation framing camera with 4 ps resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Houzhi; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Jinyuan; Xie, Weixin; Bai, Yanli; Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo; Niu, Hanben

    2016-04-01

    A framing camera using pulse-dilation technology is reported in this article. The camera uses pulse dilation of an electron signal from a pulsed photo-cathode (PC) to achieve high temporal resolution. While the PC is not pulsed, the measured temporal resolution of the camera without pulse-dilation is about 71 ps. While the excitation pulse is applied on the PC, the measured temporal resolution is improved to 4 ps by using the pulse-dilation technology. The spatial resolution of the dilation framing camera is also measured, which is better than 100 μm. The relationship between the temporal resolution and the PC bias voltage is obtained. The variation of the temporal resolution with the gradient of the PC excitation pulse is also provided.

  16. Temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  17. Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems Technology Demonstration (TEMPEST-D): Risk Reduction for 6U-Class Nanosatellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Steven C.; Gaier, Todd C.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Lim, Boon H.; Brown, Shannon T.; Heneghan, Cate; Chandra, Chandrasekar V.; Olson, Jon; Berg, Wesley

    2016-04-01

    TEMPEST-D will reduce the risk, cost and development time of a future constellation of 6U-Class nanosatellites to directly observe the time evolution of clouds and study the conditions that control the transition from non-precipitating to precipitating clouds using high-temporal resolution observations. TEMPEST-D provides passive millimeter-wave observations using a compact instrument that fits well within the size, weight and power (SWaP) requirements of the 6U-Class satellite architecture. TEMPEST-D is suitable for launch through NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI), for which it was selected in February 2015. By measuring the temporal evolution of clouds from the moment of the onset of precipitation, a TEMPEST constellation mission would improve our understanding of cloud processes and help to constrain one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. Knowledge of clouds, cloud processes and precipitation is essential to our understanding of climate change. Uncertainties in the representation of key processes that govern the formation and dissipation of clouds and, in turn, control the global water and energy budgets lead to substantially different predictions of future climate in current models. TEMPEST millimeter-wave radiometers with five frequencies from 89 GHz to 182 GHz penetrate into the cloud to observe key changes as precipitation begins or ice accumulates inside the storm. The evolution of ice formation in clouds is important for climate prediction and a key factor in Earth's radiation budget. TEMPEST is designed to provide critical information on the time evolution of cloud and precipitation, yielding a first-order understanding of assumptions and uncertainties in current cloud parameterizations in general circulation models in diverse climate regimes. For a potential future one-year operational mission, five identical 6U-Class satellites would be deployed in the same orbital plane with 5- to 10-minute spacing deployed in an orbit

  18. Clouds in ECMWF's 30 KM Resolution Global Atmospheric Forecast Model (TL639)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Morcrette, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    Global models of the general circulation of the atmosphere resolve a wide range of length scales, and in particular cloud structures extend from planetary scales to the smallest scales resolvable, now down to 30 km in state-of-the-art models. Even the highest resolution models do not resolve small-scale cloud phenomena seen, for example, in Landsat and other high-resolution satellite images of clouds. Unresolved small-scale disturbances often grow into larger ones through non-linear processes that transfer energy upscale. Understanding upscale cascades is of crucial importance in predicting current weather, and in parameterizing cloud-radiative processes that control long term climate. Several movie animations provide examples of the temporal and spatial variation of cloud fields produced in 4-day runs of the forecast model at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in Reading, England, at particular times and locations of simultaneous measurement field campaigns. model resolution is approximately 30 km horizontally (triangular truncation TL639) with 31 vertical levels from surface to stratosphere. Timestep of the model is about 10 minutes, but animation frames are 3 hours apart, at timesteps when the radiation is computed. The animations were prepared from an archive of several 4-day runs at the highest available model resolution, and archived at ECMWF. Cloud, wind and temperature fields in an approximately 1000 km X 1000 km box were retrieved from the archive, then approximately 60 Mb Vis5d files were prepared with the help of Graeme Kelly of ECMWF, and were compressed into MPEG files each less than 3 Mb. We discuss the interaction of clouds and radiation in the model, and compare the variability of cloud liquid as a function of scale to that seen in cloud observations made in intensive field campaigns. Comparison of high-resolution global runs to cloud-resolving models, and to lower resolution climate models is leading to better

  19. Temporal naturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  20. a New Spatial and Temporal Fusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    As Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) has a tradeoff between the high temporal resolution and high spatial resolution, this paper proposed a spatial and temporal model with auto-regression error correction (AREC) method to blend the two types of images in order to obtain the composed image with both high spatial and temporal resolution. Experiments and validation were conducted on a data set located in Shenzhen, China and compared with Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) in several objective indexes and visual analysis. It was found that AREC could effectively predict the land cover changes and the fusion results had better performances versus the ones of STARFM.

  1. Temporal contingency.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Contingency, and more particularly temporal contingency, has often figured in thinking about the nature of learning. However, it has never been formally defined in such a way as to make it a measure that can be applied to most animal learning protocols. We use elementary information theory to define contingency in such a way as to make it a measurable property of almost any conditioning protocol. We discuss how making it a measurable construct enables the exploration of the role of different contingencies in the acquisition and performance of classically and operantly conditioned behavior.

  2. Temporal contingency.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Contingency, and more particularly temporal contingency, has often figured in thinking about the nature of learning. However, it has never been formally defined in such a way as to make it a measure that can be applied to most animal learning protocols. We use elementary information theory to define contingency in such a way as to make it a measurable property of almost any conditioning protocol. We discuss how making it a measurable construct enables the exploration of the role of different contingencies in the acquisition and performance of classically and operantly conditioned behavior. PMID:23994260

  3. Temporal resolution of PrPSc transport, PrPSc accumulation, activation of glia and neuronal death in retinas from C57Bl/6 mice inoculated with RML scrapie: Relevance to biomarkers of prion disease progression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to objectively evaluate the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between transport of misfolded prion protein to the retina from the brain, accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the re...

  4. Temporal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, M D; Hoyert, M S

    1989-09-01

    A signal appeared for a certain time period. After the period elapsed, pigeons had to begin and complete a sequence of 15 responses in a time window ranging from the signal duration to 50% longer. Sessions involved as many as 10 different signal durations occurring in a random sequence. The times produced by pigeons often were in the same ranges as those that have been found with adult human subjects. The average times were described equally well as linear or power functions of signal duration. However, instead of the overestimation of durations usually found when animals have timed the duration of antecedent stimuli, the linear functions suggested that the pigeons underestimated the durations of their own behavior. The birds showing the strongest control when the conditions involved eight or 10 different duration requirements revealed the constant coefficients of variation that support Weber's law and scalar timing theory. Scalar timing in temporal differentiation appears to depend on non-ambiguous information about the duration required for reinforcement and on a high degree of sensitivity to the duration requirement.

  5. Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems Technology Demonstration (TEMPEST-D): Risk Reduction for 6U-Class Nanosatellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, S. C.; Todd, G.; Kummerow, C. D.; Chandrasekar, V.; Padmanabhan, S.; Lim, B.; Brown, S. T.; van den Heever, S. C.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ruf, C. S.; Luo, Z. J.; Munchak, S. J.; Haddad, Z. S.; Boukabara, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems Technology Demonstration (TEMPEST-D) is designed to demonstrate required technology to enable a constellation of 6U-Class nanosatellites to directly observe the time evolution of clouds and study the conditions that control the transition of clouds to precipitation using high-temporal resolution observations. TEMPEST millimeter-wave radiometers in the 90-GHz to 183-GHz frequency range penetrate into the cloud to observe key changes as the cloud begins to precipitate or ice accumulates inside the storm. The evolution of ice formation in clouds is important for climate prediction since it largely drives Earth's radiation budget. TEMPEST improves understanding of cloud processes and helps to constrain one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. TEMPEST-D provides observations at five millimeter-wave frequencies from 90 to 183 GHz using a single compact instrument that is well suited for the 6U-Class architecture and fits well within the capabilities of NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI), for which TEMPEST-D was approved in 2015. For a potential future mission of one year of operations, five identical 6U-Class satellites deployed in the same orbital plane with 5-10 minute spacing at ~400 km altitude and 50°-65° inclination are expected to capture 3 million observations of precipitation, including 100,000 deep convective events. TEMPEST is designed to provide critical information on the time evolution of cloud and precipitation microphysics, yielding a first-order understanding of the behavior of assumptions in current cloud-model parameterizations in diverse climate regimes.

  6. Temporal generalization.

    PubMed

    Church, R M; Gibbon, J

    1982-04-01

    Responses of 26 rats were reinforced following a signal of a certain duration, but not following signals of shorter or longer durations. This led to a positive temporal generalization gradient with a maximum at the reinforced duration in six experiments. Spacing of the nonreinforced signals did not influence the gradient, but the location of the maximum and breadth of the gradient increased with the duration of the reinforced signal. Reduction of reinforcement, either by partial reinforcement or reduction in the probability of a positive signal, led to a decrease in the height of the generalization gradient. There were large, reliable individual differences in the height and breadth of the generalization gradient. When the conditions of reinforcement were reversed (responses reinforced following all signals longer or shorter than a single nonreinforced duration), eight additional rats had a negative generalization gradient with a minimum at a signal duration shorter than the single nonreinforced duration. A scalar timing theory is described that provided a quantitative fit of the data. This theory involved a clock that times in linear units with an accurate mean and a negligible variance, a distribution of memory times that is normally distributed with an accurate mean and a scalar standard deviation, and a rule to respond if the clock is "close enough" to a sample of the memory time distribution. This decision is based on a ratio of the discrepancy between the clock time and the remembered time, to the remembered time. When this ratio is below a (variable) threshold, subjects respond. When three timing parameters--coefficient of variation of the memory time, the mean and the standard deviation of the threshold--were set at their median values, a theory with two free parameters accounted for 96% of the variance. The two parameters reflect the probability of attention to time and the probability of a response given inattention. These parameters were not influenced

  7. Temporal Coding of Volumetric Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llull, Patrick Ryan

    'Image volumes' refer to realizations of images in other dimensions such as time, spectrum, and focus. Recent advances in scientific, medical, and consumer applications demand improvements in image volume capture. Though image volume acquisition continues to advance, it maintains the same sampling mechanisms that have been used for decades; every voxel must be scanned and is presumed independent of its neighbors. Under these conditions, improving performance comes at the cost of increased system complexity, data rates, and power consumption. This dissertation explores systems and methods capable of efficiently improving sensitivity and performance for image volume cameras, and specifically proposes several sampling strategies that utilize temporal coding to improve imaging system performance and enhance our awareness for a variety of dynamic applications. Video cameras and camcorders sample the video volume (x,y,t) at fixed intervals to gain understanding of the volume's temporal evolution. Conventionally, one must reduce the spatial resolution to increase the framerate of such cameras. Using temporal coding via physical translation of an optical element known as a coded aperture, the compressive temporal imaging (CACTI) camera emonstrates a method which which to embed the temporal dimension of the video volume into spatial (x,y) measurements, thereby greatly improving temporal resolution with minimal loss of spatial resolution. This technique, which is among a family of compressive sampling strategies developed at Duke University, temporally codes the exposure readout functions at the pixel level. Since video cameras nominally integrate the remaining image volume dimensions (e.g. spectrum and focus) at capture time, spectral (x,y,t,lambda) and focal (x,y,t,z) image volumes are traditionally captured via sequential changes to the spectral and focal state of the system, respectively. The CACTI camera's ability to embed video volumes into images leads to exploration

  8. Highest Resolution Gaspra Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This picture of asteroid 951 Gaspra is a mosaic of two images taken by the Galileo spacecraft from a range of 5,300 kilometers (3,300 miles), some 10 minutes before closest approach on October 29, 1991. The Sun is shining from the right; phase angle is 50 degrees. The resolution, about 54 meters/pixel, is the highest for the Gaspra encounter and is about three times better than that in the view released in November 1991. Additional images of Gaspra remain stored on Galileo's tape recorder, awaiting playback in November. Gaspra is an irregular body with dimensions about 19 x 12 x 11 kilometers (12 x 7.5 x 7 miles). The portion illuminated in this view is about 18 kilometers (11 miles) from lower left to upper right. The north pole is located at upper left; Gaspra rotates counterclockwise every 7 hours. The large concavity on the lower right limb is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) across, the prominent crater on the terminator, center left, about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile). A striking feature of Gaspra's surface is the abundance of small craters. More than 600 craters, 100-500 meters (330-1650 feet) in diameter are visible here. The number of such small craters compared to larger ones is much greater for Gaspra than for previously studied bodies of comparable size such as the satellites of Mars. Gaspra's very irregular shape suggests that the asteroid was derived from a larger body by nearly catastrophic collisions. Consistent with such a history is the prominence of groove-like linear features, believed to be related to fractures. These linear depressions, 100-300 meters wide and tens of meters deep, are in two crossing groups with slightly different morphology, one group wider and more pitted than the other. Grooves had previously been seen only on Mars's moon Phobos, but were predicted for asteroids as well. Gaspra also shows a variety of enigmatic curved depressions and ridges in the terminator region at left. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the

  9. Gaspra - Highest Resolution Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This picture of asteroid 951 Gaspra is a mosaic of two images taken by the Galileo spacecraft from a range of 5,300 kilometers (3,300 miles), some 10 minutes before closest approach on October 29, 1991. The Sun is shining from the right; phase angle is 50 degrees. The resolution, about 54 meters/pixel, is the highest for the Gaspra encounter and is about three times better than that in the view released in November 1991. Additional images of Gaspra remain stored on Galileo's tape recorder, awaiting playback in November. Gaspra is an irregular body with dimensions about 19 x 12 x 11 kilometers (12 x 7.5 x 7 miles). The portion illuminated in this view is about 18 kilometers (11 miles) from lower left to upper right. The north pole is located at upper left; Gaspra rotates counterclockwise every 7 hours. The large concavity on the lower right limb is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) across, the prominent crater on the terminator, center left, about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile). A striking feature of Gaspra's surface is the abundance of small craters. More than 600 craters, 100-500 meters (330-1650 feet) in diameter are visible here. The number of such small craters compared to larger ones is much greater for Gaspra than for previously studied bodies of comparable size such as the satellites of Mars. Gaspra's very irregular shape suggests that the asteroid was derived from a larger body by nearly catastrophic collisions. Consistent with such a history is the prominence of groove-like linear features, believed to be related to fractures. These linear depressions, 100-300 meters wide and tens of meters deep, are in two crossing groups with slightly different morphology, one group wider and more pitted than the other. Grooves had previously been seen only on Mars's moon Phobos, but were predicted for asteroids as well. Gaspra also shows a variety of enigmatic curved depressions and ridges in the terminator region at left. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the

  10. Fuzzy branching temporal logic.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong-ick; Lee, Kwang H; Lee, Doheon

    2004-04-01

    Intelligent systems require a systematic way to represent and handle temporal information containing uncertainty. In particular, a logical framework is needed that can represent uncertain temporal information and its relationships with logical formulae. Fuzzy linear temporal logic (FLTL), a generalization of propositional linear temporal logic (PLTL) with fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states defined on a linear time model, was previously proposed for this purpose. However, many systems are best represented by branching time models in which each state can have more than one possible future path. In this paper, fuzzy branching temporal logic (FBTL) is proposed to address this problem. FBTL adopts and generalizes concurrent tree logic (CTL*), which is a classical branching temporal logic. The temporal model of FBTL is capable of representing fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states, and the order relation among them is represented as a directed graph. The utility of FBTL is demonstrated using a fuzzy job shop scheduling problem as an example. PMID:15376850

  11. [Dispute Resolutions].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Claudia L.; Cooks, Leda M.

    1994-01-01

    Focusing on the teaching of alternative dispute resolutions at universities, Claudia L. Hale and Leda M. Cooks argue that mediation should be taught primarily as a communication process that involves the joint efforts of mediator and disputants. Teachers of mediation should begin by distinguishing mediation from other forms of dispute resolution,…

  12. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  13. Spatial and temporal filtering technique for processing lidar photocount data.

    PubMed

    Gardner, C S; Shelton, J D

    1981-04-01

    Shot noise places a practical limit on the spatial and temporal resolution of lidar photocount data. A 2-D signal-processing technique that utilizes spatial and temporal filtering to reduce shot noise and increase resolution is described. The technique is applied to sodium lidar data collected during the fall of 1979 over Urbana, Illinois. Temporal filtering is shown to enhance the spatial resolution of the sodium profiles significantly by reducing shot noise by more than 10 dB. The signal-processing technique is applicable to a wide variety of lidar data.

  14. Temporal Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filk, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In this article I investigate several possibilities to define the concept of "temporal non-locality" within the standard framework of quantum theory. In particular, I analyze the notions of "temporally non-local states", "temporally non-local events" and "temporally non-local observables". The idea of temporally non-local events is already inherent in the standard formalism of quantum mechanics, and Basil Hiley recently defined an operator in order to measure the degree of such a temporal non-locality. The concept of temporally non-local states enters as soon as "clock-representing states" are introduced in the context of special and general relativity. It is discussed in which way temporally non-local measurements may find an interesting application for experiments which test temporal versions of Bell inequalities.

  15. Resolution in Photovoltaic Potential Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Coors, V.; Zlatanova, S.; Oosterom, P. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an analysis of the effect of the various types of resolution involved in photovoltaic potential computation is presented. To calculate solar energy incident on a surface, shadow from surrounding buildings has been considered. The incident energy on a surface has been calculated taking the orientation, tilt and position into consideration. Different sky visibility map has been created for direct and diffuse radiation and only the effect of resolution of the factors has been explored here. The following four resolutions are considered: 1. temporal resolution (1, 10, 60 minutes time interval for calculating visibility of sun), 2. object surface resolution (0.01, 0.1, 0.375, 0.75, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 m2 as maximum triangle size of a surface to be considered), 3. blocking obstacle resolution (number of triangles from LoD1, LoD2, or LoD3 CityGML building models), and 4. sky resolution (ranging from 150 to 600 sky-patches used to divide the sky-dome). Higher resolutions result in general in more precise estimation of the photovoltaic potential, but also the computation time is increasing, especially as realizes that this computation has to be done for every building with its object surface (both roofs and façades). This paper is the first in depth analysis ever of the effect of resolution and will help to configure the proper settings for effective photovoltaic potential computations.

  16. Observations of Sand Dune Migration on the Colorado River in Grand Canyon using High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplinski, M. A.; Buscmobe, D.; Ashley, T.; Tusso, R.; Grams, P. E.; McElroy, B. J.; Mueller, E. R.; Hamill, D.

    2015-12-01

    Repeat, high-resolution multibeam bathymetric surveys were conducted in March and July 2015 along a reach of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon near the Diamond Creek gage (362 km downstream of Lees Ferry, AZ) to characterize the migration of sand dunes. The surveys were collected as part of a study designed to quantify the relative importance of bedload and suspended sediment transport and develop a predictive relationship for bedload transport. Concurrent measurements of suspended-sediment concentrations, bed-sediment grain size, and water velocity were also collected. The study site is approximately 350 m long and 50 m wide; water depths are 7 to 10 m during normal flows; and a field of sand dunes form along its entire length with negligible coarse material at the bed surface. Full swath coverage of the site required about 6 to 10 minutes to complete with two passes of the survey vessel. Mapping occurred continuously during several survey periods. For each survey period, time-series of bathymetric maps were constructed from each pair of survey lines. In March, surveys were collected over durations of 2, 3, 9, and 11 hours, at discharges of 339 to 382 m3/s. In July, surveys were collected over durations of 4, 4, and 13 hours, at discharges ranging from 481 to 595 ft3/s. These surveys capture the migration of sand dunes over a wide range of discharge with an unprecedented temporal resolution. The dunes in March were between 30 and 50 cm in height, 5 m in length, and migrating downstream at about 1 m per hour. In July, dunes were between 75 and 130 cm in height and 10-15 m in length, and were migrating downstream at rates of 5 to 2 m per hour. The surveys also reveal that the dune migration is spatially and temporally variable, with fast-migrating small dunes variably superimposed on slower-moving larger dunes. The dunes also refract around shoreline talus piles and other flow constrictions collectively causing a large degree of dune deformation as they migrate.

  17. Temporal Ventriloquism in a Purely Temporal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jessica; Alais, David

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how audiovisual signals are combined in time for a temporal analogue of the ventriloquist effect in a purely temporal context, that is, no spatial grounding of signals or other spatial facilitation. Observers were presented with two successive intervals, each defined by a 1250-ms tone, and indicated in which interval a brief…

  18. Conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The sooner conflict is identified and confronted, the more quickly it can be resolved (and the sooner, the better). When this is accomplished calmly and objectively, many areas of conflict will be eliminated. Addressing conflict as it arises also sends a clear message to the team that the practice seeks resolution, not punishment or negative consequences. In addition, the dentist and the office manager need to lead by example by avoiding gossip and encouraging open communication. The goal is to go from a parent-child relationship with the dental team to an adult-adult relationship using this series of managerial conflict resolution steps.

  19. Temporal Processing Capabilities in Repetition Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidiropoulos, Kyriakos; Ackermann, Hermann; Wannke, Michael; Hertrich, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal resolution capacities of the central-auditory system in a subject (NP) suffering from repetition conduction aphasia. More specifically, the patient was asked to detect brief gaps between two stretches of broadband noise (gap detection task) and to evaluate the duration of two biphasic (WN-3) continuous noise…

  20. Computed tomographic anatomy of the temporal bone

    SciTech Connect

    Virapongse, C.; Rothman, S.L.G.; Kier, E.L.; Sarwar, M.

    1982-10-01

    With the recent development of high-resolution computed tomography (CT), there is a growing need to explore the full potential of this new method in demonstrating the detailed anatomy of the temporal bone. For this purpose, dry skulls with intact ossicles were scanned in axial and coronal projections. The detailed CT anatomy of the temporal bone was documented, complemented by images from live patients. Because of its superior contrast resolution, CT was able to demonstrate numerous structures, such as the tympanic membrane, ossicles, and supporting structures, hitherto never or poorly visualized by any other method. In addition, the ease by which axial sections of the temporal bone could be obtained is of great benefit in displaying several structures previously difficult to evaluate.

  1. Spatial and temporal changes in household structure locations using high-resolution satellite imagery for population assessment: an analysis of household locations in southern Zambia between 2006 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Timothy; Pinchoff, Jessie; Lubinda, Jailos; Hamapumbu, Harry; Searle, Kelly; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Thuma, Philip E.; Moss, William J.; Curriero, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite imagery is increasingly available at high spatial resolution and can be used for various purposes in public health research and program implementation. Comparing a census generated from two satellite images of the same region in rural southern Zambia obtained four and a half years apart identified patterns of household locations and change over time. The length of time that a satellite image-based census is accurate determines its utility. Households were enumerated manually from satellite images obtained in 2006 and 2011 of the same area. Spatial statistics were used to describe clustering, cluster detection, and spatial variation in the location of households. A total of 3,821 household locations were enumerated in 2006 and 4,256 in 2011, a net change of 435 houses (11.4% increase). Comparison of the images indicated that 971 (25.4%) structures were added and 536 (14.0%) removed. Further analysis suggested similar household clustering in the two images and no substantial difference in concentration of households across the study area. Cluster detection analysis identified a small area where significantly more household structures were removed than expected; however, the amount of change was of limited practical significance. These findings suggest that random sampling of households for study participation would not induce geographic bias if based on a 4.5 year old image in this region. Application of spatial statistical methods provide insights into the population distribution changes between two time periods and can be helpful in assessing the accuracy of satellite imagery. PMID:27245798

  2. NCAI Resolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Five Major Policy Resolutions were adopted, without objection, at the 33rd Annual Convention of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 1976. The issues involved were: Treaties and Trust Responsibilities, Tribal Government, Jurisdiction, Federal Administration and Structure of Indian Affairs, and…

  3. Multiscale time activity data exploration via temporal clustering visualization spreadsheet.

    PubMed

    Woodring, Jonathan; Shen, Han-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Time-varying data is usually explored by animation or arrays of static images. Neither is particularly effective for classifying data by different temporal activities. Important temporal trends can be missed due to the lack of ability to find them with current visualization methods. In this paper, we propose a method to explore data at different temporal resolutions to discover and highlight data based upon time-varying trends. Using the wavelet transform along the time axis, we transform data points into multi-scale time series curve sets. The time curves are clustered so that data of similar activity are grouped together, at different temporal resolutions. The data are displayed to the user in a global time view spreadsheet where she is able to select temporal clusters of data points, and filter and brush data across temporal scales. With our method, a user can interact with data based on time activities and create expressive visualizations. PMID:19008560

  4. Dynamics of temporal discrimination.

    PubMed

    Guilhardi, Paulo; Church, Russell M

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe and explain the acquisition of temporal discriminations, transitions from one temporal interval to another, and asymptotic performance of stimulus and temporal discriminations. Rats were trained on a multiple cued interval (MCI) procedure with a head entry response on three signaled fixed-interval schedules of reinforcement (30, 60, and 120 sec). They readily learned the three temporal discriminations, whether they were presented simultaneously or successively, and they rapidly adjusted their performance to new intervals when the intermediate interval was varied daily. Although exponential functions provided good descriptions of many measures of temporal discrimination, different parameter values were required for each measure. The addition of a linear operator to a packet theory of timing with a single set of parameters provided a quantitative process model that fit many measures of the dynamics of temporal discrimination.

  5. Fractional Fourier transform in temporal ghost imaging with classical light

    SciTech Connect

    Setaelae, Tero; Shirai, Tomohiro; Friberg, Ari T.

    2010-10-15

    We investigate temporal, second-order classical ghost imaging with long, incoherent, scalar plane-wave pulses. We prove that in rather general conditions, the intensity correlation function at the output of the setup is given by the fractional Fourier transform of the temporal object. In special cases, the correlation function is shown to reduce to the ordinary Fourier transform and the temporal image of the object. Effects influencing the visibility and the resolution are considered. This work extends certain known results on spatial ghost imaging into the time domain and could find applications in temporal tomography of pulses.

  6. Temporal Organization in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhavy, Raymond W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    High school students read textual passages organized around a semantic, temporal, or random theme. Free recall, semantically, and temporally-cued tests measured recall. During free recall, the organized passages yielded greater recall. For the cued tests, more words were remembered when the passage organization matched the type of test cue.…

  7. Effects of a 10-Minutes Peer Education Protocol to Reduce Binge Drinking among Adolescents during Holidays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planken, Martijn J. E.; Boer, Henk

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate a standard ten-minute peer education protocol to reduce binge drinking among Dutch adolescents at campsites during summer holidays. Using a quasi-experimental design, we evaluated the effects of the peer education protocol as applied by trained peer educators. We collected data by telephone interviews fourteen…

  8. The Nature of the Enigmatic 10-Minute Accreting Binary System ES CET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeghs, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    ES Cet is one of the most compact binary systems known with an orbital period of only 10.3 minutes. Our allocated observations with the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite were performed in January and July 2004, with the data being delivered to the PI in August 2004. Preliminary results were presented by the PI in September 2004 and January 2005. We have also secured supporting optical observations of ES Ceti using the Magellan telescopes (November 2004). The team is currently performing a thorough and final analysis of the X-ray, UV and optical data sets with the latest XMM pipeline software and our own analysis packages.

  9. 10-minute delayed recall from the modified mini-mental state test predicts Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Lyness, Scott A; Lee, Ae Young; Zarow, Chris; Teng, Evelyn L; Chui, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity and specificity of two delayed recall scores from the Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) test with consensus clinical diagnosis to differentiate cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) versus non-AD pathologies. At a memory disorders clinic, 117 cognitively impaired patients were administered a baseline 3MS test and received a contemporaneous consensus clinical diagnosis. Their brains were examined after death about 5 years later. Using logistic regression with forward selection to predict pathologically defined AD versus non-AD, 10-min delayed recall entered first (p = 0.001), followed by clinical diagnosis (p = 0.02); 1-min delayed recall did not enter. 10-min delayed recall scores ≤4 (score range = 0-9) were 87% sensitive and 47% specific in predicting AD pathology; consensus clinical diagnosis was 82% sensitive and 45% specific. For the 57 patients whose initial Mini-Mental State Examination scores were ≥19 (the median), 3MS 10-min delayed recall scores ≤4 showed some loss of sensitivity (80%) but a substantial gain in specificity (77%). In conclusion, 10-min delayed recall score on the brief 3MS test distinguished between AD versus non-AD pathology about 5 years before death at least as well as consensus clinical diagnosis that requires much more comprehensive information and complex deliberation.

  10. A 10-minute prototype assay for tissue degradation monitoring in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Kil, Catherine; Stankewich, Michael C; Yao, Zhi; Li, Jie; Vortmeyer, Alexander O

    2015-08-01

    We recently identified alpha II spectrin as a Tissue Degradation Indicator (TDI) and demonstrated that intrinsic spectrin-breakdown levels reliably reveal tissue degradation status in biospecimens. With the present study, we introduce an in vitro biological assay to mimic the endogenous spectrin-breakdown process and serve as degradation monitor (DM). By initiating the DM at the time of specimen collection and by attaching the DM to respective specimens, specimen degradation can be assessed by DM readout without specimen consumption. Using a protease inhibitory assay and protease-targeted immunoassays, we identified calpain as the protease responsible for degradation-induced spectrin breakdown. To recapitulate spectrin degradation in vitro, we developed several enzymatic assays in test tubes by incubating recombinant spectrins and synthetic Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based spectrin peptides with purified human and porcine calpains. The in vitro assays reliably performed in different environments for a limited time due to loss of calpain activity. To maintain longer calpain activity, we introduced cultured cells as calpain providers into the in vitro assays. Under a variety of degradative conditions, including 4°C, 13°C, 23°C, 29°C, 37°C, freezing, and freeze-thaw steps, we compared the use of this prototype DM to the intrinsic spectrin cleavage assay (ISCA) in specimen degradation assessment using animal models. A strong correlation (r=0.9895) was detected between the DM-revealed degradation and the ISCA-revealed degradation. Notably, the DM-based degradation assessment takes only 10min and does not jeopardize the tissue itself, whereas the ISCA-based degradation assessment needs to sacrifice tissues and takes several hours to accomplish. Our data suggests the application of an in vitro degradation monitor for fast, real time, and non-invasive assessment of specimen degradation. This observation could lead to a transformative product dedicated to biospecimen quality control. This study also addresses critical, yet unmet needs for developing a universal standard for specimen degradation measurement.

  11. Performance on Temporal Information Processing as an Index of General Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rammsayer, Thomas H.; Brandler, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The relation between general intelligence (psychometric "g") and temporal resolution capacity of the central nervous system was examined by assessing performance on eight different temporal tasks in a sample of 100 participants. Correlational and principal component analyses suggested a unitary timing mechanism, referred to as temporal "g".…

  12. Integrating High Temporal Resolution Single Particle Data with Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Guazzotti, S.; Sodeman, D.; Holecek, J.; Carmichael, G. R.; Tang, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Single particle analysis can provide direct insight into the evolution of the mixing state of atmospheric particles. Information at this level can be used to gain insights into particle sources as well as atmospheric processing. There are a number of instruments which have been developed in the past decade which allow one to measure the size and chemical composition of individual particles in real time. This presentation will focus on aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) measurements made during ACE-Asia and other locations in the United States, focusing on the size-resolved chemical information that can be acquired with single particle mass spectrometers. The ability to use single particle signatures to distinguish between elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and various mixtures will be demonstrated. Results will be presented showing how unique mass spectral markers can be used to discriminate between dust, sea salt, fossil fuel, and biomass particles, monitoring their relative contributions and changes in chemistry on short timescales. A discussion of how single particle measurements might be used to refine current atmospheric models by adding unique information will be presented.

  13. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  14. An Assessment of MEG Coherence Imaging in the Study of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Elisevich, Kost; Shukla, Neetu; Moran, John; Smith, Brien; Schultz, Lonni; Mason, Karen; Barkley, Gregory L; Tepley, Norman; Gumenyuk, Valentina; Bowyer, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study examines whether magnetoencephalographic (MEG) coherence imaging is more sensitive than the standard single equivalent dipole (ECD) model in lateralizing the site of epileptogenicity in patients with drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods An archival review of ECD MEG analyses of 30 presurgical TLE patients was undertaken with data extracted subsequently for coherence analysis by a blinded reviewer for comparison of accuracy of lateralization. Postoperative outcome was assessed by Engel classification. MEG coherence images were generated from 10 minutes of spontaneous brain activity and compared to surgically resected brain areas outlined on each subject's MRI. Coherence values were averaged independently for each hemisphere to ascertain the laterality of the epileptic network. Reliability between runs was established by calculating the correlation between epochs. Match rates compared the results of each of the two MEG analyses with optimal postoperative outcome. Key Findings The ECD method provided an overall match rate of 43% (13 cases) for Engel class I outcomes with 37% (11 cases) found to be indeterminate (i.e., no spikes identified on MEG). Coherence analysis provided an overall match rate of 77% (23 cases). Of 19 cases without evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis, coherence analysis correctly lateralized the side of TLE in 11 cases (58%). Sensitivity of the ECD method was 41% (indeterminate cases included) and that of the coherence method 73% with a positive predictive value of 70% for an Engel class Ia outcome. Intrasubject coherence imaging reliability was consistent from run-to-run (correlation >0.90) using three 10-minute epochs. Significance MEG coherence analysis has greater sensitivity than the ECD method for lateralizing TLE and demonstrates reliable stability from run-to-run. It therefore improves upon the capability of MEG in providing further information of use in clinical decision-making where the laterality of

  15. Fast temporal interactions in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Rupp, A; Hack, S; Gutschalk, A; Schneider, P; Picton, T W; Stippich, C; Scherg, M

    2000-11-27

    The temporal resolution of the human primary auditory cortex (AC) was studied using middle-latency evoked fields. Paired sounds with either the same or different spectral characteristics were presented with gaps between the sounds of 1, 4, 8 and 14 ms. Spatio-temporal modelling showed (1) that the response to the second sound was recognizable with gaps of 1 ms and rapidly increased in amplitude with increasing gap durations, (2) an enhanced N40m amplitude at gaps > 4 ms, (3) delayed N19m-P30m latencies when the stimuli were different. The median psychoacoustical thresholds were 1.6 ms for the same stimuli and 2.5 ms for different stimuli, confirming the electrophysiological evidence for rapid pattern-specific temporal processing in human primary auditory cortex.

  16. Juvenile temporal arteritis revisited.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, F H; Lie, J T; Nienhuis, B J; Konzen, K M; Groover, R V

    1994-05-01

    We describe a case of arteritis involving the superficial temporal artery in an 8-year-old boy. After a 2-week prodrome of headache in the right temporal region, a painful pulsatile 6-mm nodule developed. No history of trauma or systemic disease was noted. The differential diagnosis included vasculitis or thrombosis of a vascular malformation of the temporal artery. The lesion was surgically excised for both diagnostic and cosmetic reasons. Histologic features of the nodule were diagnostic of juvenile temporal arteritis and characterized by non-giant cell granulomatous inflammation of the temporal artery, occlusive fibrous intimal proliferation, and microaneurysmal disruption of the media. At 12-month follow-up, the patient was well; no recurrent lesions or systemic disease was noted. Although rare, this disease should be recognized as arteritis that affects the external carotid circulation and should not be confused with classic giant cell temporal arteritis. If physicians are aware of this benign inflammatory disease of the temporal artery in children and young adults, unnecessary treatment will not be administered.

  17. Employing temporal self-similarity across the entire time domain in computed tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, D; Van Eyndhoven, G; Lionheart, W R B; Withers, P J; Dobson, K J; McDonald, S A; Atwood, R; Lee, P D

    2015-06-13

    There are many cases where one needs to limit the X-ray dose, or the number of projections, or both, for high frame rate (fast) imaging. Normally, it improves temporal resolution but reduces the spatial resolution of the reconstructed data. Fortunately, the redundancy of information in the temporal domain can be employed to improve spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel regularizer for iterative reconstruction of time-lapse computed tomography. The non-local penalty term is driven by the available prior information and employs all available temporal data to improve the spatial resolution of each individual time frame. A high-resolution prior image from the same or a different imaging modality is used to enhance edges which remain stationary throughout the acquisition time while dynamic features tend to be regularized spatially. Effective computational performance together with robust improvement in spatial and temporal resolution makes the proposed method a competitive tool to state-of-the-art techniques.

  18. [Duration and temporality].

    PubMed

    Fouks, L; Guibert, S; Cardon; Montot

    1990-01-01

    The notion of temporality in living is in perpetual motion between passive temporality and creative conscience. Human existence is not purely immanent, a flow of transcedence continually runs through it. Melancholia is a lose of creativity accompanied by a feeling that time as lived has stopped, time being lived as a new mode of space. Maniac temporality is an improductive and unsociable furious flight toward. The melancholic feeling out of time is crushed by the problematic of alterity, sin and eternity. The maniac lives an imaginary and deceptive problematic. The ambivalent ideal of the schizophrenic is both a return to biological life as well as a fascination by formal thought.

  19. Means for improving apparent resolution of television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Technique using short term temporal integration characteristics of the observers visual system improves the apparent resolution of television video presentations. The raster is displaced slightly on each frame so the eye can integrate the information in each raster grain. This phase shift uses a switching time delay.

  20. A Search for Temporal Changes on Pluto and Charon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgartner, Jason Daniel; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Devins, Spencer; Beyer, Ross A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie; New Horizons Geology, Geophysics and Imaging Science Theme Team

    2016-10-01

    A search for short-term temporal changes on Pluto and Charon was conducted using the highest resolution New Horizons encounter images. To accomplish this, different images of the same region were overlaid and blinked; at least two researchers searched each image set for evidence of temporal changes. The images included all of the New Horizons LORRI observations between about 3.6 hours prior to closest approach and closest approach; the longest change detection search interval for both Pluto and Charon was about 3.2 hours. Each image was compared to all lower resolution images of the same region, for a total of more than 100 image sets. The resolution of the images searched varied from about 80 m to 880 m. Variability between the images was observed, but is attributed to the variable image resolutions, photometric angles, and instrument artifacts. No definitive variability that is indicative of a temporal change on either Pluto or Charon was found. In contrast, plumes on Triton were observed to be variable in images of similar resolution over intervals of less than 45 minutes (L. Soderblom et al., Science 250, 410, (1990)). This search for temporal changes will be extended to include lower-resolution, full-disk images such that all illuminated regions of both Pluto and Charon will be investigated. NASA funding for this research is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Spatial and temporal vision of macaques after central retinal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Pasternak, T.; Zehl, D.

    1981-07-01

    Spatial contrast and temporal modulation sensitivity of two macaque monkeys were measured at three luminance levels before and after binocular laser coagulation of the fovea. The radius of the lesions ranged from 1.6 to 2.2 degree from the center of the fovea. After placement of the lesions, the visibility of high spatial frequencies was greatly reduced, although sensitivity at middle and low spatial frequencies was unaffected. No loss of spatial resolution was found at the lowest luminance tested. When temporal modulation sensitivity was tested with 4 deg targets, foveal lesions had no effect at any temporal frequency or luminance. However, with a 0.57 degree target, sensitivity to lower temporal frequencies was impaired. Thus visual loss after destruction of the fovea is limited to high luminance, small targets, and the resolution of fine detail.

  2. Nanosecond microscopy with spectroscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Christoph; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrate coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy in a wide-field setup with nanosecond laser pulse excitation. In contrast to confocal setups, the image of a sample can be recorded with a single pair of excitation pulses. For this purpose, the excitation geometry is specially designed in order to satisfy the phase matching condition over the whole sample area. The spectral, temporal and spatial sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by imaging test samples, i.e. oil vesicles in sunflower seeds, on a nanosecond timescale. The method provides snapshot imaging in 3 ns with a spectral resolution of 25 cm-1.

  3. Ultrafast, temporally stochastic STED nanoscopy of millisecond dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jale; Zahn, Jasmin; Maglione, Marta; Sigrist, Stephan J; Marquard, Jonas; Chojnacki, Jakub; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Sahl, Steffen J; Engelhardt, Johann; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-09-01

    Electro-optical scanning (>1,000 frames/s) with pixel dwell times on the order of the lifetime of the fluorescent molecular state renders stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy temporally stochastic. Photon detection from a molecule occurs stochastically in one of several scanning frames, and the spatial origin of the photon is known with subdiffraction precision. Images are built up by binning consecutive frames, making the time resolution freely adjustable. We demonstrated nanoscopy of vesicle motions in living Drosophila larvae and the cellular uptake of viral particles with 5- to 10-ms temporal resolution.

  4. Resolution-enhanced Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Aubrun, J. N.; Rosenberg, W. J.; Roche, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    A familiar mapping spectrometer implementation utilizes two dimensional detector arrays with spectral dispersion along one direction and spatial along the other. Spectral images are formed by spatially scanning across the scene (i.e., push-broom scanning). For imaging grating and prism spectrometers, the slit is perpendicular to the spatial scan direction. For spectrometers utilizing linearly variable focal-plane-mounted filters the spatial scan direction is perpendicular to the direction of spectral variation. These spectrometers share the common limitation that the number of spectral resolution elements is given by the number of pixels along the spectral (or dispersive) direction. Resolution enhancement by first passing the light input to the spectrometer through a scanned etalon or Michelson is discussed. Thus, while a detector element is scanned through a spatial resolution element of the scene, it is also temporally sampled. The analysis for all the pixels in the dispersive direction is addressed. Several specific examples are discussed. The alternate use of a Michelson for the same enhancement purpose is also discussed. Suitable for weight constrained deep space missions, hardware systems were developed including actuators, sensor, and electronics such that low-resolution etalons with performance required for implementation would weigh less than one pound.

  5. Temporal signal processing of dolphin biosonar echoes from salmon prey.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui Helen

    2014-08-01

    Killer whales project short broadband biosonar clicks. The broadband nature of the clicks provides good temporal resolution of echo highlights and allows for the discriminations of salmon prey. The echoes contain many highlights as the signals reflect off different surfaces and parts of the fish body and swim bladder. The temporal characteristics of echoes from salmon are highly aspect dependent and six temporal parameters were used in a support vector machine to discriminate between species. Results suggest that killer whales can classify salmon based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification. PMID:25096148

  6. Temporal signal processing of dolphin biosonar echoes from salmon prey.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui Helen

    2014-08-01

    Killer whales project short broadband biosonar clicks. The broadband nature of the clicks provides good temporal resolution of echo highlights and allows for the discriminations of salmon prey. The echoes contain many highlights as the signals reflect off different surfaces and parts of the fish body and swim bladder. The temporal characteristics of echoes from salmon are highly aspect dependent and six temporal parameters were used in a support vector machine to discriminate between species. Results suggest that killer whales can classify salmon based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification.

  7. Temporal Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Thomas, B. C.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, Stolz and Adams unveiled a subgrid-scale model for LES based upon approximately inverting (defiltering) the spatial grid-filter operator and termed .the approximate deconvolution model (ADM). Subsequently, the utility and accuracy of the ADM were demonstrated in a posteriori analyses of flows as diverse as incompressible plane-channel flow and supersonic compression-ramp flow. In a prelude to the current paper, a parameterized temporal ADM (TADM) was developed and demonstrated in both a priori and a posteriori analyses for forced, viscous Burger's flow. The development of a time-filtered variant of the ADM was motivated-primarily by the desire for a unifying theoretical and computational context to encompass direct numerical simulation (DNS), large-eddy simulation (LES), and Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation (RANS). The resultant methodology was termed temporal LES (TLES). To permit exploration of the parameter space, however, previous analyses of the TADM were restricted to Burger's flow, and it has remained to demonstrate the TADM and TLES methodology for three-dimensional flow. For several reasons, plane-channel flow presents an ideal test case for the TADM. Among these reasons, channel flow is anisotropic, yet it lends itself to highly efficient and accurate spectral numerical methods. Moreover, channel-flow has been investigated extensively by DNS, and a highly accurate data base of Moser et.al. exists. In the present paper, we develop a fully anisotropic TADM model and demonstrate its utility in simulating incompressible plane-channel flow at nominal values of Re(sub tau) = 180 and Re(sub tau) = 590 by the TLES method. The TADM model is shown to perform nearly as well as the ADM at equivalent resolution, thereby establishing TLES as a viable alternative to LES. Moreover, as the current model is suboptimal is some respects, there is considerable room to improve TLES.

  8. Temporal radiance caching.

    PubMed

    Gautron, Pascal; Bouatouch, Kadi; Pattanaik, Sumanta

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel method for fast, high quality computation of glossy global illumination in animated environments. Building on the irradiance caching and radiance caching algorithms, our method leverages temporal coherence by sparse temporal sampling and interpolation of the indirect lighting. In our approach, part of the global illumination solution computed in previous frames is reused in the current frame. Our reusing scheme adapts to the change of incoming radiance by updating the indirect lighting only where there is a significant change. By reusing data in several frames, our method removes the flickering artifacts and yields a significant speedup compared to classical computation in which a new cache is computed for every frame. We also define temporal gradients for smooth temporal interpolation. A key aspect of our method is the absence of any additional complex data structure, making the implementation into any existing renderer based on irradiance and radiance caching straightforward. We describe the implementation of our method using graphics hardware for improved performance.

  9. Information and Temporality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flender, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Being able to give reasons for what the world is and how it works is one of the defining characteristics of modernity. Mathematical reason and empirical observation brought science and engineering to unprecedented success. However, modernity has reached a post-state where an instrumental view of technology needs revision with reasonable arguments and evidence, i.e. without falling back to superstition and mysticism. Instrumentally, technology bears the potential to ease and to harm. Easing and harming can't be controlled like the initial development of technology is a controlled exercise for a specific, mostly easing purpose. Therefore, a revised understanding of information technology is proposed based upon mathematical concepts and intuitions as developed in quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics offers unequaled opportunities because it raises foundational questions in a precise form. Beyond instrumentalism it enables to raise the question of essences as that what remains through time what it is. The essence of information technology is acausality. The time of acausality is temporality. Temporality is not a concept or a category. It is not epistemological. As an existential and thus more comprehensive and fundamental than a concept or a category temporality is ontological; it does not simply have ontic properties. Rather it exhibits general essences. Datability, significance, spannedness and openness are general essences of equiprimordial time (temporality).

  10. Visual temporal processing in dyslexia and the magnocellular deficit theory: the need for speed?

    PubMed

    McLean, Gregor M T; Stuart, Geoffrey W; Coltheart, Veronika; Castles, Anne

    2011-12-01

    A controversial question in reading research is whether dyslexia is associated with impairments in the magnocellular system and, if so, how these low-level visual impairments might affect reading acquisition. This study used a novel chromatic flicker perception task to specifically explore temporal aspects of magnocellular functioning in 40 children with dyslexia and 42 age-matched controls (aged 7-11). The relationship between magnocellular temporal resolution and higher-level aspects of visual temporal processing including inspection time, single and dual-target (attentional blink) RSVP performance, go/no-go reaction time, and rapid naming was also assessed. The Dyslexia group exhibited significant deficits in magnocellular temporal resolution compared with controls, but the two groups did not differ in parvocellular temporal resolution. Despite the significant group differences, associations between magnocellular temporal resolution and reading ability were relatively weak, and links between low-level temporal resolution and reading ability did not appear specific to the magnocellular system. Factor analyses revealed that a collective Perceptual Speed factor, involving both low-level and higher-level visual temporal processing measures, accounted for unique variance in reading ability independently of phonological processing, rapid naming, and general ability.

  11. Resolution limitations and optimization of the LLNL streak camera focus

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Griffith, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The RCA C73435 image tube is biased at voltages far from its original design in the LLNL ultrafast (10 ps) streak camera. Its output resolution at streak camera operating potentials has been measured as a function of input slit width, incident-light wavelength, and focus-grid voltage. The temporal resolution is insensitive to focus-grid voltage for a narrow (100 ..mu..m) input slit, but is very sensitive to focus-grid voltage for a wide (2 mm) input slit. At the optimum wide-slit focus voltage, temporal resolution is insensitive to slit width. Spatial resolution is nearly independent of focus-grid voltage for values that give good temporal resolution. Both temporal and spatial resolution depend on the incident-light wavelength. Data for 1.06-..mu..m light show significantly better focusing than for 0.53-..mu..m light. Streak camera operation is simulated with a computer program that calculates photoelectron trajectories. Electron ray tracing describes all of the observed effects of slit width, incident-light wavelength, and focus-grid voltage on output resolution. 7 refs.

  12. Optimal Temporal Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Fuat; Freestone, David; Simen, Patrick; deSouza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Holmes, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Time is an essential feature of most decisions, because the reward earned from decisions frequently depends on the temporal statistics of the environment (e.g., on whether decisions must be made under deadlines). Accordingly, evolution appears to have favored a mechanism that predicts intervals in the seconds to minutes range with high accuracy on average, but significant variability from trial to trial. Importantly, the subjective sense of time that results is sufficiently imprecise that maximizing rewards in decision-making can require substantial behavioral adjustments (e.g., accumulating less evidence for a decision in order to beat a deadline). Reward maximization in many daily decisions therefore requires optimal temporal risk assessment. Here, we review the temporal decision-making literature, conduct secondary analyses of relevant published datasets, and analyze the results of a new experiment. The paper is organized in three parts. In the first part, we review literature and analyze existing data suggesting that animals take account of their inherent behavioral variability (their “endogenous timing uncertainty”) in temporal decision-making. In the second part, we review literature that quantitatively demonstrates nearly optimal temporal risk assessment with sub-second and supra-second intervals using perceptual tasks (with humans and mice) and motor timing tasks (with humans). We supplement this section with original research that tested human and rat performance on a task that requires finding the optimal balance between two time-dependent quantities for reward maximization. This optimal balance in turn depends on the level of timing uncertainty. Corroborating the reviewed literature, humans and rats exhibited nearly optimal temporal risk assessment in this task. In the third section, we discuss the role of timing uncertainty in reward maximization in two-choice perceptual decision-making tasks and review literature that implicates timing uncertainty

  13. Quantum temporal probabilities in tunneling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anastopoulos, Charis Savvidou, Ntina

    2013-09-15

    We study the temporal aspects of quantum tunneling as manifested in time-of-arrival experiments in which the detected particle tunnels through a potential barrier. In particular, we present a general method for constructing temporal probabilities in tunneling systems that (i) defines ‘classical’ time observables for quantum systems and (ii) applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. We show that the relevant probabilities are defined in terms of specific correlation functions of the quantum field associated with tunneling particles. We construct a probability distribution with respect to the time of particle detection that contains all information about the temporal aspects of the tunneling process. In specific cases, this probability distribution leads to the definition of a delay time that, for parity-symmetric potentials, reduces to the phase time of Bohm and Wigner. We apply our results to piecewise constant potentials, by deriving the appropriate junction conditions on the points of discontinuity. For the double square potential, in particular, we demonstrate the existence of (at least) two physically relevant time parameters, the delay time and a decay rate that describes the escape of particles trapped in the inter-barrier region. Finally, we propose a resolution to the paradox of apparent superluminal velocities for tunneling particles. We demonstrate that the idea of faster-than-light speeds in tunneling follows from an inadmissible use of classical reasoning in the description of quantum systems. -- Highlights: •Present a general methodology for deriving temporal probabilities in tunneling systems. •Treatment applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. •Derive a new expression for tunneling time. •Identify new time parameters relevant to tunneling. •Propose a resolution of the superluminality paradox in tunneling.

  14. Temporal Bone Localized Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Hasan; Acioğlu, Engin; Durna, Yusuf Muhammed; Yiğit, Özgür; Bozkurt, Erol Rüştü; Karagöz, Yeşim

    2015-11-01

    Chondroblastoma is a highly destructive tumor originating from immature cartilage cells. Although chondroblastoma is defined as a benign tumor, it may exhibit malign tumor behaviors such as invasion or metastasis on neighboring structures. Magnetic resonance (MR) image is a solid mass lesion, which included heterogeneous hypointense in T2A and heterogeneous minimal hyperintense in T1A with destructive expansile characteristics and millimetric calcifications. Temporal bone chondroblastomas may complicate the diagnosis because of their different histologic characteristics. Microscopically, chondroblastic cell nests and calcification of locally "chicken wire" type around the cells are observed. These tumors secrete s-100 and vimentin and are used for differential diagnosis. In this study, a temporal bone localized chondroblastoma case is presented.

  15. Temporal Bone Localized Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Hasan; Acioğlu, Engin; Durna, Yusuf Muhammed; Yiğit, Özgür; Bozkurt, Erol Rüştü; Karagöz, Yeşim

    2015-11-01

    Chondroblastoma is a highly destructive tumor originating from immature cartilage cells. Although chondroblastoma is defined as a benign tumor, it may exhibit malign tumor behaviors such as invasion or metastasis on neighboring structures. Magnetic resonance (MR) image is a solid mass lesion, which included heterogeneous hypointense in T2A and heterogeneous minimal hyperintense in T1A with destructive expansile characteristics and millimetric calcifications. Temporal bone chondroblastomas may complicate the diagnosis because of their different histologic characteristics. Microscopically, chondroblastic cell nests and calcification of locally "chicken wire" type around the cells are observed. These tumors secrete s-100 and vimentin and are used for differential diagnosis. In this study, a temporal bone localized chondroblastoma case is presented. PMID:26517458

  16. Coverage centralities for temporal networks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Yano, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Structure of real networked systems, such as social relationship, can be modeled as temporal networks in which each edge appears only at the prescribed time. Understanding the structure of temporal networks requires quantifying the importance of a temporal vertex, which is a pair of vertex index and time. In this paper, we define two centrality measures of a temporal vertex based on the fastest temporal paths which use the temporal vertex. The definition is free from parameters and robust against the change in time scale on which we focus. In addition, we can efficiently compute these centrality values for all temporal vertices. Using the two centrality measures, we reveal that distributions of these centrality values of real-world temporal networks are heterogeneous. For various datasets, we also demonstrate that a majority of the highly central temporal vertices are located within a narrow time window around a particular time. In other words, there is a bottleneck time at which most information sent in the temporal network passes through a small number of temporal vertices, which suggests an important role of these temporal vertices in spreading phenomena. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-60498-7

  17. Spatial and temporal information fusion for crop condition monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop growth condition information is critical for crop management and yield estimation. In order to monitor crop conditions from space, high spatial and temporal resolution remote sensing data are required. Data fusion approach provides a way to generate such data set from multiple remote sensing da...

  18. Fast Spatio-Temporal Data Mining from Large Geophysical Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolorz, P.; Mesrobian, E.; Muntz, R.; Santos, J. R.; Shek, E.; Yi, J.; Mechoso, C.; Farrara, J.

    1995-01-01

    Use of the UCLA CONQUEST (CONtent-based Querying in Space and Time) is reviewed for performance of automatic cyclone extraction and detection of spatio-temporal blocking conditions on MPP. CONQUEST is a data analysis environment for knowledge and data mining to aid in high-resolution modeling of climate modeling.

  19. Spatial, Temporal and Spectral Satellite Image Fusion via Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huihui

    Remote sensing provides good measurements for monitoring and further analyzing the climate change, dynamics of ecosystem, and human activities in global or regional scales. Over the past two decades, the number of launched satellite sensors has been increasing with the development of aerospace technologies and the growing requirements on remote sensing data in a vast amount of application fields. However, a key technological challenge confronting these sensors is that they tradeoff between spatial resolution and other properties, including temporal resolution, spectral resolution, swath width, etc., due to the limitations of hardware technology and budget constraints. To increase the spatial resolution of data with other good properties, one possible cost-effective solution is to explore data integration methods that can fuse multi-resolution data from multiple sensors, thereby enhancing the application capabilities of available remote sensing data. In this thesis, we propose to fuse the spatial resolution with temporal resolution and spectral resolution, respectively, based on sparse representation theory. Taking the study case of Landsat ETM+ (with spatial resolution of 30m and temporal resolution of 16 days) and MODIS (with spatial resolution of 250m ~ 1km and daily temporal resolution) reflectance, we propose two spatial-temporal fusion methods to combine the fine spatial information of Landsat image and the daily temporal resolution of MODIS image. Motivated by that the images from these two sensors are comparable on corresponding bands, we propose to link their spatial information on available Landsat- MODIS image pair (captured on prior date) and then predict the Landsat image from the MODIS counterpart on prediction date. To well-learn the spatial details from the prior images, we use a redundant dictionary to extract the basic representation atoms for both Landsat and MODIS images based on sparse representation. Under the scenario of two prior Landsat

  20. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    DOE PAGES

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance atmore » high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.« less

  1. The simulation for the temporal characteristic of the microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Houzhi; Long, Jinghua; Liu, Jinyuan; Xie, Weixin; Bai, Yanli; Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo; Li, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Framing cameras based on the gated microchannel plate (MCP) are versatile diagnostic tools for fast Z-pinch and inertial confinement fusion experiments. In order to understand the temporal characteristic of the MCP used in such camera, the MCP is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. By simulating the electron cascade in the MCP, the relationship between the MCP temporal resolution and the ratio of its thickness to the channel diameter (L/D ratio) is obtained. The variation of the temporal resolution with the voltage applied on the MCP is also provided. The transit time and the transit time spread (TTS) simulations of the MCP are presented. The simulated results show that the transit time and TTS of the MCP are increased with L/D ratio increasing while the channel diameter of the MCP is 10 um.

  2. TEMPORAL SELF-ORGANIZATION IN GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-20

    We report on the discovery of a relation between the number of star formation (SF) peaks per unit time, ν{sub peak}, and the size of the temporal smoothing window function, Δt, used to define the peaks: ν{sub peak}∝Δt {sup 1} {sup –} {sup φ} (φ ∼ 1.618). This relation holds over the range of Δt = 10-1000 Myr that can be reliably computed here, using a large sample of galaxies obtained from a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. This means that the temporal distribution of SF peaks in galaxies as a population is fractal with a Hausdorff fractal dimension equal to φ – 1. This finding reveals, for the first time, that the superficially chaotic process of galaxy formation is underlined by temporal self-organization up to at least one gigayear. It is tempting to suggest that, given the known existence of spatial fractals (such as the power-law two-point function of galaxies), there is a joint spatio-temporal self-organization in galaxy formation. From an observational perspective, it will be urgent to devise diagnostics to probe the SF histories of galaxies with good temporal resolution to facilitate a test of this prediction. If confirmed, it would provide unambiguous evidence for a new picture of galaxy formation that is interaction driven, cooperative, and coherent in and between time and space. Unravelling its origin may hold the key to understanding galaxy formation.

  3. Temporal changes in ventricular function assessed echocardiographically in conscious and anesthetized mice.

    PubMed

    Rottman, Jeffrey N; Ni, Gemin; Khoo, Michelle; Wang, Zhizhang; Zhang, Wei; Anderson, Mark E; Madu, Ernest C

    2003-11-01

    The mouse is an important model system for cardiovascular biology, with echocardiography a critical tool for noninvasive measurement of cardiac morphology and function. The feasibility and short-term temporal consistency of repeated echocardiographic measurements in conscious mice has not been previously evaluated. We performed serial 2-dimensional guided M-mode transthoracic echocardiographic measurements at 5- to 10-minute intervals over 60 minutes in conscious mice and in mice treated with 1 of 3 anesthetic regimens: ketamine and acepromazine (n = 14); pentobarbital (n = 14); and ketamine and xylazine (n = 13). Unanesthetized mice received intraperitoneal saline (n = 6) or no injection (n = 7). In sequentially repeated measurements over 1 hour in conscious mice, none of the measured or derived echocardiographic parameters differed from baseline, whereas all 3 anesthetic regimens produced significant, prolonged, and temporally variable decreases in heart rate and fractional shortening. The relationship between heart rate and fractional shortening was not altered by anesthetic choice. Serial echocardiographic assessments of cardiac function, dimension, and mass can be performed with high reproducibility in conscious mice.

  4. [Temporal meaning of suffering].

    PubMed

    Porée, J

    2015-09-01

    If we had to find a few simple words to express what a suffering human being experiences, no matter what ills are causing the suffering and no matter what circumstances underlie the ills themselves, we could unmistakably say that it is the experience of not being able to go on like this. Suffering can be described, in this same sense, as an alteration in temporality. However, describing suffering as such only makes sense if we already have a conception of normal temporality. Yet for this, philosophical tradition offers not one but four competing conceptions. In the present article, we begin by briefly presenting these different conceptions. We then show how each one sheds light, by way of contrast, on a phenomenon whose meaning thus appears to be essentially negative. But does this phenomenon have a negative meaning only? Doesn't it correspond as much to a transformation as an alteration of temporality? This is what we will strive to establish in the third part of the article by relating suffering to hope, in a paradoxical sense of the term. Of the four conceptions of time likely to shed a contrasting light on the upheavals that suffering introduces into our life experience, the one described by Aristotle in Physics is historically the first. In particular, the notion of succession originates therein. But this conception does not account for what makes time the unit of a past, a present, and a future. In Book XI of Confessions, St. Augustine situated this unit not in nature but in the human mind. Hence, his definition of time as a distension of the soul and the necessary division into physical time and psychic time it entails. Husserl's Lessons on the phenomenology of the consciousness of internal time lend credit to this division, but they illuminate only the internal constitution of the "present", which is at the heart of the psychological conception of time. In Being and Time, Heidegger breaks away from this long-standing tradition; in his view, physical time

  5. Temporal Characterization of Aircraft Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2004-01-01

    Current aircraft source noise prediction tools yield time-independent frequency spectra as functions of directivity angle. Realistic evaluation and human assessment of aircraft fly-over noise require the temporal characteristics of the noise signature. The purpose of the current study is to analyze empirical data from broadband jet and tonal fan noise sources and to provide the temporal information required for prediction-based synthesis. Noise sources included a one-tenth-scale engine exhaust nozzle and a one-fifth scale scale turbofan engine. A methodology was developed to characterize the low frequency fluctuations employing the Short Time Fourier Transform in a MATLAB computing environment. It was shown that a trade-off is necessary between frequency and time resolution in the acoustic spectrogram. The procedure requires careful evaluation and selection of the data analysis parameters, including the data sampling frequency, Fourier Transform window size, associated time period and frequency resolution, and time period window overlap. Low frequency fluctuations were applied to the synthesis of broadband noise with the resulting records sounding virtually indistinguishable from the measured data in initial subjective evaluations. Amplitude fluctuations of blade passage frequency (BPF) harmonics were successfully characterized for conditions equivalent to take-off and approach. Data demonstrated that the fifth harmonic of the BPF varied more in frequency than the BPF itself and exhibited larger amplitude fluctuations over the duration of the time record. Frequency fluctuations were found to be not perceptible in the current characterization of tonal components.

  6. Temporal logics meet telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutten, Eric; Marce, Lionel

    1989-01-01

    The specificity of telerobotics being the presence of a human operator, decision assistance tools are necessary for the operator, especially in hostile environments. In order to reduce execution hazards due to a degraded ability for quick and efficient recovery of unexpected dangerous situations, it is of importance to have the opportunity, amongst others, to simulate the possible consequences of a plan before its actual execution, in order to detect these problematic situations. Hence the idea of providing the operator with a simulator enabling him to verify the temporal and logical coherence of his plans. Therefore, the power of logical formalisms is used for representation and deduction purposes. Starting from the class of situations that are represented, a STRIPS (the STanford Research Institute Problem Solver)-like formalism and its underlying logic are adapted to the simulation of plans of actions in time. The choice of a temporal logic enables to build a world representation, on which the effects of plans, grouping actions into control structures, will be transcribed by the simulation, resulting in a verdict and information about the plan's coherence.

  7. Temporal processing in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, K L; Ogden, N; Lind-Blad, F

    1990-02-01

    The temporal processing capabilities of 15 children with dyslexia versus 15 age-matched and 15 reading-matched controls in a word identification task were examined. The hypothesis underlying the present experiment was that word recognition would be inferior in children with dyslexia, relative to controls, when the task demanded the temporal integration (sequencing) of two-syllable words. Such a hypothesis must predict that one-syllable word recognition does not distinguish between these two populations and that these effects cannot be accounted for in terms of eye movement differences. To test this hypothesis, one- and two-syllable words displayed for 100, 300, and 3,000 msec were required to be identified. The results yielded evidence of decreased accuracy of word identification by the children with dyslexia in the two-syllable, 300-msec condition, as predicted. A second experiment was unable to uncover any differences in eye movement behaviors that could account for the effects observed in the first experiment. The results are discussed in terms of potential sequential processing deficits in individuals with dyslexia.

  8. Temporal interpolation of radar rainfall fields: meeting the stringent requirements of urban hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Pen; Ochoa-Rodriguez, Susana; Onof, Christian; Willems, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Radar rainfall estimates are playing an increasingly important role in urban hydrological applications due to their better description of the spatial and temporal characteristics of rainfall. However, the operational radar rainfall products provided by national weather services (typically at 1 km / 5 min resolution) still fail to meet the stringent resolution requirements of urban hydrological applications. While the spatial and temporal resolution of rainfall inputs are strongly related, recent studies suggest that the latter generally constitutes a more critical factor and that temporal resolutions of ~1-2 min (i.e. below those currently available) are required for urban hydrological applications, while spatial resolutions of ~1 km (i.e. close to those currently available) appear to be sufficient. Traditional strategies for obtaining higher temporal resolution radar rainfall estimates include changes in radar scanning strategies and stochastic downscaling. However, the former is not always possible, due to hardware limitations, and the latter results in large ensembles members which hinder practical use. In this work a temporal interpolation method, based upon the multi-scale variational optical flow technique, is proposed to generate high temporal-resolution (i.e. 1-2 min) radar rainfall estimates. The proposed method has been successfully applied to obtain radar rainfall estimates at 1 and 2 min temporal resolutions from UK Met Office C-band radar products originally at 5 and 10 min temporal resolution and varying spatial resolutions of 1 km, 500 m and 100 m. The performance of the higher temporal-resolution radar rainfall estimates was assessed through comparison against local rain gauge records collected at a pilot urban catchment (size ~ 865 ha) in North-East London. A further evaluation was conducted by applying the different rainfall products as input to the hydraulic model of the pilot catchment and comparing the hydraulic outputs against available flow

  9. Random walk centrality for temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luis E. C.; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Nodes can be ranked according to their relative importance within a network. Ranking algorithms based on random walks are particularly useful because they connect topological and diffusive properties of the network. Previous methods based on random walks, for example the PageRank, have focused on static structures. However, several realistic networks are indeed dynamic, meaning that their structure changes in time. In this paper, we propose a centrality measure for temporal networks based on random walks under periodic boundary conditions that we call TempoRank. It is known that, in static networks, the stationary density of the random walk is proportional to the degree or the strength of a node. In contrast, we find that, in temporal networks, the stationary density is proportional to the in-strength of the so-called effective network, a weighted and directed network explicitly constructed from the original sequence of transition matrices. The stationary density also depends on the sojourn probability q, which regulates the tendency of the walker to stay in the node, and on the temporal resolution of the data. We apply our method to human interaction networks and show that although it is important for a node to be connected to another node with many random walkers (one of the principles of the PageRank) at the right moment, this effect is negligible in practice when the time order of link activation is included.

  10. Quantum temporal probabilities in tunneling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastopoulos, Charis; Savvidou, Ntina

    2013-09-01

    We study the temporal aspects of quantum tunneling as manifested in time-of-arrival experiments in which the detected particle tunnels through a potential barrier. In particular, we present a general method for constructing temporal probabilities in tunneling systems that (i) defines 'classical' time observables for quantum systems and (ii) applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. We show that the relevant probabilities are defined in terms of specific correlation functions of the quantum field associated with tunneling particles. We construct a probability distribution with respect to the time of particle detection that contains all information about the temporal aspects of the tunneling process. In specific cases, this probability distribution leads to the definition of a delay time that, for parity-symmetric potentials, reduces to the phase time of Bohm and Wigner. We apply our results to piecewise constant potentials, by deriving the appropriate junction conditions on the points of discontinuity. For the double square potential, in particular, we demonstrate the existence of (at least) two physically relevant time parameters, the delay time and a decay rate that describes the escape of particles trapped in the inter-barrier region. Finally, we propose a resolution to the paradox of apparent superluminal velocities for tunneling particles. We demonstrate that the idea of faster-than-light speeds in tunneling follows from an inadmissible use of classical reasoning in the description of quantum systems.

  11. Temporal bone squamous cell carcinoma - Penang experience.

    PubMed

    Ng, S Y; Pua, K C; Zahirrudin, Z

    2015-12-01

    Temporal bone squamous cell carcinoma (TBSCC) is rare and poses difficulties in diagnosing, staging and management. We describe a case series with six patients who were diagnosed TBSCC, from January 2009 to June 2014, with median age of 62 years old. All patients presented with blood-stain discharge and external auditory canal mass, showing that these findings should highly alert the diagnosis of TBSCC. Three patients staged T3 and another three with T4 disease. High-resolution CT (HRCT) temporal findings were noted to be different from intraoperative findings and therefore we conclude that MRI should be done to look for middle ear involvement or other soft tissue invasion for more accurate staging. Lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) and parotidectomy was done for four patients with or without neck dissection. Patients with positive margin, perineural invasion or parotid and glenoid involvement carry poorer prognosis and postoperative radiotherapy may improve the survival rate. One patient had successful tumor resection via piecemeal removal approach in contrast with the recommended en bloc resection shows that with negative margin achieved, piecemeal removal approach can be a good option for patients with T2-3 disease. In general, T4 tumor has dismal outcome regardless of surgery or radiotherapy given.

  12. Conflict Resolution Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Melinda G.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that, due to escalating violence in contemporary society, community colleges should offer certificate or degree programs in conflict resolution. Describes a conflict resolution communication program, which teaches communication skills, mediation processes, and coping strategies to prospective mediators. (NB)

  13. Spatial-Temporal dynamics of surface water flooding and consequences for emergency services accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Bosher, Lee; Wilby, Rob; Yang, Lili; Ryley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas are increasingly susceptible to surface water flooding, with more intense precipitation and intensification of land development. Flooding has both direct impacts i.e. locations inundated with water, and indirect impacts i.e. transport networks, utility e.g. electricity/water services etc. The direct areas flooded evolve in space through the event, and are predicted by standard inundation models. However, the wider indirect impacts and the spatial-temporal patterns are less constrained and it is these that are needed to manage the impacts in real-time. This paper focusses on the Category One responders of the Fire and Rescue and Ambulance Services in the City of Leicester, East Midlands, UK. Leicester is ranked 16th out of 4215 settlements at risk of surface water flooding in the UK based upon the population at risk (15,200 people) (DEFRA, 2009). The analysis undertaken involved overlaying the flood extent with the Integrated Transport Network (ITN) data within a GIS framework. Then a simple transport routing algorithm was used to predict the travel time from specific nodes representing ambulance or fire stations to different parts of the city. Flood magnitudes with 1:20, 1:100 and 1:1000 return periods have been investigated. Under a scenario of no flooding, 100% of the city is accessible by the six fire stations in the city. However, in the 1 in 20 year surface water flood event the peak inundation results in 66.5% being accessible in the 10 minute permitted time and 6% is totally inaccessible. This falls to 40% and 13% respectively for the 1 in 100 year event. Maps show the area of the city that are accessible by two or more stations within the permitted response time, which shows these areas are the most resilient to surface water flooding. However, it isn't just the peak water depths at every location which impacts accessibility within the city but the spatial-temporal patterns of the inundation. The areas within the 10 minute response time expand

  14. Temporal dark polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Skryabin, Dmitry V

    2016-04-15

    We predict that strong coupling between waveguide photons and excitons of quantum well embedded into waveguide results in the formation of hybrid-dark and antidark light-matter solitons. Such temporal solitons exist due to interplay between repulsive excitonic nonlinearity and giant group-velocity dispersion arising in the vicinity of excitonic resonance. Such fully conservative states do not require external pumping to counteract losses and form continuous families parameterized by the power-dependent phase shift and velocity of their motion. Dark solitons are stable in the considerable part of their existence domain, while antidark solitons are always unstable. Both families exist outside the forbidden frequency gap of the linear system. PMID:27082338

  15. High time resolution laser induced fluorescence in pulsed argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Biloiu, Ioana A.; Sun Xuan; Scime, Earl E.

    2006-10-15

    A submillisecond time resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method for obtaining the temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function in pulsed argon plasma is presented. A basic LIF system that employs a continuous laser wave pumping and lock-in aided detection of the subsequent fluorescence radiation is modified by addition of a high frequency acousto-optic modulator to provide measurements of the ion flow velocity and ion temperature in a helicon generated pulsed argon plasma with temporal resolutions as high as 30 {mu}s.

  16. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created inmore » practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.« less

  17. Sharp temporal tuning in the bat auditory midbrain overcomes spectral-temporal trade-off imposed by cochlear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Macías, Silvio; Hechavarría, Julio C; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In the cochlea of the mustached bat, cochlear resonance produces extremely sharp frequency tuning to the dominant frequency of the echolocation calls, around 61 kHz. Such high frequency resolution in the cochlea is accomplished at the expense of losing temporal resolution because of cochlear ringing, an effect that is observable not only in the cochlea but also in the cochlear nucleus. In the midbrain, the duration of sounds is thought to be analyzed by duration-tuned neurons, which are selective to both stimulus duration and frequency. We recorded from 57 DTNs in the auditory midbrain of the mustached bat to assess if a spectral-temporal trade-off is present. Such spectral-temporal trade-off is known to occur as sharp tuning in the frequency domain which results in poorer resolution in the time domain, and vice versa. We found that a specialized sub-population of midbrain DTNs tuned to the bat's mechanical cochlear resonance frequency escape the cochlear spectral-temporal trade-off. We also show evidence that points towards an underlying neuronal inhibition that appears to be specific only at the resonance frequency. PMID:27374258

  18. Sharp temporal tuning in the bat auditory midbrain overcomes spectral-temporal trade-off imposed by cochlear mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Silvio; Hechavarría, Julio C.; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In the cochlea of the mustached bat, cochlear resonance produces extremely sharp frequency tuning to the dominant frequency of the echolocation calls, around 61 kHz. Such high frequency resolution in the cochlea is accomplished at the expense of losing temporal resolution because of cochlear ringing, an effect that is observable not only in the cochlea but also in the cochlear nucleus. In the midbrain, the duration of sounds is thought to be analyzed by duration-tuned neurons, which are selective to both stimulus duration and frequency. We recorded from 57 DTNs in the auditory midbrain of the mustached bat to assess if a spectral-temporal trade-off is present. Such spectral-temporal trade-off is known to occur as sharp tuning in the frequency domain which results in poorer resolution in the time domain, and vice versa. We found that a specialized sub-population of midbrain DTNs tuned to the bat’s mechanical cochlear resonance frequency escape the cochlear spectral-temporal trade-off. We also show evidence that points towards an underlying neuronal inhibition that appears to be specific only at the resonance frequency. PMID:27374258

  19. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  20. Infections on Temporal Networks—A Matrix-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Koher, Andreas; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Hövel, Philipp; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2016-01-01

    We extend the concept of accessibility in temporal networks to model infections with a finite infectious period such as the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. This approach is entirely based on elementary matrix operations and unifies the disease and network dynamics within one algebraic framework. We demonstrate the potential of this formalism for three examples of networks with high temporal resolution: networks of social contacts, sexual contacts, and livestock-trade. Our investigations provide a new methodological framework that can be used, for instance, to estimate the epidemic threshold, a quantity that determines disease parameters, for which a large-scale outbreak can be expected. PMID:27035128

  1. Infections on Temporal Networks--A Matrix-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Koher, Andreas; Lentz, Hartmut H K; Hövel, Philipp; Sokolov, Igor M

    2016-01-01

    We extend the concept of accessibility in temporal networks to model infections with a finite infectious period such as the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. This approach is entirely based on elementary matrix operations and unifies the disease and network dynamics within one algebraic framework. We demonstrate the potential of this formalism for three examples of networks with high temporal resolution: networks of social contacts, sexual contacts, and livestock-trade. Our investigations provide a new methodological framework that can be used, for instance, to estimate the epidemic threshold, a quantity that determines disease parameters, for which a large-scale outbreak can be expected. PMID:27035128

  2. New insights and system designs for temporally focused multiphoton optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayblum, Tom; Schejter, Adi; Dana, Hod; Shoham, Shy

    2015-03-01

    Temporal focusing (TF) multiphoton systems constitute a powerful solution for cellular resolution optogenetic stimulation and recording in three-dimensional, scattering tissue. Here, we address two fundamental aspects in the design of such systems: first, we examine the design of TF systems with specific optical sectioning by comparatively analyzing previously published results. Next, we develop a solution for obtaining TF in a flexible three-dimensional pattern of cellmatched focal spots. Our solution employs spatio-temporal focusing (SSTF) in a unique optical system design that can be integrated before essentially any multiphoton imaging or stimulation system.

  3. Temporal Adverbials in Text Structuring: On Temporal Text Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, Tuija

    This paper discusses clause-initial adverbials of time functioning as signals of the temporal text strategy. A chain of such markers creates cohesion and coherence by forming continuity in the text and also signals textual boundaries that occur on different hierarchic levels. The temporal text strategy is closely associated with narrative text.…

  4. Medical Temporal-Knowledge Discovery via Temporal Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Moskovitch, Robert; Shahar, Yuval

    2009-01-01

    Medical knowledge includes frequently occurring temporal patterns in longitudinal patient records. These patterns are not easily detectable by human clinicians. Current knowledge could be extended by automated temporal data mining. However, multivariate time-oriented data are often present at various levels of abstraction and at multiple temporal granularities, requiring a transformation into a more abstract, yet uniform dimension suitable for mining. Temporal abstraction (of both the time and value dimensions) can transform multiple types of point-b