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Sample records for 10-mum particles induces

  1. ON THE 10 mum SILICATE FEATURE IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Nikutta, Robert; Elitzur, Moshe; Lacy, Mark E-mail: moshe@pa.uky.ed

    2009-12-20

    The 10 mum silicate feature observed with Spitzer in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals some puzzling behavior. It (1) has been detected in emission in type 2 sources, (2) shows broad, flat-topped emission peaks shifted toward long wavelengths in several type 1 sources, and (3) is not seen in deep absorption in any source observed so far. We solve all three puzzles with our clumpy dust radiative transfer formalism. Addressing (1), we present the spectral energy distribution (SED) of SST1721+6012, the first type 2 quasar observed to show a clear 10 mum silicate feature in emission. Such emission arises in models of the AGN torus easily when its clumpy nature is taken into account. We constructed a large database of clumpy torus models and performed extensive fitting of the observed SED. We find that the cloud radial distribution varies as r {sup -1.5} and the torus contains 2-4 clouds along radial equatorial rays, each with optical depth at visual approx60-80. The source bolometric luminosity is approx3 x 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}. Our modeling suggests that approx<35% of objects with tori sharing these characteristics and geometry would have their central engines obscured. This relatively low obscuration probability can explain the clear appearance of the 10 mum emission feature in SST1721+6012 together with its rarity among other QSO2. Investigating (2), we also fitted the SED of PG1211+143, one of the first type 1 QSOs with a 10 mum silicate feature detected in emission. Together with other similar sources, this QSO appears to display an unusually broadened feature whose peak is shifted toward longer wavelengths. Although this led to suggestions of non-standard dust chemistry in these sources, our analysis fits such SEDs with standard galactic dust; the apparent peak shifts arise from simple radiative transfer effects. Regarding (3), we find additionally that the distribution of silicate feature strengths among clumpy torus models closely resembles the observed

  2. Quadrupole Induced Resonant Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Fajans, Joel

    1998-11-01

    We have performed experiments that explore the effects of a magnetic quadrupole field on a pure electron plasma confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap. A model that we have developed describes the shape of the plasma and shows that a certain class of resonant particles follows trajectories that take them out of the plasma. Even though the quadrupole field destroys the cylindrical symmetry of the system, our theory predicts that if the electrons are off resonance, then the lifetime of the plasma will not be greatly affected by the quadrupole field. Our preliminary experimental results show that the shape of the plasma and the plasma lifetime agree with our model. We are investigating the scaling of this behavior with various experimental parameters such as the plasma length, density, and strength of the quadrupole field. In addition to being an example of resonant particle transport, this effect may find practical applications in experiments that plan to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine anti-hydrogen created in double-well positron/anti-proton Penning-Malmberg traps. (ATHENA Collaboration.)

  3. Quadrupole Induced Resonant Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Fajans, Joel

    1999-11-01

    We have performed experiments that explore the effects of a magnetic quadrupole field on a pure electron plasma confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap. A model that we have developed describes the shape of the plasma and shows that a certain class of resonant particles follows trajectories that take them out of the plasma. Even though the quadrupole field destroys the cylindrical symmetry of the system, our theory predicts that if the electrons are off resonance, then the lifetime of the plasma will not be greatly affected by the quadrupole field. Our preliminary experimental results show that the shape of the plasma and the plasma lifetime agree with our model. We are investigating the scaling of this behavior with various experimental parameters such as the plasma length, density, and strength of the quadrupole field. In addition to being an example of resonant particle transport, this effect may find practical applications in experiments that plan to use magnetic quadrupole neutral atom traps to confine anti-hydrogen created in double-well positron/anti-proton Malmberg-Penning traps. (ATHENA Collaboration.)

  4. Understanding the synthesis of mesoporous silica particles by evaporation induced self assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Shailendra B.

    2007-12-01

    Evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) of amphiphilic molecules within aerosol droplets is an attractive method for synthesis of mesoporous silica particles. The aim of this research was to demonstrate synthetic methodologies to develop novel particle architectures using this technique, and to understand the influence of the competing dynamics within an evaporating droplet undergoing EISA on the particle morphology and mesostructure. Experiments were conducted to control particle characteristics. Particle size and distribution was varied by varying the size and distribution of starting droplets. The compressed gas atomizer, TSI 3076, gave a roughly micron-sized droplets with a polydisperse population, whereas the vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), TSI 3450, gave a highly monodisperse droplet population when orifices of diameters 10 mum and 20 mum were used. The mesopore size and mesostructure ordering were varied by employing amphiphiles of different geometry and by the use of 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, a pore-swelling agent. The extent of ordering was influenced by factors that govern the rates of reactions of the silica precursors relative to the rates of amphiphile self-assembly. These factors included acid concentration, the alkyl group in the tetraalkoxysilane precursor, the time for which the sol was aged before droplet generation, and CTAB/Si ratio in the starting sol. Experiments and simulation studies were carried out for particles made using CTAB as the templating agent and TMB as a pore-swelling agent. Analysis of these experiments was used to get insight into the three main dynamic processes occurring inside these droplets: evaporation of the volatile species, amphiphile self-assembly and phase transformation, and hydrolysis and condensation reactions of the silica precursor species. Pore swelling was observed for particles made using the VOAG. Particles made using the 10 mum orifice retained their hexagonal mesostructure upon addition of TMB in

  5. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  6. Theory of mode-induced beam particle loss in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.; Goldston, R. J.; McGuire, K.; Boozer, Allen H.; Monticello, D. A.; Park, W.

    1983-10-01

    Large-amplitude rotating magnetohydrodynamic modes are observed to induce significant high-energy beam particle loss during high-power perpendicular netural beam injection on the poloidal divertor experiment (PDX). A Hamiltonian formalism for drift orbit trajectories in the presence of such modes is used to study induced particle loss analytically and numerically. Results are in good agreement with experiment.

  7. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  8. Effects of particles on stability of flow-induced precursors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng-Wei; Phillips, Andrew W; Edward, Graham

    2012-02-01

    The effect of two colorant particles with different surface geometries on the stability of shear-induced precursors in isotactic polypropylene was studied after the cessation of shear flow at 140 °C. In the absence of particles, the shear-induced precursors survived for at least 100 s after the shear flow ended. The presence of particles was found to stabilize lower molecular weight chains assisting in the formation of additional shear-induced precursors. The precursors thus formed in the samples containing particles contained two oriented clusters with different molecular weights. Incorporation of lower molecular weight chains in the precursors led to increased dissolution rates of the shear-induced precursors. Particle surface geometry was found to influence precursor dissolution, with planar particles stabilizing the shear-induced precursors to a much greater extent than curved particles. The particles investigated thus act like structural probes to follow quantitatively the dissolution process of precursors after shear and importantly to infer the formation of precursors during shear.

  9. Phoresis-induced clustering of particles in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Fouxon, Itzhak; Krug, Dominik; van Reeuwijk, Maarten; Holzner, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate phoresis-induced clustering of non-inertial particles in turbulent flows. Phoretic mechanisms such as thermophoresis, chemotaxis or diffusiophroesis are known to create a particle drift with respect to the fluid. Theory, based on the framework of weakly compressible flow, predicts that particles in turbulence streaked by salinity gradients experience a diffusiophoretic drift and will thus form particle cluster. An inclined gravity current setup is used to analyse clustering due to the diffusiophoretic effect in turbulent flow experimentally. Simultaneous 3D particle tracking velocimetry and laser induced fluorescent measurements provide the full Lagrangian velocity field and the local salt concentration in the observed 3D domain. Two independent methods show consistent evidence of the theoretically predicted particle clustering in turbulence. This clustering mechanism can provide the key to the understanding of spontaneous clustering phenomena such as the formation of marine snow in the ocean.

  10. Shock-induced deformation in wetted particle beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, Bradley J.; Petel, Oren E.; Frost, David L.; Higgins, Andrew J.; Ringuette, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    The high-strain-rate response of granular media has received considerable attention due to increasing interest in granular penetration. In the present study, we investigate the response of wetted packed particle beds under varying flyer plate-induced shock loadings. We investigate the critical conditions for the onset of particle deformation in systems of spherical macroscopic glass beads. Resulting particle deformations from the shock compression are characterized using microscopy as well as particle size analysis, and the effects of shock strength are compared. A fracturing response with a bimodal particle distribution is observed, with an increasing shift to the lower particle size range as shock loading is initially increased. As the transmitted shock pressure exceeds 1 GPa, a significant decrease in the mean particle size is observed.

  11. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOEpatents

    Hampikian, Janet M; Hunt, Eden M

    2001-01-01

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  12. Ripple induced trapped particle loss in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    The threshold for stochastic transport of high energy trapped particles in a tokamak due to toroidal field ripple is calculated by explicit construction of primary resonances, and a numerical examination of the route to chaos. Critical field ripple amplitude is determined for loss. The expression is given in magnetic coordinates and makes no assumptions regarding shape or up-down symmetry. An algorithm is developed including the effects of prompt axisymmetric orbit loss, ripple trapping, convective banana flow, and stochastic ripple loss, which gives accurate ripple loss predictions for representative Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor equilibria. The algorithm is extended to include the effects of collisions and drag, allowing rapid estimation of alpha particle loss in tokamaks.

  13. Aeolian Induced Erosion and Particle Entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint, Brandon

    2007-01-01

    The Granular Physics Department at The Kennedy Space Center is addressing the problem of erosion on the lunar surface. The early stages of research required an instrument that would produce erosion at a specific rate with a specific sample variation. This paper focuses on the development and experimental procedures to measure and record erosion rates. This was done with the construction of an open air wind tunnel, and examining the relationship between airflow and particle motion.

  14. Measurement of airborne particle concentrations near the Sunset Crater volcano, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Benke, Roland R; Hooper, Donald M; Durham, James S; Bannon, Donald R; Compton, Keith L; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald N

    2009-02-01

    Direct measurements of airborne particle mass concentrations or mass loads are often used to estimate health effects from the inhalation of resuspended contaminated soil. Airborne particle mass concentrations were measured using a personal sampler under a variety of surface-disturbing activities within different depositional environments at both volcanic and nonvolcanic sites near the Sunset Crater volcano in northern Arizona. Focused field investigations were performed at this analog site to improve the understanding of natural and human-induced processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The level of surface-disturbing activity was found to be the most influential factor affecting the measured airborne particle concentrations, which increased over three orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. As the surface-disturbing activity level increased, the particle size distribution and the majority of airborne particle mass shifted from particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 mum (0.00039 in) to particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 mum (0.00039 in). Under ambient conditions, above average wind speeds tended to increase airborne particle concentrations. In contrast, stronger winds tended to decrease airborne particle concentrations in the breathing zone during light and heavy surface-disturbing conditions. A slight increase in the average airborne particle concentration during ambient conditions was found above older nonvolcanic deposits, which tended to be finer grained than the Sunset Crater tephra deposits. An increased airborne particle concentration was realized when walking on an extremely fine-grained deposit, but the sensitivity of airborne particle concentrations to the resuspendible fraction of near-surface grain mass was not conclusive in the field setting when human activities disturbed the bulk of near-surface material. Although the limited sample size precluded detailed statistical analysis, the differences in airborne particle

  15. Parameterization of ionization induced in the atmosphere by precipitating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, Anton; Usoskin, Ilya; Kovaltsov, Gennady

    We present a physical model to calculate ionization induced in the atmosphere by precipitating particles. This model is based on the Bethe-Bloch equation applied for precipitating particles such as: electrons, alpha-particles and protons. The energy range of precipitating particles is up to 5MeV and 80MeV/nuc respectively. This model provides an easy implementation with a robust realization of model calculations for a wide range of incident energies of precipitating particles. This method is limited to the upper-middle atmosphere. An ionization yield function [see, Usoskin and Kovaltsov, 2006; Usoskin, Kovaltsov, Mironova, 2010] can be also used in this model, making it possible to calculate the atmospheric ionization effect of precipitating particles for the entire atmosphere, dawn to the ground.

  16. Gravitationally induced particle production and its impact on structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of a continuous particles creation processes on the linear and nonlinear matter clustering, and its consequences on the weak lensing effect induced by structure formation. We study the line of sight behavior of the contribution to the bispectrum signal at a given angular multipole l, showing that the scale where the nonlinear growth overcomes the linear effect depends strongly of particles creation rate.

  17. Radiation induces turbulence in particle-laden fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zamansky, Rémi; Coletti, Filippo; Massot, Marc; Mani, Ali

    2014-07-15

    When a transparent fluid laden with solid particles is subject to radiative heating, non-uniformities in particle distribution result in local fluid temperature fluctuations. Under the influence of gravity, buoyancy induces vortical fluid motion which can lead to strong preferential concentration, enhancing the local heating and more non-uniformities in particle distribution. By employing direct numerical simulations this study shows that the described feedback loop can create and sustain turbulence. The velocity and length scale of the resulting turbulence is not known a priori, and is set by balance between viscous forces and buoyancy effects. When the particle response time is comparable to a viscous time scale, introduced in our analysis, the system exhibits intense fluctuations of turbulent kinetic energy and strong preferential concentration of particles.

  18. External front instabilities induced by a shocked particle ring.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, V; Saurel, R; Jourdan, G; Houas, L

    2014-10-01

    The dispersion of a cylindrical particle ring by a blast or shock wave induces the formation of coherent structures which take the form of particle jets. A blast wave, issuing from the discharge of a planar shock wave at the exit of a conventional shock tube, is generated in the center of a granular medium ring initially confined inside a Hele-Shaw cell. With the present experimental setup, under impulsive acceleration, a solid particle-jet formation is observed in a quasi-two-dimensional configuration. The aim of the present investigation is to observe in detail the formation of very thin perturbations created around the external surface of the dispersed particle layer. By means of fast flow visualization with an appropriate recording window, we focus solely on the first instants during which the external particle ring becomes unstable. We find that the critical area of the destabilization of the external ring surface is constant regardless of the acceleration of the initial layer. Moreover, we observe in detail the external front perturbation wavelength, rendered dimensionless by the initial ring perimeter, and follow its evolution with the initial particle layer acceleration. We report this quantity to be constant regardless of the evolution of the initial particle layer acceleration. Finally, we can reasonably assert that external front perturbations depend solely on the material of the particles.

  19. Coherent Light induced in Optical Fiber by a Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Xavier; Ray, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Coherent light production in an optical fiber by a charged particle (named PIGL, for particle-induced guided, light) is reviewed. From the microscopic point of view, light is emitted by transient electric dipoles induced in the fiber medium by the Coulomb field of the particle. The phenomenon can also considered as the capture of virtual photons of the particle field by the fiber. Two types of captures are distinguished. Type-I takes place in a uniform part of the fiber; then the photon keeps its longitudinal momentum pz . Type-II takes place near an end or in a non-uniform part of the fiber; then pz is not conserved. Type-I PIGL is not affected by background lights external to the fiber. At grazing incidence it becomes nearly monochromatic. Its circular polarization depends on the angular momentum of the particle about the fiber and on the relative velocity between the particle and the guided wave. A general formula for the yield of Type-II radiation, based on the reciprocity theorem, is proposed. This radiation can be assisted by metallic objects stuck to the fiber, via plasmon excitation. A periodic structure leads to a guided Smith-Purcell radiation. Applications of PIGL in beam diagnostics are considered.

  20. CARDIAC MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Submitted to the American Thoracic Society 98th International Conference, May 17 - 22, 2002, Atlanta, GA

    CARDIAC MOLECULAR EFFECTS INDUCED BY AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES
    K. Dreher1, R. Jaskot1, J. Richards1, and T. Knuckles2. 1U. S. Environmental Protection Agency,...

  1. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  2. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  3. Phase transition of vortexlike self-propelled particles induced by a hostile particle.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haibin; Zhang, Xiangyin

    2015-07-01

    When encountering a hostile particle, the avoidance behaviors of the vortex state of self-propelled particles exhibit phase transition phenomena such that the vortex state can change into a crystal state. Based on the self-propelled particle model and a molecular dynamics simulation, the dynamic response of the vortex swarm induced by a hostile particle (predator or obstacle) is studied. Three parameters are defined to characterize the collective escaping behaviors, including the order parameter, the flock size, and the roundness parameter. If a predator moves slower with a larger risk radius, the vortex swarm cannot return to its original vortex state, but rather transforms into a crystal state. The critical phase transition radius, the maximum risk radius of a predator with which the transition from a vortex to crystal state cannot take place, is also examined by considering the influence of the model parameters. To some degree, the critical radius reflects the stability and robustness of the vortex swarm. PMID:26274197

  4. Phase transition of vortexlike self-propelled particles induced by a hostile particle.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haibin; Zhang, Xiangyin

    2015-07-01

    When encountering a hostile particle, the avoidance behaviors of the vortex state of self-propelled particles exhibit phase transition phenomena such that the vortex state can change into a crystal state. Based on the self-propelled particle model and a molecular dynamics simulation, the dynamic response of the vortex swarm induced by a hostile particle (predator or obstacle) is studied. Three parameters are defined to characterize the collective escaping behaviors, including the order parameter, the flock size, and the roundness parameter. If a predator moves slower with a larger risk radius, the vortex swarm cannot return to its original vortex state, but rather transforms into a crystal state. The critical phase transition radius, the maximum risk radius of a predator with which the transition from a vortex to crystal state cannot take place, is also examined by considering the influence of the model parameters. To some degree, the critical radius reflects the stability and robustness of the vortex swarm.

  5. Phase transition of vortexlike self-propelled particles induced by a hostile particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Haibin; Zhang, Xiangyin

    2015-07-01

    When encountering a hostile particle, the avoidance behaviors of the vortex state of self-propelled particles exhibit phase transition phenomena such that the vortex state can change into a crystal state. Based on the self-propelled particle model and a molecular dynamics simulation, the dynamic response of the vortex swarm induced by a hostile particle (predator or obstacle) is studied. Three parameters are defined to characterize the collective escaping behaviors, including the order parameter, the flock size, and the roundness parameter. If a predator moves slower with a larger risk radius, the vortex swarm cannot return to its original vortex state, but rather transforms into a crystal state. The critical phase transition radius, the maximum risk radius of a predator with which the transition from a vortex to crystal state cannot take place, is also examined by considering the influence of the model parameters. To some degree, the critical radius reflects the stability and robustness of the vortex swarm.

  6. Histone hyperacetylation can induce unfolding of the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, R; Bazett-Jones, D P; Locklear, L; Dixon, G H

    1990-01-01

    A direct correlation exists between the level of histone H4 hyperacetylation induced by sodium butyrate and the extent to which nucleosomes lose their compact shape and become elongated (62.0% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6; overall mean in the length/width ratio = 1.83 +/- 0.48) when bound to electron microscope specimen grids at low ionic strength (1mM EDTA, 10mM Tris, pH 8.0). A marked proportion of elongated core particles is also observed in the naturally occurring hyperacetylated chicken testis chromatin undergoing spermatogenesis when analyzed at low ionic strength (36.8% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6). Core particles of elongated shape (length/width ratio over 1.6) generated under low ionic strength conditions are absent in the hypoacetylated chicken erythrocyte chromatin and represent only 2.3% of the untreated Hela S3 cell core particles containing a low proportion of hyperacetylated histones. The marked differences between control and hyperacetylated core particles are absent if the particles are bound to the carbon support film in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl, 6mM MgCl2 and 10mM Tris pH 8.0, conditions known to stabilize nucleosomes. A survey of the published work on histone hyperacetylation together with the present results indicate that histone hyperacetylation does not produce any marked disruption of the core particle 'per se', but that it decreases intranucleosomal stabilizing forces as judged by the lowered stability of the hyperacetylated core particle under conditions of shearing stress such as cationic competition by the carbon support film of the EM grid for DNA binding. Images PMID:2339060

  7. Alteration of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Properties Induced by Particle Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Polen, M.; Beydoun, H.; Lawlis, E.; Ahern, A.; Jahn, L.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles that can serve as ice nuclei frequently experience rapid and extensive chemical aging during atmospheric transport. This is known to significantly alter some ice nucleation modes of the few types of ice nucleation particle systems where aging effects have been simulated, such as for mineral dust. Yet much of our understanding of atmospheric particle freezing properties is derived from measurements of fresh or unaged particles. We know almost nothing regarding how atmospheric aging might alter the freezing properties of biomass burning aerosol or biological particle nucleants. We have investigated the effects of simulated aging using a chamber reactor on the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) and ice-active bacteria particles. Some types of aging were found to enhance the freezing ability of BBA, exhibited as a shift in a portion of the droplet freezing curve to warmer temperatures by a few °C. Ice-active bacteria were found to consistently loose their most ice-active nucleants after repeated aging cycles. The bacterial systems always retained significantly efficient ice active sites that still allowed them to induce freezing at mild/warm temperatures, despite this decrease in freezing ability. A comprehensive series of online single-particle mass spectrometry and offline spectromicroscopic analysis of individual particles was used to determine how the aging altered the aerosol's composition, and gain mechanistic insights into how this in turn altered the freezing properties. Our new ice nucleation framework that uses a continuous distribution of ice active site ability (contact angle) was used to interpret the droplet freezing spectra and understand how aging alters the internal and external variability, and rigidity, of the ice active sites.

  8. Vortex-Breakdown-Induced Particle Capture in Branching Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ault, Jesse T; Fani, Andrea; Chen, Kevin K; Shin, Sangwoo; Gallaire, François; Stone, Howard A

    2016-08-19

    We show experimentally that a flow-induced, Reynolds number-dependent particle-capture mechanism in branching junctions can be enhanced or eliminated by varying the junction angle. In addition, numerical simulations are used to show that the features responsible for this capture have the signatures of classical vortex breakdown, including an approach flow aligned with the vortex axis and a pocket of subcriticality. We show how these recirculation regions originate and evolve and suggest a physical mechanism for their formation. Furthermore, comparing experiments and numerical simulations, the presence of vortex breakdown is found to be an excellent predictor of particle capture. These results inform the design of systems in which suspended particle accumulation can be eliminated or maximized. PMID:27588859

  9. Vortex-Breakdown-Induced Particle Capture in Branching Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Jesse T.; Fani, Andrea; Chen, Kevin K.; Shin, Sangwoo; Gallaire, François; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-08-01

    We show experimentally that a flow-induced, Reynolds number-dependent particle-capture mechanism in branching junctions can be enhanced or eliminated by varying the junction angle. In addition, numerical simulations are used to show that the features responsible for this capture have the signatures of classical vortex breakdown, including an approach flow aligned with the vortex axis and a pocket of subcriticality. We show how these recirculation regions originate and evolve and suggest a physical mechanism for their formation. Furthermore, comparing experiments and numerical simulations, the presence of vortex breakdown is found to be an excellent predictor of particle capture. These results inform the design of systems in which suspended particle accumulation can be eliminated or maximized.

  10. Noise-induced vortex reversal of self-propelled particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanshuang; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2012-10-01

    We report an interesting phenomenon of noise-induced vortex reversal in a two-dimensional system of self-propelled particles (SPPs) with soft-core interactions. With the aid of forward flux sampling, we analyze the configurations along the reversal pathway and thus identify the mechanism of vortex reversal. We find that the reversal exhibits a hierarchical process: those particles at the periphery first change their motion directions, and then more inner layers of particles reverse later on. Furthermore, we calculate the dependence of the average reversal rate on noise intensity D and the number N of SPPs. We find that the rate decreases exponentially with the reciprocal of D. Interestingly, the rate varies nonmonotonically with N and a local minimal rate exists for an intermediate value of N.

  11. Flow-induced aggregation of colloidal particles in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Donglin; Qiao, Greg G.; Dunstan, Dave E.

    2016-08-01

    The flow-induced aggregation of dilute colloidal polystyrene nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian and viscoelastic solutions is reported. A rheo-optical method has been used to detect real-time aggregation processes via measuring optical absorption or scattering in a quartz Couette cell. The observed absorbance decreases over time are attributed to the flow-induced coagulation. Numerical simulations show that the aggregation processes still follow the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in a revised version. Suspensions in a series of media are studied to evaluate the effect of the media rheological properties on the particle aggregation. The data shows that elasticity reduces the aggregation while the solution viscosity enhances the aggregation processes.

  12. Alpha Particles Induce Apoptosis through the Sphingomyelin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Seideman, Jonathan H.; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Howell, Roger W.; Kolesnick, Richard N.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET a particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with a particles emitted by the 225Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated a particles using a planar 241Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that a particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  13. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis.

  14. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  15. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  16. ICRH induced particle losses in Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustin, J. M.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Pfefferlé, D.; Geiger, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fast ions in W7-X will be produced either by neutral beam injection (NBI) or by ion-cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH). The latter presents the advantage of depositing power locally and does not suffer from core accessibility issues (Drevlak et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 073002). This work assesses the possibility of using ICRH as a fast ion source in W7-X relevant conditions. The SCENIC package is used to resolve the full wave propagation and absorption in a three-dimensional plasma equilibrium. The source of the ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) wave is modelled in this work by an antenna formulation allowing its localisation in both the poloidal and toroidal directions. The actual antenna dimension and localization is therefore approximated with good agreement. The local wave deposition breaks the five-fold periodicity of W7-X. It appears that generation of fast ions is hindered by high collisionality and significant particle losses. The particle trapping mechanism induced by ICRH is found to enhance drift induced losses caused by the finite orbit width of trapped particles. The inclusion of a neoclassically resolved radial electric field is also investigated and shows a significant reduction of particle losses.

  17. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-25

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  18. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L.; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution.

  19. Ion-induced nucleation of pure biogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Jasper; Duplissy, Jonathan; Sengupta, Kamalika; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty; Rap, Alexandru; Richards, Nigel A D; Riipinen, Ilona; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander L; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-05-26

    Atmospheric aerosols and their effect on clouds are thought to be important for anthropogenic radiative forcing of the climate, yet remain poorly understood. Globally, around half of cloud condensation nuclei originate from nucleation of atmospheric vapours. It is thought that sulfuric acid is essential to initiate most particle formation in the atmosphere, and that ions have a relatively minor role. Some laboratory studies, however, have reported organic particle formation without the intentional addition of sulfuric acid, although contamination could not be excluded. Here we present evidence for the formation of aerosol particles from highly oxidized biogenic vapours in the absence of sulfuric acid in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions. The highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) are produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. We find that ions from Galactic cosmic rays increase the nucleation rate by one to two orders of magnitude compared with neutral nucleation. Our experimental findings are supported by quantum chemical calculations of the cluster binding energies of representative HOMs. Ion-induced nucleation of pure organic particles constitutes a potentially widespread source of aerosol particles in terrestrial environments with low sulfuric acid pollution. PMID:27225125

  20. APOPTOTIC AND INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS INDUCED BY DIFFERENT PARTICLES IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollutant particles induce apoptosis and inflammation, but the relationship between these two biological processes is not entirely clear. In this study, we compared the proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects of four particles: residual oil fly ash (ROFA), St. Louis particles SR...

  1. Particles induce apical plasma membrane enlargement in epithelial lung cell line depending on particle surface area dose

    PubMed Central

    Brandenberger, Christina; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Blank, Fabian; Gehr, Peter; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background Airborne particles entering the respiratory tract may interact with the apical plasma membrane (APM) of epithelial cells and enter them. Differences in the entering mechanisms of fine (between 0.1 μm and 2.5 μm) and ultrafine ( ≤ 0.1 μm) particles may be associated with different effects on the APM. Therefore, we studied particle-induced changes in APM surface area in relation to applied and intracellular particle size, surface and number. Methods Human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549 cell line) were incubated with various concentrations of different sized fluorescent polystyrene spheres without surface charge (∅ fine – 1.062 μm, ultrafine – 0.041 μm) by submersed exposure for 24 h. APM surface area of A549 cells was estimated by design-based stereology and transmission electron microscopy. Intracellular particles were visualized and quantified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Particle exposure induced an increase in APM surface area compared to negative control (p < 0.01) at the same surface area concentration of fine and ultrafine particles a finding not observed at low particle concentrations. Ultrafine particle entering was less pronounced than fine particle entering into epithelial cells, however, at the same particle surface area dose, the number of intracellular ultrafine particles was higher than that of fine particles. The number of intracellular particles showed a stronger increase for fine than for ultrafine particles at rising particle concentrations. Conclusion This study demonstrates a particle-induced enlargement of the APM surface area of a pulmonary epithelial cell line, depending on particle surface area dose. Particle uptake by epithelial cells does not seem to be responsible for this effect. We propose that direct interactions between particle surface area and cell membrane cause the enlargement of the APM. PMID:19284624

  2. The EPIC-MOS Particle-Induced Background Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a method for constructing a spectrum of the particle-induced instrumental background of the XMM-Newton EPIC MOS detectors that can be used for observations of the diffuse background and extended sources that fill a significant fraction of the instrument field of view. The strength and spectrum of the particle-induced background, that is, the background due to the interaction of particles with the detector and the detector surroundings, is temporally variable as well as spatially variable over individual chips. Our method uses a combination of the filter-wheel-closed data and a database of unexposed-region data to construct a spectrum of the "quiescent" background. We show that, using this method of background subtraction, the differences between independent observations of the same region of "blank sky" are consistent with the statistical uncertainties except when there is clear evidence of solar wind charge exchange emission. We use the blank sky observations to show that contamination by SWCX emission is a strong function of the solar wind proton flux, and that observations through the flanks of the magnetosheath appear to be contaminated only at much higher solar wind fluxes. We have also developed a spectral model of the residual soft proton flares, which allows their effects to be removed to a substantial degree during spectral fitting.

  3. Cellular Chemotaxis Induced by Wear Particles from Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Stuart B.; Ma, Ting

    2010-01-01

    The destruction of bone around joint replacements (periprosthetic osteolysis) is an adverse biological response associated with the generation of excessive wear particles. Wear debris from the materials used for joint replacements stimulate a chronic inflammatory and foreign body reaction that leads to increased osteoclast differentiation and maturation, and decreased bone formation. Wear debris induces both local and systemic trafficking of inflammatory cells to the site of particle generation. Recent studies have shown that this effect is mediated primarily by chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) including macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, also known as CCL2), macrophage inhibitory protein-1 (MIP-1), Interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8) and others. These ligands migrate along a concentration gradient to interact with G-protein-linked transmembrane receptors on the cell surface. Chemokines are involved in the innate and adaptive immune responses, angiogenesis, wound healing and tissue repair. In vitro, in vivo and tissue retrieval studies have shown that chemokine-directed systemic trafficking of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage to wear particles results in the release of pro-inflammatory factors and subsequent bone loss. Modulation of the chemokine ligand-receptor axis is a potential strategy to mitigate the adverse effects of wear particles from joint replacements. PMID:20398931

  4. Solar radiation induced rotational bursting of interplanetary particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    It is suggested that the magnitudes of the two radiation-induced rotational bursting mechanisms (Radzieskii effect and windmill effect) have been overestimated and that they do not work significantly faster than the Poynting-Robertson effect in removing interplanetary particles. These two mechanisms are described, and serious doubts are raised regarding the derivation of their radiation pressure-torque proportionality constants, which are required for calculating their magnitudes. It is shown that both mechanisms will cause the alignment of elongated particles and, consequently, the polarization of zodiacal light. Since no positive polarization has been measured at the antisolar point, it is concluded that the magnitudes of the rotational bursting mechanisms are smaller than that of the Poynting-Robertson effect.

  5. Shear-Induced Chiral Migration of Particles with Anisotropic Rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, Nobuhiko; Larson, Ronald G.

    2009-06-01

    We report that an achiral particle with anisotropic rigidity can migrate in the vorticity direction in shear flow. A minimal “tetrumbbell” model of such a particle is constructed from four beads and six springs to make a tetrahedral structure. A combination of two different spring constants corresponding to “hard” and “soft” springs yields ten distinguishable tetrumbbells, which when simulated in shear flow with hydrodynamic interactions between beads but no Brownian motion at zero Reynolds number, produces five different types of behavior in which seven out of ten tetrumbbell structures migrate in the vorticity direction due to shear-induced chirality. Some of the structures migrate in the same direction along the vorticity direction even when the shear flow is reversed, which is impossible for permanently chiral objects.

  6. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  7. MHD-Induced Alpha Particle Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.; von Goeler, S.

    1999-03-01

    MHD-induced increases in alpha particle loss to the wall were observed for both coherent modes and transient reconnection events using an array of scintillator detectors near the wall of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The magnitude of the coherent MHD-induced alpha loss as seen by these detectors was normally comparable to the MHD-quiescent first-orbit or toroidal-field ripple loss, but the magnitude of the alpha loss during reconnection events was up to 1000 times higher than this for a short time. Modeling suggest that the coherent MHD loss mechanism will be even less significant for future reactor-scale deuterium-tritium tokamaks due to the smaller ratio of the alpha gyroradius to minor radius.

  8. Flow-induced aggregation of colloidal particles in viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donglin; Qiao, Greg G; Dunstan, Dave E

    2016-08-01

    The flow-induced aggregation of dilute colloidal polystyrene nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian and viscoelastic solutions is reported. A rheo-optical method has been used to detect real-time aggregation processes via measuring optical absorption or scattering in a quartz Couette cell. The observed absorbance decreases over time are attributed to the flow-induced coagulation. Numerical simulations show that the aggregation processes still follow the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in a revised version. Suspensions in a series of media are studied to evaluate the effect of the media rheological properties on the particle aggregation. The data shows that elasticity reduces the aggregation while the solution viscosity enhances the aggregation processes. PMID:27627363

  9. Fireworks induced particle pollution: A spatio-temporal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Singh, R. K.; Murari, V.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. S.; Banerjee, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diwali-specific firework induced particle pollution was measured in terms of aerosol mass loading, type, optical properties and vertical distribution. Entire nation exhibited an increase in particulate concentrations specifically in Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Aerosol surface mass loading at middle IGP revealed an increase of 56-121% during festival days in comparison to their background concentrations. Space-borne measurements (Aqua and Terra-MODIS) typically identified IGP with moderate to high AOD (0.3-0.8) during pre-festive days which transmutes to very high AOD (0.4-1.8) during Diwali-day with accumulation of aerosol fine mode fractions (0.3-1.0). Most of the aerosol surface monitoring stations exhibited increase in PM2.5 especially on Diwali-day while PM10 exhibited increase on subsequent days. Elemental compositions strongly support K, Ba, Sr, Cd, S and P to be considered as firework tracers. The upper and middle IGP revealed dominance of absorbing aerosols (OMI-AI: 0.80-1.40) while CALIPSO altitude-orbit-cross-section profiles established the presence of polluted dust which eventually modified with association of smoke and polluted continental during extreme fireworks. Diwali-specific these observations have implications on associating fireworks induced particle pollution and human health while inclusion of these observations should improve regional air quality model.

  10. Induced radioactivity in and around high-energy particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vincke, Helmut; Theis, Chris; Roesler, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Particle accelerators and their surroundings are locations of residual radioactivity production that is induced by the interaction of high-energy particles with matter. This paper gives an overview of the principles of activation caused at proton accelerators, which are the main machines operated at Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire. It describes the parameters defining radio-nuclide production caused by beam losses. The second part of the paper concentrates on the analytic calculation of activation and the Monte Carlo approach as it is implemented in the FLUKA code. Techniques used to obtain, on the one hand, estimates of radioactivity in Becquerel and, on the other hand, residual dose rates caused by the activated material are discussed. The last part of the paper focuses on experiments that allow for benchmarking FLUKA activation calculations and on simulations used to predict activation in and around high-energy proton machines. In that respect, the paper addresses the residual dose rate that will be induced by proton-proton collisions at an energy of two times 7 TeV in and around the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. Besides activation of solid materials, the air activation expected in the CMS cavern caused by this beam operation is also discussed. PMID:21697180

  11. Induced radioactivity in and around high-energy particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vincke, Helmut; Theis, Chris; Roesler, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Particle accelerators and their surroundings are locations of residual radioactivity production that is induced by the interaction of high-energy particles with matter. This paper gives an overview of the principles of activation caused at proton accelerators, which are the main machines operated at Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire. It describes the parameters defining radio-nuclide production caused by beam losses. The second part of the paper concentrates on the analytic calculation of activation and the Monte Carlo approach as it is implemented in the FLUKA code. Techniques used to obtain, on the one hand, estimates of radioactivity in Becquerel and, on the other hand, residual dose rates caused by the activated material are discussed. The last part of the paper focuses on experiments that allow for benchmarking FLUKA activation calculations and on simulations used to predict activation in and around high-energy proton machines. In that respect, the paper addresses the residual dose rate that will be induced by proton-proton collisions at an energy of two times 7 TeV in and around the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. Besides activation of solid materials, the air activation expected in the CMS cavern caused by this beam operation is also discussed.

  12. Eugenol attenuates pulmonary damage induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zin, Walter A; Silva, Ana G L S; Magalhães, Clarissa B; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Riva, Douglas R; Lima, Crystianne C; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Takiya, Christina M; Valença, Samuel S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Faffe, Débora S

    2012-03-01

    Environmentally relevant doses of inhaled diesel particles elicit pulmonary inflammation and impair lung mechanics. Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, presents in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our aim was to examine a possible protective role of eugenol against lung injuries induced by diesel particles. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline (10 μl in; CTRL group) or 15 μg of diesel particles DEP (15 μg in; DIE and DEUG groups). After 1 h, mice received saline (10 μl; CTRL and DIE groups) or eugenol (164 mg/kg; EUG and DEUG group) by gavage. Twenty-four hours after gavage, pulmonary resistive (ΔP1), viscoelastic (ΔP2) and total (ΔPtot) pressures, static elastance (Est), and viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE) were measured. We also determined the fraction areas of normal and collapsed alveoli, amounts of polymorpho- (PMN) and mononuclear cells in lung parenchyma, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Est, ΔP2, ΔPtot, and ΔE were significantly higher in the DIE than in the other groups. DIE also showed significantly more PMN, airspace collapse, and apoptosis than the other groups. However, no beneficial effect on lipid peroxidation was observed in DEUG group. In conclusion, eugenol avoided changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary inflammation, and alveolar collapse elicited by diesel particles. It attenuated the activation signal of caspase-3 by DEP, but apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL was avoided. Finally, it could not avoid oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde.

  13. Eugenol attenuates pulmonary damage induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zin, Walter A; Silva, Ana G L S; Magalhães, Clarissa B; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Riva, Douglas R; Lima, Crystianne C; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Takiya, Christina M; Valença, Samuel S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Faffe, Débora S

    2012-03-01

    Environmentally relevant doses of inhaled diesel particles elicit pulmonary inflammation and impair lung mechanics. Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, presents in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our aim was to examine a possible protective role of eugenol against lung injuries induced by diesel particles. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline (10 μl in; CTRL group) or 15 μg of diesel particles DEP (15 μg in; DIE and DEUG groups). After 1 h, mice received saline (10 μl; CTRL and DIE groups) or eugenol (164 mg/kg; EUG and DEUG group) by gavage. Twenty-four hours after gavage, pulmonary resistive (ΔP1), viscoelastic (ΔP2) and total (ΔPtot) pressures, static elastance (Est), and viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE) were measured. We also determined the fraction areas of normal and collapsed alveoli, amounts of polymorpho- (PMN) and mononuclear cells in lung parenchyma, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Est, ΔP2, ΔPtot, and ΔE were significantly higher in the DIE than in the other groups. DIE also showed significantly more PMN, airspace collapse, and apoptosis than the other groups. However, no beneficial effect on lipid peroxidation was observed in DEUG group. In conclusion, eugenol avoided changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary inflammation, and alveolar collapse elicited by diesel particles. It attenuated the activation signal of caspase-3 by DEP, but apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL was avoided. Finally, it could not avoid oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde. PMID:22194320

  14. Theoretical and experimental examination of particle-particle interaction effects on induced dipole moments and dielectrophoretic responses of multiple particle chains.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Hernandez, Hector; Nagler, Eliot; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), an electrokinetic phenomenon based on particle polarizations in nonuniform electric fields, is increasingly employed for particle and cell characterizations and manipulations in microdevices. However, particle number densities are rarely varied and particle-particle interactions are largely overlooked, but both affect particle's effective polarizations by changing the local electric field, which directly impacts particle assembly into chains. This work examines theoretical and experimental particle-particle interactions and dielectrophoretic responses in nonuniform electric fields, then presents individual and chain velocities of spherical polystyrene microparticles and red blood cells (RBCs) under DEP forces in a modified quadruple electrode microdevice. Velocities are independently compared between 1, 2, 3, and 4 polystyrene beads and RBCs assembled into chains aligned with the electric field. Simulations compared induced dipole moments for particles experiencing the same (single point) and changing (multiple points) electric fields. Experiments and simulations are compared by plotting DEP velocities versus applied signal frequency from 1 kHz to 80 MHz. Simulations indicate differences in the DEP force exerted on each particle according to chain position. Simulations and experiments show excellent qualitative agreement; chains with more particles experienced a decrease in the DEP response for both polystyrene beads and RBCs. These results advance understanding of the extent that induced dipole polarizations with multiple particle chains affect observed behaviors in electrokinetic cellular diagnostic systems.

  15. Visual phenomena induced by cosmic rays and accelerated particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Budinger, T. F.; Leith, J. T.; Mamoon, A.; Chapman, P. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments, conducted at cyclotrons together with observations by Apollo astronauts, suggest with little doubt that cosmic nuclei interacting with the visual apparatus cause the phenomenon of light flashes seen on translunar and transearth coast over the past four Apollo missions. Other experiments with high and low energy neutrons and a helium ion beam suggest that slow protons and helium ions with a stopping power greater than 10 to the 8th power eV/gram sq cm can cause the phenomenon in the dark adapted eye. It was demonstrated that charged particles induced by neutrons and helium ions can stimulate the visual apparatus. Some approaches to understanding the long term mission effects of galactic cosmic nuclei interacting with man and his nervous system are outlined.

  16. A compilation of charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, C.; Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.; Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leclercq-Willain, C.; Coc, A.; Barhoumi, S.; Aguer, P.; Rolfs, C.; Kunz, R.; Hammer, J. W.; Mayer, A.; Paradellis, T.; Kossionides, S.; Chronidou, C.; Spyrou, K.; degl'Innocenti, S.; Fiorentini, G.; Ricci, B.; Zavatarelli, S.; Providencia, C.; Wolters, H.; Soares, J.; Grama, C.; Rahighi, J.; Shotter, A.; Lamehi Rachti, M.

    1999-08-01

    Low-energy cross section data for 86 charged-particle induced reactions involving light (1 <=Z <=14), mostly stable, nuclei are compiled. The corresponding Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates of relevance in astrophysical plasmas at temperatures in the range from 106 K to 1010 K are calculated. These evaluations assume either that the target nuclei are in their ground state, or that the target states are thermally populated following a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, except in some cases involving isomeric states. Adopted values complemented with lower and upper limits of the rates are presented in tabular form. Analytical approximations to the adopted rates, as well as to the inverse/direct rate ratios, are provided.

  17. Light-induced electronic non-equilibrium in plasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Kornbluth, Mordechai; Nitzan, Abraham; Seideman, Tamar

    2013-05-01

    We consider the transient non-equilibrium electronic distribution that is created in a metal nanoparticle upon plasmon excitation. Following light absorption, the created plasmons decohere within a few femtoseconds, producing uncorrelated electron-hole pairs. The corresponding non-thermal electronic distribution evolves in response to the photo-exciting pulse and to subsequent relaxation processes. First, on the femtosecond timescale, the electronic subsystem relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac distribution characterized by an electronic temperature. Next, within picoseconds, thermalization with the underlying lattice phonons leads to a hot particle in internal equilibrium that subsequently equilibrates with the environment. Here we focus on the early stage of this multistep relaxation process, and on the properties of the ensuing non-equilibrium electronic distribution. We consider the form of this distribution as derived from the balance between the optical absorption and the subsequent relaxation processes, and discuss its implication for (a) heating of illuminated plasmonic particles, (b) the possibility to optically induce current in junctions, and (c) the prospect for experimental observation of such light-driven transport phenomena. PMID:23656152

  18. Enhanced particle trapping performance of induced charge electroosmosis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Ren, Yukun; Liu, Weiyu; Wu, Yupan; Jia, Yankai; Lang, Qi; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    By increasing the number of floating electrodes or enlarging the width of single floating electrode, this work provides effective ways to strongly improve the particle trapping performance of induced charge electroosmosis (ICEO). Particle trapping with double or triple separate narrow floating electrodes increases the effective actuating range of ICEO flow and therefore enhance the optimum trapping ability to be 1.63 or 2.34 times of that with single narrow electrode (width of L=200μm), and the ideal trapping frequency is independent of the electrode number due to the mutual independence of electrochemical ion relaxation over each electrode. Furthermore, using a single wide floating electrode with the effective width equal to three separate narrow floating electrodes (L=600μm) instead of a single narrow one slightly lowers the ideal trapping frequency due to an increase in the characteristic polarization length, but the trapping performance is only up to 1.59 times of that with original single narrow electrode, implying that vertical channel confinement effect may severely suppresses the effective actuating range of ICEO flow and renders the trapping performance not as expected. Trapping experiments over wide floating electrode with different channel height were carried out, showing that the trapping performance increases by correctly increasing the channel height. PMID:26914414

  19. Contact nucleation of ice induced by biological aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Alexei; Hoffmann, Nadine; Schaefer, Manfred; Duft, Denis; Leisner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The contact freezing of supercooled water droplets is one of the potentially important and the least understood heterogeneous mechanism of ice formation in tropospheric clouds. On the time scales of cloud lifetime the freezing of supercooled water droplets via contact mechanism may occur at higher temperature compared to the same IN immersed in the droplet. Recently we have developed an experimental method allowing for quantification of the freezing probability on a single droplet-particle collision event [1]. In the previous experimental studies with mineral dust (kaolinite, illite, feldspar, and hematite) we have been able to show that the rate of freezing at a given temperature is governed by the rate of droplet - particle collisions, and by the properties of the contact ice nuclei: its size, morphology and composition [1, 2]. In this contribution, we focus on the contact freezing efficiency of biological ice nuclei. We demonstrate that the contact freezing efficiency of Snomax (freeze-dried fragments of Pseudomonas syringae bacteria) follows very similar pattern observed in immersion freezing experiments, indicating that the INA-protein identified as the ice nucleation agent in the immersion freezing mode is also responsible for initiation of contact freezing. The same similarity is observed for contact freezing induced by semi-dry residual particles of birch pollen washing water, providing an evidence for the importance of organic macromolecules of biological origin for nucleation of atmospheric ice. Finally, our experiments show that mixing the birch pollen washing water with mineral dust (illite) significantly increases the IN efficiency of mineral dust and extends the temperature range of its IN activity. These findings suggest a possible route of multiplication of the effect of biological IN beyond observed atmospheric concentrations of pollen grains. [1] - Hoffmann, N., Kiselev, A., Rzesanke, D., Duft, D., and Leisner, T.: Experimental quantification of

  20. Laser-induced incandescence measurements of particles in aeroengine exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John D.

    1999-09-01

    Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) has been demonstrated as a non-intrusive technique for measurement of particle concentration in the exhausts of aero-engines on sea level test beds as part of a European Union collaborative program (AEROJET) aimed at replacing gas sampling rakes behind development engines with non-intrusive instrumentation. Currently emissions of CO, NOx, unburned hydrocarbon, and smoke from aero-engines must be shown to be less than internationally specified limits. Measurements are made on development engines on sea level test beds by applying a number of standard analytical methods to extracted exhaust gas samples. The hardware required for exhaust gas sampling is heavy and complex and is expensive to build and install. As a result, only the minimum number of emissions tests are conducted during an engine development program, and emissions data is only available to combustion engineers late in the program. Hence, there is a need for more versatile and less costly non-intrusive measurement techniques. Molecular species can be measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, while LII is a promising smoke measuring technique. The development of an LII system specifically designed for exhaust applications is described.

  1. Single particle fluorescence burst analysis of epsin induced membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Arielle; Shoup, Daniel; Kustigian, Lauren; Puchalla, Jason; Carr, Chavela M; Rye, Hays S

    2015-01-01

    Vital cellular processes, from cell growth to synaptic transmission, rely on membrane-bounded carriers and vesicles to transport molecular cargo to and from specific intracellular compartments throughout the cell. Compartment-specific proteins are required for the final step, membrane fission, which releases the transport carrier from the intracellular compartment. The role of fission proteins, especially at intracellular locations and in non-neuronal cells, while informed by the dynamin-1 paradigm, remains to be resolved. In this study, we introduce a highly sensitive approach for the identification and analysis of membrane fission machinery, called burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS). BAS is a single particle, free-solution approach, well suited for quantitative measurements of membrane dynamics. Here, we use BAS to analyze membrane fission induced by the potent, fission-active ENTH domain of epsin. Using this method, we obtained temperature-dependent, time-resolved measurements of liposome size and concentration changes, even at sub-micromolar concentration of the epsin ENTH domain. We also uncovered, at 37°C, fission activity for the full-length epsin protein, supporting the argument that the membrane-fission activity observed with the ENTH domain represents a native function of the full-length epsin protein.

  2. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  3. Theory of mode-induced beam-particle loss in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Goldston, R.J.; McGuire, K.; Boozer, A.H.; Monticello, D.A.; Park, W.

    1983-04-01

    Large-amplitude rotating magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed to induce significant high-energy-beam particle loss during high-power perpendicular neutral-beam injection on PDX. A Hamiltonian formalism for drift-orbit trajectories in the presence of such modes is used to study induced particle loss analytically and numerically. Results are in good agreement with experiment.

  4. Shear-induced alignment and dynamics of elongated granular particles.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Szabó, Balázs; Wegner, Sandra; Harth, Kirsten; Török, János; Somfai, Ellák; Bien, Tomasz; Stannarius, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    The alignment, ordering, and rotation of elongated granular particles was studied in shear flow. The time evolution of the orientation of a large number of particles was monitored in laboratory experiments by particle tracking using optical imaging and x-ray computed tomography. The experiments were complemented by discrete element simulations. The particles develop an orientational order. In the steady state the time- and ensemble-averaged direction of the main axis of the particles encloses a small angle with the streamlines. This shear alignment angle is independent of the applied shear rate, and it decreases with increasing grain aspect ratio. At the grain level the steady state is characterized by a net rotation of the particles, as dictated by the shear flow. The distribution of particle rotational velocities was measured both in the steady state and also during the initial transients. The average rotation speed of particles with their long axis perpendicular to the shear alignment angle is larger, while shear aligned particles rotate slower. The ratio of this fast/slow rotation increases with particle aspect ratio. During the initial transient starting from an unaligned initial condition, particles having an orientation just beyond the shear alignment angle rotate opposite to the direction dictated by the shear flow.

  5. Formation mechanism of shock-induced particle jetting.

    PubMed

    Xue, K; Sun, L; Bai, C

    2016-08-01

    The shock dissemination of granular rings or shells is characterized by the formation of coherent particle jets that have different dimensions from those associated with the constituent grains. In order to identify the mechanisms governing the formation of particle jets, we carry out the simulations of the shock dispersal of quasi-two-dimensional particle rings based on the discrete-element method. The evolution of the particle velocities and contact forces on the time scales ranging from microseconds to milliseconds reveals a two-stage development of particle jets before they are expelled from the outer surface. Much effort is made to understand the particle agglomeration around the inner surface that initiates the jet formation. The shock interaction with the innermost particle layers generates a heterogeneous network of force chains with clusters of strong contacts regularly spaced around the inner surface. Momentum alongside the stresses is primarily transmitted along the strong force chains. Therefore, the clustering of strong force chains renders the agglomeration of fast-moving particles connected by strong force chains. The fast-moving particle clusters subsequently evolve into the incipient particle jets. The following competition among the incipient jets that undergo unbalanced growth leads to substantial elimination of the minor jets and the significant multiplication of the major jets, the number of jets thus varying with time. Moreover, the number of jets is found to increase with the strength of the shock loading due to an increased number of jets surviving the retarding effect of major jets. PMID:27627376

  6. Shear-induced flocculation of colloidal particles in stirred tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, C.J.; Yiacoumi, S.; Tsouris, C.

    1998-10-15

    Colloidal polystyrene and paramagnetic particles consisting of mixtures of polystyrene and magnetite are used to experimentally investigate flocculation kinetics in a stirred tank under turbulent shear flow. The effects of various parameters--agitation speed, solution pH, ionic strength, particle size, and particle concentration--on the flocculation rate are investigated. A trajectory model applicable for shear-flow systems is formulated to describe particle flocculation in stirred tanks. The collision efficiency of particles is obtained from the limiting trajectory of one particle moving toward another and is a function of interparticle forces and flow properties. The collision frequency is determined as a function of particle size and energy dissipation. The flocculation frequency is then determined by multiplying the collision frequency by the collision efficiency and is incorporated into a population balance model to predict the particle size evolution. Results suggest that the flocculation rate is enhanced by increasing the agitation speed, even though the collision efficiency is decreased at a higher agitation speed. It is also found that the collision rate increases and the collision efficiency decreases as the particle size ratio is increased. Results also suggest that the breakup rate of aggregates in a turbulent shear flow could be significant and may need to be included in the population balance modeling to correctly predict the evolution of particle size distribution.

  7. Formation mechanism of shock-induced particle jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, K.; Sun, L.; Bai, C.

    2016-08-01

    The shock dissemination of granular rings or shells is characterized by the formation of coherent particle jets that have different dimensions from those associated with the constituent grains. In order to identify the mechanisms governing the formation of particle jets, we carry out the simulations of the shock dispersal of quasi-two-dimensional particle rings based on the discrete-element method. The evolution of the particle velocities and contact forces on the time scales ranging from microseconds to milliseconds reveals a two-stage development of particle jets before they are expelled from the outer surface. Much effort is made to understand the particle agglomeration around the inner surface that initiates the jet formation. The shock interaction with the innermost particle layers generates a heterogeneous network of force chains with clusters of strong contacts regularly spaced around the inner surface. Momentum alongside the stresses is primarily transmitted along the strong force chains. Therefore, the clustering of strong force chains renders the agglomeration of fast-moving particles connected by strong force chains. The fast-moving particle clusters subsequently evolve into the incipient particle jets. The following competition among the incipient jets that undergo unbalanced growth leads to substantial elimination of the minor jets and the significant multiplication of the major jets, the number of jets thus varying with time. Moreover, the number of jets is found to increase with the strength of the shock loading due to an increased number of jets surviving the retarding effect of major jets.

  8. Thermally relativistic flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kojiro; Kuroda, Hisayasu

    2009-12-15

    Thermally relativistic flows in the early Universe can be characterized by the emergence of flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime as well as induced by the gravitational force. In this paper, thermally relativistic flows induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion in curved spacetime are discussed on the basis of the general relativistic Boltzmann equation. As an object of analysis, we consider the flow from the static state inside the Schwarzschild radius of a thermally relativistic stuffed black hole induced by such motion. Analytical results obtained using the collisionless, nongravitational general relativistic Boltzmann equation reveal that the initial cluster is induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion. Numerical results obtained using the nongravitational general relativistic Anderson-Witting model confirm the presence of an initial cluster inside the thermally relativistic stuffed black hole, which is induced by gravitational-force-free particle motion.

  9. Particle-Induced Pulmonary Acute Phase Response Correlates with Neutrophil Influx Linking Inhaled Particles and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lamson, Jacob Stuart; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Nyendi, Allen Njimeri; Wahlberg, Pia; Madsen, Anne Mette; Jackson, Petra; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution is associated with cardiovascular disease. Acute phase response is causally linked to cardiovascular disease. Here, we propose that particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response provides an underlying mechanism for particle-induced cardiovascular risk. Methods We analysed the mRNA expression of Serum Amyloid A (Saa3) in lung tissue from female C57BL/6J mice exposed to different particles including nanomaterials (carbon black and titanium dioxide nanoparticles, multi- and single walled carbon nanotubes), diesel exhaust particles and airborne dust collected at a biofuel plant. Mice were exposed to single or multiple doses of particles by inhalation or intratracheal instillation and pulmonary mRNA expression of Saa3 was determined at different time points of up to 4 weeks after exposure. Also hepatic mRNA expression of Saa3, SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and in plasma and high density lipoprotein levels in plasma were determined in mice exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Results Pulmonary exposure to particles strongly increased Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue and elevated SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma, whereas hepatic Saa3 levels were much less affected. Pulmonary Saa3 expression correlated with the number of neutrophils in BAL across different dosing regimens, doses and time points. Conclusions Pulmonary acute phase response may constitute a direct link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. We propose that the particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may predict risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23894396

  10. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  11. Passing particle toroidal precession induced by electric field in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, V. V.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Sorokina, E. A.

    2013-12-15

    Characteristics of a rotation of passing particles in a tokamak with radial electric field are calculated. The expression for time-averaged toroidal velocity of the passing particle induced by the electric field is derived. The electric-field-induced additive to the toroidal velocity of the passing particle appears to be much smaller than the velocity of the electric drift calculated for the poloidal magnetic field typical for the trapped particle. This quantity can even have the different sign depending on the azimuthal position of the particle starting point. The unified approach for the calculation of the bounce period and of the time-averaged toroidal velocity of both trapped and passing particles in the whole volume of plasma column is presented. The results are obtained analytically and are confirmed by 3D numerical calculations of the trajectories of charged particles.

  12. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-Su; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:26864916

  13. Progranulin suppresses titanium particle induced inflammatory osteolysis by targeting TNFα signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Wei, Jian-lu; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Alexander Tianxing; Yi, Young-su; Einhorn, Thomas A; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2016-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major complication of prosthetic joint surgery, characterized by chronic inflammation, pain, and osteolysis surrounding the bone-implant interface. Progranulin (PGRN) is known to have anti-inflammatory action by binding to Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptors and antagonizing TNFα. Here we report that titanium particles significantly induced PGRN expression in RAW264.7 cells and also in a mouse air-pouch model of inflammation. PGRN-deficiency enhanced, whereas administration of recombinant PGRN effectively inhibited, titanium particle-induced inflammation in an air pouch model. In addition, PGRN also significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced osteoclastogenesis and calvarial osteolysis in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the inhibition of PGRN on titanium particle induced-inflammation is primarily via neutralizing the titanium particle-activated TNFα/NF-κB signaling pathway and this is evidenced by the suppression of particle-induced IκB phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and activity of the NF-κB-specific reporter gene. Collectively, these findings not only demonstrate that PGRN plays an important role in inhibiting titanium particle-induced inflammation, but also provide a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of wear debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. PMID:26864916

  14. Aloe vera Induced Biomimetic Assemblage of Nucleobase into Nanosized Particles

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Zubair, Swaleha; Sherwani, Asif; Owais, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Aim Biomimetic nano-assembly formation offers a convenient and bio friendly approach to fabricate complex structures from simple components with sub-nanometer precision. Recently, biomimetic (employing microorganism/plants) synthesis of metal and inorganic materials nano-particles has emerged as a simple and viable strategy. In the present study, we have extended biological synthesis of nano-particles to organic molecules, namely the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), using Aloe vera leaf extract. Methodology The 5-FU nano- particles synthesized by using Aloe vera leaf extract were characterized by UV, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The size and shape of the synthesized nanoparticles were determined by TEM, while crystalline nature of 5-FU particles was established by X-ray diffraction study. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU nanoparticles were assessed against HT-29 and Caco-2 (human adenocarcinoma colorectal) cell lines. Results Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopic techniques confirmed nano-size of the synthesized particles. Importantly, the nano-assembled 5-FU retained its anticancer action against various cancerous cell lines. Conclusion In the present study, we have explored the potential of biomimetic synthesis of nanoparticles employing organic molecules with the hope that such developments will be helpful to introduce novel nano-particle formulations that will not only be more effective but would also be devoid of nano-particle associated putative toxicity constraints. PMID:22403622

  15. Numerical study of particle-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Effects of particle settling and entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yi-Ju; Shao, Yun-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which the density stratification is caused by the suspension of particles in liquid flows using the conventional single-phase model and Euler-Lagrange (EL) two-phase model. The single-phase model is valid only when the particles are small and number densities are large, such that the continuum approximation applies. The present single-phase results show that the constant settling of the particle concentration restricts the lateral development of the vortex ring, which results in a decrease of the rising speed of the Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles. The EL model enables the investigation of particle-flow interaction and the influence of particle entrainment, resulting from local non-uniformity in the particle distribution. We compare bubble dynamics in the single-phase and EL cases, and our results show that the deviation between the two cases becomes more pronounced when the particle size increases. The main mechanism responsible for the deviation is particle entrainment, which can only be resolved in the EL model. We provide a theoretical argument for the small-scale local entrainment resulting from the local velocity shear and non-uniformity of the particle concentration. The theoretical argument is supported by numerical evidence. Energy budget analysis is also performed and shows that potential energy is released due to the interphase drag and buoyant effect. The buoyant effect, which results in the transformation of potential energy into kinetic energy and shear dissipation, plays a key role in settling enhancement. We also find that particle entrainment increases the shear dissipation, which in turn enhances the release of potential energy.

  16. Influence of soot aggregate structure on particle sizing using laser-induced incandescence: importance of bridging between primary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, J.; Bladh, H.; Olofsson, N.-E.; Bengtsson, P.-E.

    2013-09-01

    Soot aggregates formed in combustion processes are often described as clusters of carbonaceous particles in random fractal structures. For theoretical studies of the physical properties of such aggregates, they have often been modelled as spherical primary particles in point contact. However, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the primary particles are more connected than in a single point; there is a certain amount of bridging between the primary particles. Particle sizing using the diagnostic technique laser-induced incandescence (LII) is crucially dependent on the heat conduction rate from the aggregate to the ambient gas, which depends on the amount of bridging. In this work, aggregates with bridging are modelled using overlapping spheres, and it is shown how such aggregates can be built to fulfil specific fractal parameters. Aggregates with and without bridging are constructed numerically, and it is investigated how the bridging influences the heat conduction rate in the free-molecular regime. The calculated heat conduction rates are then used in an LII model to show how LII particle sizing is influenced by different amounts of bridging. For realistic amounts of bridging (), the primary particle diameters were overestimated by up to 9 % if bridging was not taken into account.

  17. Laser induced x-ray `RADAR' particle physics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, D.; Deas, R.; Moss, R.; Wilson, L. A.; Rusby, D.; Neely, D.

    2016-05-01

    The technique of high-power laser-induced plasma acceleration can be used to generate a variety of diverse effects including the emission of X-rays, electrons, neutrons, protons and radio-frequency radiation. A compact variable source of this nature could support a wide range of potential applications including single-sided through-barrier imaging, cargo and vehicle screening, infrastructure inspection, oncology and structural failure analysis. This paper presents a verified particle physics simulation which replicates recent results from experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Didcot, UK. The RAL experiment demonstrated the generation of backscattered X-rays from test objects via the bremsstrahlung of an incident electron beam, the electron beam itself being produced by Laser Wakefield Acceleration. A key initial objective of the computer simulation was to inform the experimental planning phase on the predicted magnitude of the backscattered X-rays likely from the test objects. This objective was achieved and the computer simulation was used to show the viability of the proposed concept (Laser-induced X-ray `RADAR'). At the more advanced stages of the experimental planning phase, the simulation was used to gain critical knowledge of where it would be technically feasible to locate key diagnostic equipment within the experiment. The experiment successfully demonstrated the concept of X-ray `RADAR' imaging, achieved by using the accurate timing information of the backscattered X-rays relative to the ultra-short laser pulse used to generate the electron beam. By using fast response X-ray detectors it was possible to derive range information for the test objects being scanned. An X-ray radar `image' (equivalent to a RADAR B-scan slice) was produced by combining individual X-ray temporal profiles collected at different points along a horizontal distance line scan. The same image formation process was used to generate

  18. Capillary tube wetting induced by particles: towards armoured bubbles tailoring.

    PubMed

    Zoueshtiagh, Farzam; Baudoin, Michael; Guerrin, David

    2014-12-21

    In this paper, we report on the strongly modified dynamics of a liquid finger pushed inside a capillary tube, when partially wettable particles are lying on the walls. Particles promote the appearance of new regimes and enable the tailored synthesis of bubbles encapsulated in a monolayer of particles (so-called "armoured bubbles"). This remarkable behavior arises due to the collection of particles at the air-liquid interface, which modify the global energy balance and stabilize the interface. Armoured-bubbles are of primary interest in industrial processes since they display increased stability, interfacial rigidity and can even sustain non-spherical shapes. This work opens perspective for a low cost bubbles-on-demand technology enabling the synthesis of armoured bubbles with specific sizes, shapes and composition.

  19. Generation of infectious virus particles from inducible transgenic genomes.

    PubMed

    Wernet, Mathias F; Klovstad, Martha; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2014-02-01

    Arboviruses like dengue virus, yellow fever virus, and West Nile virus are enveloped particles spread by mosquitoes, infecting millions of humans per year, with neither effective vaccines, nor specific antiviral therapies [1,2]. Previous studies of infection and virus replication utilize either purified virus particles or deficient genomes that do not complete the viral life cycle [1,2]. Here we describe transgenic Drosophila strains expressing trans-complementing genomes (referred to as 'replicons') from the arbovirus Sindbis [2]. We use this binary system to produce, for the first time in any metazoan, infectious virus particles through self-assembly from transgenes. Such cell-type specific particle 'launching' could serve as an attractive alternative for the development of virus-based tools and the study of virus biology in specific tissues.

  20. Aging induced changes on NEXAFS fingerprints in individual combustion particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenay, V.; Mooser, R.; Tritscher, T.; Křepelová, A.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Huthwelker, T.; Ammann, M.

    2011-11-01

    Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political) importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing of the combustion exhaust gases is still a subject of discussion. In this work, individual soot particles emitted from two different vehicles, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger car, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of NEXAFS spectra from the unprocessed particles and those resulting from exhaust photooxidation in the chamber revealed changes in the carbon functional group content. For the wood stove emissions, these changes were minor, related to the relatively mild oxidation conditions. For the EURO 2 transporter emissions, the most apparent change was that of carboxylic carbon from oxidized organic compounds condensing on the primary soot particles. For the EURO 3 car emissions oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging has likely contributed as well. Overall, the changes in the NEXAFS fingerprints were in qualitative agreement with data from an aerosol mass spectrometer. Furthermore, by taking full advantage of our in situ microreactor concept, we show that the soot particles from all three combustion sources changed their ability to take up water under humid conditions upon photochemical aging of the exhaust. Due to the selectivity and sensitivity of the NEXAFS technique for the water mass, also small amounts of water taken up into the internal voids of agglomerated particles could be

  1. A constitutive equation for concentrated suspensions that accounts for shear-induced particle migration

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.J.; Armstrong, R.C.; Brown, R.A. ); Graham, A.L.; Abbott, J.R. )

    1992-01-01

    A constitutive equation for computing particle concentration and velocity fields in concentrated monomodal suspensions is proposed that consists of two parts: a Newtonian constitutive equation in which the viscosity depends on the local particle volume fraction and a diffusion equation that accounts for shear-induced particle migration. Particle flux expressions used to obtain the diffusion equation are derived by simple scaling arguments. Predictions are made for the particle volume fraction and velocity fields for steady Couette and Poiseuille flow, and for transient start-up of steady shear flow in a Couette apparatus. Particle concentrations for a monomodal suspension of polymethyl methacrylate spheres in a Newtonian solvent are measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging in the Couette geometry for two particle sizes and volume fractions. The predictions agree remarkably well with the measurements for both transient and steady-state experiments as well as for different particle sizes.

  2. Activity induced phase separation in particles and (bio)polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosberg, Alexander

    It was recently shown that the non-equilibrium steady state of the mixture of two types of particles exposed to two different thermostats can phase separate (A.Y.Grosberg, J.-F.Joanny, PRE, v. 91, 032118, 2015). similar result is valid also in the case when particles in question are monomers of two different polymer chains, or blocks of a co-polymer. We discuss the implications of these results for the physics of chromatin.

  3. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. I. IDENTICAL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2013-10-10

    We study the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows and discuss implications for dust particle collisions in protoplanetary disks. We simulate a weakly compressible turbulent flow, evolving 14 particle species with friction timescale, τ{sub p}, covering the entire range of scales in the flow. The particle Stokes numbers, St, measuring the ratio of τ{sub p} to the Kolmogorov timescale, are in the range 0.1 ∼< St ∼< 800. Using simulation results, we show that the model by Pan and Padoan gives satisfactory predictions for the rms relative velocity between identical particles. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity is found to be highly non-Gaussian. The PDF tails are well described by a 4/3 stretched exponential function for particles with τ{sub p} ≅ 1-2 T{sub L}, where T{sub L} is the Lagrangian correlation timescale, consistent with a prediction based on PP10. The PDF approaches Gaussian only for very large particles with τ{sub p} ∼> 54 T{sub L}. We split particle pairs at given distances into two types with low and high relative speeds, referred to as continuous and caustic types, respectively, and compute their contributions to the collision kernel. Although amplified by the effect of clustering, the continuous contribution vanishes in the limit of infinitesimal particle distance, where the caustic contribution dominates. The caustic kernel per unit cross section rises rapidly as St increases toward ≅ 1, reaches a maximum at τ{sub p} ≅ 2 T{sub L}, and decreases as τ{sub p}{sup -1/2} for τ{sub p} >> T{sub L}.

  4. Walking-induced particle resuspension in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jing; Peccia, Jordan; Ferro, Andrea R.

    2014-06-01

    Resuspension of particles indoors increases the risk of consequent exposure through inhalation and non-dietary ingestion. Studies have been conducted to characterize indoor particle resuspension but results do not always agree, and there are still many open questions in this field. This paper reviews the recent research of indoor resuspension and summarizes findings to answer six critical questions: 1) How does the resuspension sources compared to other indoor sources; 2) How is resuspension determined and how does the resuspension measure change as a function of particle size; 3) What are the primary resuspension mechanisms; 4) What are the factors affecting resuspension; 5) What are the knowledge gaps and future research directions in this area; and 6) How can what we know about resuspension guide better exposure mitigation strategies? From synthesized results, we conclude that resuspension is an important source for indoor particulate matter, compared with other indoor sources. Among all existing quantification terms of resuspension, resuspension fraction has the least variation in its estimates by explicitly defining surface loading and walking frequency, and thus is recommended to be adopted in future research over other terms. Resuspension increases with particle size in the range of 0.7-10 μm, although differences exist in resuspension estimates by orders of magnitude. The primary mechanism of particle resuspension involves rolling detachment, and the adhesive forces can be greatly reduced by microscopic surface roughness. Particle resuspension is by nature complicated, affected by various factors and their interactions. There are still many open questions to be answered to achieve an understanding of resuspension fundamentals. Given the complex and multidisciplinary nature of resuspension, understanding indoor particle resuspension behavior requires cross-disciplinary participation from experts in aerosol science, textile science, surface chemistry

  5. Shear-induced particle diffusion and its effects on the flow of concentrated suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Acrivos, A.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanism underlying shear-induced particle diffusion in concentrated suspensions is clarified. Examples are then presented where this diffusion process plays a crucial role in determining the manner by which such suspensions flow under laminar conditions.

  6. Clustered DNA damage induced by heavy ion particles.

    PubMed

    Terato, Hiroaki; Ide, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    Clustered DNA damage (locally multiply damaged site) is thought to be a critical lesion caused by ionizing radiation, and high LET radiation such as heavy ion particles is believed to produce high yields of such damage. Since heavy ion particles are major components of ionizing radiation in a space environment, it is important to clarify the chemical nature and biological consequences of clustered DNA damage and its relationship to the health effects of exposure to high LET particles in humans. The concept of clustered DNA damage emerged around 1980, but only recently has become the subject of experimental studies. In this article, we review methods used to detect clustered DNA damage, and the current status of our understanding of the chemical nature and repair of clustered DNA damage. PMID:15858387

  7. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Y.; Orlando, T.; Basini, M.; Henrard, D.; Lascialfari, A.; Mattea, C.; Stapf, S.; Vuong, Q. L.

    2016-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  8. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  9. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water. PMID:26933908

  10. Measurement of secondary particle production induced by particle therapy ion beams impinging on a PMMA target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppi, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Piersanti, L.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.

    2016-05-01

    Particle therapy is a technique that uses accelerated charged ions for cancer treatment and combines a high irradiation precision with a high biological effectiveness in killing tumor cells [1]. Informations about the secondary particles emitted in the interaction of an ion beam with the patient during a treatment can be of great interest in order to monitor the dose deposition. For this purpose an experiment at the HIT (Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center) beam facility has been performed in order to measure fluxes and emission profiles of secondary particles produced in the interaction of therapeutic beams with a PMMA target. In this contribution some preliminary results about the emission profiles and the energy spectra of the detected secondaries will be presented.

  11. Buckling-induced jamming in channel flow of particle rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Dennin, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We report on observations of the flow of plastic particles floating on the surface of water in a rectangular channel. The system is driven by moving one wall of the channel at a constant velocity. The opposite side of the channel is open, and the particles are pushed into a region free of material. During the flow, video of the particle motions is captured, and the average force on the pushing wall is measured. We have studied particle shapes that are both circular disks and rectangular bars. We find that when the rectangular bars form a layer at the side walls of the channel (whether or not the central region is filled with disks or additional rectangular bars), the system exhibits sudden increases and decreases in the average force on the driving wall. This behavior is consistent with the existence of jamming in the system. We report on the shape and velocity dependence of these force fluctuations, and the evidence that buckling of the rectangular blocks at the wall is responsible for generating the jamming dynamics.

  12. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  13. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  14. A self-consistent theory of collective alpha particle losses induced by Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic Alfven waves, resonantly excited by energetic ions/alpha particles, is investigated. It is shown that {alpha}-particles govern both linear instability and nonlinear saturation dynamics, while the background MHD turbulence results only in a nonlinear real frequency shift. The most efficient saturation mechanism is found to be self-induced profile modification. Expressions for the fluctuation amplitudes and the {alpha}-particle radial flux are self-consistently derived. The work represents the first self-consistent, turbulent treatment of collective {alpha}-particle losses by Alfvenic fluctuations.

  15. Role of direct estrogen receptor signaling in wear particle-induced osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Nich, Christophe; Rao, Allison J.; Valladares, Roberto D.; Li, Chenguang; Christman, Jane E.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Yao, Zhenyu; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Petite, Hervé; Hamadouche, Moussa; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen withdrawal following surgical ovariectomy was recently shown to mitigate particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarial model. Currently, we hypothesize that estrogen receptors (ERs) were involved in this paradoxical phenomenon. To test this hypothesis, we first evaluated polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarial model, using wild type (WT) C57BL6J female mice, ERα deficient (ERαKO) mice, and WT mice either treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) or with the ER pan-antagonist ICI 182,780. According to micro-CT and histomorphometry, we showed that bone resorption was consistently altered in both ERαKO and ICI 182,780 treated mice as compared to WT and E2 groups. Then, we demonstrated that ER disruption consistently decreased both PE and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particle-induced production of TNF-α by murine macrophages in vitro. Similar results were obtained following ER blockade using ICI 182,780 in RAW 264.7 and WT macrophages. ER disruption and pre treatment with ICI 182,780 resulted in a consistent down-regulation of particle-induced TNF-α mRNA expression relative to WT macrophages or untreated RAW cells. These results indicate that the response to wear particles involves estrogen receptors in female mice, as part of macrophage activation. Estrogen receptors may be considered as a future therapeutic target for particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:23113918

  16. Crater-ray formation by impact-induced ejecta particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadono, T.; Suzuki, A. I.; Wada, K.; Mitani, N. K.; Yamamoto, S.; Arakawa, M.; Sugita, S.; Haruyama, J.; Nakamura, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    We performed impact experiments with granular targets to reveal the formation process of crater "rays", the non-uniform ejecta distributions around some fresh craters on the Moon and planets. We found mesh patterns, loosely woven with spaces like a net, as ejecta. A characteristic length of spaces between meshes was evaluated, and an angle, defined as the ratio of the characteristic length to the distance from the ejection point, was obtained as ∼a few degrees. These features are similar to the results of the analyses of the ray patterns around two lunar craters, Glushko and Kepler. Numerical simulations of granular material showed that clear mesh pattern appeared at lower coefficients of restitution between particles but was less clear at larger one, suggesting that the inelastic collisions between particles cause the clear mesh-pattern formation of impact ejecta.

  17. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  18. Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A.M. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Lee, W.W. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E {times} B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional ( pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

    PubMed Central

    Refsnes, Magne; Hetland, Ragna B; Øvrevik, Johan; Sundfør, Idunn; Schwarze, Per E; Låg, Marit

    2006-01-01

    Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α), a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr), with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm), but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm) seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm) and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm) in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm). The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm) was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm) and quartz (≤ 2 μm) to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses, but contributed less

  20. Solar Particle Induced Upsets in the TDRS-1 Attitude Control System RAM During the October 1989 Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croley, D. R.; Garrett, H. B.; Murphy, G. B.; Garrard,T. L.

    1995-01-01

    The three large solar particle events, beginning on October 19, 1989 and lasting approximately six days, were characterized by high fluences of solar protons and heavy ions at 1 AU. During these events, an abnormally large number of upsets (243) were observed in the random access memory of the attitude control system (ACS) control processing electronics (CPE) on-board the geosynchronous TDRS-1 (Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite). The RAM unit affected was composed of eight Fairchild 93L422 memory chips. The Galileo spacecraft, launched on October 18, 1989 (one day prior to the solar particle events) observed the fluxes of heavy ions experienced by TDRS-1. Two solid-state detector telescopes on-board Galileo, designed to measure heavy ion species and energy, were turned on during time periods within each of the three separate events. The heavy ion data have been modeled and the time history of the events reconstructed to estimate heavy ion fluences. These fluences were converted to effective LET spectra after transport through the estimated shielding distribution around the TDRS-1 ACS system. The number of single event upsets (SEU) expected was calculated by integrating the measured cross section for the Fairchild 93L422 memory chip with average effective LET spectrum. The expected number of heavy ion induced SEU's calculated was 176. GOES-7 proton data, observed during the solar particle events, were used to estimate the number of proton-induced SEU's by integrating the proton fluence spectrum incident on the memory chips, with the two-parameter Bendel cross section for proton SEU'S. The proton fluence spectrum at the device level was gotten by transporting the protons through the estimated shielding distribution. The number of calculated proton-induced SEU's was 72, yielding a total of 248 predicted SEU'S, very dose to the 243 observed SEU'S. These calculations uniquely demonstrate the roles that solar heavy ions and protons played in the production of SEU

  1. Experimental background due to particle induced gas desorption in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,S.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    2008-08-10

    Beam-gas collision created experimental background, i.e., singles, has affected heavy ion and polarized proton operations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The gas molecules in interaction region are mainly caused by the electron induced gas desorption. and the electrons are produced from the beam induced electron multipacting, or called electron cloud. The background has a dependence on the usual electron cloud related parameters, such as the bunch intensity, bunch spacing, and the solenoid field. With the RHIC upgrade plan, the experimental background may become a luminosity limiting factor. Mitigations are discussed.

  2. Wave induced transport and mixing of buoyant particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivdal, Magnus; Broström, Göran; Christensen, Kai H.

    2014-05-01

    The modeling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention during recent years. Both the breaking of surface waves and the inclusion of the Stokes shear production have been shown to increase the upper ocean turbulence. Furthermore the Coriolis force acting on the Stokes drift redistributes the momentum in the upper ocean, leading to a deflection of the currents. An important application affected by these processes that still needs to be studied is the mixing and drift of particles. Using an ocean column model, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force effects the drift of suspended particles. Here the suspended particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. Comparing with classical Ekman theory some physical effects on the system are studied, and as a realistic test case we use the model to study the oil drift after an offshore oil spill that took place outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be approximately 0.1% of the wind speed at an angle of about 90-120 degrees to the right, far slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by both numerical and empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from ECMWF reanalysis data, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  3. Collective two-particle resonances induced by photon entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Marten; Mukamel, Shaul

    2011-06-15

    An assembly of noninteracting atoms may become correlated upon interaction with entangled photons, and certain elements of their joint density matrix can then show collective resonances. We explore experimental signatures of these resonances in the nonlinear response of a pair of two-level atoms. We find that these resonances are canceled out in stimulated signals such as pump-probe and two-photon absorption due to the destructive interference of two-photon-absorption and emission pathways in the joint two-particle space. However, they may be observed in photon statistics (Hanbury-Brown-Twiss) measurements through the attenuation of two-time intensity correlations.

  4. Pollutant particles induce arginase II in human bronchial epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse pulmonary effects, including induction and exacerbation of asthma. Recently arginase was shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we hypothesized that PM exposure would induce ar...

  5. The potential role of strontium ranelate in treating particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ting-Kuo; Yeh, Shu-Ting; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Lin, Chun-Yen; Hsu, Lin-I; Huang, Chun-Hsiung; Huang, Chang-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear-particle-induced osteolysis is one of the major issues affecting the long-term survival of total joint prostheses. Currently, there are no effective therapeutic options to prevent osteolysis from occurring. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of strontium ranelate (SR) in reducing the risk of particle-induced osteolysis. Forty-eight C57BL/6J ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particle-induced murine calvarial osteolysis models were used. The mice were randomized into four groups as: sham (Group 1), UHMWPE particles (Group 2), and SR with UHMWPE particles (Group 3 and Group 4). Groups 1 to 3 were sacrificed at two weeks and group 4 was sacrificed at the fourth week. The skulls were then analyzed with a high-resolution micro-CT. Histological evaluation was then conducted and osteoclast numbers were analyzed for comparison. Based on the micro-CT, percentage bone volume and trabecular thickness were found to be significantly higher in Group 4 than in Group 2 (p<0.001). Osteoclast numbers in SR treated groups (Group 3 and Group 4) were reduced when compared to groups that did not receive SR treatment (Group 2). These results indicated that SR treatment helps to increase bone volume percentage and trabecular thickness and also suppresses osteoclast proliferation. It is suggested that oral SR treatment could serve as an alternative therapy for preventing particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:25841346

  6. Dendritic cells enhance UHMWPE wear particle-induced osteoclast differentiation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cang, Dingwei; Guo, Kaijin; Zhao, Fengchao

    2015-10-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been widely used in large joint replacement. Osteolysis induced by the UHMWPE wear particles is one of the main causes of replacement failure. This study aims to elucidate whether dendritic cells play a role in UHMWPE particle-induced osteolysis. An in vitro Raw 264.7 and DC 2.4 coculture system was employed to examine the effects of dendritic cells on the inflammatory and osteoclastogenic responses of Raw 264.7 toward UHMWPE particles. The expression of cytokines, NF-κB, and osteoclast marker genes was analyzed by ELISA, western blot, or quantitative PCR. The osteoclast differentiation was measured by TRAP staining and flow cytometry. UHMWPE particles induced Raw 264.7 cells to differentiate into osteoclasts, which was enhanced by coculturing with DC 2.4 cells. DC 2.4 cells augmented UHMWPE particle-elicited activation of NF-κB signaling, higher levels of TNF-α and MCP-1, and an increased expression of MMP-9, Calcr, and Ctsk, though DC 2.4 coculture alone did not significantly cause the aforementioned changes. These results suggest that dendritic cells, among other immune cells recruited by UHMWPE particle induced inflammation, could further exacerbate inflammation and osteolysis.

  7. Wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory reactions in mouse macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2007-06-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. These health risks are of increasing concern in society, and to protect public health, a clarification of the toxic properties of particles from different sources is of importance. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized as a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries where studded tires are used. The aim of this study was to further investigate and compare the ability to induce inflammatory mediators of different traffic-related wear particles collected from an urban street, a subway station, and studded tire-pavement wear. Inflammatory effects were measured as induction of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, TNF-alpha, arachidonic acid (AA), and lipid peroxidation after exposure of the murine macrophage like cell line RAW 264.7. In addition, the redox potential of the particles was measured in a cell-free system. The results show that all particles tested induce IL-6, TNF-alpha, and NO, and those from the urban street were the most potent ones. In contrast, particles collected from a subway station were most potent to induce lipid peroxidation, AA release, and formation of ROS. Particles from studded tire-pavement wear, generated using a road simulator, were able to induce inflammatory cytokines, NO, lipid peroxidation, and ROS formation. Interestingly, particles generated from pavement containing granite as the main stone material were more potent than those generated from pavement containing quartzite as the main stone material.

  8. Wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory reactions in mouse macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2007-06-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. These health risks are of increasing concern in society, and to protect public health, a clarification of the toxic properties of particles from different sources is of importance. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized as a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries where studded tires are used. The aim of this study was to further investigate and compare the ability to induce inflammatory mediators of different traffic-related wear particles collected from an urban street, a subway station, and studded tire-pavement wear. Inflammatory effects were measured as induction of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, TNF-alpha, arachidonic acid (AA), and lipid peroxidation after exposure of the murine macrophage like cell line RAW 264.7. In addition, the redox potential of the particles was measured in a cell-free system. The results show that all particles tested induce IL-6, TNF-alpha, and NO, and those from the urban street were the most potent ones. In contrast, particles collected from a subway station were most potent to induce lipid peroxidation, AA release, and formation of ROS. Particles from studded tire-pavement wear, generated using a road simulator, were able to induce inflammatory cytokines, NO, lipid peroxidation, and ROS formation. Interestingly, particles generated from pavement containing granite as the main stone material were more potent than those generated from pavement containing quartzite as the main stone material. PMID:17516662

  9. Transition induced by fixed and freely convecting spherical particles in laminar boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, H. L.; Morris, P. J.; Bajwa, A. R.; Vincent, D. C.

    1993-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of aspects of transition induced by disturbances from spherical particles in laminar boundary layers is discussed. The generation of turbulent wedges by fixed spherical particles in a laminar boundary layer on or near the surface of a flat plate is considered experimentally using flow visualization with fluorescent dye and laser Doppler velocimetry. Turbulent spots generated by freely convecting spherical particles that are released in the freestream to fall into a flat plate laminar boundary layer and impact the plate are also discussed. A combination of dye flow visualization and a video based particle tracking technique was used to study the convecting particle problem. Although the Reynolds number at the critical condition for turbulent wedge generation by fixed particles and turbulent spot generation by convecting particles are similar, transition in these two situations appears to be fundamentally different. The development of a turbulent wedge near the critical condition is a relatively gradual process. In contrast, turbulent spots form relatively quickly after the convecting particles enter the boundary layer and impact the plate. Turbulent wedge formation downstream of a fixed particle results from the destabilization of the near wall flow by the vortical structures shed into particle wake. This shedding process is dominated by periodically shed loop shaped hairpin vortices. Observation of subharmonic oscillations at 1/2 and 1/4 of this shedding frequency suggest that a chaotic route to turbulence by a series of period doubling bifurcations is possible.

  10. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  11. Sheath-induced distortions in particle distributions near enhanced polar outflow probe particle sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Marchand, R.

    2014-07-15

    We discuss sheath and kinetic effects on ion and electron distribution functions at the aperture of enhanced Polar Outflow Probe particle sensors. For this purpose, the interaction between the CASSIOPE spacecraft and space environment is simulated fully kinetically using the electrostatic Particle In Cell code PTetra. The simulations account for the geometry of the main features of the spacecraft body, the booms, and the sensors. In addition to the background plasma, the model also accounts for Earth magnetic field. The plasma parameters assumed in the simulations are obtained from the latest version of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model and the value of magnetic field is obtained from the International Geophysical Reference Field model. Our analysis shows significant distortions in the ion distribution function in the plane of the sensor aperture, as well as in the direction along the boom holding the sensor. We argue that significant distortions and asymmetries should also occur at the aperture of the suprathermal electron imager when suprathermal electrons are detected, with energies of 5 eV or more.

  12. Description of particle induced damage on protected silver coatings.

    PubMed

    Schwinde, Stefan; Schürmann, Mark; Jobst, Paul Johannes; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    In the visible to infrared spectral range, highly-reflective silver mirrors are applied in the manufacture of optical instruments such as telescopes. However, it is still difficult to combine high reflectivity and long-term stability of the protected silver coating. We show that the deposition of impervious protective layers is necessary but often not sufficient for long-term environmental stability. Hygroscopic air borne particles absorbed by the protections surface attract water molecules and form a solution. This solution first damages the protection, subsequently permeates the protection and finally damages the silver whereby the reflectivity is reduced. We demonstrate this particular damage mechanism with different experiments and describe this mechanism in detail. PMID:26192652

  13. Self-induced polar order of active Brownian particles in a harmonic trap.

    PubMed

    Hennes, Marc; Wolff, Katrin; Stark, Holger

    2014-06-13

    Hydrodynamically interacting active particles in an external harmonic potential form a self-assembled fluid pump at large enough Péclet numbers. Here, we give a quantitative criterion for the formation of the pump and show that particle orientations align in the self-induced flow field in surprising analogy to ferromagnetic order where the active Péclet number plays the role of inverse temperature. The particle orientations follow a Boltzmann distribution Φ(p) ∼ exp(Ap(z)) where the ordering mean field A scales with the active Péclet number and polar order parameter. The mean flow field in which the particles' swimming directions align corresponds to a regularized Stokeslet with strength proportional to swimming speed. Analytic mean-field results are compared with results from Brownian dynamics simulations with hydrodynamic interactions included and are found to capture the self-induced alignment very well.

  14. Non-targeted effects induced by high LET charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.; Chai, Yunfei; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Uchihori, Yukio

    Radiation-induced non-targeted response represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in that extranuclear and extracellular effects may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Using the gpt delta transgenic mouse model, there is evidence that irradiation of a small area (1 cm by 1 cm) of the lower abdominal area of animals with a 5 Gy dose of X-rays induced cyclooxygenase-2 as well as deletion mutations in the out-of-field lung tissues of the animals. The mutation correlated with an increase in prostaglandin levels in the bystander lung tissues and with an increase in the level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative DNA damage marker. An increase in COX-2 level was also detected in the out-of-field lung tissues of animals similarly exposed to high LET argon and carbon ions accelerated at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These results provide the first evidence that the COX-2 -related pathway, which is essential in mediating cellular inflammatory response, is the critical signaling link for the non-targeted, bystander phenomenon. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the non-targeted, out of field phenomenon together with evidence of their occurrence in vivo will allow us to formulate a more accurate assessment of radiation risk.

  15. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using amore » load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.« less

  16. Particle-induced indentation of the alveolar epithelium caused by surface tension forces

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, M.; Tsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Physical contact between an inhaled particle and alveolar epithelium at the moment of particle deposition must have substantial effects on subsequent cellular functions of neighboring cells, such as alveolar type-I, type-II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophage, as well as afferent sensory nerve cells, extending their dendrites toward the alveolar septal surface. The forces driving this physical insult are born at the surface of the alveolar air-liquid layer. The role of alveolar surfactant submerging a hydrophilic particle has been suggested by Gehr and Schürch's group (e.g., Respir Physiol 80: 17–32, 1990). In this paper, we extended their studies by developing a further comprehensive and mechanistic analysis. The analysis reveals that the mechanics operating in the particle-tissue interaction phenomena can be explained on the basis of a balance between surface tension force and tissue resistance force; the former tend to move a particle toward alveolar epithelial cell surface, the latter to resist the cell deformation. As a result, the submerged particle deforms the tissue and makes a noticeable indentation, which creates unphysiological stress and strain fields in tissue around the particle. This particle-induced microdeformation could likely trigger adverse mechanotransduction and mechanosensing pathways, as well as potentially enhancing particle uptake by the cells. PMID:20634359

  17. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  18. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  19. The mechanism of particles transport induced by electrostatic perturbation in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhichen; Qiu, Zhiyong; Sheng, Zhengmao

    2013-12-15

    Particle transport in tokamak devices due to wave-particle resonance induced diffusion is studied. The diffusion coefficient is derived both analytically using quasilinear theory, and numerically using a test particle code, and the obtained diffusion coefficient agrees with each other in its validity regime. Dependence of the diffusion coefficient on turbulence intensity, turbulence radial mode structures, and particle energy is investigated. It is found that the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the turbulence intensity, and the diffusion is maximized for E{sub t}≃T{sub i}, and k{sub r}Δ{sub 0}≃1. Here, E{sub t} is the test particle energy, T{sub i} is the thermal ion temperature, Δ{sub 0} is the distance between neighboring mode rational surfaces, and 1/k{sub r} is the half width of the fine radial mode structure on each rational surface.

  20. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of shear-induced powder migration in injection moulding.

    PubMed

    Kauzlarić, David; Pastewka, Lars; Meyer, Hagen; Heldele, Richard; Schulz, Michael; Weber, Oxana; Piotter, Volker; Hausselt, Jürgen; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G

    2011-06-13

    We present the application of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization scheme to Phillips' model for shear-induced particle migration in concentrated suspensions. This model provides an evolution equation for the scalar mean volume fraction of idealized spherical solid particles of equal diameter which is discretized by the SPH formalism. In order to obtain a discrete evolution equation with exact conservation properties we treat in fact the occupied volume of the solid particles as the degree of freedom for the fluid particles. We present simulation results in two- and three-dimensional channel flow. The two-dimensional results serve as a verification by a comparison to analytic solutions. The three-dimensional results are used for a comparison with experimental measurements obtained from computer tomography of injection moulded ceramic microparts. We observe the best agreement of measurements with snapshots of the transient simulation for a ratio D(c)/D(η)=0.1 of the two model parameters. PMID:21536579

  1. Transport reversals of chiral active particles induced by a perpendicular constant force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-chun; Zhou, Jia-ning; Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-11-01

    Transport of chiral active particles in a symmetric periodic potential is investigated in the presence of a constant force. It is found that due to chirality of active particles the transversal constant force can break the symmetry of the system and induce a longitudinal net current. There exists an optimal constant force at which the rectification is maximal. Remarkably, longitudinal current reversals can occur by suitably tailoring the transversal constant force. Therefore, particles with different chiralities move to different directions and can be effectively separated.

  2. Radiation induced rotation of interplanetary dust particles - A feasibility study for a space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, K. F.; Misconi, N. Y.; Paddack, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    Irregular interplanetary dust particles may acquire a considerable spin rate due to two non-statistical dynamical mechanisms induced by solar radiation. These arise from variations in surface albedo discussed by Radzievskii (1954) and from irregularities in surface geometry discussed by Paddack (1969). An experiment is reported which will lead to an evaluation in space of the effectiveness of these two spin mechanisms. The technique of optical levitation in an argon laser beam provides a stable trap for particles 10-60 microns in diameter. The objective is to design an optical trap for dielectric particles in vacuum to study these rotation mechanisms in the gravity-free environment of a Spacelab experiment.

  3. Long-lived anomalous thermal diffusion induced by elastic cell membranes on nearby particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Guckenberger, Achim; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The physical approach of a small particle (virus, medical drug) to the cell membrane represents the crucial first step before active internalization and is governed by thermal diffusion. Using a fully analytical theory we show that the stretching and bending of the elastic membrane by the approaching particle induces a memory in the system, which leads to anomalous diffusion, even though the particle is immersed in a purely Newtonian liquid. For typical cell membranes the transient subdiffusive regime extends beyond 10 ms and can enhance residence times and possibly binding rates up to 50%. Our analytical predictions are validated by numerical simulations.

  4. Dynamic ultramicroscopy of laser-induced flows in colloidal solutions of plasmon-resonance particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, I V; Tuchin, V V; Nefedov, I S; Khlebtsov, B N

    2008-06-30

    A method is proposed for visualisation of the velocity fields of colloidal plasmon-resonance nanoparticles moving in a laser beam. The method uses the particle image velocimetry for processing ultramicroscopic images. Particles in a thick layer of colloidal solution are illuminated by a slit laser ultramicroscopic source with a large numerical aperture providing a high contrast of particle images and visualisation of the transverse velocity distribution in laser-induced flows with a high spatial resolution. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  5. The effect of induced charges on low-energy particle trajectories near conducting and semiconducting plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the induced charge was found on particles less than 1 eV as they passed through simulated parallel, grounded channels that are comparable in dimension to those that are presently in space plasma instruments which measure the flux of low-energy ions. Applications were made to both conducting and semiconducting channels that ranged in length from 0.1 to 50 mm and in aspect ratio from 1 to 100. The effect of the induced charge on particle trajectories from simple straight lines. Several configurations of channel aspect ratio and detector locations are considered. The effect is important only at very low energies with small dimensions.

  6. Delay induced instabilities in self-propelling swarming particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Schwartz, Ira

    2008-03-01

    We consider a general model of self-propelling biological or artificial individuals interacting through a pairwise attractive force in a two-dimensional system in the presence of noise and communication time delay. Previous work has shown that a large enough noise intensity will cause a translating swarm of individuals to transition to a rotating swarm with a stationary center of mass. In this work, we use numerical simulations to show that with the addition of a time delay, the model possesses a transition that depends on the size of the coupling parameter. This transition is independent of the swarm state (traveling or rotating) and is characterized by the alignment of all of the individuals along with a swarm oscillation. By considering the mean field equations without noise, we show that the time delay induced transition is associated with a Hopf bifurcation. The analytical result yields good agreement with numerical computations of the value of the coupling parameter at the Hopf point.

  7. Light flash phenomena induced by HzE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Pease, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Astronauts and Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes are closed and adapted to darkness. These phenomena have been collectively labelled as light flashes. Visual phenomena which are similar in appearance to those observed in space have been demonstrated at the number of accelerator facilities by expressing the eyes of human subjects to beams of various types of radiation. In some laboratory experiments Cerenkov radiation was found to be the basis for the flashes observed while in other experiments Cerenkov radiation could apparently be ruled out. Experiments that differentiate between Cerenkov radiation and other possible mechanisms for inducing visual phenomena was then compared. The phenomena obtained in the presence and absence of Cerenkov radiation were designed and conducted. A new mechanism proposed to explain the visual phenomena observed by Skylab astronauts as they passed through the South Atlantic Anomaly, namely nuclear interactions in and near the sensitive layer of the retina, is covered. Also some studies to search for similar transient effects of space radiation on sensors and microcomputer memories are described.

  8. Obese mice are resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Ichinose, Takamichi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2014-06-01

    Particulate matter can exacerbate respiratory diseases such as asthma. Diesel exhaust particles are the substantial portion of ambient particulate matter with a <2.5 µm diameter in urban areas. Epidemiological data indicate increased respiratory health effects of particulate matter in obese individuals; however, the association between obesity and diesel exhaust particle-induced airway inflammation remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the differences in susceptibility to airway inflammation induced by exposure to diesel exhaust particles between obese mice (db/db) and lean mice (db/+m). Female db/db and db/+m mice were intratracheally administered diesel exhaust particles or vehicle every 2 weeks for a total of seven times. The cellular profile of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histological changes in the lungs were assessed and the lungs and serum were analyzed for the generation of cytokines, chemokines and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Diesel exhaust particle exposure-induced eosinophilic infiltration in db/+m mice accompanied by T-helper 2 cytokine, chemokine and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in the lungs. In contrast, it induced mild neutrophilic airway inflammation accompanied by elevated cytokines and chemokines in db/db mice. The lungs of db/db mice exhibited decreased expression of eosinophil activators/chemoattractants such as interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and eotaxin compared with those of db/+m mice. In addition, serum eotaxin and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels were significantly higher in db/db mice than in db/+m mice. In conclusion, obesity can affect susceptibility to diesel exhaust particle-induced airway inflammation, which is possibly due to differences in local and systemic inflammatory responses between lean and obese individuals.

  9. Fluid-induced propulsion of rigid particles in wormlike micellar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, David A.; Keim, Nathan C.; Shen, Xiaoning; Arratia, Paulo E.

    2014-10-01

    In the absence of inertia, a reciprocal swimmer achieves no net motion in a viscous Newtonian fluid. Here, using tracking methods and birefringence imaging, we investigate the ability of a reciprocally actuated particle to translate through a complex fluid that possesses a network. A geometrically polar particle, a rod with a bead on one end, is reciprocally rotated using magnetic fields. The particle is immersed in a wormlike micellar (WLM) solution that is known to be susceptible to the formation of shear bands and other localized structures due to shear-induced remodeling of its microstructure. Results show that the nonlinearities present in this WLM solution break time-reversal symmetry under certain conditions, and enable propulsion of an artificial "swimmer." We find three regimes dependent on the Deborah number (De): net motion towards the bead-end of the particle at low De, net motion towards the rod-end of the particle at intermediate De, and no appreciable propulsion at high De. At low De, where the particle time scale is longer than the fluid relaxation time, we believe that propulsion is caused by an imbalance in the fluid first normal stress differences between the two ends of the particle (bead and rod). At De ˜ 1, however, we observe the emergence of a region of network anisotropy near the rod using birefringence imaging. This anisotropy suggests alignment of the micellar network, which is "locked in" due to the shorter time scale of the particle relative to the fluid.

  10. A Study of Interfacial-Instability-Induced Mixing in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Annamalai, Subramanian; Ouellet, Frederick

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when a bed of particles is explosively dispersed, a multiphase instability front may occur, and lead to the formation of aerodynamically stable jet-particle structures. It is believed that these coherent structures originates from the early phase of explosive dispersal, in particular, in the manner in which the initial layer of particles undergoes instability, as it rapidly expands in the radial direction. In this work we want to isolate and study the effect of gas-particle two-way interaction on the nature of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities of an explosively driven particle layer. As a result we perform numerical experiments, where we limit the initial volume fraction of the particle layer. The focus of this investigation is on the RT and RM growth mechanisms in the linear and non-linear stages under the complexity of the cylindrical geometry, very high pressures and densities associated with the detonation process. Thus, in addition to the initial disturbance created by the random distribution of particles, we explicitly vary the initial density of the particle and gas distribution. Detailed analyses of single mode and two-mode RT/RM-induced mixing are presented. This work was supported (in part) by the U.S. DoE, NNSA, ASC Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  11. Lycorine suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuai; Jin, Gu; Huang, Kang-Mao; Ma, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yan; Tang, Xiao-Zhen; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Ji-Ying; Qin, An; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts play an important role in diseases involving bone loss. In this study, we assessed the effect of a plant-derived natural alkaloid (lycorine, or LY) on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis could be inhibited by LY; this effect was due to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling via MAP kinase kinases (MKKs). The MAPK agonist anisomycin could partially rescue the inhibitory effect of LY. Furthermore, LY also played a protective role in both a murine ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model and a titanium particle-induced osteolysis model. These results confirmed that LY was effective in preventing osteoclast-related diseases in vivo. In conclusion, our results show that LY is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and therefore could be used to treat OVX-induced osteoporosis and wear particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:26238331

  12. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE INTERLEUKIN-8 GENE TRANSCRIPTION AND P38 MAPK ACTIVATION IN NORMAL BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to particulate matter-induced adverse health effects. Interleukin (IL)-8 is an important proinflammatory cytokine in the human lung that is induced in respiratory cells exposed to a variety of environmental insul...

  13. Alpha particle induced gamma yields in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Miller, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine has a relatively large (α,n) production cross-section in the MeV range, the energy range of interest for special nuclear materials. In the uranium fuel cycle enriched UF6 in particular is a reasonably prolific source of (α,n) neutrons because along with 235U, 234U becomes enriched and it has a relatively short half-life. This enables the mass content of storage cylinders containing UF6 to be verified by neutron counting methods. In association with such measurements high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (HRGS) measurements using a high-purity Ge detector are often undertaken to determine the 235U enrichment based off the intensity of the direct 186 keV line. The specific (α,n) neutron production, neutrons per second per gram of U, is sensitive to the relative isotopic composition, particularly the 234U concentration, and the traditional gross neutron counting approach is needed to quantitatively interpret the data. In addition to F(α,n) neutrons, α-induced reaction γ-rays are generated, notably at 110, 197, 582, 891, 1236 and 1275 keV. If one could observe 19F(α,xγ) gamma-lines in the HRGS spectra the thought was that perhaps the α-activity could be estimated directly, and in turn the 234U abundance obtained. For example, by utilizing the ratio of the detected 197-186 keV full energy peaks. However, until now there has been no readily available estimate of the expected strength of the reaction gamma-rays nor any serious consideration as to whether they might be diagnostic or not. In this work we compute the thick target yields of the chief reaction gamma-rays in UF6 using published thin target data. Comparisons are made to the neutron production rates to obtain γ/n estimates, and also to the 235U decay line at 186 keV which we take as a fiducial line. It is shown that the reaction gamma-rays are produced but are far too weak for practical safeguards purposes. Now that the underlying numerical data is readily available however, it can be used to

  14. Particle number scaling for diffusion-induced dissipation in graphene and carbon nanotube nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhén, Christin; Isacsson, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    When a contaminant diffuses on the surface of a nanomechanical resonator, the motions of the two become correlated. Despite being a high-order effect in the resonator-particle coupling, such correlations affect the system dynamics by inducing dissipation of the resonator energy. Here, we consider this diffusion-induced dissipation in the cases of multiple particles adsorbed on carbon nanotube and graphene resonators. By solving the stochastic equations of motion, we simulate the ringdown of the resonator, in order to determine the resonator energy decay rate. We find two different scalings with the number of adsorbed particles K and particle mass m . In the regime where the adsorbates are inertially trapped at an antinode of vibration, the dissipation rate Γ scales with the total adsorbed mass Γ ∝K m . In contrast, in the regime where particles diffuse freely over the resonator, the dissipation rate scales as the product of the total adsorbed mass and the individual particle mass: Γ ∝K m2 .

  15. URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRUCTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRICTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION.Jacqueline D. Carter, Zhuowei Li, Lisa A. Dailey, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina, and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    Exposure to particulate matter...

  16. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  17. Geometric quantum phase for displaced states for a particle with an induced electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos de Melo, J.; Bakke, K.; Furtado, C.

    2016-07-01

    Basing on the analogue Landau levels for a neutral particle possessing an induced electric dipole moment, we show that displaced states can be built in the presence of electric and magnetic fields. Besides, the Berry phase associated with these displaced quantum states is obtained by performing an adiabatic cyclic evolution in series of paths in parameter space.

  18. Fluctuation-induced transport of two coupled particles: Effect of the interparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnovskii, Yurii A.; Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Trakhtenberg, Leonid I.; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-06-01

    We consider a system of two coupled particles fluctuating between two states, with different interparticle interaction potentials and particle friction coefficients. An external action drives the interstate transitions that induces reciprocating motion along the internal coordinate x (the interparticle distance). The system moves unidirectionally due to rectification of the internal motion by asymmetric friction fluctuations and thus operates as a dimeric motor that converts input energy into net movement. We focus on how the law of interaction between the particles affects the dimer transport and, in particular, the role of thermal noise in the motion inducing mechanism. It is argued that if the interaction potential behaves at large distances as xα, depending on the value of the exponent α, the thermal noise plays a constructive (α > 2), neutral (α = 2), or destructive (α < 2) role. In the case of α = 1, corresponding piecewise linear potential profiles, an exact solution is obtained and discussed in detail.

  19. Manipulation of micro-particles by flexible polymer-based optically-induced dielectrophoretic devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Ju; Hung, Shih-Hsun; Jeng, Jun-Yuan; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a novel technology to manipulate micro-particles with the assistance from flexible polymer-based optically-induced dielectrophoretic (ODEP) devices. Bending the flexible ODEP devices downwards or upwards to create convex or concave curvatures, respectively, enables the more effective separation or collection of micro-particles with different diameters. The travel distances of the polystyrene beads of 40 μm diameter, as induced by the projected light in a given time period was increased by ~100%, which were 43.0 ± 5.0 and 84.6 ± 4.0 μm for flat and convex ODEP devices, respectively. A rapid separation or collection of micro-particles can be achieved with the assistance of gravity because the falling polystyrene beads followed the inclination of the downward and upward bent ODEP devices.

  20. Drift- or fluctuation-induced ordering and self-organization in driven many-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, D.; Platkowski, T.

    2002-10-01

    According to empirical observations, some pattern formation phenomena in driven many-particle systems are more pronounced in the presence of a certain noise level. We investigate this phenomenon of fluctuation-driven ordering with a cellular-automaton model of interactive motion in space and find an optimal noise strength, while order breaks down at high(er) fluctuation levels. Additionally, we discuss the phenomenon of noise- and drift-induced self-organization in systems that would show disorder in the absence of fluctuations. In the future, related studies may have applications to the control of many-particle systems such as the efficient separation of particles. The rather general formulation of our model in the spirit of game theory may allow to shed some light on several different kinds of noise-induced ordering phenomena observed in physical, chemical, biological, and socio-economic systems (e.g., attractive and repulsive agglomeration, or segregation).

  1. Induced velocities of grains embedded in a turbulent gas. [test particle theory application to protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voelk, H. J.; Morfill, G.; Roeser, S.; Jones, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    A theory is presented for the dynamics of dust particles in an incompressible turbulent fluid. Grain-gas coupling occurs through friction forces that are proportional to the mean grain velocity relative to the gas. This test particle theory is applied to the case of Kolmogoroff spectrum in a protostellar cloud. The mean turbulence induced grain velocity and the mean turbulent relative velocity of two grains are calculated. Whereas the former should determine the dust scale height, grain-grain collisions are influenced by the latter. For a reasonable strength of turbulence, the mean induced relative velocity of two particles turns out to be at least as large as the corresponding terminal velocity difference during gravitational settling.

  2. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  3. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  4. Settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced particles in advanced wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Deng, Yang

    2016-04-15

    Ferrate(VI) as an emerging water treatment agent has recently recaptured interests for advanced wastewater treatment. A large number of studies were published to report ferrate(VI)-driven oxidation for various water contaminants. In contrast, very few efforts were made to characterize ferrate(VI) resultant particles in water and wastewater. In this study, jar tests were performed to examine the settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide particles, particularly the non-settable fraction of these particles, after ferrate(VI) reduction in a biologically treated municipal wastewater. The particle settleability was evaluated through the measurement of turbidity and particulate iron concentration in the supernatant with the settling time. Results showed that a majority of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide aggregates remained suspended and caused an increased turbidity. For example, at a Fe(VI) dose of 5.0 mg/L and pH 7.50, 82% of the added iron remained in the supernatant and the turbidity was 8.97 NTU against the untreated sample turbidity (2.33 NTU) after 72-h settling. The poor settling property of these particles suggested that coagulation and flocculation did not perform well in the ferrate(VI) treatment. Particle size analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that nano-scale particles were produced after ferrate(VI) decomposition, and gradually aggregated to form micro-scale larger particles in the secondary effluent. Zeta potentials of the non-settable ferrate(VI) resultant aggregates varied between -7.36 and -8.01 mV at pH 7.50 during the 72-h settling. The negative surface charges made the aggregates to be relatively stable in the wastewater matrix. PMID:26900976

  5. Settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced particles in advanced wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Deng, Yang

    2016-04-15

    Ferrate(VI) as an emerging water treatment agent has recently recaptured interests for advanced wastewater treatment. A large number of studies were published to report ferrate(VI)-driven oxidation for various water contaminants. In contrast, very few efforts were made to characterize ferrate(VI) resultant particles in water and wastewater. In this study, jar tests were performed to examine the settleability and characteristics of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide particles, particularly the non-settable fraction of these particles, after ferrate(VI) reduction in a biologically treated municipal wastewater. The particle settleability was evaluated through the measurement of turbidity and particulate iron concentration in the supernatant with the settling time. Results showed that a majority of ferrate(VI)-induced iron oxide aggregates remained suspended and caused an increased turbidity. For example, at a Fe(VI) dose of 5.0 mg/L and pH 7.50, 82% of the added iron remained in the supernatant and the turbidity was 8.97 NTU against the untreated sample turbidity (2.33 NTU) after 72-h settling. The poor settling property of these particles suggested that coagulation and flocculation did not perform well in the ferrate(VI) treatment. Particle size analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that nano-scale particles were produced after ferrate(VI) decomposition, and gradually aggregated to form micro-scale larger particles in the secondary effluent. Zeta potentials of the non-settable ferrate(VI) resultant aggregates varied between -7.36 and -8.01 mV at pH 7.50 during the 72-h settling. The negative surface charges made the aggregates to be relatively stable in the wastewater matrix.

  6. Simulation by using the lattice Boltzmann method of microscopic particle motion induced by artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the simulation of particle motion induced by the fluid flow driven by an array of beating artificial cilia inside a micro-channel. A worm-like-chain model is used to simulate the elastic cilia, and the lattice Boltzmann equation is used to compute the fluid flow. We employ a harmonic force at the extreme tip of each cilium to actuate it. Our simulation methods are first validated by applying them to the motion of a single cilium and a freely falling sphere. After validation, we simulate the fluid flow generated by an array of beating cilia and find that a maximum flow rate is achieved at an optimum sperm number. Next, we simulate the motion of a neutrally buoyant spherical particle at this optimum sperm number by tracking the particle motion with a smoothed profile method. We address the effect of the following parameters on the particle velocity: the gap between cilia and particle, the particle size, the cilia density, and the presence of an array of intermediate particles.

  7. Particles deposition induced by the magnetic field in the coronary bypass graft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, Sandor I.; Totorean, Alin F.; Vekas, Ladislau

    2016-03-01

    Bypass graft failures is a complex process starting with intimal hyperplasia development which involve many hemodynamic and biological factors. This work presents experimental results regarding the possibility to use magnetic drug delivery to prevent the development of the intimal hyperplasia using a simplified but intuitive model. The primary goal is to understand the magnetic particle deposition in the anastomosis region of the bypass graft taking into account the complex flow field created in this area which involves recirculation region, flow mixing and presence of particles with high residence time. The three-dimensional geometry model was used to simulate the motion and accumulation of the particles under the magnetic field influence in anastomotic region of the coronary bypass graft. The flow patterns are evaluated both numerically and experimentally and show a good correlation in term of flow parameters like vortex length and flow stagnation point positions. Particle depositions are strongly dependent on the magnet position and consequently of the magnetic field intensity and field gradient. Increased magnetic field controlled by the magnet position induces increased particle depositions in the bypass graft anastomosis. The result shows that particle depositions depend on the bypass graft angle, and the deposition shape and particle accumulation respectively, depend by the flow pattern in the anastomosis region.

  8. Gene expression changes in normal human skin fibroblasts induced by HZE-particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liang-Hao; Shingyoji, Masato; Chen, Fanqing; Chatterjee, Aloke; Kasai, Kiyomi-Eguchi; Chen, David J

    2005-10-01

    Studies have shown that radiation exposure affects global gene expression in mammalian cells. However, little is known about the effects of HZE particles on gene expression. To study these effects, human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with HZE particles of different energies and LETs. The data obtained from these experiments indicate that changes in gene expression are dependent on the energy of the radiation source. Particles with the highest energy, i.e. iron, induced the biggest expression changes in terms of numbers of genes and magnitudes of changes. Many genes were found to undergo significant expression changes after HZE-particle irradiation, including CDKN1A/p21, MDM2, TNFRSF6/fas, PCNA and RAD52. Unlike X rays, HZE particles expose cells to two types of radiation: primary ions and delta rays. We hypothesized that the biological effects of delta rays, which are secondary electron emissions, should resemble the effects of X rays. To explore this idea, gene expression changes between cells that had been irradiated with HZE particles and X rays were compared. The results support our hypothesis since the number of genes that commonly changed after exposure to both radiations increased as a function of particle energy. PMID:16187761

  9. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS THROUGH A POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine carbon particles induce IL-8 expression in human airway
    epithelial cells through a post-transcritpional mechanism
    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to
    particulate matter (PM) - induced adverse health effects. IL-8 is an
    i...

  10. Magneto-induced stress enhancing effect in a colloidal suspension of paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles dispersed in a ferrofluid medium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taixiang; Gong, Xinglong; Xu, Yangguang; Xuan, Shouhu

    2014-02-14

    The magneto-induced stress and relative microstructure in a colloidal suspension of paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles dispersed in a ferrofluid medium is studied using particle-level dynamics simulation. It shows that the stress perpendicular to the direction of an external uniaxial magnetic field can be strongly enhanced by increasing the ratio of paramagnetic particles to approaching that of superparamagnetic particles. The magnetic field-induced net-like or embedded chain-like microstructures formed by paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles contribute to this stress enhancing effect. PMID:24837318

  11. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers. PMID:26708022

  12. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Chang, H. C.; Cho, I. C.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, C. S.; Chou, W. T.

    2014-08-01

    In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair.

  13. A sandwiched flexible polymer mold for control of particle-induced defects in nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Jizong; Ge, Haixiong

    2013-01-01

    Particle related defects are one of the key concerns for nanoimprint lithography, since the particle can amplify the defect to become much larger than the particle itself. We developed a flexible tri-layer mold for control of particle-induced defects. The mold was composed of a PDMS cushion layer sandwiched between a rigid imprint pattern layer and a plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) backplane. The PET foil was used as the backplane of the mold to protect the sticky PDMS surface. The PDMS as a cushion layer could locally deform to conform the shape of substrate due to its high elasticity. The multifunctional epoxysiloxane was used for the formation of an imprint layer because of its insensitivity toward oxygen during curing, high transparency, excellent mechanical strength and high resistance to oxygen plasma after cross-linking. Nanostructures with different geometries and sizes were faithfully duplicated by this mold through a UV-curing imprint process. The particle-induced defectivity was dramatically improved by the deformation of the PDMS cushion layer with a slight external pressure. 500 nm pitch grating structures were successfully imprinted on a microposts array surface, both the top and the intervening bottom portions between the microposts.

  14. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers.

  15. Quantitative elemental detection of size-segregated particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Taira, Takuya; Zhang, Xiao Bo; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Kurose, Ryoichi

    2013-09-01

    In order to simulate coal combustion and develop optimal and stable boiler control systems in real power plants, it is imperative to obtain the detailed information in coal combustion processes as well as to measure species contents in fly ash, which should be controlled and analyzed for enhancing boiler efficiency and reducing environmental pollution. The fly ash consists of oxides (SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, and so on), unburned carbon, and other minor elements. Recently laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to coal combustion and other industrial fields because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and non-contact features. In these applications it is important to measure controlling factors without any sample preparation to maintain the real-time measurement feature. The relation between particle content and particle diameter is also one of the vital researches, because compositions of particles are dependent on their diameter. In this study, we have detected the contents of size-segregated particles using LIBS. Particles were classified by an Anderson cascade impactor and their contents were measured using the output of 1064 nm YAG laser, a spectrograph and an ICCD camera. The plasma conditions such as plasma temperature are dependent on the size of particles and these effects must be corrected to obtain quantitative information. The plasma temperature was corrected by the emission intensity ratio from the same atom. Using this correction method, the contents of particles can be measured quantitatively in fixed experimental parameters. This method was applied to coal and fly ash from a coal-fired burner to measure unburned carbon and other contents according to the particle diameter. The acquired results demonstrate that the LIBS technique is applicable to measure size-segregated particle contents in real time and this method is useful for the analysis of coal combustion and its control because of its sensitive and

  16. Macrophage Polarization in IL-10 Treatment of Particle-Induced Inflammation and Osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianhao; Jia, Tanghong; Gong, Weiming; Ning, Bin; Wooley, Paul H; Yang, Shang-You

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic influence and potential mechanism of IL-10 in ameliorating orthopedic debris particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis. A murine air pouch with bone implantation and polyethylene particles was also used to evaluate the therapeutic effects of IL-10. The data suggested that the particle challenges significantly promoted macrophage activation and osteoclastogenesis, with dramatically increased macrophage infiltration into the pouch membranes and elevated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cell deposition. Immunohistochemical stains revealed a significantly higher ratio of induced nitric oxide synthase-expressing cells in the particle-challenged group; treatment with IL-10 resulted in marked switching to CD163(+) cells. Also, IL-10 effectively reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive stained cells in the pouch membranes, and minimized the bone mineral density loss compared with untreated samples. Real-time PCR and Western blot examination indicated that IL-10 treatment significantly diminished the particle-induced IL-1β expression but promoted expression of CD163, transforming growth factor-β1, and CCR2. Furthermore, IL-10 significantly inhibited the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene particle-elevated phospho-STAT1 and phospho-NF-κB p65 productions, and promoted phospho-STAT3 expression. Overall, the data indicate the pivotal effects of IL-10 on macrophage polarization. The effects of IL-10 in ameliorating local inflammation and osteolysis may be associated with macrophage polarization through the up-regulation of the Janus activating kinase/STAT3 signaling pathway, and the down-regulation of NF-κB and Janus activating kinase/STAT1 expression.

  17. Gravitationally induced particle production and its impact on the WIMP abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, I.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A large set of independent astronomical observations have provided a strong evidence for nonbaryonic dark matter in the Universe. One of the most investigated candidates is an unknown long-lived Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which was in thermal equilibrium with the primeval plasma. Here we investigate the WIMP abundance based on the relativistic kinetic treatment for gravitationally induced particle production recently proposed in the literature (Lima and Baranov, 2014) [16]. The new evolution equation is deduced and solved both numerically and through a semi-analytical approach. The predictions of the WIMP observables are discussed and compared with the ones obtained in the standard approach.

  18. Picosecond time scale modification of forward scattered light induced by absorption inside particles.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Myriam; d'Abzac, Françoix-Xavier; Hache, François; Hespel, Laurent; Dartigalongue, Thibault

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of absorption processes on the Time Of Flight (TOF) of the light scattered out of a thick medium in the forward direction. We use a Monte-Carlo simulation with temporal phase function and Debye modes. The main result of our study is that absorption inside the particle induces a decrease of the TOF on a picosecond time scale, measurable with a femtosecond laser apparatus. This decrease, which exhibits a neat sensitivity to the absorption coefficient of particles, could provide an efficient way to measure this absorption.

  19. The suppression of charged-particle-induced noise in infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Briotta, D. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A d.c.-coupled transimpedance amplifier/pulse suppression circuit designed to remove charged-particle-induced noise from infrared detectors is described. Noise spikes produced by single particle events are large and have short rise times, and can degrade the performance of an infrared detector in moderate radiation environments. The use of the suppression circuit improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 1.6:1, which corresponds to a reduction in required observing time by a factor of about 2.6.

  20. Gravitationally induced adiabatic particle production: from big bang to de Sitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-08-01

    In the background of a flat homogeneous and isotropic space-time, we consider a scenario of the Universe driven by the gravitationally induced ‘adiabatic’ particle production with constant creation rate. We have shown that this Universe attains a big bang singularity in the past and at late-time it asymptotically becomes de Sitter. To clarify this model Universe, we performed a dynamical analysis and found that the Universe attains a thermodynamic equilibrium in this late de Sitter phase. Finally, for the first time, we have discussed the possible effects of ‘adiabatic’ particle creations in the context of loop quantum cosmology.

  1. Gravitationally induced adiabatic particle production: from big bang to de Sitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-08-01

    In the background of a flat homogeneous and isotropic space–time, we consider a scenario of the Universe driven by the gravitationally induced ‘adiabatic’ particle production with constant creation rate. We have shown that this Universe attains a big bang singularity in the past and at late-time it asymptotically becomes de Sitter. To clarify this model Universe, we performed a dynamical analysis and found that the Universe attains a thermodynamic equilibrium in this late de Sitter phase. Finally, for the first time, we have discussed the possible effects of ‘adiabatic’ particle creations in the context of loop quantum cosmology.

  2. Fiber Bragg grating filter using evaporated induced self assembly of silica nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammarling, Krister; Zhang, Renyung; Manuilskiy, Anatoliy; Nilsson, Hans-Erik

    2014-03-01

    In the present work we conduct a study of fiber filters produced by evaporation of silica particles upon a MM-fiber core. A band filter was designed and theoretically verified using a 2D Comsol simulation model of a 3D problem, and calculated in the frequency domain in respect to refractive index. The fiber filters were fabricated by stripping and chemically etching the middle part of an MM-fiber until the core was exposed. A mono layer of silica nano particles were evaporated on the core using an Evaporation Induced Self-Assembly (EISA) method. The experimental results indicated a broader bandwidth than indicated by the simulations which can be explained by the mismatch in the particle size distributions, uneven particle packing and finally by effects from multiple mode angles. Thus, there are several closely connected Bragg wavelengths that build up the broader bandwidth. The experimental part shows that it is possible by narrowing the particle size distributing and better control of the particle packing, the filter effectiveness can be greatly improved.

  3. Particle size coarsening induced by valve silicone in a metered dose inhaler.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Jill K; Alex, Sony; Salama, Germain; Obenauer-Kutner, Linda; Huyck, Susan; Berry, Julianne; Sequeira, Joel; Brouet, Guillaume; Marie, Christophe

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of valve silicone on the delivered particle size distribution of a suspension metered dose inhaler (MDI). Valves were manufactured with distinct levels of silicone, which could be differentiated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The amount of silicone in the valve was proportional to the amount of silicone that entered the formulation and the subsequent decrease in fine particle fraction (FPF) of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) measured by Andersen cascade impaction. The effect of silicone content was not linear as even small amounts of silicone made a significant contribution to particle size coarsening. This coarsening was also a function of storage time and temperature. Accelerated stability conditions greatly increased coarsening kinetics as 1 month at 40 degrees C and 75% RH induced significantly more coarsening than 12 months at room temperature. Field emission scanning electron micrograph images suggest that the primary mechanism of particle size change may be aggregation as particle clusters were seen. This study indicates that silicone can be a critical process parameter for particle size distribution of a suspension MDI product. Thus, the amount of silicone in the valves needs to be minimized and controlled.

  4. Extract of motorcycle exhaust particles induced macrophages apoptosis by calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2002-12-01

    Large survey and experiments have reported that environment pollutants from fossil fuel combustion would cause immune system deleterious by enhancement of allergic reaction and damage to respiratory tract. In this study, we reported that the extract of motorcycle exhaust particles (MEP) might affect the immune system by inducing cell apoptosis on macrophages. The motorcycle exhaust particles were collected from a two-stoke engine and their cytotoxic effect on macrophages was investigated. We found MEP is cytotoxic and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells, murine peritoneal macrophage, and rat alveolar macrophage. Pretreatment with mitochondria permeability transition inhibitor (cyclosporin A), intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca(2+) chelator, and antioxidants (NAC, GSH, catalase, SOD) attenuated the MEP-induced cell apoptosis, and BAPTA-AM was the most effective one. Utilized Fura-2/AM loaded RAW 264.7 cells to directly detect the change of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), we found that MEP could induce a sustained increase of [Ca(2+)](i). The raise of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by MEP could be completely blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA-AM, however, only partially inhibited by the extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, EGTA. These results suggested that both influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and release of Ca(2+) from the internal storage were involved. We also found that MEP caused a decrease of mitochondria membrane potential and an increase of oxidative stress in RAW 264.7 cells. In conclusion, we found that the particles, collected from the motorcycle exhaust, contain chemicals that will induce apoptosis of macrophage in calcium-dependent manner.

  5. Particle resuspension via human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jing

    This dissertation consists of three correlated parts that are related to particle resuspension from floorings in indoor environment. The term resuspension in this dissertation refers the re-entrainment of deposited particles into atmosphere via mechanic disturbances by human activity indoors, except where it is specified. The first part reviews the literature related to particle resuspension. Fundamental concepts and kinetics of resuspension of particles were extracted from previous studies. Suggestions for future research on indoor particle resuspension have been given based on the literature reviews and the findings of part 2 and part 3. The second part involved 54 resuspension experiments conducted in a room-scale environmental chamber. Three floorings types and two ventilation configurations were tested. Air exchange rate were fixed during the experiments, and the temperature/RH were monitored. The airborne particle concentration was measured by an array of optical particle counters (OPCs) in the chamber. Resuspension rates were estimated in size ranges of 0.8--1, 1.0--2.0, 2.0--5.0, and 5.0--10 mum ranging from 10-5--10 -2 hr-1, with higher resuspension rates associated with larger particles. Resuspension via walking activity varied from experiment to experiment. A "heavy and fast" walking style was associated with a higher resuspension rate than a less active style. Given the same floor loading of the test particles, resuspension rates for the carpeted floor were on the same order of magnitude but significantly higher than those for the hard floor. In the third part, an image analysis method (IAM) was adapted to characterize the particle distribution on fabric floorings. The IAM results showed the variability of particles loading on various carpets. The dust particles on fibers from ten carpets vary in sizes. The normal dust loading varies from house to house from 3.6x106 particles/cm2 to 8.2x106 particles/cm2. The dust particle number distribution for size

  6. Light charged particles emitted in fission reactions induced by protons on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Paradela, C.; Ayyad, Y.; Casarejos, E.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370 A ,500 A , and 650 A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA Collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. This measurement allowed us, for the first time, to obtain correlations between the light charged particles emitted during the fission process and the charge distributions of the fission fragments. These correlations were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  7. Effect of oxide particle distribution on the helium-induced fracture of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.A.

    1990-12-31

    Long-term exposure to tritium (H{sup 3}) gas can degrade the mechanical properties of copper alloys while similar exposure to protium (H{sup 1}) gas does not cause such degradation. This difference in behavior is attributed to the presence of helium which is generated by the radioactive decay of tritium. The accumulation of helium, which is virtually insoluble in the copper lattice, can cause the nucleation of cavities along grain boundaries and promote intergranular fracture. Permeation studies have shown that oxide particles act as trap sites for diffusing hydrogen isotopes, and thus may affect the susceptibility of copper to helium-induced degradation by altering the initial tritium distribution in the metal lattice. Tensile and metallographic data demonstrate that oxide particles trap both tritium and helium and decrease the susceptibility of copper to helium-induced intergranular fracture. 25 refs, 3 tabs, 12 figs.

  8. Effect of oxide particle distribution on the helium-induced fracture of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term exposure to tritium (H[sup 3]) gas can degrade the mechanical properties of copper alloys while similar exposure to protium (H[sup 1]) gas does not cause such degradation. This difference in behavior is attributed to the presence of helium which is generated by the radioactive decay of tritium. The accumulation of helium, which is virtually insoluble in the copper lattice, can cause the nucleation of cavities along grain boundaries and promote intergranular fracture. Permeation studies have shown that oxide particles act as trap sites for diffusing hydrogen isotopes, and thus may affect the susceptibility of copper to helium-induced degradation by altering the initial tritium distribution in the metal lattice. Tensile and metallographic data demonstrate that oxide particles trap both tritium and helium and decrease the susceptibility of copper to helium-induced intergranular fracture. 25 refs, 3 tabs, 12 figs.

  9. Spectroscopy of defects induced by ohmic contact preparation in LEC GaAs particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Canali, C.; Nava, F.

    1996-12-01

    Semi-insulating LEC gallium arsenide particle detectors were realized with differently manufactured ohmic contacts to improve their performances and possibly avoid injection effects often experienced when the detectors work in full depletion conditions. I-V and C-V measurements on Schottky structures were carried out. Photo-induced current transient spectroscopy and also photo-deep level transient spectroscopy investigations, performed on both planar and Schottky structures, identified electron and hole traps. Detector performances were correlated to defects action.

  10. On inducing finite dimensional physical field representations for massless particles in even dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhansali, Vineer

    1993-01-01

    Assuming trivial action of Euclidean translations, the method of induced representations is used to derive a correspondence between massless field representations transforming under the full generalized even dimensional Lorentz group, and highest weight states of the relevant little group. This gives a connection between 'helicity' and 'chirality' in all dimensions. Restrictions on 'gauge independent' representations for physical particles that this induction imposes are also stated.

  11. Scaled particle focusing in a microfluidic device with asymmetric electrodes utilizing induced-charge electroosmosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yukun; Liu, Jiangwei; Liu, Weiyu; Lang, Qi; Tao, Ye; Hu, Qingming; Hou, Likai; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel continuous-flow microfluidic particle concentrator with a specified focusing-particle number ratio (FR) at different channel outlets using induced-charge electroosmosis (ICEO). The particle-focusing region contains two floating electrodes of asymmetric widths L2 and L1 in the gap between a driving electrode pair, all of which are fabricated in parallel in the main channel. Applying an AC voltage over the driving electrodes, an ICEO flow with two vortexes can be induced over each of the two floating electrodes, and the actuation range of the ICEO vortex is proportional to the respective electrode size. We establish a preliminary physical model for the value of FR: at a moderate voltage and frequency range, FR approaches L2/L1 due to the scaled ICEO actuation range; by further modifying the voltage or frequency, FR is freely adjustable because of the variation in ICEO velocity. Furthermore, by connecting multiple focusing regions in series, i.e., high FR = (L2/L1)(n) can be conveniently generated in an n-stage flow focusing device. Our results provide a promising method for yielding transverse concentration gradients of particles useful in pre-processing before analysis. PMID:27354159

  12. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-loaded lactoferrin nano particles against rotenone induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kumar, Prashant; Kumari, Sonali; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin is known to have neuroprotective role and possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities. Rotenone, a flavonoid induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic cells is being widely studied in Parkinson's Disease (PD) research. In the present study, curcumin loaded lactoferrin nano particles prepared by sol-oil chemistry were used to protect dopaminergic cell line SK-N-SH against rotenone induced neurotoxicity. These curcumin loaded nano particles were of 43-60 nm diameter size and around 100 nm hydrodynamic size as assessed by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis respectively. The encapsulation efficiency was 61.3% ± 2.4%. Cellular uptake of curcumin through these nano particles was confirmed by confocal imaging and spectrofluorimetric analysis. The curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles showed greater intracellular drug uptake, sustained retention and greater neuroprotection than soluble counterpart. Neuroprotective activity was characterized through viability assays and by estimating ROS levels. Furthermore rotenone induced PD like features were characterized by decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and increase in α-synuclein expression. Taken together curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery strategy against neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26826319

  13. Particles from wood smoke and traffic induce differential pro-inflammatory response patterns in co-cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kocbach, Anette Herseth, Jan Inge; Lag, Marit; Refsnes, Magne; Schwarze, Per E.

    2008-10-15

    The inflammatory potential of particles from wood smoke and traffic has not been well elucidated. In this study, a contact co-culture of monocytes and pneumocytes was exposed to 10-40 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of particles from wood smoke and traffic for 12, 40 and 64 h to determine their influence on pro-inflammatory cytokine release (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8) and viability. To investigate the role of organic constituents in cytokine release the response to particles, their organic extracts and the washed particles were compared. Antagonists were used to investigate source-dependent differences in intercellular signalling (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1). The cytotoxicity was low after exposure to particles from both sources. However, wood smoke, and to a lesser degree traffic-derived particles, induced a reduction in cell number, which was associated with the organic fraction. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines was similar for both sources after 12 h, but traffic induced a greater release than wood smoke particles with increasing exposure time. The organic fraction accounted for the majority of the cytokine release induced by wood smoke, whereas the washed traffic particles induced a stronger response than the corresponding organic extract. TNF-{alpha} and IL-1 antagonists reduced the release of IL-8 induced by particles from both sources. In contrast, the IL-6 release was only reduced by the IL-1 antagonist during exposure to traffic-derived particles. In summary, particles from wood smoke and traffic induced differential pro-inflammatory response patterns with respect to cytokine release and cell number. Moreover, the influence of the organic particle fraction and intercellular signalling on the pro-inflammatory response seemed to be source-dependent.

  14. The Effect of Surface Induced Flows on Bubble and Particle Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelcher, Scott A.; Solomentsev, Yuri E.; Anderson, John L.; Boehmer, Marcel; Sides, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    Almost 20 years have elapsed since a phenomenon called "radial specific coalescence" was identified. During studies of electrolytic oxygen evolution from the back side of a vertically oriented, transparent tin oxide electrode in alkaline electrolyte, one of the authors (Sides) observed that large "collector" bubbles appeared to attract smaller bubbles. The bubbles moved parallel to the surface of the electrode, while the electric field was normal to the electrode surface. The phenomenon was reported but not explained. More recently self ordering of latex particles was observed during electrophoretic deposition at low DC voltages likewise on a transparent tin oxide electrode. As in the bubble work, the field was normal to the electrode while the particles moved parallel to it. Fluid convection caused by surface induced flows (SIF) can explain these two apparently different experimental observations: the aggregation of particles on an electrode during electrophoretic deposition, and a radial bubble coalescence pattern on an electrode during electrolytic gas evolution. An externally imposed driving force (the gradient of electrical potential or temperature), interacting with the surface of particles or bubbles very near a planar conducting surface, drives the convection of fluid that causes particles and bubbles to approach each other on the electrode.

  15. Catalytic particles induced Marangoni flow: motion, pumping and self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Dominguez, Alvaro; Popescu, Mihail N.; Dietrich, Siegfried

    When catalytic particles, such as Janus particles, or enzymes are in the vicinity of a fluid-fluid interface, their behavior can be strongly modulated by the presence of the interface and/or by the inhomogeneity in the transport properties of the two fluid phases. Hence, the effective interaction with the interface can lead to novel dynamical regimes absent in homogeneous fluids. For example, if the by-products of the catalysis are surface active their spatial distribution will affect the local value of the surface tension. In such a scenario, when a catalytic particle approaches a fluid-fluid interface a Marangoni flow will set up as a response to the inhomogeneity in the surface tension induced by the byproducts of the catalysis. The onset of such a flow will attract the catalytic particle towards the interface. Interestingly the strength of such an effective attraction is strongly affected by the affinity of the byproduct to the interface as well as by the transport properties of the two fluid phases. In particular, for water-oil interfaces such an effect overwhelms other means of active transport such as self-diffusiophoresis and makes it suitable to enhance particle accumulation close to fluid-fluid interfaces. Finally I will discuss the onset of collective behavior.

  16. Detection of tire tread particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, David; Bilík, Martin; Prochazková, Petra; Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan; Novotný, Karel; Ticová, Barbora; Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper is a study of the potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of tire tread particles. Tire tread particles may represent pollutants; simultaneously, it is potentially possible to exploit detection of tire tread particles for identification of optically imperceptible braking tracks at locations of road accidents. The paper describes the general composition of tire treads and selection of an element suitable for detection using the LIBS method. Subsequently, the applicable spectral line is selected considering interferences with lines of elements that might be present together with the detected particles, and optimization of measurement parameters such as incident laser energy, gate delay and gate width is performed. In order to eliminate the matrix effect, measurements were performed using 4 types of tires manufactured by 3 different producers. An adhesive tape was used as a sample carrier. The most suitable adhesive tape was selected from 5 commonly available tapes, on the basis of their respective LIBS spectra. Calibration standards, i.e. an adhesive tape with different area content of tire tread particles, were prepared for the selected tire. A calibration line was created on the basis of the aforementioned calibration standards. The linear section of this line was used for determination of the detection limit value applicable to the selected tire. Considering the insignificant influence of matrix of various types of tires, it is possible to make a simple recalculation of the detection limit value on the basis of zinc content in a specific tire.

  17. Smad7 foci are present in micronuclei induced by heavy particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minli; Saha, Janapriya; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2013-08-30

    DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by ionizing radiation (IR) activate DNA damage response (DDR) and cytokine signaling pathways, including double strand break (DSB) repair and TGFβ/Smad signaling pathway. Proteins assembled at IR-induced DSB sites can be visualized as foci, including γH2AX, 53BP1, ATM and ATF2. Unrepaired DSBs are thought to be one origin of micronuclei (MN), an indicator of genotoxic stress and chromosomal instability. Studies have detected γH2AX in IR-induced MN, indicating the presence of DSB in MN. Previously we reported that TGFβ downstream proteins Smad7 and phospho-Smad2 (pSmad2) co-localized with DDR proteins following radiation. Here we studied the status of Smad7 and pSmad2 in MN post high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in human normal and cancerous cells. We observed γH2AX foci in IR-induced MN, whereas 53BP1 and ATF2 were absent. Interestingly, Smad7 foci, but not pSmad2, were detectable in both spontaneous and IR-induced MN. We compared the effect of particle track structures on the yield of MN using 5.6MeV/u boron (B) and 600MeV/u iron (Fe) particles with similar LET (200 and 180keV/μm, respectively) in human fibroblasts. The frequency of MN induced by B was lower than that by Fe particles, albeit the proportion of Smad7-positive to Smad7-negative MN remained constant. An increased frequency of spontaneous MN, with slightly higher ratio of Smad7 or γH2AX positive, was found in human prostate cancer cells (PC3) compared to normal cells. 24h after 1Gy of Fe particles exposure, the yield of MN increased, and the majority (∼70%) carried γH2AX and Smad7. Phospho-ATM (Ser1981) foci were found in both spontaneous and IR-induced MN in PC3 cells, displaying a much lower frequency compared to γH2AX and Smad7. Our data suggest a unique role of Smad7 in IR-induced MN formation, which may associate with DNA repair, apoptosis and genomic instability.

  18. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, τ{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with τ{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at τ{sub p,} {sub l} = τ{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For τ{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with τ{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with τ{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ∝ τ{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  19. Analysis of α-particle-induced chromosomal aberrations by chemically-induced PCC. Elaboration of dose-effect curves.

    PubMed

    Puig, Roser; Pujol, Mònica; Barrios, Leonardo; Caballín, María Rosa; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc

    2016-09-01

    In a similar way to high-dose exposures to low-LET radiations, cells show difficulties reaching mitosis after high-LET radiation exposure. For this reason, techniques have been proposed that are able to analyze chromosome aberrations in interphase by prematurely condensing the chromosomes (PCC-techniques). Few dose-effect curves for high-LET radiation types have been reported, and none for α-particles. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by chemically-induced PCC, the chromosome aberrations induced by several doses of α-particles. Monolayers of peripheral lymphocytes were exposed to an α-source of Americium-241 with a mean energy entering the cells of 2.7 MeV. Lymphocytes were exposed to 10 doses, from 0-2.5 Gy, and then cultured for 48 h. Colcemid and Calyculin-A were added at 24 and 1 h before harvesting, respectively. During microscope analysis, chromosome rings and extra chromosome pieces were scored in G2/M-PCC and M cells, while dicentric chromosomes were only scored in M cells. As the dose increased, fewer cells were able to reach mitosis and the proportion of G2/M-PCC cells increased. Chromosome rings were hardly observed in M cells when compared to G2/M-PCC cells. Extra fragments were more frequent than rings in both G2/M-PCC and M cells, but with lower frequencies than in G2/M-PCC cells. The distribution of dicentrics and extra fragments showed a clear overdispersion; this was not so evident for rings. The dose-effect curves obtained fitted very well to a linear model. Damaged cells after α-particle irradiation show more difficulties in reaching mitosis than cells exposed to γ-rays. After α-particle irradiation the frequency of all the chromosome aberrations considered increased linearly with the dose, and α-particles clearly produced more dicentrics and extra chromosome pieces with respect to γ-rays. After α-particle exposure, the existence of extra chromosome fragments in PCC cells seems to be a good candidate for use as a biomarker

  20. Analysis of α-particle-induced chromosomal aberrations by chemically-induced PCC. Elaboration of dose-effect curves.

    PubMed

    Puig, Roser; Pujol, Mònica; Barrios, Leonardo; Caballín, María Rosa; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc

    2016-09-01

    In a similar way to high-dose exposures to low-LET radiations, cells show difficulties reaching mitosis after high-LET radiation exposure. For this reason, techniques have been proposed that are able to analyze chromosome aberrations in interphase by prematurely condensing the chromosomes (PCC-techniques). Few dose-effect curves for high-LET radiation types have been reported, and none for α-particles. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by chemically-induced PCC, the chromosome aberrations induced by several doses of α-particles. Monolayers of peripheral lymphocytes were exposed to an α-source of Americium-241 with a mean energy entering the cells of 2.7 MeV. Lymphocytes were exposed to 10 doses, from 0-2.5 Gy, and then cultured for 48 h. Colcemid and Calyculin-A were added at 24 and 1 h before harvesting, respectively. During microscope analysis, chromosome rings and extra chromosome pieces were scored in G2/M-PCC and M cells, while dicentric chromosomes were only scored in M cells. As the dose increased, fewer cells were able to reach mitosis and the proportion of G2/M-PCC cells increased. Chromosome rings were hardly observed in M cells when compared to G2/M-PCC cells. Extra fragments were more frequent than rings in both G2/M-PCC and M cells, but with lower frequencies than in G2/M-PCC cells. The distribution of dicentrics and extra fragments showed a clear overdispersion; this was not so evident for rings. The dose-effect curves obtained fitted very well to a linear model. Damaged cells after α-particle irradiation show more difficulties in reaching mitosis than cells exposed to γ-rays. After α-particle irradiation the frequency of all the chromosome aberrations considered increased linearly with the dose, and α-particles clearly produced more dicentrics and extra chromosome pieces with respect to γ-rays. After α-particle exposure, the existence of extra chromosome fragments in PCC cells seems to be a good candidate for use as a biomarker

  1. Turbulence-induced relative velocity of dust particles. II. The bidisperse case

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo; Scalo, John E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-08-10

    We extend our earlier work on turbulence-induced relative velocity between equal-size particles (Paper I, in this series) to particles of arbitrarily different sizes. The Pan and Padoan (PP10) model shows that the relative velocity between different particles has two contributions, named the generalized shear and acceleration terms, respectively. The generalized shear term represents the particles' memory of the spatial flow velocity difference across the particle distance in the past, while the acceleration term is associated with the temporal flow velocity difference on individual particle trajectories. Using the simulation of Paper I, we compute the root-mean-square relative velocity, (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2}, as a function of the friction times, τ{sub p1} and τ{sub p2}, of the two particles and show that the PP10 prediction is in satisfactory agreement with the data, confirming its physical picture. For a given τ{sub p1} below the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, T{sub L}, (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} as a function of τ{sub p2} shows a dip at τ{sub p2} ≅ τ{sub p1}, indicating tighter velocity correlation between similar particles. Defining a ratio f ≡ τ{sub p,{sub l}}/τ{sub p,{sub h}}, with τ{sub p,{sub l}} and τ{sub p,{sub h}} the friction times of the smaller and larger particles, we find that (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} increases with decreasing f due to the generalized acceleration contribution, which dominates at f ≲ 1/4. At a fixed f, our model predicts that (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} scales as τ{sub p,h}{sup 1/2} for τ{sub p,{sub h}} in the inertial range of the flow, stays roughly constant for T{sub L} ≲ τ{sub p,{sub h}} ≲ T{sub L}/f, and finally decreases as τ{sub p,h}{sup −1/2} for τ{sub p,{sub h}} >> T{sub L}/f. The acceleration term is independent of the particle distance, r, and reduces the r dependence of (w {sup 2}){sup 1/2} in the bidisperse case.

  2. Brain signaling and behavioral responses induced by exposure to (56)Fe-particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denisova, N. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that exposure to 56Fe-particle irradiation (1.5 Gy, 1 GeV) produced aging-like accelerations in neuronal and behavioral deficits. Astronauts on long-term space flights will be exposed to similar heavy-particle radiations that might have similar deleterious effects on neuronal signaling and cognitive behavior. Therefore, the present study evaluated whether radiation-induced spatial learning and memory behavioral deficits are associated with region-specific brain signaling deficits by measuring signaling molecules previously found to be essential for behavior [pre-synaptic vesicle proteins, synaptobrevin and synaptophysin, and protein kinases, calcium-dependent PRKCs (also known as PKCs) and PRKA (PRKA RIIbeta)]. The results demonstrated a significant radiation-induced increase in reference memory errors. The increases in reference memory errors were significantly negatively correlated with striatal synaptobrevin and frontal cortical synaptophysin expression. Both synaptophysin and synaptobrevin are synaptic vesicle proteins that are important in cognition. Striatal PRKA, a memory signaling molecule, was also significantly negatively correlated with reference memory errors. Overall, our findings suggest that radiation-induced pre-synaptic facilitation may contribute to some previously reported radiation-induced decrease in striatal dopamine release and for the disruption of the central dopaminergic system integrity and dopamine-mediated behavior.

  3. Cellular and molecular analysis of mutagenesis induced by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L. X.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannias, D.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) and gamma rays was scored using human-hamster hybrid AL cells. The LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility ranged from 10 keV/microm protons to 150 keV/microm 4He ions. The induced mutant fractions at both the S1 and HGPRT loci were dependent on the dose and LET. In addition, for each dose examined, the mutant yield at the S1 locus was 30-60 fold higher than at the corresponding HGPRT locus. To determine whether the mutation spectrum was comparably dependent on dose and LET, independent S1- and HGPRT- mutants induced by 150 keV/microm 4He ions and gamma rays were isolated, and their DNA was analyzed by both Southern blotting and multiplex PCR methods. While the majority of radiation-induced mutants showed deletions of varying sizes, the relative percentage of large deletions was found to be related to both the dose and LET of the radiation examined. Using a mutation system that can detect multilocus changes, results of the present study show that radiation-induced chromosomal loss can be in the millions of base pairs.

  4. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect II: Effects of variations of the fuel particle diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shurong; Wang, Qiming; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-02-01

    In order to predict the irradiation mechanical behaviors of plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the total burnup is divided into two stages: the initial stage and the increasing stage. At the initial stage, the thermal effects induced by the high temperature differences between the operation temperatures and the room temperature are mainly considered; and at the increasing stage, the intense mechanical interactions between the fuel particles and the matrix due to the irradiation swelling of fuel particles are focused on. The large-deformation thermo-elasto-plasticity finite element analysis is performed to evaluate the effects of particle diameters on the in-pile mechanical behaviors of fuel elements. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the fuel particle diameters; the effects of particle diameters on the maximum first principal stresses vary with burnup, and the considered case with the largest particle diameter holds the maximum values all along; (2) at the cladding near the interface between the fuel meat and the cladding, the Mises stresses and the first principal stresses undergo major changes with increasing burnup, and different variations exist for different particle diameter cases; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles rise with the particle diameters.

  5. Strontium ranelate inhibits titanium-particle-induced osteolysis by restraining inflammatory osteoclastogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Zhu, Shijun; Cui, Jingfu; Shao, Hongguo; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Geng, Dechun; Yu, Long

    2014-11-01

    Wear-particle-induced osteolysis is considered to be the main reason for revision after arthroplasty. Although the exact mechanism remains unclear, inflammatory osteoclastogenesis plays an important role in this process. Strontium ranelate (SR) was found to have a therapeutic effect on osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Based on prior studies, the present authors hypothesized that SR prevents wear-particle-induced osteolysis through restraining inflammatory osteoclastogenesis. The present study used 80 male C57BL/J6 mice to test this hypothesis in a murine osteolysis model. All experimental animals were randomly divided into four groups: a control group; a SR group; a titanium group; and a titanium+SR group. Once titanium particles had been implanted in mice, the mice were administered SR (900 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) by gavage for 14 days. After 14 days, the calvaria were collected for micro-computed tomography (μCT), histological and molecular analysis. The results of μCT and histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that SR markedly inhibited bone resorption and the generation of tartrate-resistant acid-phosphatase-positive cells in vivo, compared with titanium-stimulated calvaria. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and ELISAs showed that SR stimulated the mRNA and protein expression of osteoprotegerin, and inhibited gene and protein expression of receptor activators of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand in titanium-particle-charged calvaria. In addition, SR obviously reduced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in the calvaria of the titanium group. It was concluded that SR inhibits titanium-induced osteolysis by restraining inflammatory osteoclastogenesis, and that it could be developed as a new drug to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. PMID:25078426

  6. Modeling fundamental plasma transport and particle-induced emission in a simplified Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Paul Nicholas

    This work involves the modeling of fundamental plasma physics processes occurring within environments that are similar to that of the discharge and plume regions of electric propulsion devices such as Hall effect thrusters. The research is conducted as a collaborative effort with the Plasma & Space Propulsion Laboratory at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), as part of the University of Michigan/AFRL Center for Excellence in Electric Propulsion (MACEEP). Transport physics, such as particle-particle collisions and particle-induced electron emission, are simulated within the UCLA experimental facility and its representative electric propulsion environment. Simulation methods employed include the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques for the kinetic simulation of charged, rarefied species on high-performance computing architectures. Momentum- (MEX) and charge-exchange (CEX) collision cross-section models for Xe and Xe+, both total and differential, are successfully validated at collision energies of ˜1.5 keV within the novel facility. Heavy-species collisional transport models are validated and the importance of scattering anisotropy in this collision-dominated environment is shown. The theory of particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is then investigated in the context of the relevant energies and environments of the UCLA facility and electric propulsion devices and diagnostics. Reduced, semi-empirical models for total yield and emitted electron energy distribution functions that are easily implemented in a DSMC-PIC code are developed for the simulation of secondary-electron emission due to low-energy ions and high-energy atoms, even in the case of incomplete target-material information. These models are important for the characterization of electric propulsion devices due to the problematic nature of low-temperature plasma diagnostic techniques in which the emission of electrons is physically indistinguishable

  7. Toll-like receptors-2 and 4 are overexpressed in an experimental model of particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Roberto D; Nich, Christophe; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Li, Chenguang; Swank, Katherine R; Gibon, Emmanuel; Rao, Allison J; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    Aseptic loosening secondary to particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major cause of failure of total joint replacements (TJR) in the mid- and long term. As sentinels of the innate immune system, macrophages are central to the recognition and initiation of the inflammatory cascade, which results in the activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and danger-associated molecular patterns. Experimentally, polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene (PE) particles have been shown to activate macrophages via the TLR pathway. The specific TLRs involved in PE particle-induced osteolysis remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TLR-2, -4, and -9 mediated responses play a critical role in the development of PE wear particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium model. To test this hypothesis, we first demonstrated that PE particles caused observable osteolysis, visible by microCT and bone histomorphometry when the particles were applied to the calvarium of C57BL/6 mice. The number of TRAP positive osteoclasts was significantly greater in the PE-treated group when compared to the control group without particles. Finally, using immunohistochemistry, TLR-2 and TLR-4 were highly expressed in PE particle-induced osteolytic lesions, whereas TLR-9 was downregulated. TLR-2 and -4 may represent novel therapeutic targets for prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and accompanying TJR failure. PMID:24115330

  8. Toll-like Receptors-2 and 4 are overexpressed in an experimental model of particle-induced osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Roberto D.; Nich, Christophe; Zwingenberger, Stefan; Li, Chenguang; Swank, Katherine R.; Gibon, Emmanuel; Rao, Allison J.; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic loosening secondary to particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major cause of failure of total joint replacements (TJR) in the mid- and long-term. As sentinels of the innate immune system, macrophages are central to the recognition and initiation of the inflammatory cascade which results in the activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Experimentally, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) particles have been shown to activate macrophages via the TLR pathway. The specific TLRs involved in PE particle-induced osteolysis remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that TLR-2, -4 and -9 mediated responses play a critical role in the development of PE wear particle-induced osteolysis in the murine calvarium model. To test this hypothesis, we first demonstrated that PE particles caused observable osteolysis, visible by microCT and bone histomorphometry when the particles were applied to the calvarium of C57BL/6 mice. The number of TRAP positive osteoclasts was significantly greater in the PE-treated group when compared to the control group without particles. Finally, using immunohistochemistry, TLR-2 and TLR-4 were highly expressed in PE particle-induced osteolytic lesions, whereas TLR-9 was downregulated. TLR-2 and -4 may represent novel therapeutic targets for prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and accompanying TJR failure. PMID:24115330

  9. Diesel exhaust particles induce endothelial dysfunction in apoE{sup -/-} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Christian S.; Sheykhzade, Majid; Moller, Peter; Folkmann, Janne Kjaergaard; Amtorp, Ole; Jonassen, Thomas; Loft, Steffen . E-mail: s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk

    2007-02-15

    Background: Particulate air pollution can aggravate cardiovascular disease by mechanisms suggested to involve translocation of particles to the bloodstream and impairment of endothelial function, possibly dependent on present atherosclerosis. Aim: We investigated the effects of exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in vivo and ex vivo on vasomotor functions in aorta from apoE{sup -/-} mice with slight atherosclerosis and from normal apoE{sup +/+} mice. Methods: DEP 0, 0.5 or 5 mg/kg bodyweight in saline was administered i.p. The mice were sacrificed 1 h later and aorta ring segments were mounted on wire myographs. Segments from unexposed mice were also incubated ex vivo with 0, 10 and 100 {mu}g DEP/ml before measurement of vasomotor functions. Results: Exposure to 0.5 mg/kg DEP in vivo caused a decrease in the endothelium-dependent acetylcholine elicited vasorelaxation in apoE{sup -/-} mice, whereas the response was enhanced in apoE{sup +/+} mice. No significant change was observed after administration of 5 mg/kg DEP. In vivo DEP exposure did not affect constriction induced by K{sup +} or phenylephrine. In vitro exposure to 100 {mu}g DEP/ml enhanced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and attenuated phenylephrine-induced constriction. Vasodilation induced by sodium nitroprusside was not affected by any DEP exposure. Conclusion: Exposure to DEP has acute effect on vascular functions. Endothelial dysfunction possibly due to decreased NO production as suggested by decreased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation and unchanged sodium nitroprusside response can be induced by DEP in vivo only in vessels of mice with some atherosclerosis.

  10. Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis via modulating RANKL signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Yi; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Dan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Schisantherin A impairs RANKL signaling pathway. • Schisantherin A suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Schisantherin A may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays critical role in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been a promising strategy for treating osteoclast related bone diseases such as osteoporosis and aseptic prosthetic loosening. Schisantherin A (SA), a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra sphenanthera, has been used as an antitussive, tonic, and sedative agent, but its effect on osteoclasts has been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SA was found to inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, SA inhibited OSCAR, cathepsin K and TRAP in a dose dependent manner. Further signal transduction studies revealed that SA down-regulate RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling activation by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, SA also decreased the RANKL-induced MAPKs signaling pathway, including JNK and ERK1/2 posphorylation while had no obvious effects on p38 activation. Finally, SA suppressed the NF-κB and MAPKs subsequent gene expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. In vivo studies, SA inhibited osteoclast function and exhibited bone protection effect in wear-particle-induced bone erosion model. Taken together, SA could attenuate osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. These data indicated that SA is a promising therapeutic natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related prosthesis loosening.

  11. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  12. Urban particle-induced apoptosis and phenotype shifts in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Holian, A; Hamilton, R F; Morandi, M T; Brown, S D; Li, L

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological studies report a small but positive association between short-term increases in airborne particulate matter and small increases in morbidity and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular disease in urban areas. However, the lack of a mechanistic explanation to link particle exposure and human health effects makes it difficult to validate the human health effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that urban particles could cause apoptosis of human alveolar macrophages(AM) and a shift of their phenotypes to a higher immune active state, which would provide a mechanism to explain an inflammatory response. Freshly isolated human AM were incubated for 24 hr with urban particles (#1648 and #1649), Mount Saint Helen's ash (MSH), and residual oil fly ash (ROFA).Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and apoptosis was demonstrated by morphology, cell death ELISA, and DNA ladder formation. Additionally, AM were characterized according to RFD1(+) (immune stimulatory macrophages) and RFD1(+)7(+) (suppressor macrophages) phenotypes by flow cytometry. ROFA particles caused AM necrosis at concentrations as low as 10 microg/ml, urban particles had no effect except at 200 microg/ml, and MSH had no effect at 200 microg/ml. ROFA (25 microg/ml) and particles #1648 or #1649 (100 microg/ml) caused apoptosis of AM by all three criteria, but 200 microg/ml MSH had no effect. Finally, 25 microg/ml ROFA and 100 microg/ml particles #1648 or #1649 up regulated the expression of the RFD1(+) AM phenotype, while only ROFA decreased the RFD1(+)7(+) phenotype. Consequently, ROFA and urban particles can induce apoptosis of human AM and increase the ratio of AM phenotypes toward a higher immune active state (i.e., increased RFD1(+):RFD1(+)7(+) ratio). Ifurban particles cause similar changes in vivo, this could result in lung inflammation and possible increased pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID

  13. Strontium inhibits titanium particle-induced osteoclast activation and chronic inflammation via suppression of NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shijun; Hu, Xuanyang; Tao, Yunxia; Ping, Zichuan; Wang, Liangliang; Shi, Jiawei; Wu, Xiexing; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Huilin; Nie, Zhikui; Xu, Yaozeng; Wang, Zhirong; Geng, Dechun

    2016-01-01

    Wear-particle-induced chronic inflammation and osteoclastogenesis have been identified as critical factors of aseptic loosening. Although strontium is known to be involved in osteoclast differentiation, its effect on particle-induced inflammatory osteolysis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the potential impact and underling mechanism of strontium on particle-induced osteoclast activation and chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro. As expected, strontium significantly inhibited titanium particle-induced inflammatory infiltration and prevented bone loss in a murine calvarial osteolysis model. Interestingly, the number of mature osteoclasts decreased after treatment with strontium in vivo, suggesting osteoclast formation might be inhibited by strontium. Additionally, low receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and p65 immunochemistry staining were observed in strontium-treatment groups. In vitro, strontium obviously decreased osteoclast formation, osteoclastogenesis-related gene expression, osteoclastic bone resorption and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in bone-marrow-derived macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrated that strontium impaired osteoclastogenesis by blocking RANKL-induced activation of NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that strontium can significantly inhibit particle-induced osteoclast activation and inflammatory bone loss by disturbing the NF-κB pathway, and is an effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of wear particle-induced aseptic loosening. PMID:27796351

  14. Non-random distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) in mammalian cells is dependent on the spatial distribution of energy deposition from the ionizing radiation. For high LET particle radiations the primary ionization sites occur in a correlated manner along the track of the particles, while for X-rays these sites are much more randomly distributed throughout the volume of the cell. It can therefore be expected that the distribution of dsbs linearly along the DNA molecule also varies with the type of radiation and the ionization density. Using pulsed-field gel and conventional gel techniques, we measured the size distribution of DNA molecules from irradiated human fibroblasts in the total range of 0.1 kbp-10 Mbp for X-rays and high LET particles (N ions, 97 keV/microns and Fe ions, 150 keV/microns). On a mega base pair scale we applied conventional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques such as measurement of the fraction of DNA released from the well (FAR) and measurement of breakage within a specific NotI restriction fragment (hybridization assay). The induction rate for widely spaced breaks was found to decrease with LET. However, when the entire distribution of radiation-induced fragments was analysed, we detected an excess of fragments with sizes below about 200 kbp for the particles compared with X-irradiation. X-rays are thus more effective than high LET radiations in producing large DNA fragments but less effective in the production of smaller fragments. We determined the total induction rate of dsbs for the three radiations based on a quantitative analysis of all the measured radiation-induced fragments and found that the high LET particles were more efficient than X-rays at inducing dsbs, indicating an increasing total efficiency with LET. Conventional assays that are based only on the measurement of large fragments are therefore misleading when determining total dsb induction rates of high LET particles. The possible biological significance of this non

  15. Stress-induced Start Codon Fidelity Regulates Arsenite-inducible Regulatory Particle-associated Protein (AIRAP) Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Lolita; Braunstein, Ilana; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Initial steps in protein synthesis are highly regulated processes as they define the reading frame of the translation machinery. Eukaryotic translation initiation is a process facilitated by numerous factors (eIFs), aimed to form a “scanning” mechanism toward the initiation codon. Translation initiation of the main open reading frame (ORF) in an mRNA transcript has been reported to be regulated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in a manner of re-initiation. This mode of regulation is governed by the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and controlled by cellular stresses. Another mode of translational initiation regulation is leaky scanning, and this regulatory process has not been extensively studied. We have identified arsenite-inducible regulatory particle-associated protein (AIRAP) transcript to be translationally induced during arsenite stress conditions. AIRAP transcript contains a single uORF in a poor-kozak context. AIRAP translation induction is governed by means of leaky scanning and not re-initiation. This induction of AIRAP is solely dependent on eIF1 and the uORF kozak context. We show that eIF1 is phosphorylated under specific conditions that induce protein misfolding and have biochemically characterized this site of phosphorylation. Our data indicate that leaky scanning like re-initiation is responsive to stress conditions and that leaky scanning can induce ORF translation by bypassing poor kozak context of a single uORF transcript. PMID:24898249

  16. Diesel Exhaust Particle-Exposed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Induce Dendritic Cell Maturation and Polarization via Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bleck, Bertram; Tse, Doris B.; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria A.; Zhang, Feijie

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to air pollutants, including ambient particulate matter, has been proposed as a mechanism for the rise in allergic disorders. Diesel exhaust particles, a major component of ambient particulate matter, induce sensitization to neoallergens, but the mechanisms by which sensitization occur remain unclear. We show that diesel exhaust particles upregulate thymic stromal lymphopoietin in human bronchial epithelial cells in an oxidant-dependent manner. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin induced by diesel exhaust particles was associated with maturation of myeloid dendritic cells, which was blocked by anti-thymic stromal lymphopoietin antibodies or silencing epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Dendritic cells exposed to diesel exhaust particle-treated human bronchial epithelial cells induced Th2 polarization in a thymic stromal lymphopoietin-dependent manner. These findings provide new insight into the mechanisms by which diesel exhaust particles modify human lung mucosal immunity. PMID:18049884

  17. Thermally induced passage and current of particles in a highly unstable optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, Artem; Zemánek, Pavel; Filip, Radim

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the statistics of first-passage times of a Brownian particle moving in a highly unstable nonlinear potential proportional to an odd power of position. We observe temperature-induced shortening of the mean first-passage time and its dependence on the power of nonlinearity. We propose a passage-time fraction as both a simple and experimentally detectable witness of the nonlinearity. It is advantageously independent of all other parameters of the experiment and observable for a small number of trajectories. To better characterize the stochastic passage in the unstable potential, we introduce an analogy of the signal-to-noise ratio for the statistical distribution of the first-passage times. Interestingly, the upper bound for the signal-to-noise ratio is temperature independent in the unstable potential. Finally, we describe the nonequilibrium steady state of the particle cyclically passing through unstable odd nonlinearity. The maximum of the steady-state probability distribution shifts against the directions of the current and this counterintuitive effect increases with temperature. All these thermally induced effects are very promising targets for experimental tests of highly nonlinear stochastic dynamics of particles placed into optical potential landscapes of shaped optical tweezers.

  18. Near-Infrared-Induced Heating of Confined Water in Polymeric Particles for Efficient Payload Release

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-triggered release from polymeric capsules could make a major impact on biological research by enabling remote and spatiotemporal control over the release of encapsulated cargo. The few existing mechanisms for NIR-triggered release have not been widely applied because they require custom synthesis of designer polymers, high-powered lasers to drive inefficient two-photon processes, and/or coencapsulation of bulky inorganic particles. In search of a simpler mechanism, we found that exposure to laser light resonant with the vibrational absorption of water (980 nm) in the NIR region can induce release of payloads encapsulated in particles made from inherently non-photo-responsive polymers. We hypothesize that confined water pockets present in hydrated polymer particles absorb electromagnetic energy and transfer it to the polymer matrix, inducing a thermal phase change. In this study, we show that this simple and highly universal strategy enables instantaneous and controlled release of payloads in aqueous environments as well as in living cells using both pulsed and continuous wavelength lasers without significant heating of the surrounding aqueous solution. PMID:24717072

  19. Is delayed genomic instability specifically induced by high-LET particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testard, Isabelle; Sabatier, Laure

    1998-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can induce a large variety of damages in the DNA. The processing or repair of this damage occurs in the first minutes up to several hours after irradiation. Afterwhile the remaining lesions are fixed in an irreparable state. However, in recent years, data have accumulated to suggest that genomic instability can manifest in the progeny of irradiated cells leading to accumulation of damage through cell generations. Different biological endpoints were described: delayed cell death, delayed mutations, de novo chromosomal instability. The question regarding the ability of sparsely ionizing X-or γ-rays to induce such phenomenon is still unclear for normal cells. In most of the reports, high linear energy transfer (LET) particles are able to induce genomic instability but not low-LET particles. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still unknown. In human fibroblasts irradiated by heavy ions in a large range of LETs, we showed that the chromosomal instability is characterized by telomeric associations (TAS) involving specific chromosomes. The same instability is observed during the senescence process and during the first passages after viral transfection. The specific chromosomal instability that we observed after irradiation would not be a direct consequence of irradiation but would be a natural phenomenon occurring after many cell divisions. The effect of the irradiation would lie on the bypass of the senescence process that would permit cells with end to end fusions to survive and be transmitted through cell generations, accumulating chromosome rearrangements and chromosome imbalances. Research on molecular mechanisms of chromosomal instability is focused on the role of telomeres in end to end fusions. Such observations could contribute to understand why chromosomal instability is not a dose dependant phenomenon. Why high-LET particles would be so potent in inducing delayed instability? The answer might lie in the study of primary effects of

  20. Gravitational induced particle production through a nonminimal curvature-matter coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, José P.; Pavón, Diego

    2015-08-01

    We consider the possibility of a gravitationally induced particle production through the mechanism of a nonminimal curvature-matter coupling. An interesting feature of this gravitational theory is that the divergence of the energy-momentum tensor is nonzero. As a first step in our study we reformulate the model in terms of an equivalent scalar-tensor theory, with two arbitrary potentials. By using the formalism of open thermodynamic systems, we interpret the energy balance equations in this gravitational theory from a thermodynamic point of view, as describing irreversible matter creation processes. The particle number creation rates, the creation pressure, and the entropy production rates are explicitly obtained as functions of the scalar field and its potentials, as well as of the matter Lagrangian. The temperature evolution laws of the newly created particles are also obtained. The cosmological implications of the model are briefly investigated, and it is shown that the late-time cosmic acceleration may be due to particle creation processes. Furthermore, it is also shown that due to the curvature-matter coupling, during the cosmological evolution a large amount of comoving entropy is also produced.

  1. Ion channels induced in lipid bilayers by subvirion particles of the nonenveloped mammalian reoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, M T; Nibert, M L; Fields, B N

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms by which nonenveloped viruses penetrate cell membranes as an early step in infection are not well understood. Current ideas about the mode for cytosolic penetration by nonenveloped viruses include (i) formation of a membrane-spanning pore through which viral components enter the cell and (ii) local breakdown of the cellular membrane to provide direct access of infecting virus to the cell's interior. Here we report that of the three viral particles of nonenveloped mammalian reoviruses: virions, infectious subvirion particles, and cores (the last two forms generated from intact reovirus virions by proteolysis), only the infectious subvirion particles induced the formation of anion-selective, multisized channels in planar lipid bilayers under the experimental conditions used in this study. The value for the smallest size conductance varied depending on the lipid composition of the bilayer between 90 pS (Asolectin) and 300 pS (phosphatidylethanolamine:phosphatidylserine) and was found to be voltage independent. These findings are consistent with a proposal that the proteolytically activated infectious subviral particles mediate the interaction between virus and the lipid bilayer of a cell membrane during penetration. In addition, the findings indicate that the "penetration proteins" of some enveloped and nonenveloped viruses share similarities in the way they interact with bilayers. PMID:7504268

  2. Characterization of lacustrine iron sulfide particles with proton-induced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, W. ); Grime, G.W. ); Woof, C. )

    1992-12-01

    Black particles, collected by filtration (1.2-[mu] pore size) from the anoxic waters of a soft-water lake, were examined by a scanning proton microprobe which permitted quantitative elemental analysis by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). There was a uniform distribution of sulfur across the filter, but Fe, and to a lesser extent, Mn, was localized in [approximately]5-[mu]m diameter clusters. Elemental analysis with 1-[mu]m-diameter beams revealed that the Fe clusters were mainly comprised of iron oxides. Iron sulfide material not in the Fe clusters had stoichiometric proportions of Fe[sub 1.0]S[sub 0.60]P[sub 0.60]Ca[sub 0.24]K[sub 0.14]. Although a purely biogenic origin for P, Ca, and K cannot be ruled out, the composition is consistent with the particles originating as authigenic iron oxides which react with sulfide as they sink through the water column. The iron sulfide particles are richer in Cu (4,000 ppm) and Zn (6,000 ppm) than the iron oxides, suggesting that these elements are also concentrated as their insoluble sulfides. The coexistence of iron oxides and sulfides indicates that either the supply of sulfide is limiting or that some iron oxide particles are unreactive. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Particle-induced erythropoietin-independent effects of erythroid precursor cells in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Ploemacher, R E; van Soest, P L; Wagemaker, G; van 't Hull, E

    1979-09-01

    A possible regulatory action of phagocytic cells on erythropoiesis was investigated by infusion of inert polystyrene latex particles (LAT). LAT appeared to induce changes in the femoral content of erythroid progenitor cells. These changes were most pronounced in primitive erythroid progenitor cells (BFUe) and appeared to be gradually damped in more differentiated populations (CFUe and erythroblasts). LAT did not influence granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFUc). The effects of LAT could not be attributed to changes in the systemic erythropoietin (EP) concentration. Administration of dexamethason nullified the effect of low doses of LAT, suggesting that phagocytosis of the particles is essential to the observed effects. Erythroid burst formation was previously found to be dependent on a bone marrow associated activity, termed BFA (burst feeder activity). BFA acts as an in vitro inducer of EP-responsiveness in BFUe. In this study it was found that LAT-induced changes in femoral erythroid progenitor cell content were characteristically preceded by corresponding changes in BFA. It was concluded that BFA-associated cells probably play a role in vivo in the early differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells. The present data are interpreted as direct in vivo evidence supporting a two-step regulatory model operating in erythropoiesis and provide evidence that phagocytic cells are a component of the erythroid haemopoietic inductive micro-environment. PMID:519701

  4. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  5. Laser-Induced Particle Adsorption on Atomically Thin MoS2.

    PubMed

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Choi, Seung Tae; Kim, Yong Soo; DelRio, Frank W; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-02-10

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) shows great potential for use in nanodevices because of its remarkable electronic, optoelectronic, and mechanical properties. These material properties are often dependent on the thickness or the number of layers, and hence Raman spectroscopy is widely used to characterize the thickness of atomically thin MoS2 due to the sensitivity of the vibrational spectrum to thickness. However, the lasers used in Raman spectroscopy can increase the local surface temperature and eventually damage the upper layers of the MoS2, thereby changing the aforementioned material properties. In this work, the effects of lasers on the topography and material properties of atomically thin MoS2 were systematically investigated using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. In detail, friction force microscopy was used to study the friction characteristics of atomically thin MoS2 as a function of laser powers from 0.5 to 20 mW and number of layers from 1 to 3. It was found that particles formed on the top surface of the atomically thin MoS2 due to laser-induced thermal effects. The degree of particle formation increased as the laser power increased, prior to the thinning of the atomically thin MoS2. In addition, the degree of particle formation increased as the number of MoS2 layers increased, which suggests that the thermal behavior of the supported MoS2 may differ depending on the number of layers. The particles likely originated from the atmosphere due to laser-induced heating, but could be eliminated via appropriate laser powers and exposure times, which were determined experimentally. The outcomes of this work indicate that thermal management is crucial in the design of reliable nanoscale devices based on atomically thin MoS2.

  6. Autophagy is essential for ultrafine particle-induced inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Yin-Fang; Wang, Ping-Li; Wu, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhou-Yang; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhu, Chen; Cao, Chao; Mao, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Feng; Wang, Bei-Bei; Cormier, Stephania A; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Environmental ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is capable of inducing airway injury, while the detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate pivotal roles of autophagy in regulation of inflammation and mucus hyperproduction induced by PM containing environmentally persistent free radicals in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. PM was endocytosed by HBE cells and simultaneously triggered autophagosomes, which then engulfed the invading particles to form amphisomes and subsequent autolysosomes. Genetic blockage of autophagy markedly reduced PM-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines, e.g. IL8 and IL6, and MUC5AC in HBE cells. Mice with impaired autophagy due to knockdown of autophagy-related gene Becn1 or Lc3b displayed significantly reduced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in response to PM exposure in vivo. Interference of the autophagic flux by lysosomal inhibition resulted in accumulated autophagosomes/amphisomes, and intriguingly, this process significantly aggravated the IL8 production through NFKB1, and markedly attenuated MUC5AC expression via activator protein 1. These data indicate that autophagy is required for PM-induced airway epithelial injury, and that inhibition of autophagy exerts therapeutic benefits for PM-induced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction, although they are differentially orchestrated by the autophagic flux.

  7. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  8. PIXE-induced XRF by high energy protons and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, M.; Manfredi, G.; Milazzo, M.; Silari, M.

    1993-04-01

    In the past three years a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study has been conducted on the production of intense sources of monochromatic X-rays in the range 1-75 keV by bombardment of pure element targets with protons and alpha particles of tens of MeV energy. The present paper describes a dual-chamber irradiation system which has been designed and built for PIXE-induced XRF. Preliminary experimental results of analyses obtained with 20 MeV protons and a Zn primary target are shown.

  9. Analytical Applications Of Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, I. V.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Ene, A.; Badica, T.; Ghisa, V.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper a complex study of the capabilities of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique for the determination of major, minor and trace constituents of metallurgical, biological and environmental samples has been done. The elements identified in the metallurgical samples (steels) using PIXE were: K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, W, Ga, As, Pb, Mo, Rb, In, Rh, Zr, Pd, Nb, Sn and Sb. In the investigated biological and environmental samples (vegetals leaves, soil and mosses) PIXE analysis allowed determination of: S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Hg and Pb.

  10. Analysis of radiation-induced small Cu particle cluster formation in aqueous CuCl2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayanetti, Sumedha; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Radition-induced small Cu particle cluster formation in aqueous CuCl2 was analyzed. It was noticed that nearest neighbor distance increased with the increase in the time of irradiation. This showed that the clusters approached the lattice dimension of bulk copper. As the average cluster size approached its bulk dimensions, an increase in the nearest neighbor coordination number was found with the decrease in the surface to volume ratio. Radiolysis of water by incident x-ray beam led to the reduction of copper ions in the solution to themetallic state.

  11. Effect of particle size on hydroxyapatite crystal-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nadra, Imad; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Philippidis, Pandelis; Whelan, Linda C; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Haskard, Dorian O; Landis, R Clive

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages may promote a vicious cycle of inflammation and calcification in the vessel wall by ingesting neointimal calcific deposits (predominantly hydroxyapatite) and secreting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, itself a vascular calcifying agent. Here we have investigated whether particle size affects the proinflammatory potential of hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro and whether the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway plays a role in the macrophage TNFalpha response. The particle size and nano-topography of nine different crystal preparations was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and gas sorbtion analysis. Macrophage TNFalpha secretion was inversely related to hydroxyapatite particle size (P=0.011, Spearman rank correlation test) and surface pore size (P=0.014). A necessary role for the NF-kappaB pathway was demonstrated by time-dependent I kappaB alpha degradation and sensitivity to inhibitors of I kappaB alpha degradation. To test whether smaller particles were intrinsically more bioactive, their mitogenic activity on fibroblast proliferation was examined. This showed close correlation between TNFalpha secretion and crystal-induced fibroblast proliferation (P=0.007). In conclusion, the ability of hydroxyapatite crystals to stimulate macrophage TNFalpha secretion depends on NF-kappaB activation and is inversely related to particle and pore size, with crystals of 1-2 microm diameter and pore size of 10-50 A the most bioactive. Microscopic calcific deposits in early stages of atherosclerosis may therefore pose a greater inflammatory risk to the plaque than macroscopically or radiologically visible deposits in more advanced lesions.

  12. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

  13. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles.

  14. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  15. Autophagy mediated CoCrMo particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis by promoting osteoblast apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenheng; Liu, Naicheng; Liu, Kang; Zhou, Gang; Gan, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Tongguo; He, Wei; Wang, Lintao; Guo, Ting; Bao, Nirong; Wang, Rui; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Jiangning; Dong, Lei; Zhao, Jianning; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis is the leading cause of aseptic loosening, which is the most common reason for THA (total hip arthroplasty) failure and revision surgery. Although existing studies suggest that osteoblast apoptosis induced by wear debris is involved in aseptic loosening, the underlying mechanism linking wear particles to osteoblast apoptosis remains almost totally unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of autophagy on osteoblast apoptosis induced by CoCrMo metal particles (CoPs) in vitro and in a calvarial resorption animal model. Our study demonstrated that CoPs stimulated autophagy in osteoblasts and PIO (particle-induced osteolysis) animal models. Both autophagy inhibitor 3-MA (3-methyladenine) and siRNA of Atg5 could dramatically reduce CoPs-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Further, inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA ameliorated the severity of osteolysis in PIO animal models. Moreover, 3-MA also prevented osteoblast apoptosis in an antiautophagic way when tested in PIO model. Collectively, these results suggest that autophagy plays a key role in CoPs-induced osteolysis and that targeting autophagy-related pathways may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis.

  16. Autophagy mediated CoCrMo particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis by promoting osteoblast apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenheng; Liu, Naicheng; Liu, Kang; Zhou, Gang; Gan, Jingjing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Tongguo; He, Wei; Wang, Lintao; Guo, Ting; Bao, Nirong; Wang, Rui; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Jiangning; Dong, Lei; Zhao, Jianning; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis is the leading cause of aseptic loosening, which is the most common reason for THA (total hip arthroplasty) failure and revision surgery. Although existing studies suggest that osteoblast apoptosis induced by wear debris is involved in aseptic loosening, the underlying mechanism linking wear particles to osteoblast apoptosis remains almost totally unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of autophagy on osteoblast apoptosis induced by CoCrMo metal particles (CoPs) in vitro and in a calvarial resorption animal model. Our study demonstrated that CoPs stimulated autophagy in osteoblasts and PIO (particle-induced osteolysis) animal models. Both autophagy inhibitor 3-MA (3-methyladenine) and siRNA of Atg5 could dramatically reduce CoPs-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Further, inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA ameliorated the severity of osteolysis in PIO animal models. Moreover, 3-MA also prevented osteoblast apoptosis in an antiautophagic way when tested in PIO model. Collectively, these results suggest that autophagy plays a key role in CoPs-induced osteolysis and that targeting autophagy-related pathways may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis. PMID:26566231

  17. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2003-01-01

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0 Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term changes in amphetamine-induced reinforcement and aversion in rats following exposure to 56Fe particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    Exposing rats to heavy particles produces alterations in the functioning of dopaminergic neurons and in the behaviors that depend upon the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Two of these dopamine-dependent behaviors include amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measure using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced reinforcement, measured using the conditioned place preference procedure, and amphetamine-induced aversion, measured using the conditioned taste aversion. Previous research has shown that exposing rats to 1.0 Gy of 1GeV/n 56Fe particles produced a disruption of an amphetamine-induced taste aversion 3 days following exposure, but produced an apparent enhancement of the aversion 112 days following exposure. The present experiments were designed to provide a further evaluation of these results by examining taste aversion learning 154 days following exposure to 1.0Gy 56Fe particles and to establish the convergent validity of the taste aversion results by looking at the effects of exposure on the establishment of an amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference 3, 7, and 16 weeks following irradiation. The taste aversion results failed to confirm the apparent enhancement of the amphetamine-induced CTA observed in the prior experiment. However, exposure to 56Fe particles prevented the acquisition of amphetamine-induced place preference at all three-time intervals. The results are interpreted as indicating that exposure to heavy particles can produce long-term changes in behavioral functioning.

  19. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao; Skovmand, Astrid; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A-DEP) for 24h to study lipid droplet formation and possible mechanisms. The results show that A-DEP did not induce cytotoxicity. The production of reactive oxygen species was only significantly increased after exposure for 3h, but not 24h. Intracellular level of reduced glutathione was increased after 24h exposure. These results combined indicate an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Exposure to A-DEP was associated with significantly increased formation of lipid droplets, as well as changes in lysosomal function, assessed as reduced LysoTracker staining. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction.

  20. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao; Skovmand, Astrid; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A-DEP) for 24h to study lipid droplet formation and possible mechanisms. The results show that A-DEP did not induce cytotoxicity. The production of reactive oxygen species was only significantly increased after exposure for 3h, but not 24h. Intracellular level of reduced glutathione was increased after 24h exposure. These results combined indicate an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Exposure to A-DEP was associated with significantly increased formation of lipid droplets, as well as changes in lysosomal function, assessed as reduced LysoTracker staining. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction. PMID:26122084

  1. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  2. An insight into polymerization-induced self-assembly by dissipative particle dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Lv, Yisheng; Wang, Liquan; Xu, Pengxiang; Lin, Jiaping; Lin, Shaoliang

    2016-08-14

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly is a one-pot route to produce concentrated dispersions of block copolymer nano-objects. Herein, dissipative particle dynamics simulations with a reaction model were employed to investigate the behaviors of polymerization-induced self-assembly. The polymerization kinetics in the polymerization-induced self-assembly were analyzed by comparing with solution polymerization. It was found that the polymerization rate enhances in the initial stage and decreases in the later stage. In addition, the effects of polymerization rate, length of macromolecular initiators, and concentration on the aggregate morphologies and formation pathway were studied. The polymerization rate and the length of the macromolecular initiators are found to have a marked influence on the pathway of the aggregate formations and the final structures. Morphology diagrams were mapped correspondingly. A comparison between simulation results and experimental findings is also made and an agreement is shown. This work can enrich our knowledge about polymerization-induced self-assembly. PMID:27414465

  3. An insight into polymerization-induced self-assembly by dissipative particle dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Lv, Yisheng; Wang, Liquan; Xu, Pengxiang; Lin, Jiaping; Lin, Shaoliang

    2016-08-14

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly is a one-pot route to produce concentrated dispersions of block copolymer nano-objects. Herein, dissipative particle dynamics simulations with a reaction model were employed to investigate the behaviors of polymerization-induced self-assembly. The polymerization kinetics in the polymerization-induced self-assembly were analyzed by comparing with solution polymerization. It was found that the polymerization rate enhances in the initial stage and decreases in the later stage. In addition, the effects of polymerization rate, length of macromolecular initiators, and concentration on the aggregate morphologies and formation pathway were studied. The polymerization rate and the length of the macromolecular initiators are found to have a marked influence on the pathway of the aggregate formations and the final structures. Morphology diagrams were mapped correspondingly. A comparison between simulation results and experimental findings is also made and an agreement is shown. This work can enrich our knowledge about polymerization-induced self-assembly.

  4. Intracellular Delivery by Shape Anisotropic Magnetic Particle-Induced Cell Membrane Cuts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chien; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tung, Kuan-Wen; Zhou, Jessica; Teitell, Michael A; Yeh, J Andrew; Chiou, Pei Yu

    2016-08-01

    Introducing functional macromolecules into a variety of living cells is challenging but important for biology research and cell-based therapies. We report a novel cell delivery platform based on rotating shape anisotropic magnetic particles (SAMPs), which make very small cuts on cell membranes for macromolecule delivery with high efficiency and high survivability. SAMP delivery is performed by placing commercially available nickel powder onto cells grown in standard cell culture dishes. Application of a uniform magnetic field causes the magnetic particles to rotate because of mechanical torques induced by shape anisotropic magnetization. Cells touching these rotating particles are nicked, which generates transient membrane pores that enable the delivery of macromolecules into the cytosol of cells. Calcein dye, 3 and 40 kDa dextran polymers, a green fluorescence protein (GFP) plasmid, siRNA, and an enzyme (β-lactamase) were successfully delivered into HeLa cells, primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs), and mouse cortical neurons that can be difficult to transfect. The SAMP approach offers several advantages, including easy implementation, low cost, high throughput, and efficient delivery of a broad range of macromolecules. Collectively, SAMP delivery has great potential for a broad range of academic and industrial applications. PMID:26882924

  5. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  6. Mineral particles of varying composition induce differential chemokine release from epithelial lung cells: importance of physico-chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ovrevik, J; Myran, T; Refsnes, M; Låg, M; Becher, R; Hetland, R B; Schwarze, P E

    2005-04-01

    Presently, little is known about the potential health effects of mineral particles other than asbestos and quartz. In this study, a human epithelial lung cell line (A549), primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) and primary rat type 2 (T2) cells were exposed to stone quarry particles of two size fractions (<10 and <2.5 microm) from nine different rock samples. The ability to induce the release of chemokines from lung cells was investigated and compared with the particles' mineral and element composition and the amount of soluble elements. The stone particles induced the release of only low levels of interleukin (IL)-8 from A549 cells. In contrast, some of the other particles induced the release of high levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 from T2 cells, and high levels of IL-8 from SAECs. Differences in particle surface area could account for differences in activity between the <10 and <2.5 microm fractions of six out of the nine rock samples. For two samples the <2.5 microm fraction was most active and for one sample the <10 microm fraction was most active. Content of the mineral plagioclase displayed a strong, negative correlation with the potential to induce MIP-2, whereas the mineral pyroxene was positively correlated with MIP-2 induction. However, neither plagioclase nor pyroxene content was sufficient to explain differences in bioactivity between the particles. No statistically significant correlation was found between the amounts of total or soluble elements and MIP-2 release. In conclusion, the results suggest that mineral particles with a high content of plagioclase have a low potential to induce a pro-inflammatory response. However, a particular mineral or element responsible for eliciting strong increases in chemokine release could not be identified. Thus, at present it appears that analysing mineral and element content is insufficient to predict stone particle bioactivity, and that biological testing is a necessity.

  7. HZE particle radiation induces tissue-specific and p53-dependent mutagenesis in transgenic animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic animals, with the integrated target gene, provide a unique approach for measuring and characterizing mutations in any tissue of the animal. We are using the plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mice with different p53 genetic background to examine radiation-induced genetic damage resulting from exposure to heavy particle radiation. We measured lacZ mutation frequencies (MF) in the brain and spleen tissues at various times after exposing animals to an acute dose of 1 Gy of 1GeV/amu iron particles. MF in the spleen of p53+/+ animals increased up to 2.6-fold above spontaneous levels at 8 weeks post irradiation. In contrast, brain MF from the same animals increased 1.7-fold above controls in the same period. In the p53-/- animals, brain MF increased to 2.2-fold above spontaneous levels at 1 week after treatment, but returned to control levels thereafter. Radiation also induced alterations in the spectrum of mutants in both tissues, accompanied by changes in the frequency of mutants with deletions extending past the transgene into mouse genomic DNA. Our results indicate that the accumulation of transgene MF after radiation exposure is dependant on the tissue examined as well as the p53 genetic background of the animals.

  8. Targeted Cytoplasmic Irradiation with Alpha Particles Induces Mutations in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Jun; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, An; Waldren, Charles A.; Geard, Charles R.; Yu, Zengliang; Hei, Tom K.

    1999-04-01

    Ever since x-rays were shown to induce mutation in Drosophila more than 70 years ago, prevailing dogma considered the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutations and carcinogenesis, as being due mostly to direct damage to the nucleus. Although there was indication that alpha particle traversal through cellular cytoplasm was innocuous, the full impact remained unknown. The availability of the microbeam at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility of Columbia University made it possible to target and irradiate the cytoplasm of individual cells in a highly localized spatial region. By using dual fluorochrome dyes (Hoechst and Nile Red) to locate nucleus and cellular cytoplasm, respectively, thereby avoiding inadvertent traversal of nuclei, we show here that cytoplasmic irradiation is mutagenic at the CD59 (S1) locus of human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, while inflicting minimal cytotoxicity. The principal class of mutations induced are similar to those of spontaneous origin and are entirely different from those of nuclear irradiation. Furthermore, experiments with radical scavenger and inhibitor of intracellular glutathione indicated that the mutagenicity of cytoplasmic irradiation depends on generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that cytoplasm is an important target for genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. In addition, cytoplasmic traversal by alpha particles may be more dangerous than nuclear traversal, because the mutagenicity is accomplished by little or no killing of the target cells.

  9. Autophagy mediated TiAl₆V₄ particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis by promoting expression of TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Liu, Naicheng; Meng, Jia; Wang, Zhenheng; Zhou, Gang; Shi, Tongguo; Zhao, Jianning

    2016-04-22

    Peri-prosthetic osteolysis and the consequent aseptic loosening constitute the most common reason for total joint arthroplasty failure and surgical revision. Although numerous studies suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by wear particles is involved in the pathological process of aseptic loosening, the underlying mechanism linking wear particles to pro-inflammatory cytokines remains to be illustrated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of autophagy on TNF-α secretion induced by TiAl6V4 particles (TiPs) in macrophages and in a calvarial resorption animal model. Our study demonstrated that TiPs activated autophage in macrophages and particle-induced osteolysis animal models as well as periprosthetic membranes of patients with aseptic loosening. The autophagy inhibitor 3-MA (3-methyladenine) could dramatically reduce TiPs-induced TNF-α expression both in macrophages and in membranes from animal models. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA ameliorated the severity of osteolysis in PIO animal models. Collectively, these results suggest that autophagy plays a key role in TiPs-induced osteolysis by promoting TNF-α expression and that blocking autophagy may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis.

  10. Motorcycle exhaust particles induce airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in BALB/C mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2004-06-01

    A number of large studies have reported that environmental pollutants from fossil fuel combustion can cause deleterious effects to the immune system, resulting in an allergic reaction leading to respiratory tract damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of motorcycle exhaust particles (MEP), a major pollutant in the Taiwan urban area, on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in laboratory animals. BALB/c mice were instilled intratracheally (i.t.) with 1.2 mg/kg and 12 mg/kg of MEP, which was collected from two-stroke motorcycle engines. The mice were exposed 3 times i.t. with MEP, and various parameters for airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness were sequentially analyzed. We found that MEP would induce airway and pulmonary inflammation characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inflammatory cell infiltration in lung. In addition, MEP treatment enhanced BALF interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine levels and serum IgE production. Bronchial response measured by unrestrained plethysmography with methacholine challenge showed that MEP treatment induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in BALB/c mice. The chemical components in MEP were further fractionated with organic solvents, and we found that the benzene-extracted fraction exerts a similar biological effect as seen with MEP, including airway inflammation, increased BALF IL-4, serum IgE production, and induction of AHR. In conclusion, we present evidence showing that the filter-trapped particles emitted from the unleaded-gasoline-fueled two-stroke motorcycle engine may induce proinflammatory and proallergic response profiles in the absence of exposure to allergen.

  11. Interaction of the human cytomegalovirus particle with the host cell induces hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Steven; Nicholl, Mary Jane; Sutherland, Jane S.; Preston, Chris M.

    2011-05-25

    The cellular protein hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) was induced after infection of human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv-HCMV) also elicited the effect, demonstrating that the response was provoked by interaction of the infecting virion with the cell and that viral gene expression was not required. Although induction of HIF-1{alpha} was initiated by an early event, accumulation of the protein was not detected until 9 hours post infection, with levels increasing thereafter. Infection with uv-HCMV resulted in increased abundance of HIF-1{alpha}-specific RNA, indicating stimulation of transcription. In addition, greater phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was observed, and the activity of this enzyme was required for induction of HIF-1{alpha} to occur. HIF-1{alpha} controls the expression of many cellular gene products; therefore the findings reveal new ways in which interaction of the HCMV particle with the host cell may cause significant alterations to cellular physiology.

  12. The lasting effect of limonene-induced particle formation on air quality in a genuine indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Carolin; Wissenbach, Dirk K; von Bergen, Martin; Franck, Ulrich; Wendisch, Manfred; Schlink, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric ozone-terpene reactions, which form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, can affect indoor air quality when outdoor air mixes with indoor air during ventilation. This study, conducted in Leipzig, Germany, focused on limonene-induced particle formation in a genuine indoor environment (24 m(3)). Particle number, limonene and ozone concentrations were monitored during the whole experimental period. After manual ventilation for 30 min, during which indoor ozone levels reached up to 22.7 ppb, limonene was introduced into the room at concentrations of approximately 180 to 250 μg m(-3). We observed strong particle formation and growth within a diameter range of 9 to 50 nm under real-room conditions. Larger particles with diameters above 100 nm were less affected by limonene introduction. The total particle number concentrations (TPNCs) after limonene introduction clearly exceed outdoor values by a factor of 4.5 to 41 reaching maximum concentrations of up to 267,000 particles cm(-3). The formation strength was influenced by background particles, which attenuated the formation of new SOA with increasing concentration, and by ozone levels, an increase of which by 10 ppb will result in a six times higher TPNC. This study emphasizes indoor environments to be preferred locations for particle formation and growth after ventilation events. As a consequence, SOA formation can produce significantly higher amounts of particles than transported by ventilation into the indoor air.

  13. The effect of enoxacin on osteoclastogenesis and reduction of titanium particle-induced osteolysis via suppression of JNK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuqiang; Qu, Xinhua; Wu, Chuanlong; Zhai, Zanjing; Tian, Bo; Li, Haowei; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Xu, Xinchen; Wang, Wengang; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Dai, Kerong

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of enoxacin on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis. Wear particles liberated from the surface of prostheses are associated with aseptic prosthetic loosening. It is well established that wear particles induce inflammation, and that extensive osteoclastogenesis plays a critical role in peri-implant osteolysis and subsequent prosthetic loosening. Therefore, inhibiting extensive osteoclast formation and bone resorption could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent prosthetic loosening. In this study, we demonstrated that enoxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, exerts potent inhibitory effects on titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. Interestingly, the number of mature osteoclasts decreased after treatment with enoxacin in vivo, suggesting that osteoclast formation might be inhibited by enoxacin. We then performed in vitro studies to confirm our hypothesis and revealed the mechanism of action of enoxacin. Enoxacin inhibited osteoclast formation by specifically abrogating RANKL-induced JNK signaling. Collectively, these results suggest that enoxacin, an antibiotic with few side effects that is widely used in clinics, had significant potential for the treatment of particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis and other diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and function.

  14. Continuous particle separation using pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE)

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyungkook; Kim, Youngkyu; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce pressure-driven flow-induced miniaturizing free-flow electrophoresis (PDF-induced μ-FFE), a novel continuous separation method. In our separation system, the external flow and electric field are applied to particles, such that particle movement is affected by pressure-driven flow, electroosmosis, and electrophoresis. We then analyzed the hydrodynamic drag force and electrophoretic force applied to the particles in opposite directions. Based on this analysis, micro- and nano-sized particles were separated according to their electrophoretic mobilities with high separation efficiency. Because the separation can be achieved in a simple T-shaped microchannel, without the use of internal electrodes, it offers the advantages of low-cost, simple device fabrication and bubble-free operation, compared with conventional μ-FFE methods. Therefore, we expect the proposed separation method to have a wide range of filtering/separation applications in biochemical analysis. PMID:26819221

  15. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC-MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  16. Elemental analysis of agricultural soil samples by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruvinel, Paulo E.; Flocchini, Robert G.; Artaxo, Paulo; Crestana, Silvio; Herrmann, Paulo S. P., Jr.

    1999-04-01

    In agriculture, elements essential to vital processes are also called nutrients. A suitable and reliable particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) methodology for content determination of essential nutrients in soil samples was developed and its effectiveness proved. The PIXE method is applied to intermediate thickness samples, whose mass per area unit are smaller than 1 μg/cm 2. Precision and accuracy of the method was estimated after repeated measurements of a single reference material: CRM PACS-2 (estuarine sediment) with a matrix quite similar to the soil samples measured. This paper reports the results of elemental measurements in soil samples. A discussion of agricultural soil sample preparation for PIXE analysis is also presented.

  17. Measurement-induced-nonlocality for Dirac particles in Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger dilation space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Juan; Xu, Shuai; Ye, Liu

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the quantum correlation via measurement-induced-nonlocality (MIN) for Dirac particles in Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GHS) dilation space-time. It is shown that the physical accessible quantum correlation decreases as the dilation parameter increases monotonically. Unlike the case of scalar fields, the physical accessible correlation is not zero when the Hawking temperature is infinite owing to the Pauli exclusion principle and the differences between Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Meanwhile, the boundary of MIN related to Bell-violation is derived, which indicates that MIN is more general than quantum nonlocality captured by the violation of Bell-inequality. As a by-product, a tenable quantitative relation about MIN redistribution is obtained whatever the dilation parameter is. In addition, it is worth emphasizing that the underlying reason why the physical accessible correlation and mutual information decrease is that they are redistributed to the physical inaccessible regions.

  18. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols.

  19. The merits of particle induced X-ray emission in revealing painting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelmeijer, C.; Mäder, M.

    2002-04-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) at the external proton beam has proved ideal to study individual techniques of creating art objects. In particular, PIXE is suitable for examining paintings because of the low level of background produced by organic components like binders and paper backings. Thus, traces of pigments as deposited from pens on cardboard can be identified by this method. The combination of PIXE with external Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) allows non-destructive characterisation of near surface and thin film arrangements of paint materials. Thicker but less complex layers of oil paintings can be identified by special procedures of depth-resolved PIXE investigation. In this case, RBS provides additional information on organic coverings like madder lake or varnishes.

  20. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm.

  1. Water-soluble core/shell nanoparticles for proton therapy through particle-induced radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Maeng Jun; Kim, Kye-Ryung

    2015-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), therapy, and drug delivery systems. Metallic nanoparticles as therapeutic tools have been demonstrated using radio-frequency magnetic fields or near-infrared light. Recently, therapeutic applications of metallic nanomaterials combined with proton beams have been reported. Particle-induced radiation from metallic nanoparticles, which can enhance the therapeutic effects of proton therapy, was released when the nanoparticles were bombarded by a high-energy proton beam. Core/shell nanoparticles, especially Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles, have drawn attention in biological applications due to their attractive characteristics. However, studies on the phase transfer of organic-ligand-based core/shell nanoparticles into water are limited. Herein, we demonstrated that hydrophobic core/shell structured nanomaterials could be successfully dispersed in water through chloroform/surfactant mixtures. The effects of the core/shell nanomaterials and the proton irradiation on Escherichia coli (E. coli) were also explored.

  2. A model for vehicle-induced non-tailpipe emissions of particles along Swedish roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omstedt, G.; Bringfelt, B.; Johansson, C.

    One of the most important parameters that controls the suspension of road dust particles in the air is road surface moisture. This is calculated every hour from a budget equation that takes into account precipitation, evaporation and runoff. During wet conditions a road dust layer is built up from road wear which strongly depends on the use of studded tyres and road sanding. The dust layer is reduced during dry road conditions by suspension of particles due to vehicle-induced turbulence. The dust layer is also reduced by wash-off due to precipitation. Direct non-tailpipe vehicle emissions due to the wear and tear of the road surface, brakes and tyres are accounted for in the traditional way as constant emission factors expressed as mass emitted per vehicle kilometre. The model results are compared with measurements from both a narrow street canyon in the city centre of Stockholm and from an open highway outside the city. The model is able to account for the main features in the day-to-day mean PM 10 variability for the street canyon and for the highway. A peak in the PM 10 concentration is typically observed in late winter and early spring in the Nordic countries where studded tyres are used. This behaviour is due to a combination of factors: frequent conditions with dry roads, high number of cars with studded tyres and an accumulated road dust layer that increases suspension of particles. The study shows that using a constant emission factor for PM 10 or relating PM 10 emissions to NO x cannot be used for prediction of day-to-day variations in PM 10 concentrations in the traffic environments studied here. The model needs to describe variations in dust load, wetness of the road and how dust suspension interacts with these processes.

  3. Ion permeation inside microgel particles induced by specific interactions: from charge inversion to overcharging.

    PubMed

    Moncho-Jordá, A; Adroher-Benítez, I

    2014-08-21

    In this work we have performed a theoretical study of a system formed by ionic microgels in the presence of monovalent salt with the help of Ornstein-Zernike integral equations within the hypernetted-chain (HNC) approximation. We focus in particular on analysing the role that the short-range specific interactions between the polymer fibres of the microgel and the incoming ions have on the equilibrium ion distribution inside and outside the microgel. For this purpose, a theoretical model based on the equilibrium partitioning effect is developed to determine the interaction between the microgel particle and a single ion. The results indicate that when counterions are specifically attracted to the polymer fibres of the microgel, an enhanced counterion accumulation occurs that induces the charge inversion of the microgel and a strong increase of the microgel net charge (or overcharging). In the case of coions, the specific attraction is also able to provoke the coion adsorption even though they are electrostatically repelled, and so increasing the microgel charge (true overcharging). Moreover, we show that ion adsorption onto the microgel particle is very different in swollen and shrunken states due to the competition between specific attraction and steric repulsion. In particular, ion adsorption occurs preferentially in the internal core of the particle for swollen states, whereas it is mainly concentrated in the external shell for de-swollen configurations. Finally, we observe the existence of a critical salt concentration, where the net charge of the microgels vanishes; above this inversion point the net charge of the microgels increases again, thus leading to reentrant stability of microgel suspensions.

  4. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  5. Concentrated ambient ultrafine particle exposure induces cardiac change in young healthy volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient ultrafine particles has been associated with cardiopulmonary toxicity and mortality. Adverse effects specifically linked to ultrafine particles include loss of sympathovagal balance and altered hemostasis. To characterize the effects of ultrafine particles in ...

  6. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester abrogates bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene particle-induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, M S F; Perilli, E; Stansborough, R L; Marino, V; Cantley, M D; Xu, J; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Haynes, D R; Gibson, R J; Crotti, T N

    2015-06-01

    Particle-induced bone loss by osteoclasts is a common cause of aseptic loosening around implants. This study investigates whether caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a potent and specific inhibitor of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 and nuclear factor kappa B, at a low dose reduces bone resorption in a murine calvarial model of polyethylene (PE) particle-induced osteolysis. The effects of particles and CAPE treatment on gastrointestinal tract (GIT) histopathology were also evaluated. Mice were scanned using in vivo animal micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a baseline measurement. PE particles (2.82 × 10(9) particles/mL) were implanted over the calvariae on day 0. CAPE was administered subcutaneously (1 mg/kg/day) at days 0, 4, 7 and 10. Mice were killed at day 14 and serum was analysed for Type-1 carboxyterminal collagen crosslinks (CTX)-1 and osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) levels. Ex vivo μCT scans were conducted to assess bone volume (BV) change and percentage area of calvarial surface resorbed. Calvarial and GIT tissue was processed for histopathology. By day 14, PE particles significantly induced calvarial bone loss compared with control animals as evidenced by resorption areas adjacent to the implanted PE in three-dimensional μCT images, an increase in percentage of resorbed area (p = 0.0022), reduction in BV (p = 0.0012) and increased Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells. Serum CTX-1 (p = 0.0495) and OSCAR levels (p = 0.0006) significantly increased in the PE implant group. CAPE significantly inhibited PE particle-induced calvarial osteolysis, as evidenced by a significant reduction in surface bone resorption (p = 0.0012) and volumetric change (p = 0.0154) compared with PE only, but had no effect on systemic CTX-1. Neither particles nor CAPE had an effect on GIT histopathology. PMID:25804981

  7. Exposure to wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2006-04-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized to be a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries were studded tires are used. In this work, we investigated the inflammatory effect of PM10 generated from the wear of studded tires on two different types of pavement. As comparison, we also investigated PM10 from a traffic-intensive street, a subway station, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Human monocyte-derived macrophages, nasal epithelial cells (RPMI 2650), and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to the different types of particles, and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha into the culture medium was measured. The results show a significant release of cytokines from macrophages after exposure for all types of particles. When particles generated from asphalt/granite pavement were compared to asphalt/quartzite pavement, the granite pavement had a significantly higher capacity to induce the release of cytokines. The granite pavement particles induced cytokine release at the same magnitude as the street particles did, which was higher than what particles from both a subway station and DEP did. Exposure of epithelial cells to PM10 resulted in a significant increase of TNF-alpha secreted from BEAS-2B cells for all types of particles used (DEP was not tested), and the highest levels were induced by subway particles. None of the particle types were able to evoke detectable cytokine release from RPMI 2650 cells. The results indicate that PM10 generated by the wear of studded tires on the street surface is a large contributor to the cytokine-releasing ability of particles in traffic-intensive areas and that the type of pavement used is important for the level of this contribution

  8. Exposure to wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2006-04-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized to be a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries were studded tires are used. In this work, we investigated the inflammatory effect of PM10 generated from the wear of studded tires on two different types of pavement. As comparison, we also investigated PM10 from a traffic-intensive street, a subway station, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Human monocyte-derived macrophages, nasal epithelial cells (RPMI 2650), and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to the different types of particles, and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha into the culture medium was measured. The results show a significant release of cytokines from macrophages after exposure for all types of particles. When particles generated from asphalt/granite pavement were compared to asphalt/quartzite pavement, the granite pavement had a significantly higher capacity to induce the release of cytokines. The granite pavement particles induced cytokine release at the same magnitude as the street particles did, which was higher than what particles from both a subway station and DEP did. Exposure of epithelial cells to PM10 resulted in a significant increase of TNF-alpha secreted from BEAS-2B cells for all types of particles used (DEP was not tested), and the highest levels were induced by subway particles. None of the particle types were able to evoke detectable cytokine release from RPMI 2650 cells. The results indicate that PM10 generated by the wear of studded tires on the street surface is a large contributor to the cytokine-releasing ability of particles in traffic-intensive areas and that the type of pavement used is important for the level of this contribution

  9. Spatial learning and memory deficits induced by exposure to iron-56-particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Shukitt-Hale, B; Casadesus, G; McEwen, J J; Rabin, B M; Joseph, J A

    2000-07-01

    It has previously been shown that exposing rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE) disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system, such as motor performance and an amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion; these adverse behavioral and neuronal effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. Because cognition declines with age, spatial learning and memory were assessed in the Morris water maze 1 month after whole-body irradiation with 1.5 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon high-energy (56)Fe particles, to test the cognitive behavioral consequences of radiation exposure. Irradiated rats demonstrated cognitive impairment compared to the control group as seen in their increased latencies to find the hidden platform, particularly on the reversal day when the platform was moved to the opposite quadrant. Also, the irradiated group used nonspatial strategies during the probe trials (swim with no platform), i.e. less time spent in the platform quadrant, fewer crossings of and less time spent in the previous platform location, and longer latencies to the previous platform location. These findings are similar to those seen in aged rats, suggesting that an increased release of reactive oxygen species may be responsible for the induction of radiation- and age-related cognitive deficits. If these decrements in behavior also occur in humans, they may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere.

  10. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall. PMID:24032936

  11. Thermally induced light-driven microfluidics using a MOEMS-based laser scanner for particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Matthias P.; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    One key challenge in the field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip experiments for biological or chemical applications is the remote manipulation of fluids, droplets and particles. These can be volume elements of reactants, particles coated with markers, cells or many others. Light-driven microfluidics is one way of accomplishing this challenge. In our work, we manipulated micrometre sized polystyrene beads in a microfluidic environment by inducing thermal flows. Therefore, the beads were held statically in an unstructured microfluidic chamber, containing a dyed watery solution. Inside this chamber, the beads were moved along arbitrary trajectories on a micrometre scale. The experiments were performed, using a MOEMS (micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems)-based laser scanner with a variable focal length. This scanner system is integrated in a compact device, which is flexibly applicable to various microscope setups. The device utilizes a novel approach for varying the focal length, using an electrically tunable lens. A quasi statically driven MOEMS mirror is used for beam steering. The combination of a tunable lens and a dual axis micromirror makes the device very compact and robust and is capable of positioning the laser focus at any arbitrary location within a three dimensional working space. Hence, the developed device constitutes a valuable extension to manually executed microfluidic lab-on-chip experiments.

  12. Comparison of fluorescence-based techniques for the quantification of particle-induced hydroxyl radicals

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Corey A; Simon, Sanford R; Schoonen, Martin AA

    2008-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species including hydroxyl radicals can cause oxidative stress and mutations. Inhaled particulate matter can trigger formation of hydroxyl radicals, which have been implicated as one of the causes of particulate-induced lung disease. The extreme reactivity of hydroxyl radicals presents challenges to their detection and quantification. Here, three fluorescein derivatives [aminophenyl fluorescamine (APF), amplex ultrared, and dichlorofluorescein (DCFH)] and two radical species, proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac have been compared for their usefulness to measure hydroxyl radicals generated in two different systems: a solution containing ferrous iron and a suspension of pyrite particles. Results APF, amplex ultrared, and DCFH react similarly to the presence of hydroxyl radicals. Proxyl fluorescamine and tempo-9-ac do not react with hydroxyl radicals directly, which reduces their sensitivity. Since both DCFH and amplex ultrared will react with reactive oxygen species other than hydroxyl radicals and another highly reactive species, peroxynitite, they lack specificity. Conclusion The most useful probe evaluated here for hydroxyl radicals formed from cell-free particle suspensions is APF due to its sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:18307787

  13. Spatial learning and memory deficits induced by exposure to iron-56-particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Casadesus, G.; McEwen, J. J.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    It has previously been shown that exposing rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE) disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system, such as motor performance and an amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion; these adverse behavioral and neuronal effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. Because cognition declines with age, spatial learning and memory were assessed in the Morris water maze 1 month after whole-body irradiation with 1.5 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon high-energy (56)Fe particles, to test the cognitive behavioral consequences of radiation exposure. Irradiated rats demonstrated cognitive impairment compared to the control group as seen in their increased latencies to find the hidden platform, particularly on the reversal day when the platform was moved to the opposite quadrant. Also, the irradiated group used nonspatial strategies during the probe trials (swim with no platform), i.e. less time spent in the platform quadrant, fewer crossings of and less time spent in the previous platform location, and longer latencies to the previous platform location. These findings are similar to those seen in aged rats, suggesting that an increased release of reactive oxygen species may be responsible for the induction of radiation- and age-related cognitive deficits. If these decrements in behavior also occur in humans, they may impair the ability of astronauts to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere.

  14. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall.

  15. Modeling particle-induced electron emission in a simplified plasma Test Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliano, Paul N.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2013-03-21

    Particle-induced electron emission (PIE) is modeled in a simplified, well-characterized plasma Test Cell operated at UCLA. In order for PIE to be a useful model in this environment, its governing equations are first reduced to lower-order models which can be implemented in a direct simulation Monte Carlo and Particle-in-Cell framework. These reduced-order models are described in full and presented as semi-empirical models. The models are implemented to analyze the interaction of low- and high-energy ({approx}1-2 keV) xenon ions and atoms with the stainless steel electrodes of the Test Cell in order to gain insight into the emission and transport of secondary electrons. Furthermore, there is a lack of data for xenon-stainless steel atom- and ion-surface interactions for similar environments. Using experimental data as a reference, both total yields and emitted electron energy distribution functions can be deduced by observing sensitivities of current collection results to these numerical models and their parameters.

  16. Local delivery of mutant CCL2 protein-reduced orthopaedic implant wear particle-induced osteolysis and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyi; Sato, Taishi; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) has been widely used as a standard treatment for late-stage arthritis. One challenge for long-term efficacy of TJR is the generation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particles from the implant surface that activates an inflammatory cascade which may lead to bone loss, prosthetic loosening and eventual failure of the procedure. Here, we investigate the efficacy of local administration of mutant CCL2 proteins, such as 7ND, on reducing wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis in vivo using a mouse calvarial model. Mice were treated with local injection of 7ND or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) every other day for up to 14 days. Wear particle-induced osteolysis and the effects of 7ND treatment were evaluated using micro-CT, histology, and immunofluorescence staining. Compared with the PBS control, 7ND treatment significantly decreased wear particle-induced osteolysis, which led to a higher bone volume fraction and bone mineral density. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining showed 7ND treatment decreased the number of recruited inflammatory cells and osteoclasts. Together, our results support the feasibility of local delivery of 7ND for mitigating wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis, which may offer a promising strategy for extending the life time of TJRs. PMID:26174978

  17. Laser-induced shockwave chromatography: a separation and analysis method for nanometer-sized particles and molecules.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Tetsuhiko; Ichinose, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Shinpei

    2011-04-01

    A microscopic chromatography has been developed where nanometer-size molecules or particles are separated according to their size by the laser-induced shockwave in a water-filled capillary. As the shockwave passed through the mixture of molecules/particles in solution, they move to the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The distance from the point of shockwave generation depends on the particle size or molecular weight. This technique has some advantages compared to conventional chromatography, in terms of quick analysis of molecular weight and applicability to sticky and adsorbing polymers. Experimental results obtained for proteins, their aggregates, and inorganic nanoparticles are presented.

  18. The Inhibition of RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis through the Suppression of p38 Signaling Pathway by Naringenin and Attenuation of Titanium-Particle-Induced Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wengang; Wu, Chuanlong; Tian, Bo; Liu, Xuqiang; Zhai, Zanjing; Qu, Xinhua; Jiang, Chuan; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Mao, Yuanqing; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Zhu, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of naringenin on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis. Osteolysis from wear-induced particles and aseptic loosening are the most frequent late complications of total joint arthroplasty leading to revision of the prosthesis. Osteolysis during aseptic loosening is most likely due to increased bone resorption by osteoclasts. Through in vitro studies, we demonstrated that naringenin, a naturally occurring flavanone in grapefruit and tomatoes, exerts potent inhibitory effects on the ligand of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and revealed that the mechanism of action of naringenin, which inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppression of the p38 signaling pathway. Through in vivo studies, we proved that naringenin attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In general, we demonstrated that naringenin inhibited osteoclastogenesis via suppression of p38 signaling in vitro and attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. This study also suggested that naringenin has significant potential for the treatment of osteolysis-related diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and activity. PMID:25464380

  19. Alpha particles induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in primary human lymphocytes mediated through ATM.

    PubMed

    Horn, Simon; Brady, Darren; Prise, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    The use of high linear energy transfer radiations in the form of carbon ions in heavy ion beam lines or alpha particles in new radionuclide treatments has increased substantially over the past decade and will continue to do so due to the favourable dose distributions they can offer versus conventional therapies. Previously it has been shown that exposure to heavy ions induces pan-nuclear phosphorylation of several DNA repair proteins such as H2AX and ATM in vitro. Here we describe similar effects of alpha particles on ex vivo irradiated primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Following alpha particle irradiation pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM, but not DNA-PK and 53BP1, was observed throughout the nucleus. Inhibition of ATM, but not DNA-PK, resulted in the loss of pan-nuclear phosphorylation of H2AX in alpha particle irradiated lymphocytes. Pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX signal was rapidly lost over 24h at a much greater rate than foci loss. Surprisingly, pan-nuclear gamma-H2AX intensity was not dependent on the number of alpha particle induced double strand breaks, rather the number of alpha particles which had traversed the cell nucleus. This distinct fluence dependent damage signature of particle radiation is important in both the fields of radioprotection and clinical oncology in determining radionuclide biological dosimetry and may be indicative of patient response to new radionuclide cancer therapies.

  20. Galactomannan and Zymosan Block the Epinephrine-Induced Particle Transport in Tracheal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Weiterer, Sebastian; Kohlen, Thomas; Veit, Florian; Sachs, Lydia; Uhle, Florian; Lichtenstern, Christoph; Weigand, Markus A.; Henrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Ciliary beating by respiratory epithelial cells continuously purges pathogens from the lower airways. Here we investigated the effect of the fungal cell wall polysaccharides Galactomannan (GM) and Zymosan (Zym) on the adrenergic activated particle transport velocity (PTV) of tracheal epithelium. Methods Experiments were performed using tracheae isolated from male C57BL/6J mice. Transport velocity of the cilia bearing epithelial cells was measured by analysing recorded image sequences. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using Amplex Red reagents. PCR experiments were performed on isolated tracheal epithelium to identify adrenergic receptor mRNA. Results The adrenergic receptors α1D, α2A, β1 and β2 have been identified in isolated tracheal epithelium. We found epinephrine responsible for an increase in PTV, which could only be reduced by selective β-receptor-inhibition. In addition, either GM or Zym prevented the epinephrine induced PTV increase. Furthermore, we observed a strong ROS generation evoked by GM or Zym. However, epinephrine induced increase in PTV recovered in the presence of GM and Zym after application of ROS scavengers. Conclusion Both GM or Zym trigger reversible ROS generation in tracheal tissue leading to inhibition of the β-adrenergic increase in PTV. PMID:26571499

  1. Alleviative effects of quercetin and onion on male reproductive toxicity induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Hiromi; Kohara, Machiko; Aizawa, Koichi; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Inakuma, Takahiro; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Sagai, Masaru

    2008-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are particulate matter from diesel exhaust that contain many toxic compounds, such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Some toxicities of PAH are thought to be expressed via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). The male reproductive toxicity of DEPs might depend on AhR activation induced by PAHs. We hypothesized that AhR antagonists protect against the male reproductive toxicity of DEPs. Quercetin is a flavonoid and a well-known AhR antagonist, while onion contains many flavonoids, including quercetin. Hence, we examined whether quercetin and onion have alleviative effects against the male reproductive toxicity induced by DEPs. BALB/c male mice were fed quercetin- or onion-containing diets and received 10 injections of DEP suspension or vehicle into the dorsal subcutaneous layer over 5 weeks. The mice were euthanized at 2 weeks, after the last treatment, and their organs were collected. Daily sperm production and total incidence of sperm abnormalities were significantly affected in the DEP groups as compared with the vehicle group, but the total incidence of sperm abnormalities in the quercetin + DEP-treated mice was significantly reduced as compared with the DEP-treated mice. The numbers of Sertoli cells were significantly decreased in DEP-treated mice as compared with the vehicle-treated mice, but, the numbers of Sertoli cells were significantly increased in the quercetin and the onion + DEP-treated mice as compared with the DEP-treated mice. These results clearly indicate alleviative effects of quercetin and onion against the male reproductive toxicity induced by DEP.

  2. Picosecond laser induced fragmentation of coarse Cu2O particles into nanoparticles in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mokhtar; Remalli, Nagarjuna; Yehya, Fahem; Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Srikanth, Vadali V. S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Micron sized cuprous oxide (Cu2O) particles are easily fragmented into nanosized (5-10 nm) particles using picosecond (ps) laser (wavelength = 532 nm) pulses. The coarse Cu2O particles are first synthesized by reducing copper chloride with the aid of honey. These particles are then dispersed in liquid media (double distilled water or ethanol) and exposed to ps laser pulses to obtain well-dispersed nanosized Cu2O particles. By using this method of fragmentation, morphology of the particles can be altered while retaining their crystal structure. The innate nature of this method allows continuous production of nanoparticles from coarser particles.

  3. Propagation Distance of the α-Particle-Induced Bystander Effect: The Role of Nuclear Traversal and Gap Junction Communication

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Sylvain; Pusset, David; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2009-01-01

    When cell populations are exposed to low-dose α-particle radiation, a significant fraction of the cells will not be traversed by a radiation track. However, stressful effects occur in both irradiated and bystander cells in the population. Characterizing these effects, and investigating their underlying mechanism(s), is critical to understanding human health risks associated with exposure to α particles. To this end, confluent normal human fibroblast cultures were grown on polyethylene terephthalate foil grafted to an ultrathin solid-state nuclear track detector and exposed under non-perturbing conditions to low-fluence α particles from a broadbeam irradiator. Irradiated and affected bystander cells were localized with micrometer precision. The stress-responsive protein p21Waf1 (also known as CDKN1A) was induced in bystander cells within a 100-µm radius from an irradiated cell. The mean propagation distance ranged from 20 to 40 µm around the intranuclear α-particle impact point, which corresponds to a set of ∼30 cells. Nuclear traversal, induced DNA damage, and gap junction communication were critical contributors to propagation of this stressful effect The strategy described here may be ideal to investigate the size of radiation-affected target and the relative contribution of different cellular organelles to bystander effects induced by energetic particles, which is relevant to radioprotection and cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19580486

  4. Dose response of micronuclei induced by combination radiation of α-particles and γ-rays in human lymphoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ruiping; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Yuan, Dexiao; Shao, Chunlin

    2013-01-01

    Combination radiation is a real situation of both nuclear accident exposure and space radiation environment, but its biological dosimetry is still not established. This study investigated the dose-response of micronuclei (MN) induction in lymphocyte by irradiating HMy2.CIR lymphoblast cells with α-particles, γ-rays, and their combinations. Results showed that the dose-response of MN induced by γ-rays was well-fitted with the linear-quadratic model. But for α-particle irradiation, the MN induction had a biphasic phenomenon containing a low dose hypersensitivity characteristic and its dose response could be well-stimulated with a state vector model where radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was involved. For the combination exposure, the dose response of MN was similar to that of α-irradiation. However, the yield of MN was closely related to the sequence of irradiations. When the cells were irradiated with α-particles at first and then γ-rays, a synergistic effect of MN induction was observed. But when the cells were irradiated with γ-rays followed by α-particles, an antagonistic effect of MN was observed in the low dose range although this combination radiation also yielded a synergistic effect at high doses. When the interval between two irradiations was extended to 4h, a cross-adaptive response against the other irradiation was induced by a low dose of γ-rays but not α-particles.

  5. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang

    2013-10-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) modes with fishbone-like structures are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection into MST reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to large fast ion beta and stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of these instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport and interaction with global tearing modes. Internal magnetic field fluctuations associated with the EP modes are directly observed for the first time by Faraday-effect polarimetry (frequency ~ 90 kHz and amplitude ~ 2 G). Simultaneously measured density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving and asymmetric spatial structure that peaks near the core where fast ions reside and shifts outward as the instability evolves. Furthermore, the EP mode frequencies appear at ~k∥VA , consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growing phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop (~ 15 %) when the EP modes peak, indicating the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced (× 2) with the onset of multiple nonlinearly-interacting EP modes. The fast ions also impact global tearing modes, reducing their amplitudes by up to 65%. This mode reduction is lessened following the EP-bursts, further evidence for fast ion redistribution that weakens the suppression mechanism. Possible tearing mode suppression mechanisms will be discussed. Work supported by US DoE.

  6. Amphetamine-Induced Taste Aversion Learning in Young and Old F-344 Rats Following Exposure to 56Fe Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure to 56Fe particles produces changes in dopaminergic function and in dopamine dependent behaviors, including amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) learning. Because many of these changes are characteristic of the changes that accompany the aging process, the present study was ...

  7. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 attenuates titanium particle-induced osteolysis by suppressing osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. RESULTS Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. CONCLUSIONS CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  8. Adenovirus-Mediated siRNA Targeting CXCR2 Attenuates Titanium Particle-Induced Osteolysis by Suppressing Osteoclast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. Material/Methods Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. Results Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. Conclusions CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  9. Results and perspectives of the investigation of traditional and thermal stress induced thermophoresis of particles in gas in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Balapanov, Daniyar; Beresnev, Sergey; Queeckers, Patrick

    Thermophoretic motion of particles suspended in a gas has been a subject of extensive theoretical and experimental investigations for many years because of its wide spread in nature, significance for fundamental and applied aerosol physic. Negative thermophoresis, i.e. solid particle motion towards hotter region in a gas and not as usually from hotter region, was predicted more than 40 years ago and remains an unsolved problem for a choice between different models treating main driving mechanisms -- thermal slip and thermal stress induced gas motion. For a problem of negative thermophoresis, we present experimental evidences in favor of the latter mechanism based on direct observation of particle motion at microgravity; Knudsen particle number 2\\cdot 10(-3) (Kn being the ratio of the molecular mean free path to the particle size); particle-to-gas heat conductivity ratios 2\\cdot 10(4) for copper solid particles and 1.8 for glass bubbles. For both types of particles the experimental results fit well the gas kinetic model of Beresnev and Chernyak [1]. We present characteristics of a set-up and procedures that are able to provide sufficient accuracy and volume of experimental data for testing any model of particle thermophoresis. High quality microgravity is a necessity for such investigations. The short duration microgravity of drop towers suits well this requirement. The sign and value of the thermophoretic force strongly depends on the Knudsen number, particle-to-gas heat conductivity ratio and accommodation coefficients, all of which vary within several decimal orders of magnitude. In order to make crucial conclusions on the choice of the adequate model, there should be hundreds of short duration microgravity experiments. The European Space Agency scientific project Interaction in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems (ICAPS) [2] planned for the International Space Station, provides complementary opportunities for the investigation of thermophoresis at large

  10. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of "crowding effect" which is the entropic interaction in the cell.

  11. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of “crowding effect” which is the entropic interaction in the cell. PMID:26752650

  12. Sintered indium-tin oxide particles induce pro-inflammatory responses in vitro, in part through inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Badding, Melissa A; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Park, Ju-Hyeong; Fix, Natalie R; Cummings, Kristin J; Leonard, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. As the demand for consumer electronics continues to increase, so does the concern for occupational exposures to particles containing these potentially toxic metal oxides. Indium-containing particles have been shown to be cytotoxic in cultured cells and pro-inflammatory in pulmonary animal models. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which ITO production materials may be the most toxic to workers and how they initiate pulmonary inflammation remain poorly understood. Here we examined four different particle samples collected from an ITO production facility for their ability to induce pro-inflammatory responses in vitro. Tin oxide, sintered ITO (SITO), and ventilation dust particles activated nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) within 3 h of treatment. However, only SITO induced robust cytokine production (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8) within 24 h in both RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Our lab and others have previously demonstrated SITO-induced cytotoxicity as well. These findings suggest that SITO particles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, which has been implicated in several immune-mediated diseases via its ability to induce IL-1β release and cause subsequent cell death. Inflammasome activation by SITO was confirmed, but it required the presence of endotoxin. Further, a phagocytosis assay revealed that pre-uptake of SITO or ventilation dust impaired proper macrophage phagocytosis of E. coli. Our results suggest that adverse inflammatory responses to SITO particles by both macrophage and epithelial cells may initiate and propagate indium lung disease. These findings will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind an emerging occupational health issue.

  13. Sintered Indium-Tin Oxide Particles Induce Pro-Inflammatory Responses In Vitro, in Part through Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Badding, Melissa A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Park, Ju-Hyeong; Fix, Natalie R.; Cummings, Kristin J.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. As the demand for consumer electronics continues to increase, so does the concern for occupational exposures to particles containing these potentially toxic metal oxides. Indium-containing particles have been shown to be cytotoxic in cultured cells and pro-inflammatory in pulmonary animal models. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which ITO production materials may be the most toxic to workers and how they initiate pulmonary inflammation remain poorly understood. Here we examined four different particle samples collected from an ITO production facility for their ability to induce pro-inflammatory responses in vitro. Tin oxide, sintered ITO (SITO), and ventilation dust particles activated nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) within 3 h of treatment. However, only SITO induced robust cytokine production (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8) within 24 h in both RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Our lab and others have previously demonstrated SITO-induced cytotoxicity as well. These findings suggest that SITO particles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, which has been implicated in several immune-mediated diseases via its ability to induce IL-1β release and cause subsequent cell death. Inflammasome activation by SITO was confirmed, but it required the presence of endotoxin. Further, a phagocytosis assay revealed that pre-uptake of SITO or ventilation dust impaired proper macrophage phagocytosis of E. coli. Our results suggest that adverse inflammatory responses to SITO particles by both macrophage and epithelial cells may initiate and propagate indium lung disease. These findings will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind an emerging occupational health issue. PMID:25874458

  14. Gravitational perturbation of the BTZ black hole induced by test particles and weak cosmic censorship in AdS spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Jorge V.; Cardoso, Vitor

    2011-05-15

    We analyze the gravitational perturbations induced by particles falling into a three dimensional, asymptotically AdS black hole geometry. More specifically, we solve the linearized perturbation equations obtained from the geodesic motion of a ringlike distribution of test particles in the BTZ background. This setup ensures that the U(1) symmetry of the background is preserved. The nonasymptotic flatness of the background raises difficulties in attributing the significance of energy and angular momentum to the conserved quantities of the test particles. This issue is well known but, to the best of our knowledge, has never been addressed in the literature. We confirm that the naive expressions for energy and angular momentum are the correct definitions. Finally, we put an asymptotically AdS version of the weak cosmic censorship to a test: by attempting to overspin the BTZ black hole with test particles it is found that the black hole cannot be spun-up past its extremal limit.

  15. The lasting effect of limonene-induced particle formation on air quality in a genuine indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Carolin; Wissenbach, Dirk K; von Bergen, Martin; Franck, Ulrich; Wendisch, Manfred; Schlink, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric ozone-terpene reactions, which form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, can affect indoor air quality when outdoor air mixes with indoor air during ventilation. This study, conducted in Leipzig, Germany, focused on limonene-induced particle formation in a genuine indoor environment (24 m(3)). Particle number, limonene and ozone concentrations were monitored during the whole experimental period. After manual ventilation for 30 min, during which indoor ozone levels reached up to 22.7 ppb, limonene was introduced into the room at concentrations of approximately 180 to 250 μg m(-3). We observed strong particle formation and growth within a diameter range of 9 to 50 nm under real-room conditions. Larger particles with diameters above 100 nm were less affected by limonene introduction. The total particle number concentrations (TPNCs) after limonene introduction clearly exceed outdoor values by a factor of 4.5 to 41 reaching maximum concentrations of up to 267,000 particles cm(-3). The formation strength was influenced by background particles, which attenuated the formation of new SOA with increasing concentration, and by ozone levels, an increase of which by 10 ppb will result in a six times higher TPNC. This study emphasizes indoor environments to be preferred locations for particle formation and growth after ventilation events. As a consequence, SOA formation can produce significantly higher amounts of particles than transported by ventilation into the indoor air. PMID:25966888

  16. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinerzhagen, F.; Breuer, L.; Bukowska, H.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Herder, M.; Lebius, H.; Schleberger, M.; Wucher, A.

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator.

  17. A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Meinerzhagen, F; Breuer, L; Bukowska, H; Bender, M; Severin, D; Herder, M; Lebius, H; Schleberger, M; Wucher, A

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of >10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations, which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion, and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in situ analysis of different types of sample systems ranging from metals to insulators. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enables us to study the chemical composition of the surface, while scanning probe microscopy allows a detailed view into the local electrical and morphological conditions of the sample surface down to atomic scales. With the new setup, particle emission during irradiation as well as persistent modifications of the surface after irradiation can thus be studied. We present first data obtained with the new setup, including a novel measuring protocol for time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the GSI UNILAC accelerator.

  18. Effects of heavy particle irradiation and diet on amphetamine- and lithium chloride-induced taste avoidance learning in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Szprengiel, Aleksandra; Joseph, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Rats were maintained on diets containing either 2% blueberry or strawberry extract or a control diet for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to 1.5 Gy of 56Fe particles in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three days following irradiation, the rats were tested for the effects of irradiation on the acquisition of an amphetamine- or lithium chloride-induced (LiCl) conditioned taste avoidance (CTA). The rats maintained on the control diet failed to show the acquisition of a CTA following injection of amphetamine. In contrast, the rats maintained on antioxidant diets (strawberry or blueberry extract) continued to show the development of an amphetamine-induced CTA following exposure to 56Fe particles. Neither irradiation nor diet had an effect on the acquisition of a LiCl-induced CTA. The results are interpreted as indicating that oxidative stress following exposure to 56Fe particles may be responsible for the disruption of the dopamine-mediated amphetamine-induced CTA in rats fed control diets; and that a reduction in oxidative stress produced by the antioxidant diets functions to reinstate the dopamine-mediated CTA. The failure of either irradiation or diet to influence LiCl-induced responding suggests that oxidative stress may not be involved in CTA learning following injection of LiCl.

  19. The influence of laser-particle interaction in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Helmut; Loper, Kristofer H.; Hahn, David W.; Niemax, Kay

    2011-02-01

    Particles produced by previous laser shots may have significant influence on the analytical signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (LA-ICP) spectrometry if they remain close to the position of laser sampling. The effects of these particles on the laser-induced breakdown event are demonstrated in several ways. LIBS-experiments were conducted in an ablation cell at atmospheric conditions in argon or air applying a dual-pulse arrangement with orthogonal pre-pulse, i.e., plasma breakdown in a gas generated by a focussed laser beam parallel and close to the sample surface followed by a delayed crossing laser pulse in orthogonal direction which actually ablates material from the sample and produces the LIBS plasma. The optical emission of the LIBS plasma as well as the absorption of the pre-pulse laser was measured. In the presence of particles in the focus of the pre-pulse laser, the plasma breakdown is affected and more energy of the pre-pulse laser is absorbed than without particles. As a result, the analyte line emission from the LIBS plasma of the second laser is enhanced. It is assumed that the enhancement is not only due to an increase of mass ablated by the second laser but also to better atomization and excitation conditions favored by a reduced gas density in the pre-pulse plasma. Higher laser pulse frequencies increase the probability of particle-laser interaction and, therefore, reduce the shot-to-shot line intensity variation as compared to lower particle loadings in the cell. Additional experiments using an aerosol chamber were performed to further quantify the laser absorption by the plasma in dependence on time both with and without the presence of particles. The overall implication of laser-particle interactions for LIBS and LA-ICP-MS/OES are discussed.

  20. Emerging mechanistic targets in lung injury induced by combustion-generated particles.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The mechanism for biological effect following pulmonary exposure to combustion-generated particles is incompletely defined. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels were identified as “particle sensors” in that their activation was coupled with the initiation ...

  1. Ultrastructural Characterization of Turnip Mosaic Virus-Induced Cellular Rearrangements Reveals Membrane-Bound Viral Particles Accumulating in Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Juan; Basu, Kaustuv; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Positive-strand RNA [(+) RNA] viruses remodel cellular membranes to facilitate virus replication and assembly. In the case of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the viral membrane protein 6K2 plays an essential role in endomembrane alterations. Although 6K2-induced membrane dynamics have been widely studied by confocal microscopy, the ultrastructure of this remodeling has not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the formation of TuMV-induced membrane changes by chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF/FS) for transmission electron microscopy at different times of infection. We observed the formation of convoluted membranes connected to rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) early in the infection process, followed by the production of single-membrane vesicle-like (SMVL) structures at the midstage of infection. Both SMVL and double-membrane vesicle-like structures with electron-dense cores, as well as electron-dense bodies, were found late in the infection process. Immunogold labeling results showed that the vesicle-like structures were 6K2 tagged and suggested that only the SMVL structures were viral RNA replication sites. Electron tomography (ET) was used to regenerate a three-dimensional model of these vesicle-like structures, which showed that they were, in fact, tubules. Late in infection, we observed filamentous particle bundles associated with electron-dense bodies, which suggests that these are sites for viral particle assembly. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. Our work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses remodel cellular membranes for different stages of the infection process, such as protein translation and processing, viral RNA synthesis, particle assembly, and virus

  2. Particle induced X-ray emission-computed tomography analysis of an adsorbent for extraction chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kitamura, Akane; Ohkubo, Takeru; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Takahatake, Yoko; Watanabe, Sou; Koma, Yoshikazu; Kada, Wataru

    2016-03-01

    Nd, which simulates minor actinides (MAs), was used for investigating residual minor actinides produced during the extraction chromatography separation of spent fuel from fast neutron reactors. A cross-sectional distribution of Nd in a minute globular adsorbent having diameter less than 50 μm was obtained using particle induced X-ray emission-computed tomography with a 3-MeV proton microbeam. The measurement area was 150 × 150 μm2 corresponding to 128 × 128 imaging pixels in projection images with 9° resolution, image reconstruction was carried out by a modified ML-EM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) method. As a result, the cross-sectional distribution of Nd in the adsorbent was successfully obtained, and it was first revealed that Nd existed both in the central region and on the outer surface even after an elution. This implies that the internal structure of the adsorbent must be modified for improving of the recovery of MAs.

  3. Using ApoE Nanolipoprotein Particles To Analyze SNARE-Induced Fusion Pores.

    PubMed

    Bello, Oscar D; Auclair, Sarah M; Rothman, James E; Krishnakumar, Shyam S

    2016-03-29

    Here we introduce ApoE-based nanolipoprotein particle (NLP)-a soluble, discoidal bilayer mimetic of ∼23 nm in diameter, as fusion partners to study the dynamics of fusion pores induced by SNARE proteins. Using in vitro lipid mixing and content release assays, we report that NLPs reconstituted with synaptic v-SNARE VAMP2 (vNLP) fuse with liposomes containing the cognate t-SNARE (Syntaxin1/SNAP25) partner, with the resulting fusion pore opening directly to the external buffer. Efflux of encapsulated fluorescent dextrans of different sizes show that unlike the smaller nanodiscs, these larger NLPs accommodate the expansion of the fusion pore to at least ∼9 nm, and dithionite quenching of fluorescent lipid introduced in vNLP confirms that the NLP fusion pores are short-lived and eventually reseal. The NLPs also have capacity to accommodate larger number of proteins and using vNLPs with defined number of VAMP2 protein, including physiologically relevant copy numbers, we find that 3-4 copies of VAMP2 (minimum 2 per face) are required to keep a nascent fusion pore open, and the SNARE proteins act cooperatively to dilate the nascent fusion pore. PMID:26972604

  4. Energetic-particle-induced electromagnetic geodesic acoustic mode in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingfeng; Dong, J. Q.; He, Zhixiong; He, Hongda; Shen, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Energetic-particle-induced kinetic electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (EKEGAMs) are numerically studied in low β (=plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) tokamak plasmas. The parallel component of the perturbed vector potential is considered along with the electrostatic potential perturbation. The effects of finite Larmor radius and finite orbit width of the bulk and energetic ions as well as electron parallel dynamics are all taken into account in the dispersion relation. Systematic harmonic and ordering analysis are performed for frequency and growth rate spectra of the EKEGAMs, assuming ( k ρ i ) ˜ q - 3 ˜ β ≪ 1, where q, k, and ρi are the safety factor, radial component of the EKEGAMs wave vector, and the Larmor radius of the ions, respectively. It is found that there exist critical βh/βi values, which depend, in particular, on pitch angle of energetic ions and safety factor, for the mode to be driven unstable. The EKEGAMs may also be unstable for pitch angle λ 0 B < 0.4 in certain parameter regions. Finite β effect of the bulk ions is shown to have damping effect on the EKEGAMs. Modes with higher radial wave vectors have higher growth rates. The damping from electron dynamics is found decreasing with decrease of the temperature ratio Te/Ti. The modes are easily to be driven unstable in low safety factor q region and high temperature ratio Th/Ti region. The harmonic features of the EKEGAMs are discussed as well.

  5. Search for wave-induced particle precipitation from lightning and transmitter sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Wave-induced particle precipitation is introduced and examined for whistlers whose sources are within the plasmapause. The possible correlation between lightning strokes that carry positive charge to the ground and the observed Trimpi events is discussed, sudden phase and/or amplitude shifts of a received VLF signal with gradual return to predisturbed values. The thunderstorm charging mechanisms that lead to the observed charge distribution and the advection of the positively charged cirrus anvil away from the body of the thunderstorm are briefly examined. The comparative current strengths and the relative frequency of positive and negative strokes is studied for different types of thunderstorms. The magnetospheric ducting of the lightning-generated whistler wave and the interaction with trapped electrons is examined. The detectable effects the precipitating electrons have on the ionosphere is introduced. Included are testing and design of the x-ray detector and balloon-launch considerations. The problems encountered during the x-ray-detector's balloon flights are examined. The riometer and x-ray-detector data-analysis methods are mentioned. The results were negative for the data analyzed, but the limiting factors severely restricted the usable data. Possible experimental methods are mentioned.

  6. Light induced heterogeneous ozone processing on the pesticides adsorbed on silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Désert, M.; Quivet, E.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    In France, in 2010, the sales of pesticides reached 1.8 billion euros for 61 900 tons of active ingredients, positioning France as a first European consumer of pesticides, as reported by the European Crop Protection Association. About 19 million hectares of crops are sprayed annually with pesticides, i.e., 35% of the total surface area of France. This corresponds to an average pesticide dose of 3.2 kg ha-1. The consumption of herbicide and fungicide is favoured in comparison to the use of insecticides in France and the other European countries, as well. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences the atmospheric fate of these compounds such as their photo-chemical degradation. There is much uncertainty concerning the behavior of the pesticides in the atmosphere. Especially, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the degradation of the pesticides induced by heterogeneous reactions in absence and especially in presence of solar light. Considering that most of the pesticides currently used are semi-volatile, it is of crucial importance to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of particulate pesticides with light and with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and OH radical. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the light induced heterogeneous ozonation of suspended pesticide particles. 8 pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin and tetraconazole) were chosen for their physico-chemical properties and their concentration levels in the PACA (Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) region, France. Silica particles with well-known properties were chosen as model particles of atmospheric relevance. Kinetic rate constants were determined to allow estimate the atmospheric lifetimes relating to ozone. The rate constants were determined as follows: k = (6.6 × 0.2) 10-19, (7.2 × 0.3) 10-19, (5.1 × 0.5) 10-19, (3.9 × 0.3) 10-19 [cm3 molecules-1 s-1] for Cyprodinil

  7. A comparison of the relative rates of hemolysis induced by various fibrogenic and non-fibrogenic particles with washed rat erythrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hefner, R E; Gehring, P J

    1975-10-01

    Correlations between in vitro hemolytic activity and the in vivo fibrogenic activity of a number of particulate materials are demonstrated. Fibrogenic particles are capable of inducing hemolysis, while non-fibrogenic particles are not. It is suggested that particulates inducing a rate of hemolysis greater than 1 X 10(-4) min-1 may be fibrogenic.

  8. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  9. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue.

    PubMed

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  10. Complexation- and ligand-induced metal release from 316L particles: importance of particle size and crystallographic structure.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Hedberg, Jonas; Liu, Yi; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2011-12-01

    Iron, chromium, nickel, and manganese released from gas-atomized AISI 316L stainless steel powders (sized <45 and <4 μm) were investigated in artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF, pH 4.5) and in solutions of its individual inorganic and organic components to determine its most aggressive component, elucidate synergistic effects, and assess release mechanisms, in dependence of surface changes using atomic absorption spectroscopy, Raman, XPS, and voltammetry. Complexation is the main reason for metal release from 316L particles immersed in ALF. Iron was mainly released, while manganese was preferentially released as a consequence of the reduction of manganese oxide on the surface. These processes resulted in highly complexing media in a partial oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium on the surface. The extent of metal release was partially controlled by surface properties (e.g., availability of elements on the surface and structure of the outermost surface) and partially by the complexation capacity of the different metals with the complexing agents of the different media. In general, compared to the coarse powder (<45 μm), the fine (<4 μm) powder displayed significantly higher released amounts of metals per surface area, increased with increased solution complexation capacity, while less amounts of metals were released into non-complexing solutions. Due to the ferritic structure of lower solubility for nickel of the fine powder, more nickel was released into all solutions compared with the coarser powder.

  11. Studying the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by two kinds of bentonite particles on human B lymphoblast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meibian; Lu, Yezhen; Li, Xiaoxue; Chen, Qing; Lu, Longxi; Xing, Mingluan; Zou, Hua; He, Jiliang

    2010-02-12

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by native and active bentonite particles (BPs) on human B lymphoblast cells using seven assays. Our results showed that the order of cytotoxicity was: active BPs>native BPs>quartz particles (DQ-12)>gypsum, according to the IC50 values in CCK-8 assay and neutral red uptake (NRU) assay. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, the proportions of early apoptotic cells, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition and the malondialdehyde (MDA) release in the native and active BPs groups were significantly higher than those in the gypsum and DQ-12 groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Moreover, the cytotoxicity of active BPs with higher adsorption capacity of phenol was higher than that of native BPs with relatively lower adsorption capacity of phenol. The oxidative stress induced by active BPs was significantly higher than that induced by native BPs (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The water-soluble fractions of BPs did not induce the cytotoxicity and ROS generation. These findings indicated that active and native BPs could induce significantly the cytotoxic effects and oxidative stress on human B lymphoblast cells in vitro. The cytotoxic difference between active BPs and native BPs may be associated with the adsorption capacity of BPs and oxidative stress induced by BPs to a certain extent. The insoluble particle fractions may play a main role in the cytotoxic effects and oxidative stress induced by BPs.

  12. Studying the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by two kinds of bentonite particles on human B lymphoblast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meibian; Lu, Yezhen; Li, Xiaoxue; Chen, Qing; Lu, Longxi; Xing, Mingluan; Zou, Hua; He, Jiliang

    2010-02-12

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by native and active bentonite particles (BPs) on human B lymphoblast cells using seven assays. Our results showed that the order of cytotoxicity was: active BPs>native BPs>quartz particles (DQ-12)>gypsum, according to the IC50 values in CCK-8 assay and neutral red uptake (NRU) assay. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, the proportions of early apoptotic cells, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition and the malondialdehyde (MDA) release in the native and active BPs groups were significantly higher than those in the gypsum and DQ-12 groups (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Moreover, the cytotoxicity of active BPs with higher adsorption capacity of phenol was higher than that of native BPs with relatively lower adsorption capacity of phenol. The oxidative stress induced by active BPs was significantly higher than that induced by native BPs (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The water-soluble fractions of BPs did not induce the cytotoxicity and ROS generation. These findings indicated that active and native BPs could induce significantly the cytotoxic effects and oxidative stress on human B lymphoblast cells in vitro. The cytotoxic difference between active BPs and native BPs may be associated with the adsorption capacity of BPs and oxidative stress induced by BPs to a certain extent. The insoluble particle fractions may play a main role in the cytotoxic effects and oxidative stress induced by BPs. PMID:19948159

  13. Differential proinflammatory responses induced by diesel exhaust particles with contrasting PAH and metal content.

    PubMed

    Totlandsdal, Annike I; Låg, Marit; Lilleaas, Edel; Cassee, Flemming; Schwarze, Per

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to diesel engine exhaust particles (DEPs), representing a complex and variable mixture of components, has been linked with cellular production and release of several types of mediators related to pulmonary inflammation. A key challenge is to identify the specific components, which may be responsible for these effects. The aim of this study was to compare the proinflammatory potential of two DEP-samples with contrasting contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals. The DEP-samples were compared with respect to their ability to induce cytotoxicity, expression and release of proinflammatory mediators (IL-6, IL-8), activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and expression of CYP1A1 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. In addition, dithiothreitol and ascorbic acid assays were performed in order to examine the oxidative potential of the PM samples. The DEP-sample with the highest PAH and lowest metal content was more potent with respect to cytotoxicity and expression and release of proinflammatory mediators, CYP1A1 and HO-1 expression and MAPK activation, than the DEP-sample with lower PAH and higher metal content. The DEP-sample with the highest PAH and lowest metal content also possessed a greater oxidative potential. The present results indicate that the content of organic components may be determinant for the proinflammatory effects of DEP. The findings underscore the importance of considering the chemical composition of particulate matter-emissions, when evaluating the potential health impact and implementation of air pollution regulations. PMID:23900936

  14. Differential proinflammatory responses induced by diesel exhaust particles with contrasting PAH and metal content.

    PubMed

    Totlandsdal, Annike I; Låg, Marit; Lilleaas, Edel; Cassee, Flemming; Schwarze, Per

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to diesel engine exhaust particles (DEPs), representing a complex and variable mixture of components, has been linked with cellular production and release of several types of mediators related to pulmonary inflammation. A key challenge is to identify the specific components, which may be responsible for these effects. The aim of this study was to compare the proinflammatory potential of two DEP-samples with contrasting contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals. The DEP-samples were compared with respect to their ability to induce cytotoxicity, expression and release of proinflammatory mediators (IL-6, IL-8), activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and expression of CYP1A1 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. In addition, dithiothreitol and ascorbic acid assays were performed in order to examine the oxidative potential of the PM samples. The DEP-sample with the highest PAH and lowest metal content was more potent with respect to cytotoxicity and expression and release of proinflammatory mediators, CYP1A1 and HO-1 expression and MAPK activation, than the DEP-sample with lower PAH and higher metal content. The DEP-sample with the highest PAH and lowest metal content also possessed a greater oxidative potential. The present results indicate that the content of organic components may be determinant for the proinflammatory effects of DEP. The findings underscore the importance of considering the chemical composition of particulate matter-emissions, when evaluating the potential health impact and implementation of air pollution regulations.

  15. Numerical investigations of mismatch induced halos in intense charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, C.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we discuss the parametric resonance model of halo creation, and compare it with self consistent simulation results. In particular, we employ two different initial distribution functions, and we find agreement with the particle-core model, within the limitations of the latter. Furthermore, using a simple particle tracking algorithm, we are able to follow the trajectories of the halo particles, noting that a large number of them go through the core and re-emerge later.

  16. Photoelectric charging of dust particles: Effect of spontaneous and light induced field emission of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Dixit, A.

    2009-09-07

    The authors have analyzed the charging of dust particles in a plasma, taking into account the electron/ion currents to the particles, electron/ion generation and recombination, electric field emission, photoelectric emission and photoelectric field emission of electrons under the influence of light irradiation; the irradiance has been assumed to be at a level, which lets the particles retain the negative sign of the charge. Numerical results and discussion conclude the papers.

  17. Maturation-Induced Cloaking of Neutralization Epitopes on HIV-1 Particles

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Amanda S.; Willis, Jordan R.; Crowe, James E.; Aiken, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    To become infectious, HIV-1 particles undergo a maturation process involving proteolytic cleavage of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins. Immature particles contain a highly stable spherical Gag lattice and are impaired for fusion with target cells. The fusion impairment is relieved by truncation of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT), indicating that an interaction between the immature viral core and gp41 within the particle represses HIV-1 fusion by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that the conformation of Env on the viral surface is regulated allosterically by interactions with the HIV-1 core during particle maturation. To test this, we quantified the binding of a panel of monoclonal antibodies to mature and immature HIV-1 particles by immunofluorescence imaging. Surprisingly, immature particles exhibited markedly enhanced binding of several gp41-specific antibodies, including two that recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER) and neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains. Several of the differences in epitope exposure on mature and immature particles were abolished by truncation of the gp41 CT, thus linking the immature HIV-1 fusion defect with altered Env conformation. Our results suggest that perturbation of fusion-dependent Env conformational changes contributes to the impaired fusion of immature particles. Masking of neutralization-sensitive epitopes during particle maturation may contribute to HIV-1 immune evasion and has practical implications for vaccine strategies targeting the gp41 MPER. PMID:21931551

  18. Hydrogen absorption induced metal deposition on palladium and palladium-alloy particles

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jia X.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to methods for producing metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The method includes contacting hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles with one or more metal salts to produce a sub-monoatomic or monoatomic metal- or metal-alloy coating on the surface of the hydrogen-absorbed palladium or palladium-alloy particles. The invention also relates to methods for producing catalysts and methods for producing electrical energy using the metal-coated palladium or palladium-alloy particles of the present invention.

  19. Two-Dimensional Patterning of Inorganic Particles in Resin Using Ultrasound-Induced Plate Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuziuti, Toru; Masuda, Yoshitake; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-08-01

    The fabrication of a two-dimensional millimeter-sized pattern of micrometer-sized titanium dioxide particles in UV-reactive acrylic resin using 1.93 MHz ultrasound is demonstrated. A mixture of particles and resin is set in a thin layer between square glass plates of which one plate is irradiated with ultrasound. Both vibration normal to the plate and the wave propagating in the mixture form standing waves to provide a two-dimensional pattern of the particles. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of the UV-hardened pattern indicate that the titanium dioxide particles are embedded in the resin.

  20. Laser-induced Hertzian fractures in silica initiated by metal micro-particles on the exit surface.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, Eyal; Raman, Rajesh N; Cross, David; Carr, C W; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2016-05-16

    Laser-induced Hertzian fractures on the exit surface of silica glass are found to result from metal surface-bound micro particles. Two types of metal micro-spheres are studied (stainless-steel and Al) using ultraviolet laser light. The fracture initiation probability curve as a function of fluence is obtained, resulting in an initiation threshold fluence of 11.1 ± 4.7 J/cm2 and 16.5 ± 4.5 J/cm2 for the SS and Al particles, accordingly. The modified damage density curve is calculated based on the fracture probability. The calculated momentum coupling coefficient linking incident laser fluence to the resulting plasma pressure is found to be similar for both particles: 32.6 ± 15.4 KN/J and 28.1 ± 10.4 KN/J for the SS and Al cases accordingly. PMID:27409875

  1. In-air Rutherford Backscattering and Particle Induced X-ray Emission for Biophysics and Material Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, James

    2015-03-01

    Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) are methods of nondestructive analysis of elemental composition. Rebounding particles or emitted x-rays can be ``collected'' and then analyzed to reveal the number ratio of the elements in a sample. Due to the nondestructive feature of these processes, RBS and PIXE are useful in many diverse fields of study such as archaeology, art, and biology; however, these experiments usually require large, expensive particle accelerators and detectors. Instead, I am attempting to use a radioactive source, photodiodes, and computer software to perform the same methods at a fraction of the cost. I am exploring cost, time, and resolution benefits and losses of my approach versus the traditional accelerator-based approach.

  2. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  3. Riboflavin-induced oxidation in fish oil-in-water emulsions: Impact of particle size and optical transparency.

    PubMed

    Uluata, Sibel; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-12-15

    The influence of particle size and optical properties on the stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions to riboflavin-induced oxidation by blending different combinations of small (d=44nm) and large (d=216nm) lipid droplets was examined. Emulsion turbidity increased with increasing mean droplet diameter due to greater light scattering by larger particles. The influence of droplet size on the stability of the emulsions to riboflavin-induced lipid oxidation during storage at 20 or 37°C was measured. At 37°C, the rate of lipid hydroperoxide formation increased with decreasing droplet diameter, but there were no significant differences in propanal concentrations. At 20°C, both peroxide and propanal values indicated that the rate of oxidation increased with decreasing droplet size. These data show that riboflavin was more effective at promoting oxidation in nanoemulsions containing small droplets because light was able to penetrate more easily and generate reactive oxygen species. PMID:27451204

  4. First detection of Cherenkov light from cosmic-particle-induced air showers by Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biland, A.; Britvitch, I.; Lorenz, E.; Otte, N.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Ritt, S.; Roeser, U.; Schneebeli, M.

    2007-10-01

    We report on first tests of Geiger-mode APDs (G-APD) to detect Cherenkov light from cosmic particle induced air showers. The motivation for this study stems from the requirement to improve the sensitivity of large imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) by replacing the photomultipliers (PMT) by high detection efficiency G-APDs. Three tests have been carried out, confirming sufficiently high light sensitivity of blue-sensitive G-APDs as future replacement of PMTs in IACTs.

  5. Comparative Elongated Mineral Particle Toxicology & Erionite’s Apparent  High Potency for Inducing Mesothelioma

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent NHEERL research under EPA's Libby Action Plan has determined that elongated particle relative potency for rat pleural mesothelioma is best predicted on the basis of total external surface area (TSA) of slightly acid leached test samples which simulate particle bio-durabili...

  6. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND LIPID MEDIATORS INDUCED IN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES BY ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In ambient aerosols, ultrafine particles (UFP) and their agglomerates are considered to be major factors contributing to adverse health effects. Reactivity of agglomerated UFP of elemental carbon (EC), Printex 90, Printex G, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) was evaluated by the...

  7. Combination of ac electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis for particle manipulation on electrically-induced microscale wave structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Cheng-Che; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a simple method to fabricate controllable microscale wave structures on the top of regular interdigitated electrode (IDE) arrays using electrically-assisted lithography techniques. Smooth wave structures are extremely difficult, if not impossible, to fabricate using traditional multilayer photolithography technology. The fabricated wave structures were carefully measured using an optical profiler and the measured wave profiles were used in the numerical simulation of electrical field and for evaluating the parameters influencing the fabricated wave structure. It is demonstrated that the combined smooth wave structure and IDE array offer unique capability for particle manipulation including particle concentration, aggregation and separation. Particle motion manipulated via the combined wave structure and IDE array is governed by ac electroosmosis (ACEO), dielectrophoresis (DEP) or a combination of both depending on the applied frequency. At lower frequencies (~30 kHz), ACEO dominates and particles are driven to move along the valleys of the wave structures; while at higher frequencies (~200 kHz), DEP force dominates which concentrates particles at the peaks of the wave structures. In addition, varying the ac waveform from sine-wave to square-wave allows for dynamic control of particle motion. Size-dependent particle separation over the wave structure is also demonstrated for a mixture of 0.5 µm and 2 µm particles that are separated into two populations by the joint effects of drag and DEP forces when being pumped to flow via ACEO.

  8. The shear induced motion of a particle over a rough plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charru, F.; Zenit, R.

    2005-11-01

    The interaction of a spherical particle with a fixed rough bed in a simple shear viscous flow is studied experimentally. The shear flow is produced using an annular Couette cell which has a rectangular cross section and is filled with silicon oil. The rough bed consists of a monolayer of glued particles, randomly positioned on an annular ring placed on the bottom of the channel. By means of digital image particle tracking, the position of the test particle was obtained from a high speed video imaging system. The velocity of the particle was calculated in the stream, cross stream and vertical directions. Values of the mean and fluctuating components were calculated for a wide range of parameters, varying the particle size and density, the fluid viscosity and the mean shear, γ. It was found that the normalized stream-wise mean particle velocity U/US, where US is the Stokes settling velocity, depends only on the dimensionless shear rate, θ=μγ/(δρg d), also called Shields number. This is consistent with the fact that the particle Reynolds number was smaller than 1 for most experiments. A simple model is proposed, based on a balance of hydrodynamic forces and a lumped friction force. Good agreement is found between the model predictions and the experiments.

  9. Conditions for laser-induced plasma to effectively remove nano-particles on silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinghua; Luo, Li; Zhang, Yubo; Hu, Ruifeng; Feng, Guoying

    2016-09-01

    Particles can be removed from a silicon surface by means of irradiation and a laser plasma shock wave. The particles and silicon are heated by the irradiation and they will expand differently due to their different expansion coefficients, making the particles easier to be removed. Laser plasma can ionize and even vaporize particles more significantly than an incident laser and, therefore, it can remove the particles more efficiently. The laser plasma shock wave plays a dominant role in removing particles, which is attributed to its strong burst force. The pressure of the laser plasma shock wave is determined by the laser pulse energy and the gap between the focus of laser and substrate surface. In order to obtain the working conditions for particle removal, the removal mechanism, as well as the temporal and spatial characteristics of velocity, propagation distance and pressure of shock wave have been researched. On the basis of our results, the conditions for nano-particle removal are achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574221).

  10. Evidence for particle-induced horizontal gene transfer and serial transduction between bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chiura, Hiroshi Xavier; Kogure, Kazuhiro; Hagemann, Sylvia; Ellinger, Adolf; Velimirov, Branko

    2011-06-01

    Incubation of the amino acid-deficient strain Escherichia coli AB1157 with particles harvested from an oligotrophic environment revealed evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) with restoration of all deficiencies in revertant cells with frequencies up to 1.94 × 10(-5). None of the markers were preferentially transferred, indicating that the DNA transfer is performed by generalized transduction. The highest gene transfer frequencies were obtained for single markers, with values up to 1.04 × 10(-2). All revertants were able to produce particles of comparable size, appearing at the beginning of the stationary phase. Examination of the revertants using electron microscopy showed bud-like structures with electron-dense bodies. The particles that display the structural features of membrane vesicles were again infectious to E. coli AB1157, producing new infectious particles able to transduce genetic information, a phenomenon termed serial transduction. Thus, the <0.2-μm particle fraction from seawater contains a particle size fraction with high potential for gene transfer. Biased sinusoidal field gel electrophoresis indicated a DNA content for the particles of 370 kbp, which was higher than that of known membrane vesicles. These findings provide evidence of a new method of HGT, in which mobilizable DNA is trafficked from donor to recipient cells via particles.

  11. The formation of chlorine-induced alterations in daguerreotype image particles: a high resolution SEM-EDS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Silvia A.; Schulte, Franziska; Kennedy, Nora W.; Schrott, Alejandro G.

    2011-10-01

    The daguerreotype image, composed of nanosized silver-mercury or silver-mercury-gold amalgam particles formed on a polished silver substrate, is particularly sensitive to deterioration by chlorine-containing compounds resulting in the formation of AgCl that generates redeposited silver upon exposure to UV and visible lights. In the present study, alterations caused by chlorides on daguerreotype test samples prepared following 19th century recipes were studied. The dependence of variations in the production steps of daguerreotypes, such as multiple sensitization and gilding, on the impact of the exposure to chlorine were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), complemented by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that AgCl nucleates on the image particles and in the substrate defects, regardless of the particle density or the sensitization process. In gilded samples, Au was observed over the image particles and the polished silver substrate as a tightly packed grainy layer, which conformably follows the polishing irregularities. For the first time it is shown that Au preferentially accumulates on top of the image particles. This gold layer does not protect the image from chlorine-induced deterioration.

  12. On-line determination of nanometric and sub-micrometric particle physicochemical characteristics using spectral imaging-aided Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy coupled with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodeo, Tanguy; Dutouquet, Christophe; Le Bihan, Olivier; Attoui, Michel; Frejafon, Emeric

    2009-10-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy has been employed to detect sodium chloride and metallic particles with sizes ranging from 40 nm up to 1 µm produced by two different particle generators. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy technique combined with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer was evaluated as a potential candidate for workplace surveillance in industries producing nanoparticle-based materials. Though research is still currently under way to secure nanoparticle production processes, the risk of accidental release is not to be neglected. Consequently, there is an urgent need for the manufacturers to have at their command a tool enabling leak detection in-situ and in real time so as to protect workers from potential exposure. In this context, experiments dedicated to laser-induced plasma particle interaction were performed. To begin with, spectral images of the laser-induced plasma vaporizing particles were recorded to visualize the spatio-temporal evolution of the atomized matter and to infer the best recording parameters for Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analytical purposes, taking into account our experimental set-up specificity. Then, on this basis, time-resolved spectroscopic measurements were performed to make a first assumption of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy potentialities. Particle size dependency on the LIBS signal was examined. Repeatability and limits of detection were assessed and discussed. All the experiments carried out with low particle concentrations point out the high time delays corresponding to the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy signal emergence. Plasma temperature temporal evolution was found to be a key parameter to explain this peculiarity inherent to laser/plasma/particle interaction.

  13. A comparison of mutations induced by accelerated iron particles versus those induced by low earth orbit space radiation in the FEM-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hartman, P S; Hlavacek, A; Wilde, H; Lewicki, D; Schubert, W; Kern, R G; Kazarians, G A; Benton, E V; Benton, E R; Nelson, G A

    2001-03-01

    The fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans was employed to determine the mutation frequency as well as the nature of mutations induced by low earth orbit space radiation ambient to Space Shuttle flight STS-76. Recovered mutations were compared to those induced by accelerated iron ions generated by the AGS synchrotron accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For logistical reasons, dauer larvae were prepared at TCU, transported to either Kennedy Space Center or Brookhaven National Laboratory, flown in space or irradiated, returned to TCU and screened for mutants. A total of 25 fem-3 mutants were recovered after the shuttle flight and yielded a mutation frequency of 2.1x10(-5), roughly 3.3-fold higher than the spontaneous rate of 6.3x10(-6). Four of the mutations were homozygous inviable, suggesting that they were large deletions encompassing fem-3 as well as neighboring, essential genes. Southern blot analyses revealed that one of the 25 contained a polymorphism in fem-3, further evidence that space radiation can induce deletions. While no polymorphisms were detected among the iron ion-induced mutations, three of the 15 mutants were homozygous inviable, which is in keeping with previous observations that high LET iron particles generate deficiencies. These data provide evidence, albeit indirect, that an important mutagenic component of ambient space radiation is high LET charged particles such as iron ions.

  14. A comparison of mutations induced by accelerated iron particles versus those induced by low earth orbit space radiation in the FEM-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, P. S.; Hlavacek, A.; Wilde, H.; Lewicki, D.; Schubert, W.; Kern, R. G.; Kazarians, G. A.; Benton, E. V.; Benton, E. R.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans was employed to determine the mutation frequency as well as the nature of mutations induced by low earth orbit space radiation ambient to Space Shuttle flight STS-76. Recovered mutations were compared to those induced by accelerated iron ions generated by the AGS synchrotron accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. For logistical reasons, dauer larvae were prepared at TCU, transported to either Kennedy Space Center or Brookhaven National Laboratory, flown in space or irradiated, returned to TCU and screened for mutants. A total of 25 fem-3 mutants were recovered after the shuttle flight and yielded a mutation frequency of 2.1x10(-5), roughly 3.3-fold higher than the spontaneous rate of 6.3x10(-6). Four of the mutations were homozygous inviable, suggesting that they were large deletions encompassing fem-3 as well as neighboring, essential genes. Southern blot analyses revealed that one of the 25 contained a polymorphism in fem-3, further evidence that space radiation can induce deletions. While no polymorphisms were detected among the iron ion-induced mutations, three of the 15 mutants were homozygous inviable, which is in keeping with previous observations that high LET iron particles generate deficiencies. These data provide evidence, albeit indirect, that an important mutagenic component of ambient space radiation is high LET charged particles such as iron ions.

  15. Flow-induced anisotropy in the susceptibility of a particle suspension.

    PubMed

    Karis, T E; Jhon, M S

    1986-07-01

    The initial susceptibility, or low-field high-frequency permeability, of a rod-like particle suspension or polymer solution can become anisotropic when the particles or molecules interact with a magnetic field in a directional manner and are nonrandomly oriented by certain types of flow field. This is the alignment that leads to thixotropy and deviatoric stresses during rheological measurements on these fluids. A general expression for the particle order parameter and the fluid permeability in terms of Legendre polynomials is derived by calculating the ensemble average over all possible orientation angles. This is an integral containing the orientation angle-dependent orientation probability function. The example case of single-domain magnetic particles suspended in extensional flow of a newtonian fluid is examined by using the following well-known models: chain-of-spheres model for the magnetic properties of a particle and the Kirkwood-Auer theory for the orientation probability function. From this, the particle orientation in the flow direction downstream from a sharp circular convergence is predicted to dramatically increase with an increase in the ratio of the extension rate to the particle rotary diffusion coefficient. Consequently, the measured permeability of the fluid is predicted to decrease parallel to, and to increase perpendicular to, the flow direction. PMID:16593725

  16. Laser-induced damage initiated on the surface of particle contamination fused silica at 1064nm

    SciTech Connect

    Michlitsch, K.J.

    1998-06-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to quantify the effects of contamination particles on the damage threshold of laser-illuminated fused silica optics and set cleanliness requirements for optics on the beam line of the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Circular contamination particles were sputter-deposited onto fused silica windows which were then illuminated repetitively using a 1064nm laser. A variety of contaminants were tested including metals, oxides, and organics. Tests were conducted with particles on the input and output surfaces of the window, and the morphological features of the damage were very reproducible. A plasma often ignited at the contamination particle; its intensity was dependent upon the mass of the contaminant. Input surface damage was characteristically more severe than output surface damage. The size of the damaged area scaled with the size of the particle. On a few occasions, catastrophic damage (cracking or ablation of the substrate) initiated on the output surface due to contamination particles on either the input or output surface. From damage growth plots, predictions can be made about the severity of damage expected from contamination particles of known size and material.

  17. COX-2 expression induced by diesel particles involves chromatin modification and degradation of HDAC1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the inflammatory response induced by physiologic and stress stimuli. Exposure to diesel exhaust particulate matter (DEP) has been shown to induce pulmonary inflammation and exacerbate asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary dis...

  18. Emerging Mechanistic Targets in Lung Injury Induced by Combustion-Generated Particles

    PubMed Central

    Fariss, Marc W.; Gilmour, M. Ian; Reilly, Christopher A.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Ghio, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism for biological effect following exposure to combustion-generated particles is incompletely defined. The identification of pathways regulating the acute toxicological effects of these particles provides specific targets for therapeutic manipulation in an attempt to impact disease following exposures. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels were identified as “particle sensors” in that their activation was coupled with the initiation of protective responses limiting airway deposition and inflammatory responses, which promote degradation and clearance of the particles. TRPA1, V1, V4, and M8 have a capacity to mediate adverse effects after exposure to combustion-generated particulate matter (PM); relative contributions of each depend upon particle composition, dose, and deposition. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to an organic extract of diesel exhaust particle was followed by TRPV4 mediating Ca++ influx, increased RAS expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 activation. These novel pathways of biological effect can be targeted by compounds that specifically inhibit critical signaling reactions. In addition to TRPs and calcium biochemistry, humic-like substances (HLS) and cell/tissue iron equilibrium were identified as potential mechanistic targets in lung injury after particle exposure. In respiratory epithelial cells, iron sequestration by HLS in wood smoke particle (WSP) was associated with oxidant generation, cell signaling, transcription factor activation, and release of inflammatory mediators. Similar to WSP, cytotoxic insoluble nanosized spherical particles composed of HLS were isolated from cigarette smoke condensate. Therapies that promote bioelimination of HLS and prevent the disruption of iron homeostasis could function to reduce the harmful effects of combustion-generated PM exposure. PMID:23322347

  19. Neutron-induced charged-particle emission studies below 100 MeV at WNR

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Lee, T.M.; Sterbenz, S.M.

    1994-07-01

    Charged-particles produced by neutron bombardment of selected targets with Z=5 through 53 have been studied for neutron energies from 1 MeV to about 100 MeV using the spallation neutron source at WNR/LAMPF. Particle detection with energy measurement and particle identification is accomplished by two-element {Delta}E-E counters, three-element {Delta}E{sub l}-{Delta}E{sub 2}-E counters or with pulse-shape discrimination using scintillators directly in the neutron beam. The experimental techniques for these measurements are described and comparisons made among the different approaches. This presentation introduces five papers contributed to this conference.

  20. MECHANISMS OF NANODIAMOND PARTICLE INDUCED IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanodiamond particles (NDP) prepared by detonation under confined conditions have a number of industrial and analytical applications. Previous in vitro studies have reported NDP to be biologically inert with negligible cytotoxicity, implying that they are potentially suitable for...

  1. The radiation-induced rotation of cosmic dust particles: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misconi, N. Y.; Ratcliff, K. F.

    1981-01-01

    A crossed beam, horizontal optical trap, used to achieve laser levitation of particles in an effort to determine how solar radiation produces high spin rate in interplanetary dust particles, is described. It is suggested that random variations in albedo and geometry give rise to a nonzero effective torque when the influence of a unidrectional source of radiaton (due to the Sun) over the surface of a interplanetary dust particle is averaged. This resultant nonzero torque is characterized by an asymmetry factor which is the ratio of the effective moment arm to the maximum linear dimension of the body and is estimated to be 5 X 10 to the minus four power. It is hoped that this symmetry factor, which stabilizes the nonstatistical response of the particle, can be measured in a future Spacelab experiment.

  2. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES INDUCE ABERRANT ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL DIRECTED CELL MOVEMENT BY DISRUPTION OF POLARITY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following inj...

  3. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    PubMed Central

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium. PMID:27112961

  4. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media.

    PubMed

    Aragones, J L; Steimel, J P; Alexander-Katz, A

    2016-04-26

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  5. Nanodiamond particles induce IL-8 expression through a transcript stabilization mechanism in human airway epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanodiamond particles (NDP) prepared by detonational processes have a number of industrial and analytical applications. Previous in vitro studies have reported NDP to be biologically inert with negligible cytotoxicity, implying that they are potentially suitable for biomedical ap...

  6. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-04-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  7. Moonlet induced wakes in planetary rings: Analytical model including eccentric orbits of moon and ring particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiß, M.; Spahn, F.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2010-11-01

    Saturn's rings host two known moons, Pan and Daphnis, which are massive enough to clear circumferential gaps in the ring around their orbits. Both moons create wake patterns at the gap edges by gravitational deflection of the ring material (Cuzzi, J.N., Scargle, J.D. [1985]. Astrophys. J. 292, 276-290; Showalter, M.R., Cuzzi, J.N., Marouf, E.A., Esposito, L.W. [1986]. Icarus 66, 297-323). New Cassini observations revealed that these wavy edges deviate from the sinusoidal waveform, which one would expect from a theory that assumes a circular orbit of the perturbing moon and neglects particle interactions. Resonant perturbations of the edges by moons outside the ring system, as well as an eccentric orbit of the embedded moon, may partly explain this behavior (Porco, C.C., and 34 colleagues [2005]. Science 307, 1226-1236; Tiscareno, M.S., Burns, J.A., Hedman, M.M., Spitale, J.N., Porco, C.C., Murray, C.D., and the Cassini Imaging team [2005]. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 37, 767; Weiss, J.W., Porco, C.C., Tiscareno, M.S., Burns, J.A., Dones, L. [2005]. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 37, 767; Weiss, J.W., Porco, C.C., Tiscareno, M.S. [2009]. Astron. J. 138, 272-286). Here we present an extended non-collisional streamline model which accounts for both effects. We describe the resulting variations of the density structure and the modification of the nonlinearity parameter q. Furthermore, an estimate is given for the applicability of the model. We use the streamwire model introduced by Stewart (Stewart, G.R. [1991]. Icarus 94, 436-450) to plot the perturbed ring density at the gap edges. We apply our model to the Keeler gap edges undulated by Daphnis and to a faint ringlet in the Encke gap close to the orbit of Pan. The modulations of the latter ringlet, induced by the perturbations of Pan (Burns, J.A., Hedman, M.M., Tiscareno, M.S., Nicholson, P.D., Streetman, B.J., Colwell, J.E., Showalter, M.R., Murray, C.D., Cuzzi, J.N., Porco, C.C., and the Cassini ISS team [2005]. Bull. Am

  8. Trace the polymerization induced by gamma-ray irradiated silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoik; Ryu, Jungju; Kim, Myungwoong; Im, Seung Soon; Kim, Ick Soo; Sohn, Daewon

    2016-08-01

    A γ-ray irradiation to inorganic particles is a promising technique for preparation of organic/inorganic composites as it offers a number of advantages such as an additive-free polymerizations conducted under mild conditions, avoiding undesired damage to organic components in the composites. Herein, we demonstrated a step-wise formation mechanism of organic/inorganic nanocomposite hydrogel in detail. The γ-ray irradiation to silica particles dispersed in water generates peroxide groups on their surface, enabling surface-initiated polymerization of acrylic acid from the inorganic material. As a result, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) covers the silica particles in the form of a core-shell at the initial stage. Then, PAA-coated silica particles associate with each other by combination of radicals at the end of chains on different particles, leading to micro-gel domains. Finally, the micro-gels are further associated with each other to form a 3D network structure. We investigated this mechanism using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our result strongly suggests that controlling reaction time is critical to achieve specific and desirable organic/inorganic nanocomposite structure among core-shell particles, micro-gels and 3D network bulk hydrogel.

  9. Soot particle sizing during high-pressure Diesel spray combustion via time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryser, R.; Gerber, T.; Dreier, T.

    2009-01-15

    Single-pulse time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII) signal transients from soot particulates were acquired during unsteady high pressure Diesel combustion in a constant volume cell for typical top dead center conditions during a Diesel engine cycle. Measurements were performed for initial gas pressures between 1 and 3 MPa, injection pressures between 50 and 130 MPa and laser probe timings between 5 and 16 ms after start of fuel injection. In separate experiments and for the same cell operating conditions gas temperatures were deduced from spectrally resolved soot pyrometry measurements. Implementing the LII model of Kock et al. [Combust. Flame 147 (20006) 79-92] ensemble mean soot particle diameters were evaluated from least-squares fitting of theoretical cooling curves to experimental TiRe-LII signal transients. Since in the experiments the environmental gas temperature and the width of an assumed particle size distribution were not known, the effects of the initial choice of these parameters on retrieved particle diameters were investigated. It is shown that evaluated mean particle diameters are only slightly biased by the choice of typical size distribution widths and gas temperatures. For a fixed combustion phase mean particle diameters are not much affected by gas pressure, however they become smaller at high fuel injection pressure. At a mean chamber pressure of 1.39 MPa evaluated mean particle diameters increased by a factor of two for probe delays between 5 and 16 ms after start of injection irrespective of the choices of first-guess fitting variables, indicating a certain robustness of data analysis procedure. (author)

  10. Soot particle sizing during high-pressure Diesel spray combustion via time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryser, R.; Gerber, T.; Dreier, T.

    2008-11-15

    Single-pulse time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII) signal transients from soot particulates were acquired during unsteady high pressure Diesel combustion in a constant volume cell for typical top dead center conditions during a Diesel engine cycle. Measurements were performed for initial gas pressures between 1 and 3 MPa, injection pressures between 50 and 130 MPa and laser probe timings between 5 and 16 ms after start of fuel injection. In separate experiments and for the same cell operating conditions gas temperatures were deduced from spectrally resolved soot pyrometry measurements. Implementing the LII model of Kock et al. [Combust. Flame 147 (2006) 79-92] ensemble mean soot particle diameters were evaluated from least-squares fitting of theoretical cooling curves to experimental TiRe-LII signal transients. Since in the experiments the environmental gas temperature and the width of an assumed particle size distribution were not known, the effects of the initial choice of these parameters on retrieved particle diameters were investigated. It is shown that evaluated mean particle diameters are only slightly biased by the choice of typical size distribution widths and gas temperatures. For a fixed combustion phase mean particle diameters are not much affected by gas pressure, however they become smaller at high fuel injection pressure. At a mean chamber pressure of 1.39 MPa evaluated mean particle diameters increased by a factor of two for probe delays between 5 and 16 ms after start of injection irrespective of the choices of first-guess fitting variables, indicating a certain robustness of data analysis procedure. (author)

  11. Energetic particle drive for toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes and kinetic toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in a low-shear Tokamak. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, B.N. |; Sharapov, S.E.

    1994-10-01

    The structure of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and kinetic TAE (KTAE) with large mode numbers is analyzed and the linear power transfer from energetic particles to these modes is calculated in the low shear limit when each mode is localized near a single gap within an interval whose total width {Delta}{sup out} is much smaller than the radius r{sub m} of the mode location. Near its peak where most of the mode energy is concentrated, the mode has an inner scalelength {Delta}{sup in}, which is much smaller than {Delta}{sup out}. The scale {Delta}{sup in} is determined by toroidicity and kinetic effects, which eliminate the singularity of the potential at the resonant surface. This work examines the case when the drift orbit width of energetic particles {Delta}{sub b} is much larger than the inner scalelength {Delta}{sup in}, but arbitrary compared to the total width of the mode. It is shown that the particle-to-wave linear power transfer is comparable for the TAE and KTAE modes in this case. The ratio of the energetic particle contributions to the growth rates of the TAE and KTAE modes is then roughly equal to the inverse ratio of the mode energies. It is found that, in the low shear limit the growth rate of the KTAE modes can be larger than that for the TAE modes.

  12. Characterization of particle hygroscopicity by Raman lidar: Selected case studies from the convective and orographically-induced precipitation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelitano, Dario; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato

    2013-05-01

    The characterization of particle hygroscopicity has primary importance for climate monitoring and prediction. Model studies have demonstrated that relative humidity (RH) has a critical influence on aerosol climate forcing. Hygroscopic properties of aerosols influence particle size distribution and refractive index and hence their radiative effects. Aerosol particles tend to grow at large relative humidity values as a result of their hygroscopicity. Raman lidars with aerosol, water vapor and temperature measurement capability are potentially attractive tools for studying aerosol hygroscopicity as in fact they can provide continuous altitude-resolved measurements of particle optical, size and microphysical properties, as well as relative humidity, without perturbing the aerosols or their environment. Specifically, the University of Basilicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) considered for the present study, has the capability to perform all-lidar measurements of relative humidity based on the application of both the rotational and the vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL was operational in Achern (Black Forest, Lat: 48.64° N, Long: 8.06° E, Elev.: 140 m) between 25 May and 30 August 2007 in the framework of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). The present analysis is focused on selected case studies characterized by the presence of different aerosol types with different hygroscopic behavior. The observed behavior, dependent upon aerosol composition, may range from hygrophobic to strongly hygroscopic.

  13. Scaling laws of impact induced shock pressure and particle velocity in planetary mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteux, J.; Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2016-01-01

    While major impacting bodies during accretion of a Mars type planet have very low velocities (<10 km/s), the characteristics of the shockwave propagation and, hence, the derived scaling laws are poorly known for these low velocity impacts. Here, we use iSALE-2D hydrocode simulations to calculate shock pressure and particle velocity in a Mars type body for impact velocities ranging from 4 to 10 km/s. Large impactors of 100-400 km in diameter, comparable to those impacted on Mars and created giant impact basins, are examined. To better represent the power law distribution of shock pressure and particle velocity as functions of distance from the impact site at the surface, we propose three distinct regions in the mantle: a near field regime, which extends to 1-3 times the projectile radius into the target, where the peak shock pressure and particle velocity decay very slowly with increasing distance, a mid field region, which extends to ∼4.5 times the impactor radius, where the pressure and particle velocity decay exponentially but moderately, and a more distant far field region where the pressure and particle velocity decay strongly with distance. These scaling laws are useful to determine impact heating of a growing proto-planet by numerous accreting bodies.

  14. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  15. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  16. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Belov, K; Mulrey, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Wissel, S A; Zilles, A; Bechtol, K; Borch, K; Chen, P; Clem, J; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Huege, T; Hyneman, R; Jobe, K; Kuwatani, K; Lam, J; Liu, T C; Nam, J; Naudet, C; Nichol, R J; Rauch, B F; Rotter, B; Saltzberg, D; Schoorlemmer, H; Seckel, D; Strutt, B; Vieregg, A G; Williams, C

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  17. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, K.; Mulrey, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Wissel, S. A.; Zilles, A.; Bechtol, K.; Borch, K.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.; Gorham, P. W.; Hast, C.; Huege, T.; Hyneman, R.; Jobe, K.; Kuwatani, K.; Lam, J.; Liu, T. C.; Nam, J.; Naudet, C.; Nichol, R. J.; Rauch, B. F.; Rotter, B.; Saltzberg, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Seckel, D.; Strutt, B.; Vieregg, A. G.; Williams, C.; T-510 Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  18. Electron counting and beam-induced motion correction enable near atomic resolution single particle cryoEM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueming; Mooney, Paul; Zheng, Shawn; Booth, Chris; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Gubbens, Sander; Agard, David A.; Cheng, Yifan

    2013-01-01

    In recent work with large high symmetry viruses, single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) has reached the milestone of determining near atomic resolution structures by allowing direct fitting of atomic models into experimental density maps. However, achieving this goal with smaller particles of lower symmetry remains extraordinarily challenging. Using a newly developed single electron counting detector, we confirm that electron beam induced motion significantly degrades resolution and, importantly, show how the combination of rapid readout and nearly noiseless electron counting allow image blurring to be corrected to subpixel accuracy. Thus, intrinsic image information can be restored to high resolution (Thon rings visible to ~3 Å). Using this approach we determined a 3.3 Å resolution structure of a ~700 kDa protein with D7 symmetry showing clear side chain density. Our method greatly enhances image quality and data acquisition efficiency - key bottlenecks in applying near atomic resolution cryoEM to a broad range of protein samples. PMID:23644547

  19. Roles of charged particles and reactive species on cell membrane permeabilization induced by atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Hokari, Yutaro; Tominami, Kanako; Mokudai, Takayuki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-07-01

    As factors that influence cell membrane permeabilization during direct and indirect atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation, charged particle influx, superoxide anion radicals (O2 -•), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plasma-irradiated solution were evaluated. These are the three strong candidate factors and might multiply contribute to cell membrane permeabilization. In particular, a shorter plasma diffusion distance leads to the enhancement of the direct effects such as charged particle influx and further increase cell membrane permeability. In addition, O2 -• dissipates over time (a life span of the order of minutes) in plasma-irradiated water, and the deactivation of a plasma-irradiated solution in term of cell membrane permeabilization occurs in a life span of the same order. These results could promote the understanding of the mechanism of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization.

  20. Preparation of Cation-Exchange Particle Designed for High-Speed Collection of Proteins by Radiation-Induced Graft Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Yuta; Shimoda, Yuichi; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi; Furumoto, Goro; Shirataki, Hironobu; Shinohara, Naoyuki; Kubota, Noboru

    A cation-exchange polymer brush was immobilized onto a polyethylene-based particle with an average diameter of 35 μm by radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and subsequent sulfonation with sodium sulfite. A lysozyme solution was forced to flow through a bed (height 2 cm, cross-sectional area 0.61 cm2) charged with the resultant cation-exchange particles at a space velocity ranging from 500 to 2300 h-1. From a viewpoint of equilibrium binding capacity and elution percentage of lysozyme, the dose of electron beam and the degree of GMA grafting were optimized to be 200 kGy and 100%, respectively. The bed exhibited a constant dynamic binding capacity of lysozyme 14 mg⁄mL irrespective of space velocity due to negligible diffusional mass-transfer resistance.

  1. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Belov, K; Mulrey, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Wissel, S A; Zilles, A; Bechtol, K; Borch, K; Chen, P; Clem, J; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Huege, T; Hyneman, R; Jobe, K; Kuwatani, K; Lam, J; Liu, T C; Nam, J; Naudet, C; Nichol, R J; Rauch, B F; Rotter, B; Saltzberg, D; Schoorlemmer, H; Seckel, D; Strutt, B; Vieregg, A G; Williams, C

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties. PMID:27104694

  2. Confinement of a Dirac Particle to a Hard-Wall Confining Potential Induced by Noninertial Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the influence of noninertial effects on a Dirac particle in the Minkowski spacetime by showing that the geometry of the manifold can play the role of a hard-wall confining potential. Thus, we discuss a limit case where the relativistic bound states can be achieved in analogous way to having a Dirac particle confined to a quantum dot. We discuss the application of this mathematical model in studies of noninertial effects on condensed matter systems described by the Dirac equation, and compare the nonrelativistic limit of the energy levels with the spectrum of energy of a spin-½ particle confined to a quantum dot [E. Tsitsishvili et al., Phys. Rev. B70 (2004) 115316].

  3. Wave-particle interactions induced by SEPAC on Spacelab 1 Wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Sasaki, S.; Yanagisawa, M.; Burch, J. L.; Reasoner, D. L.; Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) flew on Spacelab 1 in November and December 1983. SEPAC included an accelerator which emitted electrons into the ionospheric plasma with energies up to 5 keV and currents up to 300 mA. The SEPAC equipment also included an energetic plasma generator, a neutral gas generator, and an extensive array of diagnostics. The diagnostics included plasma wave detectors, and energetic electron analyzer, a photometer, a high sensitivity television camera, a Langmuir probe and a pressure gage. Twenty-eight experiments were performed during the mission to investigate beam-plasma interactions, electron beam dynamics, plasma beam propagation, and vehicle charging. The wave-particle interactions were monitored by the plasma wave instrumentation, by the energetic electron detector and by the optical detectors. All show evidence of wave-particle interactions, which are described in this paper.

  4. Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

    2010-06-30

    Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement

  5. Subpixel centroid position error analysis in particle tracking velocimetry induced by the CCD pixel binning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmatov, A.; Akselli, B.; Nasibov, A.; Nasibov, H.

    2010-05-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) is a non-invasive, full field optical measuring technique that has become one of the dominant tools for obtaining velocity information in fluid motion. In PTV experiments, the fluid of interest is seeded with fluorescent tracer particles, where measurement of individual particle displacements, recorded by means of digital camera at two instances of time, is further used to ascertain overall flow motion. Upper limit of a flow speed a PTV system can measure is bound by the frame rate of a camera used, and the system's accuracy is limited by the accuracy of the particle centroid estimation. In order to increase the upper limit, we investigated the use of CCD binning option, which doubles camera frame rate, preserves effective field of view, suppresses photon and readout noise of CCD at the expense of loss in spatial resolution. This study provides quantitative assessment of tradeoff between aforementioned advantages of binning over the loss in spatial resolution, which can increase uncertainty in particle centroid estimation. We carried our experiments using scientific grade PixeFly camera and analyzed 1μm and 1.9μm size red fluorescence polystyrene microspheres, placed on a quartz glass plate, by the Hirox variable zoom lens (1-10x) conjugated with a OL- 700II objective. For each binning mode (horizontal, vertical and composite), we investigated and reported estimation errors of various cross-correlation and center of mass based centroid localization methods, using more than 100.000 particle image pairs. We found that, performing vertical binning in the context of laminar flows doubled measurable flow rate, while caused only a negligible estimation error in the order of hundredth of a pixel.

  6. Aerosol Mass Spectrometry via Laser-Induced Incandescence Particle Vaporization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy B. Onasch

    2011-10-20

    We have successfully developed and commercialized a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) instrument to measure mass, size, and chemical information of soot particles in ambient environments. The SP-AMS instrument has been calibrated and extensively tested in the laboratory and during initial field studies. The first instrument paper describing the SP-AMS has been submitted for publication in a peer reviewed journal and there are several related papers covering initial field studies and laboratory studies that are in preparation. We have currently sold 5 SP-AMS instruments (either as complete systems or as SP modules to existing AMS instrument operators).

  7. Toxicity of Mineral Dusts and a Proposed Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Particle-Induced Lung Diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; Zeidler-Erdely, P.; Scully, R.R.; Meyers, V.; Wallace, W.; Hunter, R.; Renne, R.; McCluskey, R.; Castranova, V.; Barger, M.; Meighan, T.; James, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Humans will set foot on the moon again. The lunar surface has been bombarded for 4 billion years by micrometeoroids and cosmic radiation, creating a layer of fine dust having a potentially reactive particle surface. To investigate the impact of surface reactivity (SR) on the toxicity of particles, and in particular, lunar dust (LD), we ground 2 Apollo 14 LD samples to increase their SR and compare their toxicity with those of unground LD, TiO2 and quartz. Intratracheally instilled at 0, 1, 2.5, or 7.5 mg/rat, all dusts caused dose-dependent increases in pulmonary lesions, and enhancement of biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). The toxicity of LD was greater than that of TiO2 but less than that of quartz. Three LDs differed 14-fold in SR but were equally toxic; quartz had the lowest SR but was most toxic. These results show no correlation between particle SR and toxicity. Often pulmonary toxicity of a dust can be attributed to oxidative stress (OS). We further observed dose-dependent and dustcytotoxicity- dependent increases in neutrophils. The oxidative content per BALF cell was also directly proportional to both the dose and cytotoxicity of the dusts. Because neutrophils are short-lived and release of oxidative contents after they die could initiate and promote a spectrum of lesions, we postulate a general mechanism for the pathogenesis of particle-induced diseases in the lung that involves chiefly neutrophils, the source of persistent endogenous OS. This mechanism explains why one dust (e.g., quartz or nanoparticles) is more toxic than another (e.g., micrometer-sized TiO2), why dust-induced lesions progress with time, and why lung cancer occurs in rats but not in mice and hamsters exposed to the same duration and concentration of dust.

  8. INHALATION OF OZONE AND DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES (DEP) INDUCES ACUTE AND REVERSIBLE CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have recently shown that episodic but not acute exposure to ozone or DEP induces vascular effects that are associated with the loss of cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acids (DEP 2.0 mg/m3 > ozone, 0.4 ppm). In this study we determined ozone and DEP-induced cardiac gen...

  9. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE-INDUCED EPITHELIAL TOXICITY IS MODULATED BY UV-IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 20 million individuals in the U.S alone. Asthmatic symptoms can be exacerbated by environmental insults like exposure to particulate matter (PM). Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) account for a significant por...

  10. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE-INDUCED EPITHELIAL TOXICITY IS MODULATED BY UV-IRRADIATION -- NCSU

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 20 million individuals in the U.S alone. Asthmatic symptoms can be exacerbated by environmental insults like exposure to particulate matter (PM). Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) account for a portion of PM...

  11. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on how wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory). Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  12. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-05-01

    The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory). Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  13. Fine ambient particles induce oxidative stress and metal binding genes in human alveolar machrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient pollutant particles (APP) increased respiratory morbidity and mortality. The alveolar macrophages (AMs) are one cell type in the lung directly exposed to APP. Upon contact with APP, AMs are activated and produce reactive oxygen species, but the scope ofthis ox...

  14. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLE INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN A MURINE MUCOSAL SENSITIZATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies in humans and animals have shown diesel exhaust particles (DEP) can act as an immunological adjuvant to enhance the development of allergic lung disease and this effect is influenced by the chemical composition of the DEP. The adjuvancy of NIST SRM 2975 (NDEP) generated...

  15. Observations of adhesion-induced deformations between spheroidal gold particles and conducting substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimai, D. S.; DeMejo, L. P.; Bowen, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Spheroidal gold particles, approximately 3 μm in diameter, were deposited on both hard and soft planar, electrically conducting substrates, and the interfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the particles appeared to embed into the softer substrate, but not into the harder one. The softer substrate also appeared to flow up the sides of the particles. The diameters of the craters formed are compared with the predictions based on Hertz' [Zimon, Adhesion of Dusts and Powders (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1982)] model of elastic deformation, Krupp's [Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 1, 111 (1967)] model of plastic response [assuming van der Waals (Zimon, ibid. and Krupp, ibid.) interactions], and Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts' [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 324, 301 (1971)] model of tensile response due to surface tension. These calculations suggest that the observed deformation on the softer substrate is predominantly plastic rather than elastic and that surface tension is significant. The techniques are expanded and results reported for the case of gold particles on insulating surfaces.

  16. Pulse laser-induced particle separation from polymethyl methacrylate: a mechanistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, S.; Armbruster, O.; Kautek, W.

    2013-04-01

    The separation mechanism of opaque and transparent model micro-particles, graphite and polystyrene copolymer spheres, respectively, from polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) substrates were investigated employing a ns-pulse laser radiating at 532 nm. The particles transparent in the visible wavelength range could be removed from PMMA efficiently in a very narrow fluence range between 1 and 2 J/cm2 according to a simple 1D thermal expansion model. Above this fluence region, with single pulses, the transparent microspheres caused local ablation of the PMMA substrate in the optical microlens nearfield. This process led to removal of the particles themselves due to the expansion of the ablation plasma. The irregularly shaped graphite particles shaded the underlying substrate from the incoming radiation so that no optical nearfield damage mechanism could be observed. Therefore, a substantial cleaning window between 0.5 and more than 16 J/cm2 was provided. The graphite data suggest an ablation mechanism of the particulates themselves due to a high optical absorption coefficient.

  17. Numerical modelling of shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Siva Prasad A. V.; Basu, Sumit

    2015-10-01

    Shock compaction of reactive powder mixtures to synthesize new materials is one of the oldest material processing techniques and has been studied extensively by several researchers over the past few decades. The quantitative connection between the shock energy imparted and the extent of reaction that can be completed in the small time window associated with the passage of the shock wave is complicated and depends on a large variety of parameters. In particular, our understanding of the complex interplay between the thermo-elasto-viscoplastic behaviour of the granular constituents and their temperature dependent, diffusion-limited reaction mechanism may be enriched through careful numerical simulations. A robust numerical model should be able to handle extremely large deformations coupled with diffusion mediated fast reaction kinetics. In this work, a meshfree discrete particle numerical method based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures is proposed. We present a numerical strategy to carry out reactions between reactant powder particles and partition the obtained products between the particles in a manner that accounts for the requirement that the total mass of the entire system remains constant as the reactions occur. Instead of solving the reaction-diffusion problem, we propose a ‘pseudo-diffusion’ model in which a distance dependent reaction rate constant is defined to carry out chemical reaction kinetics. This approach mimics the actual reaction-diffusion process at short times. Our numerical model is demonstrated for the well-studied reaction system Nb  +  2Si \\rightleftharpoons NbSi 2 . The predicted mass fractions of the product obtained from the simulations are in agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the effects of impact speed, particle arrangement and mixing ratio on the predicted product mass fractions are discussed.

  18. Quantification of online removal of refractory black carbon using laser-induced incandescence in the single particle soot photometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aiken, Allison C.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; DeMott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2016-04-05

    Refractory black carbon (rBC) is an aerosol that has important impacts on climate and human health. rBC is often mixed with other species, making it difficult to isolate and quantify its important effects on physical and optical properties of ambient aerosol. To solve this measurement challenge, a new method to remove rBC was developed using laser-induced incandescence (LII) by Levin et al. in 2014. Application of the method with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is used to determine the effects of rBC on ice nucleating particles (INP). Here, we quantify the efficacy of the method in the laboratory usingmore » the rBC surrogate Aquadag. Polydisperse and mobility-selected samples (100–500 nm diameter, 0.44–36.05 fg), are quantified by a second SP2. Removal rates are reported by mass and number. For the mobility-selected samples, the average percentages removed by mass and number of the original size are 88.9 ± 18.6% and 87.3 ± 21.9%, respectively. Removal of Aquadag is efficient for particles >100 nm mass-equivalent diameter (dme), enabling application for microphysical studies. However, the removal of particles ≤100 nm dme is less efficient. Absorption and scattering measurements are reported to assess its use to isolate brown carbon (BrC) absorption. Scattering removal rates for the mobility-selected samples are >90% on average, yet absorption rates are 53% on average across all wavelengths. Therefore, application to isolate effects of microphysical properties determined by larger sizes is promising, but will be challenging for optical properties. Lastly, the results reported also have implications for other instruments employing internal LII, e.g., the Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS).« less

  19. Turbulence-induced relative velocity of dust particles. III. The probability distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo; Scalo, John E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-09-01

    Motivated by its important role in the collisional growth of dust particles in protoplanetary disks, we investigate the probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows. Using the simulation from our previous work, we compute the relative velocity PDF as a function of the friction timescales, τ{sub p1} and τ{sub p2}, of two particles of arbitrary sizes. The friction time of the particles included in the simulation ranges from 0.1τ{sub η} to 54T {sub L}, where τ{sub η} and T {sub L} are the Kolmogorov time and the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, respectively. The relative velocity PDF is generically non-Gaussian, exhibiting fat tails. For a fixed value of τ{sub p1}, the PDF shape is the fattest for equal-size particles (τ{sub p2} = τ{sub p1}), and becomes thinner at both τ{sub p2} < τ{sub p1} and τ{sub p2} > τ{sub p1}. Defining f as the friction time ratio of the smaller particle to the larger one, we find that, at a given f in (1/2) ≲ f ≲ 1, the PDF fatness first increases with the friction time τ{sub p,h} of the larger particle, peaks at τ{sub p,h} ≅ τ{sub η}, and then decreases as τ{sub p,h} increases further. For 0 ≤ f ≲ (1/4), the PDF becomes continuously thinner with increasing τ{sub p,h}. The PDF is nearly Gaussian only if τ{sub p,h} is sufficiently large (>>T {sub L}). These features are successfully explained by the Pan and Padoan model. Using our simulation data and some simplifying assumptions, we estimated the fractions of collisions resulting in sticking, bouncing, and fragmentation as a function of the dust size in protoplanetary disks, and argued that accounting for non-Gaussianity of the collision velocity may help further alleviate the bouncing barrier problem.

  20. Measurement of Beta Particles Induced Electron-Hole Pairs Recombination in Depletion Region of GaAs PN Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Yang; Jiang, Lan; Li, Da-Rang

    2011-05-01

    PN junctions and schottky diodes are widely employed as electron-hole pair collectors in electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques and betavoltaic batteries, in which the recombination in depletion regions is ignored. We measured the beta particles induced electron-hole pairs recombination in the depletion region of a GaAs P+PN+ junction, based on comparisons between measured short currents and ideal values. The results show that only 20% electron-hole pairs in the depletion can be collected, causing the short current. This indicates an electron-hole pair diffusion length of 0.2μm in the depletion region. Hence, it is necessary to evaluate the recombination in the EBIC techniques and betavoltaic design.

  1. Fucoidan Extracted from Hijiki Protects Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells Against Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure-Induced Disruption.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Sook; Eom, Sang-Yong; Kim, In-Soo; Ali, Syed F; Kleinman, Michael T; Kim, Yong-Dae; Kim, Heon

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of fucoidan against the decreased function of primary cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMECs) after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). BBMECs were extracted from bovine brains and cultured until confluent. To evaluate the function of BBMECs, we performed a permeability test using cell-by-cell equipment and by Western blot analysis for zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1), which is a tight junction protein of BMECs, and evaluated oxidative stress in BBMECs using the DCFH-DA assay and the CUPRAC-BCS assay. The increased oxidative stress in BBMECs following DEP exposure was suppressed by fucoidan. In addition, permeability of BBMECs induced by DEP exposure was decreased by fucoidan treatment. Our results showed that fucoidan protects against BBMEC disruption induced by DEP exposure. This study provides evidence that fucoidan might protect the central nervous system (CNS) against DEP exposure.

  2. Alpha-quartz-induced chemokine expression by rat lung epithelial cells: effects of in vivo and in vitro particle exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, K. E.; Howard, B. W.; Carter, J. M.; Asquith, T.; Johnston, C.; Detilleux, P.; Kunkel, S. L.; Isfort, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that can play a key role in leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue injury or infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to alpha-quartz as well as other noxious particles increases chemokine gene expression in rat lung, although the cells responsible for chemokine expression and the mechanisms underlying this response have remained unclear. The present studies demonstrate that exposure of rats to alpha-quartz induced expression of mRNA for the chemokine macrophage-inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 in epithelial cells lining the terminal bronchioles and alveolar ducts as well as macrophages and alveolar type II cells in the more distal lung. Treatment of rats with an anti-MIP-2 antiserum before alpha-quartz exposure markedly attenuated neutrophilic infiltration of the lungs demonstrating an important role for MIP-2 in alpha-quartz-induced pulmonary inflammation. In vitro exposure of primary cultures of rat alveolar type II cells or the rat alveolar type II cell line RLE-6TN to tumor necrosis factor-alpha, endotoxin, or alpha-quartz increased mRNA for MIP-2 as well as the structurally and functionally similar chemokine cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant but not the chemokine MIP-1 alpha. The alpha-quartz-induced increase in epithelial MIP-2 mRNA resulted, at least in part, from increased gene transcription and was associated with the release of active MIP-2 protein. Induction of RLE-6TN MIP-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant mRNA expression was not unique to alpha-quartz, being also increased by crocidolite asbestus fibers but not by titanium dioxide or MMVF-10 glass fibers. These findings indicate that epithelial cells contribute to chemokine expression in rat lung after exposure to alpha-quartz and potentially other noxious particles and suggest that alpha-quartz-activated MIP-2 expression in vivo results, at least in part, from a direct action of the particles on the lung epithelium. Images

  3. Entropic attraction: Polymer compaction and expansion induced by nano-particles in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Guo-Jun; Chien, Fan-Tso; Luzhbin, Dmytro; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2015-05-01

    We investigated nanoparticle (NP)-induced coil-to-globule transition of a semi-flexible polymer in a confined suspension of ideal NP using Langevin dynamics. DNA molecules are often found to be highly compact, bound with oppositely charged proteins in a crowded environment within cells and viruses. Recent studies found that high concentration of electrostatically neutral NP also condenses DNA due to entropically induced depletion attraction between DNA segments. Langevin dynamics simulations with a semi-flexible chain under strong confinement were performed to investigate the competition between NP-induced monomer-monomer and monomer-wall attraction under different confinement heights and NP volume fractions. We found that whether NP induce polymer segments to adsorb to the walls and swell or to attract one another and compact strongly depends on the relative strength of the monomer-wall and the NP-wall interactions.

  4. Particle concentration at planet-induced gap edges and vortices. I. Inviscid three-dimensional hydro disks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Bai, Xue-ning

    2014-04-20

    We perform a systematic study of the dynamics of dust particles in protoplanetary disks with embedded planets using global two-dimensional and three-dimensional inviscid hydrodynamic simulations. Lagrangian particles have been implemented into the magnetohydrodynamic code Athena with cylindrical coordinates. We find two distinct outcomes depending on the mass of the embedded planet. In the presence of a low-mass planet (8 M {sub ⊕}), two narrow gaps start to open in the gas on each side of the planet where the density waves are shocked. These shallow gaps can dramatically affect particle drift speed and cause significant, roughly axisymmetric dust depletion. On the other hand, a more massive planet (>0.1 M{sub J} ) carves out a deeper gap with sharp edges, which are subject to Rossby wave instability leading to vortex formation. Particles with a wide range of sizes (0.02 < Ωt{sub s} < 20) are trapped and settle to the midplane in the vortex, with the strongest concentration for particles with Ωt{sub s} ∼ 1. The dust concentration is highly elongated in the φ direction, and can be as wide as four disk scale heights in the radial direction. Dust surface density inside the vortex can be increased by more than a factor of 10{sup 2} in a very non-axisymmetric fashion. For very big particles (Ωt{sub s} >> 1) we find strong eccentricity excitation, in particular around the planet and in the vicinity of the mean motion resonances, facilitating gap openings there. Our results imply that in weakly turbulent protoplanetary disk regions (e.g., the {sup d}ead zone{sup )} dust particles with a very wide range of sizes can be trapped at gap edges and inside vortices induced by planets with M{sub p} < M{sub J} , potentially accelerating planetesimal and planet formation there, and giving rise to distinctive features that can be probed by ALMA and the Extended Very Large Array.

  5. Continuous-flow Electrophoretic Separation of Particles with Dissimilar Charge-to-Mass Ratios via the Wall-induced Non-inertial Lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Cory; Todd, Andrew; Lu, Xinyu; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-11-01

    Traditional electrophoresis separates particles with dissimilar charge-to-mass ratios along the channel length direction in a batchwise mode. We present in this talk a continuous-flow electrophoretic separation of particles in the transverse direction of a straight microchannel. This separation stems from the particle property-dependent lateral migration due to the wall-induced non-inertial electrical lift force. It is demonstrated through both a binary and a ternary separation of polymer particles based on surface charge and size. A numerical model is also developed to understand this separation and to study the parametric effects.

  6. A Rapid Method for Viral Particle Detection in Viral-Induced Gastroenteritis: A TEM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, M. John; Barrish, James P.; Hayes, Elizabeth S.; Leer, Laurie C.; Estes, Mary K.; Cubitt, W. D.

    1995-10-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a common cause of hospitalization in the pediatric population. The most frequent cause of gastroenteritis is viral in origin. The purpose of this study was to compare a rapid modified negative-staining TEM method with the conventional pseudoreplica technique in detection of viral particles in fecal samples from children with viral gastroenteritis. The modified negative-staining method resulted in a significantly higher (2.5 ± 0.5, p = 0.02) viral rating score than that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique (1.7 ± 0.4). In addition, the preparation time for the negative-staining method was approximately one fifth that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique. Rapid diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis may be made by ultrastructural detection of viral particles in fecal samples using the negative staining technique.

  7. The 'toothbrush-cluster': probing particle acceleration by merger induced shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, Reinout

    2012-09-01

    We have discovered a spectacular merging galaxy cluster hosting a 2-Mpc elongated radio source, suggesting particle acceleration at merger shocks. The large straight extent is however very difficult to explain with current merger scenarios and a very high Mach number of 4.5 is required to explain the radio spectral index. We therefore argue that this cluster is a key object to test current models of shock acceleration and cluster formation. The proposed Chandra+EVLA observations will address the following: (i) is there a compelling need for a more sophisticated particle acceleration mechanism than standard diffusive shock acceleration? And (ii) are we witnessing a very special configuration consisting of multiple merger events that collectively conspire to yield such a linear shock?

  8. Particle manipulation with acoustic vortex beam induced by a brass plate with spiral shape structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tian; Ke, Manzhu; Li, Weiping; Yang, Qian; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we give direct demonstration of acoustic radiation force and acoustic torque on particles exerted by an acoustic vortex beam, which is realized by an acoustic artificial structure plate instead of traditional transducer arrays. First, the first order acoustic vortex beam, which has the distinctive features of a linear and continuous phase variation from -π to π around its propagation axis and a magnitude null at its core, is obtained through one single acoustic source incident upon a structured brass plate with Archimedean spiral grating engraved on the back surface. Second, annular self-patterning of polystyrene particles with a radius of 90 μm is realized in the gradient field of this acoustic vortex beam. In addition, we further exhibit acoustic angular momentum transfer to an acoustic absorptive matter, which is verified by a millimeter-sized polylactic acid disk self-rotating in water in the acoustic field of the generated vortex beam.

  9. Candidate Reactions for Mercury Detection Induced by Neutron and Alpha Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, James J.; Wittman, Richard S.; Schenter, Robert E.; Cooper, John A.

    2007-03-21

    This paper summarizes modeling of mercury to activated states with alpha particles, neutrons, or deuterons, and the spectral emission from the activated products. Activation can occur with a source such as 242Cf , 241Am-Be, a neutron generator, or a particle accelerator, and the activation products measured if sufficient signal is provided. Identification and measurement of mercury by prompt gamma emission, generated by bombardment with neutrons is reported. Activation product reactions of (α, xn) (d, xn) (n,γ) and (n,p) are screened as candidate reactions. Initial calculations indicate the potential use of either alpha, or 14 MeV neutron activation to assess part per billion concentrations of mercury in the gaseous phase. Ultimately, data from sample analysis of ambient conditions flue gas will be used to assess mercury detection sensitivity and specificity under typical operating conditions.

  10. A study of the scintillation light induced in liquid xenon by electrons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence and the intensity of the primary scintillation light in liquid Xe excited by Am-241 alpha particles and Bi-207 internal-conversion electrons were measured at different electric-field strengths. High-purity liquid Xe was used to fill a parallel-plate ionization chamber equipped with a CaF2 window coupled to a UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The effect of the specific ionization density on the scintillation light and the time correlation between the light signal and the charge signal is reported. It is demonstrated that the fast scintillation signal produced in liquid Xe by an ionizing particle provides an ideal trigger in a detector aiming at a complete three-dimensional event reconstruction with an excellent background rejection capability.

  11. On the theory of the ionization-induced drag of fast charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, D. N.

    2016-09-01

    The moments in the theory of deceleration of fast charged particles colliding with an oscillator have been considered in the dipole approximation. In this approximation, the problem has been solved exactly, and the moment of the oscillator has been determined from the initial state | m> = |0> in the form of the sum of 1D integrals. The method considered here makes it possible to calculate the moments for ion velocities close to atomic velocities ( v ~ v a).

  12. Comparative analysis of charged particle-induced autosomal mutations in murine cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Turker, Mitchell; Dan, Cristian; Kwoh, Ely

    Carcinogenesis requires the accumulation of mutations and most of these mutations of occur on autosomes. This study seeks to determine the effect of the tissue microenvironment on the frequency and types of autosomal mutations in epithelial cells exposed to the types of charged particles in space radiation environments. Epithelial cells are the principal cells at risk for the development of solid cancers in humans. Aprt heterozygous mice from a cross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice (B6D2F1) are used for these studies. The tissue of interest here is the kidney. We evaluated the effects of Fe ion on cytotoxicity, mutant frequency, and mutant spectra in kidney epithelium exposed in vivo. In vitro studies use primary kidney clones from B6D2F1 mice. Animals or cells were exposed to graded doses (0-2 Gy) of 1 GeV/amu Fe ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were given whole body exposure in plexiglas holders. Cells were irradiated in T-75 flasks as monolayers. Cytotoxicity for cells exposed as monolayers were performed immediately post-irradiation. In vitro mutation assays were performed after a 5-6 day expression period post-irradiation, at which time cells were seeded in standard medium supplemented with 2,6 diaminopurine to screen for Aprt mutants. Colony formation was assessed in parallel in standard medium. In contrast, mice were euthanized after 2-4 months post-irradiation (early) or 8-10 months post-irradiation (late) to determine the cytotoxic and mutagenic response to Fe ion irradiation. Once the kidneys were digested, the cytotoxicity and mutation assays were performed using the same methodology employed for cells in vitro. Individual Apr t mutant colonies were collected from separate flasks exposed in vitro to 2 Gy of Fe ions. A similar group of Aprt mutants were collected from separate, un-irradiated flasks Aprt mutant colonies were also collected from individual kidneys for un-irradiated mice and for mice

  13. Comparative analysis of charged particle-induced autosomal mutations in murine cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Turker, Mitchell; Dan, Cristian; Kwoh, Ely

    Carcinogenesis requires the accumulation of mutations and most of these mutations of occur on autosomes. This study seeks to determine the effect of the tissue microenvironment on the frequency and types of autosomal mutations in epithelial cells exposed to the types of charged particles in space radiation environments. Epithelial cells are the principal cells at risk for the development of solid cancers in humans. Aprt heterozygous mice from a cross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice (B6D2F1) are used for these studies. The tissue of interest here is the kidney. We evaluated the effects of Fe ion on cytotoxicity, mutant frequency, and mutant spectra in kidney epithelium exposed in vivo. In vitro studies use primary kidney clones from B6D2F1 mice. Animals or cells were exposed to graded doses (0-2 Gy) of 1 GeV/amu Fe ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were given whole body exposure in plexiglas holders. Cells were irradiated in T-75 flasks as monolayers. Cytotoxicity for cells exposed as monolayers were performed immediately post-irradiation. In vitro mutation assays were performed after a 5-6 day expression period post-irradiation, at which time cells were seeded in standard medium supplemented with 2,6 diaminopurine to screen for Aprt mutants. Colony formation was assessed in parallel in standard medium. In contrast, mice were euthanized after 2-4 months post-irradiation (early) or 8-10 months post-irradiation (late) to determine the cytotoxic and mutagenic response to Fe ion irradiation. Once the kidneys were digested, the cytotoxicity and mutation assays were performed using the same methodology employed for cells in vitro. Individual Apr t mutant colonies were collected from separate flasks exposed in vitro to 2 Gy of Fe ions. A similar group of Aprt mutants were collected from separate, un-irradiated flasks Aprt mutant colonies were also collected from individual kidneys for un-irradiated mice and for mice

  14. A Study of Particle Production in Proton Induced Collisions Using the MIPP Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    The Main Injector Particle Production (MIPP) experiment is a fixed target hadron production experiment at Fermilab. MIPP is a high acceptance spectrometer which provides excellent charged particle identification using Time Projection Chamber (TPC), Time of Flight (ToF), multicell Cherenkov (Ckov), ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors, and Calorimeter for neutrons. The MIPP experiment is designed to measure particle production in interactions of 120 GeV/c primary protons from the Main Injector and secondary beams of $\\pi^{\\pm}, \\rm{K}^{\\pm}$, p and $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ from 5 to 90 GeV/c on nuclear targets which include H, Be, C, Bi and U, and a dedicated run with the NuMI target. The goal of the experiment is to measure hadron production cross sections or yields using these beams and targets. These hadronic interaction data can have a direct impact on the detailed understanding of the neutrino fluxes of several accelerator-based neutrino experiments like MINOS, MINER$\

  15. Unique flow transitions and particle collection switching phenomena in a microchannel induced by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2010-12-01

    We present an experimental approach for controlled switching between uniform flow for pumping and vortical flow for mixing in a microchannel fabricated onto a piezoelectric substrate. For particle laden fluids, this arrangement permits a choice between transport and alignment of microparticles. Using surface acoustic waves with amplitudes beyond 1 nm, the transition from uniform to mixing flows occurs when the acoustic wavelength in the fluid is reduced to a dimension smaller than the channel width, i.e., λf≥Wch for uniform flow and λfparticles in an initially homogeneous suspension agglomerate into equally spaced lines with a separation of λf/2. Switching the transducer between its fundamental resonant frequency f0 and its first harmonic frequency f1+˜2f0 causes a switch between uniform and mixing flow, while switching between large and small amplitude excitation allows one to choose whether to collect the particles in the flow along nodal lines parallel to the channel. These results are uniquely achieved without requiring the microfabrication of complex microchannel architectures and control schemes; the switching is simply achieved by adjusting two parameters: the acoustic excitation frequency and amplitude.

  16. Fluid-particle characteristics in fully-developed cluster-induced turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we present a theoretical framework for collisional fluid-particle turbulence. To identify the key mechanisms responsible for energy exchange between the two phases, an Eulerian-Lagrangian strategy is used to simulate fully-developed cluster-inudced turbulence (CIT) under a range of Reynolds numbers, where fluctuations in particle concentration generate and sustain the carrier-phase turbulence. Using a novel filtering approach, a length-scale separation between the correlated particle velocity and uncorrelated granular temperature (GT) is achieved. This separation allows us to extract the instantaneous Eulerian volume fraction, velocity and GT fields from the Lagrangian data. Direct comparisons can thus be made with the relevant terms that appear in the multiphase turbulence model. It is shown that the granular pressure is highly anisotropic, and thus additional transport equations (as opposed to a single equation for GT) are necessary in formulating a predictive multiphase turbulence model. In addition to reporting the relevant contributions to the Reynolds stresses of each phase, two-point statistics, integral length/timescales, averages conditioned on the local volume fraction, and PDFs of the key multiphase statistics are presented and discussed. The research reported in this paper is partially supported by the HPC equipment purchased through U.S. National Science Foundation MRI Grant Number CNS 1229081 and CRI Grant Number 1205413.

  17. Scenarios for the nonlinear evolution of alpha particle induced Alfven wave instability

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Ye, Huanchun.

    1992-03-01

    Various nonlinear scenarios are given for the evolution of energetic particles that are slowing down in a background plasma and simultaneously causing instability of the background plasma waves. If the background damping is sufficiently weak, a steady-state wave is established as described by Berk and Breizman. For larger background damping rate pulsations develop. Saturation occurs when the wave amplitude rises to where the wave trapping frequency equals the growth rate. The wave then damps due to the small background dissipation present and a relatively long quiet interval exists between bursts while the free energy of the distribution is refilled by classical transport. In this scenario the anomalous energy loss of energetic particles due to diffusion is small compared to the classical collisional energy exchange with the background plasma. However, if at the trapping frequency, the wave amplitude is large enough to cause orbit stochasticity, a phase space explosion'' occurs where the wave amplitudes rise to higher levels which leads to rapid loss of energetic particles.

  18. Scenarios for the nonlinear evolution of alpha particle induced Alfven wave instability

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Ye, Huanchun

    1992-03-01

    Various nonlinear scenarios are given for the evolution of energetic particles that are slowing down in a background plasma and simultaneously causing instability of the background plasma waves. If the background damping is sufficiently weak, a steady-state wave is established as described by Berk and Breizman. For larger background damping rate pulsations develop. Saturation occurs when the wave amplitude rises to where the wave trapping frequency equals the growth rate. The wave then damps due to the small background dissipation present and a relatively long quiet interval exists between bursts while the free energy of the distribution is refilled by classical transport. In this scenario the anomalous energy loss of energetic particles due to diffusion is small compared to the classical collisional energy exchange with the background plasma. However, if at the trapping frequency, the wave amplitude is large enough to cause orbit stochasticity, a phase space ``explosion`` occurs where the wave amplitudes rise to higher levels which leads to rapid loss of energetic particles.

  19. Influence of particle size on bioprocess induced changes on technological functionality of wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Coda, Rossana; Kärki, Ilona; Nordlund, Emilia; Heiniö, Raija-Liisa; Poutanen, Kaisa; Katina, Kati

    2014-02-01

    Wheat bran is nutritionally an important source of dietary fibre, vitamins and minerals, but its negative influence on dough rheology, texture and sensory quality of bread limits its use in bread baking. The current study aimed at improving the technological functionality of bran by bioprocessing Wheat bran of different particle size (750, 400, 160, 50 μm) was fermented 8 h or 24 h with Lactobacillus brevis E95612 and Kazachstania exigua C81116 with or without addition of enzyme mixture with various carbohydrase activities. Kinetics of growth and acidification showed that the growth of the starters was enhanced in the presence of enzymes in bran having particle size of 160 and 50 μm. Fermentation was critical to improve dough stability and volume of bran enriched breads, whereas addition of enzymes had the most significant effect in improving bread shelf-life. Wheat bread containing 160 μm bran fermented 8 h with enzymes had mild flavour, the highest volume and shelf-life. Reduction of particle size increased perceived smoothness of mouthfeel but provided darker colour in bran-containing breads. The short 8 h bioprocessing, with or without enzymes did not increase pungent flavour or bitter aftertaste in comparison with the native bran.

  20. DNA double-strand breaks induced along the trajectory of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, I. C.; Niu, H.; Chen, C. H.; Yu, Y. C.; Hsu, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-known that the DNA damage caused by charged particles considerably differs from damage due to electromagnetic radiation. In the case of irradiation by charged particles the DNA lesions are more complex and clustered. Such clustered damage is presumed difficult to be repaired, and is potentially lethal. In this study, we utilize a 90°-scattering system and related imaging techniques to investigate the accumulation of γ-H2AX along the trajectory of charged particles. By immunostaining the γ-H2AX protein, optical images of corresponding double strand breaks were observed using a high resolution confocal microscope. We demonstrate the difference in the accumulation of γ-H2AX from irradiation by 1 MeV protons and that of 150 keV X-rays. The acquired images were arranged and reconstructed into a 3D image using ImageJ software. We discovered that the γ-H2AX foci, following irradiation by protons, have a tendency to extend in the beam direction, while those from X-ray irradiation tend to be smaller and more randomly distributed. These results can be explained by the physical model of energy deposition.

  1. Circulation and distribution of gold nanoparticles and induced alterations of tissue morphology at intravenous particle delivery.

    PubMed

    Terentyuk, Georgy S; Maslyakova, Galina N; Suleymanova, Leyla V; Khlebtsov, Boris N; Kogan, Boris Ya; Akchurin, Garif G; Shantrocha, Alexander V; Maksimova, Irina L; Khlebtsov, Nicolai G; Tuchin, Valery V

    2009-05-01

    Kinetics, biodistribution, and histological studies were performed to evaluate the particle-size effects on the distribution of 15 nm and 50 nm PEG-coated colloidal gold (CG) particles and 160 nm silica/gold nanoshells (NSs) in rats and rabbits. The above nanoparticles (NPs) were used as a model because of their importance for current biomedical applications such as photothermal therapy, optical coherence tomography, and resonance-scattering imaging. The dynamics of NPs circulation in vivo was evaluated after intravenous administration of 15 nm CG NPs to rabbit, and the maximal concentrations of gold were observed 15-30 min after injection. Rats were injected in the tail vein with PEG-coated NPs (about 0.3 mg Au/kg rats). 24 h after injection, the accumulation of gold in different organs and blood was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In accordance with the published reports, we observed 15 nm particles in all organs with rather smooth distribution over liver, spleen and blood. By contrast, the larger NSs were accumulated mainly in the liver and spleen. For rabbits, the biodistribution was similar (72 h after intravenous injection). We report also preliminary data on the light microscopy and TEM histological examination that allows evaluation of the changes in biotissues after gold NPs treatment.

  2. RANKL-associated suppression of particle-induced osteolysis in an aged model of Calcitonin and α-CGRP deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kauther, Max D; Neuerburg, Carl; Wefelnberg, Florian; Bachmann, Hagen S; Schlepper, Rüdiger; Hilken, Gero; Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Grabellus, Florian; Schilling, Arndt F; Jäger, Marcus; Wedemeyer, Christian

    2013-04-01

    An aging population with higher bone turnover intensifies the need for joint replacement surgery. However, particle-induced osteolysis (PIO) remains a major cause of early implant loosening. Differences in bone remodeling between young and aged Calcitonin (CT)- and α-CGRP (Calcitonin gene-related peptide)-deficient mice (Calca(-/-)) might modify our previous findings regarding CT/α-CGRP in PIO. This may have important implications for PIO in an aging population. Four groups of twelve-month-old wild-type and Calca(-/-) mice underwent either SHAM surgery with and without CT, or polyethylene-particle implantation with related treatment. Morphometric changes were detected using μ-CT, histomorphometric analysis and by counting TRAP(+) cells (osteoclast-staining). Bone remodeling was assessed using serum and urinary markers. There was no osteolysis in aged particle-treated Calca(-/-) animals and the effect of CT on PIO was reduced compared to wild-type mice. However, there were significantly higher numbers of TRAP(+) cells in Calca(-/-) animals, and bone remodeling markers revealed a significant increase in OPG/OCN and a significant reduction in RANKL compared to aged wild-type mice. CT/α-CGRP modulates bone cell activity in PIO in aged mice in a way that is distinct from young animals. This may have implications for the treatment of PIO in the periprosthetic surface of joint replacements in an aging population.

  3. Charged Particle Induced Radiation damage of Germanium Detectors in Space: Two Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruekner, J.; Koenen, M.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Bailey, S. H.; Boynton W. V.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (MO GRS) was designed to measure gamma-rays emitted by the Martian surface. This gamma-ray emission is induced by energetic cosmic-ray particles penetrating the Martian surface and producing many secondary particles and gamma rays. The MO GRS consisted of an high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a passive cooler. Since radiation damage due to permanent bombardment of energetic cosmic ray particles (with energies up to several GeV) was expected for the MO GRS HPGe crystal, studies on radiation damage effects of HPGe crystals were carried on earth. One of the HPGe crystals (paradoxically called FLIGHT) was similar to the MO GRS crystal. Both detectors, MO GRS and FLIGHT, contained closed-end coaxial n-type HPGe crystals and had the same geometrical dimensions (5.6 x 5.6 cm). Many other parameters, such as HV and operation temperature, differed in space and on earth, which made it somewhat difficult to directly compare the performance of both detector systems. But among other detectors, detector FLIGHT provided many useful data to better understand radiation damage effects.

  4. Designing experimental setup and procedures for studying alpha-particle-induced adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, V. W. Y.; Lam, R. K. K.; Chong, E. Y. W.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2010-03-01

    The present work was devoted to designing the experimental setup and the associated procedures for alpha-particle-induced adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Thin PADC films with a thickness of 16 μm were fabricated and employed as support substrates for holding dechorionated zebrafish embryos for alpha-particle irradiation from the bottom through the films. Embryos were collected within 15 min when the light photoperiod began, which were then incubated and dechorionated at 4 h post fertilization (hpf). They were then irradiated at 5 hpf by alpha particles using a planar 241Am source with an activity of 0.1151 μCi for 24 s (priming dose), and subsequently at 10 hpf using the same source for 240 s (challenging dose). The levels of apoptosis in irradiated zebrafish embryos at 24 hpf were quantified through staining with the vital dye acridine orange, followed by counting the stained cells under a florescent microscope. The results revealed the presence of the adaptive response in zebrafish embryos in vivo, and demonstrated the feasibility of the adopted experimental setup and procedures.

  5. Blocking TGF-β expression inhibits silica particle-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yi; Shen, Yan; Zhang, Zhihong; Cui, Xiuqing; Xiao, Lili; Liu, Yuewei; Luo, Xin; Chen, Weihong

    2015-11-01

    The main characteristic of silicosis is irreversible fibrosis. Certain studies have shown that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulated by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is involved in fibrosis. Thus, we suggest that TGF-β regulated EMT may play an important role in silicosis. In this study, we determined the expression of TGF-β-Smad2/3, EMT- and ECM-related markers in lung epithelial cells treated with silica particle by RT-PCR, western-blot and ELISA. In order to explore the role of TGF-β, we used TGF-β inhibitor in the cell model. We found that the cells lost the expression of epithelial phenotypic markers and acquired increased expression of mesenchymal cells markers with ECM deposition after treatment with silica particle. Moreover, the changes of EMT-related event was restricted in response to TGF-β inhibitor. These findings suggest that EMT is essentially involved in the pathogenesis of fibrosis induced by silica particles and down-regulating the TGF-β expression can inhibit the process of EMT.

  6. Emodin mitigates diesel exhaust particles-induced increase in airway resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Al-Salam, Suhail; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; Ali, Badreldin H

    2015-08-15

    Clinical and experimental studies have reported that short-term exposure to particulate air pollution is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and impairment of lung function. Emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone) has a strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the possible ameliorative effect of emodin on diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced impairment of lung function, inflammation and oxidative stress in mice. Mice were intratracheally instilled with DEP (20 μg/mouse) or saline (control). Emodin was administered intraperitoneally 1h before and 7h after pulmonary exposure to DEP. Twenty-four hours following DEP exposure, we evaluated airway resistance measured by forced oscillation technique, lung inflammation and oxidative stress. Emodin treatment abated the DEP-induced increase in airway resistance, and prevented the influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Similarly, lung histopathology confirmed the protective effect of emodin on DEP-induced lung inflammation. DEP induced a significant increase of proinflammatory cytokines in the lung including tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6 and interleukin 1β. The latter effect was significantly ameliorated by emodin. DEP caused a significant increase in lung lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species and a significant decrease of reduced glutathione concentration. These effects were significantly mitigated by emodin. We conclude that emodin significantly mitigated DEP-induced increase of airway resistance, lung inflammation and oxidative stress. Pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, emodin may be considered a potentially useful pulmonary protective agent against particulate air pollution-induced lung toxicity.

  7. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Lin Jianguo; Sun Yuliang; Bennouna, Soumaya; Lo, Michael; Wu Qingyang; Bu Zhigao; Pulendran, Bali; Compans, Richard W. . E-mail: compans@microbio.emory.edu; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection.

  8. Diesel exhaust particles induce the over expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) gene in alvelor machrophage and failed to induce apoptosis through activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM2.5-10), including diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been reported to induce lung injury and exacerbation of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Alveolar macrophages play a major role in the lung's response to inhaled particles and...

  9. Light Induced Degradation of Eight Commonly Used Pesticides Adsorbed on Atmospheric Particles: Kinetics and Product Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Durand, A.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.; Quivet, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world whether in agricultural production or in non-agricultural settings. They may pose a potential human health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. Pesticides are found in the atmosphere removed from the target area by volatilization or wind erosion, and carried over long distances. These compounds are partitioned between the gaseous and particulate atmospheric phases. The increasingly used pesticides are semi-volatile compounds which are usually adsorbed on the surface of the atmospheric particles. These pesticides may undergo chemical and photo-chemical transformation. New compounds may then be formed that could be more hazardous than the primary pesticides. The atmospheric fate and lifetime of adsorbed pesticides on particles are controlled by the these (photo)chemical processes. However, there is a lack of kinetic data regarding the pesticides in the particle phase. This current work focuses on the photolytic degradation of commonly used pesticides in particulate phase. It aims at estimating the photolytic rates and thus the lifetimes of pesticides adsorbed on silica particles as a proxy of atmospheric particles. The following eight commonly used pesticides, cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole, were chosen because of their physico-chemical properties. The photolysis rates of tetraconazole and permethrin were extremely slow ≤ 1.2 · 10-6 s-1. The photolysis rates for the other pesticides were determined in the range of: (5.9 ± 0.3) · 10-6 < k < (1.7 ± 0.1) · 10-4 s-1 from slowest to the fastest: pendimethalin < cyprodinil < deltamethrin < difenoconazole < oxadiazon < fipronil. Finally, the identification of the surface products upon light irradiation was performed, using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-IMS-ToF)-MS/MS. The potentially formed gas-phase products during

  10. Prevention of Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis by a Novel V-ATPase Inhibitor Saliphenylhalamide through Inhibition of Osteoclast Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Cao, Lei; Chim, Shek M.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Xu, Jiake; Zheng, Ming Hao; Dai, Ke Rong

    2012-01-01

    Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening (Aseptic prosthetic loosening) is one of the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty. It is well established that extensive bone destruction (osteolysis) by osteoclasts is responsible for wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption should prevent wear particle induced osteolysis and may serve as a potential therapeutic avenue for prosthetic loosening. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that saliphenylhalamide, a new V-ATPase inhibitor attenuates wear particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In vitro biochemical and morphological assays revealed that the inhibition of osteolysis is partially attributed to a disruption in osteoclast acidification and polarization, both a prerequisite for osteoclast bone resorption. Interestingly, the V-ATPase inhibitor also impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways. In conclusion, we showed that saliphenylhalamide affected multiple physiological processes including osteoclast differentiation, acidification and polarization, leading to inhibition of osteoclast bone resorption in vitro and wear particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. The results of the study provide proof that the new generation V-ATPase inhibitors, such as saliphenylhalamide, are potential anti-resorptive agents for treatment of peri-implant osteolysis. PMID:22509274

  11. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  12. Diesel exhaust particles induce aberrant alveolar epithelial directed cell movement by disruption of polarity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    LaGier, Adriana J; Manzo, Nicholas D; Dye, Janice A

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following injury requires efficient and directed alveolar epithelial cell migration, this study's goal was to understand the mechanisms underlying alveolar epithelial cells response to DEP, particularly when exposure is accompanied with comorbid lung injury. Separate mechanistic steps of directed migration were investigated in confluent murine LA-4 cells exposed to noncytotoxic concentrations (0-100 μg/cm(2)) of either automobile-emitted diesel exhaust particles (DEP(A)) or carbon black (CB) particles. A scratch wound model ascertained how DEP(A) exposure affected directional cell migration and BCECF ratio fluorimetry-monitored intracellular pH (pHi). Cells were immunostained with giantin to assess cell polarity, and with paxillin to assess focal cell adhesions. Cells were immunoblotted for ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) to assess cytoskeletal anchoring. Data demonstrate herein that exposure of LA-4 cells to DEP(A) (but not CB) resulted in delayed directional cell migration, impaired de-adhesion of the trailing edge cell processes, disrupted regulation of pHi, and altered Golgi polarity of leading edge cells, along with modified focal adhesions and reduced ERM levels, indicative of decreased cytoskeletal anchoring. The ability of DEP(A) to disrupt directed cell migration at multiple levels suggests that signaling pathways such as ERM/Rho are critical for transduction of ion transport signals into cytoskeletal arrangement responses. These results provide insights into the mechanisms by which chronic exposure to traffic-based emissions may result in decrements in lung capacity. PMID:23294296

  13. Particle modelling of low-pressure radio-frequency magnetron discharges including the effects of self-induced electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyoucef, D.; Yousfi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Modelling of radio-frequency (RF) magnetron discharges is performed using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo technique in the case of low-pressure argon gas at 4 mTorr and high external magnetic field in order to self-maintain the discharge and to generate an energetic quasi-ion beam required for cathode sputtering applications. An emphasis is made, for the first time in the literature in the case of low-pressure RF discharges, on the development of a particle model coupled with the full set of electromagnetic field equations. The aim is to analyse the effect on the RF plasma features of the plasma-induced magnetic field resulting from the coupling of the Maxwell-Ampere equation. We also analysed the effect of the electric field due to the time variation of magnetic field resulting from the coupling of the Maxwell-Faraday equation. For the present asymmetrical plasma reactor, the mean relative difference on, for instance, the ion density with and without the consideration of plasma-induced magnetic and electric fields due to the time variation of the magnetic field can reach about 2.5% in the region of the plasma bulk and about 10% in the lateral sheath. The effects of these two induced electromagnetic fields are in fact higher in the regions where the radial magnetic field generated by the external magnets belonging to the magnetron configuration is low. These non-negligible relative differences clearly show the importance of rigorously taking into account, beyond the usual Poisson's equation for the space charge electric field, the full set of electromagnetic Maxwell equations for a more accurate modelling of these low-pressure discharges, particularly when the total current density reaches a few mA cm-2.

  14. Possible emittance growth induced by nonlinear space charge fields for arbitrary particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A procedure to obtain a ratio of beam radii at final and initial states in arbitrary particle distributions is proposed, and is applied to the estimation of possible emittance growth for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions. The ratios are estimated for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions as a function of tune depression. The possible emittance growth as a function of tune depression and nonlinear field energy factor is also estimated with and without a constant radius ratio approximation. It is confirmed that the possible emittance growths are almost the same in comparison to the cases with and without the constant radius ratio approximation at each distribution.

  15. The effect of local IL-4 delivery or CCL2 blockade on implant fixation and bone structural properties in a mouse model of wear particle induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taishi; Pajarinen, Jukka; Behn, Anthony; Jiang, Xinyi; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Yao, Zhenyu; Egashira, Kensuke; Yang, Fan; Goodman, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Modulation of macrophage polarization and prevention of CCL2-induced macrophage chemotaxis are emerging strategies to reduce wear particle induced osteolysis and aseptic total joint replacement loosening. In this study, the effect of continuous IL-4 delivery or bioactive implant coating that constitutively releases a protein inhibitor of CCL2 signaling (7ND) on particle induced osteolysis were studied in the murine continuous femoral intramedullary particle infusion model. Polyethylene particles with or without IL-4 were infused into mouse distal femurs implanted with hollow titanium rods using subcutaneous infusion pumps. In another experimental group, particles were infused into the femur through a 7ND coated rod. After 4 weeks, fixation of the implant was assessed using a pullout test. The volume of trabecular bone and the geometry of the local cortical bone were assessed by µCT and the corresponding structural properties of the cortical bone determined by torsional testing. Continuous IL-4 delivery led to increased trabecular bone volume as well as enhanced local bone geometry and structural properties, while 7ND implant coating did not have effect on these parameters. The results suggest that local IL-4 treatment is a promising strategy to mitigate wear particle induced osteolysis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2255-2262, 2016.

  16. CNS-induced deficits of heavy particle irradiation in space: the aging connection.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J A; Shukitt-Hale, B; McEwen, J; Rabin, B M

    2000-01-01

    Our research over the last several years has suggested that young (3 mo) rats exposed to whole-body 56Fe irradiation show neuronal signal transduction alterations and accompanying motor behavioral changes that are similar to those seen in aged (22-24 mo) rats. Since it has been postulated that 1-2% of the composition of cosmic rays contain 56Fe particles of heavy particle irradiation, there may be significant CNS effects on astronauts on long-term space flights which could produce behavioral changes that could be expressed during the mission or at some time after the return. These, when combined with other effects such as weightlessness and exposure to proton irradiations may even supercede mutagenic effects. It is suggested that by determining mechanistic relationships that might exist between aging and irradiation it may be possible to determine the common factor(s) involved in both perturbations and develop procedures to offset their deleterious effects. For example, one method that has been effective is nutritional modification. PMID:11542857

  17. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles*

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Kenrick A.; Mota-Peynado, Alina De-La; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy. PMID:26670610

  18. Light induced changes in Raman scattering of carotenoid molecules in Photosystem I particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Atanaska; Abarova, Silviya; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Velitchkova, Maya

    2007-03-01

    The photosynthetic antenna systems are able to regulate the light energy harvesting under different light conditions by dynamic changes in their protein structure protecting the reaction center complexes. The changes modulate the electronic structure of the main antenna pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids) and distort the characteristic planar structure of carotenoids, allowing their forbidden out of plane vibrations. Electronic absorption and low-temperature resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to study the changes in composition and spectral properties of the major carotenoids in spinach Photosystem I particles due to high light treatment. The duration of the applied intensity of the white light (1800 μE m -2 s -1) was 30, 60 and 120 minutes. We used Raman scattering in an attempt to recognize the type and conformation of photobleached carotenoid molecules. The resonance Raman spectra were measured at 488 and 514.5 nm, coinciding with the absorption maximum positions of the carotenoids neoxanthin and lutein, correspondingly. The results revealed nearly a full photobleaching of the long wavelength lutein molecules, whereas the bleaching of neoxantin molecules is negligible. The involvement of these changes in the photoprotection and photoinactivation of the Photosystem I particles was discussed.

  19. Unravelling the properties of supported copper oxide: can the particle size induce acidic behaviour?

    PubMed

    Zaccheria, Federica; Scotti, Nicola; Marelli, Marcello; Psaro, Rinaldo; Ravasio, Nicoletta

    2013-02-01

    There is a renewed interest in designing solid acid catalysts particularly due to the significance of Lewis acid catalyzed processes such as Friedel-Crafts acylation and alkylation and cellulose hydrolysis for the development of sustainable chemistry. This paper reports a new focus point on the properties of supported CuO on silica, a material that up to now has been considered only as the precursor of an effective hydrogenation catalyst. Thus, it deals with a re-interpretation of some of our results with supported copper oxide aimed to unveil the root of acidic activity exhibited by this material, e.g. in alcoholysis reactions. Several techniques were used to highlight the very high dispersion of the oxide phase on the support allowing us to ascribe the acidic behavior to coordinative unsaturation of the very small CuO particles. In turn this unsaturation makes the CuO particles prone to coordinate surrounding molecules present in the reaction mixture and to exchange them according to their nucleophilicity. PMID:23207422

  20. LETTER: Self-organized pattern formation and noise-induced control based on particle computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlf, Thimo; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    We propose a new non-equilibrium model for spatial pattern formation based on local information transfer. Unlike most standard models of pattern formation it is not based on the Turing instability or initially laid down morphogen gradients. Information is transmitted through the system via particle-like excitations whose collective dynamics results in pattern formation and control. Here, a simple problem of domain formation is addressed by means of this model in an implementation as stochastic cellular automata, and then generalized to a system of coupled dynamical networks. One observes stable pattern formation, even in the presence of noise and cell flow. Noise contributes through the production of quasi-particles to de novo pattern formation as well as to robust control of the domain boundary position. Pattern proportions are scale independent as regards system size. The dynamics of pattern formation is stable over large parameter ranges, with a discontinuity at vanishing noise and a second-order phase transition at increased cell flow.

  1. Brownian dynamics simulation of orientational behavior, flow-induced structure, and rheological properties of a suspension of oblate spheroid particles under simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suga, Takanori; Mori, Noriyasu

    2005-08-01

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations were carried out for suspensions of oblate spheroid particles interacting via the Gay-Berne (GB) potential. The oblate spheroid particles were applied as a model of disc-like particles and the system of suspension of the particles was considered. Numerically analyzed were both the change in phase with the number density of the particles at equilibrium state and the behavior of the particles in simple shear flows. The system changed from isotropic phase to nematic one with increasing the particle concentration. In the simulation of shear flows, the shear was imposed upon the systems in nematic phase at equilibrium. The systems exhibited various motions of the director depending on the shear rate, e.g. the continuous rotation of director at low shear rates, the wagging at moderate shear rates, and the flow aligning at high shear rates. Temporal change in inner structure of suspensions was also analyzed and collapse of initial particle configurations due to shear was found. Moreover, rheological properties of the suspension were investigated. The numerical simulation predicted the shear-thinning in viscosity, negative first normal stress difference, and positive second normal stress difference, and these results qualitatively agreed with the predictions using a constitutive equation for discotic nematics. The present study proved that the BD simulation using spheroid particles interacting via the GB potential is an effective approach for investigating the flow behavior and flow-induced structure of suspensions of disklike particles at a particulate level.

  2. Nano zerovalent iron particles induce pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicity in an in vitro human co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhelin; Yang, Lingyan; Chen, Ku-Fan; Chen, Guan-Wen; Peng, Yen-Ping; Chen, Jen-Kun; Suo, Guangli; Yu, Jiantao; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Despite promising environmental applications for nano zerovalent iron (nZVI), concerns remain about the potential accumulation and toxic effects of nZVI particles. Here, we use an alveolar-capillary co-culture model to investigate a possible link between low-level epithelial exposure to nZVI and pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicity. While nZVI was unable to pass through the epithelial barrier into the endothelium, nZVI exposure did cause oxidative and inflammatory responses in both epithelial and endothelial cells. Therefore, toxic effects induced by nZVI are not restricted to epithelial cells but can be transferred into the endothelium. Communication between A549 and EA.hy926 cells is responsible for amplification of nZVI-induced toxic responses. Decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance and zonula occludens proteins after epithelial exposure to nZVI impaired epithelial barrier integrity. Increases in oxidized α1-antitrypsin and oxidized low-density lipoprotein in the co-culture model suggest that nZVI exposure increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and atherosclerosis. Therefore, inhalation of nZVI has the potential to induce cardiovascular disease through oxidative and inflammatory mediators produced from the damaged lung epithelium in chronic lung diseases. PMID:26694701

  3. Co-immunization with virus-like particle and DNA vaccines induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection and bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Jong Seok; Yoo, Si-Eun; Lee, Yu-Na; Ko, Eun-Ju; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Young-Tae; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Ji-Yun; Li, Jian Dong; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that immunization with non-replicating virus-like particle (FFG VLP) containing RSV F and G glycoproteins together with RSV F DNA induced T helper type 1 antibody responses to RSV F similar to live RSV infection. Upon RSV challenge 21 weeks after immunization, FFG VLP vaccination induced protection against RSV infection as shown by clearance of lung viral loads, and the absence of eosinophil infiltrates, and did not cause lung pathology. In contrast, formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccination showed significant pulmonary eosinophilia, severe mucus production, and extensive histopathology resulting in a hallmark of pulmonary pathology. Substantial lung pathology was also observed in mice with RSV re-infections. High levels of systemic and local inflammatory cytokine-secreting cells were induced in mice with FI-RSV but not with FFG VLP immunization after RSV challenge. Therefore, the results provide evidence that recombinant RSV FFG VLP vaccine can confer long-term protection against RSV without causing lung pathology. PMID:25110201

  4. Air pollution upregulates endothelial cell procoagulant activity via ultrafine particle-induced oxidant signaling and tissue factor expression.

    PubMed

    Snow, S J; Cheng, W; Wolberg, A S; Carraway, M S

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular events triggered by clot formation. Endothelial activation and initiation of coagulation are pathophysiological mechanisms that could link inhaled air pollutants to vascular events. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms of increased endothelial cell procoagulant activity following exposure to soluble components of ultrafine particles (soluble UF). Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were exposed to soluble UF and assessed for their ability to trigger procoagulant activity in platelet-free plasma. Exposed HCAEC triggered earlier thrombin generation and faster fibrin clot formation, which was abolished by an anti-tissue factor (TF) antibody, indicating TF-dependent effects. Soluble UF exposure increased TF mRNA expression without compensatory increases in key anticoagulant proteins. To identify early events that regulate TF expression, we measured endothelial H2O2 production following soluble UF exposure and identified the enzymatic source. Soluble UF exposure increased endothelial H2O2 production, and antioxidants attenuated UF-induced upregulation of TF, linking the procoagulant responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Chemical inhibitors and RNA silencing showed that NOX-4, an important endothelial source of H2O2, was involved in UF-induced upregulation of TF mRNA. These data indicate that soluble UF exposure induces endothelial cell procoagulant activity, which involves de novo TF synthesis, ROS production, and the NOX-4 enzyme. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with air pollution exposure.

  5. Air pollution upregulates endothelial cell procoagulant activity via ultrafine particle-induced oxidant signaling and tissue factor expression.

    PubMed

    Snow, S J; Cheng, W; Wolberg, A S; Carraway, M S

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular events triggered by clot formation. Endothelial activation and initiation of coagulation are pathophysiological mechanisms that could link inhaled air pollutants to vascular events. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms of increased endothelial cell procoagulant activity following exposure to soluble components of ultrafine particles (soluble UF). Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were exposed to soluble UF and assessed for their ability to trigger procoagulant activity in platelet-free plasma. Exposed HCAEC triggered earlier thrombin generation and faster fibrin clot formation, which was abolished by an anti-tissue factor (TF) antibody, indicating TF-dependent effects. Soluble UF exposure increased TF mRNA expression without compensatory increases in key anticoagulant proteins. To identify early events that regulate TF expression, we measured endothelial H2O2 production following soluble UF exposure and identified the enzymatic source. Soluble UF exposure increased endothelial H2O2 production, and antioxidants attenuated UF-induced upregulation of TF, linking the procoagulant responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Chemical inhibitors and RNA silencing showed that NOX-4, an important endothelial source of H2O2, was involved in UF-induced upregulation of TF mRNA. These data indicate that soluble UF exposure induces endothelial cell procoagulant activity, which involves de novo TF synthesis, ROS production, and the NOX-4 enzyme. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with air pollution exposure. PMID:24752501

  6. Particle-Based Simulation of Shock-Induced Deformation of Elastic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Nakayama, K.

    Shock-induced deformations of solid bodies are of practical interest to those who are concerned with explosive processing of materials, demolition of buildings, precautions against accidental explosions, etc. In order to simulate the shock-induced deformations of solid bodies, a large number of numerical codes based on continuum mechanics, which are called hydrocodes, have been developed so far [1, 2]. When the amount of deformation is relatively small, Lagrangian hydrocodes have been used to simulate the dynamic response of shock-loaded materials. When the deformation is large, Eulerian hydrocodes have been utilized instead. This is because the computational grids distorted along with the deformation of materials in the Lagrangian approach make the simulations either inaccurate or unstable, while the Eulerian approach where grids are fixed in space can handle such large deformations of materials. On the contrary, material interfaces that are precisely defined in the Lagrangian approach are not traced exactly in the Eulerian one.

  7. Contact freezing induced by biological (Snomax) and mineral dust (K-feldspar) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, N.; Schäfer, M.; Duft, D.; Kiselev, A. A.; Leisner, T.

    2013-12-01

    The contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets is one of the potentially important and the least investigated heterogeneous mechanism of ice formation in tropospheric clouds [1]. On the time scales of cloud lifetime the freezing of supercooled water droplets via contact mechanism may occur at higher temperature compared to the same IN immersed in the droplet. In our experiment we study single water droplets freely levitated in an Electrodynamic Balance [2]. We have shown previously that the rate of freezing at given temperature is governed only by the rate of droplet -particle collision and by the properties of the contact ice nuclei [2, 3]. Recently, we have extended our experiments to feldspar, being the most abundant component of the atmospheric mineral dust particles, and Snomax, as a proxy for atmospheric biological Ice Nuclei (IN). In this contribution we show that both IN exhibits the same temperature, size and material dependency observed previously in immersion mode [4, 5]. Based on these results, we limit the number of mechanisms that could be responsible for the enhancement of contact nucleation of ice in supercooled water. [1] - Ladino, L. A., Stetzer, O., and Lohmann, U.: Contact freezing: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 13, 7811-7869, doi:10.5194/acpd-13-7811-2013, 2013. [2] - Hoffmann, N., Kiselev, A., Rzesanke, D., Duft, D., and Leisner, T.: Experimental quantification of contact freezing in an electrodynamic balance, Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., 6, 3407-3437, doi:10.5194/amtd-6-3407-2013, 2013. [3] - Hoffmann, N., Duft, D., Kiselev, A., and Leisner, T.: Contact freezing efficiency of mineral dust aerosols studied in an electrodynamic balance: quantitative size and temperature dependence for illite particles, Faraday Discuss., doi: 10.1039/C3FD00033H, 2013. [4] - Atkinson, James D., Murray, Benjamin J., Woodhouse, Matthew T., Whale, Thomas F., Baustian, Kelly J., Carslaw, Kenneth S., Dobbie, Steven, O'Sullivan, Daniel, and Malkin, Tamsin

  8. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect I: Effects of variations of the fuel particle volume fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Yan, Xiaoqing; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-05-01

    A new method of modeling the in-pile mechanical behaviors of dispersion nuclear fuel elements is proposed. Considering the irradiation swelling together with the thermal effect, numerical simulations of the in-pile mechanical behaviors are performed with the developed finite element models for different fuel particle volume fractions of the fuel meat. The effects of the particle volume fractions on the mechanical performances of the fuel element are studied. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the particle volume fractions at each burnup; the locations of the maximum first principal stresses shift with increasing burnup; at low burnups, the maximum first principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while at high burnups, the 20% volume fraction case holds the lowest value; (2) at the cladding, the maximum equivalent plastic strains and the tensile principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while the maximum Mises stresses do not follow this order at high burnups; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles increase with the particle volume fractions, and the particles will engender plastic strains until the particle volume fraction reaches high enough.

  9. Rat lung tumors induced by exposure to selected poorly soluble nonfibrous particles.

    PubMed

    Nikula, K J

    2000-01-01

    Rodent bioassays have been used to assess the carcinogenicity of several inhaled, poorly soluble, nonfibrous particles that vary in toxicity and carcinogenic potency. There is substantial published information from chronic inhalation bioassays of diesel exhaust, carbon black, titanium dioxide, talc, and coal dust. This review summarizes data from studies with exposures for 2 yr or more using these 5 materials. The review has four objectives: (1) to summarize the current information available from these bioassays concerning exposure-dose-carcinogenic response in rats, (2) to summarize the pathologic and phenotypic features of the neoplastic response in rats, (3) to examine possible strain- and gender-related differences, and (4) to compare the neoplastic responses of rat to those of other species exposed to these materials.

  10. Induced radioactivities in concrete constituents irradiated by high-energy particles.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Hirayama, H; Ban, S; Taino, M; Ishii, H

    1984-06-01

    The powdered concrete constituents of magnetite ore, pyrites ore, marble, gravel and Portland cement were prepared and irradiated by 12- GeV protons and secondary particles at the slow extracted beam line of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics ( KEK ) 12- GeV proton synchrotron. The saturated activities for individual nuclides produced were calculated, and the time variation of photon exposure rate due to the residual activities was also evaluated for each sample. The exposure rates ranked in the following order: magnetite ore greater than pyrites ore greater than gravel greater than or equal to cement greater than marble. The levels of photon exposure rates from heavy, ordinary and marble concretes were also estimated on the basis of the results obtained for each constituent. It is suggested that the use of marble concrete in the inside wall of accelerator tunnels can reduce considerably the exposure to the accelerator maintenance workers, compared with heavy and ordinary concretes commonly used. PMID:6724935

  11. Shape-induced chiral ordering in two-dimensional packing of snowmanlike dimeric particles.

    PubMed

    Han, Youngkyu; Lee, Juncheol; Choi, Siyoung Q; Choi, Myung Chul; Kim, Mahn Won

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the distinctive phase behaviors in random packing due to particle shapes is an important issue in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we investigate the random packing structure of two-dimensional (2D) snowmen via wax-snowman packing experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations. Both experiments and simulations reveal that neighboring snowmen have a strong short-range orientational correlation and consequently locally form particular conformations. A chiral conformation is dominant for high area fractions near the jamming condition (φ>0.8), and the proportion of the chiral conformation increases with γ. We also found that the attractive interaction does not have a significant impact on the results. The geometry of chirally ordered snowmen causes a mismatch with 2D crystalline symmetries and thus inhibits the development of long-range spatial order, despite the strong orientational correlation between neighbors.

  12. Induced radioactivities in concrete constituents irradiated by high-energy particles.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Hirayama, H; Ban, S; Taino, M; Ishii, H

    1984-06-01

    The powdered concrete constituents of magnetite ore, pyrites ore, marble, gravel and Portland cement were prepared and irradiated by 12- GeV protons and secondary particles at the slow extracted beam line of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics ( KEK ) 12- GeV proton synchrotron. The saturated activities for individual nuclides produced were calculated, and the time variation of photon exposure rate due to the residual activities was also evaluated for each sample. The exposure rates ranked in the following order: magnetite ore greater than pyrites ore greater than gravel greater than or equal to cement greater than marble. The levels of photon exposure rates from heavy, ordinary and marble concretes were also estimated on the basis of the results obtained for each constituent. It is suggested that the use of marble concrete in the inside wall of accelerator tunnels can reduce considerably the exposure to the accelerator maintenance workers, compared with heavy and ordinary concretes commonly used.

  13. THE IRRADIATION-INDUCED OLIVINE TO AMORPHOUS PYROXENE TRANSFORMATION PRESERVED IN AN INTERPLANETARY DUST PARTICLE

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    2009-11-01

    Amorphization of crystalline olivine to glass with a pyroxene composition is well known from high-energy irradiation experiments. This report is on the first natural occurrence of this process preserved in a chondritic aggregate interplanetary dust particle. The Fe-rich olivine grain textures and compositions and the glass grain compositions delineate this transformation that yielded glass with Fe-rich pyroxene compositions. The average glass composition, (Mg, Fe){sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, is a serpentine-dehydroxylate with O/Si = 3.56 +- 0.25, (Mg+Fe)/Si = 1.53 +- 0.24, and Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.74 +- 0.1. These measured atomic ratios match the ratios that have been proposed for amorphous interstellar silicate grains very well, albeit the measured Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio is lower than was proposed for amorphous interstellar silicate grains, Mg/(Mg+Fe) > 0.9.

  14. Virus-like particles as antigenic nanomaterials for inducing protective immune responses in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Patterson, Dustin P; Douglas, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    The lung is a major entry point for many of the most detrimental pathogens to human health. The onslaught of pathogens encountered by the lung is counteracted by protective immune responses that are generated locally, which can be stimulated through vaccine strategies to prevent pathogen infections. Here, we discuss the use of virus-like particles (VLPs), nonpathogen derivatives of viruses or protein cage structures, to construct new vaccines exploiting the lung as a site for immunostimulation. VLPs are unique in their ability to be engineered with near molecular level detail and knowledge of their composition and structure. A summary of research in developing VLP-based vaccines for the lung is presented that suggests promising results for future vaccine development. PMID:25325241

  15. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. IV. Charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Greco, O.; Grossi, G.; Matsufuji, N.; Pugliese, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently reported the kinetics of chromosome rejoining and exchange formation in human lymphocytes exposed to gamma rays using the techniques of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and premature chromosome condensation (PCC). In this paper, we have extended previous measurements to cells exposed to charged particles. Our goal was to determine differences in chromatin break rejoining and misrejoining after exposure to low- and high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Cells were irradiated with hydrogen, neon, carbon or iron ions in the LET range 0.3-140 keV/microm and were incubated at 37 degrees C for various times after exposure. Little difference was observed in the yield of early prematurely condensed chromosome breaks for the different ions. The kinetics of break rejoining was exponential for all ions and had similar time constants, but the residual level of unrejoined breaks after prolonged incubation was higher for high-LET radiation. The kinetics of exchange formation was also similar for the different ions, but the yield of chromosome interchanges measured soon after exposure was higher for high-LET particles, suggesting that a higher fraction of DNA breaks are misrejoined quickly. On the other hand, the rate of formation of complete exchanges was slightly lower for densely ionizing radiation. The ratios between the yields of different types of aberrations observed at 10 h postirradiation in prematurely condensed chromosome preparations were dependent on LET. We found significant differences between the yields of aberrations measured in interphase (after repair) and metaphase for densely ionizing radiation. This difference might be caused by prolonged mitotic delay and/or interphase death. Overall, the results point out significant differences between low- and high-LET radiation for the formation of chromosome aberrations.

  16. First principles simulation of laser-induced periodic surface structure using the particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2015-11-01

    We present our results of a fundamental simulation of a periodic grating structure formation on a copper target during the femtosecond-pulse laser damage process, and compare our results to recent experiment. The particle-in-cell (PIC) method is used to model the initial laser heating of the electrons, a two-temperature model (TTM) is used to model the thermalization of the material, and a modified PIC method is employed to model the atomic transport leading to a damage crater morphology consistent with experimental grating structure formation. This laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is shown to be directly related to the formation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and their interference with the incident laser pulse.

  17. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múčka, V.; Buňata, M.; Čuba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, L.

    2015-07-01

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells.

  18. Distortion of genetically modified organism quantification in processed foods: influence of particle size compositions and heat-induced DNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Moreano, Francisco; Busch, Ulrich; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2005-12-28

    Milling fractions from conventional and transgenic corn were prepared at laboratory scale and used to study the influence of sample composition and heat-induced DNA degradation on the relative quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in food products. Particle size distributions of the obtained fractions (coarse grits, regular grits, meal, and flour) were characterized using a laser diffraction system. The application of two DNA isolation protocols revealed a strong correlation between the degree of comminution of the milling fractions and the DNA yield in the extracts. Mixtures of milling fractions from conventional and transgenic material (1%) were prepared and analyzed via real-time polymerase chain reaction. Accurate quantification of the adjusted GMO content was only possible in mixtures containing conventional and transgenic material in the form of analogous milling fractions, whereas mixtures of fractions exhibiting different particle size distributions delivered significantly over- and underestimated GMO contents depending on their compositions. The process of heat-induced nucleic acid degradation was followed by applying two established quantitative assays showing differences between the lengths of the recombinant and reference target sequences (A, deltal(A) = -25 bp; B, deltal(B) = +16 bp; values related to the amplicon length of the reference gene). Data obtained by the application of method A resulted in underestimated recoveries of GMO contents in the samples of heat-treated products, reflecting the favored degradation of the longer target sequence used for the detection of the transgene. In contrast, data yielded by the application of method B resulted in increasingly overestimated recoveries of GMO contents. The results show how commonly used food technological processes may lead to distortions in the results of quantitative GMO analyses.

  19. Electron counting and beam-induced motion correction enable near-atomic-resolution single-particle cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueming; Mooney, Paul; Zheng, Shawn; Booth, Christopher R; Braunfeld, Michael B; Gubbens, Sander; Agard, David A; Cheng, Yifan

    2013-06-01

    In recent work with large high-symmetry viruses, single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has achieved the determination of near-atomic-resolution structures by allowing direct fitting of atomic models into experimental density maps. However, achieving this goal with smaller particles of lower symmetry remains challenging. Using a newly developed single electron-counting detector, we confirmed that electron beam-induced motion substantially degrades resolution, and we showed that the combination of rapid readout and nearly noiseless electron counting allow image blurring to be corrected to subpixel accuracy, restoring intrinsic image information to high resolution (Thon rings visible to ∼3 Å). Using this approach, we determined a 3.3-Å-resolution structure of an ∼700-kDa protein with D7 symmetry, the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome, showing clear side-chain density. Our method greatly enhances image quality and data acquisition efficiency-key bottlenecks in applying near-atomic-resolution cryo-EM to a broad range of protein samples.

  20. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Weisheng; Li, Xiaolin; Wan, Tianmin; Liu, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Guilin; Li, Yan

    2006-06-01

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM(10) were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPs collected from various pollution sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM(10) is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM(10) are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra. PMID:16808872

  1. Electron counting and beam-induced motion correction enable near-atomic-resolution single-particle cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueming; Mooney, Paul; Zheng, Shawn; Booth, Christopher R; Braunfeld, Michael B; Gubbens, Sander; Agard, David A; Cheng, Yifan

    2013-06-01

    In recent work with large high-symmetry viruses, single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has achieved the determination of near-atomic-resolution structures by allowing direct fitting of atomic models into experimental density maps. However, achieving this goal with smaller particles of lower symmetry remains challenging. Using a newly developed single electron-counting detector, we confirmed that electron beam-induced motion substantially degrades resolution, and we showed that the combination of rapid readout and nearly noiseless electron counting allow image blurring to be corrected to subpixel accuracy, restoring intrinsic image information to high resolution (Thon rings visible to ∼3 Å). Using this approach, we determined a 3.3-Å-resolution structure of an ∼700-kDa protein with D7 symmetry, the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome, showing clear side-chain density. Our method greatly enhances image quality and data acquisition efficiency-key bottlenecks in applying near-atomic-resolution cryo-EM to a broad range of protein samples. PMID:23644547

  2. Variations of boundary reaction rate and particle size on the diffusion-induced stress in a phase separating electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; He, Linghui; Ni, Yong; Song, Yicheng

    2014-10-14

    In contrast to the case of single-phase delithiation wherein faster discharging leads to higher diffusion-induced stress (DIS), this paper reports nonmonotonous dependency of the boundary reaction rate on the DIS in nanosized spherical electrode accompanying phase separation. It is attributed to a transition from two-phase to single-phase delithiation driven by increase of the boundary reaction rate leading to narrowing and vanishing of the miscibility gap in a range of the particle size. The profiles of lithium concentration and the DIS are identified during the transition based on a continuum model. The resultant maximum DIS first decreases in the region of two-phase delithiation and later returns to increase in the region of single-phase delithiation with the increase of the boundary reaction rate. A map for the failure behavior in the spherical electrode particle is constructed based on the Tresca failure criterion. These results indicate that the failure caused by the DIS can be avoided by appropriate selection of the said parameters in such electrodes.

  3. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y.

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  4. Biosensing based on magnetically induced self-assembly of particles in magnetic colloids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Takamura, Tsukasa; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2012-03-01

    Superparamagnetic beads and nonmagnetic beads of different sizes were assembled to form a "ring-structure" in a magnetorheological (MR) fluid solution by the application of external magnetic fields. For superparamagnetic beads and non-magnetic beads functionalized with probe and target molecules, respectively, the ring-structure was maintained even after removing the external magnetic field due to biomolecular bonding. Several experiments are described, including the formation process of ring-structures with and without molecular interactions, the accelerating effect of external magnetic fields, and the effect of biotin concentration on the structures of the rings. We define the small nonmagnetic particles as "petals" because the whole structure looks like a flower. The number of remnant ring petals was a function of the concentration of target molecules in the concentration range of 0.0768 ng/ml-3.8419 ng/ml which makes this protocol a promising method for biosensing. Not only was the formation process rapid, but the resulting two-dimensional colloidal system also offers a simple method for reducing reagent consumption and waste generation.

  5. Charged-particle induced alterations of surfaces in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers calculated the plasma bombardment profiles of the surfaces of the icy Saturnian satellites in order to interpret reflection spectra and the effect of charged particles on the surfaces (mantles) of Pluto and of comets in the Oort cloud. Pluto's exposure to cosmic rays results in a slow alteration of the reflectance if the methane condensed on its surface. The UV absorbed in the atmosphere can produce precipitates. The researchers showed that, depending on the rates of the competing regolith processes and rates for replenishment of the methane, the surface can appear bright, red, or dark. Using laboratory data, they showed that the amount of darkening occurring in one orbit is small. Therefore, transport, burial, and re-exposure of organic sediments must control the reflectance, and the average reflectance is established by the radiation altered species accumulated over many orbits with the observed spatial, and possible temporal, differences in albedo due to transport. The cosmic rays, although producing changes in reflectance slowly, do so inevitably. Therefore, the fact that the surface is not dark everywhere implies that it is active and the exposure rates vs. depth into the surface of Pluto can be used to constrain turnover rates. Comets in the Oort cloud experience similar rates.

  6. A Study on Time-Resolved Laser Induced Incandescence Analysis Method for the Measurement of Primary Particle Size in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongil; Ryoo, Hoon Chul; Chun, Hong Sik; Song, Soonho; Hahn, Jae Won; Chun, Kwang Min

    A simple correlation between particle size and the time-resolved laser induced incandescence signal is introduced and applied to a diesel engine for the measurement of primary particle size in the raw exhaust gas. The measurements from time-resolved LII signal are calibrated for all experimental conditions using Transmission Electron Microscope photographs to investigate the differences between particle size from TEM photographs and that estimated by LII. An evaluation of uncertainty in the LII measurements is also presented. From the comparison between the two measurements and uncertainty analysis, it can be concluded that the time-resolved LII theory employed in this study can be used as a useful tool for measuring primary particle size in engine exhaust since the measurements from LII are reliable and in a good agreement with those from TEM imaging. From a practical point of view, the strategy for particle size measurements presented here are simple and straightforward in its application.

  7. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca2+ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca2+ signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca2+ signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca2+ signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca2+ signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca2+ pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca2+ response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca2+ signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca2+ signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  8. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca²⁺ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca(2+) signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca(2+) signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca(2+) pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca(2+) response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  9. Laser-induced migration of oil particles suspended in a water matrix.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, German; Parra, Juan Enrique; Mosqueda, Felix

    2002-10-20

    The thermoconvective flow induced in oil samples and oil-in-water emulsions by irradiation with a laser beam is studied experimentally. The samples are irradiated by He-Ne and CO2 lasers at different power levels. Time-resolved records of temperature and surface waves that propagate in a liquid surface are presented. In laser-heated emulsions the thermoconvective flow leads the dispersed oil droplets to the water-free surface where they agglomerate to form a floating oil layer. The reflected light beam is formed by a speckle pattern whose intensity and contrast show a spiking, quasi-periodic time variation. A theoretical model is proposed to explain this phenomenon.

  10. Particle Radiation-Induced Nontargeted Effects in Bone-Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Sasi, Sharath P; Park, Daniel; Muralidharan, Sujatha; Wage, Justin; Kiladjian, Albert; Onufrak, Jillian; Enderling, Heiko; Yan, Xinhua; Goukassian, David A

    2015-01-01

    Bone-marrow- (BM-) derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are critical for endothelial cell maintenance and repair. During future space exploration missions astronauts will be exposed to space irradiation (IR) composed of a spectrum of low-fluence protons ((1)H) and high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei (e.g., iron-(56)Fe) for extended time. How the space-type IR affects BM-EPCs is limited. In media transfer experiments in vitro we studied nontargeted effects induced by (1)H- and (56)Fe-IR conditioned medium (CM), which showed significant increase in the number of p-H2AX foci in nonirradiated EPCs between 2 and 24 h. A 2-15-fold increase in the levels of various cytokines and chemokines was observed in both types of IR-CM at 24 h. Ex vivo analysis of BM-EPCs from single, low-dose, full-body (1)H- and (56)Fe-IR mice demonstrated a cyclical (early 5-24 h and delayed 28 days) increase in apoptosis. This early increase in BM-EPC apoptosis may be the effect of direct IR exposure, whereas late increase in apoptosis could be a result of nontargeted effects (NTE) in the cells that were not traversed by IR directly. Identifying the role of specific cytokines responsible for IR-induced NTE and inhibiting such NTE may prevent long-term and cyclical loss of stem and progenitors cells in the BM milieu. PMID:26074973

  11. Particle Radiation-Induced Nontargeted Effects in Bone-Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, Sharath P.; Park, Daniel; Muralidharan, Sujatha; Wage, Justin; Kiladjian, Albert; Onufrak, Jillian; Enderling, Heiko; Yan, Xinhua; Goukassian, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone-marrow- (BM-) derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are critical for endothelial cell maintenance and repair. During future space exploration missions astronauts will be exposed to space irradiation (IR) composed of a spectrum of low-fluence protons (1H) and high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei (e.g., iron-56Fe) for extended time. How the space-type IR affects BM-EPCs is limited. In media transfer experiments in vitro we studied nontargeted effects induced by 1H- and 56Fe-IR conditioned medium (CM), which showed significant increase in the number of p-H2AX foci in nonirradiated EPCs between 2 and 24 h. A 2–15-fold increase in the levels of various cytokines and chemokines was observed in both types of IR-CM at 24 h. Ex vivo analysis of BM-EPCs from single, low-dose, full-body 1H- and 56Fe-IR mice demonstrated a cyclical (early 5–24 h and delayed 28 days) increase in apoptosis. This early increase in BM-EPC apoptosis may be the effect of direct IR exposure, whereas late increase in apoptosis could be a result of nontargeted effects (NTE) in the cells that were not traversed by IR directly. Identifying the role of specific cytokines responsible for IR-induced NTE and inhibiting such NTE may prevent long-term and cyclical loss of stem and progenitors cells in the BM milieu. PMID:26074973

  12. Advancement of Shock-wave Induced Spraying Process through the Study of Gas and Particle Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi Esfahani, Mohammad

    This research advances the knowledge of the working principles of the Shock-wave Induced Spraying Process (SISP), a thermal spray material deposition technique. Pulses created by a fast acting valve pass through a heated line increasing energy content and interacting with metered batches of heated or non-heated powder introduced into the line. The powder is accelerated to high velocities before bonding to the substrate upon impact. Advantages over other cold spray processes include cost savings and a more effective transfer of thermal energy to the powder. The shock-wave occurring near the substrate in other cold spray processes is avoided. The SISP flow field is resolved by using a computational model. The two-dimensional model accounts for the valve, gas heater, a tapered nozzle at the tip of the device, and preheating of the powder. It is implemented with a commercial computational fluid dynamics code. Comparisons are made with one-dimensional predictions, and measurements of pressure and temperature. Particle flow predictions are validated using particle velocity and adhesion measurements. A flow region of both high temperature and velocity gas, favorable to material deposition, forms which is not present in comparable steady-state cold spray processes. Increasing gas pressure increases the gas speed, while increasing temperature increases speed and temperature of this region. Using helium results in greater energy levels but for shorter periods of time. This indicates the need for a powder feeder which places particles in the flow at correct instants and durations of time. The effects of particle flow parameters on system performance are examined. It is found that the device must be operated at very high main heater and powder heater temperatures: 900 °C and 700 °C respectively to achieve a coating with stainless steel using nitrogen as the driving gas. It is also shown that a heater length range of 0.9 m to 1.4 m results in the greatest likelihood of

  13. Cell Cycle Checkpoint Proteins p21 and Hus1 Regulating Intercellular Signaling Induced By Alpha Particle Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Jun; Hang, Haiying

    In recent years, the attentions for radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been paid on the intercellular signaling events connecting the irradiated and non-irradiated cells. p21 is a member of the Cip/Kip family and plays essential roles in cell cycle progression arrest after cellular irradiation. DNA damage checkpoint protein Hus1 is a member of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex and functions as scaffold at the damage sites to facilitate the activation of downstream effectors. Using the medium trasfer method and the cells of MEF, MEF (p21-/-), MEF (p21-/-Hus1-/-) as either medium donor or receptor cells, it was found that with 5cGy alpha particle irradiation, the bystander cells showed a significant induction of -H2AX for normal MEFs (p¡0.05). However, the absence of p21 resulted in deficiency in inducing bystander effects. Further results indicated p21 affected the intercellular DNA damage signaling mainly through disrupting the production or release of the damage signals from irradiated cells. When Hus1 and p21 were both knocked out, an obvious induction of -H2AX recurred in bystander cells and the induction of -H2AX was GJIC (gap junction-mediated intercellular communication) dependent, indicating the interrelationship between p21 and Hus1 regulated the production and relay of DNA damage signals from irradiated cells to non-irradiated bystander cells.

  14. A pandemic H1N1 influenza virus-like particle vaccine induces cross-protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Inn, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Gi-Ja; Quan, Fu-Shi

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) represent promising alternative vaccines. However, it is necessary to demonstrate that influenza VLPs confer cross-protection against antigenically distinct viruses. In this study, a VLP vaccine comprising hemagglutinin (HA) and M1 from the A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) were used and its ability to induce cross-protective efficacy against heterologous viruses A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) and A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) in mice was assessed. Vaccination with 2009 H1 VLPs induced significantly higher levels of IgG cross-reactive with these heterologous viruses after the second boost compared to after the prime or first boost. Lung virus titers also decreased significantly and the lung cross-reactive IgG response after lethal virus challenge was significantly greater in immunized mice compared to naïve mice. Vaccinated mice showed 100% protection against A/PR/8/34 and A/Caledonia/20/99 viruses with only moderate body weight loss and induction of cross-reactive recall, IgG antibody-secreting cell responses. The variations in HA amino acid sequences and antigenic sites were determined and correlated with induction of cross-protective immunity. These results indicate that VLPs can be used as an effective vaccine that confers cross-protection against antigenically distinct viruses.

  15. Effective moment of inertia for several fission reaction systems induced by nucleons, light particles, and heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soheyli, S.

    2011-10-01

    The effective moment of inertia of the compound nucleus is calculated for several fission reaction systems induced by nucleons, light particles, and heavy ions. The determination of this quantity for these systems is based upon the comparison between the experimental data of the fission fragment angular distributions as well as the prediction of the standard saddle-point statistical model. For the systems, the two cases, namely with and without neutron emission corrections, were considered. Afterward, our theoretical results are compared with the data obtained from the rotational liquid drop model as well as the Sierk model and satisfactory agreements were found. We also calculated the quadrupole deformation and mass asymmetry parameters of the fissioning nuclei at the saddle point by two methods, the first method is based on an ellipsoid shape assumption for the fissioning nucleus, and the other is based on dinuclear system model, since in heavy ion induced fission reactions, the compound nuclei which undergo fission can be considered as states of two touching clusters (dinuclear system). Afterward, the results of these two methods were compared and satisfactory agreements were found between them.

  16. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-06-01

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n γ)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  17. Traffic induced particle resuspension in Paris: Emission factors and source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, F.; Favez, O.; Pandolfi, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Moukhtar, S.; Bruge, B.; Verlhac, S.; Orza, J. A. G.; Bonnaire, N.; Le Priol, T.; Petit, J.-F.; Sciare, J.

    2016-03-01

    Gaining knowledge on the process of particle resuspension from urban paved roads is of particular importance considering the increasing relevance of this source in urban air quality management and the lack of basic information on emission factors and source contributions. In this study we performed extensive field measurements for the quantification of the emission factors from different types of road in the city of Paris, and investigated the causes of their variability and the contributions to the ambient air PM10 observed across one year at one traffic monitoring site in the ring road of Paris. Results show agreement between lower road dust loadings (RD10: 0.7-2.2 mg m-2) and emission factors (5.4-9.0 mg vehicle-1 km-1) at inner-roads of Paris, compared to the ring road (2.4 mg m-2 and 17 mg vehicle-1 km-1, respectively), where the two parameters are estimated independently. The higher values in the ring road were likely caused by the poor state of pavement and higher share of heavy duty vehicles. Road wear, brake wear and a carbonaceous source, were almost equally responsible for 96% of RD10. At the traffic monitoring site located at the ring road (220,000 vehicle/day), the contributions of road dust emissions were estimated by receptor modeling to be 13% of PM10 on an annual mean (6.3 μg m-3), while the sum of vehicle exhaust and wear accounted for 47% resulting in a total traffic contribution of 60% of PM10. Road salting resulted to be a minor contributor (1% of annual mean) also in winter time (2%).

  18. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy.

    PubMed

    McMullan, G; Vinothkumar, K R; Henderson, R

    2015-11-01

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å(2) for every incident 300 keV e(-)/Å(2). The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e(-)/Å(2) per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination.

  19. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy.

    PubMed

    McMullan, G; Vinothkumar, K R; Henderson, R

    2015-11-01

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å(2) for every incident 300 keV e(-)/Å(2). The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e(-)/Å(2) per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination. PMID:26103047

  20. Exosomal Hsp70 Induces a Pro-Inflammatory Response to Foreign Particles Including Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Paras K.; Anand, Ellis; Bleck, Christopher K. E.; Anes, Elsa; Griffiths, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    Background Exosomes are endosome-derived vesicles that are released when multi-vesicular bodies (MVBs) fuse with the plasma membrane. Exosomes released from mycobacteria-infected cells have recently been shown to be pro-inflammatory. A prominent host molecule that is found within these exosomes is Hsp70, a member of the heat-shock family of proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings We first characterized the exosomes purified from control and mycobacteria-infected cells. We found that relative to uninfected cells, macrophages infected with M. smegmatis and M. avium release more exosomes and the exosomes they released had more Hsp70 on their surface. Both exosomes and exogenous Hsp70 treatment of macrophages led to NF-κB activation and TNFα release in uninfected macrophages; Hsp70 levels were elevated in mycobacteria-infected cells. Macrophage treatment with Hsp70 also led to increase in the phagocytosis and maturation of latex-bead phagosomes. Finally, Hsp70 pre-incubation of M. smegmatis- and M. avium-infected cells led to increased phago-lysosome fusion, as well as more killing of mycobacteria within macrophages. Conclusions/Significance Our results fit into an emerging concept whereby exosomes-containing Hsp70 are effective inducers of inflammation, also in response to mycobacterial infection. PMID:20405033

  1. Thermodynamically induced particle transport: Order-by-induction and entropic trapping at the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    A theory for thermodynamic induction (TI) under isothermal conditions is presented. This includes a treatment of the Helmholtz free energy budget available for a gate variable to utilize towards aiding another variable's approach towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This energy budget could be used to help create interesting physical structures and examples of order-by-induction. I also show how to treat TI in the continuum limit which can be obtained from a variational principle. Several important examples of isothermal TI have been discussed, including a type of electromigration that may be detectable in electrolytes, superfluids and semiconductors. As an example of a bottlenecked system exhibiting enhanced TI, manipulation of atoms and molecules by STM has been discussed in detail. My considerations provide strong support for microscopic bond-breaking mechanisms being governed by a general thermodynamic principle. In particular, I show that induced entropy trapping can explain the level of control that sliding-type manipulations demonstrate. The most reasonable choices for the parameters input into the simple formula give a threshold condition for STM manipulations that is strikingly close to what is required to match results reported in the literature. My continuum model predicts the shape of the adsorbate potential well for the STM case and from this I predict a level of force detectable by AFM. A final proposal, and example of order-by-induction, predict a long tether may be constructed between sample and tip that is just one atom thick.

  2. Unconventional maturation of dendritic cells induced by particles from the laminated layer of larval Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Casaravilla, Cecilia; Pittini, Alvaro; Rückerl, Dominik; Seoane, Paula I; Jenkins, Stephen J; MacDonald, Andrew S; Ferreira, Ana M; Allen, Judith E; Díaz, Alvaro

    2014-08-01

    The larval stage of the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus causes hydatid disease in humans and livestock. This infection is characterized by the growth in internal organ parenchymae of fluid-filled structures (hydatids) that elicit surprisingly little inflammation in spite of their massive size and persistence. Hydatids are protected by a millimeter-thick layer of mucin-based extracellular matrix, termed the laminated layer (LL), which is thought to be a major factor determining the host response to the infection. Host cells can interact both with the LL surface and with materials that are shed from it to allow parasite growth. In this work, we analyzed the response of dendritic cells (DCs) to microscopic pieces of the native mucin-based gel of the LL (pLL). In vitro, this material induced an unusual activation state characterized by upregulation of CD86 without concomitant upregulation of CD40 or secretion of cytokines (interleukin 12 [IL-12], IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and IL-6). When added to Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, pLL-potentiated CD86 upregulation and IL-10 secretion while inhibiting CD40 upregulation and IL-12 secretion. In vivo, pLL also caused upregulation of CD86 and inhibited CD40 upregulation in DCs. Contrary to expectations, oxidation of the mucin glycans in pLL with periodate did not abrogate the effects on cells. Reduction of disulfide bonds, which are known to be important for LL structure, strongly diminished the impact of pLL on DCs without altering the particulate nature of the material. In summary, DCs respond to the LL mucin meshwork with a "semimature" activation phenotype, both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Radiation-induced alterations in synaptic neurotransmission of dentate granule cells depend on the dose and species of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Marty, V N; Vlkolinsky, R; Minassian, N; Cohen, T; Nelson, G A; Spigelman, I

    2014-12-01

    The evaluation of potential health risks associated with neuronal exposure to space radiation is critical for future long duration space travel. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of low-dose proton and high-energy charged particle (HZE) radiation on electrophysiological parameters of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and its associated functional consequences. We examined excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in DG granule cells (DGCs) in dorsal hippocampal slices from male C57BL/6 mice at 3 months after whole body irradiation with accelerated proton, silicon or iron particles. Multielectrode arrays were used to investigate evoked field synaptic potentials, an extracellular measurement of synaptic excitability in the perforant path to DG synaptic pathway. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were used to measure miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in DGCs. Exposure to proton radiation increased synaptic excitability and produced dose-dependent decreases in amplitude and charge transfer of mIPSCs, without affecting the expression of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor α2, β3 and γ2 subunits determined by Western blotting. Exposure to silicon radiation had no significant effects on synaptic excitability, mEPSCs or mIPSCs of DGCs. Exposure to iron radiation had no effect on synaptic excitability and mIPSCs, but significantly increased mEPSC frequency at 1 Gy, without changes in mEPSC kinetics, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Overall, the data suggest that proton and HZE exposure results in radiation dose- and species-dependent long-lasting alterations in synaptic neurotransmission, which could cause radiation-induced impairment of hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions.

  4. Fabrication of macroporous cement scaffolds using PEG particles: In vitro evaluation with induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Sladkova, Martina; Palmer, Michael; Öhman, Caroline; Alhaddad, Rawan Jaragh; Esmael, Asmaa; Engqvist, Håkan; de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria

    2016-12-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been extensively used in reconstructive dentistry and orthopedics, but it is only recently that CPCs have been combined with stem cells to engineer biological substitutes with enhanced healing potential. In the present study, macroporous CPC scaffolds with defined composition were fabricated using an easily reproduced synthesis method, with minimal fabrication and processing steps. Scaffold pore size and porosity, essential for cell infiltration and tissue ingrowth, were tuned by varying the content and size of polyethylene glycol (PEG) particles, resulting in 9 groups with different architectural features. The scaffolds were characterized for chemical composition, porosity and mechanical properties, then tested in vitro with human mesenchymal progenitors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MPs). Biomimetic decellularized bone scaffolds were used as reference material in this study. Our manufacturing process resulted in the formation of macroporous monetite scaffolds with no residual traces of PEG. The size and content of PEG particles was found to affect scaffold porosity, and thus mechanical properties. Irrespective of pore size and porosity, the CPC scaffolds fabricated in this study supported adhesion and viability of human iPSC-MPs similarly to decellularized bone scaffolds. However, the architectural features of the scaffolds were found to affect the expression of bone specific genes, suggesting that specific scaffold groups could be more suitable to direct human iPSC-MPs in vitro toward an osteoblastic phenotype. Our simplistic fabrication method allows rapid, inexpensive and reproducible construction of macroporous CPC scaffolds with tunable architecture for potential use in dental and orthopedic applications. PMID:27612757

  5. Trapping and chaining self-assembly of colloidal polystyrene particles over a floating electrode by using combined induced-charge electroosmosis and attractive dipole-dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiyu; Shao, Jinyou; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan; Ren, Yukun

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel low-frequency strategy to trap 10 μm colloidal polystyrene (PS) particles of small buoyancy velocity on the surface of a floating electrode, on the basis of combined induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow and dipole-dipole chaining phenomenon. For field frequencies of 5-50 Hz, much lower than the reciprocal RC time scale, double-layer polarization makes electric field lines pass around the 'insulating' surface of the ideally polarizable floating electrode. Once the long-range ICEO convective micro-vortexes transport particles quickly from the bulk fluid to the electrode surface, neighbouring particles aligned along the local horizontal electric field attract one another by attractive dipolar interactions, and form arrays of particle chains that are almost parallel with the applied electric field. Most importantly, this low-frequency trapping method takes advantage of the dielectrophoretic (DEP) particle-particle interaction to enhance the downward buoyancy force of this dipolar chaining assembly structure, in order to overcome the upward ICEO fluidic drag and realize stable particle trapping around the flow stagnation region. For the sake of comparison, the field frequency is further raised far above the DC limit. At the intermediate frequencies of 200 Hz-2 kHz, this trapping method fails to work, since the normal electric field component emanates from the conducting electrode surface. Besides, at high field frequencies (>3 kHz), particles can be once again effectively trapped at the electrode center, though with a compact (3 kHz) or disordered (10 kHz) 2D packing state on the electrode surface and mainly governed by the short-range negative DEP force field, resulting in requiring a much longer trapping time. To gain a better interpretation of the various particle behaviours observed in experiments, we develop a theoretical framework that takes into account both Maxwell-Wagner interfacial charge relaxation at the particle

  6. Trapping and chaining self-assembly of colloidal polystyrene particles over a floating electrode by using combined induced-charge electroosmosis and attractive dipole-dipole interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiyu; Shao, Jinyou; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan; Ren, Yukun

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel low-frequency strategy to trap 10 μm colloidal polystyrene (PS) particles of small buoyancy velocity on the surface of a floating electrode, on the basis of combined induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow and dipole-dipole chaining phenomenon. For field frequencies of 5-50 Hz, much lower than the reciprocal RC time scale, double-layer polarization makes electric field lines pass around the 'insulating' surface of the ideally polarizable floating electrode. Once the long-range ICEO convective micro-vortexes transport particles quickly from the bulk fluid to the electrode surface, neighbouring particles aligned along the local horizontal electric field attract one another by attractive dipolar interactions, and form arrays of particle chains that are almost parallel with the applied electric field. Most importantly, this low-frequency trapping method takes advantage of the dielectrophoretic (DEP) particle-particle interaction to enhance the downward buoyancy force of this dipolar chaining assembly structure, in order to overcome the upward ICEO fluidic drag and realize stable particle trapping around the flow stagnation region. For the sake of comparison, the field frequency is further raised far above the DC limit. At the intermediate frequencies of 200 Hz-2 kHz, this trapping method fails to work, since the normal electric field component emanates from the conducting electrode surface. Besides, at high field frequencies (>3 kHz), particles can be once again effectively trapped at the electrode center, though with a compact (3 kHz) or disordered (10 kHz) 2D packing state on the electrode surface and mainly governed by the short-range negative DEP force field, resulting in requiring a much longer trapping time. To gain a better interpretation of the various particle behaviours observed in experiments, we develop a theoretical framework that takes into account both Maxwell-Wagner interfacial charge relaxation at the particle

  7. Calcineurin/NFAT pathway mediates wear particle-induced TNF-α release and osteoclastogenesis from mice bone marrow macrophages in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-xiang; Wu, Chuan-long; Zhu, Zhen-an; Li, Mao-qiang; Mao, Yuan-qing; Liu, Ming; Wang, Xiao-qing; Yu, De-gang; Tang, Ting-ting

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the roles of the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway in regulation of wear particles-induced cytokine release and osteoclastogenesis from mouse bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Methods: Osteoclasts were induced from mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) in the presence of 100 ng/mL receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). Acridine orange staining and MTT assay were used to detect the cell viability. Osteoclastogenesis was determined using TRAP staining and RT-PCR. Bone pit resorption assay was used to examine osteoclast phenotype. The expression and cellular localization of NFATc1 were examined using RT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The production of TNFα was analyzed with ELISA. Results: Titanium (Ti) or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles (0.1 mg/mL) did not significantly change the viability of BMMs, but twice increased the differentiation of BMMs into mature osteoclasts, and markedly increased TNF-α production. The TNF-α level in the PMMA group was significantly higher than in the Ti group (96 h). The expression of NFATc1 was found in BMMs in the presence of the wear particles and RANKL. In bone pit resorption assay, the wear particles significantly increased the resorption area and total number of resorption pits in BMMs-seeded ivory slices. Addition of 11R-VIVIT peptide (a specific inhibitor of calcineurin-mediated NFAT activation, 2.0 μmol/L) did not significantly affect the viability of BMMs, but abolished almost all the wear particle-induced alterations in BMMs. Furthermore, VIVIT reduced TNF-α production much more efficiently in the PMMA group than in the Ti group (96 h). Conclusion: Calcineurin/NFAT pathway mediates wear particles-induced TNF-α release and osteoclastogenesis from BMMs. Blockade of this signaling pathway with VIVIT may provide a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:24056707

  8. Vitamin E-diffused highly cross-linked UHMWPE particles induce less osteolysis compared to highly cross-linked virgin UHMWPE particles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bichara, David A; Malchau, Erik; Sillesen, Nanna H; Cakmak, Selami; Nielsen, G Petur; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2014-09-01

    Recent in vitro findings suggest that UHMWPE wear particles containing vitamin E (VE) may have reduced biologic activity and decreased osteolytic potential. We hypothesized that particles from VE-stabilized, radiation cross-linked UHMWPE would cause less osteolysis in a murine calvarial bone model when compared to virgin gamma irradiated cross-linked UHMWPE. Groups received equal amount of particulate debris overlaying the calvarium for 10 days. Calvarial bone was examined using high resolution micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses. There was a statistically significant difference between virgin (12.2%±8%) and VE-UHMWPE (3%±1.4%) groups in regards to bone resorption (P=0.005) and inflammatory fibrous tissue overlaying the calvaria (0.48 vs. 0.20, P<0.0001). These results suggest that VE-UHMWPE particles have reduced osteolytic potential in vivo when compared to virgin UHMWPE.

  9. Protective Effect of Curcumin on Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Effects Induced by Repeated Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Subramaniyan, Deepa; Ali, Badreldin H.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate air pollution has been associated with increased risk of cardiopulmonary diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We have previously demonstrated that single dose exposure to diesel exhaust particle (DEP) causes lung inflammation and peripheral thrombotic events. Here, we exposed mice with repeated doses of DEP (15µg/animal) every 2nd day for 6 days (a total of 4 exposures), and measured several cardiopulmonary endpoints 48 h after the end of the treatments. Moreover, the potential protective effect of curcumin (the yellow pigment isolated from turmeric) on DEP-induced cardiopulmonary toxicity was assessed. DEP exposure increased macrophage and neutrophil numbers, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α) in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and enhanced airway resistance to methacoline measured invasively using Flexivent. DEP also significantly increased plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and TNF α concentrations, systolic blood pressure (SBP) as well as the pial arteriolar thrombosis. It also significantly enhanced the plasma D-dimer and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Pretreatment with curcumin by oral gavage (45 mg/kg) 1h before exposure to DEP significantly prevented the influx of inflammatory cells and the increase of TNF α in BAL, and the increased airway resistance caused by DEP. Likewise, curcumin prevented the increase of SBP, CRP, TNF α, D-dimer and PAI-1. The thrombosis was partially but significantly mitigated. In conclusion, repeated exposure to DEP induced lung and systemic inflammation characterized by TNFα release, increased SBP, and accelerated coagulation. Our findings indicate that curcumin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent that prevents the release of TNFα and protects against the pulmonary and cardiovascular effects of DEP. PMID:22745783

  10. Annealing-Induced Bi Bilayer on Bi2Te3 Investigated via Quasi-Particle-Interference Mapping.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, Koen; Govaerts, Kirsten; Debehets, Jolien; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Chen, Taishi; Li, Zhe; Netsou, Asteriona; Song, Fengqi; Lamoen, Dirk; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Partoens, Bart; Park, Kyungwha

    2016-09-27

    Topological insulators (TIs) are renowned for their exotic topological surface states (TSSs) that reside in the top atomic layers, and hence, detailed knowledge of the surface top atomic layers is of utmost importance. Here we present the remarkable morphology changes of Bi2Te3 surfaces, which have been freshly cleaved in air, upon subsequent systematic annealing in ultrahigh vacuum and the resulting effects on the local and area-averaging electronic properties of the surface states, which are investigated by combining scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) experiments with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our findings demonstrate that the annealing induces the formation of a Bi bilayer atop the Bi2Te3 surface. The adlayer results in n-type doping, and the atomic defects act as scattering centers of the TSS electrons. We also investigated the annealing-induced Bi bilayer surface on Bi2Te3 via voltage-dependent quasi-particle-interference (QPI) mapping of the surface local density of states and via comparison with the calculated constant-energy contours and QPI patterns. We observed closed hexagonal patterns in the Fourier transform of real-space QPI maps with secondary outer spikes. DFT calculations attribute these complex QPI patterns to the appearance of a "second" cone due to the surface charge transfer between the Bi bilayer and the Bi2Te3. Annealing in ultrahigh vacuum offers a facile route for tuning of the topological properties and may yield similar results for other topological materials. PMID:27584869

  11. Study of the vortex-induced pressure excitation source in a Francis turbine draft tube by particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2015-12-01

    Francis turbines operating at part-load experience the development of a precessing cavitation vortex rope at the runner outlet, which acts as an excitation source for the hydraulic system. In case of resonance, the resulting pressure pulsations seriously compromise the stability of the machine and of the electrical grid to which it is connected. As such off-design conditions are increasingly required for the integration of unsteady renewable energy sources into the existing power system, an accurate assessment of the hydropower plant stability is crucial. However, the physical mechanisms driving this excitation source remain largely unclear. It is for instance essential to establish the link between the draft tube flow characteristics and the intensity of the excitation source. In this study, a two-component particle image velocimetry system is used to investigate the flow field at the runner outlet of a reduced-scale physical model of a Francis turbine. The discharge value is varied from 55 to 81 % of the value at the best efficiency point. A particular set-up is designed to guarantee a proper optical access across the complex geometry of the draft tube elbow. Based on phase-averaged velocity fields, the evolution of the vortex parameters with the discharge, such as the trajectory and the circulation, is determined for the first time. It is shown that the rise in the excitation source intensity is induced by an enlargement of the vortex trajectory and a simultaneous increase in the precession frequency, as well as the vortex circulation. Below a certain value of discharge, the structure of the vortex abruptly changes and loses its coherence, leading to a drastic reduction in the intensity of the induced excitation source.

  12. Combustion derived ultrafine particles induce cytochrome P-450 expression in specific lung compartments in the developing neonatal and adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jackie K. W.; Vogel, Christoph F.; Baek, Jaeeun; Kodani, Sean D.; Uppal, Ravi S.; Bein, Keith J.; Anderson, Donald S.

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle exhaust is rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and can be a dominant contributor to ultrafine urban particulate matter (PM). Exposure to ultrafine PM is correlated with respiratory infections and asthmatic symptoms in young children. The lung undergoes substantial growth, alveolarization, and cellular maturation within the first years of life, which may be impacted by environmental pollutants such as PM. PAHs in PM can serve as ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that induces expression of certain isozymes in the cytochrome P-450 superfamily, such as CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, localized in specific lung cell types. Although AhR activation and induction has been widely studied, its context within PM exposure and impact on the developing lung is poorly understood. In response, we have developed a replicable ultrafine premixed flame particle (PFP) generating system and used in vitro and in vivo models to define PM effects on AhR activation in the developing lung. We exposed 7-day neonatal and adult rats to a single 6-h PFP exposure and determined that PFPs cause significant parenchymal toxicity in neonates. PFPs contain weak AhR agonists that upregulate AhR-xenobiotic response element activity and expression and are capable inducers of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in both ages with different spatial and temporal patterns. Neonatal CYP1A1 expression was muted and delayed compared with adults, possibly because of differences in the enzyme maturation. We conclude that the inability of neonates to sufficiently adapt in response to PFP exposure may, in part, explain their susceptibility to PFP and urban ultrafine PM. PMID:23502512

  13. Influenza virus subpopulations: exchange of lethal H5N1 virus NS for H1N1 virus NS triggers de novo generation of defective-interfering particles and enhances interferon-inducing particle efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ngunjiri, John M; Buchek, Gregory M; Mohni, Kareem N; Sekellick, Margaret J; Marcus, Philip I

    2013-03-01

    Reassortment of influenza A viruses is known to affect viability, replication efficiency, antigenicity, host range, and virulence, and can generate pandemic strains. In this study, we demonstrated that the specific exchange of the NS gene segment from highly pathogenic A/HK/156/97 (H5N1) [E92 or E92D NS1] virus for the cognate NS gene segment of A/PR/834(H1N1) [D92 NS1] virus did not cause a significant change in the sizes of infectious particle subpopulations. However, it resulted in 2 new phenotypic changes: (1) de novo generation of large subpopulations of defective-interfering particles (DIPs); and (2) enhancement of interferon (IFN)-inducing particle efficiency leading to an order of magnitude or higher quantum (peak) yield of IFN in both avian and mammalian cells. These changes were attributed to loss of function of the H5N1-NS gene products. Most notably, the NS exchange obliterated the usual IFN-induction-suppressing capacity associated with expression of full-size NS1 proteins, and hence functionally mimicked deletions in the NS1 gene. The loss of NS1-mediated suppression of IFN induction, de novo generation of DIPs, and the concomitant enhancement of IFN-inducing particle efficiency suggest that in an attenuated background, the H5N1-NS could be used to formulate a self-adjuvanting live attenuated influenza vaccine similar to viruses with deletions in the NS1 gene.

  14. Alpha-Particle-Induced Complex Chromosome Exchanges Transmitted through Extra-Thymic Lymphopoiesis In Vitro Show Evidence of Emerging Genomic Instability.

    PubMed

    Sumption, Natalia; Goodhead, Dudley T; Anderson, Rhona M

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to high-linear energy transfer α-particles includes environmental (e.g. radon gas and its decay progeny), medical (e.g. radiopharmaceuticals) and occupational (nuclear industry) sources. The associated health risks of α-particle exposure for lung cancer are well documented however the risk estimates for leukaemia remain uncertain. To further our understanding of α-particle effects in target cells for leukaemogenesis and also to seek general markers of individual exposure to α-particles, this study assessed the transmission of chromosomal damage initially-induced in human haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells after exposure to high-LET α-particles. Cells surviving exposure were differentiated into mature T-cells by extra-thymic T-cell differentiation in vitro. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridisation (M-FISH) analysis of naïve T-cell populations showed the occurrence of stable (clonal) complex chromosome aberrations consistent with those that are characteristically induced in spherical cells by the traversal of a single α-particle track. Additionally, complex chromosome exchanges were observed in the progeny of irradiated mature T-cell populations. In addition to this, newly arising de novo chromosome aberrations were detected in cells which possessed clonal markers of α-particle exposure and also in cells which did not show any evidence of previous exposure, suggesting ongoing genomic instability in these populations. Our findings support the usefulness and reliability of employing complex chromosome exchanges as indicators of past or ongoing exposure to high-LET radiation and demonstrate the potential applicability to evaluate health risks associated with α-particle exposure.

  15. Alpha-Particle-Induced Complex Chromosome Exchanges Transmitted through Extra-Thymic Lymphopoiesis In Vitro Show Evidence of Emerging Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sumption, Natalia; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Anderson, Rhona M.

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to high-linear energy transfer α-particles includes environmental (e.g. radon gas and its decay progeny), medical (e.g. radiopharmaceuticals) and occupational (nuclear industry) sources. The associated health risks of α-particle exposure for lung cancer are well documented however the risk estimates for leukaemia remain uncertain. To further our understanding of α-particle effects in target cells for leukaemogenesis and also to seek general markers of individual exposure to α-particles, this study assessed the transmission of chromosomal damage initially-induced in human haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells after exposure to high-LET α-particles. Cells surviving exposure were differentiated into mature T-cells by extra-thymic T-cell differentiation in vitro. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridisation (M-FISH) analysis of naïve T-cell populations showed the occurrence of stable (clonal) complex chromosome aberrations consistent with those that are characteristically induced in spherical cells by the traversal of a single α-particle track. Additionally, complex chromosome exchanges were observed in the progeny of irradiated mature T-cell populations. In addition to this, newly arising de novo chromosome aberrations were detected in cells which possessed clonal markers of α-particle exposure and also in cells which did not show any evidence of previous exposure, suggesting ongoing genomic instability in these populations. Our findings support the usefulness and reliability of employing complex chromosome exchanges as indicators of past or ongoing exposure to high-LET radiation and demonstrate the potential applicability to evaluate health risks associated with α-particle exposure. PMID:26252014

  16. Carrier induced epitopic suppression of antibody responses induced by virus-like particles is a dynamic phenomenon caused by carrier-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jegerlehner, Andrea; Wiesel, Melanie; Dietmeier, Klaus; Zabel, Franziska; Gatto, Dominique; Saudan, Philippe; Bachmann, Martin F

    2010-07-26

    Pre-existing immunity against vaccine carrier proteins has been reported to inhibit the immune response against antigens conjugated to the same carrier by a process termed carrier induced epitopic suppression (CIES). Hence understanding the phenomenon of CIES is of major importance for the development of conjugate vaccines. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a novel class of potent immunological carriers which have been successfully used to enhance the antibody response to virtually any conjugated antigen. In the present study we investigated the impact of a pre-existing VLP-specific immune response on the development of antibody responses against a conjugated model peptide after primary, secondary and tertiary immunization. Although VLP-specific immune responses led to reduced peptide-specific antibody titers, we showed that CIES against peptide-VLP conjugates could be overcome by high coupling densities, repeated injections and/or higher doses of conjugate vaccine. Furthermore we dissected VLP-specific immunity by adoptively transferring VLP-specific antibodies, B-cells or T(helper) cells separately into naïve mice and found that the observed CIES against peptide-VLP conjugates was mainly mediated by carrier-specific antibodies.

  17. Toroidal current induced by particle trapping inside a new toroidal laboratory magnetized plasma device with poloidal magnetic field induced by a central conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Th.; Caron, X.; Gravier, E.; Antar, G.

    2012-10-01

    In the laboratory toroidal device MISTOR, a poloidal field is created by a current (1200 A) flowing along a central toroidal conductor. A security factor q=1 is obtained at radial position r = 5 cm. Helium plasma is produced by electric discharge using a tungsten filament. When Bpol= 0, the whole plasma is turbulent that is a standard in a Simple Magnetized Torus. As Bpol is increased, the turbulence level decreases and a stable plasma is obtained. This is correlated with the decrease of the radial electric field. The confinement time is estimated in the afterglow decaying plasma. It increases from 50 microsec. without poloidal field to 0.5 millisec. when q=1 at mid-radius. The trapping of the particles inside the mirror-traps inherent in this topology (banana orbits) is studied. The precession of the banana orbits seems to be the dominant mechanism. The measurement of the toroidal current using a probe indicates that the electrons experience an oriented toroidal drift along the field lines. Detailed measurements of the EEDF are compared with theory. The influence of detrapping is investigated in order to estimate the bootstrap current induced in this device.

  18. L Particles Transmit Viral Proteins from Herpes Simplex Virus 1-Infected Mature Dendritic Cells to Uninfected Bystander Cells, Inducing CD83 Downmodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Mirko; Mühl-Zürbes, Petra; Drassner, Christina; Daniel, Christoph; Klewer, Monika; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mature dendritic cells (mDCs) are known as the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) since they are also able to prime/induce naive T cells. Thus, mDCs play a pivotal role during the induction of antiviral immune responses. Remarkably, the cell surface molecule CD83, which was shown to have costimulatory properties, is targeted by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for viral immune escape. Infection of mDCs with HSV-1 results in downmodulation of CD83, resulting in reduced T cell stimulation. In this study, we report that not only infected mDCs but also uninfected bystander cells in an infected culture show a significant CD83 reduction. We demonstrate that this effect is independent of phagocytosis and transmissible from infected to uninfected mDCs. The presence of specific viral proteins found in these uninfected bystander cells led to the hypothesis that viral proteins are transferred from infected to uninfected cells via L particles. These L particles are generated during lytic replication in parallel with full virions, called H particles. L particles contain viral proteins but lack the viral capsid and DNA. Therefore, these particles are not infectious but are able to transfer several viral proteins. Incubation of mDCs with L particles indeed reduced CD83 expression on uninfected bystander DCs, providing for the first time evidence that functional viral proteins are transmitted via L particles from infected mDCs to uninfected bystander cells, thereby inducing CD83 downmodulation. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 has evolved a number of strategies to evade the host's immune system. Among others, HSV-1 infection of mDCs results in an inhibited T cell activation caused by degradation of CD83. Interestingly, CD83 is lost not only from HSV-1-infected mDCs but also from uninfected bystander cells. The release of so-called L particles, which contain several viral proteins but lack capsid and DNA, during infection is a common phenomenon observed among several viruses, such

  19. Geometric and electronic structure of Au on Au/CeO2 catalysts during the CO oxidation: Deactivation by reaction induced particle growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Mageed, Ali M.; Kučerová, Gabriela; Abd El-Moemen, Ayman; Bansmann, Joachim; Widmann, Daniel; Jürgen Behm, R.

    2016-05-01

    Changes of the geometric and electronic structure of gold on Au/CeO2 catalysts induced by different pre-treatments (oxidative and reductive) and by the CO oxidation reaction at 80°C were followed by operando XANES / EXAFS measurements. The results showed that i) oxidative pre-treatment (O2) leads to larger Au nanoparticles than reductive pre-treatment (CO), that ii) Au is predominantly metallic during CO oxidation, irrespective of the preceding pre-treatment, and that iii) there is a reaction induced Au particle growth. Correlations with the activity of the respective catalysts and its temporal evolution give insights into the origin of deactivation of these catalysts under reaction conditions, in particular on reaction induced changes in the Au particle size.

  20. Three-dimensional DEM-CFD analysis of air-flow-induced detachment of API particles from carrier particles in dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiecheng; Wu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Air flow and particle-particle/wall impacts are considered as two primary dispersion mechanisms for dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Hence, an understanding of these mechanisms is critical for the development of DPIs. In this study, a coupled DEM-CFD (discrete element method-computational fluid dynamics) is employed to investigate the influence of air flow on the dispersion performance of the carrier-based DPI formulations. A carrier-based agglomerate is initially formed and then dispersed in a uniformed air flow. It is found that air flow can drag API particles away from the carrier and those in the downstream air flow regions are prone to be dispersed. Furthermore, the influence of the air velocity and work of adhesion are also examined. It is shown that the dispersion number (i.e., the number of API particles detached from the carrier) increases with increasing air velocity, and decreases with increasing the work of adhesion, indicating that the DPI performance is controlled by the balance of the removal and adhesive forces. It is also shown that the cumulative Weibull distribution function can be used to describe the DPI performance, which is governed by the ratio of the fluid drag force to the pull-off force.

  1. Resorption kinetics of four hydroxyapatite-based ceramics by particle induced X-ray emission and neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallot, E.; Irigaray, J. L.; Oudadesse, H.; Brun, V.; Weber, G.; Frayssinet, P.

    1999-05-01

    From the viewpoint of hard tissue response to implant materials, calcium phosphates are probably the most compatible materials presently known. During the last few years, much attention has been paid to hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate as potential biomaterials for bone substitute. A good implantation of biomaterials in the skeleton is to reach full integration of non-living implant with living bone. The aim of this study is to compare the resorption kinetics of four kinds of calcium phosphate ceramics: hydroxyapatite (Ca{10}(PO4)6(OH)2), hydroxyapatite doped with manganese or zinc and a composite material of 75% hydroxyapatite and 25% β-tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2). Cylinders (5 6 mm in diameter) of these ceramics were packed into holes made in the femur diaphysis of mature ovine. At 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 28, 36 and 48 weeks after the operation, bone/implant interface was embedded in polymethylmethacrylate. We used the PIXE method (particle induced X-ray emission) to measure the distribution of mineral elements (Ca, P, Sr, Zn, Mn and Fe) at the bone/implant interface. At 4, 8, 16, 28 and 48 weeks after implantation we studied a biopsy of the ceramics by neutron activation method. Then, we have a global measurement of mineral elements in the biomaterial. The results showed that the resorption kinetics of hydroxyapatite doped with zinc was faster than that of the three other bioceramics.

  2. Therapeutic immunisation of rabbits with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) virus-like particles (VLP) induces regression of established papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Vandana A; Rybicki, Edward P; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2008-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) is the main risk factor for invasive cancer of the cervix. Due to this global public health burden, two prophylactic HPV L1 virus-like particles (VLP) vaccines have been developed. While these vaccines have demonstrated excellent type-specific prevention of infection by the homologous vaccine types (high and low risk HPV types), no data have been reported on the therapeutic effects in people already infected with the low-risk HPV type. In this study we explored whether regression of CRPV-induced papillomas could be achieved following immunisation of out-bred New Zealand White rabbits with CRPV VLPs. Rabbits immunised with CRPV VLPs had papillomas that were significantly smaller compared to the negative control rabbit group (P ≤ 0.05). This data demonstrates the therapeutic potential of PV VLPs in a well-understood animal model with potential important implications for human therapeutic vaccination for low-risk HPVs. PMID:18355406

  3. Enhanced prion detection in biological samples by magnetic particle extraction and real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    PubMed

    Denkers, Nathaniel D; Henderson, Davin M; Mathiason, Candace K; Hoover, Edward A

    2016-08-01

    Prions have been demonstrated in body fluids and excreta using bioassay, but at levels too low for detection by conventional direct-detection assays. More rapid and sensitive detection of prions in these clinically accessible specimens would be valuable for diagnosis and investigations of transmission, environmental impact, and interventions. In addition to very low concentrations of prions, in vitro amplification assays are challenged by the presence of inhibitors in these complex sources. Here, we leverage the prion attribute of avid metal binding with the versatile power of real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to enhance and simplify detection of chronic wasting-disease prions in biological samples. Iron oxide particle binding and magnetic extraction combined with RT-QuIC permitted rapid analysis of the low concentrations of prions in saliva, urine, faeces, and cerebrospinal fluid. These methods are pertinent to ante-mortem detection, monitoring, and surveillance, and could conceivably be applicable to other protein-misfolding disorders. PMID:27233771

  4. Anacardic Acids from Cashew Nuts Ameliorate Lung Damage Induced by Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Owen, Robert W.; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50 μg of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100 μL of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs. PMID:23533495

  5. Photothermal investigation of the laser-induced modification of a single gold nano-particle in a silica film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertussi, B.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Commandre, M.; Rullier, J.-L.; Bonneau, F.; Combis, P.; Bouchut, P.

    2005-10-01

    Absorbing defects are believed to induce thermal effects that lead to laser damage, but the correlation between defect absorption and damage has not been clearly demonstrated. A model system consisting of a thin-film of silica containing gold nano-particles serving as nano-scale absorbing defects is investigated. For this purpose, a photothermal microscope coupled with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser allow us to follow the evolution of gold inclusion absorption before and after laser irradiation, without repositioning the sample. The "pre-damage" threshold had been defined previously as the laser fluence causing localized modification of the defect absorption without any surface modification. Thanks to the high sensitivity of photothermal microscopy, we find this threshold to be sevenfold less than that for the appearance of surface cracks. Numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the thermal evolution of the inclusion as a function of the laser fluence. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, we observe that the pre-damage threshold is closely linked to the melting of the metallic inclusion. Furthermore, the effect of repetitive shots on the evolution of gold inclusion absorption is examined experimentally and discussed.

  6. Laboratory verification of the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Chang'e-3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-Liang; Li, Chun-Lai; Fu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Li-Yan; Ban, Cao; Li, Han; Zou, Yong-Liao; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2015-11-01

    In the Chang'e-3 mission, the Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Yutu rover is used to analyze the chemical composition of lunar soil and rock samples. APXS data are only valid are only if the sensor head gets close to the target and integration time lasts long enough. Therefore, working distance and integration time are the dominant factors that affect APXS results. This study confirms the ability of APXS to detect elements and investigates the effects of distance and time on the measurements. We make use of a backup APXS instrument to determine the chemical composition of both powder and bulk samples under the conditions of different working distances and integration times. The results indicate that APXS can detect seven major elements, including Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe under the condition that the working distance is less than 30 mm and having an integration time of 30 min. The statistical deviation is smaller than 15%. This demonstrates the instrument's ability to detect major elements in the sample. Our measurements also indicate the increase of integration time could reduce the measurement error of peak area, which is useful for detecting the elements Mg, Al and Si. However, an increase in working distance can result in larger errors in measurement, which significantly affects the detection of the element Mg.

  7. Anacardic acids from cashew nuts ameliorate lung damage induced by exposure to diesel exhaust particles in mice.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Laura Nicoletti; Annoni, Raquel; Torres, Larissa Helena Lobo; Durão, Ana Carolina Cardoso Santos; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Almeida, Francine Maria; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenorio Quirino Santos; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Milton Arruda; Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W; Marcourakis, Tania; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Mauad, Thais

    2013-01-01

    Anacardic acids from cashew nut shell liquid, a Brazilian natural substance, have antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and modulate immune responses and angiogenesis. As inflammatory lung diseases have been correlated to environmental pollutants exposure and no reports addressing the effects of dietary supplementation with anacardic acids on lung inflammation in vivo have been evidenced, we investigated the effects of supplementation with anacardic acids in a model of diesel exhaust particle- (DEP-) induced lung inflammation. BALB/c mice received an intranasal instillation of 50  μ g of DEP for 20 days. Ten days prior to DEP instillation, animals were pretreated orally with 50, 150, or 250 mg/kg of anacardic acids or vehicle (100  μ L of cashew nut oil) for 30 days. The biomarkers of inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the alveolar parenchyma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and pulmonary vessels were investigated. All doses of anacardic acids ameliorated antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased vascular adhesion molecule in vessels. Animals that received 50 mg/kg of anacardic acids showed decreased levels of neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor in the lungs and BALF, respectively. In summary, we demonstrated that AAs supplementation has a potential protective role on oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms in the lungs.

  8. The Influence of Acute Hyperglycemia in an Animal Model of Lacunar Stroke That Is Induced by Artificial Particle Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Jun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Yu-Min; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have revealed that hyperglycemia during ischemic stroke increases the stroke's severity and the infarct size in clinical and animal studies. However, no conclusive evidence demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia worsens post-stroke outcomes and increases infarct size in lacunar stroke. In this study, we developed a rat model of lacunar stroke that was induced via the injection of artificial embolic particles during full consciousness. We then used this model to compare the acute influence of hyperglycemia in lacunar stroke and diffuse infarction, by evaluating neurologic behavior and the rate, size, and location of the infarction. The time course of the neurologic deficits was clearly recorded from immediately after induction to 24 h post-stroke in both types of stroke. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic deficit in diffuse infarction at 24 h after stroke, and also aggravated the cerebral infarct. Furthermore, the infarct volumes of the basal ganglion, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum but not the cortex were positively correlated with serum glucose levels. In contrast, acute hyperglycemia reduced the infarct volume and neurologic symptoms in lacunar stroke within 4 min after stroke induction, and this effect persisted for up to 24 h post-stroke. In conclusion, acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic outcomes in diffuse infarction, although it significantly reduced the size of the cerebral infarct and improved the neurologic deficits in lacunar stroke. PMID:27226775

  9. Broadband Ultrahigh-Resolution Spectroscopy of Particle-Induced X Rays: Extending the Limits of Nondestructive Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosaari, M. R. J.; Käyhkö, M.; Kinnunen, K. M.; Laitinen, M.; Julin, J.; Malm, J.; Sajavaara, T.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J.; Reintsema, C.; Swetz, D.; Schmidt, D.; Ullom, J. N.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2016-08-01

    Nondestructive analysis (NDA) based on x-ray emission is widely used, for example, in the semiconductor and concrete industries. Here, we demonstrate significant quantitative and qualitative improvements in broadband x-ray NDA by combining particle-induced emission with detection based on superconducting microcalorimeter arrays. We show that the technique offers great promise in the elemental analysis of thin-film and bulk samples, especially in the difficult cases where tens of different elements with nearly overlapping emission lines have to be identified down to trace concentrations. We demonstrate the efficiency and resolving capabilities by spectroscopy of several complex multielement samples in the energy range 1-10 keV, some of which have a trace amount of impurities not detectable with standard silicon drift detectors. The ability to distinguish the chemical environment of an element is also demonstrated by measuring the intensity differences and chemical shifts of the characteristics x-ray peaks of titanium compounds. In particular, we report measurements of the K α /K β intensity ratio of thin films of TiN and measurements of Ti K α satellite peak intensities in various Ti thin-film compounds. We also assess the detection limits of the technique, comment on detection limits possible in the future, and discuss possible applications.

  10. Sulfur dioxide oxidation induced mechanistic branching and particle formation during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Philip T M; Keunecke, Claudia; Krüger, Bastian C; Maaß, Mona-C; Zeuch, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the reaction of stabilised Criegee Intermediates (CIs) with sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), leading to the formation of a carbonyl compound and sulfur trioxide, is a relevant atmospheric source of sulfuric acid. Here, the significance of this pathway has been examined by studying the formation of gas phase products and aerosol during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene in the presence of SO(2) in the pressure range of 10 to 1000 mbar. For β-pinene at atmospheric pressure, the addition of SO(2) suppresses the formation of the secondary ozonide and leads to highly increased nopinone yields. A complete consumption of SO(2) is observed at initial SO(2) concentrations below the yield of stabilised CIs. In experiments using 2-butene a significant consumption of SO(2) and additional formation of acetaldehyde are observed at 1 bar. A consistent kinetic simulation of the experimental findings is possible when a fast CI + SO(2) reaction rate in the range of recent direct measurements [Welz et al., Science, 2012, 335, 204] is used. For 2-butene the addition of SO(2) drastically increases the observed aerosol yields at higher pressures. Below 60 mbar the SO(2) oxidation induced particle formation becomes inefficient pointing to the critical role of collisional stabilisation for sulfuric acid controlled nucleation at low pressures.

  11. Fiber-coupled, 10 kHz simultaneous OH planar laser-induced fluorescence/particle-image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2013-01-15

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle-image velocimetry (PIV) techniques that employ free-standing optics face severe challenges when implemented in harsh environments associated with practical combustion facilities because of limited optical access and restrictions on operation of sensitive laser systems. To circumvent this problem, we have developed and implemented a fiber-coupled, high-speed ultraviolet (UV) PLIF/PIV system for measuring hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration and velocity in a realistic 4 MW combustion rig. This system permits delivery of high-power, 10 kHz, nanosecond-duration OH-PLIF excitation pulses (283 nm) and PIV pulses (532 nm) through a common 6 m long, 600 μm core, deep-UV-enhanced multimode fiber. Simultaneous OH-PLIF and PIV imaging at a data-acquisition rate of 10 kHz is demonstrated in turbulent premixed flames behind a bluff body. The effects of delivering high-repetition-rate, intense UV and visible beams through a long optical fiber are investigated, and potential system improvements are discussed.

  12. ER Stress Mediates TiAl6V4 Particle-Induced Peri-Implant Osteolysis by Promoting RANKL Expression in Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenheng; Liu, Naicheng; Shi, Tongguo; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhen; Gan, Jingjing; Guo, Ting; Qian, Hongbo; Bao, Nirong; Zhao, Jianning

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis is a major cause of aseptic loosening, which is one of the most common reasons for total hip arthroplasty (THA) failure. Previous studies have shown that the synovial fibroblasts present in the periprosthetic membrane are important targets of wear debris during osteolysis. However, the interaction mechanisms between the wear debris and fibroblasts remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress induced by TiAl6V4 particles (TiPs) in human synovial fibroblasts and calvarial resorption animal models. The expression of ER stress markers, including IRE1-α, GRP78/Bip and CHOP, were determined by western blot in fibroblasts that had been treated with TiPs for various times and concentration. To address whether ER stress was involved in the expression of RANKL, the effects of ER stress blockers (including 4-PBA and TUDCA) on the expression of RANKL in TiPs-treated fibroblasts were examined by real-time PCR, western blot and ELISA. Osteoclastogenesis was assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Our study demonstrated that ER stress markers were markedly upregulated in TiPs-treated fibroblasts. Blocking ER stress significantly reduced the TiPs-induced expression of RANKL both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the inhibition of ER stress ameliorated wear particle-induced osteolysis in animal models. Taken together, these results suggested that the expression of RANKL induced by TiPs was mediated by ER stress in fibroblasts. Therefore, down regulating the ER stress of fibroblasts represents a potential therapeutic approach for wear particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:26366858

  13. Influenza virus subpopulations: interferon induction-suppressing particles require expression of NS1 and act globally in cells; UV irradiation of interferon-inducing particles blocks global shut-off and enhances interferon production.

    PubMed

    Malinoski, Christopher P; Marcus, Philip I

    2013-02-01

    Influenza virus populations contain several subpopulations of noninfectious biologically active particles that are measured by the unique phenotypes they express. Two of these subpopulations were studied: (1) interferon (IFN)-inducing particles (IFP) and (2) IFN induction-suppressing particles (ISP). ISP are dominant in cells coinfected with one or more IFP; they completely suppress IFN production in cells otherwise programmed to induce it. Influenza virus ISP were shown to act in host cells in a nonspecific and global manner, suppressing IFN induction independent of the family of viruses serving as IFN inducers. ISP must be present within the first 3 h of coinfection with IFP to be maximally effective; by 7 hpi IFN induction/production is refractory to the action of superinfecting ISP. UV target and thermal inactivation analyses revealed that ISP activity was dependent solely on the expression of the NS gene. Low doses of UV radiation enhanced by ∼10-fold the already high IFN-inducing capacity of a virus that expressed truncated NS1. There was no change in the number of IFP, implying that the production of IFN/cell had increased. We postulated that preventing degradation of cellular RNA pol II by viral polymerase prolonged the transcription of cellular mRNA, including IFN mRNA, to enhance the IFN-inducing capacity of the cell without any increase in the number of IFP. These studies point to the dueling roles of IFP and ISP in modulating IFN induction/production, the former activity being critical to the efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccines.

  14. Dynamic characteristics of 56Fe-particle radiation-induced alterations in the rat brain: magnetic resonance imaging and histological assessments.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Smith, Anna; Badaut, Jerome; Obenaus, Andre

    2010-06-01

    56Fe-particle radiation-induced brain disturbances are a major health concern for astronauts during long-term space travel. The present study investigated temporal modifications within the brain after 56Fe-particle exposure using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlated to histology. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to brain-only 56Fe-particle radiation. MRI including T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, pre/postcontrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging was performed 0.25-18 months after exposure. T2 relaxation times and the apparent diffusion coefficient were quantified within the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, retrosplenial cortex and thalamus, and correlative histopathology was then performed at each time. In the absence of visible lesions on MR images, the apparent diffusion coefficient and T2 relaxation times revealed 56Fe-particle-induced dynamic changes in all ROIs over the 18-month time course. The patterns of MR changes were spatially similar within the different regions. The temporal alterations in the apparent diffusion coefficient corresponded to the glial cell changes within the brain. Quantitative MRI provides a non-invasive approach to monitor spatio-temporal brain alterations after 56Fe-particle irradiation. The apparent diffusion coefficient appears to be a sensitive metric to reveal ongoing tissue modifications involving multiple cellular components in vivo.

  15. Surface modification of amorphous nanosilica particles suppresses nanosilica-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA damage in various mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Matsuyama, Keigo; Nakazato, Yasutaro; Tochigi, Saeko; Hirai, Toshiro; Kondoh, Sayuri; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is increasing concern regarding the potential health risks of nanomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluated the effect of surface properties of nanomaterials on cellular responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the surface properties play an important in determining its safety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These data provide useful information for producing safer nanomaterials. -- Abstract: Recently, nanomaterials have been utilized in various fields. In particular, amorphous nanosilica particles are increasingly being used in a range of applications, including cosmetics, food technology, and medical diagnostics. However, there is concern that the unique characteristics of nanomaterials might induce undesirable effects. The roles played by the physical characteristics of nanomaterials in cellular responses have not yet been elucidated precisely. Here, by using nanosilica particles (nSPs) with a diameter of 70 nm whose surface was either unmodified (nSP70) or modified with amine (nSP70-N) or carboxyl groups (nSP70-C), we examined the relationship between the surface properties of nSPs and cellular responses such as cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and DNA damage. To compare the cytotoxicity of nSP70, nSP70-N, or nSP70-C, we examined in vitro cell viability after nSP treatment. Although the susceptibility of each cell line to the nSPs was different, nSP70-C and nSP70-N showed lower cytotoxicity than nSP70 in all cell lines. Furthermore, the generation of ROS and induction of DNA damage in nSP70-C- and nSP70-N-treated cells were lower than those in nSP70-treated cells. These results suggest that the surface properties of nSP70 play an important role in determining its safety, and surface modification of nSP70 with amine or carboxyl groups may be useful for the development of safer nSPs. We hope that our results will contribute to the development of safer nanomaterials.

  16. Three-dimensional DEM–CFD analysis of air-flow-induced detachment of API particles from carrier particles in dry powder inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiecheng; Wu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Air flow and particle–particle/wall impacts are considered as two primary dispersion mechanisms for dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Hence, an understanding of these mechanisms is critical for the development of DPIs. In this study, a coupled DEM–CFD (discrete element method–computational fluid dynamics) is employed to investigate the influence of air flow on the dispersion performance of the carrier-based DPI formulations. A carrier-based agglomerate is initially formed and then dispersed in a uniformed air flow. It is found that air flow can drag API particles away from the carrier and those in the downstream air flow regions are prone to be dispersed. Furthermore, the influence of the air velocity and work of adhesion are also examined. It is shown that the dispersion number (i.e., the number of API particles detached from the carrier) increases with increasing air velocity, and decreases with increasing the work of adhesion, indicating that the DPI performance is controlled by the balance of the removal and adhesive forces. It is also shown that the cumulative Weibull distribution function can be used to describe the DPI performance, which is governed by the ratio of the fluid drag force to the pull-off force. PMID:26579364

  17. A new particle-induced X-ray emission set-up for laterally resolved analysis over wide areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanf, D.; Buchriegler, J.; Renno, A. D.; Merchel, S.; Munnik, F.; Ziegenrücker, R.; Scharf, O.; Nowak, S. H.; von Borany, J.

    2016-06-01

    The recently installed and unique PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) set-up at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) is mainly dedicated to applications for a detailed overview of elemental composition over large sample areas within a short time even at trace level. The so-called High-Speed-PIXE (HS-PIXE), a combination of a pnCCD-based pixel-detector with polycapillary X-ray optics, offers simultaneous imaging of sample areas up to 12 × 12 mm2 with a lateral resolution better than 100 μm. Each of the 264 × 264 individual pixels detects X-ray photons in an energy range from 2 keV to 20 keV with an energy resolution of 152 eV (@Mn-Kα). A high precision sample manipulator offers the inspection of areas up to 250 × 250 mm2. During first experiments the determined resolution is (76 ± 23) μm using a sample of well-known sharp-edged chromium patterns. Trace element analysis has been performed using a geological sample, a tin ore, with an average Ta-concentration below 0.1 at.%. Fine-zoned structures became visible in the Ta-Lα intensity map within only 45 min. The High-Speed-PIXE closes a gap in the analytical process flow chain especially for geoanalytical characterisations. It is a unique and fast detection system to identify areas of interest in comparably short time at large-area scale for further analysis.

  18. HIV-1-Induced Small T Cell Syncytia Can Transfer Virus Particles to Target Cells through Transient Contacts.

    PubMed

    Symeonides, Menelaos; Murooka, Thomas T; Bellfy, Lauren N; Roy, Nathan H; Mempel, Thorsten R; Thali, Markus

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates fusion of viral and target cell membranes, but it can also mediate fusion of infected (producer) and target cells, thus triggering the formation of multinucleated cells, so-called syncytia. Large, round, immobile syncytia are readily observable in cultures of HIV-1-infected T cells, but these fast growing "fusion sinks" are largely regarded as cell culture artifacts. In contrast, small HIV-1-induced syncytia were seen in the paracortex of peripheral lymph nodes and other secondary lymphoid tissue of HIV-1-positive individuals. Further, recent intravital imaging of lymph nodes in humanized mice early after their infection with HIV-1 demonstrated that a significant fraction of infected cells were highly mobile, small syncytia, suggesting that these entities contribute to virus dissemination. Here, we report that the formation of small, migratory syncytia, for which we provide further quantification in humanized mice, can be recapitulated in vitro if HIV-1-infected T cells are placed into 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels rather than being kept in traditional suspension culture systems. Intriguingly, live-cell imaging in hydrogels revealed that these syncytia, similar to individual infected cells, can transiently interact with uninfected cells, leading to rapid virus transfer without cell-cell fusion. Infected cells were also observed to deposit large amounts of viral particles into the extracellular space. Altogether, these observations suggest the need to further evaluate the biological significance of small, T cell-based syncytia and to consider the possibility that these entities do indeed contribute to virus spread and pathogenesis.

  19. Is there a particle-size dependence for the mediation by colloidal redox catalysts of the light-induced hydrogen evolution from water

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.; Moradpour, A.

    1980-11-19

    Particle-size effects for the catalysis by platinum of the light-induced hydrogen evolution from water, using the (Ru(bpy)/sub 3//sup 2 +//methyl viologen/EDTA) model system, were investigated with widely polydispersed colloidal platinum hydrosols and samples with narrower size distributions obtained from the former hydrosols by centrifugation. The optimum values for the hydrogen-formation rates and yields were found to be very similar for all catalysts studied; this was true for those containing polydispersed or selected small (<100 A) as well as large particles (>1000 A). In fact, no platinum particle-size effects on the methyl viologen mediated hydrogen evolutions were observed in the investigated size range. These results are discussed in relation to studies on catalyst-dispersion effects in the field of heterogeous catalysis.

  20. Colored-noise Fokker-Planck equation for the shear-induced self-diffusion process of non-Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukassen, Laura J.; Oberlack, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In the literature, it is pointed out that non-Brownian particles tend to show shear-induced diffusive behavior due to hydrodynamic interactions. Several authors indicate a long correlation time of the particle velocities in comparison to Brownian particle velocities modeled by a white noise. This work deals with the derivation of a Fokker-Planck equation both in position and velocity space which describes the process of shear-induced self-diffusion, whereas, so far, this problem has been described by Fokker-Planck equations restricted to position space. The long velocity correlation times actually would necessitate large time-step sizes in the mathematical description of the problem in order to capture the diffusive regime. In fact, time steps of specific lengths pose problems to the derivation of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation because the whole particle configuration changes during long time-step sizes. On the other hand, small time-step sizes, i.e., in the range of the velocity correlation time, violate the Markov property of the position variable. In this work we regard the problem of shear-induced self-diffusion with respect to the Markov property and reformulate the problem with respect to small time-step sizes. In this derivation, we regard the nondimensionalized Langevin equation and develop a new compact form which allows us to analyze the Langevin equation for all time scales of interest for both Brownian and non-Brownian particles starting from a single equation. This shows that the Fokker-Planck equation in position space should be extended to a colored-noise Fokker-Planck equation in both position and colored-noise velocity space, which we will derive.