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Sample records for 10-point pain scale

  1. Comparison of pain scale preferences and pain intensity according to pain scales among Turkish Patients: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Yazici Sayin, Yazile; Akyolcu, Neriman

    2014-03-01

    Pain scale preferences may vary among patients. Providing a choice of which pain scale to use might be helpful for patients. The aim of this study was to determine patient pain scale preferences and compare the level of agreement among pain scales commonly used during postoperative pain assessment. A total of 621 patients during the early postoperative period were enrolled in this descriptive study. A questionnaire form, the faces pain scale (FPS), visual analog scale (VAS), numeric rating scale (NRS), verbal descriptor scale (VDS), thermometer pain scale (TPS), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SFMPQ), and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) were used to collect data. Most patients reported that their pain was not measured with any of the pain scales. Patient preference for pain scales were as follows: 97.4% FPS, 88.6% NRS, 84.1% VDS, 78.1% TPS, 60.1% SFMPQ, 37.0% BPI, 11.4% VAS, and 10.5% MPQ. Education was an important factor in the preferences for all scales (p < .000). The level of pain determined by the VAS did not correlate with the level of pain identified by the NRS, TPS, FPS, and VDS (p < .05). There was no difference among the levels of pain for the NRS, TPS, FPS and VDS (p > .05), but there was for the VAS (p < .05). The pain scales chosen should be reliable, valid, and able to evaluate the effects of treatment. The results suggest that the NRS, TPS, FPS, and VDS were appropriate pain rating scales for the participants in this study, and that the VAS should be used in combination with one of these scales.

  2. Pain assessment scales in newborns: integrative review

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Gleicia Martins; Lélis, Ana Luíza Paula de Aguiar; de Moura, Alline Falconieri; Cardoso, Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão; da Silva, Viviane Martins

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze studies on methods used to assess pain in newborns. DATA SOURCES: Integrative review study of articles published from 2001 to 2012, carried out in the following databases: Scopus, PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS and Cochrane. The sample consisted of 13 articles with level of evidence 5. DATA SYNTHESIS: 29 pain assessment scales in newborns, including 13 one-dimensional and 16 multidimensional, that assess acute and prolonged pain in preterm and full-term infants were available in scientific publications. CONCLUSION: Based on the characteristics of scales, one cannot choose a single one as the most appropriate scale, as this choice will depend on gestational age, type of painful stimulus and the environment in which the infant is inserted. It is suggested the use of multidimensional or one-dimensional scales; however, they must be reliable and validated. PMID:25511005

  3. [Pain scales used in the newborn infant: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Pereira Da Silva, Tiago; Justo Da Silva, Lincoln

    2010-01-01

    For many years, appropriate relevance has not been given for pain in newborn infants, but research brought to light this important subject in neonatal medicine. Pain scores have been organized in scales and validated to be used in clinical practice. Currently, there are several scales based on different pain indicators. These scales should be used according to different circumstances. With the purpose of helping health professionals, a systematic review of neonatal pain scales based on gestational age, duration of painful episode and type of pain indicator was carried out. Data concerning validation of the scales were also analyzed and two scales for use in clinical practice or in research are suggested.

  4. King's Parkinson's disease pain scale, the first scale for pain in PD: An international validation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, K Ray; Rizos, A; Trenkwalder, C; Rascol, O; Pal, S; Martino, D; Carroll, C; Paviour, D; Falup-Pecurariu, C; Kessel, B; Silverdale, M; Todorova, A; Sauerbier, A; Odin, P; Antonini, A; Martinez-Martin, P

    2015-10-01

    Pain is a key unmet need and a major aspect of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). No specific validated scales exist to identify and grade the various types of pain in PD. We report an international, cross-sectional, open, multicenter, one-point-in-time evaluation with retest study of the first PD-specific pain scale, the King's PD Pain Scale. Its seven domains include 14 items, each item scored by severity (0-3) multiplied by frequency (0-4), resulting in a subscore of 0 to 12, with a total possible score range from 0 to 168. One hundred seventy-eight PD patients with otherwise unexplained pain (age [mean ± SD], 64.38 ± 11.38 y [range, 29-85]; 62.92% male; duration of disease, 5.40 ± 4.93 y) and 83 nonspousal non-PD controls, matched by age (64.25 ± 11.10 y) and sex (61.45% males) were studied. No missing data were noted, and floor effect was observed in all domains. The difference between mean and median King's PD Pain Scale total score was less than 10% of the maximum observed value. Skewness was marginally high (1.48 for patients). Factor analysis showed four factors in the King's PD Pain Scale, explaining 57% of the variance (Kaiser-Mayer-Olkin, 0.73; sphericity test). Cronbach's alpha was 0.78, item-total correlation mean value 0.40, and item homogeneity 0.22. Correlation coefficients of the King's PD Pain Scale domains and total score with other pain measures were high. Correlation with the Scale for Outcomes in PD-Motor, Non-Motor Symptoms Scale total score, and quality of life measures was high. The King's PD Pain Scale seems to be a reliable and valid scale for grade rating of various types of pain in PD.

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Centrality of Pain Scale

    PubMed Central

    Morasco, Benjamin J.; Turk, Dennis C.; Nicolaidis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The Centrality of Pain Scale (COPS) is a recently developed, patient-centered, 10-item self-report measure designed to assess how central, or dominating, individuals with chronic pain perceive pain in their life. The COPS previously underwent initial development and validation, and preliminary results suggested that the measure had excellent psychometric properties and COPS scores were associated with important clinical factors. The purpose of the present study is to examine the psychometric properties of the COPS in a sample of individuals with mixed chronic pain diagnoses (n=178) being treated at a US Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Principal component analysis of COPS items revealed a single factor and all items loaded highly. The COPS had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha=0.902) and was significantly correlated with other measures of pain, mental health, psychological factors associated with pain, and chronic pain coping styles, suggesting convergent and divergent validity. Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated that COPS score was independently associated with both pain severity and interference. Future research should evaluate the generalizability of the COPS in different samples, its responsiveness to treatment, and the extent to which pain centrality may be a focus of non-pharmacological interventions for chronic pain. PMID:25958315

  6. Clinically significant differences in acute pain measured on self-report pain scales in children

    PubMed Central

    Tsze, Daniel S.; Hirschfeld, Gerrit; von Baeyer, Carl L.; Bulloch, Blake; Dayan, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to determine the minimum and ideal clinically significant differences (MCSD, ICSD) of the Faces Pain Scale–Revised (FPS-R) and the Color Analog Scale (CAS) in children and to identify any differences in these estimates based on patient characteristics. Methods This was a prospective study of children aged 4 to 17 years with acute pain presenting to two urban pediatric emergency departments. Participants self-reported their pain severity using the FPS-R and CAS and qualitatively described their changes in pain. Changes in pain score reported using the FPS-R and CAS that were associated with “a little less” and “much less” pain (MCSD and ICSD, respectively) were identified using a receiver operating characteristic–based method and expressed as raw change score and percent reductions. Estimates of MCSD and ICSD were determined for each category of initial pain severity (mild, moderate, and severe) and patient characteristics (age, sex, and ethnicity). Post hoc exploratory analyses evaluated categories of race, primary language, and etiology of pain. Results A total of 314 children with acute pain were enrolled; mean (±SD) age was 9.8 (±3.8) years. The FPS-R raw change score and percent reduction MCSD estimates were 2/10 and 25%, with ICSD estimates of 3/10 and 60%. For the CAS, raw change score and percent reduction MCSD estimates were 1/10 and 15%, with ICSD estimates of 2.75/10 and 52%. For both scales, raw change score and percent reduction estimates of the MCSD remained unchanged in children with either moderate or severe pain. For both scales, estimates of ICSD were not stable across categories of initial pain severity. There was no difference in MCSD or ICSD based on age, sex, ethnicity, race, primary language, or etiology of pain. Conclusions The MCSD estimates can be expressed as raw change score and percent reductions for the FPS-R and CAS. These estimates appear stable for children with moderate to severe pain

  7. A multi-scale view of skin thermal pain: from nociception to pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y J; Lu, T J

    2010-02-13

    All biological bodies live in a thermal environment, including the human body, where skin is the interface with a protecting function. When the temperature is out of the normal physiological range, skin fails to protect, and the pain sensation is evoked. Furthermore, in medicine, with advances in laser, microwave and similar technologies, various thermal therapeutic methods have been widely used to cure disease/injury involving skin tissue. However, the corresponding problem of pain relief has limited further application and development of these thermal treatments. Skin thermal pain is induced through both direct (i.e. an increase/decrease in temperature) and indirect (e.g. thermomechanical and thermochemical) ways, and is governed by complicated thermomechanical-chemical-neurophysiological responses. However, a complete understanding of the underlying mechanisms is still far from clear. In this article, starting from an engineering perspective, we aim to recast the biological behaviour of skin in engineering system parlance. Then, by coupling the concepts of engineering with established methods in neuroscience, we attempt to establish multi-scale modelling of skin thermal pain through ion channel to pain sensation. The model takes into account skin morphological plausibility, the thermomechanical response of skin tissue and the biophysical and neurological mechanisms of pain sensation.

  8. The Experience of Cognitive Intrusion of Pain: scale development and validation

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Nina; Crombez, Geert; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic pain often report their cognition to be impaired by pain, and this observation has been supported by numerous studies measuring the effects of pain on cognitive task performance. Furthermore, cognitive intrusion by pain has been identified as one of 3 components of pain anxiety, alongside general distress and fear of pain. Although cognitive intrusion is a critical characteristic of pain, no specific measure designed to capture its effects exists. In 3 studies, we describe the initial development and validation of a new measure of pain interruption: the Experience of Cognitive Intrusion of Pain (ECIP) scale. In study 1, the ECIP scale was administered to a general population sample to assess its structure and construct validity. In study 2, the factor structure of the ECIP scale was confirmed in a large general population sample experiencing no pain, acute pain, or chronic pain. In study 3, we examined the predictive value of the ECIP scale in pain-related disability in fibromyalgia patients. The ECIP scale scores followed a normal distribution with good variance in a general population sample. The scale had high internal reliability and a clear 1-component structure. It differentiated between chronic pain and control groups, and it was a significant predictor of pain-related disability over and above pain intensity. Repairing attentional interruption from pain may become a novel target for pain management interventions, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic. PMID:26067388

  9. A Review of Observational Pain Scales in Nonverbal Elderly with Cognitive Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Juyoung; Castellanos-Brown, Karen; Belcher, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Pain assessment for nonverbal older adults with cognitive impairments or dementia presents many challenges, and it is important to determine which scales are most useful in assessing pain among this population. Method: In this review 11 observational scales for assessment of pain in older adults with dementia or cognitive impairments…

  10. RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING SCALE OF THE KNEE OUTCOME SURVEY AND NUMERIC PAIN RATING SCALE IN PATIENTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Sara R.; Gil, Alexandra B.; Moore, Charity G.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess internal and external responsiveness of the Activity of Daily Living Scale of the Knee Outcome Survey and Numeric Pain Rating Scale on patients with patellofemoral pain. Design One group pre-post design. Subjects A total of 60 individuals with patellofemoral pain (33 women; mean age 29.9 (standard deviation 9.6) years). Methods The Activity of Daily Living Scale and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale were assessed before and after 8 weeks of physical therapy program. Patients completed a global rating of change scale at the end of therapy. The standardized effect size, Guyatt responsiveness index, and the minimum clinical important difference were calculated. Results Standardized effect size of the Activity of Daily Living Scale was 0.63, Guyatt responsiveness index was 1.4, area under the curve was 0.83 (95% confidence interval: 0.72, 0.94), and the minimum clinical important difference corresponded to an increase of 7.1 percentile points. Standardized effect size of the Numeric Pain Rating Scale was 0.72, Guyatt responsiveness index was 2.2, area under the curve was 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.70, 0.92), and the minimum clinical important difference corresponded to a decrease of 1.16 points. Conclusion Information from this study may be helpful to therapists when evaluating the effectiveness of rehabilitation intervention on physical function and pain, and to power future clinical trials on patients with patellofemoral pain. PMID:19229444

  11. Factorial Structure of the Pain Rehabilitation Expectations Scale: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheing, Gladys L. Y.; Lai, Amy K. M.; Vong, Sinfia K. S.; Chan, Fong H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the preliminary validation results for the Pain Rehabilitation Expectations Scale (PRES). The PRES is a clinical tool developed to measure the expectations about rehabilitation treatment and outcome for people with back pain. Fifty people with chronic back pain were recruited from 11 physiotherapy outpatient…

  12. Test--retest stability of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia in chronic pain over a longer period of time.

    PubMed

    Lamé, Inge E; Peters, Madelon L; Kessels, Alfons G; Van Kleef, Maarten; Patijn, Jacob

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the test-retest stability of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and their subscales in chronic pain patients over relatively long period of times like those that are most often seen in clinical practice. Fifty non-malignant chronic pain patients filled out the PCS and TSK twice with a mean interval between testing of 52 days. Both assessment instruments showed sufficient test-retest stability, even with long time intervals between testing.

  13. Validation of the English version of the UNESP-Botucatu multidimensional composite pain scale for assessing postoperative pain in cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A scale validated in one language is not automatically valid in another language or culture. The purpose of this study was to validate the English version of the UNESP-Botucatu multidimensional composite pain scale (MCPS) to assess postoperative pain in cats. The English version was developed using translation, back-translation, and review by individuals with expertise in feline pain management. In sequence, validity and reliability tests were performed. Results Of the three domains identified by factor analysis, the internal consistency was excellent for ‘pain expression’ and ‘psychomotor change’ (0.86 and 0.87) but not for ‘physiological variables’ (0.28). Relevant changes in pain scores at clinically distinct time points (e.g., post-surgery, post-analgesic therapy), confirmed the construct validity and responsiveness (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.001). Favorable correlation with the IVAS scores (p < 0.001) and moderate to very good agreement between blinded observers and ‘gold standard’ evaluations, supported criterion validity. The cut-off point for rescue analgesia was > 7 (range 0–30 points) with 96.5% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity. Conclusions The English version of the UNESP-Botucatu-MCPS is a valid, reliable and responsive instrument for assessing acute pain in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy, when used by anesthesiologists or anesthesia technicians. The cut-off point for rescue analgesia provides an additional tool for guiding analgesic therapy. PMID:23867090

  14. Is it possible to objectify the visual pain scale?

    PubMed Central

    Ergin, Mehmet; Girisgin, Abdullah Sadik; Dundar, Zerrin Defne; Calik, Goknil Saniye; Ertas, Izzetin; Egici, Mehmet Taskin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To test our hypothesis that a new modified VAS (mVAS) is superior and more objective than VAS in evaluating pain perception and treatment response between genders who have renal colic pain. Methods: The individuals in patient and control groups were first asked to mark the pain perceived during access of IV line (VASIV score). Then the patients with renal colic were asked to mark the pain they experienced before treatment (VASRC score) and at 15 and 30 minutes after the administration of the first analgesic drug. The modified VAS scores (mVAS score) were obtained by subtracting the VASIV score from VASRC score. Results: When VAS was used, the female patients had significantly higher level of pain at 0, 15, and 30th minutes than men (p = 0.012, p = 0.001, and p = 0.003, respectively). However, there was not any significant difference at 0 and 30th min between sexes while female patients had significantly higher level of pain scores only at 15th minute according to mVAS scores (p = 0.027). Conclusion: We think that the mVAS is superior and more objective than VAS in evaluating pain perception and abolished the difference in the perceived level of pain due to gender. PMID:26870129

  15. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Nai-Huan; Yang, Yen; Lee, Ming Shinn; Dalal, Koustuv; Smith, Graeme D

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS) and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT) for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments. PMID:27695360

  16. Pain catastrophizing in children with chronic pain and their parents: proposed clinical reference points and reexamination of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale measure.

    PubMed

    Pielech, Melissa; Ryan, Maggie; Logan, Deirdre; Kaczynski, Karen; White, Matthew T; Simons, Laura E

    2014-11-01

    The current study aimed to validate the child and parent pain catastrophizing scale in a large chronic pain sample and to identify child pain catastrophizing clinical reference points. Patients and parents (n=697) evaluated at a pediatric pain program completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, child (PCS-C) and parent (PCS-P) reports, along with additional measures of psychological functioning. The measure's psychometric properties were examined, as were relations across demographic, pain, and psychological characteristics and pain catastrophizing. Clinical reference points were identified for the PCS-C from differences in pain catastrophizing across levels of disability, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. Overall, we did not find support for the hypothesized 3-dimension structure, and we recommend potentially removing items 7 and 8 for both the PCS-P and PCS-C as a result of floor/ceiling effects. The 11-item PCS-C is most parsimonious as a unitary construct, while the 11-item PCS-P comprises 2 factors. Although parent catastrophizing was significantly associated with child outcomes after controlling for pain level, it was no longer significant when accounting for child catastrophizing. When comparing PCS-C scores based on child outcomes, significant differences emerged for low, moderate, and high catastrophizing levels. It appears that the influence of parent catastrophizing on outcomes can be explained through its impact on child catastrophizing levels. PCS-C reference points derived from this large sample can aid clinicians in assessment and treatment planning, in turn increasing the utility of the PCS-C for both clinical and research purposes.

  17. Relationship between electrodiagnostic severity and neuropathic pain assessed by the LANSS pain scale in carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gürsoy, Azize Esra; Kolukısa, Mehmet; Yıldız, Gülsen Babacan; Kocaman, Gülşen; Çelebi, Arif; Koçer, Abdülkadir

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of neuropathic pain assessed by the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) scale and electrophysiological findings in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We studied 124 hands with idiopathic CTS with pain complaints involving hand and wrist. All hands were assessed by the LANSS with which a score of 12 or more is defined as pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms. These hands were assigned to minimal, mild, moderate, severe, or extreme severe groups according to the results of the median nerve conduction studies. Results A LANSS score ≥ 12, suggestive of pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms, was defined in 59 (47.6%) CTS hands. Pain intensity was significantly higher in CTS hands with a LANSS score ≥ 12 (P < 0.001). Among electrophysiological findings, compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly lower in hands with a LANSS score ≥ 12 compared with hands with a LANSS score < 12 (P = 0.020). Severity of CTS was not significantly different between LANSS ≥ 12 and LANSS < 12 groups. Electrophysiological severity was significantly higher in CTS hands with evoked pain (P = 0.005) and allodynia (P < 0.001) in LANSS subscore analysis. Conclusion We suggest that the presence of pain dominated by neuropathic mechanisms in CTS is not related to electrophysiological CTS severity. Neuropathic pain should be assessed carefully in patients with CTS, and an appropriate treatment plan should be chosen, taking into account the clinical and electrophysiological findings together with the true pain classification. PMID:23326196

  18. Cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain on the visual analogue scale for pain in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Anne M; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R; Balk, Gerlof A; Stewart, Roy E

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to find the cut-off points on the visual analogue scale (VAS) to distinguish among mild, moderate, and severe pain, in relation to the following: pain-related interference with functioning; verbal description of the VAS scores; and latent class analysis for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. A total of 456 patients were included. Pain was assessed using the VAS and verbal rating scale; functioning was assessed using the domains of the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36). Eight cut-off point schemes were tested using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), ordinal logistic regression, and latent class analysis. The study results showed that VAS scores ⩽ 3.4 corresponded to mild interference with functioning, whereas 3.5 to 6.4 implied moderate interference, and ⩾ 6.5 implied severe interference. VAS scores ⩽ 3.4 were best described for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain as mild pain, 3.5 to 7.4 as moderate pain, and ⩾ 7.5 as severe pain. Latent class analysis found that a 3-class solution fitted best, resulting in the classes 0.1 to 3.8, 3.9 to 5.7, and 5.8 to 10 cm. Findings from our study agree with those of some other studies, although many other studies found different optimal cut-off point schemes. As there appear to be no universally accepted cut-off points, and in view of the low-to-moderate associations between VAS scores and functioning and between VAS and verbal rating scale scores, the correct classification of VAS scores as mild, moderate. or severe in clinical practice seems doubtful.

  19. Developing a comparative scale of different nociceptive and neuropathic pain through two psychophysical methods.

    PubMed

    Hortense, Priscilla; Sousa, Fátima Aparecida Emm Faleiros

    2009-01-01

    The general aim of this study was to create a comparative scale of different types of pain through different psychophysical methods and different samples. The psychophysical methods used were magnitude estimation and category estimation. The participants were 30 patients from different outpatient clinics, 30 physicians and 30 nurses. The results were: 1) cancer pain, myocardial infarction pain, renal colic, burn-injury pain, and labor pain were considered more intense, regardless of the psychophysical method used or sample studied; 2) The ranking of different pain intensities, comparing the different psychophysical methods used, resulted in significant agreement levels with Kendal values close to 1.00; 3) There were divergences in the perception of the intensities of some types of pain. These divergences were especially observed between professionals and patients.

  20. Validity of Three Rating Scales for Measuring Pain Intensity in Youths with Physical Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Jordi; Castarlenas, Elena; de la Vega, Rocío; Solé, Ester; Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Jensen, Mark P.; Engel, Joyce M.; Racine, Mélanie

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence confirming that youths with physical disabilities are at risk for chronic pain. Although many scales for assessing pain intensity exist, it is unclear whether they are all equally suitable for youths. The aim of this study was to address this knowledge gap by comparing the validity of the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS-11), the Wong Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale (FACES), and a 6-point categorical Verbal Rating Scale (VRS-6) for assessing pain intensity among youths (aged 8 to 20) with physical disabilities. Methods One hundred and thirteen youths (mean age= 14.19 years; SD = 2.9) were interviewed and asked to rate their current pain intensity and recalled (in the past week) worst, least, and average pain with the NRS-11 and the FACES. Participants were also asked to rate their average pain intensity during the past 4 weeks using a VRS-6, and were administered measures assessing pain interference, disability and psychological functioning. Results Analyses showed that all of the pain intensity measures were associated positively with each other. Nevertheless, the NRS-11 appeared to out-perform both the VRS-6 and in particular the FACES scale with respect to: (1) the associations with the validity criterion (i.e., pain interference, disability and psychological functioning) and (2) a lack of any moderating effect of age on the association between the measure and the criterion variables. Conclusions The findings support the validity of the NRS-11 for assessing pain intensity in youths with physical disabilities between the ages of 8 and 20 years. PMID:25833415

  1. How many response levels do children distinguish on faces scales for pain assessment?

    PubMed

    Decruynaere, Céline; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Plaghki, Léon

    2009-07-01

    Faces scales are one of the most commonly used instruments to assess pain intensity in children. Most available faces scales present five to seven faces. The present research was conducted to investigate the ability of 4- to 7-year-old children to distinguish the response categories of different faces scales. In the first study, 121 children were asked to rate painful situations on a 3- and a 6-level faces scale commencing with a smiling 'no pain' face. Children were divided into two age groups (4-5 and 6-7 years). Investigations of the category functioning were performed with a rating scale Rasch model for each age group. Results revealed the low performances of the 6-level faces scale as compared to the 3-level faces scale and also the difficulty children experienced in scoring the imaginary painfulness of items. Consequently, a second study was conducted. In this second study, 76 children were asked to rate pictures depicting painful situations on a 3-level faces scale beginning with a neutral 'no pain' face. Results of this second study confirmed an improvement in the ability to distinguish the three response categories with age. The 4-5 year-old children could only distinguish two response categories and the 6-7 year-old children were able to discern the three levels of the 3-level faces scale. In conclusion, young children do not distinguish as many faces as proposed by the majority of available faces scales. These results strongly recommend a reduction in the number of response levels of faces scales for pain assessment in children.

  2. The Utility of the Faces Pain Scale in the Assessment of Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Its Relation with Quality of Life and Psychologic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Sebnem Koldas; Ay, Saime; Oztuna, Derya; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Evcik, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the utility of the vertical Faces Pain Scale (FPS) in the assessment of pain in stroke patients using the shoulder pain model and to assess its utility in the Turkish patient population. The secondary aim was to analyze the association of FPS with the quality of life and depression in the study population.…

  3. [Pain scale: implementation for patients in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Keller, Clarissa; Paixão, Adriana; Moraes, Maria Antonieta; Rabelo, Eneida Rejane; Goldmeier, Silvia

    2013-06-01

    A clinical intervention study was developed in a hospital specialized in cardiology in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, with the objective of evaluating the implementation of the pain scale in post-operative cardiac surgery patients. It was developed in four steps: pre-test on pain, training lecture for nursing staff, and, reapplication of the pre-test at 30 and 60 days. The test consisted of ten questions weighing one point each. Scores > or =7 were determined to represent satisfactory knowledge in using the pain scale. The sample consisted of 57 nursing professionals. The scores ranged from 6.12 +/- 1.65 in the pre-test to 7.73 +/- 1.05 and 8.18 +/- 0.99 after 30 and 60 days, respectively (p<0.005). Pain intensity was correlated to medication standardized by protocol. The training improved the knowledge of the team and the type of analgesia administered in relation to pain intensity.

  4. EDIN Scale Implemented by Gestational Age for Pain Assessment in Preterms: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, F.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Chronic neonatal pain can lead to long-term adverse effects on the immature brain. EDIN scale for prolonged pain might not be fully suitable for premature infants. We aimed to test a modified EDIN scale, adding postmenstrual age (PMA) as a sixth item (EDIN6). Methods. In a two-phase prospective study, pain was assessed in all neonates admitted in our NICU. In T1 EDIN was applied; in T2 EDIN6 with additional scores of 2, 1, and 0, respectively, for 25–32, 33–37, and >37 weeks PCA was tested. Scores > 6 suggested pain. The nursing staff was given a questionnaire to evaluate EDIN and EDIN6. Results. A total of 15960 pain assessments were recorded (8693 in T1; 7267 in T2). With EDIN6, cumulative detection of pain almost tripled (117/7267 versus 52/8693, p = 0.001). Main differences were found among less mature categories (50/1472 versus 17/1734, p = 0.001 in PCA 25–32; 26/2606 versus 10/4335, p = 0.001 in PMA 33–37; 41/3189 versus 25/2624, p = 0.26 in PMA > 37). Adequacy of pain assessment in lower PMA was judged “medium-high” in 13,4% of nurses in T1 and 71,4% in T2. Conclusions. EDIN6 may allow improved evaluation of pain in preterm infants. PMID:28271074

  5. The Development and Psychometric Validation of an Arabic-Language Version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Souha

    2017-01-01

    Context. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) is the most widely used measure of pain-specific catastrophizing. Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to develop and psychometrically evaluate an Arabic-language version of the PCS. Methods. In Study 1, 150 adult chronic nonmalignant pain patients seeking treatment at a hospital setting completed the PCS-A and a number of self-report measures assessing clinical parameters of pain, symptoms of depression, and quality of life. Study 2 employed a cold pressor pain task to examine the PCS-A in a sample of 44 healthy university students. Results. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a two-factor structure. Confirmatory factor analysis comparing the 2-factor model, Sullivan's original 3-factor model, and a 1-factor model based on the total score all provided adequate fit to the data. Cronbach's alpha coefficients across all models met or exceeded accepted standards of reliability. Catastrophizing was associated with higher levels of depression and increased pain intensity and interference. Catastrophizing predicted decreased quality of life, even after controlling for the contribution of gender, employment, depression, and pain interference. PCS-A scores were positively correlated with heightened experimental pain severity and decreased pain tolerance. Conclusion. The present results provide strong support for the psychometric properties of the PCS-A. PMID:28190958

  6. The Development and Psychometric Validation of an Arabic-Language Version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale.

    PubMed

    Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad; Fares, Souha; French, Douglas J

    2017-01-01

    Context. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) is the most widely used measure of pain-specific catastrophizing. Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to develop and psychometrically evaluate an Arabic-language version of the PCS. Methods. In Study 1, 150 adult chronic nonmalignant pain patients seeking treatment at a hospital setting completed the PCS-A and a number of self-report measures assessing clinical parameters of pain, symptoms of depression, and quality of life. Study 2 employed a cold pressor pain task to examine the PCS-A in a sample of 44 healthy university students. Results. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a two-factor structure. Confirmatory factor analysis comparing the 2-factor model, Sullivan's original 3-factor model, and a 1-factor model based on the total score all provided adequate fit to the data. Cronbach's alpha coefficients across all models met or exceeded accepted standards of reliability. Catastrophizing was associated with higher levels of depression and increased pain intensity and interference. Catastrophizing predicted decreased quality of life, even after controlling for the contribution of gender, employment, depression, and pain interference. PCS-A scores were positively correlated with heightened experimental pain severity and decreased pain tolerance. Conclusion. The present results provide strong support for the psychometric properties of the PCS-A.

  7. Effects of stress on pain in horses and incorporating pain scales for equine practice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ann E

    2010-12-01

    The stress response represents an animal's attempt to reestablish the body's homeostasis after injury, intense physical activity, or psychological strain. Two different neuroendocrine pathways may be activated in stressful situations: the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, leading to increased cortisol levels, and the sympathoadrenomedullar system, leading to increased catecholamine levels. By applying some of the evaluation methods described in this article in the appropriate clinical situations, equine veterinarians can almost certainly improve their ability to recognize and manage pain in horses.

  8. Use of the Faces Pain Scale by left and right hemispheric stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Benaim, Charles; Froger, Jerome; Cazottes, Claire; Gueben, Delphine; Porte, Melanie; Desnuelle, Claude; Pelissier, Jacques Yvon

    2007-03-01

    No pain scale is available for stroke patients due to the presence of language or cognitive disorders. However, the Faces Pain Scale (FPS), which was initially developed for children, has been used with success in adults with cognitive impairments. The aim of this study is to test whether the FPS could be used in left or right hemispheric stroke patients (LHSP, RHSP). One hundred twenty-seven stoke patients and 21 controls were recruited in 2 rehabilitation units. Construct validity of FPS was assessed by rating and ranking facial expressions. FPS was correlated to a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and to a Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) for the assessment of shoulder pain. Reliability was determined by test-retest procedures. Performances of RHSP in the ranking and rating procedures were very poor compared to LHSP and to controls. However, in the assessment of patients' shoulder pain, FPS scores were highly correlated with VAS and VRS in both stroke groups (r=0.65-0.82, p<10(-3)). FPS was more reliable in LHSP than in RHSP. It was preferred to VAS and VRS in LHSP, while in RHSP VAS was the preferred scale. The present study provides preliminary support for the validity and the reliability of FPS in LHSP. However, we do not recommend its sole use in stroke patients. Further studies are needed to determine whether FPS can be used in stroke patients for assessing changes in severity of pain over time.

  9. Using the mouse grimace scale and behaviour to assess pain in CBA mice following vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Amy L; Kitson, Gemma L; Skalkoyannis, Benjamin; Flecknell, Paul A; Leach, Matthew C

    2016-08-01

    Mice used in biomedical research should have pain reduced to an absolute minimum through refinement of procedures or by the provision of appropriate analgesia. Vasectomy is a common and potentially painful surgical procedure carried out on male mice to facilitate the production of genetically modified mice. The aim of our study was to determine if 0.05 mg/kg buprenorphine would ameliorate pain associated changes following abdominal vasectomy and to determine if the mouse grimace scale is an appropriate tool for the assessment of pain in this model. Eight male CBA mice underwent abdominal vasectomy as part of a genetically modified mouse-breeding programme. Here we assessed pain using a previously validated behaviour-based method and the mouse grimace scale. All mice received buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) pre-surgery. Behaviour and grimace scores were compared between baseline (pre-surgery), 30 min, 5 h, 24 h and 25 h post surgery. Following 24 h post-op, all mice were administered 5 mg/kg meloxicam (s.c.) as additional analgesia. Significant increases in specific pain behaviours and mouse grimace scale score were found 30 min post surgery. At 5 h post surgery, scores were returning to baseline levels. Frequency of rearing was significantly decreased at both 30 min and 5 h post surgery compared to baseline, demonstrating a longer lasting change in normal exploratory behaviour. Buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg) was ineffective at ameliorating these pain-associated changes in CBA mice and should be considered inadequate at this dose. By 24 h post surgery, pain associated behaviours, grimace scale and rearing had all returned to baseline levels. There was no change in pain behaviours or MGS following administration of meloxicam indicating that an additional dose of meloxicam does not appear to offer benefit at this point. Using the mouse grimace scale to assess pain in mice, appeared to be effective in the immediate post vasectomy period in CBA mice

  10. Clinical monitoring scales in acute brain injury: assessment of coma, pain, agitation, and delirium.

    PubMed

    Riker, Richard R; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2014-12-01

    Serial clinical examination represents the most fundamental and basic form of neurological monitoring, and is often the first and only form of such monitoring in patients. Even in patients subjected to physiological monitoring using a range of technologies, the clinical examination remains an essential tool to follow neurological progress. Key aspects of the clinical examination have now been systematized into scoring schemes, and address consciousness, pain, agitation, and delirium (PAD). The Glasgow Coma Scale has been the traditional tool to measure consciousness, but the full outline of unresponsiveness (FOUR) score has recently been validated in a variety of settings, and at present, both represent clinically useful tools. Assessment of PAD in neurologically compromised patients present special challenges. For pain, the Numeric Rating Scale is the preferred initial approach, with either the Behavioral Pain Scale or the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool in subjects who are not able to respond. The Nociception Coma Scale-Revised may be useful in patients with severe disorders of consciousness. Conventional sedation scoring tools for critical care, such as the Richmond Area Sedation Scale (RASS) and Sedation-Agitation Scale (SAS) may provide reasonable tools in some neurocritical care patients. The use of sedative drugs and neuromuscular blockers may invalidate the use of some clinical examination tools in others. The use of sedation interruption to assess neurological status can result in physiological derangement in unstable patients (such as those with uncontrolled intracranial hypertension), and is not recommended.

  11. Use of the Rat Grimace Scale to Evaluate Neuropathic Pain in a Model of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Philips, Blythe H; Weisshaar, Christine L; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2017-02-01

    Although neck and low-back pain are common sources of neuropathic pain with high societal costs, the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is not well-defined. Traditionally, most rodent pain studies rely on evoked reflex-based testing to measure pain. However, these testing methods do not reveal spontaneous pain, particularly early after injury. The rat grimace scale (RGS) for quantifying spontaneous pain has been validated after visceral, incisional, orthopedic, and inflammatory insults but not neuropathic pain. The current study used a rat model of radiculopathy to investigate the time course of RGS, the effect of the NSAID meloxicam on RGS, and the reliability and consistency of RGS across testers. RGS values at baseline and at 3, 6, 24, and 48 h after cervical nerve root compression (NRC) that induced robust evoked pain responses were compared with those obtained after sham surgery. The RGS was also evaluated at 6 h after NRC in another set of rats that had received meloxicam treatment prior to surgery. At 6 h, NRC induced higher RGS scores (1.27 ± 0.18) than did sham surgery (0.93 ± 0.20), and scores remained above baseline for as long as 48 h. Treatment with meloxicam before NRC reduced RGS at 6 h to sham levels, which were lower than those of injury without treatment. The RGS was associated with very good interobserver reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.91) and excellent internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.87). These findings suggest that RGS is a useful approach to identifying and monitoring acute neuropathic pain in rats.

  12. The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia and neck pain, disability and range of motion: a narrative review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) that was developed in 1990 is a 17 item scale originally developed to measure the fear of movement related to chronic lower back pain. Objective: To review the literature regarding TSK and neck pain, perceived disability and range of motion of the cervical spine. Methods: Medline, MANTIS, Index to Chiropractic Literature and CINAHL were searched. Results: A total of 16 related articles were found and divided into four categories: TSK and Neck Pain; TSK, Neck Pain and Disability; TSK, Neck Pain, Disability and Strength; and TSK, Neck Pain and Surface Electromyography. Conclusion: The fear avoidance model can be applied to neck pain sufferers and there is value from a psychometric perspective in using the TSK to assess kinesiophobia. Future research should investigate if, and to what extent, other measureable factors commonly associated with neck pain, such as decreased range of motion, correlate with kinesiophobia. PMID:21886284

  13. Development and validation of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Anaïs; Bourgault, Patricia; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Courtemanche-Harel, Roxanne; Choinière, Manon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perceived self-efficacy is a non-negligible outcome when measuring the impact of self-management interventions for chronic pain patients. However, no validated, chronic pain-specific self-efficacy scales exist for studies conducted with French-speaking populations. OBJECTIVES: To establish the validity of the use of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (FC-CPSES) among chronic pain patients. METHODS: The Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale is a validated 33-item self-administered questionnaire that measures perceived self-efficacy to perform self-management behaviours, manage chronic disease in general and achieve outcomes (a six-item version is also available). This scale was adapted to the context of chronic pain patients following cross-cultural adaptation guidelines. The FC-CPSES was administered to 109 fibromyalgia and 34 chronic low back pain patients (n=143) who participated in an evidence-based self-management intervention (the PASSAGE program) offered in 10 health care centres across the province of Quebec. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients (α) were calculated to determine the internal consistency of the 33- and six-item versions of the FC-CPSES. With regard to convergent construct validity, the association between the FC-CPSES baseline scores and related clinical outcomes was examined. With regard to the scale’s sensitivity to change, pre- and postintervention FC-CPSES scores were compared. RESULTS: Internal consistency was high for both versions of the FC-CPSES (α=0.86 to α=0.96). Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with higher mental health-related quality of life and lower pain intensity and catastrophizing (P<0.05), supporting convergent validity of the scale. There was a statistically significant increase in FC-CPSES scores between pre- and postintervention measures for both versions of the FC-CPSES (P<0.003), which supports their sensitivity to clinical change during an intervention. CONCLUSIONS: These

  14. Development of the Pain-Related Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep (PBAS) Scale for the Assessment and Treatment of Insomnia Comorbid with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Afolalu, Esther F.; Moore, Corran; Ramlee, Fatanah; Goodchild, Claire E.; Tang, Nicole K.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep is a cognitive-behavioral factor central to the development and perpetuation of insomnia. Previous works to unravel the complex interrelationship between pain and insomnia have not explored the role of inflexible beliefs about the sleep-pain interaction, possibly due to a lack of a valid instrument for doing so. The current study evaluated the psychometric and functional properties of a 10-item Pain-Related Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep (PBAS) scale. Methods: The PBAS scale was administered to four clinical samples of chronic pain patients with comorbid insomnia: to examine the scale's psychometric properties (n = 137), test-retest reliability (n = 26), sensitivity to treatment (n = 20), and generalizability (n = 62). All participants completed the PBAS together with validated measures of pain interference, insomnia severity, and cognitive-behavioral processes hypothesized to underpin insomnia. Results: The PBAS scale was found to be reliable, with adequate internal consistency and temporal stability. Factor analysis suggested a 2-factor solution representing beliefs about “pain as the primary cause of insomnia” and the “inevitable consequences of insomnia on pain and coping.” The PBAS total score was positively correlated with scores from the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) scale, Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep (DBAS) scale, and the Anxiety and Preoccupation about Sleep Questionnaire (APSQ). It was a significant predictor of insomnia severity and pain interference. A significant reduction in PBAS was also observed in patients after receiving a hybrid cognitive-behavioral intervention for both pain and insomnia. Conclusions: Pain-related sleep beliefs appear to be an integral part of chronic pain patients' insomnia experience. The PBAS is a valid and reliable instrument for evaluating the role of these beliefs in chronic pain patients. Citation: Afolalu EF, Moore C, Ramlee

  15. Hysteria Scale Elevations in Low Back Pain Patients: A Risk Factor for Misdiagnosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Charles K.

    1986-01-01

    Examined the nature of elevations on the Hysteria scale of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in low back pain patients. Subscales reflecting somatic complaints were more powerful predictors of diagnostic status than were subscales with nonsomatic content. Overlapping and nonoverlapping items on the Hysteria and Hypochondriasis scales…

  16. Pain intensity assessment: a comparison of selected pain intensity scales for use in cognitively intact and cognitively impaired African American older adults.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Laurie Jowers; Herr, Keela

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of selected pain intensity scales including the Faces Pain Scale (FPS), the Verbal Description Scale, the Numeric Rating Scale, and the Iowa Pain Thermometer to assess pain in cognitively impaired minority older adults. A descriptive correlational design was used, and a convenience sample of 57 volunteers age 58 and older residing in the South was recruited for this study. The sample consisted of 8 males and 49 females with a mean age of 76. Fifty-nine percent of the sample completed an 11th grade education or less, and 59% completed high school or college. Seventy-seven percent (n = 44) of the sample scored 24 or less on the mental status exam, indicating some degree of cognitive impairment. The remaining 23% (n = 13) were cognitively intact. All of the participants were able to use each of the scales to rate their pain. Concurrent validity of the scales was supported with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from.74 to.83 in the cognitively impaired group and.81 to.96 in the cognitively intact group. Test-retest reliability at a 2-week interval was acceptable in the cognitively intact group (Spearman rank correlations ranged from.73 to.83) and to a lesser degree in the cognitively impaired group (correlations ranged from.52 to.79). When asked about scale preference, both the cognitively impaired and the intact group indicated a preference for the FPS. Findings from this study suggest that cognitive impairment did not inhibit older minority participants' ability to use a variety of pain intensity scales. Additionally, options should be provided that address individual needs of older adults considering specific cognitive level and disability, education, gender, ethnicity, and cultural influences concerning perceptions of the various pain intensity scales.

  17. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Acupuncture Therapy by Verbal Pain Scale in Patients with Abdominal Pain of Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Becel, Sinan; Sezgin, Yılmaz; Akçay, Fatih

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy based on Verbal Pain Scale (VPS) scores in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients admitted to the emergency department with attacks of abdominal pain. This observational study was conducted in Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital between August 2014 and December 2014. Twenty patients admitted to the emergency department with FMF attacks were included in the study. Acupuncture therapy was applied to three points including LI4 (Hegu), ST25 (Tianshu), and Ren12 (Zhongwan). The VPS test was applied to the patients before and after the treatment. Average VPS scores were found to be 8.45±0.75 before the treatment and 2.10±0.85 after the treatment. The difference of the VPS scores before and after treatment was statistically significant (p=0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of FMF attacks. Our results suggest that acupuncture therapy can be used as an effective treatment method in patients with FMF attacks.

  18. Pain assessment in children undergoing venipuncture: the Wong–Baker faces scale versus skin conductance fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Vagliano, Liliana; Ceratto, Simone; Viviani, Fabio; Miniero, Roberto; Ricceri, Fulvio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the subjective Wong–Baker faces pain rating scale (WBFS) and of the objective skin conductance fluctuation (SCF) test in assessing pain in children undergoing venipuncture. One-hundred and fifty children (aged 5–16 years) entered the study. All underwent venipuncture at the antecubital fossa to collect blood specimens for routine testing in the same environmental conditions. After venipuncture, the children indicated their pain intensity using the WBFS, whereas the number of SCFs was recorded before, during and after venipuncture. So, pain level was measured in each child with WBFS and SCF. We found that the level of WBFS-assessed pain was lower in all children, particularly those above 8 years of age, than SCF-assessed pain (p < 0.0001). Moreover, the number of SCFs was significantly higher during venipuncture than before or after venipuncture (p < 0.0001). At multivariate regression analysis, age and previous experience of venipuncture influenced the WBFS (β = −1.81, p < 0.001, and β = −0.86, p < 0.001, respectively) but not SCFs. In conclusion, although both procedures can be useful for research and clinical practice, our findings show that WBFS was affected by age and previous venipuncture, whereas SCF produced uniform data. If verified in other studies, our results should be taken into account when using these tools to evaluate pain in children. PMID:23638373

  19. Pain assessment in elderly with dementia: Brazilian validation of the PACSLAC scale

    PubMed Central

    Thé, Karol Bezerra; Gazoni, Fernanda Martins; Cherpak, Guilherme Liausu; Lorenzet, Isabel Clasen; dos Santos, Luciana Alves; Nardes, Edlene Maria; dos Santos, Fânia Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To validate the Pain Assessment Checklist for Seniors with Limited Ability to Communicate – Portuguese in demented elderly and to analyze its measurement properties. Methods We evaluated 50 elderly with dementia, residing in a nursing home and with limited communication ability, when exposed to potentially painful situations. The tool was applied at two different moments. First, two interviewers applied it simultaneously, and the intensity of pain was asked based on the caregiver’s opinion. After 14 days, with no analgesic intervention, one of the interviewers applied it again. Results The sample comprised more females, aged over 80 years, with dementia due to Alzheimer, presenting musculoskeletal pain of moderate to severe intensity. The psychometric properties of the tool demonstrated appropriate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.827). The scale had excellent reproducibility, according to the intraclass correlation coefficient, and the tool has been duly validated. Conclusion The Pain Assessment Checklist for Seniors with Limited Ability to Communicate – Portuguese had adequate measuring properties for use with elderly presenting limited communication. PMID:27462888

  20. 75 FR 33657 - Submission for Review: Application for 10-Point Veteran Preference, 3206-0001

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Application for 10-Point Veteran Preference, 3206-0001 AGENCY: U.S. Office... for 10-Point Veteran Preference. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until August 13....perryman@opm.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Standard Form (SF) 15, Application for 10-Point...

  1. 75 FR 53001 - Submission for Review: Application for 10-Point Veteran Preference, 3206-0001

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Application for 10-Point Veteran Preference, 3206-0001 AGENCY: U.S. Office... for 10-Point Veterans' Preference. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Standard Form (SF) 15, Application for 10-Point Veterans' Preference, is used...

  2. Development of a simple measurement scale to evaluate the severity of non-specific low back pain for industrial ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yoshiyuki; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Kumashiro, Mashaharu

    2010-06-01

    This study developed an assessment scale that hierarchically classifies degrees of low back pain severity. This assessment scale consists of two subscales: 1) pain intensity; 2) pain interference. First, the assessment scale devised by the authors was used to administer a self-administered questionnaire to 773 male workers in the car manufacturing industry. Subsequently, the validity of the measurement items was examined and some of them were revised. Next, the corrected low back pain scale was used in a self-administered questionnaire, the subjects of which were 5053 ordinary workers. The hierarchical validity between the measurement items was checked based on the results of Mokken Scale analysis. Finally, a low back pain assessment scale consisting of seven items was perfected. Quantitative assessment is made possible by scoring the items and low back pain severity can be classified into four hierarchical levels: none; mild; moderate; severe. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The use of this scale devised by the authors allows a more detailed assessment of the degree of risk factor effect and also should prove useful both in selecting remedial measures for occupational low back pain and evaluating their efficacy.

  3. Nurses assessing pain with the Nociception Coma Scale: interrater reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Vink, Peter; Eskes, Anne Maria; Lindeboom, Robert; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-12-01

    The Nociception Coma Scale (NCS) is a pain observation tool, developed for patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) due to acquired brain injury (ABI). The aim of this study was to assess the interrater reliability of the NCS and NCS-R among nurses for the assessment of pain in ABI patients with DOC. A secondary aim was further validation of both scales by assessing its discriminating abilities for the presence or absence of pain. Hospitalized patients with ABI (n = 10) were recorded on film during three conditions: baseline, after tactile stimulation, and after noxious stimulation. All stimulations were part of daily treatment for these patients. The 30 recordings were assessed with the NCS and NCS-R by 27 nurses from three university hospitals in the Netherlands. Each nurse viewed 9 to 12 recordings, totaling 270 assessments. Interrater reliability of the NCS/NCS-R items and total scores were estimated by intraclass correlations (ICC), which showed excellent and equal average measures reliability for the NCS and NCR-R total scores (ICC 0.95), and item scores (range 0.87-0.95). Secondary analysis was performed to assess differences in ICCs among nurses' education and experience and to assess the scales discriminating properties for the presence of pain. The NCS and NCS-R are valid and reproducible scales that can be used by nurses with an associate (of science) in nursing degree or baccalaureate (of science) in nursing degree. It seems that more experience with ABI patients is not a predictor for good agreement in the assessment of the NCS(-R).

  4. Performance on selected visual and auditory subtests of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition during laboratory-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Etherton, Joseph L; Tapscott, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Although chronic pain patients commonly report problems with concentration and memory, recent research indicates that induced pain alone causes little or no impairment on several Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) subtests, suggesting that cognitive complaints in chronic pain may be attributable to factors other than pain. The current studies examined potential effects of induced pain on Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV) visual working memory index (VWM) subtests (Experiment 1, n = 32) and on the immediate portions of WMS-IV auditory memory (IAM) subtests (Experiment 2, n = 55). In both studies, participants were administered one of two subtests (Symbol Span or Spatial Addition for Experiment 1; Logical Memory or Verbal Paired Associates for Experiment 2) normally and were then administered the alternate subtest while experiencing either cold pressor pain induction or a nonpainful control condition. Results indicate that induced pain in nonclinical volunteers did not impair performance on either VWM or IAM performance, suggesting that pain alone does not account for complaints or deficits in these domains in chronic pain patients. Nonpainful variables such as sleep deprivation or emotional disturbance may be responsible for reported cognitive complaints in chronic pain patients.

  5. Statistical Models for the Analysis of Zero-Inflated Pain Intensity Numeric Rating Scale Data.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Joseph L; Buta, Eugenia; Bathulapalli, Harini; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Brandt, Cynthia A

    2017-03-01

    Pain intensity is often measured in clinical and research settings using the 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (NRS). NRS scores are recorded as discrete values, and in some samples they may display a high proportion of zeroes and a right-skewed distribution. Despite this, statistical methods for normally distributed data are frequently used in the analysis of NRS data. We present results from an observational cross-sectional study examining the association of NRS scores with patient characteristics using data collected from a large cohort of 18,935 veterans in Department of Veterans Affairs care diagnosed with a potentially painful musculoskeletal disorder. The mean (variance) NRS pain was 3.0 (7.5), and 34% of patients reported no pain (NRS = 0). We compared the following statistical models for analyzing NRS scores: linear regression, generalized linear models (Poisson and negative binomial), zero-inflated and hurdle models for data with an excess of zeroes, and a cumulative logit model for ordinal data. We examined model fit, interpretability of results, and whether conclusions about the predictor effects changed across models. In this study, models that accommodate zero inflation provided a better fit than the other models. These models should be considered for the analysis of NRS data with a large proportion of zeroes.

  6. Open-label placebo treatment in chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cláudia; Caetano, Joaquim Machado; Cunha, Lidia; Rebouta, Paula; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Kirsch, Irving

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This randomized controlled trial was performed to investigate whether placebo effects in chronic low back pain could be harnessed ethically by adding open-label placebo (OLP) treatment to treatment as usual (TAU) for 3 weeks. Pain severity was assessed on three 0- to 10-point Numeric Rating Scales, scoring maximum pain, minimum pain, and usual pain, and a composite, primary outcome, total pain score. Our other primary outcome was back-related dysfunction, assessed on the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire. In an exploratory follow-up, participants on TAU received placebo pills for 3 additional weeks. We randomized 97 adults reporting persistent low back pain for more than 3 months' duration and diagnosed by a board-certified pain specialist. Eighty-three adults completed the trial. Compared to TAU, OLP elicited greater pain reduction on each of the three 0- to 10-point Numeric Rating Scales and on the 0- to 10-point composite pain scale (P < 0.001), with moderate to large effect sizes. Pain reduction on the composite Numeric Rating Scales was 1.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.0-2.0) in the OLP group and 0.2 (−0.3 to 0.8) in the TAU group. Open-label placebo treatment also reduced disability compared to TAU (P < 0.001), with a large effect size. Improvement in disability scores was 2.9 (1.7-4.0) in the OLP group and 0.0 (−1.1 to 1.2) in the TAU group. After being switched to OLP, the TAU group showed significant reductions in both pain (1.5, 0.8-2.3) and disability (3.4, 2.2-4.5). Our findings suggest that OLP pills presented in a positive context may be helpful in chronic low back pain. PMID:27755279

  7. Properties of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia across Workers with Different Pain Experiences and Cultural Backgrounds: A Rasch Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, M B; Damsgård, E; Holtermann, A; Anke, A; Søgaard, K; Røe, C

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate whether the construct validity of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) is consistent with respect to its scaling properties, unidimensionality and targeting among workers with different levels of pain. The 311 participating Danish workers reported kinesiophobia by TSK (13 statement version) and number of days with pain during the past year (less than 8 days, less than 90 days and greater than 90 days). A Rasch analysis was used to evaluate the measurement properties of the TSK in the workers across pain levels, ages, genders and ethnicities. The TSK did not fit the Rasch model, but removing one item solved the poorness of fit. Invariance was found across the pain levels, ages and genders. Thus, with a few modifications, the TSK was shown to capture a unidimensional construct of fear of movement in workers with different pain levels, ages, and genders.

  8. Development of the Horse Grimace Scale (HGS) as a Pain Assessment Tool in Horses Undergoing Routine Castration

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Costa, Emanuela; Minero, Michela; Lebelt, Dirk; Stucke, Diana; Canali, Elisabetta; Leach, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment of pain is critical for the welfare of horses, in particular when pain is induced by common management procedures such as castration. Existing pain assessment methods have several limitations, which reduce the applicability in everyday life. Assessment of facial expression changes, as a novel means of pain scoring, may offer numerous advantages and overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a standardised pain scale based on facial expressions in horses (Horse Grimace Scale [HGS]). Methodology/Principal Findings Forty stallions were assigned to one of two treatments and all animals underwent routine surgical castration under general anaesthesia. Group A (n = 19) received a single injection of Flunixin immediately before anaesthesia. Group B (n = 21) received Flunixin immediately before anaesthesia and then again, as an oral administration, six hours after the surgery. In addition, six horses were used as anaesthesia controls (C). These animals underwent non-invasive, indolent procedures, received the same treatment as group A, but did not undergo surgical procedures that could be accompanied with surgical pain. Changes in behaviour, composite pain scale (CPS) scores and horse grimace scale (HGS) scores were assessed before and 8-hours post-procedure. Only horses undergoing castration (Groups A and B) showed significantly greater HGS and CPS scores at 8-hours post compared to pre operatively. Further, maintenance behaviours such as explorative behaviour and alertness were also reduced. No difference was observed between the two analgesic treatment groups. Conclusions The Horse Grimace Scale potentially offers an effective and reliable method of assessing pain following routine castration in horses. However, auxiliary studies are required to evaluate different painful conditions and analgesic schedules. PMID:24647606

  9. Neck Pain and Disability Scale and the Neck Disability Index: reproducibility of the Dutch Language Versions

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Grietje E.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2010-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to translate the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD) from English into Dutch producing the NPAD–Dutch Language Version (DLV). The second aim was to analyze test–retest reliability and agreement of the NPAD–DLV and the Neck Disability Index (NDI)–DLV. The NPAD was translated according to established guidelines. Thirty-four patients (mean age 37.5 years, 68% female) with chronic neck pain (CNP), within an outpatient rehabilitation setting, participated in this study. The NPAD–DLV and the NDI–DLV were filled out twice with a mean test–retest interval of 18 days. The intraclass correlation coefficient of the NPAD–DLV was 0.76 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57–0.87) and of the NDI–DLV 0.84 (95% CI 0.69–0.92). The limits of agreement of the NPAD–DLV and the NDI–DLV were, respectively, ±20.9 (scale 0–100) and ±6.5 (scale 0–50). The reliability of the NPAD–DLV and the NDI–DLV was acceptable for patients with CNP. The variation (‘instability’) in the NPAD–DLV total scores was relatively large and larger than the variation of the NDI–DLV. PMID:20424872

  10. Neck Pain and Disability Scale and the Neck Disability Index: reproducibility of the Dutch Language Versions.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, Wim; de Vries, Grietje E; Geertzen, Jan H B; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Reneman, Michiel F

    2010-10-01

    The first aim of this study was to translate the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD) from English into Dutch producing the NPAD-Dutch Language Version (DLV). The second aim was to analyze test-retest reliability and agreement of the NPAD-DLV and the Neck Disability Index (NDI)-DLV. The NPAD was translated according to established guidelines. Thirty-four patients (mean age 37.5 years, 68% female) with chronic neck pain (CNP), within an outpatient rehabilitation setting, participated in this study. The NPAD-DLV and the NDI-DLV were filled out twice with a mean test-retest interval of 18 days. The intraclass correlation coefficient of the NPAD-DLV was 0.76 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-0.87) and of the NDI-DLV 0.84 (95% CI 0.69-0.92). The limits of agreement of the NPAD-DLV and the NDI-DLV were, respectively, ±20.9 (scale 0-100) and ±6.5 (scale 0-50). The reliability of the NPAD-DLV and the NDI-DLV was acceptable for patients with CNP. The variation ('instability') in the NPAD-DLV total scores was relatively large and larger than the variation of the NDI-DLV.

  11. Reliability and Validity of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale: Applications for Use as an Epidemiologic Screener

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A screening instrument’s ability to provide clinicians with consistent and reproducible information is crucial to intervention. Despite widespread acceptance and clinical use of the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) in orthopedics and sports medicine, few studies have reported on its reliability and no such studies have concentrated on child or adolescent samples exclusively, segments of the population for which this instrument is often used. The purpose of the current study was to describe and report on the reliability and validity of the AKPS for use with high school female athletes participating in interscholastic athletics. The study was a secondary analysis of prospective epidemiologic data using established scale validation methods. The records of 414 female athletes 11.0 to 18.1 years of age (Mean 13.9 yrs, SD = 1.7 yrs) were used for analysis. Four different approaches to scoring and scale reduction of the AKPS were evaluated, including the original, ordinal 13-item form, a modified, ordinal 6-item form, a modified, dichotomous 13-item form, and a modified, dichotomous 6-item form. Three different types of reliability (internal consistency, equivalence across forms, standard error of measurement) and one type of validity (criterion-related) were estimated for the AKPS in the current sample. The four scoring formats of the AKPS scale were found to have high internal consistency (αcoef = 0.83 to 0.91), equivalence across the short and long forms (r = 0.98), acceptable standard errors of measurement (0.82 to 3.00), and moderate to high criterion related validity—as determined by physican’s diagnosis: 0.92 (13-item form), 0.90 (6-item form). The Kujala AKPS is a valid and reliable measure of anterior knee pain and appropriate for use as an epidemiologic screening tool with adolescent female athletes. PMID:27441381

  12. Using the Horse Grimace Scale (HGS) to Assess Pain Associated with Acute Laminitis in Horses (Equus caballus)

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Costa, Emanuela; Stucke, Diana; Dai, Francesca; Minero, Michela; Leach, Matthew C.; Lebelt, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Acute laminitis is a common equine disease characterized by intense foot pain. This work aimed to investigate whether the Horse Grimace Scale (HGS), a facial-expression-based pain coding system, can be usefully applied to assess pain associated with acute laminitis in horses at rest. Ten horses, referred as acute laminitis cases with no prior treatment, were assessed at the admission and at seven days after the initial evaluation and treatment. The authors found that the Horse Grimace Scale is a potentially effective method to assess pain associated with acute laminitis in horses at rest, as horses showing high HGS scores also exhibited higher Obel scores, and veterinarians classified them in a more severe painful state. Abstract Acute laminitis is a common equine disease characterized by intense foot pain, both acutely and chronically. The Obel grading system is the most widely accepted method for describing the severity of laminitis by equine practitioners, however this method requires movement (walk and trot) of the horse, causing further intense pain. The recently developed Horse Grimace Scale (HGS), a facial-expression-based pain coding system, may offer a more effective means of assessing the pain associated with acute laminitis. The aims of this study were: to investigate whether HGS can be usefully applied to assess pain associated with acute laminitis in horses at rest, and to examine if scoring HGS using videos produced similar results as those obtained from still images. Ten horses, referred as acute laminitis cases with no prior treatment, were included in the study. Each horse was assessed using the Obel and HGS (from images and videos) scales: at the admission (before any treatment) and at seven days after the initial evaluation and treatment. The results of this study suggest that HGS is a potentially effective method to assess pain associated with acute laminitis in horses at rest, as horses showing high HGS scores also exhibited

  13. Validation of a Quality of Life Scale for Women with Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M.; Suttorp, Marika J.; Elliott, Marc N.; Clemens, J. Quentin; Berry, Sandra H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To validate a disease-specific scale to measure impact of symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), a condition that affects up to 6.5% of U.S. women. Methods Participants were drawn from the RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology Study (RICE), a telephone probability survey of 146,231 U.S. households. Women who met RICE BPS/IC symptom criteria (n=3,397) completed the 6 -item RAND Bladder Symptom Impact scale (RICE BSI-6). The RICE BSI-6 was adapted from a scale used to assess impact of diabetes on life and sexuality, and modified based on expert input on face validity and focus group work; items specific to diabetic symptoms were eliminated. Validated scales of symptom severity, mental-and physical -health-related QoL, depression, coping, and perceived control were used to assess convergent validity. Results The RICE BSI-6 (α=.92) was significantly related to greater symptom severity, worse general mental and physical health-related QoL, more severe depression symptoms, and lower perceived control over life in general and over BPS/IC symptoms (p-values<.05). It was also associated with less use of distancing coping (p<.05). Conclusion The RICE BSI-6 shows excellent internal consistency and strong convergent validity. It can be used to examine effects of psychosocial and treatment interventions on QoL among women with BPS/IC. PMID:22146841

  14. Orofacial Pain during Mastication in People with Dementia: Reliability Testing of the Orofacial Pain Scale for Non-Verbal Individuals.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Merlijn W; Visscher, Corine; Delwel, Suzanne; van der Steen, Jenny T; Pieper, Marjoleine J C; Scherder, Erik J A; Achterberg, Wilco P; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to establish the reliability of the "chewing" subscale of the OPS-NVI, a novel tool designed to estimate presence and severity of orofacial pain in nonverbal patients. Methods. The OPS-NVI consists of 16 items for observed behavior, classified into four categories and a subjective estimate of pain. Two observers used the OPS-NVI for 237 video clips of people with dementia in Dutch nursing homes during their meal to observe their behavior and to estimate the intensity of orofacial pain. Six weeks later, the same observers rated the video clips a second time. Results. Bottom and ceiling effects for some items were found. This resulted in exclusion of these items from the statistical analyses. The categories which included the remaining items (n = 6) showed reliability varying between fair-to-good and excellent (interobserver reliability, ICC: 0.40-0.47; intraobserver reliability, ICC: 0.40-0.92). Conclusions. The "chewing" subscale of the OPS-NVI showed a fair-to-good to excellent interobserver and intraobserver reliability in this dementia population. This study contributes to the validation process of the OPS-NVI as a whole and stresses the need for further assessment of the reliability of the OPS-NVI with subjects that might already show signs of orofacial pain.

  15. Role of Nucleus Accumbens in Neuropathic Pain: Linked Multi-Scale Evidence in the Rat Transitioning to Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Contini, Massimos; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Macro; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury, SNI). We observed inter-related changes: 1) In resting-state fMRI, functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28 days (but not 5 days) after SNI; 2) contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28 days after SNI; 3) In SNI (but not sham) covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5 days and settled to a new state at 28 days; and 4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior. PMID:24607959

  16. Orofacial Pain during Mastication in People with Dementia: Reliability Testing of the Orofacial Pain Scale for Non-Verbal Individuals

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Merlijn W.; Visscher, Corine; Delwel, Suzanne; van der Steen, Jenny T.; Pieper, Marjoleine J. C.; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Achterberg, Wilco P.; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to establish the reliability of the “chewing” subscale of the OPS-NVI, a novel tool designed to estimate presence and severity of orofacial pain in nonverbal patients. Methods. The OPS-NVI consists of 16 items for observed behavior, classified into four categories and a subjective estimate of pain. Two observers used the OPS-NVI for 237 video clips of people with dementia in Dutch nursing homes during their meal to observe their behavior and to estimate the intensity of orofacial pain. Six weeks later, the same observers rated the video clips a second time. Results. Bottom and ceiling effects for some items were found. This resulted in exclusion of these items from the statistical analyses. The categories which included the remaining items (n = 6) showed reliability varying between fair-to-good and excellent (interobserver reliability, ICC: 0.40–0.47; intraobserver reliability, ICC: 0.40–0.92). Conclusions. The “chewing” subscale of the OPS-NVI showed a fair-to-good to excellent interobserver and intraobserver reliability in this dementia population. This study contributes to the validation process of the OPS-NVI as a whole and stresses the need for further assessment of the reliability of the OPS-NVI with subjects that might already show signs of orofacial pain. PMID:26977118

  17. Role of nucleus accumbens in neuropathic pain: linked multi-scale evidence in the rat transitioning to neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Contini, Massimo; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Marco; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2014-06-01

    Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury [SNI]). We observed interrelated changes: (1) In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28days (but not 5days) after SNI; (2) Contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28days after SNI; (3) In SNI (but not sham), covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5days and settled to a new state at 28days; and (4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior.

  18. Validation of the scale on Satisfaction of Adolescents with Postoperative pain management – idiopathic Scoliosis (SAP-S)

    PubMed Central

    Khadra, Christelle; Le May, Sylvie; Ballard, Ariane; Théroux, Jean; Charette, Sylvie; Villeneuve, Edith; Parent, Stefan; Tsimicalis, Argerie; MacLaren Chorney, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Background Spinal fusion is a common orthopedic surgery in children and adolescents and is associated with high pain levels postoperatively. If the pain is not well managed, negative outcomes may ensue. To our knowledge, there is no measure in English that assesses patient’s satisfaction with postoperative pain management following idiopathic scoliosis surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of the satisfaction subscale of the English version of the Satisfaction of Adolescents with Postoperative pain management – idiopathic Scoliosis (SAP-S) scale. Methods Eighty-two participants aged 10–18 years, who had undergone spinal fusion surgery, fully completed the SAP-S scale at 10–14 days postdischarge. Construct validity was assessed through a principal component analysis using varimax rotation. Results Principal component analysis indicated a three-factor structure of the 13-item satisfaction subscale of the SAP-S scale. Factors referred to satisfaction regarding current medication received (Factor 1), actions taken by nurses and doctors to manage pain (Factor 2) and information received after surgery (Factor 3). Cronbach’s alpha was 0.91, showing very good internal consistency. Data on satisfaction and clinical outcomes were also reported. Conclusion The SAP-S is a valid and reliable measure of satisfaction with postoperative pain management that can be used in both research and clinical settings to improve pain management practices. Although it was developed and validated with adolescents who had undergone spinal fusion surgery, it can be used, with further validation, to assess adolescents’ satisfaction with pain management in other postoperative contexts. PMID:28138264

  19. The Chronic Pain Myth Scale: Development and Validation of a French-Canadian Instrument Measuring Knowledge, Beliefs, and Attitudes of People in the Community towards Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to better design awareness programs on chronic pain (CP), measurement of knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of people in the community towards this condition is most useful. Objectives. To develop and validate a French-Canadian scale that could be used for this purpose. Methods. Items of the Chronic Pain Myth Scale (CPMS) were developed based on different information sources, reviewed by pain experts, and pretested. The CPMS was administered to 1555 participants among the general Quebec population. Results. The final CPMS contained 26 items allowing the calculation of three subscales scores (knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes towards people suffering from CP, biopsychosocial impacts of CP, and treatment of CP) which showed adequate internal consistency (α = 0.72–0.82). There were statistically significant differences in subscales scores between participants who reported suffering versus not suffering from CP, reported knowing versus not knowing someone who suffers from CP, and reported being versus not being a healthcare professional, which supports the construct validity of the scale. Conclusions. Our results provide preliminary evidence supporting the psychometric qualities of the use of the CPMS for the measurement of knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes towards CP among French-speaking individuals of the Quebec general population. PMID:27746680

  20. Cross-cultural Adaptation and Linguistic Validation of the Korean Version of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Pain Scale.

    PubMed

    Park, Cholhee; Lee, Youn-Woo; Yoon, Duck Mi; Kim, Do Wan; Nam, Da Jeong; Kim, Do-Hyeong

    2015-09-01

    Distinction between neuropathic pain and nociceptive pain helps facilitate appropriate management of pain; however, diagnosis of neuropathic pain remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to develop a Korean version of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) pain scale and assess its reliability and validity. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the original LANSS pain scale into Korean was established according to the published guidelines. The Korean version of the LANSS pain scale was applied to a total of 213 patients who were expertly diagnosed with neuropathic (n = 113) or nociceptive pain (n = 100). The Korean version of the scale had good reliability (Cronbach's α coefficient = 0.815, Guttman split-half coefficient = 0.800). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.928 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.885-0.959 (P < 0.001), suggesting good discriminate value. With a cut-off score ≥ 12, sensitivity was 72.6%, specificity was 98.0%, and the positive and negative predictive values were 98% and 76%, respectively. The Korean version of the LANSS pain scale is a useful, reliable, and valid instrument for screening neuropathic pain from nociceptive pain.

  1. Cut-Off Points for Mild, Moderate, and Severe Pain on the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Variability and Influence of Sex and Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Köke, Albère J. A.; Oosterwijk, René F. A.; Swaan, Jeannette L.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) is often used in pain management. The aims of our study were to determine the cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, to measure the variability of the optimal cut-off points, and to determine the influence of patients’ catastrophizing and their sex on these cut-off points. Methods: 2854 patients were included. Pain was assessed by the NRS, functioning by the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and catastrophizing by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Cut-off point schemes were tested using ANOVAs with and without using the PSC scores or sex as co-variates and with the interaction between CP scheme and PCS score and sex, respectively. The variability of the optimal cut-off point schemes was quantified using bootstrapping procedure. Results and conclusion: The study showed that NRS scores ≤ 5 correspond to mild, scores of 6–7 to moderate and scores ≥8 to severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning. Bootstrapping analysis identified this optimal NRS cut-off point scheme in 90% of the bootstrapping samples. The interpretation of the NRS is independent of sex, but seems to depend on catastrophizing. In patients with high catastrophizing tendency, the optimal cut-off point scheme equals that for the total study sample, but in patients with a low catastrophizing tendency, NRS scores ≤ 3 correspond to mild, scores of 4–6 to moderate and scores ≥7 to severe pain in terms of interference with functioning. In these optimal cut-off schemes, NRS scores of 4 and 5 correspond to moderate interference with functioning for patients with low catastrophizing tendency and to mild interference for patients with high catastrophizing tendency. Theoretically one would therefore expect that among the patients with NRS scores 4 and 5 there would be a higher average PDI score for those with low

  2. Cut-Off Points for Mild, Moderate, and Severe Pain on the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Variability and Influence of Sex and Catastrophizing.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Anne M; Stewart, Roy E; Köke, Albère J A; Oosterwijk, René F A; Swaan, Jeannette L; Schreurs, Karlein M G; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) is often used in pain management. The aims of our study were to determine the cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, to measure the variability of the optimal cut-off points, and to determine the influence of patients' catastrophizing and their sex on these cut-off points. Methods: 2854 patients were included. Pain was assessed by the NRS, functioning by the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and catastrophizing by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Cut-off point schemes were tested using ANOVAs with and without using the PSC scores or sex as co-variates and with the interaction between CP scheme and PCS score and sex, respectively. The variability of the optimal cut-off point schemes was quantified using bootstrapping procedure. Results and conclusion: The study showed that NRS scores ≤ 5 correspond to mild, scores of 6-7 to moderate and scores ≥8 to severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning. Bootstrapping analysis identified this optimal NRS cut-off point scheme in 90% of the bootstrapping samples. The interpretation of the NRS is independent of sex, but seems to depend on catastrophizing. In patients with high catastrophizing tendency, the optimal cut-off point scheme equals that for the total study sample, but in patients with a low catastrophizing tendency, NRS scores ≤ 3 correspond to mild, scores of 4-6 to moderate and scores ≥7 to severe pain in terms of interference with functioning. In these optimal cut-off schemes, NRS scores of 4 and 5 correspond to moderate interference with functioning for patients with low catastrophizing tendency and to mild interference for patients with high catastrophizing tendency. Theoretically one would therefore expect that among the patients with NRS scores 4 and 5 there would be a higher average PDI score for those with low

  3. Validation of a Spanish language version of the pain self-perception scale in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Pain Self-Perception Scale (PSPS) is a 24-item questionnaire used to assess mental defeat in chronic pain patients. The aim of this study was to develop a Spanish language version of the PSPS (PSPS-Spanish), to assess the instrument's psychometric properties in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia and to confirm a possible overlapping between mental defeat and pain catastrophizing. Methods The PSPS was translated into Spanish by three bilingual content and linguistic experts, and then back-translated into English to assess for equivalence. The final Spanish version was administered, along with the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), Pain Visual Analogue Scale (PVAS), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), to 250 Spanish patients with fibromyalgia. Results PSPS-Spanish was found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.90 and the item-total r correlation coefficients ranged between 0.68 and 0.86). Principal components analysis revealed a one-factor structure which explained 61.4% of the variance. The test-retest correlation assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient, over a 1-2 weeks interval, was 0.78. The total PSPS score was significantly correlated with all the questionnaires assessed (HADS, PVAS, PCS, and FIQ). Conclusions The Spanish version of the PSPS appears to be a valid tool in assessing mental defeat in patients with fibromyalgia. In patients with fibromyalgia and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), PSPS-Spanish correlates more intensely with FIQ than in patients without PTSD. Mental defeat seems to be a psychological construct different to pain catastrophizing. PMID:21050485

  4. Translation, Adaptation, and Validation of Hindi Version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain for Use in India.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Dipika; Gudala, Kapil; Lavudiya, Sreenu; Ghai, Babita; Arora, Pooja

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVES : This study translates the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) into Hindi and examines the psychometric properties of the translated version (Hindi PCS [Hi-PCS]) in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). METHODS : Forward and backward translations were performed from English to Hindi according to standard methodology. A final version was evaluated by a committee of clinical experts and Hi-PCS was then pilot-tested in 10 patients with CLBP. Cross-cultural validation of the resulting adapted Hi-PCS was done by administering Hi-PCS at baseline to 100 patients with CLBP (≥ 12 weeks pain) who were able to read and write in Hindi, and re-administering Hi-PCS after 3 days. Construct validity was assessed using factor analysis. Psychometric properties including internal consistency; test-retest reliability; and convergent validity with pain severity, functional disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were also assessed. RESULTS : Principal component analysis observed a three-factor structure, which explained 58% of the variance. Confirmatory factor analysis elicited the best fit as judged by the model fit indices. Hi-PCS as a whole was deemed to be internally consistent (Cronbach's α = 0.76). Intraclass correlation coefficient for the Hi-PCS is 0.923 (95% CI: 0.875-0.953). Hi-PCS was moderately correlated with pain intensity (r = 0.651) and functional disability (r = 0.352), and negatively correlated with QoL (r = -0.380). CONCLUSIONS : PCS translation and cross-cultural adaptation to Hindi demonstrated good factor structure along adequate psychometric properties and could be recommended for use in CLBP research in India.

  5. Live Music Therapy as an Active Focus of Attention for Pain and Behavioral Symptoms of Distress During Pediatric Immunization.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Sumathy; Ramesh, Bhuvaneswari; Dixit, Priyanka B; Venkatesh, Soma; Das, Prarthana; Gunasekaran, Dhandapany

    2016-07-01

    A total of 100 children coming for routine immunization to pediatric outpatient department were included and were divided into experiment (n = 50) and control (n = 50) groups. Experiment group received live music therapy during immunization procedure. Control group received no intervention. The Modified Behavior Pain Scale (MBPS), 10-point pain levels, and 10-point distress levels were documented by parents. Duration of crying was recorded by investigators. Pre- and postimmunization blood pressures and heart rates of parents holding the children were also measured and recorded by investigators. Independent and paired t tests were used for analysis. All 3 domains of the Modified Behavior Pain Scale and duration of crying showed significant improvement (P < .05) in the experiment group. Pain and distress levels also showed statistically nonsignificant improvement in experiment group. Blood pressure and heart rate of parents showed no difference. Music therapy could be helpful to children, parents, and health care providers by reducing discomfort of the child during pediatric immunization.

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Pain Numeric Rating Scale When Applied to Multiple Body Regions among Professional Musicians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the broad popularity of a numeric rating scale (NRS) its psychometric properties are not well known. The objective was to determine if there is any difference in the discrimination ability of the NRS when used for measuring pain severity separately in different body regions. Methods Cross-sectional survey study of 630 professional musicians. Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to define the psychometric properties of the NRS. Results The discrimination ability of the pain NRS was dependent on the body area to which it was applied. The discrimination was low 0.5 (95% CI 0.4. to 0.7) for the hand region and perfect for the shoulder and upper part of the neck– 3.2 (95% CI 1.2 to 5.2) and 10.5 (95% CI 10.0 to 10.9), respectively. Both shoulder and neck NRSs showed a great shift towards higher levels of pain severity meaning that the ability of the NRS to discriminate low levels of pain is poor. NRS scores obtained from all other regions did not demonstrate any discrimination ability. Conclusions The pain NRS might have different psychometric properties depending on the body area to which it is applied. Overall, the modest discrimination ability of the pain NRS implies that it should be used in screening questionnaires with some reservations. PMID:27603011

  7. Using the Horse Grimace Scale (HGS) to Assess Pain Associated with Acute Laminitis in Horses (Equus caballus).

    PubMed

    Dalla Costa, Emanuela; Stucke, Diana; Dai, Francesca; Minero, Michela; Leach, Matthew C; Lebelt, Dirk

    2016-08-03

    Acute laminitis is a common equine disease characterized by intense foot pain, both acutely and chronically. The Obel grading system is the most widely accepted method for describing the severity of laminitis by equine practitioners, however this method requires movement (walk and trot) of the horse, causing further intense pain. The recently developed Horse Grimace Scale (HGS), a facial-expression-based pain coding system, may offer a more effective means of assessing the pain associated with acute laminitis. The aims of this study were: to investigate whether HGS can be usefully applied to assess pain associated with acute laminitis in horses at rest, and to examine if scoring HGS using videos produced similar results as those obtained from still images. Ten horses, referred as acute laminitis cases with no prior treatment, were included in the study. Each horse was assessed using the Obel and HGS (from images and videos) scales: at the admission (before any treatment) and at seven days after the initial evaluation and treatment. The results of this study suggest that HGS is a potentially effective method to assess pain associated with acute laminitis in horses at rest, as horses showing high HGS scores also exhibited higher Obel scores and veterinarians classified them in a more severe painful state. Furthermore, the inter-observer reliability of the HGS total score was good for both still images and video evaluation. There was no significant difference in HGS total scores between the still images and videos, suggesting that there is a possibility of applying the HGS in clinical practice, by observing the horse for a short time. However, further validation studies are needed prior to applying the HGS in a clinical setting.

  8. Algoplus® Scale in Older Patients with Dementia: A Reliable Real-World Pain Assessment Tool.

    PubMed

    Monacelli, Fiammetta; Signori, Alessio; Roffredo, Laura; Pace, Katiuscia; Nencioni, Alessio; Pickering, Gisele; Nicolas, Macian; Odetti, Patrizio

    2017-01-01

    Pain is still a neglected clinical issue in elderly people with dementia and/or communicative disorders, with an unacceptable higher rate of under diagnosis and under treatment. Cognitive deficit and emotional and psychological disturbances entangle pain symptoms, affecting patient self-report. So far, observational pain tools do not have fully adequate clinimetric properties and quality requirements for easy-to-use daily rating. Older patients with dementia represent a clinical challenge. The assessment of pain is important for improving clinical outcomes, such as functional status, frailty trajectories, comorbidity, and quality of life. The PAINAID scale appears to be the most accurate pain tool in people with dementia along with the Algoplus® scale, a recently developed tool to rapidly assess acute pain in hospitals settings. The present study aimed to assess the clinimetric properties of the Algoplus®, as compared to PAINAID, for detecting acute pain in a real-world cohort of hospitalized older patients with dementia.

  9. A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Magnesium Oxide for Alleviation of Chronic Low Back Pain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    place (Smith, 1996). The NMDA receptors are found throughout the brain and especially in the telencephalic structures. The hippocampus is heavily... morphine equivalents) 2. Dependent Variables: (a) Pain (as measured by a 10 point numeric pain intensity scale) (b) Quality of Life (as measured by a...analgesics has also been extensively researched. Miranda and Paeile (1989) reported a minireview of the interactions between calcium channel blockers and

  10. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties Testing of the Arabic Anterior Knee Pain Scale.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Lohman, Everett; Daher, Noha S; Bahijri, Khalid; Alghamdi, Abdulmohsen; Altorairi, Nezar; Arnons, Arin; Matar, Abdullah

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND PFPS is one of the most frequently occurring overuse injuries affecting the lower limbs. A variety of functional and self-reported outcome measures have been used to assess clinical outcomes of patients with PFPS, however, only the Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) has been designed for PFPS patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS We followed international recommendations to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the AKPS. The Arabic AKPS and the Arabic RAND 36-item Health Survey were administered to 40 patients who were diagnosed with PFPS. Participants were assessed at baseline and after 2 to 3 days assessed with the Arabic AKPS only. The measurements tested were reliability, validity, and feasibility. RESULTS The Arabic AKPS showed high reliability for both temporal stability, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha was 0.81 for the first assessment and 0.75 for the second), excellent test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients ICC=0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.98) and good agreement (standard error of measurement SEM=1.8%). The Arabic AKPS was significantly correlated with physical components of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (Spearman's rho=0.69: p<0.001). No ceiling or floor effects were observed. CONCLUSIONS The Arabic AKPS is a valid and reliable tool and is comparable to the original English version and other translated versions.

  11. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties Testing of the Arabic Anterior Knee Pain Scale

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Lohman, Everett; Daher, Noha S.; Bahijri, Khalid; Alghamdi, Abdulmohsen; Altorairi, Nezar; Arnos, Arin; Matar, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Background PFPS is one of the most frequently occurring overuse injuries affecting the lower limbs. A variety of functional and self-reported outcome measures have been used to assess clinical outcomes of patients with PFPS, however, only the Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) has been designed for PFPS patients. Material/Methods We followed international recommendations to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the AKPS. The Arabic AKPS and the Arabic RAND 36-item Health Survey were administered to 40 patients who were diagnosed with PFPS. Participants were assessed at baseline and after 2 to 3 days assessed with the Arabic AKPS only. The measurements tested were reliability, validity, and feasibility. Results The Arabic AKPS showed high reliability for both temporal stability, internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha was 0.81 for the first assessment and 0.75 for the second), excellent test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients ICC=0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.98) and good agreement (standard error of measurement SEM=1.8%). The Arabic AKPS was significantly correlated with physical components of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (Spearman’s rho=0.69: p<0.001). No ceiling or floor effects were observed. Conclusions The Arabic AKPS is a valid and reliable tool and is comparable to the original English version and other translated versions. PMID:28364114

  12. Validity and Reliability of Behavioral Pain Scale in Patients With Low Level of Consciousness Due to Head Trauma Hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamideh; Tavangar, Hossein; Ghandehari, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Background: Estimating pain in patients of intensive care unit (ICU) is essential, but because of their special situation, verbal scales cannot be used. Therefore, to estimate the level of pain, behavioral pain scale was developed by Payen in 2001. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of behavioral pain scale in patients with low level of consciousness due to head trauma hospitalized in ICU. Patients and Methods: This descriptive prospective study was performed in Yazd in 2013. In this study, fifty patients, including thirteen women and thirty seven men, were involved. To collect the data a questionnaire including demographic and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) information as well as a list of behavioral pain scale (BPS) were used. SPSS software (version 18) was used to analyze the data. Results: There was no significant difference in reliability proving of average score of BPS recorded by two day and night assessors (P > 5). Cronbach’s alpha was 85 for painful procedures and 76 for non-painful procedures. In addition, known groups’ technique (painful and non-painful procedures) was used to assess validity. The average scores were 7.75 during painful procedures and 3.28 during non-painful procedures (P = 0.001). The results stated that BPS scores during these two procedures were significantly different. Conclusions: BPS in patients with low level of consciousness due to head trauma has strong reliability and validity. Therefore, this scale can be used for patients hospitalized in ICU to assess the level of pain. PMID:25032173

  13. Dealing with Persistent Pain in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... org/files/documents/DailyPainDiary.pdf . Use a pain scale to rate the severity of your pain. Pain scale helps measure how bad your pain is and ... most effective treatment for your pain. A pain scale is included in the pain diary link above. ...

  14. Reliability and Concurrent Validity of the Palliative Outcome Scale, the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, and the Brief Pain Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Agra-Varela, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Some domains of the questionnaires used to measure symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in patients with advanced cancer seem to measure similar dimensions or constructs, so it would be useful for clinicians to demonstrate the interchangeability of equivalent domains of the questionnaires in measuring the same constructs. Objective This study investigated the reliability and concurrent validity of the Palliative Outcome Scale (POS), the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL), and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), used to measure symptom control in patients with advanced cancer. Design This was an evaluative study. Setting/Subjects Subjects were patients with advanced cancer attended by Spanish primary care physicians. Measurements Secondary analysis was performed of 117 outpatients who completed the POS, BPI, and RSCL at two different times, with an interval of 7 to 10 days. Bland and Altman analyses and plot, repeatability coefficient, as well as Spearman correlations were carried out. Results There were 117 included patients. Mean age was 69.4 (11.5) years, gender was 60% male, 37.6% completed only elementary school, diagnoses were mainly digestive and lung cancer, with a low functional rate and presence of oncologic pain. First and second questionnaire rounds showed significant correlations and agreement. Agreement was shown between pain intensity of BPI and pain and physical scales of RSCL, and between physical symptoms of RSCL and of POS, with significant correlations in equivalent dimensions. Conclusion BPI, POS, and RSCL have shown adequate reliability and moderate concurrent validity among them. PMID:23808642

  15. Measurement Properties of the Non-Communicating Adult Pain Checklist (NCAPC): A Pain Scale for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Scored in a Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotan, M.; Moe-Nilssen, R.; Ljunggren, A. E.; Strand, L. I.

    2010-01-01

    The 18 items' Non-Communicating Adult Pain Checklist (NCAPC) has been developed from the 27 items Non-Communicating Children Pain Checklist to better capture pain behavior of adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD). As part of the NCAPC's measurement properties, internal consistency, reliability and sensitivity to pain have…

  16. Using the mouse grimace scale to assess pain associated with routine ear notching and the effect of analgesia in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, A L; Leach, M C

    2015-04-01

    Social housing is recommended where possible for laboratory mice. In order to achieve this, mice must be individually identifiable. Although, various methods are available, permanent identification is often required, such as ear notching. This method is likely to be painful and to date there is limited literature on pain assessment and alleviation for this routine husbandry practice. Here we aimed to determine if the mouse grimace scale (MGS) could be used to assess pain in C57BL/6 mice following routine ear notching. Langford et al. found that very acute noxious stimuli (i.e. < 10 min in duration) did not produce a change in MGS score in comparison to baseline. Here, no significant difference was found between MGS scores at baseline and immediately post ear notching, potentially indicating that the pain associated with ear notching is either too acute to assess using the MGS tool or the practice is not painful. Studies in other species indicate that ear notching is painful, therefore, unless we can confidently conclude that the process of ear notching is not painful, we should err on the side of caution and assume it is painful due to the large number of mice ear-notched and potential welfare consequences. Alternative methods of assessing pain following this routine practice should be used in order to assess both the potential pain in mice, and the effectiveness of analgesics or local anaesthetics to relieve any associated pain.

  17. A Systematic Comparison Between Subjects with No Pain and Pain Associated with Active Myofascial Trigger Points

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Armstrong, Katee; Diao, Guoqing; Heimur, Juliana; Kopecky, John; Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Gebreab, Tadesse; Shah, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether standard evaluations of pain distinguish subjects with no pain from those with myofascial pain syndromes (MPS) and active trigger points (MTrPs); and to assess whether self-reports of mood, function and health-related quality of life differ between these groups. Design Prospective, descriptive study. Setting University Patients Adults with and without neck pain Methods We evaluated adults with MPS and active (painful) MTrPs and those without pain. Subjects in the “Active” (‘A’) group had at least one active MTrP with spontaneous pain which was persistent, lasted more than 3 months and had characteristic pain on palpation. Subjects in the “No pain” (‘Np’) group had no spontaneous pain. However, some had discomfort on MTrP palpation (latent MTrP) while others in the Np group had no discomfort on palpation of nodules or had no nodules. Outcome Measures Each participant underwent range of motion (ROM) measurement, 10-point manual muscle test, and manual and algometric palpation. The latter determined the pain/pressure threshold using an algometer of 4 pre-determined anatomical sites along the upper trapezius. Participants rated pain using a verbal analogue scale (0–10); completed the Brief Pain Inventory and Oswestry Disability Scale (ODS), which included a sleep sub-scale; Short Form 36(SF36) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results here were 24 in the ‘A’ group (mean 36 yrs, 16 women) and 26 in the ‘Np’ group (mean 26 yrs, 12 women). Subjects in group ‘A’ differed from ‘Np’ in number of latent MTrPs (p=.0062); asymmetrical cervical ROM (p=.01 side bending and p=.002 rotation); in all pain reports (p<.0001); algometry (p<.03); POMS (p<.038); SF36 (p<.01) and ODS (p<.0001). Conclusion A systematic musculoskeletal evaluation of people with MPS reliably distinguishes them from subjects with no pain. The two groups are significantly different in their physical findings and self-reports of pain, sleep

  18. [Scales to evaluate pain in elderly patients suffering from dementia. Help-tools for the physiotherapist, doctor, nurse and occupational therapist].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan; Jiménez-Palomares, María; González-López-Arza, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which scales are being used to evaluate pain in old people suffering from dementia. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all articles (randomized controlled trials and clinical trials without randomization) published in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library Plus, PEDro and Dialnet and BMC Geriatrics from January 2000 to January 2012. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not use scales for evaluating pain in elderly patients suffering from dementia, and other type of articles (case studies, reviews...). Finally, 13 studies were included in this review. From the results obtained it appears that more studies are needed to confirm the pain scales used for the elderly suffering from dementia. Observational scales may be useful to evaluate pain in these patients.

  19. Validations and psychological properties of a simplified Chinese version of pain anxiety symptoms scale (SC-PASS).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Wu, Sui-Yi; Yang, Yi-Lin; Li, Ming; Huang, Jian-Ming; Wei, Xian-Zhao

    2017-03-01

    The Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS) has been developed to evaluate pain anxiety, which leads to avoidance of daily activities and normal movements. However, a simplified Chinese version of PASS is still not available. Physicians are not aware of which patients are prone to anxiety, and what the risk factors are.To cross-culturally adapt the PASS into a simplified Chinese version and test the reliability and validity. Factors affecting pain anxiety were also explored.The PASS was first translated into a simplified Chinese version according to a forward-backward method. Then, validations were tested including content validity, construct validity, and reliability. Content validity was analyzed by response trend. Construct validity was analyzed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), exploratory factor analysis, and priori hypotheses testing. Reliability was analyzed by internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Risk factors of catastrophizing were analyzed by performing multivariate liner regression.A total of 219 patients were included in the study. The scores of items were well distributed. Both CFA and exploratory factor analysis suggested a 2nd-order, 4-factor model, accounting for 65.42% of the total variance according to principle component analysis. SC-PASS obtained good reliability with a Cronbach α = 0.92 and ICC = 0.90. College education, long pain duration, and both married and divorced status were risk factors. Factors reduced pain-related anxiety were no medication assumption, female sex, widowed status, non-Han ethnicity, and having no religious belief.The SC-PASS was applicable in Chinese patients and it was suitable for the clinical uses in mainland China.

  20. Validations and psychological properties of a simplified Chinese version of pain anxiety symptoms scale (SC-PASS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Wu, Sui-Yi; Yang, Yi-Lin; Li, Ming; Huang, Jian-Ming; Wei, Xian-Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS) has been developed to evaluate pain anxiety, which leads to avoidance of daily activities and normal movements. However, a simplified Chinese version of PASS is still not available. Physicians are not aware of which patients are prone to anxiety, and what the risk factors are. To cross-culturally adapt the PASS into a simplified Chinese version and test the reliability and validity. Factors affecting pain anxiety were also explored. The PASS was first translated into a simplified Chinese version according to a forward-backward method. Then, validations were tested including content validity, construct validity, and reliability. Content validity was analyzed by response trend. Construct validity was analyzed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), exploratory factor analysis, and priori hypotheses testing. Reliability was analyzed by internal consistency and test–retest reliability. Risk factors of catastrophizing were analyzed by performing multivariate liner regression. A total of 219 patients were included in the study. The scores of items were well distributed. Both CFA and exploratory factor analysis suggested a 2nd-order, 4-factor model, accounting for 65.42% of the total variance according to principle component analysis. SC-PASS obtained good reliability with a Cronbach α = 0.92 and ICC = 0.90. College education, long pain duration, and both married and divorced status were risk factors. Factors reduced pain-related anxiety were no medication assumption, female sex, widowed status, non-Han ethnicity, and having no religious belief. The SC-PASS was applicable in Chinese patients and it was suitable for the clinical uses in mainland China. PMID:28272194

  1. Validation of a Spanish version of the psychological inflexibility in pain scale (PIPS) and an evaluation of its relation with acceptance of pain and mindfulness in sample of persons with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological flexibility has been suggested as a fundamental process in health. The Psychological Inflexibility in Pain Scale (PIPS) is one of the scales employed for assessing psychological inflexibility in pain patients. The aim of this study was to validate the Spanish version of the PIPS and secondly, to compare it to two other psychological constructs, the acceptance of pain and mindfulness scales. Methods The PIPS was translated into Spanish by two bilingual linguistic experts, and then, back-translated into English to assess for equivalence. The final Spanish version was administered along with the Pain Visual Analogue Scale, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire and the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, to 250 Spanish patients with fibromyalgia. Face validity, construct validity, reliability (internal consistency and test-retest) and convergent validity were tested. Also a multiple regression analysis was carried out.The usual guidelines have been followed for cross-cultural adaptations. Results Data were very similar to the ones obtained in the original PIPS version. The construct validity confirmed the original two-components solution which explained 61.6% of the variance. The Spanish PIPS had good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.97) and internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s alpha: 0.90). The Spanish PIPS’ score correlated significantly with worse global functioning (r = 0.55), anxiety (r = 0.54), depression (r = 0.66), pain catastrophizing (r = 0.62), pain acceptance (r = −0.72) and mindfulness (r = −0.47), as well as correlating modestly with pain intensity (r = 0.12). The multiple regression analyses showed that psychological inflexibility, acceptance and mindfulness are not overlapped. Conclusions The Spanish PIPS scale appears to be a valid and reliable instrument for the evaluation of

  2. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    PubMed Central

    Witzeman, Kathryn; Nguyen, Ruby HN; Eanes, Alisa; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 8.3%—16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy. Objective To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD. Design In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity. Methods We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100) was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the highest level of pain. Results The lower vestibule’s mucosa 5.81 (standard deviation =2.83) was significantly more sensitive than the upper vestibule 2.52 (standard deviation =2.6) (P<0.01) on exam. However, mucosal sensitivity was not associated with intercourse pain, while muscle sensitivity was moderately associated with both average and highest intensity of intercourse pain (r=−0.46, P=0.01 and r=−0.42, P=0.02), respectively. Conclusion This preliminary study suggests that mucosal measures alone may not sufficiently capture the spectrum of clinical pain report in women with PVD, which is consistent with the empirical success of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26316805

  3. Evaluation of the effect of laser acupuncture and cupping with ryodoraku and visual analog scale on low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Lien; Wu, Hung-Chien; Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Su, Chuan-Tsung; Shih, Yong-Sheng; Lin, Chii-Wann; Wu, Jih-Huah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture (LA) and soft cupping on low back pain. In this study, the subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: active group (real LA and soft cupping) and placebo group (sham laser and soft cupping). Visual analog scale (VAS) and Ryodoraku were used to evaluate the effect of treatment on low back pain in this trial. Laser, 40 mW, wavelength 808 nm, pulse rate 20 Hz, was used to irradiate Weizhong (BL40) and Ashi acupoints for 10 minutes. And the Ryodoraku values were measured 2 times, that is, before and 15 minutes after treatment. The results show that there were significant difference between the first day baseline and the fifth day treatment in VAS in the two groups. Therefore, LA combined with soft cupping or only soft cupping was effective on low back pain. However, the Ryodoraku values of Bladder Meridian of the placebo group have been decreased apparently, and didn't come back to their original values. It means that "cupping" plays the role of "leak or purge" in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). On the other hand, the Ryodoraku values of Bladder Meridian of the active group have been turned back to almost their original values; "mend or reinforcing" effect is attributed to the laser radiation.

  4. Evaluation of the Effect of Laser Acupuncture and Cupping with Ryodoraku and Visual Analog Scale on Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mu-Lien; Wu, Hung-Chien; Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Su, Chuan-Tsung; Shih, Yong-Sheng; Lin, Chii-Wann; Wu, Jih-Huah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture (LA) and soft cupping on low back pain. In this study, the subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: active group (real LA and soft cupping) and placebo group (sham laser and soft cupping). Visual analog scale (VAS) and Ryodoraku were used to evaluate the effect of treatment on low back pain in this trial. Laser, 40 mW, wavelength 808 nm, pulse rate 20 Hz, was used to irradiate Weizhong (BL40) and Ashi acupoints for 10 minutes. And the Ryodoraku values were measured 2 times, that is, before and 15 minutes after treatment. The results show that there were significant difference between the first day baseline and the fifth day treatment in VAS in the two groups. Therefore, LA combined with soft cupping or only soft cupping was effective on low back pain. However, the Ryodoraku values of Bladder Meridian of the placebo group have been decreased apparently, and didn't come back to their original values. It means that “cupping” plays the role of “leak or purge” in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). On the other hand, the Ryodoraku values of Bladder Meridian of the active group have been turned back to almost their original values; “mend or reinforcing” effect is attributed to the laser radiation. PMID:23118792

  5. Agreement between 2 pain visual analogue scales, by age and area of complaint in neck and low back pain subjects: the standard pen and paper VAS versus plastic mechanical sliderule VAS

    PubMed Central

    Hagino, Carol; Thompson, Marylee; Advent, Jolayne; Rivet, Lyne

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This study endeavoured to determine the agreement between the standard pencil and paper pain VAS (pVAS) and a relatively newly designed plastic mechanical (slide-rule) VAS (mVAS) in assessing cervical and lumbar pain intensity in cervical pain vs low back pain (LBP) patients stratified by age (< 65 years of age (yoa) and ≥ 65 yoa). Design Architecture: This was a concurrent validity study assessing the agreement between the gold standard pVAS and the experimental mVAS. Sample Size: A sample size estimate revealed that a minimum of 9 subjects for each of 4 age-complaint subgroups (< 65 yoa) neck pain, ≥ 65 yoa neck pain, <65 yoa low back pain, ≥ 65 yoa low back pain) would be necessary. Sample Profile: All adults (≥ 18 yrs of age) presenting to the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College’s Herbert K. Lee Outpatient Clinic with low back (LBP) pain or neck pain were considered eligible for the study. Three (3) essentially asymptomatic subjects were also recruited in order to provide a complete spectrum of pain severities. Outcome Measure: Pain intensity was measured in centimetres (to nearest one tenth) on the pVAS and in ten units on the mVAS (to the nearest one tenth unit). Method: The pVAS was administered by including it with either the standard intake forms which all new patients are required to complete, or by presenting it to patients visiting the Clinic for a subsequent treatment. The subject made a visual estimation of his/her pain intensity and marked it on the pVAS accordingly. The response was then measured in centimetres. One of the investigators presented the mVAS to the subject after arrival in the examination room. The mVAS instrument was presented to the subject with instructions as to how to indicate his/her level of present pain intensity. Every attempt was made to ensure that no less than five minutes and no more than 15 minutes elapsed between the completion of the two forms of Visual Analogue Scale. The data were categorized

  6. Examination of the photograph series of daily activities (PHODA) scale in chronic low back pain patients with high and low kinesiophobia.

    PubMed

    Trost, Zina; France, Christopher R; Thomas, James S

    2009-02-01

    The current study examined the Photograph Series of Daily Activities (PHODA) Scale in a sample of chronic low back pain patients with high and low levels of kinesiophobia (pain-related fear). Thirty-three participants completed a modified version of the PHODA (PHODA-M) that obtained ratings of both anticipated pain and harm. Participants' responses on the PHODA-M were compared to predicted and experienced pain and harm ratings collected during a graded-difficulty reaching task. Individuals with high kinesiophobia reported higher pain and harm expectancies for PHODA-M stimuli, as well as greater predicted and experienced pain and harm in response to movement performance. In comparison to low fear participants, high fear participants showed larger correlations between pain expectancies for movements depicted in the PHODA and their ratings of predicted and experienced pain on each movement comprising the reaching task. Additionally, high fear participants showed larger associations between the perceived harmfulness of PHODA activities and predicted and experienced harm ratings in response to the reaching task. Implications for the findings are discussed.

  7. Can Wound Exudate from Venous Leg Ulcers Measure Wound Pain Status?: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tamai, Nao; Nakagami, Gojiro; Kitamura, Aya; Naito, Ayumi; Hirokawa, Masayuki; Shimokawa, Chisako; Takahashi, Kazuo; Umemoto, Junichi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the associations between the self-evaluated pain status and two pain biomarker candidates, nerve growth factor and S100A8/A9, in exudate from venous leg ulcer to finally develop an objective pain evaluation method. Patients with venous leg ulcer participated in this cross-sectional observational study conducted between April and October 2014 at two medical facilities. During routine wound care, each participant self-evaluated their pain status at each examination using the 10-point numerical rating scale (present pain intensity) and the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire 2 (continuous pain, intermittent pain, neuropathic pain, affective descriptors, and total score). Venous leg ulcer exudate sample was collected after wound cleansing. The nerve growth factor and S100A8/A9 concentrations in the venous leg ulcer exudate were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and standardized according to the wound area. The association between each pain status and the two standardized protein concentrations was evaluated using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. In 30 sample collected from 13 participants, the standardized nerve growth factor concentration was negatively correlated with continuous pain (ρ = -0.47, P = 0.01), intermittent pain (ρ = -0.48, P = 0.01), neuropathic pain (ρ = -0.51, P = 0.01), and total score (ρ = -0.46, P = 0.01). The standardized S100A8/A9 concentration was positively correlated with present pain intensity (ρ = 0.46, P = 0.03) and continuous pain (ρ = 0.48, P = 0.03). Thus, these two proteins may be useful for objective evaluation of wound pain in venous leg ulcer patients. PMID:27936243

  8. Ethical considerations for ventricular assist device support: a 10-point model.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ralph J; Benish, Lynne A; Carrow, Barbara L; Prato, Lisa; Hankins, Shelley R; Eisen, Howard J; Entwistle, John W

    2011-01-01

    The potential for long-term support on a ventricular assist device (VAD) in the bridge-to-transplant (BTT) and destination therapy (DT) settings has created unprecedented ethical challenges for patients and caregivers. Concerns include the patient's adaptation to life on a device and the ethical, clinical, and practical issues associated with living on mechanical support. On the basis of our experience treating 175 consecutive VAD patients, we have developed a model to address the ethical and psychosocial needs of patients undergoing VAD implantation. Patient preparation for VAD implantation encompasses three phases: 1) initial information regarding the physical events involved in implantation, risks and benefits of current device technology, and the use of VAD as a rescue device; 2) preimplant preparation including completion of advance directives specific to BTT/DT, competency determination, and identifying a patient spokesperson, multidisciplinary consultants, and cultural preferences regarding device withdrawal; and 3) VAD-specific end-of-life issues including plans for device replacement and palliative care with hospice or device withdrawal. This three-phase 10-point model addresses the ethical and psychosocial issues that should be discussed with patients undergoing VAD support.

  9. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  10. “Let’s Talk about OA Pain”: A Qualitative Analysis of the Perceptions of People Suffering from OA. Towards the Development of a Specific Pain OA-Related Questionnaire, the Osteoarthritis Symptom Inventory Scale (OASIS)

    PubMed Central

    Cedraschi, Christine; Delézay, Sylvie; Marty, Marc; Berenbaum, Francis; Bouhassira, Didier; Henrotin, Yves; Laroche, Françoise; Perrot, Serge

    2013-01-01

    questionnaire on osteoarthritis pain quality for osteoarthritis pain phenotyping: the OsteoArthritis Symptom Inventory Scale (OASIS). PMID:24244589

  11. Cultural adaptation and reproducibility validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD-Brazil) scale in non-verbal adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Marcia Carla Morete; Minson, Fabiola Peixoto; Lopes, Ana Carolina Biagioni; Laselva, Claudia Regina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To adapt the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) scale to Brazilian Portuguese with respect to semantic equivalence and cultural aspects, and to evaluate the respective psychometric properties (validity, feasibility, clinical utility and inter-rater agreement). Methods Two-stage descriptive, cross-sectional retrospective study involving cultural and semantic validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the scale, and investigation of its psychometric properties (validity, reliability and clinical utility). The sample consisted of 63 inpatients presenting with neurological deficits and unable to self-report pain. Results Semantic and cultural validation of the PAINAD scale was easily achieved. The scale indicators most commonly used by nurses to assess pain were “Facial expression”, “Body language” and “Consolability”. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the scale has proved to be valid and accurate; good levels of inter-rater agreement assured reproducibility. Conclusion The scale has proved to be useful in daily routine care of hospitalized adult and elderly patients in a variety of clinical settings. Short application time, ease of use, clear instructions and the simplicity of training required for application were emphasized. However, interpretation of facial expression and consolability should be given special attention during pain assessment training. PMID:25993063

  12. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of levetiracetam in central pain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Falah, M; Madsen, C; Holbech, J V; Sindrup, S H

    2012-07-01

    Levetiracetam is an anticonvulsant which is assumed to act by modulating neurotransmitter release via binding to the vesicle protein SV2A. This could have an impact on signalling in the pain pathway. The aim of this study was to test the analgesic effect of levetiracetam in central pain in multiple sclerosis. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with levetiracetam 3000 mg/day versus placebo (6-week treatment periods). Patients with multiple sclerosis, symptoms and signs complying with central neuropathic pain and pain symptoms for more than 6 months, as well as pain intensity of more than 4 on a 0 to 10-point numeric rating scale were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was pain relief at the end of each treatment period as measured on a 6-point verbal scale. Eighty-nine patients were screened for participation and 30 patients entered the study. Twenty-seven patients were included in the data analysis. There were no differences in the ratings of pain relief (levetiracetam 2.4 vs. placebo 2.1, p = 0.169), total pain intensity (levetiracetam 5.3 vs. placebo 5.7, p = 0.147) or any of the other outcome measures (p = 0.086-0.715) in the total sample of patients. However, there was significant reduction of pain, increased pain relief and/or more favourable pain relief with levetiracetam than with placebo in patients with lancinating or without touch-evoked pain (p = 0.025-0.046). This study found no effect of the anticonvulsant levetiracetam in non-selected patients with central pain in multiple sclerosis, but an effect in subgroups with specific pain symptoms was indicated.

  13. Systematic review of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability scale for assessing pain in infants and children: is it reliable, valid, and feasible for use?

    PubMed

    Crellin, Dianne J; Harrison, Denise; Santamaria, Nick; Babl, Franz E

    2015-11-01

    The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability (FLACC) scale is one of the most widely used behavioural observation pain scales. However, the psychometrics of the scale have not been adequately summarised and evaluated to provide clear recommendations regarding its use. The aim of this study was to rigorously evaluate the reliability, validity, feasibility, and utility of the scale for clinical and research purposes and provide recommendations regarding appropriate use of the scale. Databases searched were MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO (using the Ovid, PubMed, and Ebscohost platforms), The Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews and Cochrane Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar. Psychometric evaluation studies reporting feasibility, reliability, validity, or utility data for the FLACC scale applied to children (birth to 18 years) and randomised controlled trials (RCT) using the FLACC scale to measure a study outcome in infants and children. Data extraction included study design, population demographics, and psychometric data. Analysis involved in this study are quality assessment of the psychometric evaluation studies and the RCTs using the COSMIN checklist and the Jadad scale, respectively, and narrative synthesis of all results. Twenty-five psychometric evaluations studies and 52 RCTs were included. The study population, circumstances, and quality of the studies varied greatly. Sufficient data addressing postoperative pain assessment in infants and children exist. Some positive data support the psychometrics of the scale used to assess postoperative pain in children with cognitive impairment. Limited and conflicting data addressing procedural pain assessment exist. Content validity and scale feasibility have had limited psychometric evaluation. There are insufficient data to support the FLACC scale for use in all circumstances and populations to which is currently applied.

  14. A Multidimensional Scaling (INDSCAL) Approach to Pain: Comparison of Cancer Patients and Healthy Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, W. Crawford; Ferrer-Brechner, Theresa

    Multidimensional scaling (MDS) offers a rigorous approach to many problems in perception, emotion, personality, and cognition, where the stimuli are too complex to be quantified by other means. In these procedures similarity ratings of the stimulus objects are modeled as points in multidimensional space, such that perceived similarity is…

  15. The effect of logotherapy on the expressions of cortisol, HSP70, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and pain scales in advanced cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Soetrisno; Sulistyowati, Sri; Ardhianto, Adhitya; Hadi, Syamsul

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to analyze the effect of logotherapy on the expression of cortisol, HSP70, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and to conduct pain assessments in advanced cervical cancer patients. We carried out this research through pretest-posttest control-group design on the expression of cortisol, HSP70, the BDI, and pain scales after a patient receives logotherapy treatment. Based on a comparative test conducted with the two groups before the treatment, there is no significant difference (p > .05). There is a significant difference (p < .05) after the treatment, however, except for on HSP70. This study suggests that logotherapy affects the expression of cortisol, BDI, and pain scales in advanced cervical cancer patients, and that it does not affect the expression of HSP70.

  16. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  17. The Fear-avoidance Components Scale (FACS): Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Measure of Pain-related Fear Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Hartzell, Meredith M; Williams, Mark J; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Pain-related fear avoidance (FA), a common problem for patients with painful medical conditions, involves pain-related catastrophizing cognitions, hypervigilance, and avoidance behaviors, which can ultimately lead to decreased functioning, depression, and disability. Several patient-reported instruments have been developed to measure FA, but they have been criticized for limited construct validity, inadequate item specificity, lack of cutoff scores, and missing important FA components. The Fear-Avoidance Components Scale (FACS) is a new patient-reported measure designed to comprehensively evaluate FA in patients with painful medical conditions. It combines important components of FA found in prior FA scales, while trying to correct some of their deficiencies, within a framework of the most current FA model. Psychometric evaluation of the FACS found high internal consistency (α = 0.92) and high test/retest reliability (r = 0.90-0.94, P < 0.01). FACS scores differentiated between 2 separate chronic pain patient samples and a nonpatient comparison group. When clinically relevant severity levels were created, FACS severity scores were highly associated with FA-related patient-reported psychosocial and objective lifting performance variables. These results suggest that the FACS is a psychometrically strong and reliable measure that can help healthcare providers assess FA-related barriers to function and recovery.

  18. A Phase II Multicenter Trial With Rivaroxaban in the Treatment of Livedoid Vasculopathy Assessing Pain on a Visual Analog Scale

    PubMed Central

    Drabik, Attyla; Hillgruber, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Background Livedoid vasculopathy is an orphan skin disease characterized by recurrent thrombosis of the cutaneous microcirculation. It manifests itself almost exclusively in the ankles, the back of the feet, and the distal part of the lower legs. Because of the vascular occlusion, patients suffer from intense local ischemic pain. Incidence of livedoid vasculopathy is estimated to be around 1:100,000. There are currently no approved treatments for livedoid vasculopathy, making off-label therapy the only option. In Europe, thromboprophylactic treatment with low-molecular-weight heparins has become widely accepted. Objective The aim of this trial is the statistical verification of the therapeutic effects of the anticoagulant rivaroxaban in patients suffering from livedoid vasculopathy. Methods We performed a therapeutic phase IIa trial designed as a prospective, one-armed, multicenter, interventional series of cases with a calculated sample size of 20 patients. The primary outcome is the assessment of local pain on the visual analog scale (VAS) as an intraindividual difference of 2 values between baseline and 12 weeks. Results Enrollment started in December 2012 and was still open at the date of submission. The study is expected to finish in November 2014. Conclusions Livedoid vasculopathy is associated with increased thrombophilia in the cutaneous microcirculation and the continuous use of anticoagulants helps improve the symptoms. The causes of cutaneous infarctions are heterogenous, but ultimately follow the known mechanisms of the coagulation cascade. Rivaroxaban affects the coagulation cascade and inhibits the factor Xa–dependent conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, thereby considerably reducing the risk of thrombosis. Trial Registration Trial Registration EudraCT Number: 2012-000108-13-DE; https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search?query=eudract_number:2012-000108-13 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6UCktWVCA); German Clinical

  19. Establishing intra- and inter-rater agreement of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability scale for evaluating pain in toddlers during immunization

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Rebecca J; Barrowman, Nick; Elia, Sonja; Manias, Elizabeth; Royle, Jenny; Harrison, Denise

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale is a five-item tool that was developed to assess postoperative pain in young children. The tool is frequently used as an outcome measure in studies investigating acute procedural pain in young children; however, there are limited published psychometric data in this context. OBJECTIVE: To establish inter-rater and intrarater agreement of the FLACC scale in toddlers during immunization. METHODS: Participants comprised a convenience sample of toddlers recruited from an immunization drop-in service, who were part of a larger pilot randomized controlled trial. Toddlers were video- and audiotaped during immunization procedures. The first rater scored each video twice in random order over a period of three weeks (intrarater agreement), while the second rater scored each video once and was blinded to the first rater’s scores (inter-rater agreement). The FLACC scale was scored at four time-points throughout the procedure. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement of the FLACC scale. RESULTS: Thirty toddlers between 12 and 18 months of age were recruited, and video data were available for 29. Intrarater agreement coefficients were 0.88 at baseline, 0.97 at insertion of first needle, and 0.80 and 0.81 at 15 s and 30 s following the final injection, respectively. Inter-rater coefficients were 0.40 at baseline, 0.95 at insertion of first needle, and 0.81 and 0.78 at 15 s and 30 s following the final injection, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The FLACC scale has sufficient agreement in assessing pain in toddlers during immunizations, especially during the most painful periods of the procedure. PMID:24308028

  20. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  1. Effect of a combined continuous and intermittent transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain perception of burn patients evaluated by visual analog scale: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruvalcaba, Irma; Sánchez-Hernández, Viridiana; Mercado-Sesma, Arieh R

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the effect of continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the perception of pain in patients with burns of different types. Materials and methods A pilot study was conducted in 14 patients (age 30.9±7.5 years) with second- and third-degree burns of different types. The burn types included electrical, fire/flame, and chemical. All patients received continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation sessions three times per week for 4 weeks. Each session had a duration of 30 minutes. A pair of electrodes were placed around the burn. The primary efficacy endpoint was the perception of pain assessed by a visual analog scale at baseline and at the 30th day. Results A significant reduction of pain perception was reported (8.0±1.7 vs 1.0±0.5; P=0.027) by all patients after electrical stimulation therapy. There were no reports of adverse events during the intervention period. Conclusion Electrical stimulation could be a potential nonpharmacological therapeutic option for pain management in burn patients. PMID:26719723

  2. Pain description and severity of chronic orofacial pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Vickers, E R; Cousins, M J; Woodhouse, A

    1998-12-01

    A multidisciplinary pain centre study of 120 consecutive chronic orofacial pain patients assessed pain description and intensity ratings, gender differences, prevalence of concurrent conditions, and interinstrument relationships of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and visual analogue scale. Pain words chosen by patients to describe conditions were predominantly sensory words, and patients with concurrent conditions often listed words indicating a substantial affective component. Results showed pain intensity ratings of chronic orofacial pain conditions have similar or higher pain ratings when compared with other medical chronic pain conditions such as back pain, cancer pain and arthritis. There was a significantly higher female: male ratio (88:32) with gender playing an important but poorly understood causal role. The most frequent condition diagnosed was atypical facial pain (n = 40), followed by temporomandibular disorder (n = 32), atypical odontalgia (n = 29) and pathology of the orofacial region (n = 19). Temporomandibular disorder was present in 75 of the 120 subjects, as the sole pain complaint (n = 32) or as an associated secondary condition (n = 43), indicating concurrent pain conditions exist and may be related. There were significantly higher total pain scores of the McGill Pain Questionnaire in patients with multiple conditions compared with patients with a single condition. The visual analogue scale showed a significant correlation to the number of words chosen index of the McGill Pain Questionnaire for orofacial pain.

  3. Assessing fear in patients with cervical pain: development and validation of the Pictorial Fear of Activity Scale-Cervical (PFActS-C).

    PubMed

    Turk, Dennis C; Robinson, James P; Sherman, Jeffrey J; Burwinkle, Tasha; Swanson, Kimberly

    2008-09-30

    The fear avoidance model (FAM) postulates that fear of pain or reinjury is a risk factor for persistent pain and disability, because it leads to the avoidance of physical activity. Research on the FAM has not yielded consistent results, which may be attributed to the model itself, but could also be a product of the way fear of movement is assessed. Studies of the FAM have measured fear using verbal scales consisting of items that are often vague and have only an indirect relationship with fear. This study reports on the development of a Pictorial Fear of Activity Scale-Cervical (PFActS-C). The instrument consists of a set of photographs depicting movements in which four factors that determine biomechanical demands on the neck are systematically varied--Direction of Movement, Arm Position, Weight Bearing, and Extremity of Movement. Patients (n=355) who had been involved in motor vehicle collisions with minimal symptoms (n=143) and moderate to severe symptoms (n=212) rated their fear of engaging in a set of activities depicted in the PFActS-C. Based on a principle components analysis, a 19 item measure was developed. Internal consistency (alpha=.98), stability over time (n=44, IntraClass Correlation=.72), and construct validity were all good to excellent. The results indicate that the PFActS-C may be a useful tool for assessing fear of movement in patients with cervical pain. Research is needed to confirm the factor structure of the PFActS-C and to assess the generalizability of the results to other samples with neck pain.

  4. Evaluation of the reliability and validity of the Medical Outcomes Study sleep scale in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy during an international clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Viala-Danten, Muriel; Martin, Susan; Guillemin, Isabelle; Hays, Ron D

    2008-01-01

    Background Sleep is an important element of functioning and well-being. The Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-Sleep) includes 12 items assessing sleep disturbance, sleep adequacy, somnolence, quantity of sleep, snoring, and awakening short of breath or with a headache. A sleep problems index, grouping items from each of the former domains, is also available. This study evaluates the psychometric properties of MOS-Sleep Scale in a painful diabetic peripheral neuropathic population based on a clinical trial conducted in six countries. Methods Clinical data and health-related quality of life data were collected at baseline and after 12 weeks of follow-up. Overall, 396 patients were included in the analysis. Psychometric properties of the MOS-Sleep were assessed in the overall population and per country when the sample size was sufficient. Internal consistency reliability was assessed by Cronbach's alpha; the structure of the instrument was assessed by verifying item convergent and discriminant criteria; construct validity was evaluated by examining the relationships between MOS-Sleep scores and sleep interference and pain scores, and SF-36 scores; effect-sizes were used to assess the MOS-Sleep responsiveness. The study was conducted in compliance with United States Food and Drug Administration regulations for informed consent and protection of patient rights. Results Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.71 to 0.81 for the multi-item dimensions and the sleep problems index. Item convergent and discriminant criteria were satisfied with item-scale correlations for hypothesized dimensions higher than 0.40 and tending to exceed the correlations of items with other dimensions, respectively. Taken individually, German, Polish and English language versions had good internal consistency reliability and dimension structure. Construct validity was supported with lower sleep adequacy score and greater sleep problems index scores associated with measures of sleep interference and

  5. Classification Accuracy of MMPI-2 Validity Scales in the Detection of Pain-Related Malingering: A Known-Groups Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, Kevin J.; Etherton, Joseph L.; Greve, Kevin W.; Heinly, Matthew T.; Meyers, John E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of "Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory" 2nd edition (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) validity indicators in the detection of malingering in clinical patients with chronic pain using a hybrid clinical-known groups/simulator design. The…

  6. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  7. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  8. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  9. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  10. Early visceral pain predicts chronic pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten Rune; Ording, Helle; Andersen, Claus; Licht, Peter B; Toft, Palle

    2014-11-01

    Chronic pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is related to postoperative pain during the first postoperative week, but it is unknown which components of the early pain response is important. In this prospective study, 100 consecutive patients were examined preoperatively, 1 week postoperatively, and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively for pain, psychological factors, and signs of hypersensitivity. Overall pain, incisional pain (somatic pain component), deep abdominal pain (visceral pain component), and shoulder pain (referred pain component) were registered on a 100-mm visual analogue scale during the first postoperative week. Nine patients developed chronic unexplained pain 12 months postoperatively. In a multivariate analysis model, cumulated visceral pain during the first week and number of preoperative biliary pain attacks were identified as independent risk factors for unexplained chronic pain 12 months postoperatively. There were no consistent signs of hypersensitivity in the referred pain area either pre- or postoperatively. There were no significant associations to any other variables examined. The risk of chronic pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is relatively low, but significantly related to the visceral pain response during the first postoperative week.

  11. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  12. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult.

  13. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries and conditions that cause pain and restrict motion. Neck pain causes include: Muscle strains. Overuse, such ... body then forms bone spurs that affect joint motion and cause pain. Nerve compression. Herniated disks or ...

  14. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  15. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  16. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  17. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  18. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  19. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  20. Phantom Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be an effective treatment for some types of chronic pain. In acupuncture, the practitioner inserts extremely fine, sterilized ... and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/chronic_pain/detail_chronic_pain.htm. Accessed Sept. 16, 2014. ...

  1. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  2. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  3. Experimental manipulations of pain catastrophizing influence pain levels in patients with chronic pain and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Kasch, Helge; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Pain catastrophizing (PC) has been related to pain levels in both patients experiencing acute or chronic pain and in healthy volunteers exposed to experimental pain. Still, it is unclear whether high levels of pain catastrophizing lead to high levels of pain or vice versa. We therefore tested whether levels of pain catastrophizing could be increased and decreased in the same participant through hypnotic suggestions and whether the altered level of situation-specific pain catastrophizing was related to increased and decreased pain levels, respectively. Using the spontaneous pain of 22 patients with chronic tension-type headache and experimentally induced pain in 22 healthy volunteers, participants were tested in 3 randomized sessions where they received 3 types of hypnotic suggestions: Negative (based on the 13 items in the Pain Catastrophizing Scale), Positive (coping-oriented reversion of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and Neutral (neutral sentence) hypnotic suggestions. The hypnotic suggestions significantly increased and decreased situation-specific PC in both patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Also, the levels of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were significantly altered in both patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Furthermore, regression analyses showed that changes in pain catastrophizing predicted changes in pain in patients (R = 0.204-0.304; P < 0.045) and in healthy volunteers (R = 0.328-0.252; P < 0.018). This is the first study to successfully manipulate PC in positive and negative directions in both patients with chronic pain and healthy volunteers and to show that these manipulations significantly influence pain levels. These findings may have important theoretical and clinical implications.

  4. Adaptability to pain is associated with potency of local pain inhibition, but not conditioned pain modulation: a healthy human study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Wang, Kelun; Yao, Dongyuan; Xue, Charlie C L; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between pain sensitivity, adaptability, and potency of endogenous pain inhibition, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and local pain inhibition. Forty-one healthy volunteers (20 male, 21 female) received conditioning stimulation (CS) over 2 sessions in a random order: tonic heat pain (46 °C) on the right leg for 7 minutes and cold pressor pain (1 °C to 4 °C) on the left hand for 5 minutes. Participants rated the intensity of pain continuously using a 0 to 10 electronic visual analogue scale. The primary outcome measures were pressure pain thresholds (PPT) measured at the heterotopic and homotopic location to the CS sites before, during, and 20 minutes after CS. Two groups of participants, pain adaptive and pain nonadaptive, were identified based on their response to pain in the cold pressor test. Pain-adaptive participants showed a pain reduction between peak pain and pain at end of the test by at least 2 of 10 (n=16); whereas the pain-nonadaptive participants reported unchanged peak pain during 5-minute CS (n=25). Heterotopic PPTs during the CS did not differ between the 2 groups. However, increased homotopic PPTs measured 20 minutes after CS correlated with the amount of pain reduction during CS. These results suggest that individual sensitivity and adaptability to pain does not correlate with the potency of CPM. Adaptability to pain is associated with longer-lasting local pain inhibition.

  5. Multicentric evaluation by Verbal Rate Scale and EuroQoL-5D of early and late post-operative pain after TAPP and TEP procedures with mechanical fixation for bilateral inguinal hernias.

    PubMed

    Zanghì, Antonio; Di Vita, Maria; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Castorina, Sergio; Cavallaro, Andrea Sebastiano; Piccolo, Gaetano; Grosso, Giuseppe; Cappellani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Aimed to evaluate the postoperative pain and other complications among two cohorts of patients undergone transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) and totally extraperitoneal (TEP) laparoscopic hernia repairs with mechanical fixation, the chart of 305 TAPP and 134 TEP for bilateral not recurrent inguinal hernias were reviewed. The postoperative pain was assessed by using the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) at one week, one month, 3 months ad six months postoperatively. A subgroup of 60 patients was also administered the QoL EQ-5D questionnaire and follow up for at least 6 months. We found a statistically significant difference in the first day (p = 0.001), in the 7th day (p = 0.002), 30th, and 90th day (p = 0.008) between patients perception of pain in TAPP group and TEP group, but after the 180th day there was not any considerable distinction. On the short term the postoperative pain seems slightly lesser in TEP group.

  6. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  7. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  8. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  9. Imipramine and pregabalin combination for painful polyneuropathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Holbech, Jakob V; Bach, Flemming W; Finnerup, Nanna B; Brøsen, Kim; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2015-05-01

    Monotherapy with first-line drugs for neuropathic pain often fails to provide sufficient pain relief or has unacceptable side effects because of the need for high doses. The aim of this trial was to test whether the combination of imipramine and pregabalin in moderate doses would relieve pain more effectively than monotherapy with either of the drugs. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, multicenter trial consisting of four 5-week treatment periods in patients with painful polyneuropathy. Treatment arms were imipramine 75 mg/d vs pregabalin 300 mg/d vs combination therapy vs placebo. Patients with polyneuropathy and symptoms for more than 6 months, age 20 to 85 years, pain intensity ≥4 on a 0- to 10-point numeric rating scale (NRS) and pain at least 4 days a week were included in the trial. A total of 262 patients were screened for participation, 73 patients were randomized, and 69 patients were included in the data analysis. The effect on average pain in comparison with placebo was: combination (-1.67 NRS points, P < 0.001), imipramine (-1.08 NRS points, P < 0.001), and pregabalin (-0.48 NRS points, P = 0.03). The combination therapy had significantly lower pain scores than both monotherapies: combination vs imipramine (P = 0.009), combination vs pregabalin (P < 0.001). During combination therapy, the dropout rate was higher and the patients reported a higher rate and severity of side effects. Combination of moderate doses of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and pregabalin could be considered as an alternative to high-dosage monotherapy. However, the trial also emphasized that balance between efficacy and safety is an issue.

  10. Exercise therapy for low back pain: a small-scale exploratory survey of current physiotherapy practice in the Republic of Ireland acute hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Karol; Doody, Catherine; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2006-11-01

    A small-scale exploratory cross-sectional survey investigated the current use of a range of exercise therapy approaches for low back pain (LBP) by outpatient physiotherapists in the acute hospital setting in the Republic of Ireland, where the majority of publicly funded treatment is delivered. Of the 120 postal questionnaires distributed to 24 physiotherapy departments, 87 were returned (72.5% response rate). The results showed specific spinal stabilization exercises were the most popular exercise therapy for acute (39%; n = 35) and chronic (51%; n = 48) LBP, followed by the McKenzie approach (acute LBP (ALBP) 35.6%; n = 32: chronic LBP (CLBP) 17%; n = 16), and abdominal exercise (ALBP 11.1%; n = 10: CLBP 9.6%; n = 9). The most popular forms of exercise therapy used by outpatient physiotherapists in acute hospital settings in Ireland lack support from evidence-based clinical guidelines, and further large-scale high quality randomized controlled trials of these approaches are warranted. Further research should also establish the use of exercise therapy and attitudes to clinical guidelines of physiotherapists in other countries and healthcare settings.

  11. Dimensions of "unidimensional" ratings of pain and emotions in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Huber, Alexa; Suman, Anna Lisa; Rendo, Carmela Anna; Biasi, Giovanni; Marcolongo, Roberto; Carli, Giancarlo

    2007-08-01

    The use of unidimensional scales to measure pain intensity has been criticised because of the multidimensional nature of pain. We conducted multiple linear regression analyses to determine which dimensions of pain--sensory versus affective--predicted scores on unidimensional scales measuring pain intensity and emotions in 109 Italian women suffering from chronic, non-malignant musculoskeletal pain. We then compared the results with earlier findings in two groups of cancer patients suffering from acute post-operative pain and chronic cancer-related pain, respectively. Age, physical capacity and scores on the multidimensional affect and pain survey (MAPS) were used to predict patients' ratings on one visual analogue scale (VAS) and three numerical rating scales (NRS) measuring pain intensity, anxiety and depressed mood. Unidimensional pain intensity ratings were predicted better from sensory than from affective pain predictors, and the affective predictors made no unique contribution (NRS), or only a very small one (VAS). Both sensory and emotional pain aspects were unique predictors of NRS anxiety and depression. Therefore, in contrast to earlier findings in two different types of cancer patients, in subjects affected by chronic non-malignant musculoskeletal pain, the scores on unidimensional pain intensity scales mainly reflect sensory pain dimensions, supporting the discriminant validity of the NRS and VAS used. However, the patients had some difficulty in distinguishing between sensory and emotional information. For this reason, several unidimensional scales to rate pain intensity and emotions separately should be used to obtain a complete picture of the status and needs of any given patient.

  12. Sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  13. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... acupuncture, chiropractic care, massage or other manual therapies, yoga, herbal and nutritional therapies, or others. This information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of treatment. The goals of the comprehensive pain ...

  14. Anal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... change in bowel habit or rectal bleeding. A hemorrhoid that develops quickly or is particularly painful may ... your doctor. The blood clot of a thrombosed hemorrhoid, although painful, can't break loose and travel, ...

  15. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific points on the body. Some people with low back pain report that acupuncture helps relieve their symptoms. Massage. ... Accessed May 29, 2015. Adult acute and subacute low back pain. Bloomington, Minn.: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. http:// ...

  16. Period Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may also have other symptoms, such as lower back pain, nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. Period pain is not ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  17. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  18. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  19. Breast Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... before your period and sometimes continuing through your menstrual cycle. The pain may be moderate or severe, and ... breasts. Throughout the month, not related to your menstrual cycle. Postmenopausal women sometimes have breast pain, but breast ...

  20. Hip Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... clues about the underlying cause. Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the ... tendons and other soft tissues that surround your hip joint. Hip pain can sometimes be caused by diseases ...

  1. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  2. Correlates of Complementary and Alternative Use in a Pediatric Tertiary Pain Center

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Rachel; Yeh, Gloria; Davis, Roger B.; Logan, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine correlates of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use in a pediatric population with chronic pain. To determine if CAM use is positively correlated with adaptive coping skills. Methods We examined patient data from children ages 7–18 (n=1175) with chronic pain who completed the intake assessment at the time of initial evaluation at Boston Children’s multidisciplinary Pain Treatment Service between 2003–2011. The intake assessment included validated measures of anxiety, depression, pain coping skills and functional disability. Parents were also asked whether their child had tried CAM modalities in the past. We used a multivariable logistic regression model to determine correlates of CAM use and a multivariable linear regression model to determine the relationship between bio-behavioral CAM (relaxation training, hypnosis, and biofeedback) and accommodative coping. Results In our multivariable model, we found that female gender (OR 1.47, CI 1.07–2.01), parental education (OR 1.11 per year, CI 1.06–1.16), greater pain intensity (OR 1.06 per point on an 11-point numerical analog scale, CI 1.01–1.11), and more functional disability (OR 1.19 per 10 point increment on the Functional Disability Inventory, CI 1.06–1.34) were independently associated with CAM use. Bio-behavioral CAM was found to have a statistically significant correlation with accommodative coping skills (β 0.2 p-value .003). Conclusion In a pediatric chronic pain center, CAM users tended to have higher pain intensity, and greater functional disability. Exposure to bio-behavioral CAM techniques was associated with adaptive coping skills. PMID:25169161

  3. Randomized Trial of Immediate Postoperative Pain Following Single-incision Versus Traditional Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Liu, Yang; Han, Wei; Liu, Jun; Jin, Lan; Li, Jian-She; Zhang, Zhong-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background: We undertook a randomized controlled trial to ascertain if single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) was more beneficial for reducing postoperative pain than traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (TLC). Moreover, the influencing factors of SILC were analyzed. Methods: A total of 552 patients with symptomatic gallstones or polyps were allocated randomly to undergo SILC (n = 138) or TLC (n = 414). Data on postoperative pain score, operative time, complications, procedure conversion, and hospital costs were collected. After a 6-month follow-up, all data were analyzed using the intention-to-treat principle. Results: Among SILC group, 4 (2.9%) cases required conversion to TLC. Mean operative time of SILC was significantly longer than that of TLC (58.97 ± 21.56 vs. 43.38 ± 19.02 min, P < 0.001). The two groups showed no significant differences in analgesic dose, duration of hospital stay, or cost. Median pain scores were similar between the two groups 7 days after surgery, but SILC-treated patients had a significantly lower median pain score 6 h after surgery (10-point scale: 3 [2, 4] vs. 4 [3, 5], P = 0.009). Importantly, subgroup analyses of operative time for SILC showed that a longer operative time was associated with greater prevalence of pain score >5 (≥100 min: 5/7 patients vs. <40 min, 3/16 patients, P = 0.015). Conclusions: The primary benefit of SILC appears to be slightly less pain immediately after surgery. Surgeon training seems to be important because the shorter operative time for SILC may elicit less pain immediately after surgery. PMID:26668145

  4. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  5. Pain in Children: Assessment and Nonpharmacological Management

    PubMed Central

    Srouji, Rasha; Ratnapalan, Savithiri; Schneeweiss, Suzan

    2010-01-01

    Pain perception in children is complex, and is often difficult to assess. In addition, pain management in children is not always optimized in various healthcare settings, including emergency departments. A review of pain assessment scales that can be used in children across all ages, and a discussion of the importance of pain in control and distraction techniques during painful procedures are presented. Age specific nonpharmacological interventions used to manage pain in children are most effective when adapted to the developmental level of the child. Distraction techniques are often provided by nurses, parents or child life specialists and help in pain alleviation during procedures. PMID:20706640

  6. Pain assessment in human fetus and infants.

    PubMed

    Bellieni, Carlo Valerio

    2012-09-01

    In humans, painful stimuli can arrive to the brain at 20-22 weeks of gestation. Therefore several researchers have devoted their efforts to study fetal analgesia during prenatal surgery, and during painful procedures in premature babies. Aim of this paper is to gather from scientific literature the available data on the signals that the human fetus and newborns produce, and that can be interpreted as signals of pain. Several signs can be interpreted as signals of pain. We will describe them in the text. In infants, these signs can be combined to create specific and sensible pain assessment tools, called pain scales, used to rate the level of pain.

  7. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  8. Contradictory correlations between derived scales.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M J; Hand, D J; Everitt, B S

    1991-08-01

    In a clinical trial one scale of pain relief is scored backwards relative to another (high on one corresponding to low on the other), with a consequent large negative correlation. But two derived scales of total pain, obtained by multiplying average pain relief on each scale by duration of pain (common to both pain relief measurements) gave an almost zero correlation. This apparent contradiction is explained by the inverse relationship between the pain relief scales and the large differences in duration of pain experienced by the patients.

  9. Reliability of tactile tools for pain assessment in blind athletes.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ana Claudia de Souza; Pagliuca, Lorita M Freitag; Almeida, Paulo Cesar P; Dallaire, Clemence C

    2008-06-01

    Health professionals have numerous visual and reporting scales at their disposal to assess pain. In recent years new tactile tools have been created (Pain Texture Scale and Tactile Pain Scale). This study validates these scales compared with the Numerical Rating Scale in 36 blind athletes who were assessed before and after competitions in the World Paralympics Games organized by the International Blind Sports Federation (IBSA) in Quebec, Canada. The reliability of these scales was analyzed through the intraclass correlation coefficient. Results showed good reliability for the Tactile Pain Scale and satisfactory reliability for the Pain Texture Scale.

  10. Aromatherapy: Does It Help to Relieve Pain, Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Community-Dwelling Older Persons?

    PubMed Central

    Tse, M. Y. Mimi

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an aromatherapy programme for older persons with chronic pain. The community-dwelling elderly people who participated in this study underwent a four-week aromatherapy programme or were assigned to the control group, which did not receive any interventions. Their levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and stress were collected at the baseline and at the postintervention assessment after the conclusion of the four-week programme. Eighty-two participants took part in the study. Forty-four participants (37 females, 7 males) were in the intervention group and 38 participants (30 females, 8 males) were in the control group. The pain scores were 4.75 (SD 2.32) on a 10-point scale for the intervention group and 5.24 (SD 2.14) for the control group before the programme. There was a slight reduction in the pain score of the intervention group. No significant differences were found in the same-group and between-group comparisons for the baseline and postintervention assessments. The depression, anxiety, and stress scores for the intervention group before the programme were 11.18 (SD 6.18), 9.64 (SD 7.05), and 12.91 (SD 7.70), respectively. A significant reduction in negative emotions was found in the intervention group (P < 0.05). The aromatherapy programme can be an effective tool to reduce pain, depression, anxiety, and stress levels among community-dwelling older adults. PMID:25114901

  11. Nicoboxil/nonivamide cream effectively and safely reduces acute nonspecific low back pain – a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Blahova, Zuzana; Holm, Janina Claudia; Weiser, Thomas; Richter, Erika; Trampisch, Matthias; Akarachkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background/objective Low back pain affects many patients and has a high socioeconomic impact. Topical capsaicinoids have been used for decades to treat musculoskeletal pain. This study investigated the effects of the fixed dose combination (FDC) of nonivamide (a capsaicinoid) and nicoboxil (a nicotinic acid ester) cream in the treatment of acute nonspecific low back pain. Materials and methods This phase III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational, multi-center trial investigated efficacy, safety, and tolerability of topical nicoboxil 1.08%/nonivamide 0.17% (Finalgon® cream) in treatment of acute nonspecific low back pain with the endpoints: pain intensity (PI) difference between pre-dose baseline and 8 hours after first application and the end of treatment, mobility score, and efficacy score. Results Patients (n=138), 21–65 years of age, were treated for up to 4 days with FDC or placebo cream. Mean baseline PI was 6.8 on a 0–10 point numerical rating scale. After 8 hours, pain was more reduced with the FDC than with placebo (adjusted means: 2.824 vs. 0.975 points; p<0.0001). On the last treatment day, mean pain reduction by the FDC was stronger than with placebo (adjusted means: 5.132 vs. 2.174 points; p<0.0001). Mobility on Day 1 was in favor of the FDC when compared to placebo (odds ratio [95% confidence interval {CI}]: 7.200 [3.609, 14.363], p<0.0001). At the end of treatment, patients treated with the FDC rated efficacy significantly higher than placebo (odds ratio [95% CI]: 11.370 [5.342, 24.199], p<0.0001). Both treatments were tolerated well. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Nicoboxil/nonivamide cream is an effective and safe treatment for acute nonspecific low back pain, adding a promising treatment option. PMID:28008281

  12. Personality and Temperament Correlates of Pain Catastrophizing in Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Meesters, Cor; van den Hout, Anja; Wessels, Sylvia; Franken, Ingmar; Rassin, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Pain catastrophizing is generally viewed as an important cognitive factor underlying chronic pain. The present study examined personality and temperament correlates of pain catastrophizing in a sample of young adolescents (N = 132). Participants completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Children, as well as scales for measuring sensitivity of…

  13. A comparative study of postoperative pain for open thyroidectomy versus bilateral axillo-breast approach robotic thyroidectomy using a self-reporting application for iPad

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Young Jun; Song, Junho; Kang, Jiyoung; Woo, Jung-Woo; Song, Ra-Yeong; Kwon, Hyungju; Kim, Su-Jin; Choi, June Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative pain for robotic thyroid surgeries including bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) has not been well studied. In this study, we have developed a self-reporting application (SRA) for iPad and prospectively collected pain scores from open thyroidectomy (OT) and BABA robotic thyroidectomy (RT) patients. Methods Female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma were included. Patients recorded pain scores for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, chest, and back on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. Once discharged, on postoperative day 14, a survey was also conducted on satisfaction of SRA and cosmesis. Results A total of 54 patients were enrolled (27 BABA RT and 27 OT). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative complication rates. Postoperative pain scores at days 1, 2, 3, and 14 were not significantly different between the groups for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, or back. Postoperative analgesic requirements were similar between the 2 groups. Wound satisfaction scores were significantly higher in the BABA RT group (BABA RT 7.4 vs. OT 5.7; P = 0.016). Satisfaction scores for the usefulness of SRA were above 7.2 for all four questionnaire items on the 10-point scale. Conclusion Postoperative pain for BABA RT is equivalent to OT but offers greater cosmetic satisfaction for patients. A mobile device application such as SRA may facilitate proper assessment and management of pain in postoperative patients. PMID:27186567

  14. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause of ...

  15. Neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7–10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:28205574

  16. Central pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is central pain, a neuropathic pain syndrome caused by a lesion in the brain or spinal cord that sensitizes one's perception of pain. It is a debilitating condition caused by various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, strokes, spinal cord injuries, or brain tumors. Varied symptoms and the use of pharmacological medicines and nonpharmacological therapies will be addressed.

  17. Temperament Traits and Chronic Pain: The Association of Harm Avoidance and Pain-Related Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Knaster, Peter; Estlander, Ann-Mari; Karlsson, Hasse; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kalso, Eija

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anxiety symptoms are common in chronic pain patients. High levels of anxiety are associated with increased pain experience and disability. Proneness to anxiety has a large interindividual variation. The aim of the study was to determine whether the anxiety-related temperament trait Harm Avoidance (HA), is associated with pain-related anxiety. Methods One hundred chronic pain patients in a multidisciplinary pain clinic participated in the study. The patients were assessed using the HA scale of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) of Cloninger and Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 (PASS-20). Both the HA total score and the four subscales of HA were analyzed. Current pain intensity was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to control for the influence of depression on the personality measurement. Results The HA total score was associated with PASS-20, but the association became non-significant after controlling for depression. The HA4 Fatigability subscale was associated with the PASS scales. Depression did not influence this association. Pain intensity was not correlated with HA or the PASS scales. However, the association between HA4 Fatigability and PASS was influenced by pain intensity. Higher pain intensity was associated with stronger association between the scales. Conclusion Harm Avoidance, representing temperament and trait-related anxiety, has relevance in pain-related anxiety. Assessing personality and temperament may deepen the clinician's understanding of the pain experience and behavior in chronic pain patients. PMID:23133510

  18. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  19. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  20. [Facial pain].

    PubMed

    Makhinov, K A; Barinov, A N; Zhestikova, M G; Mingazova, L R; Parkhomenko, E V

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of facial pain is a problem for physicians of different specialties (neurologists, dentists, surgeons, oculists, otolaryngologists and psychiatrists). A classification of this pathology is far from ideal and an interdisciplinary comprehensive approach is needed. Current approaches to etiotropic, symptomatic and pathogenetic treatment of patients with most frequent variants of orofacial pain are presented.

  1. [Heel pain].

    PubMed

    Cizmár, I; Svizenská, I; Pilný, J; Repko, M; Ira, D

    2005-01-01

    Heel pain is quite frequent clinical symptom in our population. Successful therapy derives from the problem aetiology. The most frequent source of pain is the mechanical basis, both on dorsal and plantar side of calcaneum. Therapy includes a variety of procedures, from routine measures to surgical intervention.

  2. Comparison of sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, and complications associated with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules between two radiologists with different levels of experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jung, Soo Jin

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the sample adequacy, patient pain ratings, and complications associated with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules between two radiologists with different levels of experience. From March 2012 to May 2012, two radiologists performed ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration to diagnose thyroid nodules in consecutive patients using the same techniques. 157 patients were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of 75 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration by an experienced radiologist and group 2 consisted of 82 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration by a less experienced radiologist. The sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, and complications related to ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration were compared between the two groups. There was no statistical difference in sex, age, nodule size, or location between the two groups. There was no statistical difference (p = 0.710) in the prevalence of adequate cytology between group 1 (94.7 % [71/75]) and group 2 (96.3 % [79/82]). The mean ± standard deviation of pain-scale ratings was 1.99 ± 1.68 in group 1 and 2.30 ± 1.83 in group 2, but there was no statistical difference (p = 0.326). There were no significant complications related to the procedure and no sonographic changes on follow-up ultrasound for either group. The study results demonstrated good outcomes for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules and no statistically significant differences in sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, or complication rates between two radiologists with different levels of experience.

  3. Intrathecal ziconotide for refractory pain.

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila A

    2004-07-01

    For cancer and AIDS patients, 10-30% of pain is refractory to strong opioids, requiring intraspinal administration for pain management. Ziconotide is a selective N-type calcium channel blocker, which inhibits neurotransmitter release, and following intrathecal administration will affect primary nociceptive afferents. In 108 patients with previously unmanaged refractory pain despite the use of systemic or intrathecal opioids, in the initial titration phase, the mean Visual Analogue Scale of Pain Intensity scores improved more in the ziconotide group (53%) than the placebo group (18%). Serious adverse effects were more common in the ziconotide group (31%) than placebo group (10%) in the initial titration phase. In the 48 patients receiving ziconotide, who proceeded to the maintenance phase, the benefit of ziconotide was continued. Until a new approach with a better effectiveness/adverse effects profile than ziconotide for refractory pain emerges, further optimisation of ziconotide for use in the treatment of refractory pain should be undertaken.

  4. Pain in Portuguese Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, Daniela; Sá, Maria José; Galhardo, Vasco; Guimarães, Joana; Lima, Deolinda

    2011-01-01

    Early reports often ignored pain as an important symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS). Pain prevalence figures in MS from European countries other than Portugal range between 40 and 65%. To our knowledge there is no published data in English on pain in MS in Portugal. We describe the demographic and clinical characteristics, with an emphasis on pain, of 85 MS patients followed-up in a Portuguese hospital, contributing to pain epidemiology in MS. Patients were interviewed sequentially after their regular appointments at the MS clinic; patients with pain completed The Brief Pain Inventory and The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). The prevalence of pain found was 34%. Headache and back pain were the most common anatomical sites described, followed by upper and lower limbs. Intensity of pain in an 11-point scale was, for the maximum pain intensity 6.7 ± 1.8, for the minimum pain intensity 2.2 ± 2.0, for the mean pain intensity 4.5 ± 1.5, and for the actual pain intensity 2.4 ± 2.9. Pain interfered significantly with general activity, mood, work, social relations, and enjoyment of life. All MS patients with pain employed words from both the sensory and affective categories of the MPQ to describe it. Patient pain descriptions’ included the word “hot-burning” in 59% of the cases, common in the report of central pain, but neuropathic pain medications were only used by 10% of them. Pain is an important symptom in Portuguese patients with MS, not only because of the high prevalence found, concordant with other European countries, but also because of its interference with quality-of-life. PMID:21503136

  5. Influence of BMI, gender, and sports on pain decrease and medication usage after facet–medial branch neurotomy or SI joint lateral branch cooled RF-neurotomy in case of low back pain: original research in the Austrian population

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Wolfgang; Stelzer, Valentin; Stelzer, Dominik; Braune, Monika; Duller, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This retrospective original research was designed to illustrate the general outcome after radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy of lumbar medial branch (MB) and posterior ramus of the sacroiliac joint of 160 patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) 1, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Methods Visual Analog Scale (VAS) 0–10 pain scores, quality of life, body mass index (BMI), medication usage, and frequency of physical exercise/sports participation (none, 1–3×/week, more) were collected before the procedure, at 1 month post procedure (n=160), and again at 6 (n=73) and 12 months (n=89) post procedure. Results A VAS decrease of 4 points on a 10-point scale (from 8 to 4) in the overall group was seen after 6 months and of 4.5 after 12 months. Lower medication usage was reported, with opioids decreased by 40% and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by 60%. Decreased pain lasted for 12 months. Significantly better outcomes were reported by patients with BMIs <30. No gender-specific differences occurred in the reported decrease in VAS. Analysis of the “no-sports” group versus the more active (1–3 times weekly sports) group showed a better pain decrease after 1 year in the active group. Conclusion The data suggest RF treatment for chronic LBP that can lead to long-term improvement. Patients with a BMI >30 are less likely to report decreased pain. The better long-term pain relief in the sports participating group is a motivation for the authors to keep the patients in motion. PMID:28144161

  6. Intensity of Pain after Pelviscopic Operations

    PubMed

    Dietterle; Pott; Joram; Riedel

    1996-08-01

    To study postpelviscopic pain as related to the temperature of insufflated carbon dioxide (CO2) gas, a cohort study was conducted with two groups of 100 women. In one group the CO2 was warmed before insufflation, and in the other it was not. The patients were asked to rate the pain they felt during the operation and on the first and second postoperative days using a scale from zero (no pain) to 10 (unbearable pain). No significant differences were detected between the groups in terms of age, consumption of analgesics, and pain. Women for whom the CO2 was warmed before insufflation experienced less pain and required only a few analgesics.

  7. Delivery Pain and the Development of Mother-Infant Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferber, Sari Goldstein; Feldman, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    This study examined delivery pain as a possible risk factor for the development of mother-infant interaction. Eighty-one mothers completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. A retrospective evaluation of labor pain was performed using the Visual Analog Scale at 2 days…

  8. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany.

  9. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development.

  10. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  11. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  12. Pain assessment and measurement in neonates: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaomei; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Cusson, Regina M; Zhang, Di

    2013-12-01

    Pain assessment and measurement are the cornerstones of pain management. Pain assessment connotes a comprehensive multidimensional description. Conversely, pain measurement provides a numeric quantitative description of each factor illustrating pain qualities. Pain scales provide a composite score used to guide practice and research. The type of infant pain instrument chosen is a significant factor in guiding pain management practice. The purpose of this review was to summarize current infant pain measures by introducing a conceptual framework for pain measurement. Although more than 40 infant pain instruments exist, many were devised solely for research purposes; several of the newly developed instruments largely overlap with existing instruments. Integration of pain management into daily practice remains problematic. Understanding how each instrument measures infant pain allows clinicians to make better decisions about what instrument to use with which infant and in what circumstances. In addition, novel new measurement techniques need further testing.

  13. Pain characteristics in fibromyalgia: understanding the multiple dimensions of pain.

    PubMed

    Plazier, Mark; Ost, Jan; Stassijns, Gaëtane; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common disease with a high economic burden. The etiology of this disease remains unclear, as there are no specific abnormalities on clinical or technical examinations. Evidence suggests that central pain sensitization at the brain pain matrix might be involved. Understanding the pain characteristics of this disease is of importance both for diagnosis and treatment. The authors present their findings of pain characteristics in a Belgium population of fibromyalgia patients. Data of 65 patients (57 male and 8 female patients) were analyzed in this study (mean age 46.86, SD = +8.79). Patients filled out the following questionnaires: visual analogue scale, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, pain-catastrophizing scale, pain vigilance and awareness questionnaire, modified fatigue impact scale, the Beck depression inventory, the short form 36 and the Dutch shortened profile of mood states. Statistical analysis was performed making use of a factor analysis and a hierarchical cluster analysis. We were able to define pain characteristics in this group of patients. The reciprocal effects of mood and fatigue on pain experience could be identified within the data, catastrophizing scores show a high correlation with overall life quality and pain experience. We have performed a cluster analysis on the fibromyalgia patients, based on the four main principal components defining the overall disease burden. Mood explained most of the variance in symptoms, followed by mental health state, fatigue, and catastrophizing. Three clusters of patients could be revealed by these components. Clusters: 1 high scores on mood disorders, pain, and decreased mental health, 2 high scores on fatigue and physical health, and 3 a mixture of these two groups. This data suggest that different subgroups of fibromyalgia patients could be identified and based on that, treatment strategies and results might be adapted.

  14. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  15. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org National ...

  16. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... analgesia, identify new targets for analgesic drugs, and test the efficacy and adverse reactions of newly developed or currently used drugs to treat pain. Researchers are currently using these technologies to discover the mechanisms by which drugs such ...

  17. Urination - painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... and vagina Other causes of painful urination include: Interstitial cystitis Prostate infection ( prostatitis ) Radiation cystitis - damage to the ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bladder ... Cystitis Prostate Diseases Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infections ...

  18. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: CBC or blood differential C-reactive protein Joint x-ray Sedimentation rate ... chap 256. Schaible H-G. Joint pain: basic mechanisms. In: McMahon SB, Koltzenburg M, Tracey I, Turk ...

  19. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Review Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  20. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  1. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategy Current Research Research Funded by NINDS Basic Neuroscience Clinical Research Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus ... pain has done. Scientists believe that advances in neuroscience will lead to more and better treatments for ...

  2. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  3. Fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Rokyta, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The fetus reacts to nociceptive stimulations through different motor, autonomic, vegetative, hormonal, and metabolic changes relatively early in the gestation period. With respect to the fact that the modulatory system does not yet exist, the first reactions are purely reflexive and without connection to the type of stimulus. While the fetal nervous system is able to react through protective reflexes to potentially harmful stimuli, there is no accurate evidence concerning pain sensations in this early period. Cortical processes occur only after thalamocortical connections and pathways have been completed at the 26th gestational week. Harmful (painful) stimuli, especially in fetuses have an adverse effect on the development of humans regardless of the processes in brain. Moreover, pain activates a number of subcortical mechanisms and a wide spectrum of stress responses influence the maturation of thalamocortical pathways and other cortical activation which are very important in pain processing.

  4. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... chocolate in your diet helps reduce breast pain. Vitamin E, thiamine, magnesium, and evening primrose oil are not harmful, but most studies have not shown any benefit. Talk to your health care provider before starting ...

  5. Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome Evaluated Using painDETECT.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jornet, Pia; Molino-Pagan, Diana; Parra-Perez, Paco; Valenzuela, Sara

    2017-01-04

    OBJECTIVE : This study set out to identify the neuropathic component of pain experienced by burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients evaluated using painDETECT, a diagnostic tool that could easily be introduced into clinical practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS : This study included 64 patients (33 BMS and 31 suffering nociceptive pain). Each completed the painDETECT neuropathic pain questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and pain intensity was also measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). RESULTS : Pain among BMS patients (evaluated by VAS) was 6.1 ± 1.9, and 4.3 ± 1.7 among nociceptive patients (P < 0.001). PainDETECT obtained total scores ≥ 19 in 21% of BMS patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. When painDETECT pain descriptors were analyzed comparing the BMS group with nociceptive pain subjects, statistically significant differences were found for burning sensation (P < 0.010), prickling (P < 0.001), electric shock-like sensation (P = 0.046), thermal sensation (P < 0.001), and numbness (P = 0.002). Logistic regression analysis found that VAS scoring was the strongest determinant predicting neuropathic pain. CONCLUSION : The present study suggests that almost a third of BMS patients present neuropathic pain, which is strongly associated with the intensity of pain measured using VAS. These data could provide the basis for further research.

  6. Pain assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Winnie; Griffith, James W.; Morrison, M. Tracy; Tanquary, Jennifer; Sabata, Dory; Victorson, David; Carey, Leeanne M.; MacDermid, Joy C.; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pain is an important component of health and function, and chronic pain can be a problem in its own right. The purpose of this report is to review the considerations surrounding pain measurement in the NIH Toolbox, as well as to describe the measurement tools that were adopted for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox assessment battery. Methods: Instruments to measure pain in the NIH Toolbox were selected on the basis of scholarly input from a diverse group of experts, as well as review of existing instruments, which include verbal rating scales, numerical rating scales, and graphical scales. Results: Brief self-report measures of pain intensity and pain interference were selected for inclusion in the core NIH Toolbox for use with adults. A 0 to 10 numerical rating scale was recommended for measuring pain intensity, and a 6-item Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) short form for measuring pain interference. The 8-item PROMIS Pediatric Pain Interference measure was recommended as a supplemental measure. No specific measure was recommended for measuring pain intensity in children. Conclusions: Core and supplemental measures were recommended for the NIH Toolbox. Additional measures were reviewed for investigators who seek tools for measuring pain intensity in pediatric samples. PMID:23479545

  7. Thalamic pain alleviated by stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenlong; Yang, Min; Liu, Pengfei; Zhong, Wenxiang; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Thalamic pain is a distressing and treatment-resistant type of central post-stroke pain. Although stellate ganglion block is an established intervention used in pain management, its use in the treatment of thalamic pain has never been reported. Patient concerns: A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of severe intermittent lancinating pain on the right side of the face and the right hand. The pain started from the ulnar side of the right forearm after a mild ischemic stroke in bilateral basal ganglia and left thalamus. Weeks later, the pain extended to the dorsum of the finger tips and the whole palmar surface, becoming more severe. Meanwhile, there was also pain with similar characteristics emerging on her right face, resembling atypical trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnoses: Thalamic pain was diagnosed. Interventions: After refusing the further invasive treatment, she was suggested to try stellate ganglion block. Outcomes: After a 3-day period of pain free (numerical rating scale: 0) postoperatively, she reported moderate to good pain relief with a numerical rating scale of about 3 to 4 lasting 1 month after the first injection. Pain as well as the quality of life was markedly improved with less dose of analgesic agents. Lessons: Stellate ganglion block may be an optional treatment for thalamic pain. PMID:28151918

  8. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  9. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  10. Measurement scales in clinical research of the upper extremity, part 1: general principles, measures of general health, pain, and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Badalamente, Marie; Coffelt, Laureen; Elfar, John; Gaston, Glenn; Hammert, Warren; Huang, Jerry; Lattanza, Lisa; Macdermid, Joy; Merrell, Greg; Netscher, David; Panthaki, Zubin; Rafijah, Greg; Trczinski, Douglas; Graham, Brent

    2013-02-01

    Measurement is a fundamental cornerstone in all aspects of scientific discovery, including clinical research. To be useful, measurement instruments must meet several key criteria, the most important of which are satisfactory reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Part 1 of this article reviews the general concepts of measurement instruments and describes the measurement of general health, pain, and patient satisfaction.

  11. Psychometric profiles and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Eversole, L R; Stone, C E; Matheson, D; Kaplan, H

    1985-09-01

    The myofacial pain-dysfunction syndrome and atypical facial pain are the most prevalent chronic pain disorders of the facial region. Previously, the myofacial pain-dysfunction syndrome included all TMJ/masticatory muscle pain, jaw dysfunction, and joint clicking. We have segregated two major subgroups subsumed within this diagnostic classification and have assigned them to a myogenic facial pain (MFP) group and a TMJ internal derangement (TMJID) group. Significant age and personality differences were uncovered when these subpopulations were compared to subjects with atypical facial pain (AFP). Both MFP and TMJID groups are relatively homologous, involving younger persons than AFP subjects. Alternatively, when MFP, TMJID, and AFP subjects were compared for differences in MMPI psychometric scales, MFP and AFP subjects exhibited significantly higher scores, particularly for hypochondriasis, depression, and hysteria, than did TMJID subjects. It is concluded that subcategorization of myofascial pain-dysfunction patients into a myogenic pain group and a TMJ internal derangement group is justified on the basis of psychometric differences. Furthermore, psychopathologic factors are more significant among MFP and AFP subjects than among TMJID patients.

  12. Pain Assessment in Hospitalized Older Adults With Dementia and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Christina May; Monroe, Todd; Mion, Lorraine C.

    2015-01-01

    Pain can have negative effects leading to prolonged hospital stays. Determining the presence of uncontrolled and untreated pain in patients with cognitive impairments such as delirium, dementia, and delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) is challenging. One tool commonly suggested for use in assessment of pain in older adults with cognitive impairment is the Pain Assessment In Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) scale. Proper use of the PAINAD scale as part of a comprehensive pain management plan can help reduce the likelihood of a patient experiencing unrecognized and untreated pain. Using an individual example, this article illustrates best practices in pain assessment and management for a woman experiencing DSD during an acute hospitalization. PMID:24800815

  13. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3

  14. Pain, pain catastrophizing, and past legal charges related to drugs.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Watts, Daron A; Wiederman, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Using a self-report survey methodology in a cross-sectional consecutive primary care sample (N = 238), we examined pain at 3 time points (today, past month, past year), pain catastrophizing using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and history of legal charges for 5 drug-related crimes as defined by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Among the subsample of 185 participants with histories of being prescribed analgesics, 33 reported a history of legal charges for drug-related crimes. Analyses of variance among this subsample confirmed statistically significant relationships between the current level of pain and history of legal charges for drug-related crimes, as well as level of pain catastrophizing and history of legal charges for drug-related crimes.

  15. Sex differences in experimental measures of pain sensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bulls, Hailey W; Freeman, Emily L; Anderson, Austen JB; Robbins, Meredith T; Ness, Timothy J; Goodin, Burel R

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that increased pain sensitivity and disruption of endogenous pain inhibitory processes may account, at least in part, for the greater prevalence and severity of chronic pain in women compared to men. However, previous studies addressing this topic have produced mixed findings. This study examined sex differences in pain sensitivity and inhibition using quantitative sensory testing (QST), while also considering the influence of other important factors such as depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Healthy men (n=24) and women (n=24) each completed a QST battery. This battery included an ischemic pain task (IPT) that used a submaximal effort tourniquet procedure as well as a conditioned pain modulation (CPM) procedure for the assessment of endogenous pain inhibition. Prior to QST, participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Analyses revealed significant sex differences for the ischemic pain task and the conditioned pain modulation procedure, such that women tolerated the ischemic pain for a shorter amount of time and demonstrated less pain inhibition compared with men. This remained true even when accounting for sex differences in depressive symptoms and sleep quality. The results of this study suggest that women may be more pain sensitive and possess less-efficient endogenous pain inhibitory capacity compared with men. Whether interventions that decrease pain sensitivity and enhance pain inhibition in women ultimately improve their clinical pain outcomes is an area of research that deserves additional attention in the future. PMID:26170713

  16. Preoperative widespread pain sensitization and chronic pain after hip and knee replacement: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Sayers, Adrian; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Pyke, Mark; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain after joint replacement is common, affecting approximately 10% of patients after total hip replacement (THR) and 20% of patients after total knee replacement (TKR). Heightened generalized sensitivity to nociceptive input could be a risk factor for the development of this pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was associated with chronic pain after joint replacement. Data were analyzed from 254 patients receiving THR and 239 patients receiving TKR. Pain was assessed preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Pain Scale. Preoperative widespread pain sensitivity was assessed through measurement of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the forearm using an algometer. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression and linear mixed models, and adjustments were made for confounding variables. In both the THR and TKR cohort, lower PPTs (heightened widespread pain sensitivity) were significantly associated with higher preoperative pain severity. Lower PPTs were also significantly associated with higher pain severity at 12 months after surgery in the THR cohort. However, PPTs were not associated with the change in pain severity from preoperative to 12 months postoperative in either the TKR or THR cohort. These findings suggest that although preoperative widespread pressure pain sensitivity is associated with pain severity before and after joint replacement, it is not a predictor of the amount of pain relief that patients gain from joint replacement surgery, independent of preoperative pain severity. PMID:25599300

  17. Improving pain assessment and managment in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Julian; Moxham, Sian; Ramadurai, Gopinath; Williams, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients can experience a variety of pain. Many stroke patients have co-morbidities such as osteoporosis, arthritis or diabetes causing diabetic neuropathy. As well as pain from other long term conditions, stroke patients can experience central post-stroke pain, headaches, and musculoskeletal issues such as hypertonia, contractures, spasticity, and subluxations. These stroke patients can also have communication difficulties in the form of expressive dysphasia and/or global aphasia. Communication difficulties can result in these patients not expressing their pain and therefore not having it assessed, leading to inadequate pain relief that could impact their rehabilitation and recovery. By implementing an observational measurement of pain such as the Abbey pain scale, patients with communication difficulties can have their pain assessed and recorded. Initially 30% of patients on the acute stroke ward did not have their pain assessed and adequately recorded and 15% of patients had inadequate pain relief. The patient was assessed if they were in pain and therefore not receiving adequate pain relief by measuring their pain on the Abbey pain scale. After introducing the Abbey pain scale and creating a nurse advocate, an improvement was shown such that only 5% of patients did not have their pain recorded and all had adequate pain relief.

  18. Improving pain assessment and managment in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Julian; Moxham, Sian; ramadurai, gopinath; Williams, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients can experience a variety of pain. Many stroke patients have co-morbidities such as osteoporosis, arthritis or diabetes causing diabetic neuropathy. As well as pain from other long term conditions, stroke patients can experience central post-stroke pain, headaches, and musculoskeletal issues such as hypertonia, contractures, spasticity, and subluxations. These stroke patients can also have communication difficulties in the form of expressive dysphasia and/or global aphasia. Communication difficulties can result in these patients not expressing their pain and therefore not having it assessed, leading to inadequate pain relief that could impact their rehabilitation and recovery. By implementing an observational measurement of pain such as the Abbey pain scale, patients with communication difficulties can have their pain assessed and recorded. Initially 30% of patients on the acute stroke ward did not have their pain assessed and adequately recorded and 15% of patients had inadequate pain relief. The patient was assessed if they were in pain and therefore not receiving adequate pain relief by measuring their pain on the Abbey pain scale. After introducing the Abbey pain scale and creating a nurse advocate, an improvement was shown such that only 5% of patients did not have their pain recorded and all had adequate pain relief. PMID:26732690

  19. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  20. Phase II Study of Concurrent Capecitabine and External Beam Radiotherapy for Pain Control of Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer Origin

    PubMed Central

    Kundel, Yulia; Nasser, Nicola J.; Purim, Ofer; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Fenig, Eyal; Pfeffer, Raphael M.; Stemmer, Salomon M.; Rizel, Shulamith; Symon, Zvi; Kaufman, Bella; Sulkes, Aaron; Brenner, Baruch

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain from bone metastases of breast cancer origin is treated with localized radiation. Modulating doses and schedules has shown little efficacy in improving results. Given the synergistic therapeutic effect reported for combined systemic chemotherapy with local radiation in anal, rectal, and head and neck malignancies, we sought to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of combined capecitabine and radiation for palliation of pain due to bone metastases from breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-nine women with painful bone metastases from breast cancer were treated with external beam radiation in 10 fractions of 3 Gy, 5 fractions a week for 2 consecutive weeks. Oral capecitabine 700 mg/m2 twice daily was administered throughout radiation therapy. Rates of complete response, defined as a score of 0 on a 10-point pain scale and no increase in analgesic consumption, were 14% at 1 week, 38% at 2 weeks, 52% at 4 weeks, 52% at 8 weeks, and 48% at 12 weeks. Corresponding rates of partial response, defined as a reduction of at least 2 points in pain score without an increase in analgesics consumption, were 31%, 38%, 28%, 34% and 38%. The overall response rate (complete and partial) at 12 weeks was 86%. Side effects were of mild intensity (grade I or II) and included nausea (38% of patients), weakness (24%), diarrhea (24%), mucositis (10%), and hand and foot syndrome (7%). Conclusions/Significance External beam radiation with concurrent capecitabine is safe and tolerable for the treatment of pain from bone metastases of breast cancer origin. The overall and complete response rates in our study are unusually high compared to those reported for radiation alone. Further evaluation of this approach, in a randomized study, is warranted. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01784393NCT01784393 PMID:23874586

  1. Structural plasticity and reorganisation in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Rohini; Flor, Herta

    2016-12-15

    Chronic pain is not simply a temporal continuum of acute pain. Studies on functional plasticity in neural circuits of pain have provided mechanistic insights and linked various modulatory factors to a change in perception and behaviour. However, plasticity also occurs in the context of structural remodelling and reorganisation of synapses, cells and circuits, potentially contributing to the long-term nature of chronic pain. This Review discusses maladaptive structural plasticity in neural circuits of pain, spanning multiple anatomical and spatial scales in animal models and human patients, and addresses key questions on structure-function relationships.

  2. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Pulsed Radiofrequency Sympathectomy for Treating Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Haghighi, Mohammad; Biazar, Gelareh; Hashemi, Masood; Haddadi, Soodabeh; Fathi, Amirhossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a long-term complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes that majorly impacts quality of life. Its prevalence increases with age and duration of diabetes. It is more common in patients who have suboptimal glycemic control over several years. Because DPN may be resistant to conventional treatments, it is common for patients to only have partial pain relief. Therefore, new therapeutic options are needed for the condition. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) lumbar sympathectomy in treating painful DPN. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients with painful DPN refractory to conventional treatment were randomly and evenly assigned to either the TENS or PRF lumbar sympathectomy groups. Pain evaluations were based on the 10-point numerical rating scale (NRS). Subjects were followed for three months and had a total of four study visits (baseline and 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after treatment). Results: Sixty patients completed all study visits. In both groups, the NRS rating significantly decreased after treatment, with a marked pain reduction observed at the first follow-up evaluation. In the PRF group, the NRS decreased from 6.46 at baseline to 2.76 at the 1 week visit. One and 3 months after treatment, the NRS was 4.30 and 5.13, respectively (P < 0.0001). In the TENS group, the NRS decreased from 6.10 at baseline to 3.96 at the 1 week visit. One and 3 months after treatment, the NRS was 5.23 and 5.90, respectively (P < 0.0001). Unfortunately, the NRS steady increased almost back to baseline levels in the TENS group. The NRS only slightly increased during the follow-up period in the PRF group, but did not reach baseline levels. Conclusions: Both TENS and PRF lumbar sympathectomy are promising pain relief treatments for painful DNP. However, PRF lumbar sympathectomy seems to have a superior

  3. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  4. [Elbow pain].

    PubMed

    Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Miintyselkii, Pekka; Havulinna, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    Pain and disability in the elbow are not as common as in the neck, shoulder or wrist, for example. The elbow may, however, present disorders that may in a prolonged state be difficult and cause significant loss of working capacity. These include epicondylitis, osteoarthritis and entrapment of the ulnar nerve.

  5. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  6. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck. If neck pain involves compression of your nerves, you may feel numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arm or ... When to Contact a Medical Professional ... fever and headache, and your neck is so stiff that you cannot touch your chin to your chest. This may be ...

  7. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Chronic Pain By Beth Loy, Ph.D. Preface Introduction Information ... at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Chronic Pain How prevalent is chronic pain? Chronic pain has ...

  8. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  9. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  10. Physical function improvements and relief from fatigue and pain are associated with increased productivity at work and at home in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with certolizumab pegol

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter; Strand, Vibeke; Purcaru, Oana; Coteur, Geoffroy; Mease, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the association between improvements in physical function, fatigue and pain and improvements in productivity at work and at home in patients treated with certolizumab pegol (CZP) in combination with MTX. Methods. Physical function, fatigue and pain were assessed in two CZP clinical trials (Rheumatoid Arthritis PreventIon of structural Damage 1 and 2) using the HAQ-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) and Patient Assessment of Pain, with minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) defined as ≥0.22, ≥1 and ≥10 points, respectively. Work and home productivity were evaluated using the RA-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS-RA). The odds of achieving an HAQ-DI, FAS or pain ‘response’ at Week 12, defined as improvements ≥MCID, were compared between CZP and control groups. Improvements in productivity at Week 12 were compared between CZP-treated HAQ-DI, FAS or pain responders and non-responders. Results. The odds of achieving improvements ≥MCID were five times higher for pain, and two to three times higher for physical function and fatigue, in patients receiving CZP vs control. Per month, responders reported significantly greater improvements in productivity at work and reduced interference of RA with their work productivity than non-responders. Responders also reported significantly greater improvements in productivity at home and participation in family, social and leisure activities. Conclusions. This study demonstrated a clear association between patient-reported improvements in physical function, fatigue and pain, and improvements in productivity both at work and home. PMID:20547658

  11. Shape shifting pain: chronification of back pain shifts brain representation from nociceptive to emotional circuits.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Javeria A; Baliki, Marwan N; Huang, Lejian; Baria, Alex T; Torbey, Souraya; Hermann, Kristina M; Schnitzer, Thomas J; Apkarian, A Vania

    2013-09-01

    representation for a constant percept, back pain, can undergo large-scale shifts in brain activity with the transition to chronic pain. These observations challenge long-standing theoretical concepts regarding brain and mind relationships, as well as provide important novel insights regarding definitions and mechanisms of chronic pain.

  12. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  13. [Experiences with the use of pain diaries in the care of outpatients suffering from chronic pain.].

    PubMed

    Schülin, C; Seemann, H; Zimmermann, M

    1989-09-01

    For the present investigation 31 out-patients suffering from chronic pain received a pain diary, that is a booklet in which they recorded their pain level on visual analogue scales and daily activities several times during a day. We used weekly interviews and the patient's records in the diary to evaluate the patient's compliance and the influence of a pain diary on the pain perception and on the physician-patient-interaction. We found that most of the patients were willing and able to use the pain diary. 30 out of 31 patients kept the diary voluntarily for an average period of 4 weeks. 70% of the patients regarded the pain diary as helpful irrespective of whether or not they considered it at the same time as burden. Only 10% reported difficulties in using the pain diary. The majority of patients (70%) noticed no change by the use of the diary in their general pain perception, about 17% reported to feel an increasing fixation on their pain, while 13% felt more distance from their pain by using a pain diary. The use of a pain diary produces a survey over the pain for a longer period than a usual consultation could present. In particular the relationship between the pain level and other recorded events and activities becomes visible. The apin data become especially clear when displayed graphically in a "pain curve". In this way therapeutic interventions can be checked whether or not they are efficient. Each patient was asked at every meeting to indicate on a separate visual analogue scale the pain level he would consider bearable. This mark was accepted by all patients as their aim for the therapy, a more realistic aim than the expectation of a complete freedom from pain. When observed over a period of at least two weeks we found this mark staying constant with half of the patients. In 23.8% the patients decreased this subjectively bearable pain level more than 1 cm, in 14.3% the level was increased. In 9.5% it varied without any clear tendency. For many patients the

  14. Minimum detectable and minimal clinically important changes for pain in patients with nonspecific neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Francisco M; Abraira, Víctor; Royuela, Ana; Corcoll, Josep; Alegre, Luis; Tomás, Miquel; Mir, María Antonia; Cano, Alejandra; Muriel, Alfonso; Zamora, Javier; del Real, María Teresa Gil; Gestoso, Mario; Mufraggi, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Background The minimal detectable change (MDC) and the minimal clinically important changes (MCIC) have been explored for nonspecific low back pain patients and are similar across different cultural settings. No data on MDC and MCIC for pain severity are available for neck pain patients. The objectives of this study were to estimate MDC and MCIC for pain severity in subacute and chronic neck pain (NP) patients, to assess if MDC and MCIC values are influenced by baseline values and to explore if they are different in the subset of patients reporting referred pain, and in subacute versus chronic patients. Methods Subacute and chronic patients treated in routine clinical practice of the Spanish National Health Service for neck pain, with or without pain referred to the arm, and a pain severity ≥ 3 points on a pain intensity number rating scale (PI-NRS), were included in this study. Patients' own "global perceived effect" over a 3 month period was used as the external criterion. The minimal detectable change (MDC) was estimated by means of the standard error of measurement in patients who self-assess as unchanged. MCIC were estimated by the mean value of change score in patients who self-assess as improved (mean change score, MCS), and by the optimal cutoff point in receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC). The effect on MDC and MCIC of initial scores, duration of pain, and existence of referred pain were assessed. Results 658 patients were included, 487 of them with referred pain. MDC was 4.0 PI-NRS points for neck pain in the entire sample, 4.2 for neck pain in patients who also had referred pain, and 6.2 for referred pain. MCS was 4.1 and ROC was 1.5 for referred and for neck pain, both in the entire sample and in patients who also complained of referred pain. ROC was lower (0.5 PI-NRS points) for subacute than for chronic patients (1.5 points). MCS was higher for patients with more intense baseline pain, ranging from 2.4 to 4.9 PI-NRS for neck pain and

  15. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java Required Print page Save and share ... by G. Edward Jeffries, MD, FACS Post-Amputation Pain Post-amputation pain is one of the most ...

  16. Ketoprofen Dental Pain Study.

    PubMed

    Levin, L M; Cooper, S A; Betts, N J; Wedell, D; Hermann, D G; Lamp, C; Secreto, S A; Hersh, E V

    1997-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, recently approved as an over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic at a 12.5 mg dosage strength. This is the first published study which explores the analgesic efficacy and safety of ketoprofen 12.5 mg in patients experiencing pain following the removal of impacted third molars. This study was single-dose, double-blind and randomized utilizing a 6-hour in-patient evaluation period. Patients ingested a single dose of ketoprofen 12.5 mg (n = 30), ketoprofen 37.5 mg (n = 32) or placebo (n = 15) when their post-surgical pain reached at least a moderate intensity on a 5-point categorical (CAT) scale and greater than 50 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Measures of pain intensity and relief were gathered every 20 minutes for the first 2 hours, and then hourly from hours 3 through 6. Adverse drug reactions were also recorded as they occurred. Both dosages of ketoprofen were significantly more efficacious than placebo (two way ANOVAs, p < 0.05). For pain intensity difference (PID) and pain relief, the 12.5 mg dose exhibited statistical superiority from hours 1 through 3, while the 37.5 mg dose exhibited statistical superiority from 40 minutes through 4 hours. Ketoprofen 37.5 mg was significantly more efficacious than the 12.5 mg dose only at 40 minutes for PID(VAS) and relief, and at 60 minutes for PID(VAS). Both ketoprofen dosages displayed significantly greater 3-hr, 4-hr and 6-hr summary analgesic measures (SPID(VAS), SPID(CAT), TOTPAR) than placebo, with the exception of the 6-hr SPID(CAT) measure for ketoprofen 12.5 mg. No serious side effects were observed in this study. We conclude that ketoprofen in a dose range of 12.5 mg to 37.5 mg is a safe and effective analgesic for the relief of post-operative dental pain.

  17. Undertreatment of caner pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Lee, Shiu-Yu C

    2015-06-01

    Pain is a burdensome symptom that can commonly exist chronically along the cancer trajectory. Uncontrolled pain will impact on cancer patients' quality of life, even further negatively affect cancer survivors' employment. Based on systemic reviews of studies for past 10 years, the paper reported that although there is enormous advancement on the knowledge of cancer pain and pain management, studies still documented undertreatment of cancer pain globally. Additionally, pain distress a significant portion of cancer survivors. The pain in cancer survivors distinct from the pain related with cancer, instead emphasize on pain related with cancer treatment, such as neuropathic pain, muscular syndrome. Evidence-based pain management with common pain problems in cancer survivors is lacking. Further studies are needed to understand the pain in cancer survivors and to develop effective strategies in helping cancer survivors to manage their pain.

  18. Effects of pain education program on pain intensity, pain treatment satisfaction, and barriers in Turkish cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Yasemin Kuzeyli; Cicek, Fadiloglu; Uyar, Meltem

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled study was to investigate the effect of a pain education program (PEP) on pain intensity, patients' satisfaction with pain treatment, and patient-related barriers to pain management among Turkish patients with cancer. The study was conducted in a sample of 40 patients who were hospitalized for cancer and experiencing pain. The patients were equally randomized to either a PEP or a control group. The data were collected by means of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Numeric Rating Scale, and the Barrier Questionnaire-Revised. After the completion of the questionnaires at the first interview, patients in the PEP group received pain education using a pain educational booklet and an explanatory slide program that discussed the booklet's content with the patients. Patients in the control group received routine clinical care. The questionnaires were reapplied to the patients in both groups after 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Participation in a PEP was associated with decreased pain intensity scores for "present" and "least pain" during weeks 2, 4, and 8 (p < .05). Similarly, there were significant differences between the groups with respect to weeks 2, 4, and 8 satisfaction with pain treatment (p < .05). At the end of second week, the total BQ-r score decreased significantly in the PEP group from 2.12 to 1.29 compared with 2.30 to 2.28 in the control group (p < .001). The findings suggest that the PEP decreases pain intensity, improves satisfaction with treatment, and decreases barriers about cancer pain management in cancer patients. Incorparation of PEP into the standard of care for cancer patients with pain may improve the quality of pain management.

  19. HYPNOTHERAPY INTERVENTION FOR LOIN PAIN HEMATURIA: A CASE STUDY1

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Gary R.; Koep, Lauren L.; Kendrick, Cassie E.

    2012-01-01

    Loin pain hematuria is characterized by chronic loin pain, hematuria, and dysuria. There are no known effective treatments for loin pain hematuria and longer-term use of analgesics and surgical options are often ineffective or associated with negative side effects. This article reports on a 17-year-old female patient diagnosed with loin pain hematuria who presented with unilateral, uncontrolled loin pain following numerous unsuccessful attempts at controlling her symptoms with traditional medical interventions—including antibiotics, opioids, and renal denervation. The patient received 8 sessions of hypnotherapy. Baseline, end-point, and follow-up measures administered included the General Health Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire, Pain Discomfort Scale, and visual analogue measures of pain, academic interference, and social interference. At follow-up, results indicated clinically significant decreases in pain, anxiety, and depression with nearly complete remission of presenting symptoms. PMID:22098573

  20. Pain Catastrophizing is Associated with Dental Pain in a Stressful Context

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C.-S.; Niddam, D.M.; Hsu, M.-L.; Hsieh, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Pain is associated with anxiety in a dental setting. It has remained unclear how cognitive-affective factors modulate pain and anxiety in a stressful context, such as receiving dental procedures. We hypothesized that both the situational factor (unpredictability about painful stimuli) and the trait factor (pain catastrophizing, i.e., the tendency to interpret pain in negative orientation) account for dental pain. Fifteen healthy participants were recruited to perform an associative learning task. They were asked to learn the pairing between visual cues and the intensity of incoming painful stimuli delivered at the right upper central incisor. Brain activation associated with pain was recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The participants reported increased anxiety and pain in the stressful context, where stimuli intensity was not predicted by the preceding cue. The score of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale was positively correlated with the increased pain modulated by unpredictability. Brain activation at the right posterior hippocampus, a region critically related to associative learning of aversive stimuli and context, was correlated with the individual catastrophizing level. Our findings suggest that both the situational factor (unpredictability) and the trait factor (catastrophizing) influence dental pain, highlighting the role of cognitive-affective factors in pain control of dental patients. PMID:23232145

  1. Pain Intensity and Pain Interference in patients with lung cancer: A pilot study of Biopsychosocial Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Jo Ann; Higgins, Melinda K.; Miller, Andrew H.; Keefe, Francis J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore biopsychosocial factors (beliefs, depression, catastrophizing cytokines) in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer and no pain in order to determine their relationship at diagnosis and across time and to determine whether these factors contribute to pain intensity or pain interference with function at pain onset. Methods A longitudinal, exploratory, pilot study was implemented in a private medical center and a VA medical center in the southeast. Twelve subjects not experiencing pain related to cancer of the lung or its treatment were recruited. A Karnofsky status of 40% and Hemoglobin of 8 grams were required. Five questionnaires were completed and 10 cc of blood was drawn at Baseline; 4 questionnaires and blood draws were repeated monthly for 5 months. One Baseline questionnaire and a pain assessment were added at Final. Demographic, clinical and questionnaire data were summarized; standardized scale scores were calculated. Results Biopsychosocial scores that were low at Baseline increased from T1-T4 but decreased slightly T5-T6. Individuals with higher pain intensity and higher pain interference at Final had higher psychosocial scores at Baseline than individuals with lower pain intensity and lower pain interference at Final. Conclusions Unrelated to disease stage, metastasis or treatment, unique, levels of biopsychosocial factors are observed in patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer who report higher levels of Pain Intensity and higher levels of Pain Interference at the time pain occurs. Replication studies are needed to validate this response pattern and determine the value of repeated individual assessments. PMID:24064756

  2. Pain catastrophizing is associated with dental pain in a stressful context.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-S; Niddam, D M; Hsu, M-L; Hsieh, J-C

    2013-02-01

    Pain is associated with anxiety in a dental setting. It has remained unclear how cognitive-affective factors modulate pain and anxiety in a stressful context, such as receiving dental procedures. We hypothesized that both the situational factor (unpredictability about painful stimuli) and the trait factor (pain catastrophizing, i.e., the tendency to interpret pain in negative orientation) account for dental pain. Fifteen healthy participants were recruited to perform an associative learning task. They were asked to learn the pairing between visual cues and the intensity of incoming painful stimuli delivered at the right upper central incisor. Brain activation associated with pain was recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The participants reported increased anxiety and pain in the stressful context, where stimuli intensity was not predicted by the preceding cue. The score of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale was positively correlated with the increased pain modulated by unpredictability. Brain activation at the right posterior hippocampus, a region critically related to associative learning of aversive stimuli and context, was correlated with the individual catastrophizing level. Our findings suggest that both the situational factor (unpredictability) and the trait factor (catastrophizing) influence dental pain, highlighting the role of cognitive-affective factors in pain control of dental patients.

  3. Sex differences in parent and child pain ratings during an experimental child pain task.

    PubMed

    Moon, E C; Chambers, C T; Larochette, Anne-Claire; Hayton, K; Craig, K D; McGrath, P J

    2008-01-01

    Research in the field of pediatric pain has largely ignored the role of fathers in their children's pain experiences. The first objective of the present study was to examine the effect of the presence of mothers versus fathers on children's subjective ratings, facial expressions and physiological responses to acute pain. The second objective was to examine whether child and parent sex influence parents' proxy ratings of their children's pain. The final objective was to compare levels of agreement between mothers' and fathers' assessments of their children's pain. Participants included 73 children (37 boys, 36 girls), four to 12 years of age, along with 32 fathers and 41 mothers. Children undertook the cold pressor pain task while observed by one of their parents. During the task, the children's heart rates and facial expressions were recorded. Children provided self-reports and parents provided proxy reports of child pain intensity using the seven-point Faces Pain Scale. Neither child nor parent sex had a significant impact on children's subjective reports, facial expressions or heart rates in response to acute pain. Fathers gave their sons higher pain ratings than their daughters, whereas mothers' ratings of their sons' and daughters' pain did not differ. Kappa statistics and t tests revealed that fathers tended to be more accurate judges of their children's pain than mothers. Overall, this research highlights the importance of examining both parent and child sex differences in pediatric pain research.

  4. Chronic pain assessment: A seven-factor model

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Megan A; Tripp, Dean A; Fabrigar, Leandre R; Davidson, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many measures assessing related dimensions of the chronic pain experience (eg, pain severity, pain coping, depression, activity level), but the relationships among them have not been systematically established. OBJECTIVE: The present study set out to determine the core dimensions requiring assessment in individuals with chronic pain. METHODS: Individuals with chronic pain (n=126) completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Chronic Pain Coping Index, Multidimensional Pain Inventory, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form, Pain Disability Index and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. RESULTS: Before an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the nine chronic pain measures, EFAs were conducted on each of the individual measures, and the derived factors (subscales) from each measure were submitted together for a single EFA. A seven-factor model best fit the data, representing the core factors of pain and disability, pain description, affective distress, support, positive coping strategies, negative coping strategies and activity. CONCLUSIONS: Seven meaningful dimensions of the pain experience were reliably and systematically extracted. Implications and future directions for this work are discussed. PMID:18719712

  5. Definitions and Types of Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapy Pain Management Recommendations References April 15, 2017 Definitions and Types of Pain Defining Pain Pain is ... there are many mechanisms involved in nociception. More definitions ... Classifying Pain Pain can be "acute" or "chronic." ...

  6. Medication management of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Slipp, Marlene; Burnham, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of chronic pain is high and increasing. Medication management is an important component of chronic pain management. There is a shortage of physicians who are available and comfortable providing this service. In Alberta, pharmacists have been granted an advanced scope of practice. Given this empowerment, their availability, training and skill set, pharmacists are well positioned to play an expanded role in the medication management of chronic pain sufferers. Objective: To compare the effectiveness and cost of a physician-only vs a pharmacist-physician team model of medication management for chronic nonmalignant pain sufferers. Method: Data was analyzed for 89 patients who had received exclusively medication management at a rural Alberta multidisciplinary clinic. 56 were managed by a sole physician. 33 were managed by a team (pharmacist + physician). In the team model, the physician did the medical assessment, diagnosis, and established a treatment plan in consultation with the patient and pharmacist. The pharmacist then provided the ongoing follow-up including education, dose titration and side effect management and consulted with the physician as needed. Change in pain (Numerical Rating Scale) and disability (Pain Interference Questionnaire) over the course of treatment were recorded. The treatment duration and number of visits were used to calculate cost of care. Results: Both models of medication management resulted in significant and comparable improvements in pain, disability and patient perception of medication effectiveness. Patients in the physician-only group were seen more frequently and at a greater cost. The pharmacist-physician team approach was markedly more cost-effective, and patients expressed a high level of satisfaction with their medication management. Conclusions: The pharmacist-physician team model of medication management results in significant reductions of pain and disability for chronic nonmalignant pain sufferers

  7. Differential changes in functional disability and pain intensity over the course of psychological treatment for children with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Lynch-Jordan, Anne M; Sil, Soumitri; Peugh, James; Cunningham, Natoshia; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Goldschneider, Kenneth R

    2014-10-01

    Patients presenting for treatment of chronic pain often believe that pain reduction must be achieved before returning to normal functioning. However, treatment programs for chronic pain typically take a rehabilitative approach, emphasizing decreasing pain-related disability first with the expectation that pain reduction will follow. This information is routinely provided to patients, yet no studies have systematically examined the actual trajectories of pain and disability in a clinical care setting. In this study of youth with chronic pain (N=94, 8 to 18 years), it was hypothesized that 1) functional disability and pain would decrease over the course of psychological treatment for chronic pain and 2) functional disability would decrease more quickly than pain intensity. Participants received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain management (M=5.6 sessions) plus standard medical care. The Functional Disability Inventory and a Numeric Rating Scale of average pain intensity were completed by the child at every CBT session. Hierarchical linear modeling was conducted to examine the longitudinal trajectories of disability and pain. Standardized estimates of the slopes of change were obtained to test differences in rates of change between pain and disability. Results showed an overall significant decline in functional disability over time. Although pain scores reduced slightly from pretreatment to posttreatment, the longitudinal decline over treatment was not statistically significant. As expected, the rate of change of disability was significantly more rapid than pain. Evidence for variability in treatment response was noted, suggesting the need for additional research into individual trajectories of change in pediatric pain treatment.

  8. Pain assessment in context: a state of the science review of the McGill pain questionnaire 40 years on.

    PubMed

    Main, Chris J

    2016-07-01

    The McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ) and its later derivative the short form-MPQ have been used widely both in experimental and clinical pain studies. They have been of considerable importance in stimulating research into the perception of pain and now, with the publication of its latest variant, the short form-MPQ-2, it is appropriate to appraise their utility in the light of subsequent research into the nature of pain and the purpose of pain assessment. Following a description of the content and development of the questionnaires, issues of validity, reliability, and utility are addressed, not only in terms of the individual pain descriptors and the scales, but also in terms of methods of quantification. In addition, other methods of pain depiction are considered. In the second part of the review, advances in pain measurement and methodology, in the elucidation of pain mechanisms and pathways, in the psychology of pain, and in the nature of pain behavior are presented and their implications for pain assessment in general and the MPQ family of measures in particular will be addressed. It is suggested that pain assessment needs to be cast in its social context. We need to understand the influences on pain expression using a socio-communication model of pain that recognizes the function of pain and the importance of both innate pain responses and the effects of social learning. The review concludes with recommendations for future use of the MPQ and identifies a number of research challenges which lie ahead.

  9. Barriers to cancer pain management in Danish and Lithuanian patients treated in pain and palliative care units.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Samsanaviciene, Jurgita; Liubarskiene, Zita; Sjøgren, Per; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona; Sciupokas, Arunas; Hansen, Ole Bo

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of cancer-related pain is high despite available guidelines for the effective assessment and management of that pain. Barriers to the use of opioid analgesics partially cause undertreatment of cancer pain. The aim of this study was to compare pain management outcomes and patient-related barriers to cancer pain management in patient samples from Denmark and Lithuania. Thirty-three Danish and 30 Lithuanian patients responded to, respectively, Danish and Lithuanian versions of the Brief Pain Inventory pain scale, the Barriers Questionnaire II, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Specific Questionnaire On Pain Communication, and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Emotional distress and patient attitudes toward opioid analgesics in cancer patient samples from both countries explained pain management outcomes in the multivariate regression models. Pain relief and pain medication adherence were better in Denmark, and the country of origin significantly explained the difference in the regression models for these outcomes. In conclusion, interventions in emotional distress and patient attitudes toward opioid analgesics may result in better pain management outcomes generally, whereas poor adherence to pain medication and poor pain relief appear to be more country-specific problems.

  10. Conditioned Pain Modulation and Situational Pain Catastrophizing as Preoperative Predictors of Pain following Chest Wall Surgery: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosen, Kasper; Vase, Lene; Pilegaard, Hans K.; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Drewes, Asbjørn M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Variability in patients' postoperative pain experience and response to treatment challenges effective pain management. Variability in pain reflects individual differences in inhibitory pain modulation and psychological sensitivity, which in turn may be clinically relevant for the disposition to acquire pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of conditioned pain modulation and situational pain catastrophizing on postoperative pain and pain persistency. Methods Preoperatively, 42 healthy males undergoing funnel chest surgery completed the Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck's Depression Inventory before undergoing a sequential conditioned pain modulation paradigm. Subsequently, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale was introduced and patients were instructed to reference the conditioning pain while answering. Ratings of movement-evoked pain and consumption of morphine equivalents were obtained during postoperative days 2–5. Pain was reevaluated at six months postoperatively. Results Patients reporting persistent pain at six months follow-up (n = 15) were not significantly different from pain-free patients (n = 16) concerning preoperative conditioned pain modulation response (Z = 1.0, P = 0.3) or level of catastrophizing (Z = 0.4, P = 1.0). In the acute postoperative phase, situational pain catastrophizing predicted movement-evoked pain, independently of anxiety and depression (β = 1.0, P = 0.007) whereas conditioned pain modulation predicted morphine consumption (β = −0.005, P = 0.001). Conclusions Preoperative conditioned pain modulation and situational pain catastrophizing were not associated with the development of persistent postoperative pain following funnel chest repair. Secondary outcome analyses indicated that conditioned pain modulation predicted morphine consumption and situational pain catastrophizing predicted movement-evoked pain intensity in the acute postoperative

  11. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  12. Comparative Associations of Working Memory and Pain Catastrophizing With Chronic Low Back Pain Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Trevor A.; Bishop, Mark D.; Riley, Joseph L.; Fillingim, Roger B.; George, Steven Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background Because of its high global burden, determining biopsychosocial influences of chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a research priority. Psychological factors such as pain catastrophizing are well established. However, cognitive factors such as working memory warrant further investigation to be clinically useful. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine how working memory and pain catastrophizing are associated with CLBP measures of daily pain intensity and movement-evoked pain intensity. Design This study was a cross-sectional analysis of individuals with ≥3 months of CLBP (n=60) compared with pain-free controls (n=30). Method Participants completed measures of working memory, pain catastrophizing, and daily pain intensity. Movement-evoked pain intensity was assessed using the Back Performance Scale. Outcome measures were compared between individuals with CLBP and those who were pain-free using nonparametric testing. Associations were determined using multivariate regression analyses. Results Participants with CLBP (mean age=47.7 years, 68% female) had lower working memory performance (P=.008) and higher pain catastrophizing (P<.001) compared with pain-free controls (mean age=47.6 years, 63% female). For individuals with CLBP, only working memory remained associated with daily pain intensity (R2=.07, standardized beta=−.308, P=.041) and movement-evoked pain intensity (R2=.14, standardized beta=−.502, P=.001) after accounting for age, sex, education, and interactions between pain catastrophizing and working memory. Limitations The cross-sectional design prevented prospective analysis. Findings also are not indicative of overall working memory (eg, spatial) or cognitive performance. Conclusion Working memory demonstrated the strongest association with daily pain and movement-evoked pain intensity compared with (and after accounting for) established CLBP factors. Future research will elucidate the prognostic value of working memory on prevention

  13. Grading the intensity of nondental orofacial pain: identification of cutoff points for mild, moderate, and severe pain

    PubMed Central

    Brailo, Vlaho; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Background When assessing pain in clinical practice, clinicians often label pain as mild, moderate, and severe. However, these categories are not distinctly defined, and are often used arbitrarily. Instruments for pain assessment use more sophisticated scales, such as a 0–10 numerical rating scale, and apart from pain intensity assess pain-related interference and disability. The aim of the study was to identify cutoff points for mild, moderate, and severe nondental orofacial pain using a numerical rating scale, a pain-related interference scale, and a disability measurement. Materials and methods A total of 245 patients referred to the Facial Pain Unit in London were included in the study. Intensity and pain-related interference were assessed by the Brief Pain Inventory. Pain-related disability was assessed by the Chronic Graded Pain Scale. Average pain intensity (0–10) was classified into nine schemes with varying cutoff points of mild, moderate, and severe pain. The scheme with the most significant intergroup difference, expressed by multivariate analysis of variance, provided the cutoffs between mild, moderate, and severe pain. Results The combination that showed the greatest intergroup differences for all patients was scheme 47 (mild 1–4, moderate 5–7, severe 8–10). The same combination provided the greatest intergroup differences in subgroups of patients with temporomandibular disorder and chronic idiopathic facial pain, respectively. Among the trigeminal neuralgia patients alone, the combination with the highest intergroup differences was scheme 48 (mild 1–4, moderate 5–8, severe 9–10). Conclusion The cutoff points established in this study can discriminate in pain intensity categories reasonably well, and showed a significant difference in most of the outcome measures used. PMID:25759597

  14. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Aslaksen, Per M; Lyby, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor "fear of medical pain" significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality.

  15. Neuropathic Pain After Lung Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  16. Prevalence and associations of neuropathic pain in a cohort of multi-ethnic Asian low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kew, Yueting; Tan, Cheng-Yin; Ng, Chong-Jing; Thang, Sue-Sien; Tan, Leong-Hooi; Khoo, Yvonne Khaii; Lim, Jun-Ni; Ng, Jia-Hui; Chan, Chris Yin-Wei; Kwan, Mun-Keong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2017-04-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain differs in different ethnic populations. The aims of the study are to determine its frequency and associations in a multi-ethnic cohort of Asian low back pain patients. This was a cross-sectional study of low back patients seen at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Neuropathic low back pain patients were identified using the painDETECT questionnaire and compared with non-neuropathic (unclear or nociceptive) low back pain patients, in terms of socio-demographic and clinical factors, pain severity (numerical pain rating scale, NPRS), disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, RMDQ), as well as anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). Of 210 patients, 26 (12.4%) have neuropathic low back pain. Neuropathic pain is associated with non-Chinese ethnicity, higher body mass index and pain radiation below the knee. Patients with neuropathic pain have significantly higher NPRS and RMDQ scores, and there are more subjects with anxiety on HADS. However, there are no differences between the groups in age, gender, pain duration or underlying diagnosis of low back pain. The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain in a multi-ethnic Malaysian cohort is lower than previously reported in other populations with possible differences between ethnic groups. It is associated with greater pain severity, disability and anxiety.

  17. Pain and pain management in haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Auerswald, Günter; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cedric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Lambert, Thierry; Šalek, Silva Zupančić

    2016-01-01

    Joint pain is common in haemophilia and may be acute or chronic. Effective pain management in haemophilia is essential to reduce the burden that pain imposes on patients. However, the choice of appropriate pain-relieving measures is challenging, as there is a complex interplay of factors affecting pain perception. This can manifest as differences in patients’ experiences and response to pain, which require an individualized approach to pain management. Prophylaxis with factor replacement reduces the likelihood of bleeds and bleed-related pain, whereas on-demand therapy ensures rapid bleed resolution and pain relief. Although use of replacement or bypassing therapy is often the first intervention for pain, additional pain relief strategies may be required. There is an array of analgesic options, but consideration should be paid to the adverse effects of each class. Nevertheless, a combination of medications that act at different points in the pain pathway may be beneficial. Nonpharmacological measures may also help patients and include active coping strategies; rest, ice, compression, and elevation; complementary therapies; and physiotherapy. Joint aspiration may also reduce acute joint pain, and joint steroid injections may alleviate chronic pain. In the longer term, increasing use of prophylaxis or performing surgery may be necessary to reduce the burden of pain caused by the degenerative effects of repeated bleeds. Whichever treatment option is chosen, it is important to monitor pain and adjust patient management accordingly. Beyond specific pain management approaches, ongoing collaboration between multidisciplinary teams, which should include physiotherapists and pain specialists, may improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27439216

  18. Experimentally induced pain perception is acutely reduced by aerobic exercise in people with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Shepanski, Melissa A; Mackenzie, Sean P; Clifford, Philip S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether subjects with chronic low back pain demonstrate exercise-induced analgesia to experimentally induced pressure pain. We employed a repeated measures design to study eight subjects with chronic low back pain (mean +/- standard deviation age = 40 +/- 10, duration of pain = 7 +/- 4 years). Pain ratings were measured immediately before and 2 minutes and 32 minutes after 25 minutes of cycle ergometry (5 minutes at 50% peak oxygen uptake, then 20 minutes at 70% peak oxygen uptake). We based the pain ratings on subject input on a visual analog scale at 10-second intervals during the 2-minute pressure pain stimulus to the nondominant index finger. Compared with preexercise values, pain ratings were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after exercise at both 2 and 32 minutes postexercise. We conclude that pressure pain perception can be reduced for more than 30 minutes following aerobic exercise from leg cycling among people with chronic low back pain.

  19. Does changing pain-related knowledge reduce pain and improve function through changes in catastrophizing?

    PubMed

    Lee, Hopin; McAuley, James H; Hübscher, Markus; Kamper, Steven J; Traeger, Adrian C; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from randomized controlled studies shows that reconceptualizing pain improves patients' knowledge of pain biology, reduces catastrophizing thoughts, and improves pain and function. However, causal relationships between these variables remain untested. It is hypothesized that reductions in catastrophizing could mediate the relationship between improvements in pain knowledge and improvements in pain and function. To test this causal mechanism, we conducted longitudinal mediation analyses on a cohort of 799 patients who were exposed to a pain education intervention. Patients provided responses to the neurophysiology of pain questionnaire, catastrophic thoughts about pain scale, visual analogue pain scale, and the patient specific functional scale, at baseline, 1-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. With adjustment for potential confounding variables, an improvement in pain biology knowledge was significantly associated with a reduction in pain intensity (total effect = -2.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.96 to -1.44). However, this effect was not mediated by a reduction in catastrophizing (indirect effect = -0.16, 95% CI = -0.36 to 0.02). This might be due to a weak, nonsignificant relationship between changes in catastrophizing and pain intensity (path b = 0.19, 95% CI = -0.03 to 0.41). Similar trends were found in models with function as the outcome. Our findings indicate that change in catastrophizing did not mediate the effect of pain knowledge acquisition on change in pain or function. The strength of this conclusion is moderated, however, if patient-clinician relational factors are conceptualized as a consequence of catastrophizing, rather than a cause.

  20. [Pain therapy in small pets].

    PubMed

    Tacke, Sabine; Gollwitzer, Andrea; Grammel, Lukas; Henke, Julia

    2017-02-09

    Although many advances in pain therapy have been made in recent years, pain therapy is more difficult in the small domestic animal than in cats and dogs. However, there is the ethical obligation that these animals also receive adequate pain therapy. An analgesic is rarely authorized for use in small pets, with pharmacological investigations often lacking and dosages frequently only determined empirically. The small size of the animals often requires a higher dose per kilogram bodyweight compared to cats and dogs. The dosage itself is also difficult to apply in small animals, because many analgesics must be diluted before their use. In addition, frequent manipulation of small animals for analgesic administration induces stress in the patient, which can intensify the pain. In the present article, those analgesics suitable for use in the small domestic animal are described and the indications for the use of the various types of analgesics are explained. A specialized section concentrates on pain detection and algesimetry in the small domestic animal. The detection of pain is much more difficult in small domestic animals. In the last few years so-called "grimace scales" have been developed which are used to assess the facial expression of the animals.

  1. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses of these medicines can help with chronic low back pain , even if the person does not feel sad ... notices pain. Antidepressants most commonly used for chronic low back pain also help you sleep. Antidepressants most often used ...

  2. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  3. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    Painkillers; Drugs for pain; Analgesics; Opioids ... Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are used only for pain that is severe and is not helped by other types of painkillers. When used ...

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... regional pain syndrome is an uncommon form of chronic pain that usually affects an arm or a leg. ... exercises may be. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) . Chronic pain is sometimes eased by applying electrical impulses to ...

  5. Low mindfulness predicts pain catastrophizing in a fear-avoidance model of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Robert; Rees, Clare; Preece, Minette; Schütze, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between persistent pain and self-directed, non-reactive awareness of present-moment experience (i.e., mindfulness) was explored in one of the dominant psychological theories of chronic pain - the fear-avoidance model[53]. A heterogeneous sample of 104 chronic pain outpatients at a multidisciplinary pain clinic in Australia completed psychometrically sound self-report measures of major variables in this model: Pain intensity, negative affect, pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear, pain hypervigilance, and functional disability. Two measures of mindfulness were also used, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [4] and the Five-Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire [1]. Results showed that mindfulness significantly negatively predicts each of these variables, accounting for 17-41% of their variance. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that mindfulness uniquely predicts pain catastrophizing when other variables are controlled, and moderates the relationship between pain intensity and pain catastrophizing. This is the first clear evidence substantiating the strong link between mindfulness and pain catastrophizing, and suggests mindfulness might be added to the fear-avoidance model. Implications for the clinical use of mindfulness in screening and intervention are discussed.

  6. Painful Memories: Reliability of Pain Intensity Recall at 3 Months in Senior Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacques S.; Griffith, Lauren E.; Paquet, Jean; Chauny, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Background. Validity of pain recall is questioned in research. Objective. To evaluate the reliability of pain intensity recall for seniors in an emergency department (ED). Methods. This study was part of a prospective multicenter project for seniors (≥65 years old) treated in an ED for minor traumatic injury. Pain intensity (0–10 numerical rating scale) was evaluated at the initial ED visit, at one week (baseline), and 3 months. At three months, patients were asked to recall the pain intensity they had at baseline. Results. 482 patients were interviewed (mean age 76.6 years, SD ± 7.3) and 72.8% were female. Intraclass correlation coefficient between pain at baseline and its recall was 0.24 (95% CI: 0.14–0.33). Senior patients tended to overestimate their pain intensity by a mean of 1.2 (95% CI: 0.9–1.5) units. A stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the variance of baseline pain recall at 3 months was explained by pain at ED visit (11%), pain at 3 months (7%), and pain at baseline (2%). Conclusion. The accuracy of pain intensity recall after three months is poor in seniors and seems to be influenced by the pain experienced at the time of injury. PMID:28260963

  7. Chronic pain related to quality of sleep

    PubMed Central

    Tonial, Leandro Freitas; Stechman, José; Hummig, Wagner

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the relation between the degrees of chronic pain and drowsiness levels. Methods: The study was conducted with 115 patients, who answered the questionnaire as diagnostic criteria in the survey. After evaluation based on the protocol of chronic pain registry RDC/TMD- Axis II, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale was applied to assess drowsiness levels. Results: Among the participating patients, there were more females (80%), and the type of pain more prevalent was chronic (70.4%). Concerning the grades of chronic pain, grade II predominated (38.3%), corresponding to high pain intensity and low disability. The ratio observed for levels of sleepiness was more prevalent for sleep debt average (38.3%). Conclusion: The grades of chronic pain and the levels of sleepiness did not correlate with each other or with the gender of patients. PMID:25003919

  8. [Analgesics in pediatrics. Before prescribing: recognize and evaluate pain, reassure].

    PubMed

    Fournier-Charrière, E; Dommergues, J P

    1997-06-07

    CAREFUL ASSESSMENT: In pediatric clinics, it has become habitual to prescribe analgesics in all painful situations. Particular attention must be paid to pain experienced by the child and obtaining objective evidence allowing valid assessment prior to treatment. ACUTE PAIN: Usually clearly expressed by crying screams, agitation, retraction and protection of the painful area, signs of acute pain are nonspecific and not proportional to its intensity. PROLONGED PAIN: Sadness and depression confound the expression of prolonged pain. Diagnosis may be difficult; an association between a potentially painful situation, pain relieving positions, and retraction behavior is specific. ESTABLISH CONFIDENCE: For both the child and his family, an atmosphere of confidence and a clear explanation of the lesions and their treatments are essential to break the viscious cycle of pain and anxiety. EXAMINING A CHILD WITH PAIN: Patience is the essence of examining children, facial mimics, reactions, movements and positions all provide essential information. ASSESSING PAIN INTENSITY: Using the visual analogue scale, VAS, children over 5 years of age can show where the pain is on a drawing of the body. For those under 5, questioning the family and looking for specific signs is an essential source of information. The DEGR scale can be used to score prolonged pain in children from 2 to 6 or 8 years of age.

  9. The relationship between the fear-avoidance model of pain and personality traits in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Pilar; Sánchez, Ana Isabel; Miró, Elena; Medina, Ana; Lami, María José

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between several cognitive-affective factors of the fear-avoidance model of pain, the big five model of personality, and functional impairment in fibromyalgia (FM). Seventy-four FM patients completed the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20, the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire, and the Impairment and Functioning Inventory. Results indicated that the cognitive-affective factors of pain are differentially associated with personality traits. Neuroticism and conscientiousness were significant predictors of pain catastrophizing, and neuroticism, openness, and agreeableness were significant predictors of pain anxiety. Personality traits did not contribute significantly to vigilance to pain. The effect of neuroticism upon pain anxiety was mediated by pain catastrophizing, and neuroticism showed a trend to moderate the relationship between impairment and pain anxiety. Results support the fear-avoidance model of pain. Implications of the findings for the understanding and management of FM are discussed.

  10. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  11. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  12. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  13. Benzodiazepine use in patients with chronic pain in an interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Julie L; Craner, Julia R; Evans, Michele M; Hooten, W Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In the context of widespread opioid use, increased emphasis has been placed on the potentially deleterious effects of concurrent benzodiazepine (BZD) and opioid use. Although use of opioids in chronic pain has been a major focus, BZD use is equally concerning. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between BZD and opioid use in adults with chronic pain upon admission to an outpatient interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation (IPR) program. Methods The study cohort involved 847 consecutive patients admitted to a 3-week outpatient IPR program from January 2013 through December 2014. Study variables included baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the pain severity subscale of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory. Results Upon admission, 248 (29%) patients were taking BZDs. Patients using BZDs were significantly more likely to use opioids and to be female. Additionally, patients using BZDs had significantly greater depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity scores. In univariable logistic regression analysis, opioid use, female sex, and greater scores of depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity were significantly associated with BZD use. In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, pain duration, opioid use, depression, pain catastrophizing, and pain severity, only female sex and greater depression scores were significantly associated with BZD use. Discussion Among patients participating in an outpatient IPR program, female sex and greater depression scores were associated with BZD use. Results identify a high prevalence of BZD use in patients with chronic pain and reinforce the need to weigh the risks versus benefits when prescribing in this patient population. PMID:28223841

  14. Research into pain perception with arteriovenous fistula (avf) cannulation.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ana E; Viegas, Ariani; Monteiro, Mara; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Carlos E

    2008-12-01

    Patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) undergoing haemodialysis (HD) are repeatedly exposed to stress and pain from approximately 300 punctures per year to their arteriovenous fistula (AVF). Repeated AVF punctures lead to a considerable degree of pain, due to the calibre and length of the bevel of fistula needles. Pain is a sensitive, emotional and subjective experience. The objective of this study was to measure pain associated with AVF needling. The analogue visual scale (AVS) divided into 10 equal parts (0 indicating lack of pain, and 10 unbearable pain) was used. Patients(7) perceptions were measured in three different HD sessions. Pain was considered mild during AVF needling. The buttonhole technique caused a mean degree of pain of 2.4 (+/-1.7), compared to 3.1 (+/-2.3) using the conventional ropeladder technique. Although without reaching a statistically significant difference, diminished pain was associated with the buttonhole technique.

  15. Understanding venous leg ulcer pain: results of a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Kathleen A; Harrison, Margaret B; Graham, Ian D; Burke, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Venous leg ulcer pain experienced during compression bandaging is poorly understood. A prospective, pilot cohort study was initiated to determine the feasibility of conducting a large-scale, repeated measures cohort study of venous leg ulcer pain and to document and describe the venous leg ulcer pain experience during the first 5 weeks of treatment with compression bandages. Eligible individuals admitted to a nurse-led community leg ulcer service in one Canadian community were recruited for the 5-week study. Pain assessment tools (ie, numerical rating scale and short form McGill Pain Questionnaire) were evaluated by 20 venous ulcer patients (mean age = 73.7 years) and their nurses for ease of use during one baseline and five weekly follow-up visits. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) information was obtained. Nurses reported on ease of integrating pain data collection into regular clinical care. Each pain assessment tool was audited for completion. Most participants found the pain assessment tools easy to use, but nurses reported lengthened visit times with some participants as a result of tool administration difficulties, particularly the visual analogue scale (VAS). Overall completeness of pain assessment tools ranged from 85.0% (visual analogue scale) to 96.3% (present pain intensity and word descriptor list). The vast majority of patients (18) reported ulcer pain at baseline. Total mean scores for all pain assessment tools used decreased over time, but most patients reported pain throughout the study. The most common pain descriptors used were "aching," "stabbing," "sharp," "tender," and "tiring." Health-related quality of life was low and did not change during the 5-week study. The results of this study suggest that the vast majority of venous ulcer patients experience pain and that it is feasible to examine this pain in individuals receiving care in the community over time.

  16. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  17. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room Position Statements AAPM Facts and Figures on Pain Overview What is Chronic Pain? Incidence of Pain, ... of them. Back to Top What is Chronic Pain? While acute pain is a normal sensation triggered ...

  18. Back pain - returning to work

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain - work; Backache - work; Lumbar pain - work; Pain - back - chronic; Low back pain - work; Lumbago - work ... Exercise helps to prevent future back pain: Exercise a little ... keep your heart healthy and your muscles strong. If walking is ...

  19. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain It’s important to treat pain. If you ... to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. Each day, ...

  20. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders.

  1. Analysis of deep tissue hypersensitivity to pressure pain in professional pianists with insidious mechanical neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether pressure pain hyperalgesia is a feature of professional pianists suffering from neck pain as their main playing-related musculoskeletal disorder. Methods Twenty-three active expert pianists, 6 males and 17 females (age: 36 ± 12 years) with insidious neck pain and 23 pianists, 9 males and 14 females (age: 38 ± 10 years) without neck pain the previous year were recruited. A numerical pain rate scale, Neck Disability Index, hand size and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal and the tibialis anterior muscle in a blinded design. Results The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the second metacarpal and tibialis anterior muscles (P < 0.05), but not over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint and deltoid muscle (P > 0.10), in pianists with neck pain as compared to healthy pianists. Pianists with neck pain had a smaller (P < 0.05) hand size (mean: 181.8 ± 11.8) as compared to pianists without neck pain (mean: 188. 6 ± 13.1). PPT over the tibialis anterior muscles was negatively correlated with the intensity of neck pain. Conclusions Our findings revealed pressure pain hypersensitivity over distant non-symptomatic distant points but not over the symptomatic areas in pianists suffering from neck pain. In addition, pianists with neck pain also had smaller hand size than those without neck pain. Future studies are needed to further determine the relevance of these findings in the clinical course of neck pain as playing-related musculoskeletal disorder in professional pianists. PMID:22111912

  2. A COMPARISON OF TOPICAL MENTHOL TO ICE ON PAIN, EVOKED TETANIC AND VOLUNTARY FORCE DURING DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    PubMed Central

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; Topp, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Pain can adversely affect muscle functioning by inhibiting muscle contractions. Delayed onset muscle soreness was used as a tool to ascertain whether a topical menthol-based analgesic or ice was more effective at reducing pain and permitting greater muscular voluntary and evoked force. Methods: Sixteen subjects were randomized to receive either a topical gel containing 3.5% menthol or topical application of ice to the non-dominant elbow flexors two days following the performance of an exercise designed to induce muscle soreness. Two days later, DOMS discomfort was treated with a menthol based analgesic or ice. Maximum voluntary contractions and evoked tetanic contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were measured at baseline prior to inducing muscle soreness (T1), two days following inducing DOMS after 20 (T2), 25 (T3) and 35 (T4) minutes of either menthol gel or ice therapy. Pain perception using a 10-point visual analog scale was also measured at these four data collection points. Treatment analysis included a 2 way repeated measures ANOVA (2 × 4). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness decreased (p = 0.04) voluntary force 17.1% at T2 with no treatment effect. Tetanic force was 116.9% higher (p<0.05) with the topical analgesic than ice. Pain perception at T2 was significantly (p=0.02) less with the topical analgesic versus ice. Conclusions: Compared to ice, the topical menthol-based analgesic decreased perceived discomfort to a greater extent and permitted greater tetanic forces to be produced. Level of Evidence: Level 2b PMID:22666646

  3. Effect of pain location and duration on life function in the year after motor vehicle collision.

    PubMed

    Bortsov, Andrey V; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Peak, David A; Jones, Jeffrey S; Swor, Robert A; Domeier, Robert M; Lee, David C; Rathlev, Niels K; Hendry, Phyllis L; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-09-01

    Persistent musculoskeletal pain is common after motor vehicle collision (MVC) and often results in substantial disability. The objective of this study was to identify distributions of post-MVC pain that most interfere with specific life functions and that have the greatest interference with aggregate life function. Study data were obtained from a prospective longitudinal multicenter emergency department-based cohort of 948 European Americans experiencing MVC. Overall pain (0-10 numeric rating scale [NRS]), pain in each of 20 body regions (0-10 NRS), and pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory, 0-10 NRS) were assessed 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after MVC. After adjustment for overall pain intensity, an axial distribution of pain caused the greatest interference with most specific life functions (R(2)=0.15-0.28, association P values of <.001) and with overall function. Axial pain explained more than twice as much variance in pain interference as other pain distributions. However, not all patients with axial pain had neck pain. Moderate or severe low back pain was as common as neck pain at week 6 (prevalence 37% for each) and overlapped with neck pain in only 23% of patients. Further, pain across all body regions accounted for nearly twice as much of the variance in pain interference as neck pain alone (60% vs 34%). These findings suggest that studies of post-MVC pain should not focus on neck pain alone.

  4. Infant pain regulation as an early indicator of childhood temperament

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Sara A; Racine, Nicole; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Horton, Rachel; Garfield, Hartley; Greenberg, Saul

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable variability in infants’ responses to painful stimuli, including facial and vocal expressions. This variability in pain-related distress response may be an indicator of temperament styles in childhood. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationships among immunization pain outcomes (pain reactivity, pain regulation and parent ratings of infant pain) over the first year of life and parent report of early temperament. METHODS: A subset of parent-infant dyads in an ongoing Canadian longitudinal cohort was studied. Infant pain behaviours were coded using the Modified Behavior Pain Scale. Parental judgments of infant pain were recorded using the Numeric Rating Scale. Infant temperament was measured using the Infant Behaviour Questionnaire-Revised. Correlational analyses and multiple regressions were conducted. RESULTS: Multiple regressions revealed that the 12-month regulatory pain scores predicted parent ratings of the Negative Affectivity temperament dimension at 14 months of age. Parent ratings of infant pain at 12 months of age predicted parent ratings of the Orienting/Affiliation temperament dimension, with sex differences observed in this substrate. CONCLUSION: Pain-related distress regulation at one year of age appears to be a novel indicator of parent report of temperament ratings. Pain outcomes in the first six months of life were not related to parent temperament ratings. PMID:24308021

  5. Pain Management Task Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    conditions [e.g., peripheral neuropathies , lower extremity arthritis, non-specific LBP], cancer-related pain, post-surgical pain, and other acute pain...Integrative Pain Treatment Medicine .......................................................... 42 4.2.2 Osteopathic Manipulation...VHA and civilian hospitals. Visits outside of Army Medical Treatment Facilities (MTFs) were scheduled based on recommendations from Service

  6. Breakthrough cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew N

    2014-06-01

    Breakthrough pain is a distinct pain state that is common in patients with cancer pain and which is associated with significant morbidity in this group of patients. The aim of this article is to highlight important journal articles relating to breakthrough pain that have been published within the last year, including a systematic review of the epidemiology of breakthrough pain, the largest-ever study of the clinical features of breakthrough pain, and a network meta-analysis of the treatment of breakthrough pain.

  7. Pain, emotion, headache.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-10-01

    Pain has been considered as part of a defensive strategy whose specific role is to signal an immediate active danger to the organism. This definition fits well for acute pain. It does not work well, however, for chronic pain that is maintained even in absence of an ongoing, active threat. Currently, acute and chronic pain are considered to be separate conditions. What follows is a review of the different theories about pain and its history. Different hypotheses regarding pain mechanisms are illustrated. New data emerging from scientific research on chronic pain (migraine in particular) involving innovative imaging techniques are reported and discussed.

  8. Associations between Neuroticism and Depression in Relation to Catastrophizing and Pain-Related Anxiety in Chronic Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Kadimpati, Sandeep; Zale, Emily L; Hooten, Michael W; Ditre, Joseph W; Warner, David O

    2015-01-01

    Several cognitive-affective constructs, including pain catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety, have been implicated in the onset and progression of chronic pain, and both constructs have been identified as key targets for multidisciplinary pain treatment. Both neuroticism and depression have been linked to these constructs (and to each other), but how each may contribute to the pain experience is unknown. This study tested associations between neuroticism, depression, and indices of catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety among persons seeking treatment for chronic non-malignant pain. We hypothesized, as a higher-order personality trait, neuroticism would remain uniquely associated with both pain catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety, even after accounting for current symptoms of depression. A retrospective study design assessed depression (as measured by the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale), neuroticism (measured with the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory), the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the Pain Anxiety Symptom Score in a consecutive series of patients (n=595) admitted to a 3-week outpatient pain treatment program from March 2009 through January 2011. Hierarchical regression indicated that neuroticism was independently associated with greater pain catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety, above-and-beyond the contributions of sociodemographic characteristics, pain severity, and depression. A depression by neuroticism interaction was not observed, suggesting that associations between neuroticism and cognitive-affective pain constructs remained stable across varying levels of current depression. These findings represent an early but important step towards the clarification of complex associations between trait neuroticism, current depression, and tendencies toward catastrophic and anxiety-provoking appraisals of pain among persons seeking treatment for chronic pain.

  9. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s).

  10. Imaging Athletic Groin Pain.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Annu; Robinson, Philip

    2016-09-01

    This article outlines adductor-related groin pain, pubic-related groin pain, inguinal-related groin pain, and iliopsoas-related groin pain, with a description of the corresponding functional anatomy and imaging findings. The imaging has been described mainly in terms of MR imaging findings as this is the principal imaging modality used to investigate groin pain, although plain radiographs and ultrasound can be very useful adjuncts in specific circumstances, especially if an alternative pathology needs to be excluded.

  11. The Quality of Pain Treatment in Community-Dwelling Persons with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiwen; Snow, A. Lynn; Wilson, Nancy; Stanley, Melinda A.; Morgan, Robert O.; Sansgiry, Shubhada; Kunik, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite pervasive and debilitating pain among elders, it is underassessed and undertreated; and cognitive impairment can add challenges. We assessed the quality of pain care for community-dwelling elderly patients with dementia. Methods We phone interviewed 203 Veterans Affairs primary care outpatients with dementia and pain and reviewed medical records to score 15 quality indicators of pain assessment and management. Results Pain assessment was documented for 98%, and a standard pain scale was used for 94%. Modified pain scales were rarely used. Though 70% self-reported pain of ‘quite bad’ or worse, charts documented no pain in 64%. When pain was identified, treatment was offered to 80%; but only 59% had a follow-up assessment within 6 months. Nonpharmacological interventions were underused. Conclusion Community-dwelling elders with dementia are underdiagnosed and undertreated for pain.

  12. Validation of a modified version of the brief pain inventory for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zelman, Diane C; Gore, Mugdha; Dukes, Ellen; Tai, Kei-Sing; Brandenburg, Nancy

    2005-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is the focus of current clinical research, clinical identification, and treatment. It is unique from nociceptive pain and requires evaluation of the relevance and utility of common pain measures created for other painful conditions. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of a modified Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) for patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (BPI-DPN). Participants were patients with painful DPN (n=255) enrolled in a DPN Burden of Illness survey referred through 17 outpatient settings (primary care physicians, endocrinologists, neurologists, and anesthesiologists). Patients completed the BPI-DPN, and self-report measures of health-related quality of life, mood sleep, and healthcare utilization. Construct, criterion and discriminant validity, and internal consistency reliability were evaluated. Principal axis factoring with oblimin rotation revealed two interpretable factors (eigenvalues>1.0), consistent with most published BPI validation studies; a severity scale comprising the four BPI Severity items and an interference scale comprising the seven Interference items, which satisfied criteria for interpretability and model fit. Cronbach's alpha was high (0.94) for both scales. Mean pain Severity was highly correlated with Bodily Pain from the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12, version 2 (rs=0.63, P < 0.001), the Pain/Discomfort item in the Euro-QoL (rs=0.58, P < 0.001), and a verbal rating scale measure of pain severity (rs=0.74, P < 0.001). Individual BPI-DPN Interference domains were moderately correlated (rs's >0.5, P < 0.001) with analogous measures, and the Sleep Interference item had a high, significant association with the three primary Medical Outcome Study-Sleep scale subscales (rs's=0.66-71, P < 0.001). Worst Pain and Interference ratings were significantly associated with hospital utilization and outpatient visits due to DPN. These results replicate, in a pure peripheral neuropathic pain condition

  13. Is It Painful or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Holsti, Liisa; Grunau, Ruth E.; Oberlander, Tim F.; Osiovich, Horacio

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the ability of the Behavioral Indicators of Infant Pain (BIIP) scale to discriminate between skin-breaking and nonskin-breaking procedures, and to identify sensitized pain responses in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods Sixty-nine infants born between 24 and 32 weeks gestational age were assessed at 32 weeks postconceptional age during blood collection on one day (procedure A), and then on another day during blood collection preceded by a diaper change (procedure B). Procedure order was randomized. Outcome measures were changes in BIIP coded from continuous bedside video recordings and changes in heart rate (HR). Results During blood collection (procedure A), BIIP scores (P < 0.0001) and mean HR (P < 0.0001) were higher than during the diaper change and higher when the infants had had a preceding diaper change (procedure B vs. procedure A) (P < 0.03). HR changed from baseline to the stressors for each procedure. No differences in mean HR were observed during Lance phase between the procedure A and the B blood collection; however, HR remained elevated significantly during the Recovery phase when blood collection was preceded by the diaper change (P < 0.03). Discussion The BIIP scale is reliable, accurate, and valid assessment for measuring acute pain in preterm infants in the NICU. This assessment combines the relatively most specific, anatomically based, theoretically derived indicators; and it allows evaluation of behavioral and physiologic pain responses separately. PMID:18180641

  14. Pain Management in Intellectually Disabled Children: Assessment, Treatment, and Translational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valkenburg, Abraham J.; van Dijk, Monique; de Klein, Annelies; van den Anker, Johannes N.; Tibboel, Dick

    2010-01-01

    The primary focus of pain research in intellectually disabled individuals is still on pain assessment. Several observational pain assessment scales are available, each with its own characteristics, its own target group and its own validated use. Observational studies report differences in the treatment of intra- and postoperative pain of…

  15. Preoperative Pain, Symptoms, and Psychological Factors related to Higher Acute Pain Trajectories during Hospitalization for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Maren Falch; Miaskowski, Christine; Rustøen, Tone; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Paul, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Unrelieved postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a significant problem. This longitudinal study investigated how preoperative pain intensity, as well as a comprehensive list of preoperative and perioperative factors, influenced the severity of acute average and worst pain after TKA. Methods Prior to surgery, 203 patients completed a demographic questionnaire, Lee Fatigue Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Brief Pain Inventory was completed prior to surgery as well as through postoperative days (POD) 0 to 4. Clinical data were extracted from medical records. Results Several factors were associated with higher levels of preoperative and postoperative pain. Lower preoperative average and worst pain intensity scores were associated with increases in average and worst postoperative pain from POD1 to POD4. A higher number of comorbidities, higher C-reactive protein values, and higher pain interference with function were associated with higher preoperative levels of average pain. Older age, higher fatigue levels, and higher scores on identity and emotional responses to osteoarthritis (OA) were associated with higher preoperative levels of worst pain. Lower perceived consequences of OA were associated with higher pain from POD1 to POD4. Males and patients with lower preoperative scores for average pain had higher worst pain following surgery. Discussion Patients at higher risk for more severe postoperative pain can be identified through an assessment of pain and other risk factors identified in this study. Future research needs to test the efficacy of interventions that modify patients’ perceptions of living with OA and pain intensity before surgery on short and long term postoperative outcomes. PMID:27583551

  16. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Petschow, Christine; Scheef, Lukas; Paus, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Nadine; Schild, Hans H.; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objective Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson’s disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels. Methods 13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI) during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ) and higher (E = 640 mJ) target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale. Results No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson’s disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson’s disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusion Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson’s disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced

  17. Physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants of pain intensity, pain disability, and the number of pain locations in depressed older adults.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Denise J C; Naarding, Paul; Collard, Rose M; Comijs, Hannie C; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2014-10-01

    Late-life depression and pain more often co-occur than can be explained by chance. Determinants of pain in late-life depression are unknown, even though knowledge on possible determinants of pain in depression is important for clinical practice. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were 1) to describe pain characteristics of depressed older adults and a nondepressed comparison group, and 2) to explore physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants of acute and chronic pain intensity, disability, and multisite pain in depressed older adults. Data from the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons cohort, consisting of 378 depressed persons, diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria, and 132 nondepressed persons aged 60 years and older, were used in a cross-sectional design. Pain characteristics were measured by the Chronic Graded Pain Scale. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to explore the contribution of physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants to outcomes pain intensity, disability, and the number of pain locations. Depressed older adults more often reported chronic pain and experienced their pain as more intense and disabling compared to nondepressed older adults. Adjusted for demographic, physical, and lifestyle characteristics, multinomial logistic regression analyses showed increased odds ratios (OR) for depression in acute pain (OR 3.010; P=0.005) and chronic pain (OR 4.544, P<0.001). In addition, linear regression analyses showed that acute and chronic pain intensity, disability, and multisite pain were associated with several biopsychosocial determinants, of which anxiety was most pronounced. Further research could focus on the temporal relationship between anxiety, late-life depression, and pain.

  18. Update in cancer pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Janjan, Nora; Jain, Subash; Chau, Chi

    2006-12-01

    Cancer pain assessment and management are integral to palliative medicine. This paper reviews recent publications in the period 1999-2004 in the broad categories of epidemiology, pain assessment, nonpharmacologic approaches to cancer pain (radiation therapy, anesthetic blocks, palliative surgery and chemotherapy, complementary and alternative medicine), and in nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain, visceral pain, and bone pain.

  19. Spirituality, religion, and pain.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Anita M

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the relationships between spirituality and health has become increasingly important in health research, including nursing research. Very little of the research thus far has focused on spirituality, religion, and pain even though spiritual views have been intertwined with beliefs about pain and suffering throughout history. Spiritual views can have a substantial impact on patients' understanding of pain and decisions about pain management. The author reviews the research literature on spirituality and pain from a historical perspective. The analysis is concerned with how spirituality and religion have been used to construct a meaning of pain that shapes appraisal, coping, and pain management. The clinical implications include respectful communication with patients about spirituality and pain, inclusion of spirituality in education and support programs, integration of spiritual preferences in pain management where feasible and appropriate, consultation with pastoral care teams, and reflection by nurses about spirituality in their own lives. A discussion of research implications is included.

  20. Pain, objectivity and history: understanding pain stigma.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Daniel S

    2017-02-21

    The primary claim of this paper is that understanding the stigma so commonly endured by chronic pain sufferers today in the USA and the UK is unlikely without proper appreciation of the history of pain. Ameliorating such stigma is an ethical imperative, and yet most approaches eschew even an attempt to trace connections between historical attitudes, practices and beliefs towards pain and the stigmatisation so many pain sufferers currently endure. The manuscript aims to help fill this gap by framing pain in the modern era in context of two crucial intellectual schemes that waxed in the 19th and 20th centuries: mechanical objectivity and somaticism. The analysis explains these frameworks and applies them to exploration of primary sources connected to contested pain conditions such as railway spine. By properly situating the historical roots of what it means to cite the 'subjectivity' of pain as a problem, the modern roots of stigmatising attitudes and practices towards chronic pain sufferers become much clearer. The manuscript concludes by suggesting that interventions expressly intended to target the root causes of such stigma are much more likely to be successful than approaches that proceed in ignorance of the historical forces shaping and driving pain stigma in the present.

  1. [The pain from burns].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  2. Postoperative Pain in Children After Dentistry Under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Copp, Peter E.; Haas, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, and duration of postoperative pain in children undergoing general anesthesia for dentistry. This prospective cross-sectional study included 33 American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I and II children 4–6 years old requiring multiple dental procedures, including at least 1 extraction, and/or pulpectomy, and/or pulpotomy of the primary dentition. Exclusion criteria were children who were developmentally delayed, cognitively impaired, born prematurely, taking psychotropic medications, or recorded baseline pain or analgesic use. The primary outcome of pain was measured by parents using the validated Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) and Parents' Postoperative Pain Measure (PPPM) during the first 72 hours at home. The results showed that moderate-to-severe postoperative pain, defined as FPS-R ≥ 6, was reported in 48.5% of children. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe pain was 29.0% by FPS-R and 40.0% by PPPM at 2 hours after discharge. Pain subsided over 3 days. Postoperative pain scores increased significantly from baseline (P < .001, Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test). Moderately good correlation between the 2 pain measures existed 2 and 12 hours from discharge (Spearman rhos correlation coefficients of 0.604 and 0.603, P < .005). In conclusion, children do experience moderate-to-severe pain postoperatively. Although parents successfully used pain scales, they infrequently administered analgesics. PMID:26650492

  3. Determining the pain-affecting factors of university students with nonspecific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Taspinar, Ferruh; Taspinar, Betul; Cavlak, Ugur; Celik, Erdal

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted on university students with nonspecific low back pain in order to determine the independent variables that affect their pain. [Methods] A total of 514 students were included in this study. Pain was evaluated using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A special form was prepared in order to evaluate the following independent variables: gender, weight, height, Body Mass Index (BMI), working periods sitting straight (television, computer, seminar, etc.), working periods bending at a table (reading, writing, etc.), using lumbar support while sitting, the mean duration of pain within the last one year, type of pain, time of the pain, faculty, class, physical activity habits and smoking. The collected data were evaluated using the CHAID (Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection) analysis method. [Results] The working hours bending at a table, physical activity, height, weight, BMI and educational departments were found not to affect the severity of the pain. The pain severity was affected by the duration of pain complaints within the last one year, the duration of working staying upright, smoking, classes, usage of lumbar support and age variables. [Conclusions] The results of this study show that nonspecific low back pain of university students is affected by many factors such as smoking, class, age, using a computer and lumbar support.

  4. Older Adults’ Pain Descriptions

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the types of pain information described by older adults with chronic osteoarthritis pain. Pain descriptions were obtained from older adults’ who participated in a posttest only double blind study testing how the phrasing of healthcare practitioners’ pain questions affected the amount of communicated pain information. The 207 community dwelling older adults were randomized to respond to either the open-ended or closed-ended pain question. They viewed and orally responded to a computer displayed videotape of a practitioner asking them the respective pain question. All then viewed and responded to the general follow up question, ““What else can you tell me?” and lastly, “What else can you tell me about your pain, aches, soreness or discomfort?” Audio-taped responses were transcribed and content analyzed by trained, independent raters using 16 a priori criteria from the American Pain Society (2002) Guidelines for the Management of Pain in Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Juvenile Chronic Arthritis. Older adults described important but limited types of information primarily about pain location, timing, and intensity. Pain treatment information was elicited after repeated questioning. Therefore, practitioners need to follow up older adults’ initial pain descriptions with pain questions that promote a more complete pain management discussion. Routine use of a multidimensional pain assessment instrument that measures information such as functional interference, current pain treatments, treatment effects, and side effects would be one way of insuring a more complete pain management discussion with older adults. PMID:19706351

  5. Foot and hand massage as an intervention for postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Keck, Juanita F

    2004-06-01

    Physiological responses to pain create harmful effects that prolong the body's recovery after surgery. Patients routinely report mild to moderate pain even though pain medications have been administered. Complementary strategies based on sound research findings are needed to supplement postoperative pain relief using pharmacologic management. Foot and hand massage has the potential to assist in pain relief. Massaging the feet and hands stimulates the mechanoreceptors that activate the "nonpainful" nerve fibers, preventing pain transmission from reaching consciousness. The purpose of this pretest-posttest design study was to investigate whether a 20-minute foot and hand massage (5 minutes to each extremity), which was provided 1 to 4 hours after a dose of pain medication, would reduce pain perception and sympathetic responses among postoperative patients. A convenience sample of 18 patients rated pain intensity and pain distress using a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale. They reported decreases in pain intensity from 4.65 to 2.35 (t = 8.154, p <.001) and in pain distress from 4.00 to 1.88 (t = 5.683, p <.001). Statistically significant decreases in sympathetic responses to pain (i.e., heart rate and respiratory rate) were observed although blood pressure remained unchanged. The changes in heart rate and respiratory rate were not clinically significant. The patients experienced moderate pain after they received pain medications. This pain was reduced by the intervention, thus supporting the effectiveness of massage in postoperative pain management. Foot and hand massage appears to be an effective, inexpensive, low-risk, flexible, and easily applied strategy for postoperative pain management.

  6. The Postoperative Pain Assessment Skills pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    McGillion, Michael; Dubrowski, Adam; Stremler, Robyn; Watt-Watson, Judy; Campbell, Fiona; McCartney, Colin; Victor, J Charles; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Snell, Linda; Costello, Judy; Robb, Anja; Nelson, Sioban; Stinson, Jennifer; Hunter, Judith; Dao, Thuan; Promislow, Sara; McNaughton, Nancy; White, Scott; Shobbrook, Cindy; Jeffs, Lianne; Mauch, Kianda; Leegaard, Marit; Beattie, W Scott; Schreiber, Martin; Silver, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Pain-related misbeliefs among health care professionals (HCPs) are common and contribute to ineffective postoperative pain assessment. While standardized patients (SPs) have been effectively used to improve HCPs’ assessment skills, not all centres have SP programs. The present equivalence randomized controlled pilot trial examined the efficacy of an alternative simulation method – deteriorating patient-based simulation (DPS) – versus SPs for improving HCPs’ pain knowledge and assessment skills. METHODS: Seventy-two HCPs were randomly assigned to a 3 h SP or DPS simulation intervention. Measures were recorded at baseline, immediate postintervention and two months postintervention. The primary outcome was HCPs’ pain assessment performance as measured by the postoperative Pain Assessment Skills Tool (PAST). Secondary outcomes included HCPs knowledge of pain-related misbeliefs, and perceived satisfaction and quality of the simulation. These outcomes were measured by the Pain Beliefs Scale (PBS), the Satisfaction with Simulated Learning Scale (SSLS) and the Simulation Design Scale (SDS), respectively. Student’s t tests were used to test for overall group differences in postintervention PAST, SSLS and SDS scores. One-way analysis of covariance tested for overall group differences in PBS scores. RESULTS: DPS and SP groups did not differ on post-test PAST, SSLS or SDS scores. Knowledge of pain-related misbeliefs was also similar between groups. CONCLUSIONS: These pilot data suggest that DPS is an effective simulation alternative for HCPs’ education on postoperative pain assessment, with improvements in performance and knowledge comparable with SP-based simulation. An equivalence trial to examine the effectiveness of deteriorating patient-based simulation versus standardized patients is warranted. PMID:22184553

  7. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated.

  8. Pain Management in Horses.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alonso

    2017-04-01

    There has been great progress in the understanding of basic neurobiologic mechanisms of pain, but this body of knowledge has not yet translated into new and improved analgesics. Progress has been made regarding pain assessment in horses, but more work is needed until sensitive and accurate pain assessment tools are available for use in clinical practice. This review summarizes and updates the knowledge concerning the cornerstones of pain medicine (understand, assess, prevent, and treat). It highlights the importance of understanding pain mechanisms and expressions to enable a rational approach to pain assessment, prevention, and management in the equine patient.

  9. Central modulation of pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.; Dussor, Gregory O.; Porreca, Frank

    2010-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that the experience of pain is highly variable between individuals. Pain results from activation of sensory receptors specialized to detect actual or impending tissue damage (i.e., nociceptors). However, a direct correlation between activation of nociceptors and the sensory experience of pain is not always apparent. Even in cases in which the severity of injury appears similar, individual pain experiences may vary dramatically. Emotional state, degree of anxiety, attention and distraction, past experiences, memories, and many other factors can either enhance or diminish the pain experience. Here, we review evidence for “top-down” modulatory circuits that profoundly change the sensory experience of pain. PMID:21041960

  10. A multiple-dose, open-label, safety, compliance, and usage evaluation study of epicutaneously applied Diractin (ketoprofen in Transfersome) in joint/musculoskeletal pain or soft tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kneer, Werner; Rother, Ilka; Rother, Matthias; Seidel, Egbert

    2009-01-01

    The risk of oral NSAID including Cox-2 inhibitors to cause gastrointestinal, renal or cardiovascular adverse events related to systemic drug exposure could be reduced by local application. But only few long-term studies have been published to show safety and efficacy for long-term use of topical NSAID s. Diractin (formerly IDEA-033) is a viscous, aqueous formulation for epicutaneous application of ketoprofen based on ultra-deformable, self-regulating carrier (Transfersome). This multiple-dose, open label study with treatment periods up to 18 months included 402 patients with joint pain, musculoskeletal pain, stiffness or soft tissue inflammation (age of 61.4+/-11.5 years). Most of the patients suffered from osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee (68.9%). Diractin was applied epicutaneously up to twice daily with a maximum dose of 220 mg ketoprofen per a maximum of 2 application sites. The mean pain score at baseline was 5.4+/-.4 on a 10 point categorical scale. During the study the pain score progressively improved up to week 36 (3.5+/-1.9) without a substantial further change during the rest of observation period of up to 18 months. The reduction of pain scores between week 0 (baseline) and at all later visits was statistically significant (P<0.0001). Patients also reported an improvement of quality of life on the EUROQoL. The majority of treatment related adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders with the highest frequency reported for erythema (16.7%) and pruritus (2.0%). Systemic ketoprofen exposure remained low throughout the study period with plasma concentrations of less than 1% of what was reported for a single, standard oral dose of 200 mg ketoprofen. There were no occurrences of treatment related serious adverse events and no remarkable changes in laboratory values or vital signs. In summary, Diractin provided adequate pain relief with a good safety and tolerability profile when used for up to 18 months (72 weeks).

  11. Prevalence and determinants of cannabinoid prescription for the management of chronic noncancer pain: a postal survey of physicians in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of Quebec

    PubMed Central

    St-Amant, Huguette; Ware, Mark A.; Julien, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have been conducted to explore physicians’ prescription practices and attitudes toward the use of cannabinoids in Canada.We measured the prevalence and identified determinants of cannabinoid prescription for the management of chronic noncancer pain among physicians in southwestern Quebec. Methods In February 2013, we conducted a postal survey using a modified Dillman method that involved physicians practising in the Abitibi-Témiscamingue region of Quebec. We used multivariate logistic regression models to identify determinants of cannabinoid prescription. Results A total of 166 physicians of 318 practising in the region participated in the survey (response rate 52.2%). The prevalence of cannabinoid prescription was 27.3% (45/165) for any indication and 23.0% (38/165) for the management of chronic noncancer pain; 91.1% (41/45) of the physicians prescribed cannabinoids to 5 or fewer patients. Of the 38 physicians who prescribed cannabinoids for chronic noncancer pain, 35 (92.1%) prescribed nabilone, 7 (18.4%) medical marijuana and 2 (5.3%) nabiximols. The principal determinant of cannabinoid prescription was the physician’s level of comfort with prescribing cannabinoids (adjusted odds ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.55, per 1-point increase in comfort level measured on 10-point scale). Respondents reported that continuing medical education (CME) activities could increase their comfort level. They also indicated a need for guidelines or algorithms that included cannabinoid use as well as more studies about the efficacy and safety of cannabinoids for the management of chronic noncancer pain. Interpretation We found that cannabinoids were not often prescribed for the management of chronic noncancer pain and that survey respondents were not comfortable with prescribing this drug class. This degree of discomfort could be addressed by CME activities, more effective dissemination of guidelines and more evidence regarding cannabinoid

  12. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  13. Pain typology and incident endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Schliep, K.C.; Mumford, S.L.; Peterson, C.M.; Chen, Z.; Johnstone, E.B.; Sharp, H.T.; Stanford, J.B.; Hammoud, A.O.; Sun, L.; Buck Louis, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the pain characteristics among women, with no prior endometriosis diagnosis, undergoing laparoscopy or laparotomy regardless of clinical indication? SUMMARY ANSWER Women with surgically visualized endometriosis reported the highest chronic/cyclic pain and significantly greater dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, and dyschezia compared with women with other gynecologic pathology (including uterine fibroids, pelvic adhesions, benign ovarian cysts, neoplasms and congenital Müllerian anomalies) or a normal pelvis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Prior research has shown that various treatments for pain associated with endometriosis can be effective, making identification of specific pain characteristics in relation to endometriosis necessary for informing disease diagnosis and management. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The study population for these analyses includes the ENDO Study (2007–2009) operative cohort: 473 women, ages 18–44 years, who underwent a diagnostic and/or therapeutic laparoscopy or laparotomy at one of 14 surgical centers located in Salt Lake City, UT or San Francisco, CA. Women with a history of surgically confirmed endometriosis were excluded. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING AND METHODS Endometriosis was defined as surgically visualized disease; staging was based on revised American Society for Reproductive Medicine (rASRM) criteria. All women completed a computer-assisted personal interview at baseline specifying 17 types of pain (rating severity via 11-point visual analog scale) and identifying any of 35 perineal and 60 full-body front and 60 full-body back sites for which they experienced pain in the last 6 months. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE There was a high prevalence (≥30%) of chronic and cyclic pelvic pain reported by the entire study cohort regardless of post-operative diagnosis. However, women with a post-operative endometriosis diagnosis, compared with women diagnosed with other gynecologic disorders or a normal pelvis

  14. Advanced Innovations for Pain.

    PubMed

    Lamer, Tim J; Deer, Timothy R; Hayek, Salim M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems in terms of both the number of patients afflicted and health care costs. Most patients with chronic pain are treated with medications as the mainstay of therapy, and yet most medically treated patients continue to report ongoing pain. Additionally, adverse effects from pain medications represent a major challenge for clinicians and patients. Spinal cord stimulation and intrathecal drug delivery systems are well-established techniques that have been utilized for over 25 years. Intrathecal drug delivery systems have proven efficacy for a wide variety of intractable pain conditions and fewer adverse effects than systemic medical therapy in patients with refractory cancer-related pain. Spinal cord stimulation is cost-effective and provides improved pain control compared with medical therapy in patients with a variety of refractory pain conditions including complex regional pain syndrome, painful diabetic neuropathy, and chronic radiculopathy. Patients who have intractable pain that has not responded to reasonable attempts at conservative pain care measures should be referred to a qualified interventional pain specialist to determine candidacy for the procedures discussed in this article.

  15. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Alam, Tausif; Sollinger, Hans

    2014-09-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome is a rare disease with a prevalence of ∼0.012%. The most prominent clinical features include periods of severe intermittent or persistent unilateral or bilateral loin pain accompanied by either microscopic or gross hematuria. Patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome initially present with hematuria, flank pain, or most often both hematuria and flank pain. Kidney biopsies from patients with loin pain hematuria typically reveal only minor pathologic abnormalities. Further, loin pain hematuria syndrome is not associated with loss of kidney function or urinary tract infections. Loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated hematuria and pain are postulated to be linked to vascular disease of the kidney, coagulopathy, renal vasospasm with microinfarction, hypersensitivity, complement activation on arterioles, venocalyceal fistula, abnormal ureteral peristalsis, and intratubular deposition of calcium or uric acid microcrystals. Many patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome also meet criteria for a somatoform disorder, and analgesic medications, including narcotics, commonly are used to treat loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated pain. Interventional treatments include renal denervation, kidney autotransplantation, and nephrectomy; however, these methods should be used only as a last resort when less invasive measures have been tried unsuccessfully. In this review article, we discuss and critique current clinical practices related to loin pain hematuria syndrome pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  16. [Psychological diagnostics of functional abdominal pain in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Schlarb, Angelika A; Bock, Inga; Gulewitsch, Marco D; Hautzinger, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Given the high prevalence and possible psychosocial consequences of functional abdominal pain in children and adolescents, appropriate instruments for early diagnostics are required to work effectively against long-term chronic courses of this disorder. This report describes several self-report scales and reviews their applicability. In addition, questionnaires and interviews which assess pain intensity and associated factors as well as specific instruments for assessing functional abdominal pain in children and adolescents are introduced. It can be declared that none of the examined instruments grasps all relevant factors of pain. Especially in German there are only few appropriate diagnostic instruments for functional abdominal pain in children.

  17. Gender role expectations of pain mediate sex differences in cold pain responses in healthy Libyans.

    PubMed

    Alabas, O A; Tashani, O A; Johnson, M I

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies found a relationship between response to experimentally-induced pain and scores for the gender role expectations of pain (GREP) questionnaire. Findings were similar in individuals from America, Portugal and Israel suggesting that gender role expectations may be universal. The aim of this study was to translate and validate Arabic GREP using Factor Analysis and to investigate if sex differences to cold-pressor pain in healthy Libyan men and women are mediated through stereotypical social constructs of gender role expectations and/or pain-related anxiety. One hundred fourteen university students (58 women) underwent two cycles of cold pressor pain test to measure pain threshold, tolerance, intensity, and unpleasantness. Participants also completed the Arabic GREP questionnaire and the Pain Anxiety Symptom Scale-Short form (PASS-20). It was found that Libyan men had higher pain thresholds and tolerances than women (mean difference, 95% CI: threshold = 4.69 (s), -0.72 to 10.1, p = 0.005; tolerance = 13.46 (s), 0.5-26.4, p = 0.018). There were significant differences between sexes in 6 out of 12 GREP items (p < 0.004 after Bonferonni adjustment). The results of mediational analysis showed that GREP factors were the mediators of the effects of sex on pain threshold (z = -2.452, p = 0.014 for Self Sensitivity); (z = -2.563, p = 0.01, for Self Endurance) and on pain tolerance (z = -2.538, p = 0.01 for Self Endurance). In conclusion, sex differences in response to pain were mediated by gender role expectations of pain but not pain-related anxiety.

  18. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for increased overall health care costs. A person’s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. ... medications such as levodopa can affect a person’s perception of pain. People with Parkinson’s who are in ...

  19. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 314. This combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, most pain relievers used for surgical procedures block activity in ...

  20. Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Facts / Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids) Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids) Print What is prescription opioid misuse? Also ... Hillbilly Heroin, OC, or Vikes Prescription opioids are medications that are chemically similar to endorphins – opioids that ...

  1. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Fighting Chronic Pain Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... diagnose, health care professionals and scientists know that chronic pain is very complex. Below are some of the ...

  2. Belly Pain (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Video: Am I Normal? (For Girls) ... in the Operating Room? Belly Pain KidsHealth > For Kids > Belly Pain Print A A A What's in ...

  3. Rib cage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply) Home ...

  4. American Pain Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statement Enduring Materials APS Bulletin Webinars Resources Resource - Fibromyalgia Resources - Sickle Cell Disease Clinical Centers Guide Funding ... Patients Study Explores Role of Impaired Sleep in Fibromyalgia Pain Study Evaluates Frequency of Pediatric Pain Assessments ...

  5. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve pain due to: Cancer Carpal tunnel syndrome Fibromyalgia Childbirth (labor) Musculoskeletal injuries (such as the neck, ... pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine headache Tension headache Both ...

  6. Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... worsens. Treatment options for myofascial pain syndrome include physical therapy and trigger point injections. Pain medications and relaxation ... syndrome typically includes medications, trigger point injections or physical therapy. No conclusive evidence supports using one therapy over ...

  7. Sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Paul; Dreyer, Susan J; Cole, Andrew; Mayo, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint is a source of pain in the lower back and buttocks in approximately 15% of the population. Diagnosing sacroiliac joint-mediated pain is difficult because the presenting complaints are similar to those of other causes of back pain. Patients with sacroiliac joint-mediated pain rarely report pain above L5; most localize their pain to the area around the posterior superior iliac spine. Radiographic and laboratory tests primarily help exclude other sources of low back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and bone scans of the sacroiliac joint cannot reliably determine whether the joint is the source of the pain. Controlled analgesic injections of the sacroiliac joint are the most important tool in the diagnosis. Treatment modalities include medications, physical therapy, bracing, manual therapy, injections, radiofrequency denervation, and arthrodesis; however, no published prospective data compare the efficacy of these modalities.

  8. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Neck Disability Index and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale for patients with neck pain due to degenerative and discopathic disorders. Psychometric properties of the Polish versions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Even though there are several region-specific functional outcome questionnaires measuring neck disorders that have been developed in English-speaking countries, no Polish version has ever been validated. The purpose of our study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale (CDS) for Polish-speaking patients with neck pain. Methods The translation was carried out according to the International Quality of Life Association (IQOLA) Project. Sixty patients were treated due to degenerative and discopathic disorders in the cervical spine filled out the NDI-PL and the CDS-PL. The pain level was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale. The mean age of the assessed group was 47.1 years (SD 8.9). We used Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency. We assessed the test-retest reliability using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs). The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rS) was used to determine dependency between quantitative characteristics. The Mann-Whitney test was applied to determine dependency between quantitative and qualitative characteristics. Results The Cronbach's alpha values were excellent for the NDI-PL in the test and in the retest (0.84, 0.85, respectively), and for the CDS-PL (0.90 in the test and in the retest). Intraclass Correlation Coefficients were excellent for the CDS-PL and NDI-PL and equalled 0.93 (95% CI from 0.89 to 0.95) and 0.87 (95% CI from 0.80 to 0.92), respectively The concurrent validity was good in the test and in the retest (rs = 0.42 p < 0.001; rs = 0.40 p = 0.002, respectively) for NDI-PL and for CDS-PL (rs = 0.42 p < 0.001; rs = 0.40 p = 0.001, respectively). The adapted questionnaires showed a strong inter-correlation both in the test (0.87 p < 0.001) and in the retest (0.79 p < 0.001). Conclusions The present versions of the NDI-PL and CDS-PL, the first to be published in Polish, have proven to be reliable and valid for

  9. Complex multilocus effects of catechol-O-methyltransferase haplotypes predict pain and pain interference 6 weeks after motor vehicle collision

    PubMed Central

    Bortsov, Andrey V.; Diatchenko, Luda; McLean, Samuel A.

    2013-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase, encoded by COMT gene, is the primary enzyme that metabolizes catecholamines. COMT haplotypes have been associated with vulnerability to persistent non-traumatic pain. In this prospective observational study, we investigated the influence of COMT on persistent pain and pain interference with life functions after motor vehicle collision (MVC) in 859 European American adults for whom overall pain (0–10 numeric rating scale) and pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory) were assessed at week 6 after MVC. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the COMT gene were successfully genotyped, nine were present in three haploblocks: block 1 (rs2020917, rs737865, rs1544325), block 2 (rs4633, rs4818, rs4680, rs165774) and block 3 (rs174697, rs165599). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, haplotype TCG from block 1 predicted decreased pain interference (p =.004). The pain-protective effect of the low pain sensitivity (LPS, CGGG) haplotype from block 2 was only observed if at least one TCG haplotype was present in block 1 (haplotype × haplotype interaction p=.002 and <.0001 for pain and pain interference, respectively). Haplotype AG from block 3 was associated with pain and interference in males only (sex × haplotype interaction p=.005 and .0005, respectively). These results suggest that genetic variants in the distal promoter are important contributors to the development of persistent pain after MVC, directly and via the interaction with haplotypes in the coding region of the gene. PMID:23963787

  10. Low back pain, radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, Stephen M; Ruff, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is a pervasive problem in the adult population. Most patients with low back pain will not require imaging as spontaneous recovery within 12 weeks is the rule. However, a small percentage of patients with low back pain will have serious underlying pathology requiring more intensive investigation. This chapter delineates the signs and symptoms related to potential serious underlying causes and discusses appropriate imaging modalities that should be utilized in patients with low back pain.

  11. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain and ... Pain can be stressful for you and your family. But with treatment, pain can be ... medicines, such as: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ...

  12. Paine Appointed Administrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon announcing the appointment of Dr. Thomas O. Paine as Administrator for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The ceremony was held at the White House. Paine had been serving as acting administrator. From left to right: President Richard M. Nixon NASA Administrator Dr. Thomas O. Paine Vice President Spiro T. Agnew

  13. Forebrain Pain Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Galhardo, Vasco; Maione, Sabatino; Mackey, Sean C.

    2009-01-01

    Emotional-affective and cognitive dimensions of pain are less well understood than nociceptive and nocifensive components, but the forebrain is believed to play an important role. Recent evidence suggests subcortical and cortical brain areas outside the traditional pain processing network contribute critically to emotional-affective responses and cognitive deficits related to pain. These brain areas include different nuclei of the amygdala and certain prefrontal cortical areas. Their roles in various aspects of pain will be discussed. Biomarkers of cortical dysfunction are being identified that may evolve into therapeutic targets to modulate pain experience and improve pain-related cognitive impairment. Supporting data from preclinical studies in neuropathic pain models will be presented. Neuroimaging analysis provides evidence for plastic changes in the pain processing brain network. Results of clinical studies in neuropathic pain patients suggest that neuroimaging may help determine mechanisms of altered brain functions in pain as well as monitor the effects of pharmacologic interventions to optimize treatment in individual patients. Recent progress in the analysis of higher brain functions emphasizes the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience and the need for integrative approaches to determine the full spectrum of harmful or protective neurobiological changes in pain. PMID:19162070

  14. Pediatric Procedural Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Ronald L.; Piira, Tiina; Cohen, Lindsey L.; Cheng, Patricia S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the various settings in which infants, children, and adolescents experience pain during acute medical procedures and issues related to referral of children to pain management teams. In addition, self-report, reports by others, physiological monitoring, and direct observation methods of assessment of pain and related constructs…

  15. Pain Medications After Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you and what didn't. Talk about chronic pain. If you have chronic pain, you'll likely have to deal with that ... called tolerance — if you're taking medications for chronic pain. Discuss this in detail with your doctor before ...

  16. Treating Pain with Opioids

    MedlinePlus

    ... with using opioids to treat acute pain, or chronic pain if a Opioid p s a : t H ie o n w ... these options before you take an opioid because opioids alone are rarely enough to treat chronic pain over a long period of time. 2 Medicines ...

  17. Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pelvic pain in women Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Chronic pelvic pain is pain in the area below your bellybutton ... your hips that lasts six months or longer. Chronic pelvic pain can have multiple causes. It can be a ...

  18. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (p<0.05, small volume correction). The expression of analgesia was associated with reduction in signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus in three brainstem regions: the caudalis subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, i.e., the primary synapse, the region of the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis and in the

  19. Development of the Geop-Pain questionnaire for multidisciplinary assessment of pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Su-Hwan; Lee, Mi-Soon; Koo, Bon-Sung; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Chae, Won Seok; Jin, Hee Cheol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Kim, Yong-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the multidisciplinary aspects of pain, various self-rating questionnaires have been developed, but there have not been sufficient relevant studies on this topic in South Korea. The aim of this study was to develop a new pain sensitivity-related questionnaire in the Korean language that would be simple and would well reflect Koreans' senses. Methods A new pain assessment questionnaire was developed through a pre-survey on "geop", which is the Korean word expressing fear, anxiety, or catastrophizing. We named the new assessment questionnaire the Geop-Pain Questionnaire (GPQ). The GPQ was composed of 15 items divided into three categories and rated on a 5-point scale. As a preliminary study, internal consistency and test-retest reliability analyses were conducted. Subsequently, 109 individuals completed the GPQ along with three pain-related questionnaires translated into Korean (Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire [PSQ], Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale [PASS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]), and the correlations were analyzed. Results All items in the GPQ showed appropriate internal consistency, and the test-retest reliability analysis showed no statistically significant differences. The correlations between the GPQ and the existing questionnaires revealed that the GPQ scores had mid-positive correlations with the PSQ scores and strong positive correlations with the PASS and PCS scores. Conclusions This study attempted to develop a questionnaire assessing pain sensitivity multidimensionally using the Korean word geop for the first time. The self-rating GPQ showed high correlations with the existing questionnaires and demonstrated potential to be utilized as a pain prediction index in clinical practice. PMID:27703631

  20. Persistent post-surgical pain and neuropathic pain after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Georgios I; Triantafilidou, Triantafilia; Ververidis, Athanasios; Agelopoulou, Cristina; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the prevalence of persistent post-surgical pain (PPSP) and neuropathic pain (NP) after total knee replacement (TKR). METHODS: MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for articles published until December 2014 in English language. Published articles were included if they referred to pain that lasts at least 3 mo after primary TKR for knee osteoarthritis, and measured pain with pain specific instruments. Studies that referred to pain caused by septic reasons and implant malalignment were excluded. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included and only 14 studies that match the inclusion criteria were selected for this review. RESULTS: The included studies were characterized by the heterogeneity on the scales used to measure pain and pre-operative factors related to PPSP and NP. The reported prevalence of PPSP and NP seems to be relatively high, but it varies among different studies. There is also evidence that the prevalence of post-surgical pain is related to the scale used for pain measurement. The prevalence of PPSP is ranging at 6 mo from 16% to 39% and at 12 mo from 13.1% to 23% and even 38% of the patients. The prevalence of NP at 6 mo post-operatively is ranging from 5.2% to 13%. Pre-operative factors related to the development of PPSP also differ, including emotional functioning, such as depression and pain catastrophizing, number of comorbidities, pain problems elsewhere and operations in knees with early grade of osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION: No firm conclusions can be reached regarding the prevalence of PPSP and NP and the related factors due to the heterogeneity of the studies. PMID:26301182

  1. The Psychophysics of Cold Pressor Pain and Its Modification through Hypnotic Suggestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgard, Ernest R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Earlier reports of the pain of putting hand and forearm in circulating ice water were recomputed to study how subjects scale that pain and to find appropriate measures of its reduction under hypnotic analgesia. (Editor)

  2. Amantadine sulfate reduces experimental sensitization and pain in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kleinböhl, Dieter; Görtelmeyer, Roman; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Hölzl, Rupert

    2006-03-01

    We investigated if established psychophysical measures of enhanced experimental sensitization in chronic musculoskeletal pain can be reduced by adjuvant treatment with a N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, amantadine sulfate, and whether a reduction in sensitization might be accompanied by a concurrent improvement in clinical pain. Sensitization was evaluated by an experimental tonic heat model of short-term sensitization with concurrent subjective and behavioral psychophysical scaling. Twenty-six patients with chronic back pain were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and received daily dosages of either placebo or 100 mg of amantadine sulfate during a 1-wk treatment. Participants completed quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds and experimental sensitization before and after treatment and clinical pain ratings before, during, and after treatment. Experimental sensitization and clinical pain were reduced in patients receiving verum. Initially, experimental sensitization was enhanced in patients, with early sensitization at nonpainful intensities of contact heat and enhanced sensitization at painful intensities, as shown previously. After 1 wk of treatment, experimental sensitization was reduced with amantadine sulfate but not with placebo. We conclude that adjuvant chronic pain treatment with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists might be beneficial for chronic pain if enhanced sensitization is involved and that the quantitative sensory test of temporal summation may be used to verify this.

  3. Distinguishing affective and somatic dimensions of pain and depression: a confirmatory factor analytic study.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Sheera F; Rudich, Zvia; Shahar, Golan

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we examined the overlap between pain and depression in a sample of 342 chronic pain patients treated at a specialty pain clinic. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to test the differentiation of pain and depression measured as latent factors derived from the subscales of the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. The affective pain subscale did not load on latent depression and the somatic depression subscale loaded weakly on latent pain. Although pain and depression are linked, we found that affective pain is distinct from depression, and that somatic depression is distinct from pain. This finding justifies further examination of the casual relationship between pain and depression.

  4. Dancing in pain: pain appraisal and coping in dancers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ruth; Hanrahan, Stephanie J

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between the type of pain experienced (performance pain and injury pain), the cognitive appraisal of pain and pain coping styles in dancers. Fifty-one professional ballet and contemporary dancers (17 males and 34 females), with the mean age of 25.9 years, completed a general pain questionnaire, the Pain Appraisal Inventory, the Survey of Pain Attitudes Control Subscale, and the Sports Inventory for Pain. Multivariate analyses of variance indicated that both the cognitive appraisal of the pain and pain coping styles did not differ according to the type of pain experienced or the pain severity. However, it was found that dancers with performance pain of either low or high severity were more likely to dance in pain than dancers experiencing injury pain. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the appraisal of pain as threatening was predictive of the use of avoidance and catastrophizing pain coping styles. Overall, results indicated that dancers may not differentiate between performance pain and injury pain, or modify their appraisal and coping strategies according to the characteristics of the pain experienced. The study highlighted an opportunity for increased education for dancers in recognizing the difference between pain considered to be a routine aspect of training and pain which is a signal of serious injury.

  5. The influence of children's pain memories on subsequent pain experience.

    PubMed

    Noel, Melanie; Chambers, Christine T; McGrath, Patrick J; Klein, Raymond M; Stewart, Sherry H

    2012-08-01

    Healthy children are often required to repeatedly undergo painful medical procedures (eg, immunizations). Although memory is often implicated in children's reactions to future pain, there is a dearth of research directly examining the relationship between the 2. The current study investigated the influence of children's memories for a novel pain stimulus on their subsequent pain experience. One hundred ten healthy children (60 boys) between the ages of 8 and 12 years completed a laboratory pain task and provided pain ratings. Two weeks later, children provided pain ratings based on their memories as well as their expectancies about future pain. One month following the initial laboratory visit, children again completed the pain task and provided pain ratings. Results showed that children's memory of pain intensity was a better predictor of subsequent pain reporting than their actual initial reporting of pain intensity, and mediated the relationship between initial and subsequent pain reporting. Children who had negatively estimated pain memories developed expectations of greater pain prior to a subsequent pain experience and showed greater increases in pain ratings over time than children who had accurate or positively estimated pain memories. These findings highlight the influence of pain memories on healthy children's expectations of future pain and subsequent pain experiences and extend predictive models of subsequent pain reporting.

  6. Occlusion and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Klineberg, I

    1978-02-01

    The role of the occlusion in the aetiology of reflex jaw muscle hyperactivity and myofacial pain is analysed. Neurological mechanisms are proposed to explain how variations in occlusal morphology of sufficient magnitude (segmental influences), and the presence of anxiety states (suprasegmental influences) affect jaw muscle activity and contribute to myofascial pain. Controlled occlusal therapy may alter the segmental neurological control of jaw muscle activity to facilitate resolution of muscle hyperactivity in acute myofascial pain. Chronic myofascial pain dysfunction is not primarily related to occlusal factors and a complex psychophysiological mechanism is involved in this type of pain problem.

  7. Myofascial low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ramsook, Ryan R; Malanga, Gerard A

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain is a common condition that is encountered by both primary care physicians as well as various specialists, which include: orthopedic surgeons, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, neurologists, rheumatologists, and pain management specialists. Associated muscular pain is very common and often a reactive response from nociception from other structures. Myofascial pain may arise, which is characterized by the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) that are located in fascia, tendons, and/or muscle. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the pathophysiology, assessment, and recommended treatment options for myofascial low back pain.

  8. Pregabalin in Chronic Post–thoracotomy Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Atul; Nar, Amandeep Singh; Bawa, Ashvind; Kaur, Gurinder; Bawa, Sayesha; Mishra, Seema

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic post–thoracotomy pain (CPP) has very high incidence and therefore it needs attention. Usually, it is burning, dysaesthetic and aching in nature and it displays many features of neuropathic pain. No one technique of thoracotomy has been shown to reduce the incidence of chronic post thoracotomy pain. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in patients with chronic post–thoracotomy pain. Methods: This prospective, randomized study was conducted on 50 consenting patients who underwent posterolateral thoracotomy. 25 patients were given pregabalin for 21 days (Group A). Another 25 were given diclofenac sodium (Group B) on demand and they escaped treatment. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scoring was performed on days 0, 1 and 7, then follow up was done at 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. The data was analyzed by using t-test and Chi- square test for various variables. Results: The pain VAS scores in Group A were significantly low at all observation points except on day 0, day 1 and day 7 post-operatively, when the difference in pain scores in both the groups were comparable. The overall pain scores of Group A were comparable at day 0, day 1 and at day 7 as compared to those of Group B (p>0.9). Pain was significantly low at three weeks (p<0.05). Pain scores of Group A were significantly low at 6 weeks,12 weeks and 24 weeks as compared to those of Group B (p<0.001) and the difference was statistically significant. No significant adverse reactions were observed during study period. Conclusion: Pregabalin is a safe and an effective adjuvant which is used for reducing the chronic post thoracotomy pain, which has no side effects and a high patient compliance. These results should be supported with multidisciplinary studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-ups. PMID:24086867

  9. Correlates of satisfaction with pain treatment in the acute postoperative period: results from the international PAIN OUT registry.

    PubMed

    Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Gerbershagen, Hans J; Taylor, Rod S; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Komann, Marcus; Rothaug, Judith; Volk, Thomas; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Zaslansky, Ruth; Brill, Silviu; Ullrich, Kristin; Gordon, Debra B; Meissner, Winfried

    2014-07-01

    Patient ratings of satisfaction with their postoperative pain treatment tend to be high even in those with substantial pain. Determinants are poorly understood and have not previously been studied in large-scale, international datasets. PAIN OUT, a European Union-funded acute pain registry and research project, collects patient-reported outcome data on postoperative day 1 using the self-reported International Pain Outcome Questionnaire (IPO), and patient, clinical, and treatment characteristics. We investigated correlates of satisfaction and consistency of effects across centres and countries using multilevel regression modelling. Our sample comprised 16,868 patients (median age 55 years; 55% female) from 42 centres in 11 European countries plus Israel, USA, and Malaysia, who underwent a wide range of surgical procedures, for example, joint, limb, and digestive tract surgeries. Median satisfaction was 9 (interquartile range 7-10) on a 0-10 scale. Three IPO items showed strong associations and explained 35% of the variability present in the satisfaction variable: more pain relief received, higher allowed participation in pain treatment decisions, and no desire to have received more pain treatment. Patient factors and additional IPO items reflecting pain experience (eg, worst pain intensity), pain-related impairment, and information on pain treatment added little explanatory value, partially due to covariate correlations. Effects were highly consistent across centres and countries. We conclude that satisfaction with postoperative pain treatment is associated with the patients' actual pain experience, but more strongly with impressions of improvement and appropriateness of care. To the degree they desire, patients should be provided with information and involved in pain treatment decisions.

  10. Pain in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  11. A prospective study on postoperative pain after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Porela-Tiihonen, Susanna; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kokki, Merja; Purhonen, Sinikka; Kokki, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate postoperative pain and early recovery in cataract patients. Patients and methods A total of 201 patients who underwent elective first eye cataract extraction surgery were enrolled, and 196 were included in the final analysis. The study design was a single-center, prospective, follow-up study in a tertiary hospital in eastern Finland. Postoperative pain was evaluated with the Brief Pain Inventory at four time points: at baseline, and at 24 hours, 1 week, and 6 weeks postsurgery. Results Postoperative pain was relatively common during the first hours after surgery, as it was reported by 67 (34%) patients. After hospital discharge, the prevalence decreased; at 24 hours, 1 week, and 6 weeks, 18 (10%), 15 (9%) and 12 (7%) patients reported having ocular pain, respectively. Most patients with eye pain reported significant pain, with a score of ≥4 on a pain scale of 0–10, but few had taken analgesics for eye pain. Those who had used analgesics rated the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol and ibuprofen as good or excellent. Other ocular irritation symptoms were common after surgery; as a new postoperative symptom, foreign-body sensation was reported by 40 patients (22%), light sensitivity by 29 (16%), burning by 15 (8%), and itching by 15 (8%). Conclusion Moderate or severe postoperative pain was relatively common after cataract surgery. Thus, all patients undergoing cataract surgery should be provided appropriate counseling on pain and pain management after surgery. PMID:23885165

  12. Avicenna's concept of pain.

    PubMed

    Tashani, Osama A; Johnson, Mark I

    2010-09-08

    Ibn Sina (Latin name - Avicenna, 980-1037) is a famous Muslim physician who wrote The Canon of Medicine. Pain-related writings within The Canon were identified and analysed and compared to Galen and Modern Pain Theory. We found evidence in The Canon that Avicenna challenged Galen's concept of pain. Galen insisted that injuries (breach of continuity) were the only cause of pain. In contrast, Avicenna suggested that the true cause of pain was a change of the physical condition (temperament change) of the organ whether there was an injury present or not. Avicenna extended Galen's descriptions of 4 to 15 types of pain and used a terminology that is remarkably similar to that used in the McGill Pain Questionnaire.

  13. Common medical pains

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Pain in infancy and childhood is extremely common. Sources of pain include illness, injury, and medical and dental procedures. Over the past two decades, tremendous progress has been made in the assessment, prevention and treatment of pain. It is important for the paediatric health care provider to be aware of the implications and consequences of pain in childhood. A multitude of interventions are available to reduce or alleviate pain in children of all ages, including neonates. These include behavioural and psychological methods, as well as a host of pharmacological preparations, which are safe and effective when used as indicated. Many complementary and alternative treatments appear to be promising in treating and relieving pain, although further research is required. The present article reviews the most common sources of pain in childhood and infancy, as well as current treatment strategies and options. PMID:19030348

  14. Pain emotion and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Panerai, Alberto E

    2011-05-01

    Pain has always been considered as part of a defensive strategy, whose specific role is to signal an immediate, active danger. This definition partially fits acute pain, but certainly not chronic pain, that is maintained also in the absence of an active noxa or danger and that nowadays is considered a disease by itself. Moreover, acute pain is not only an automatic alerting system, but its severity and characteristics can change depending on the surrounding environment. The affective, emotional components of pain have been and are the object of extensive attention and research by psychologists, philosophers, physiologists and also pharmacologists. Pain itself can be considered to share the same genesis as emotions and as a specific emotion in contributing to the maintenance of the homeostasis of each unique subject. Interestingly, this role of pain reaches its maximal development in the human; some even argue that it is specific for the human primate.

  15. Pain Assessment After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Okoroha, Kelechi R.; Keller, Robert A.; Jung, Edward K.; Khalil, Lafi; Marshall, Nathan; Kolowich, Patricia A.; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a common outpatient procedure that is accompanied by significant postoperative pain. Purpose: To determine differences in acute pain levels between patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) versus hamstring tendon (HS) autograft. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 70 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction using either BTB or HS autografts consented to participate. The primary outcome of the study was postoperative pain levels (visual analog scale), which were collected immediately after surgery and for 3 days postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included opioid consumption (intravenous morphine equivalents), hours slept, patient satisfaction, reported breakthrough pain, and calls to the physician. Results: Patients treated with BTB had increased pain when compared with those treated with HS in the acute postoperative period (mean ± SD: day 0, 6.0 ± 1.7 vs 5.2 ± 2.0 [P = .066]; day 1, 5.9 ± 1.7 vs 4.9 ±1.7 [P = .024]; day 2, 5.2 ± 1.9 vs 4.1 ± 2.0 [P = .032]; day 3, 4.8 ± 2.1 vs 3.9 ± 2.3 [P = .151]). There were also significant increases in reported breakthrough pain (day 0, 76% vs 43% [P = .009]; day 1, 64% vs 35% [P = .003]) and calls to the physician due to pain (day 1, 19% vs 0% [P = .041]) in the BTB group. There were no significant differences in narcotic requirements or sleep disturbances. Overall, the BTB group reported significantly less satisfaction with pain management on days 0 and 1 (P = .024 and .027, respectively). Conclusion: A significant increase in acute postoperative pain was found when performing ACL reconstruction with BTB compared with HS. Patients treated with BTB were more likely to have breakthrough pain, decreased satisfaction with their pain management, and to contact their physician due to pain. These findings suggest a difference in early postoperative pain between the 2 most

  16. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  17. Personality and temperament correlates of pain catastrophizing in young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; Meesters, Cor; van den Hout, Anja; Wessels, Sylvia; Franken, Ingmar; Rassin, Eric

    2007-10-01

    Pain catastrophizing is generally viewed as an important cognitive factor underlying chronic pain. The present study examined personality and temperament correlates of pain catastrophizing in a sample of young adolescents (N = 132). Participants completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Children, as well as scales for measuring sensitivity of the behavioral inhibition and behavioral activation systems (BIS-BAS), and various reactive and regulative temperament traits. Results demonstrated that BIS, reactive temperament traits (fear and anger-frustration), and perceptual sensitivity were positively related to pain catastrophizing, whereas regulative traits (attention control, inhibitory control) were negatively associated with this cognitive factor. Further, regression analyses demonstrated that only BIS and the temperamental traits of fear and perceptual sensitivity accounted for a unique proportion of the variance in adolescents' pain catastrophizing scores.

  18. [Pain assessment in the premature newborn in Intensive Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Santos, Luciano Marques; Pereira, Monick Piton; dos Santos, Leandro Feliciano Nery; de Santana, Rosana Castelo Branco

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the process of pain identification in premature by the professional staff of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a public hospital in the interior of Bahia, Brazil. This is a quantitative descriptive exploratory study that was made through a form applied to twenty-four health professional of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The data were analyzed in the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The results showed 100% of professionals believed that newborns feel pain, 83.3% knew the pain as the fifth vital sign to be evaluated; 54,8% did not know the pain assessment scales; 70.8% did not use scales and highlighted behavioral and physiological signs of the newborn as signs suggestive of pain. Thus, it is important that professionals understand the pain as a complex phenomenon that demands early intervention, ensuring the excellence of care.

  19. The Impact of Virtual Reality on Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ted; Moore, Todd; Choo, James

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic pain could benefit from additional non-opioid interventions. Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be effective in decreasing pain for procedural or acute pain but to date there have been few studies on its use in chronic pain. The present study was an investigation of the impact of a virtual reality application for chronic pain. Thirty (30) participants with various chronic pain conditions were offered a five-minute session using a virtual reality application called Cool! Participants were asked about their pain using a 0-10 visual analog scale rating before the VR session, during the session and immediately after the session. They were also asked about immersion into the VR world and about possible side effects. Pain was reduced from pre-session to post-session by 33%. Pain was reduced from pre-session during the VR session by 60%. These changes were both statistically significant at the p < .001 level. Three participants (10%) reported no change between pre and post pain ratings. Ten participants (33%) reported complete pain relief while doing the virtual reality session. All participants (100%) reported a decrease in pain to some degree between pre-session pain and during-session pain. The virtual reality experience was found here to provide a significant amount of pain relief. A head mounted display (HMD) was used with all subjects and no discomfort was experienced. Only one participant noted any side effects. VR seems to have promise as a non-opioid treatment for chronic pain and further investigation is warranted.

  20. The Impact of Virtual Reality on Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ted; Moore, Todd; Choo, James

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic pain could benefit from additional non-opioid interventions. Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be effective in decreasing pain for procedural or acute pain but to date there have been few studies on its use in chronic pain. The present study was an investigation of the impact of a virtual reality application for chronic pain. Thirty (30) participants with various chronic pain conditions were offered a five-minute session using a virtual reality application called Cool! Participants were asked about their pain using a 0–10 visual analog scale rating before the VR session, during the session and immediately after the session. They were also asked about immersion into the VR world and about possible side effects. Pain was reduced from pre-session to post-session by 33%. Pain was reduced from pre-session during the VR session by 60%. These changes were both statistically significant at the p < .001 level. Three participants (10%) reported no change between pre and post pain ratings. Ten participants (33%) reported complete pain relief while doing the virtual reality session. All participants (100%) reported a decrease in pain to some degree between pre-session pain and during-session pain. The virtual reality experience was found here to provide a significant amount of pain relief. A head mounted display (HMD) was used with all subjects and no discomfort was experienced. Only one participant noted any side effects. VR seems to have promise as a non-opioid treatment for chronic pain and further investigation is warranted. PMID:27997539

  1. Computerized assessment of pain drawing area: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wenngren, Anna; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate if pain area in patients with chronic pain could be measured by a computerized assessment on previously marked pain drawings on paper figures and to analyze the further application of the method. Methods: Seventy-two patients (54 women and 18 men) who were admitted to Umeå University Hospital during 2003 for assessment of chronic pain answered a set of questionnaires (pain intensity on the visual analog scale [VAS], disability on the Disability Rating Index [DRI], life satisfaction on the LiSat-11) and filled in pain drawings on paper figures of the human body. The pain drawings were later analyzed by using computerized assessment. Results: Women marked a greater pain area than men, but the difference was not significant (p =0.433). No significant difference was shown for the previous seven days between men and women on the VAS (p =0.914), DRI (p =0.493), or LiSat-11 (p =0.124). A statistically significant correlation was found between pain area and VAS for the previous seven days (r =0.250; p =0.046). Pain area was statistically significantly correlated to the DRI (r =0.336; p =0.014) and close to negatively correlated to the LiSat-11 (r =0.687; p =0.057). Conclusion: This pilot study shows that pain drawing area could be measured by a computerized assessment of pain drawings. The method points to the possibility of relating pain area with other instruments. In the present study, an association between the patients’ pain drawing area and pain intensity and between pain area and level of activity was shown. PMID:19721724

  2. Efficacy of Common Analgesics for Postsurgical Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Waite, Megan E; Tomkovich, Ashleigh; Quinn, Tammie L; Schumann, Alan P; Dewberry, L Savannah; Totsch, Stacie K; Sorge, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    Each year, millions of rats undergo surgery for research purposes and receive analgesics to alleviate pain. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of common analgesics in tests of hot-plate nociception and postsurgical pain by using the Rat Grimace Scale. Rats received a single dose of one of several drug-dose combinations and were tested by using the hot-plate test (acute pain) or after laparotomy (with either prophylactic or intraoperative analgesic). The efficacy of analgesics for hot-plate pain was generally not predictive of efficacy for surgical pain. Carprofen and ketoprofen were rarely effective in any of the conditions tested. With the exception of the opioid buprenorphine, several of the drugs we tested required higher-than-recommended doses to alleviate pain. Taken together, our data suggest that current analgesic use frequently is insufficient, and many rats may experience significant postsurgical pain even when analgesics are used in commonly recommended doses.

  3. Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Compared to Usual Care for Pain Relief of Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard D.; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Bennett, Maria E.; Chae, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study seeks to establish the efficacy of single-lead, 3-week peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) therapy for pain reduction in stroke survivors with chronic hemiplegic shoulder pain. Design Single-site, pilot, randomized controlled trial for adults with chronic shoulder pain after stroke. Participants were randomized to receive a 3-week treatment of single-lead PNS or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was the worst pain in the last week (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 3) measured at baseline, and weeks 1,4, 12, and 16. Secondary outcomes included pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 9), pain measured by the ShoulderQ Visual Graphic Rating Scales; and health-related quality of life (SF-36v2). Results Twenty-five participants were recruited, 13 to PNS and 12 to UC. There was a significantly greater reduction in pain for the PNS group compared to controls, with significant differences at 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. Both PNS and UC were associated with significant improvements in pain interference and physical health related quality of life. Conclusions Short-term PNS is a safe and efficacious treatment for shoulder pain. Pain reduction is greater than compared to UC and is maintained for at least 12 weeks after treatment. PMID:24355994

  4. The genetics of pain and pain inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Mogil, J S; Sternberg, W F; Marek, P; Sadowski, B; Belknap, J K; Liebeskind, J C

    1996-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the genetics of pain-related phenomena and illustrates the scope and power of genetic approaches to the study of pain. We focus on work performed in our laboratories in Jastrzebiec, Poland; Portland, OR; and Los Angeles, which we feel demonstrates the continuing usefulness of classical genetic approaches, especially when used in combination with newly available molecular genetic techniques. PMID:8610166

  5. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0-10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0-10), and perceived analgesic needs (0-10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = -0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R (2) = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R (2) = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements.

  6. Effect of the single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise on sacroiliac joint pain with knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of the single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise on sacroiliac joint pain with knee pain. [Subjects and Methods] A 39-year-old female had severe pain in the right medial buttock and right anterior knee. This study assessed the anterior pelvic tilt angle and pain provocation tests before and after single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise for 4 weeks. [Results] Following the course of exercise, the anterior pelvic tilt angles were increased, and the visual analog scale pain scores for both the right buttock and right knee were 2/10. [Conclusion] Single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise may be effective for treating SI joint pain with knee pain in females. PMID:27799721

  7. Pain Management in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard W.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective pain management is a desirable standard of care for preterm and term newborns and may potentially improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain should be assessed routinely using context-specific, validated and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Reducing invasive procedures, and using pharmacological, behavioral or environmental measures can be used to manage neonatal pain. Non-pharmacologic approaches include kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose and other sweeteners, massage and acupuncture therapy. They are used for procedures causing acute, transient, or mild pain, or as adjunctive therapy for moderate or severe pain. Local and topical anesthetics can reduce the acute pain caused by skin-breaking or mucosa-injuring procedures. Opioids form the mainstay for treatment of severe pain; morphine and fentanyl are the most commonly used drugs, although other opioids are also available. Non-opioid drugs include various sedatives and anesthetic agents, mostly used as adjunctive therapy in ventilated neonates. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen and other drugs are used for neonates, although their efficacy and safety remains unproven. Approaches for implementing an effective pain management program in the Neonatal ICU are summarized, together with practical protocols for procedural, postoperative, and mechanical ventilation-associated neonatal pain and stress. PMID:25459780

  8. Pain in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Glare, Paul A.; Davies, Pamela S.; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Paice, Judith A.; Stubblefield, Michael D.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  9. Pain after earthquake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction On 6 April 2009, at 03:32 local time, an Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the Abruzzi region of central Italy causing widespread damage in the City of L Aquila and its nearby villages. The earthquake caused 308 casualties and over 1,500 injuries, displaced more than 25,000 people and induced significant damage to more than 10,000 buildings in the L'Aquila region. Objectives This observational retrospective study evaluated the prevalence and drug treatment of pain in the five weeks following the L'Aquila earthquake (April 6, 2009). Methods 958 triage documents were analysed for patients pain severity, pain type, and treatment efficacy. Results A third of pain patients reported pain with a prevalence of 34.6%. More than half of pain patients reported severe pain (58.8%). Analgesic agents were limited to available drugs: anti-inflammatory agents, paracetamol, and weak opioids. Reduction in verbal numerical pain scores within the first 24 hours after treatment was achieved with the medications at hand. Pain prevalence and characterization exhibited a biphasic pattern with acute pain syndromes owing to trauma occurring in the first 15 days after the earthquake; traumatic pain then decreased and re-surged at around week five, owing to rebuilding efforts. In the second through fourth week, reports of pain occurred mainly owing to relapses of chronic conditions. Conclusions This study indicates that pain is prevalent during natural disasters, may exhibit a discernible pattern over the weeks following the event, and current drug treatments in this region may be adequate for emergency situations. PMID:22747796

  10. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  11. Basic science of pain.

    PubMed

    DeLeo, Joyce A

    2006-04-01

    The origin of the theory that the transmission of pain is through a single channel from the skin to the brain can be traced to the philosopher and scientist René Descartes. This simplified scheme of the reflex was the beginning of the development of the modern doctrine of reflexes. Unfortunately, Descartes' reflex theory directed both the study and treatment of pain for more than 330 years. It is still described in physiology and neuroscience textbooks as fact rather than theory. The gate control theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 rejuvenated the field of pain study and led to further investigation into the phenomena of spinal sensitization and central nervous system plasticity, which are the potential pathophysiologic correlates of chronic pain. The processing of pain takes place in an integrated matrix throughout the neuroaxis and occurs on at least three levels-at peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal sites. Basic strategies of pain control monopolize on this concept of integration by attenuation or blockade of pain through intervention at the periphery, by activation of inhibitory processes that gate pain at the spinal cord and brain, and by interference with the perception of pain. This article discusses each level of pain modulation and reviews the mechanisms of action of opioids and potential new analgesics. A brief description of animal models frames a discussion about recent advances regarding the role of glial cells and central nervous system neuroimmune activation and innate immunity in the etiology of chronic pain states. Future investigation into the discovery and development of novel, nonopioid drug therapy may provide needed options for the millions of patients who suffer from chronic pain syndromes, including syndromes in which the pain originates from peripheral nerve, nerve root, spinal cord, bone, muscle, and disc.

  12. Diagnosis of heel pain.

    PubMed

    Tu, Priscilla; Bytomski, Jeffrey R

    2011-10-15

    Heel pain is a common presenting symptom in ambulatory clinics. There are many causes, but a mechanical etiology is most common. Location of pain can be a guide to the proper diagnosis. The most common diagnosis is plantar fasciitis, a condition that leads to medial plantar heel pain, especially with the first weight-bearing steps in the morning and after long periods of rest. Other causes of plantar heel pain include calcaneal stress fracture (progressively worsening pain following an increase in activity level or change to a harder walking surface), nerve entrapment (pain accompanied by burning, tingling, or numbness), heel pad syndrome (deep, bruise-like pain in the middle of the heel), neuromas, and plantar warts. Achilles tendinopathy is a common condition that causes posterior heel pain. Other tendinopathies demonstrate pain localized to the insertion site of the affected tendon. Posterior heel pain can also be attributed to a Haglund deformity, a prominence of the calcaneus that may cause bursa inflammation between the calcaneus and Achilles tendon, or to Sever disease, a calcaneal apophysitis in children. Medial midfoot heel pain, particularly with continued weight bearing, may be due to tarsal tunnel syndrome, which is caused by compression of the posterior tibial nerve as it courses through the flexor retinaculum, medial calcaneus, posterior talus, and medial malleolus. Sinus tarsi syndrome occurs in the space between the calcaneus, talus, and talocalcaneonavicular and subtalar joints. The syndrome manifests as lateral midfoot heel pain. Differentiating among causes of heel pain can be accomplished through a patient history and physical examination, with appropriate imaging studies, if indicated.

  13. Maintenance of Pain in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewski, Danita I.; Self, Mariella M.; Williams, Amy E.; Weidler, Erica M.; Blatz, Allison M.; Shulman, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdominal pain frequency and compared the predictive value of three methods for assessing pain-stooling relations (i.e., diary, parent report, child report). Methods Seventy-six children (7–10-years-old at baseline) who presented for medical treatment of functional abdominal pain were followed up 18–24 months later. Baseline anxiety and abdominal pain-stooling relations based on pain and stooling diaries and child- and parent-questionnaires were examined in relationship to the persistence of abdominal pain frequency. Results Children’s baseline anxiety was not related to persistence of pain frequency. However, children who displayed irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms at baseline maintained pain frequency at follow-up, whereas in children in whom there was no relationship between pain and stooling, pain frequency decreased. Pain and stool diaries and parent report of pain-stooling relations were predictive of pain persistence but child-report questionnaires were not. Conclusions The presence of IBS symptoms in school age children with functional abdominal pain appears to predict persistence of abdominal pain over time, while anxiety does not. Prospective pain and stooling diaries and parent report of IBS symptoms were predictors of pain maintenance, but child report of symptoms was not. PMID:26301615

  14. Metastable Pain-Attention Dynamics during Incremental Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Slapšinskaitė, Agnė; Hristovski, Robert; Razon, Selen; Balagué, Natàlia; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pain attracts attention on the bodily regions. Attentional allocation toward pain results from the neural communication across the brain-wide network “connectome” which consists of pain-attention related circuits. Connectome is intrinsically dynamic and spontaneously fluctuating on multiple time-scales. The present study delineates the pain-attention dynamics during incremental cycling performed until volitional exhaustion and investigates the potential presence of nested metastable dynamics. Method: Fifteen young and physically active adults completed a progressive incremental cycling test and reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15 s. Results: The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout five temporal windows reaching an average of 4.26 ± 0.59 locations per participant. A total of 37 different locations were reported and marked as painful for all participants throughout the cycling task. Significant differences in entropy were observed between all temporal windows except the fourth and fifth windows. Transient dynamics of bodily locations with perceived discomfort and pain were spanned by three principal components. The metastable dynamics of the body pain locations groupings over time were discerned by three time scales: (1) the time scale of shifts (15 s); (2) the time scale of metastable configurations (100 s), and (3) the observational time scale (1000 s). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that body locations perceived as painful increase throughout the incremental cycling task following a switching metastable and nested dynamics. These findings support the view that human brain is intrinsically organized into active, mutually interacting complex and nested functional networks, and that subjective experiences inherent in pain perception depict identical dynamical principles to the neural tissue in the brain. PMID:28111563

  15. Metastable Pain-Attention Dynamics during Incremental Exhaustive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Slapšinskaitė, Agnė; Hristovski, Robert; Razon, Selen; Balagué, Natàlia; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain attracts attention on the bodily regions. Attentional allocation toward pain results from the neural communication across the brain-wide network "connectome" which consists of pain-attention related circuits. Connectome is intrinsically dynamic and spontaneously fluctuating on multiple time-scales. The present study delineates the pain-attention dynamics during incremental cycling performed until volitional exhaustion and investigates the potential presence of nested metastable dynamics. Method: Fifteen young and physically active adults completed a progressive incremental cycling test and reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15 s. Results: The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout five temporal windows reaching an average of 4.26 ± 0.59 locations per participant. A total of 37 different locations were reported and marked as painful for all participants throughout the cycling task. Significant differences in entropy were observed between all temporal windows except the fourth and fifth windows. Transient dynamics of bodily locations with perceived discomfort and pain were spanned by three principal components. The metastable dynamics of the body pain locations groupings over time were discerned by three time scales: (1) the time scale of shifts (15 s); (2) the time scale of metastable configurations (100 s), and (3) the observational time scale (1000 s). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that body locations perceived as painful increase throughout the incremental cycling task following a switching metastable and nested dynamics. These findings support the view that human brain is intrinsically organized into active, mutually interacting complex and nested functional networks, and that subjective experiences inherent in pain perception depict identical dynamical principles to the neural tissue in the brain.

  16. Pain from the life cycle perspective: Evaluation and Measurement through psychophysical methods of category estimation and magnitude estimation 1

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Fátima Aparecida Emm Faleiros; da Silva, Talita de Cássia Raminelli; Siqueira, Hilze Benigno de Oliveira Moura; Saltareli, Simone; Gomez, Rodrigo Ramon Falconi; Hortense, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to describe acute and chronic pain from the perspective of the life cycle. Methods: participants: 861 people in pain. The Multidimensional Pain Evaluation Scale (MPES) was used. Results: in the category estimation method the highest descriptors of chronic pain for children/ adolescents were "Annoying" and for adults "Uncomfortable". The highest descriptors of acute pain for children/adolescents was "Complicated"; and for adults was "Unbearable". In magnitude estimation method, the highest descriptors of chronic pain was "Desperate" and for descriptors of acute pain was "Terrible". Conclusions: the MPES is a reliable scale it can be applied during different stages of development. PMID:27556875

  17. Pain catastrophizing and cortical responses in amputees with varying levels of phantom limb pain: a high-density EEG brain-mapping study.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Nikolajsen, Lone; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Pain catastrophizing has been associated with phantom limb pain, but so far the cortical processes and the brain regions involved in this relationship have not been investigated. It was therefore tested whether catastrophizing was related to (1) spontaneous pain, (2) somatosensory activity and (3) cortical responses in phantom limb pain patients. The cortical responses were investigated via electroencephalography (EEG) as it has a high temporal resolution which may be ideal for investigating especially the attentional and hypervigilance aspect of catastrophizing to standardized acute stimuli. Eighteen upper limb amputees completed the pain catastrophizing scale. Patients' spontaneous pain levels (worst and average pain, numerical rating scales) and thresholds to electrical stimulation (sensory detection and VRS2: intense but not painful) were determined. Non-painful electrical stimuli were applied to both the affected and non-affected arm, while high-resolution (128 channels) EEG signals were recorded. Catastrophizing accounted for significant amounts of the variance in relation to spontaneous pain, especially worst pain (64.1%), and it was significantly associated with thresholds. At the affected side, catastrophizing was significantly related to the power RMS of the N/P135 dipole located in the area around the secondary somatosensory cortex which has been shown to be associated with arousal and expectations. These findings corroborate the attentional model of pain catastrophizing by indicating that even non-painful stimuli are related to enhanced attention to and negative expectations of stimuli, and they suggest that memory processes may be central to understanding the link between catastrophizing and pain.

  18. Beliefs underlying pain-related fear and how they evolve: a qualitative investigation in people with chronic back pain and high pain-related fear

    PubMed Central

    Bunzli, Samantha; Smith, Anne; Schütze, Robert; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The fear-avoidance model describes how the belief that pain is a sign of damage leads to pain-related fear and avoidance. But other beliefs may also trigger the fear and avoidance responses described by the model. Experts have called for the next generation of fear avoidance research to explore what beliefs underlie pain-related fear and how they evolve. We have previously described damage beliefs and suffering/functional loss beliefs underlying high pain-related fear in a sample of individuals with chronic back pain. The aim of this study is to identify common and differential factors associated with the beliefs in this sample. Design A qualitative study employing semistructured interviews. Setting Musculoskeletal clinics in Western Australia. Participants 36 individuals with chronic back pain and high scores on the Tampa Scale (mean 47/68). Results The overarching theme was a pain experience that did not make sense to the participants. The experience of pain as unpredictable, uncontrollable and intense made it threatening. Attempting to make sense of the threatening pain, participants with damage beliefs drew on past personal experiences of pain, societal beliefs, and sought diagnostic certainty. Met with diagnostic uncertainty, or diagnoses of an underlying pathology that could not be fixed, they were left fearful of damage and confused about how to ‘fix’ it. Participants with suffering/functional loss beliefs drew on past personal experiences of pain and sought help from healthcare professionals to control their pain. Failed treatments and the repeated failure to achieve functional goals left them unable to make ‘sensible’ decisions of what to do about their pain. Conclusions The findings raise the suggestion that sense-making processes may be implicated in the fear-avoidance model. Future research is needed to explore whether fear reduction may be enhanced by considering beliefs underlying fear and providing targeted intervention to help

  19. Measuring avoidance of pain: validation of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II-pain version.

    PubMed

    Reneman, Michiel F; Kleen, Marco; Trompetter, Hester R; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R; Köke, Albère; van Baalen, Bianca; Schreurs, Karlein M G

    2014-06-01

    Psychometric research on widely used questionnaires aimed at measuring experiential avoidance of chronic pain has led to inconclusive results. To test the structural validity, internal consistency, and construct validity of a recently developed short questionnaire: the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II-pain version (AAQ-II-P). Cross-sectional validation study among 388 adult patients with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain admitted for multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation in four tertiary rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands. Cronbach's α was calculated to analyze internal consistency. Principal component analysis was performed to analyze factor structure. Construct validity was analyzed by examining the association between acceptance of pain and measures of psychological flexibility (two scales and sum), pain catastrophizing (three scales and sum), and mental and physical functioning. Interpretation was based on a-priori defined hypotheses. The compound of the seven items of the AAQ-II-P shows a Cronbach's α of 0.87. The single component explained 56.2% of the total variance. Correlations ranged from r=-0.21 to 0.73. Two of the predefined hypotheses were rejected and seven were not rejected. The AAQ-II-P measures a single component and has good internal consistency, and construct validity is not rejected. Thus, the construct validity of the AAQ-II-P sum scores as indicator of experiential avoidance of pain was supported.

  20. Functional MRI demonstrates pain perception in hand osteoarthritis has features of central pain processing

    PubMed Central

    Sofat, Nidhi; Smee, Cori; Hermansson, Monika; Howard, Matthew; Baker, Emma H; Howe, Franklyn A; Barrick, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Background Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is typified by pain and reduced function. We hypothesised that people with HOA have enhanced sensitivity and activation of peripheral nociceptors in the hand, thereby potentiating chronic pain. In our study we aimed to assess if central sensitisation mediates pain perception in osteoarthritis of the hand. Methods Participants with proximal and distal interphalangeal joint (PIP/DIP) HOA and non-OA controls were recruited. Clinical pain scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded before and after performing a painful hand task. Central pain processing was evaluated with functional brain neuroimaging (fMRI) using a finger flexion-extension (FFE) task performed over 3 minutes. Data was analysed with FMRIB software (www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl). Group mean activation of functional MRI signal between hand osteoarthritis and control non-arthritic participants was compared. Results Our group of hand OA participants reported high pain levels compared with non-arthritic controls as demonstrated by the mean VAS in hand OA participants of 59.31± 8.19 mm compared to 4.00 ± 1.89 mm in controls (p < 0.0001), despite all participants reporting analgesic use. Functional MRI analysis showed increased activation in the thalamus, cingulate, frontal and somatosensory cortex in the hand OA group but not in controls (thresholded at p < 0.05). Regions of activation were mapped to Brodmann areas 3, 4, 6, 9, 13, 22, 24 and 44. Activated regions found in our study are recognised higher brain pain processing centres implicated in central sensitisation. Conclusions People with hand osteoarthritis demonstrated features of central sensitisation that was evident after a finger flexion-extension task using functional MRI. Functional MRI is a useful biomarker in detecting pain in hand osteoarthritis and could be used in future hand osteoarthritis pain studies to evaluate pain modulation strategies. PMID:24294351

  1. Pain Behind Bars: The Epidemiology of Pain in Older Jail Inmates in a County Jail

    PubMed Central

    Ahalt, Cyrus; Stijacic-Cenzer, Irena; Smith, Alexander K.; Goldenson, Joe; Ritchie, Christine S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The number of older jail inmates in poor health is increasing rapidly. Among older adults, pain is common and leads to greater acute care use. In jail, pain management is complicated by concerns about misuse and diversion. A lack of data about the prevalence and management of pain in older jail inmates limits our ability to develop optimal palliative care strategies for this population. Objective: To describe the prevalence of and factors associated with pain and analgesic use in a population of older jail inmates. Design: Cross-sectional study. χ2 tests assessed association between characteristics, pain, and analgesic use. Setting/Subjects: Two hundred ten jail inmates age 55 or older. Measurements: “Severe frequent pain” defined as “severe or very severe” pain experienced “frequently or constantly” using the validated Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Medical conditions, substance use, and analgesic treatment determined through self-report and jail medical records. Results: Participants' mean age was 59 years; 69% had multimorbidity; 75% reported any pain; 39% reported severe frequent pain. Report of severe frequent pain was associated with multimorbidity, functional impairment, and pre-jail acute care use (p<0.05), but not with substance use (57% versus 56%, p=0.89). Within a week of their interview, most participants with severe frequent pain had received an analgesic (87%) and many received an opioid (70%). Conclusion: High rates of pain in a rapidly growing population of older jail inmates with multimorbidity and functional impairment suggest that jails are an important site for assessing symptom burden and developing appropriate palliative care interventions. PMID:25265035

  2. Pain and functional imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvar, M

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has fundamentally changed our knowledge about the cerebral representation of pain. For the first time it has been possible to delineate the functional anatomy of different aspects of pain in the medial and lateral pain systems in the brain. The rapid developments in imaging methods over the past years have led to a consensus in the description of the central pain responses between different studies and also to a definition of a central pain matrix with specialized subfunctions in man. In the near future we will see studies where a systems perspective allows for a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the higher-order frontal and parietal cortices. Also, pending the development of experimental paradigms, the functional anatomy of the emotional aspects of pain will become better known. PMID:10466155

  3. [Buttocks sciatic pain].

    PubMed

    Labat, J-J; Robert, R; Riant, T; Louppe, J-M; Lucas, O; Hamel, O

    2009-10-01

    Confusion between radicular and nerve trunk syndrome is not rare. With sciatic pain, any nerve trunk pain or an atypical nerve course should suggest nerve trunk pain of the sciatic nerve in the buttocks. The usual reflex with sciatic pain is vertebral-radicular conflict. The absence of spinal symptoms and the beginning of pain in the buttocks and not in the lumbar region should reorient the etiologic search. Once a tumor of the nerve trunk has been ruled out (rarely responsible for pain other than that caused by tumor pressure), a myofascial syndrome should be explored searching for clinical, electrophysiological, and radiological evidence of compression of the sciatic trunk by the piriform muscle but also the obturator internus muscle. Hamstring syndrome may be confused with this syndrome. Treatment is first and foremost physical therapy. Failures can be treated with classical CT-guided infiltrations with botulinum toxin. Surgery should only be entertained when all these solutions have failed.

  4. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  5. Neuropathic ocular pain due to dry eye is associated with multiple comorbid chronic pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Covington, Derek; Levitt, Alexandra E.; McManus, Katherine T.; Seiden, Benjamin; Felix, Elizabeth R.; Kalangara, Jerry; Feuer, William; Patin, Dennis J.; Martin, Eden R.; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Levitt, Roy C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data demonstrate that dry eye (DE) susceptibility and other chronic pain syndromes (CPS) such as chronic widespread pain, irritable bowel syndrome and pelvic pain, may share common heritable factors. Previously, we showed that DE patients describing more severe symptoms tended to report features of neuropathic ocular pain (NOP). We hypothesize that patients with a greater number of CPS would have a different DE phenotype compared to those with fewer CPS. We recruited a cohort of 154 DE patients from the Miami Veterans Affairs Hospital and defined high and low CPS groups by cluster analysis. In addition to worse non-ocular pain complaints and higher PTSD and depression scores (P<0.01), we found that the high CPS group reported more severe neuropathic-type DE symptoms compared to the low CPS group, including worse ocular pain assessed via 3 different pain scales (P<0.05), with similar objective corneal DE signs. This is the first study to demonstrate DE patients who manifest a greater number of comorbid CPS report more severe DE symptoms and features of NOP. These findings provide further evidence that NOP may represent a central pain disorder, and that shared mechanistic factors may underlie vulnerability to some forms of DE and other comorbid CPS. PMID:26606863

  6. Usefulness of the Pain Tracking Technique in Acute Mechanical Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bravo Acosta, Tania; Martín Cordero, Jorge E.; Hernández Tápanes, Solangel; Pedroso Morales, Isis; Fernández Cuesta, José Ignacio; Leyva Serrano, Maritza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the pain tracking technique in acute mechanical low back pain. Method. We performed an experimental prospective (longitudinal) explanatory study between January 2011 and September 2012. The sample was randomly divided into two groups. Patients were assessed at the start and end of the treatment using the visual analogue scale and the Waddell test. Treatment consisted in applying the pain tracking technique to the study group and interferential current therapy to the control group. At the end of treatment, cryotherapy was applied for 10 minutes. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann Whitney test were used. They were performed with a predetermined significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results. Pain was triggered by prolonged static posture and intense physical labor and intensified through trunk movements and when sitting and standing. The greatest relief was reported in lateral decubitus position and in William's position. The majority of the patients had contracture. Pain and disability were modified with the rehabilitation treatment in both groups. Conclusions. Both the pain tracking and interferential current techniques combined with cryotherapy are useful treatments for acute mechanical low back pain. The onset of analgesia is faster when using the pain tracking technique. PMID:26240758

  7. Pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life in chronic low back pain and depression

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Rogério Sarmento; de Macedo, Bárbara Gazolla; Amaral, Tammy da Silva; Gomes, Henrique de Alencar; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo; Rocha, Fábio Lopes

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain and depression. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in which 193 individuals with chronic low back pain were included. The presence of depression was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory, using a cutoff validated by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The intensity and quality of pain in the groups with and without depression were assessed by the McGill Questionnaire. The Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia was applied to assess fear of movement. With respect to quality of life, the Medical Outcomes Study 36 was used. The statistical significance level was set at p <0.05. RESULTS: The prevalence of depression was 32.1%. The group with depression had worse scores in relation to pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life (physical functioning, rolephysical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health. CONCLUSION: Patients with low back pain and depression had higher pain intensity, greater fear of movement and poorer quality of life. Level of Evidence III, Cross-sectional PMID:24453639

  8. Changes in proprioception and pain in patients with neck pain after upper thoracic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinmo; Lee, Byoungkwon; Kim, Changbeom

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to conduct cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain and then investigate the changes of cervical proprioception and pain. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 30 workers with mechanical neck pain, who were randomly divided into an upper thoracic manipulation group and a cervical stability training group. Upper thoracic manipulation after cervical stability training was conducted for the upper thoracic manipulation group, and only stability training was conducted for the cervical stability training group. The intervention period was six weeks, and consisted of three sessions a week, each of which lasted for 30 minutes. For proprioception measurement, an electro-goniometer was used to measure reposition sense before and after the intervention. The visual analogue scale was used to assess pain. [Results] After the intervention, the error angle was significantly smaller in flexion and right left side-bending, and pain was significantly reduced in the upper thoracic manipulation group. According to the post intervention comparison of the two groups, there were significant differences in the proprioception and pain values. [Conclusion] Conducting both cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain was more helpful for the improvement of proprioception and pain than cervical stability training alone.

  9. Pain on injection with microemulsion propofol

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Soo-Han; Park, Do-Yang; Jung, Jin-Ah; Ki, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, Dong-Ho; Noh, Gyu-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    AIMS To evaluate the incidence and severity of injection pain caused by microemulsion propofol and lipid emulsion propofol in relation to plasma bradykinin generation and aqueous free propofol concentrations. METHODS Injection pain was evaluated in 147 patients. Aqueous free propofol concentrations in each formulation, and in formulation mixtures containing agents that reduce propofol-induced pain, were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Plasma bradykinin concentrations in both formulations and in their components mixed with blood sampled from six volunteers were measured by radioimmunoassays. Injection pain caused by 8% polyethylene glycol 660 hydroxystearate (PEG660 HS) was evaluated in another 10 volunteers. RESULTS The incidence of injection pain [visual analogue scale (VAS) >30 mm] caused by microemulsion and lipid emulsion propofol was 69.7 and 42.3% (P < 0.001), respectively. The median VAS scores for microemulsion and lipid emulsion propofol were 59 and 24 mm, respectively (95% confidence interval for the difference 12.5, 40.0). The aqueous free propofol concentration of microemulsion propofol was seven times higher than that of lipid emulsion propofol. Agents that reduce injection pain did not affect aqueous free propofol concentrations. Microemulsion propofol and 8% PEG660 HS enhanced plasma bradykinin generation, whereas lipid emulsion propofol and lipid solvent did not. PEG660 HS did not cause injection pain. CONCLUSIONS Higher aqueous free propofol concentrations of microemulsion propofol produce more frequent and severe pain. The plasma kallikrein–kinin system may not be involved, and the agents that reduce injection pain may not act by decreasing aqueous free propofol concentrations. PMID:19220277

  10. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  11. Characterizing individual painDETECT symptoms by average pain severity

    PubMed Central

    Sadosky, Alesia; Koduru, Vijaya; Bienen, E Jay; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    Background painDETECT is a screening measure for neuropathic pain. The nine-item version consists of seven sensory items (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure), a pain course pattern item, and a pain radiation item. The seven-item version consists only of the sensory items. Total scores of both versions discriminate average pain-severity levels (mild, moderate, and severe), but their ability to discriminate individual item severity has not been evaluated. Methods Data were from a cross-sectional, observational study of six neuropathic pain conditions (N=624). Average pain severity was evaluated using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, with severity levels defined using established cut points for distinguishing mild, moderate, and severe pain. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was followed by ridit analysis to represent the probability that a randomly selected subject from one average pain-severity level had a more favorable outcome on the specific painDETECT item relative to a randomly selected subject from a comparator severity level. Results A probability >50% for a better outcome (less severe pain) was significantly observed for each pain symptom item. The lowest probability was 56.3% (on numbness for mild vs moderate pain) and highest probability was 76.4% (on cold/heat for mild vs severe pain). The pain radiation item was significant (P<0.05) and consistent with pain symptoms, as well as with total scores for both painDETECT versions; only the pain course item did not differ. Conclusion painDETECT differentiates severity such that the ability to discriminate average pain also distinguishes individual pain item severity in an interpretable manner. Pain-severity levels can serve as proxies to determine treatment effects, thus indicating probabilities for more favorable outcomes on pain symptoms. PMID:27555789

  12. Low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Violante, Francesco S; Mattioli, Stefano; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Low-back pain is one of the most common painful conditions experienced by humans throughout their life. Some occupational risk factors (namely, heavy manual material handling) may also contribute to the development of low-back pain: due to the high prevalence of both low-back pain and manual material handling in the adult working population, it has been estimated that low-back pain is probably the most common occupational disorder worldwide. Lifetime prevalence of low-back pain has been reported to be as high as 84%, depending on the case definition used, and no age group is spared, even children. Although low-back pain is not a lethal condition, it was estimated at the third rank among all diseases by disability-adjusted life-years in 2010 in the USA, after ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and at the first rank by years lived with disability. It also ranked high (13th) globally for the same year, in disability-adjusted life-years. Low-back pain is currently classified as nonspecific/specific as to putative cause and as acute (lasting less than 6 weeks), subacute (6-12 weeks), or chronic (more than 12 weeks) according to duration of symptoms. The distinction between nonspecific/specific and acute/subacute/chronic low-back pain is useful not only for epidemiologic studies, but also (mainly) for choosing the appropriate strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. Workplace risk factors for low-back pain include manual lifting and whole-body vibration exposure. This chapter will provide an overview of modern concepts of low-back pain (in general) and will then outline some distinctive features of work-related low-back pain.

  13. Cancer and orofacial pain

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer pain is a devastating condition. Pain in the orofacial region, may be present as the single symptom of cancer or as a symptom of cancer in its later stages. This manuscript revises in a comprehensive manner the content of the conference entitled “Orofacial Pain and Cancer” (Dolor Orofacial y Cancer) given at the VI Simposio International “Advances in Oral Cancer” on the 22 July, 2016 in Donostia. Material and Methods We have reviewed (pubmed-medline) from the most relevant literature including reviews, systematic reviews and clinical cases, the significant and evidence-based mechanisms and mediators of cancer-associated facial pain, the diverse types of cancers that can be present in the craniofacial region locally or from distant sites that can refer to the orofacial region, cancer therapy that may induce pain in the orofacial region as well as discussed some of the new advancements in cancer pain therapy. Results There is still a lack of understanding of cancer pain pathophysiology since depends of the intrinsic heterogeneity, type and anatomic location that the cancer may present, making more challenging the creation of better therapeutic options. Orofacial pain can arise from regional or distant tumor effects or as a consequence of cancer therapy. Conclusions The clinician needs to be aware that the pain may present the characteristics of any other orofacial pain disorder so a careful differential diagnosis needs to be given. Cancer pain diagnosis is made by exclusion and only can be reached after a thorough medical history, and all the common etiologies have been carefully investigated and ruled out. The current management tools are not optimal but there is hope for new, safer and effective therapies coming in the next years. Key words:Pain, orofacial, facial, cancer. PMID:27694791

  14. Mapping health assessment questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI) score, pain visual analog scale (VAS), and disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) onto the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) utility score with the KORean Observational study Network for Arthritis (KORONA) registry data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Lin; Kim, Dam; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Min-Young; Song, Hyun Jin; Park, Sun-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Won, Soyoung; Bang, So-Young; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Chung, Won Tae; Hong, Seung-Jae; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Jong; Koh, Eunmi; Lee, Hwajeong; Lee, Hye-Soon; Lee, Jisoo; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Sung Won; Park, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Bo Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the mapping model for EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) utility values using the health assessment questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI), pain visual analog scale (VAS), and disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) in a large, nationwide cohort of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in Korea. The KORean Observational study Network for Arthritis (KORONA) registry data on 3557 patients with RA were used. Data were randomly divided into a modeling set (80 % of the data) and a validation set (20 % of the data). The ordinary least squares (OLS), Tobit, and two-part model methods were employed to construct a model to map to the EQ-5D index. Using a combination of HAQ-DI, pain VAS, and DAS28, four model versions were examined. To evaluate the predictive accuracy of the models, the root-mean-square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) were calculated using the validation dataset. A model that included HAQ-DI, pain VAS, and DAS28 produced the highest adjusted R (2) as well as the lowest Akaike information criterion, RMSE, and MAE, regardless of the statistical methods used in modeling set. The mapping equation of the OLS method is given as EQ-5D = 0.95-0.21 × HAQ-DI-0.24 × pain VAS/100-0.01 × DAS28 (adjusted R (2) = 57.6 %, RMSE = 0.1654 and MAE = 0.1222). Also in the validation set, the RMSE and MAE were shown to be the smallest. The model with HAQ-DI, pain VAS, and DAS28 showed the best performance, and this mapping model enabled the estimation of an EQ-5D value for RA patients in whom utility values have not been measured.

  15. The Factors Affecting Pain Pattern after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Dong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the factors that affect pain pattern after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods From June 2009 to October 2010, 210 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operations. Of them, 84 patients were enrolled as subjects of the present study. The evaluation of postoperative pain was conducted by visual analog scale (VAS) scores during postoperative outpatient interviews at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The factors that were thought to affect postoperative pain were evaluated by dividing into three categories: preoperative, operative, and postoperative. Results Pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery showed a strictly decreasing pain pattern. In single analysis and multiple regression tests for factors influencing the strictly decreasing pain pattern, initial VAS and pain onset were shown to be statistically significant factors (p = 0.012, 0.012, 0.044 and 0.028, respectively). With regard to the factors influencing lower than average intensity pain pattern for each period, the stiffness of internal rotation at 3 months postoperatively was shown to be a statistically significant factor in single and multiple regression tests (p = 0.017 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions High initial VAS scores and the acute onset of pain affected the strictly decreasing postoperative pain pattern. Additionally, stiffness of internal rotation at postoperative 3 months affected the higher than average intensity pain pattern for each period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25436062

  16. Screening for Pain in the Ambulatory Cancer Setting: Is 0-10 Enough?

    PubMed Central

    LeBaron, Virginia T.; Blonquist, Traci M.; Hong, Fangxin; Halpenny, Barbara; Berry, Donna L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore concordance between patient self-reports of pain on validated questionnaires and discussions of pain in the ambulatory oncology setting. Methods: Adult, ambulatory patients (N = 452) with all stages of cancer were included. Three pain measures were evaluated: two items from the Symptom Distress Scale (frequency [SDSF] and intensity [SDSI]) and the Pain Intensity Numeric Scale (PINS). Relevant pain was defined as: (1) scores 3 of 5 on SDSF or SDSI or 5 of 10 on the (PINS); or (2) discussion of existing pain in an audio-recorded clinic visit. For each scale, McNemar's test assessed concordance of patient self-reports of relevant pain with discussions of relevant pain in the audio-recorded clinic visit. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated and a receiver operating characteristic analysis evaluated thresholds on self-report pain questionnaires to best identify relevant pain discussed in clinic. Results: Identification of relevant pain by self-report was discordant (P < .001) with discussed pain coded in audio-recorded visits for all three measures. Specificity was higher for intensity (SDSI, 0.94; PINS, 0.97) than frequency (SDSF, 0.87); sensitivity was higher for frequency (SDSF, 0.35) than intensity (SDSI, 0.24; PINS, 0.12). Accuracy was higher for the SDS pain items (SDSF, 0.57; SDSI, 0.54) than for PINS (0.48). Receiver operating characteristic analysis curves suggest that lower threshold scores may improve the identification of relevant pain. Conclusion: Self-report pain screening measures favored specificity over sensitivity. Asking about pain frequency (in addition to intensity) and reconsidering threshold scores on pain intensity scales may be practical strategies to more accurately identify patients with cancer who have relevant pain. PMID:26306620

  17. Does the combination use of two pain assessment tools have a synergistic effect?

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Pain management is a very important aspect in the intensive care unit (ICU), as adequate pain control has been shown to be associated with better clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. A Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) ranging from 0 to 10 (0, no pain; 10, maximum pain), which is based on a patient's self-report, is the gold standard for pain evaluation in patients who can communicate their pain intensity. On the other hand, it is very difficult to evaluate the degree of pain in critically ill patients owing to decreased consciousness level, delirium, and the effect of sedation for mechanical ventilation management. The Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) and Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) have been developed for pain assessment in patients who cannot self-report their pain intensity, and recent research has confirmed their efficacy in clinical trials. In the study by Paolo et al., published in this journal, they have demonstrated that discriminant and criterion validities of BPS and CPOT are good for the assessment of pain in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. Besides, the authors have also shown that the combination use of these two tools is superior to the use of each tool individually. In this commentary, I would like to describe the importance and the difficulty of pain assessment in critically ill patients, discuss the validity and the reliability of the two major pain assessment tools, BPS and CPOT, and consider the future direction of pain assessment in the ICU.

  18. Painful Boney Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Boney metastasis may lead to terrible suffering from debilitating pain. The most likely malignancies that spread to bone are prostate, breast, and lung. Painful osseous metastases are typically associated with multiple episodes of breakthrough pain which may occur with activities of daily living, weight bearing, lifting, coughing, and sneezing. Almost half of these breakthrough pain episodes are rapid in onset and short in duration and 44% of episodes are unpredictable. Treatment strategies include: analgesic approaches with "triple opioid therapy", bisphosphonates, chemotherapeutic agents, hormonal therapy, interventional and surgical approaches, steroids, radiation (external beam radiation, radiopharmaceuticals), ablative techniques (radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation), and intrathecal analgesics. PMID:23861996

  19. Athletes' leg pains.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Puranen, J.

    1979-01-01

    The frequency and nature of exertion pains of the leg in athletes were studied in 2,750 cases of overuse injuries treated at the Sports Clinic of the Deaconess Institute of Oulu, Finland, during the years 1972-1977. 465 cases of exertion pain (18%) were located in the shin. The medial tibial syndrome was the most common overuse injury among these athletes, comprising 9.5% of all exertion injuries and 60% of the leg exertion pains. Together with stress fracture of the tibia, the second most common exertion pain of the leg, it accounted for 75% of the total leg pains. There are certain difficulties in differentiating between the medial tibial syndrome and stress fracture of the tibia. They both occur at the same site with similar symptoms. Radiological examination and isotope scanning are needed. The medial tibial syndrome is an overuse injury at the medial tibial border caused by running exercises. The pain is elicited by exertional ischaemia. The pathogenesis is explained by increased pressure in the fascial compartment of the deep flexor muscles due to prolonged exercise. Similar chronic ischaemic pains from exercise are also found in other fascial compartments of the leg, especially in the anterior compartment. The only treatment needed for stress fractures is rest from training. Fascial compartment pains also usually subside. If chronic fascial syndromes prevent training, fasciotomy is recommended as a reliable method to restore the athlete to normal training without pains. PMID:486888

  20. Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collado, Hervé; Fredericson, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) syndrome is a frequently encountered overuse disorder that involves the patellofemoral region and often presents as anterior knee pain. PFP can be difficult to diagnose. Not only do the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment remain challenging, but the terminology used to describe PFP is used inconsistently and can be confusing. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) seems to be multifactorial, resulting from a complex interaction among intrinsic anatomic and external training factors. Although clinicians frequently make the diagnosis of PFPS, no consensus exists about its etiology or the factors most responsible for causing pain. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of PFP.

  1. Pain management in ferrets.

    PubMed

    van Oostrom, Hugo; Schoemaker, Nico J; Uilenreef, Joost J

    2011-01-01

    The growing popularity of ferrets as pets has created the demand for advanced veterinary care for these patients. Pain is associated with a broad range of conditions, including acute or chronic inflammatory disease, neoplasia, and trauma, as well as iatrogenic causes, such as surgery and diagnostic procedures. Effective pain management requires knowledge and skills to assess pain, good understanding of the pathophysiology of pain, and general knowledge of pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic principles. Unfortunately, scientific studies on efficacy, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of analgesic drugs in the ferret are limited. However, basic rules on the treatment of pain and mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of analgesic drugs in other species can be adapted and applied to pain management in ferrets. This article aims to make an inventory of what is known on the recognition of pain in ferrets, what analgesic drugs are currently used in ferrets, and how they can be adopted in a patient-orientated pain management plan to provide effective pain relief while reducing and monitoring for unwanted side effects.

  2. Outpatient Pain Rehabilitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    Outpatient pain rehabilitation programs that include an interdisciplinary approach have been shown to be effective treatments for patients with chronic pain. The objectives of this article are to describe the common interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation programs available, the appropriate indications for use, the components of typical pain rehabilitation programs, the short-term and long-term success rates, the costs of attending these programs, and the significant societal costs of those patients who do not complete these programs and do not return to work. PMID:16789457

  3. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Spitznagle, Theresa Monaco; Robinson, Caitlin McCurdy

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with pelvic pain commonly present with complaints of pain located anywhere below the umbilicus radiating to the top of their thighs or genital region. The somatovisceral convergence that occurs within the pelvic region exemplifies why examination of not only the organs but also the muscles, connective tissues (fascia), and neurologic input to the region should be performed for women with pelvic pain. The susceptibility of the pelvic floor musculature to the development of myofascial pain has been attributed to unique functional demands of this muscle. Conservative interventions should be considered to address the impairments found on physical examination.

  4. Healthy and maladaptive dependency and its relationship to pain management and perceptions in physical therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven K; Hoban, Patrick; Boys, Ashley; Rosen, Alexandra

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the association among healthy and maladaptive aspects of interpersonal dependency and the management of pain in physical therapy outpatients. Ninety-eight patients were administered the Relationship Profile Test, West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory, and Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Results indicated that Destructive Overdependence was positively associated with an increased number of office visits, pain interference in one's daily life, pain severity, affective distress, and receiving positive partner responses. Dysfunctional Detachment was associated with affective distress, pain interference in one's daily life, and rumination about pain. Healthy Dependency was only associated with receiving distracting responses from others. Believing that a spouse/partner is supportive and caring about one's pain partially mediated the relationship between overdependency and pain interfering in one's life. These results support the clinical utility of assessing interpersonal dependency for its relationship to managing one's pain and health care utilization.

  5. Pain and Psychological Outcomes After Rehabilitative Treatment for a Woman With Chronic Pelvic Pain With Stage III Cervical Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alappattu, Meryl J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pelvic pain and sexual dysfunction are adverse effects of treatment of cervical cancer. Surgery and radiation therapies may result in soft tissue pain and dysfunction, including spasms and trigger points of the pelvic floor muscles that result in pain. In addition to physical restrictions, negative mood associated with pain is believed to intensify and prolong the pain experience. Study Design The purpose of this case report was to describe outcomes of pelvic physical therapy in a 58-year-old woman with chronic pelvic pain after medical treatments for cervical cancer. Case Description The patient reported dyspareunia, hip pain, and lower abdominal, pelvic pain, and fatigue with activities lasting greater than 30 minutes. Interventions included pelvic floor massage, dilator use, and patient education. Symptoms were assessed at baseline and completion of physical therapy, using the Female Sexual Function Index, Fear of Pain Questionnaire–III, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Numerical Pain Rating Scale. Outcomes The Female Sexual Function Index score decreased from 7.8 to 2.8, the Fear of Pain Questionnaire– III score decreased from 85 to 73, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale score decreased from 18 to 8, and lower abdominal and pelvic pain decreased from 4 of 10 to 0 of 10, while bilateral hip pain remained at 4 of 10. In addition, she exhibited increased tolerance to mechanical pressure, evidenced by progression in size of a vaginal dilator. Discussion These results suggest that pelvic physical therapy may be useful in treating chronic pelvic pain after cervical cancer treatments and may also help decrease the magnitude of negative mood aspects such as pain-related fear and catastrophizing. PMID:27134605

  6. Sex differences in the relationship between maternal fear of pain and children’s conditioned pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Subhadra; Seidman, Laura C; Lung, Kirsten C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Tsao, Jennie C

    2013-01-01

    Background Parental behaviors, emotions, and cognitions are known to influence children’s response to pain. However, prior work has not tested the association between maternal psychological factors and children’s responses to a conditioned pain modulation (CPM) task. CPM refers to the reduction in perceived pain intensity for a test stimulus following application of a conditioning stimulus to a remote area of the body, and is thought to reflect the descending inhibition of nociceptive signals. Methods The present study examined sex differences in the association between maternal anxiety about pain and children’s CPM responses in 133 healthy children aged 8–17 years. Maternal pain anxiety was assessed using the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20. In addition to the magnitude of CPM, children’s anticipatory anxiety and pain-related fear of the CPM task were measured. Results Sequential multiple linear regression revealed that even after controlling for child age and general maternal psychological distress, greater maternal pain anxiety was significantly related to greater CPM anticipatory anxiety and pain-related fear in girls, and to less CPM (ie, less pain inhibition) in boys. Conclusion The findings indicate sex-specific relationships between maternal pain anxiety and children’s responses to a CPM task over and above that accounted for by the age of the child and the mother’s general psychological distress. PMID:23569396

  7. PRACTICAL CHRONIC PAIN ASSESSMENT TOOLS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE.

    PubMed

    Loncarić-Katušin, Mirjana; Milošević, Milan; Žilić, Antonio; Mišković, Petar; Majerić-Kogler, Višnja; Žunić, Josip

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to show the role of tools in the evaluation of chronic pain (CP) in general practitioner (GP) everyday clinical practice. The study was done by analyzing electronic database of the first visits of 1090 CP patients referred to the Pain Clinic of the Karlovac General Hospital, Karlovac, Croatia, by their GPs. All patient records were analyzed according to the cause of CP, strongest pain a week before the examination, quality of sleep, and the Patients' Global Impression of Change scale. All statistical analyses were done using the IBM SPSS Statistics version 19.0.0.1 (www.spss.com). CP predominantly occurs in older age group. Patients with musculoskeletal pain accounted for the highest percentage (n = 316; 29%), followed by those with neuropathic pain (n = 253; 23.20%) and those with low back pain (n = 225; 20.60%). The mean pain intensity rating scale score was 8.3 ± 1.8 a week before the examination and the mean quality of sleep score was 6.8 ± 1.9. Moderate and severe sleep quality disorder was significantly present in patients over 65 years of age (p = 0.007), patients with musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain, back pain, and those having rated Patients' Global Impression of Change scale as worsening (p = 0.001). The severity of pain and poor quality of sleep are the leading causes of deterioration of the Patients' Global Impression of Change scale in patients suffering from musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain. In order to treat CP comprehensively, it is important for GPs to evaluate the outcomes of clinical treatment using tools for CP assessment.

  8. Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... back pain - cognitive behavioral; Backache - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Lumbar pain - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Pain - back - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Chronic back pain - low - cognitive behavioral

  9. Emotional Disturbance and Chronic Low Back Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreary, Charles P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Patients high in alientation and distrust may be poor compliers. Because only the somatic concern dimension predicted outcome, a single scale that measures this characteristic may be sufficient for effective identification of the potential good v poor responders to conservative treatment of low back pain. (Author)

  10. Management of painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Brix Finnerup, Nanna; Hein Sindrup, Søren; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is the most common type of pain in neuropathy. In painful polyneuropathies the pain usually has a "glove and stocking" distribution. The pain may be predominantly spontaneous, e.g., with a burning, pricking, or shooting character or characterized by evoked pain such as mechanical or cold allodynia. In the clinical setting, the prevention of painful neuropathies and treatment of underlying neuropathy remains inadequate and thus symptomatic treatment of the pain and related disability needs to be offered. Most randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) published in painful neuropathy have been conducted in patients with diabetes and to what extent a treatment which is found effective in painful diabetic polyneuropathy can be expected to relieve other conditions like chemotherapy- or HIV-induced neuropathy is unknown. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), gabapentin, pregabalin, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are first drug choices. In patients with localized neuropathic pain, a topical lidocaine patch may also be considered. Second-line treatments are tramadol and other opioids. New types of treatment include botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), high-dose capsaicin patches, and cannabinoids. Other types of anticonvulsant drugs such as lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and lacosamide have a more questionable efficacy in painful polyneuropathy but may have an effect in a subgroup of patients. Combination therapy may be considered in patients with insufficient effect from one drug. Treatment is usually a trial-and-error process and has to be individualized to the single patient, taking into account all comorbidities such as possible concomitant depression, anxiety, diseases, and drug interactions. Side-effects to antidepressants include dry mouth, nausea, constipation, orthostatic hypotension, and sedation. ECG should always be obtained prior to treatment with TCAs, which also should not be used in patients with cardiac

  11. Back Pain at Work: Preventing Pain and Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain are steps in the right direction. References Low back pain fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and ... backpain/detail_backpain.htm. Accessed March 30, 2016. Low back pain. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos. ...

  12. Randomized controlled pilot study: pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds in patients with neck and low back pain before and after traditional East Asian "gua sha" therapy.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Wübbeling, Klaus; Lüdtke, Rainer; Cramer, Holger; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Michalsen, Andreas; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav J

    2012-01-01

    Gua Sha is a traditional East Asian healing technique where the body surface is "press-stroked" with a smooth-edged instrument to raise therapeutic petechiae that last 2-5 days. The technique is traditionally used in the treatment of both acute and chronic neck and back pain. This study aimed to measure the effects of Gua Sha therapy on the pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds of patients with chronic neck pain (CNP) and chronic low back pain (CLBP). A total of 40 patients with either CNP or CLBP (mean age 49.23 ± 10.96 years) were randomized to either a treatment group (TG) or a waiting list control group (WLC). At baseline assessment (T1), all patients rated their pain on a 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). Patients' pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at a site of maximal pain (pain-maximum) and an adjacent (pain-adjacent) site were also established. The treatment group then received a single Gua Sha treatment. Post-intervention measurements were taken for both groups at T2, seven days after baseline assessment (T1), using the same VAS and PPT measurements in precisely the same locations as at T1. Final analysis were conducted with 21 patients with CNP and 18 patients with CLBP. The study groups were equally distributed with regard to randomization. Patients in both the CNP and the CLBP treatment groups reported pain reduction (p < 0.05) and improved health status from their one Gua Sha treatment, as compared to the waiting list group. Pain sensitivity improved in the TG in CNP, but not in CLBP patients, possibly due to higher pressure sensitivity in the neck area. No adverse events were reported. These results suggest that Gua Sha may be an effective treatment for patients with chronic neck and low back pain. Further study of Gua Sha is warranted.

  13. Responsiveness and minimal clinically important difference for pain and disability instruments in low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Henrik H; Hartvigsen, Jan; Manniche, Claus; Korsholm, Lars; Grunnet-Nilsson, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Background The choice of an evaluative instrument has been hampered by the lack of head-to-head comparisons of responsiveness and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in subpopulations of low back pain (LBP). The objective of this study was to concurrently compare responsiveness and MCID for commonly used pain scales and functional instruments in four subpopulations of LBP patients. Methods The Danish versions of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the 23-item Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ), the physical function and bodily pain subscales of the SF36, the Low Back Pain Rating Scale (LBPRS) and a numerical rating scale for pain (0–10) were completed by 191 patients from the primary and secondary sectors of the Danish health care system. Clinical change was estimated using a 7-point transition question and a numeric rating scale for importance. Responsiveness was operationalised using standardardised response mean (SRM), area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC), and cut-point analysis. Subpopulation analyses were carried out on primary and secondary sector patients with LBP only or leg pain +/- LBP. Results RMQ was the most responsive instrument in primary and secondary sector patients with LBP only (SRM = 0.5–1.4; ROC = 0.75–0.94) whereas ODI and RMQ showed almost similar responsiveness in primary and secondary sector patients with leg pain (ODI: SRM = 0.4–0.9; ROC = 0.76–0.89; RMQ: SRM = 0.3–0.9; ROC = 0.72–0.88). In improved patients, the RMQ was more responsive in primary and secondary sector patients and LBP only patients (SRM = 1.3–1.7) while the RMQ and ODI were equally responsive in leg pain patients (SRM = 1.3 and 1.2 respectively). All pain measures demonstrated almost equal responsiveness. The MCID increased with increasing baseline score in primary sector and LBP only patients but was only marginally affected by patient entry point and pain location. The MCID of the percentage change score

  14. The pain management approach to chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Rapkin, A J; Kames, L D

    1987-05-01

    Chronic pelvic pain remains a difficult management problem that is often refractory to traditional medical or surgical therapy. The pain management center approach used successfully for the treatment of cancer pain and headache can be adapted to the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. The results of this pilot study suggest that the multidisciplinary techniques of pain management promise to be an effective modality for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain.

  15. Intrathecal glycine for pain and dystonia in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Munts, Alexander G; van der Plas, Anton A; Voormolen, Joan H; Marinus, Johan; Teepe-Twiss, Irene M; Onkenhout, Willem; van Gerven, Joop M; van Hilten, Jacobus J

    2009-11-01

    Since glycinergic neurotransmission plays an important inhibitory role in the processing of sensory and motor information, intrathecal glycine (ITG) administration may be a potential therapy for both pain and movement disorders in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Aims of the current study, which is the first report on ITG in humans, were to evaluate its safety and efficacy. ITG treatment during 4 weeks was studied in CRPS patients with dystonia in the period before they received intrathecal baclofen treatment. Twenty patients were assessed and after exclusion of one patient, the remaining 19 patients were randomized in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. Safety was assessed by clinical evaluation, blood examinations and electrocardiograms. Efficacy measures involved pain (numeric rating scale, McGill pain questionnaire), movement disorders (Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale, unified myoclonus rating scale, tremor research group rating scale), activity (Radboud skills questionnaire, walking ability questionnaire), and a clinical global impression (CGI) and patient's global impression score (PGI). Treatment-emergent adverse events were generally mild to moderate and not different from placebo treatment. During ITG treatment growth hormone levels were slightly increased. Although there was a trend to worsening on the CGI and PGI during ITG treatment, there were no significant differences between ITG and placebo treatment in any of the outcomes. ITG given over 4 weeks was ineffective for pain or dystonia in CRPS. Although no serious adverse events occurred, further studies are required to rule out potential neurotoxicity of ITG.

  16. The expression of α-SMA in the painful traumatic neuroma: potential role in the pathobiology of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hede; Gao, Weiyang; Pan, Zhijun; Zhang, Feng; Fan, Cunyi

    2012-12-10

    The exact mechanism of neuroma-associated pain is not yet fully understood, thus contributing to the substantial challenge faced in managing patients with painful neuromas. We aimed to observe the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the painful traumatic neuroma and to investigate its possible roles in the cause of neuroma-associated pain. Its expression is considered to be a useful phenotypic marker for myofibroblast, and may contribute to its increased contractile activity. We collected peripheral neuroma specimens prospectively and subsequently divided them into two groups: painful (n=21) and non-painful (n=27) based on blinded preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores. We also harvested normal nerve specimens from the discarded limbs as a control group (n=8). We performed immunohistological studies to observe the expression of α-SMA in each group, and calculated the expression level by a high-resolution pathological image analysis system. There was no positive staining of α-SMA observed in the control group, slight positive staining in the non-painful group, and obviously positive staining in the painful group. Pearson correlation analysis demonstrated that VAS scores were significantly associated with the expression intensity of α-SMA (R=0.831; p<0.001). Linear regression analysis indicated that the expression intensity of α-SMA was positively related to the scale of VAS (R(2)=0.691, p<0.001). These findings suggest that: 1) expression of α-SMA may play certain roles in painful traumatic neuroma, either as a direct cause of neuroma-associated pain or as an indirect marker of local mechanical stimuli, and 2) the presence of α-SMA in the painful group may provide rationale for transpositional procedures in the management of traumatic neuroma. The persistent existence of α-SMA in the painful group and the correlation with VAS scores may provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PROMIS Pain Quality Item Bank

    PubMed Central

    Revicki, Dennis A.; Cook, Karon F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Harnam, Neesha; Chen, Wen-Hung; Keefe, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The assessment of pain sensation and quality is a key component in understanding the experience of individuals with chronic pain. This study evaluated the factor structure of the Patient-reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) pain quality item bank. Methods As part of the PROMIS project, we developed a pool of 37 pain quality items, based on a review of existing pain questionnaires and development of new items. A Web-based survey was designed and completed by 845 members of the general population and 967 individuals with different types of chronic pain. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on a random split-half sample of the data to examine the factor structure of the 37 PROMIS pain quality items in the general population and in a chronic pain sample. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted in the holdout sample. Results The EFA of the pain quality items resulted in comparable six-factor solutions for the general and chronic pain samples: (1) pulling/tugging pain; (2) tingling/numbness pain; (3) sharp/stabbing pain; (4) dull/aching pain; (5) pounding/pulsing pain; and (6) affective pain. The confirmatory factor analysis in the holdout sample supported this factor structure. Conclusions Further research is needed to evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the derived scales based on their factor scores. PMID:23836435

  18. Evaluation of pain intensity measurement during the removal of wound dressing material using 'the PainVision™ system' for quantitative analysis of perception and pain sensation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Imai, Ryutaro; Gondo, Masahide; Watanabe, Katsueki

    2012-08-01

    Reducing pain caused by the removal of adhesive wound dressing materials is very important in clinical practice and is also one of the factors to consider when choosing dressing materials. A visual analogue scale is the most popular method for assessing pain, but it is subjective and is difficult to evaluate quantitatively or statistically. Recently, a new method for the quantitative measurement of pain intensity using a painless electrical stimulation system, PainVision™, has been developed. In this study, we evaluated pain intensity during the removal of wound dressing materials in healthy volunteers by comparing pain during the removal of wound dressing materials, which use acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesive and pain during the removal of materials, which use soft silicone adhesive, as evaluated using the PainVision™ system. Pain intensity was significantly lower with the dressing materials, which use soft silicone adhesive when measured with the PainVision™ system. The PainVision™ system promises to be useful for the quantitative assessment of pain caused by the removal of adhesive wound dressing materials. Further studies are needed to determine whether the PainVision™ system is also effective in measuring pain caused by the removal of wound dressing materials in actual wounds.

  19. Chronic pain after childbirth.

    PubMed

    Landau, R; Bollag, L; Ortner, C

    2013-04-01

    With over four million deliveries annually in the United States alone and a constant increase in cesarean delivery rate, childbirth is likely to have a huge impact on the occurrence of acute and possibly chronic postpartum pain. Recent awareness that chronic pain may occur after childbirth has prompted clinicians and researchers to investigate this topic. Current evidence points towards a relatively low incidence of chronic pain after cesarean delivery, with rates ranging between 1% and 18%. To provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the relatively low occurrence of chronic pain after cesarean delivery compared with that after other types of surgery, it has been proposed that endogenous secretion of oxytocin may confer specific protection. Clinical interventions to reduce the incidence and severity of chronic post-surgical pain have not been consistently effective. Likely explanations are that the drugs that have been investigated were truly ineffective or that the effect was too modest because with a low incidence of chronic pain, studies were likely to be underpowered and failed to demonstrate an effect. In addition, since not all women require preventive therapies, preoperative testing that may identify women vulnerable to pain may be highly beneficial. Further research is needed to identify valid models that predict persistent pain to allow targeted interventions to women most likely to benefit from more tailored anti-hyperalgesic therapies.

  20. Regional cancer pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Janjan, Nora; Jain, Subash; Chau, Chi

    2006-12-01

    Cancer pain often presents in a body region. This review summarizes articles from 1999-2004 relevant to cancer pain syndromes in the head and neck, chest, back, abdomen, pelvis, and limbs. Although the evidence is limited, progress is being made in further development of the evidence base to support and guide current practice.

  1. Pain and palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Sorger, Brooke; Rosenfeld, Kenneth E; Lorenz, Karl A; Bailey, Amos F; Bui, Trinh; Weinberger, Lawrence; Montagnini, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    Severe pain is highly prevalent, with rates of 40% to 70% in patients with advanced cancer, liver disease, heart failure, human immunodeficiency virus, and renal failure. Wide variations in pain assessment and reporting methods and the measurement of multiple symptoms should be addressed in future studies. Regarding psychological approaches, determining whether hypnotherapy or other individual psychotherapeutic interventions reduce pain and/or psychological distress in a palliative care population is difficult. Interest is increasing in the concept of demoralization syndromes and the role of posttraumatic stress disorder in modulating responses to pain at the end of life. We review evidence from multiple studies that the use of rehabilitative therapy improves functional status and pain control among patients with advanced cancer, and we raise the possibility that rehabilitation therapy will be helpful in patients with other advanced diseases. We summarize ongoing clinical trials of electronic order sets, clinical care pathways, and care management pathways to improve pain management in palliative care. Wagner's Chronic Illness Model provides a way of analyzing how healthcare systems can be changed to provide adequate and continuing pain management in palliative care. Much work remains to ensure that pain is recognized, treated, and monitored effectively.

  2. Counseling for Pain Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espin, Olivia M.; Ganikos, Mary L.

    1975-01-01

    New techniques are being developed that enhance the effectiveness of psychological forces in controlling bodily reactions. All of them are powerful tools for the psychological control of pain. This article reviews such techniques and addresses itself to the contributions that counselors can make to alleviate physical pain. (Author)

  3. Chemical Interventions for Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronoff, Gerald M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews properties and pharmacological effects of medications for pain, including peripherally acting analgesics, centrally acting narcotics, and adjuvant analgesics including antidepressants. Discusses the role of the endogenous opioid system in pain and depression. Explores clinical management issues in both inpatient and outpatient settings,…

  4. Insecure attachment style is associated with chronic widespread pain.

    PubMed

    Davies, K A; Macfarlane, G J; McBeth, J; Morriss, R; Dickens, C

    2009-06-01

    Individuals with "insecure" adult attachment styles have been shown to experience more pain than people with secure attachment, though results of previous studies have been inconsistent. We performed a cross-sectional study on a large population-based sample to investigate whether, compared to pain free individuals, subjects with chronic widespread pain were more likely to report insecure adult attachment style. Subjects in a population-based cross-sectional study completed a self-rated assessment of adult attachment style. Attachment style was categorised as secure (i.e., normal attachment style); or preoccupied, dismissing or fearful (insecure attachment styles). Subjects completed a pain questionnaire from which three groups were identified: pain free; chronic widespread pain; and other pain. Subjects rated their pain intensity and pain-related disability on an 11 point Likert scale. Subjects (2509) returned a completed questionnaire (median age 49.9 years (IQR 41.2-50.0); 59.2% female). Subjects with CWP were more likely to report a preoccupied (RRR 2.6; 95%CI 1.8-3.7), dismissing (RRR 1.9; 95%CI 1.2-3.1) or fearful attachment style (RRR 1.4; 95%CI 1.1-1.8) than those free of pain. Among CWP subjects, insecure attachment style was associated with number of pain sites (Dismissing: RRR 2.8; 95%CI 1.2-2.3, Preoccupied: RRR=1.8, 95%CI 0.98-3.5) and degree of pain-related disability (Preoccupied: RRR=2.1, 95%CI 1.0-4.1), but not pain intensity. These findings suggest that treatment strategies based on knowledge of attachment style, possibly using support and education, may alleviate distress and disability in people at risk of, or affected by, chronic widespread pain.

  5. Inflammatory Genes and Psychological Factors Predict Induced Shoulder Pain Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    George, Steven Z.; Parr, Jeffrey J.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Wu, Samuel S.; Borsa, Paul A.; Dai, Yunfeng; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The pain experience has multiple influences but little is known about how specific biological and psychological factors interact to influence pain responses. The current study investigated the combined influences of genetic (pro-inflammatory) and psychological factors on several pre-clinical shoulder pain phenotypes. Methods An exercise-induced shoulder injury model was used, and a priori selected genetic (IL1B, TNF/LTA region, IL6 single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) and psychological (anxiety, depressive symptoms, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, kinesiophobia) factors were included as the predictors of interest. The phenotypes were pain intensity (5-day average and peak reported on numerical rating scale), upper-extremity disability (5-day average and peak reported on the QuickDASH instrument), and duration of shoulder pain (in days). Results After controlling for age, sex, and race, the genetic and psychological predictors were entered separately as main effects and interaction terms in regression models for each pain phenotype. Results from the recruited cohort (n = 190) indicated strong statistical evidence for the interactions between 1) TNF/LTA SNP rs2229094 and depressive symptoms for average pain intensity and duration and 2) IL1B two-SNP diplotype and kinesiophobia for average shoulder pain intensity. Moderate statistical evidence for prediction of additional shoulder pain phenotypes included interactions of kinesiophobia, fear of pain, or depressive symptoms with TNF/LTA rs2229094 and IL1B. Conclusion These findings support the combined predictive ability of specific genetic and psychological factors for shoulder pain phenotypes by revealing novel combinations that may merit further investigation in clinical cohorts, to determine their involvement in the transition from acute to chronic pain conditions. PMID:24598699

  6. Jaw muscle pain and its effect on gothic arch tracings.

    PubMed

    Obrez, A; Stohler, C S

    1996-04-01

    Perceived changes in occlusion and decreased range of motion are often expressed by patients with masticatory muscle pain. The adverse loading of craniomandibular tissues that results from an inadequate maxillomandibular relationship in combination with the coexisting dysfunction is widely regarded as the cause of pain. This study was designed to test whether pain can cause significant changes in position of the mandible and therefore form the basis for any perceived changes in the maxillomandibular relationship. A second objective was to determine whether pain can cause changes in the mandibular range of motion. Five subjects who rated pain intensity on a visual analog scale were used in a single-blind, randomized, repeated-measures study design. Tonic muscle pain was induced by infusion of 5% hypertonic saline solution into the central portion of the superficial masseter muscle. Isotonic saline solution was used as a control, with subjects blinded to the type of substance given. The effect of pain on the position of the apex of the gothic arch tracing, the direction of the lateral mandibular border movements, and the mandibular range of motion was studied in a horizontal plane with minimal occlusal separation. Pain significantly affected the position of the apex of the gothic arch tracing in anterior (F = 11.46, p = 0.03) and transverse (F = 35.0, p = 0.004) directions. Similarly, pain affected the orientation of the mandibular lateral border movements (F = 12.44, p = 0.02) and their magnitude (F = 14.97, p = 0.01). All pain-induced effects proved to be reversible. The observed effect of pain can explain the perceived change of bite that is frequently noted by patients with orofacial pain. This study provided evidence of an alternative causal relationship between pain and changes in occlusal relationship and questions occlusal therapy as treatment, directed toward the elimination of the underlying cause in patients with masticatory muscle pain.

  7. Association of anxiety with intracortical inhibition and descending pain modulation in chronic myofascial pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to answer three questions related to chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS): 1) Is the motor cortex excitability, as assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation parameters (TMS), related to state-trait anxiety? 2) Does anxiety modulate corticospinal excitability changes after evoked pain by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST)? 3) Does the state-trait anxiety predict the response to pain evoked by QST if simultaneously receiving a heterotopic stimulus [Conditional Pain Modulation (CPM)]? We included females with chronic MPS (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 11), aged 19 to 65 years. Motor cortex excitability was assessed by TMS, and anxiety was assessed based on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The disability related to pain (DRP) was assessed by the Profile of Chronic Pain scale for the Brazilian population (B:PCP:S), and the psychophysical pain measurements were measured by the QST and CPM. Results In patients, trait-anxiety was positively correlated to intracortical facilitation (ICF) at baseline and after QST evoked pain (β = 0.05 and β = 0.04, respectively) and negatively correlated to the cortical silent period (CSP) (β = -1.17 and β = -1.23, respectively) (P <0.05 for all comparisons). After QST evoked pain, the DRP was positively correlated to ICF (β = 0.02) (P < 0.05). Pain scores during CPM were positively correlated with trait-anxiety when it was concurrently with high DRP (β = 0.39; P = 0.02). Controls’ cortical excitability remained unchanged after QST. Conclusions These findings suggest that, in chronic MPS, the imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory descending systems of the corticospinal tract is associated with higher trait-anxiety concurrent with higher DRP. PMID:24645677

  8. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  9. An archaeology of pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Dennis Michael

    Pain is a discursive construct of science and medicine. Through the discourses of biopower and technoscience pain is used to construct and maintain the social body. Biopower and technoscience are discursive practices that are enveloped within the disciplines of Western society. Specifically, the disciplines of education, science, and medicine use biopower and technoscience to normalize the body and construct binaries which create the abnormal. The cyborg is a discursive practice used to implode the binaries of the disciplines which maintain the social body. Through the implosion of binaries, the binary of mind/body is no longer plausible in the explanation of pain. Neuropathic chronic pain and phantom limb pain become cyborg discourses which operate to deconstruct the pedagogies of science and medicine.

  10. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  11. [Groin pain in athletes].

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rick J M; Kokshoorn, Arjan P J; Kolkman, Karel A; van der Wal, Wybren A; van Loon, Corné J M

    2014-01-01

    Groin pain in young athletes is a common problem, accounting for significant downtime in sports participation. It can be difficult to make the correct diagnosis as groin pain has a wide differential diagnosis, which encompasses acute as well as chronic causative factors. In this article this is illustrated by presenting three cases of patients who attended our hospital. In all three cases the main complaint was sports-related groin pain, and the patients presented with very similar symptoms. However, after further investigation the patients were diagnosed with three very different types of injury: sportsman's hernia; hip labral tear; and pubic osteitis. This emphasises the need for every general practitioner and medical specialist to understand that there is a wide differential diagnosis for groin pain in athletes, in order to be able to implement specific therapy targeting the actual cause of groin pain.

  12. Clinical decision rule for primary care patient with acute low back pain at risk of developing chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Mehling, Wolf E.; Ebell, Mark H.; Avins, Andrew L.; Hecht, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context Primary care clinicians need to identify candidates for early interventions to prevent patients with acute pain from developing chronic pain. Purpose We conducted a 2-year prospective cohort study of risk factors for the progression to chronic pain and developed and internally validated a clinical decision rule (CDR) that stratifies patients into low, medium and high-risk groups for chronic pain. Study Design/Setting Prospective cohort study in primary care. Patient Sample Patients with acute low back pain (LBP; ≤30 days duration) Outcome measures Self-reported perceived non-recovery and chronic pain. Methods Patients were surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 2 years. We conducted bivariate and multivariate regression analyses of demographic, clinical and psychosocial variables for chronic pain outcomes, developed a CDR and assessed its performance by calculating the bootstrapped areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and likelihood ratios. This study was supported by NIH/NCCAM grants K23 AT002298, R21 AT004467, NIH/NCCAM K24 AT007827, the Research Evaluation and Allocation Committee (REAC) of the University of California San Francisco, and the Mount Zion Health Fund, San Francisco. The funding agencies played no role in design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; and preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. The authors report no conflict of interests. Results 605 patients enrolled. 13% had chronic pain at 6 months, 19% at 2 years. An eight-item CDR was most parsimonious for classifying patients into three risk levels. Bootstrapped AUC was 0.76 (0.70–0.82) for the 6-month CDR. Each 10-point score increase (60-point range) was associated with an odds ratio of 11.1 (10.8–11.4) for developing chronic pain. Using a <5% probability of chronic pain as the cutoff for low risk and a >40% probability for high risk, likelihood ratios were 0.26 (0.14–0.48) and 4

  13. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative - cancer pain ... The pain from cancer can have a few different causes: The cancer. When a tumor grows it can press ... nerves, bones, organs, or the spinal cord, causing pain. Medical tests. Some medical tests, such as a ...

  14. American Academy of Pain Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Essential Tools for Treating the Patient in Pain TM What Primary Care and Pain Specialists Need to Know Get Started Medications Management ... Whole Patient Get Started AAPM... the Voice of Pain Medicine Become part of the distinguished multimodal, interdisciplinary ...

  15. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  16. Post surgical pain treatment - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Postoperative pain relief ... Pain that occurs after surgery is an important concern. Before your surgery, you and your surgeon may have discussed how much pain you should expect and how it will be ...

  17. Handout on Health: Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... uterine tissue in places outside the uterus; and fibromyalgia, a condition of widespread muscle pain and fatigue. ... to be an uncommon cause of back pain. Fibromyalgia. A condition of widespread muscle pain, fatigue, and ...

  18. Presence of Mental Imagery Associated with Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Chantal; Vincent, Katy; Moore, Jane; Tracey, Irene; Goodwin, Guy M; Holmes, Emily A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether a small sample of patients with chronic pelvic pain experienced any pain-related cognitions in the form of mental images. Patients Ten women with chronic pelvic pain consecutively referred from a tertiary referral center by the physicians in charge of their treatment. Outcome measures An interview was used to determine the presence, emotional valence, content, and impact of cognitions about pain in the form of mental images and verbal thoughts. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Spontaneous Use of Imagery Scale (SUIS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were completed. Results In a population of patients with a prolonged duration of pain and high distress, all patients reported experiencing cognitions about pain in the form of mental images. For each patient, the most significant image was both negative in valence and intrusive. The associated emotional-behavioral pattern could be described within a cognitive behavioral therapy framework. Eight patients also reported coping imagery. Conclusion Negative pain-related cognitions in the form of intrusive mental imagery were reported by women with chronic pelvic pain. Targeting such imagery has led to interesting treatment innovation in the emotional disorders. Thus, imagery, hitherto neglected in pain phenomenology, could provide a novel target for cognitive behavioral therapy in chronic pain. These exciting yet preliminary results require replication and extension in a broader population of patients with chronic pain. PMID:21668746

  19. A Model for Pain Behavior in Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meir, Lotan; Strand, Liv Inger; Alice, Kvale

    2012-01-01

    The dearth of information on the pain experience of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) calls for a more comprehensive understanding of pain in this population. The Non-Communicating Adults Pain Checklist (NCAPC) is an 18-item behavioral scale that was recently found to be reliable, valid, sensitive and clinically…

  20. Effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment on Fibromyalgia-Related Pain Anxiety Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Talley, Chris; Buermann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Effects of Behavioral Activation Treatment (BAT) on pain anxiety, depression, and pain interference on a 43-year-old female with an 11-year history of chronic fibromyalgia pain are described. Analgesic, anxyiolytic, and antidepressant medications were stabilized prior to participation. Dependent measures were the Behavioral Relaxation Scale, a…

  1. Experiencing Physical Pain Leads to More Sympathetic Moral Judgments

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qianguo; Zhu, Yi; Luo, Wen-bo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that observing another’s pain can evoke other-oriented emotions, which instigate empathic concern for another’s needs. It is not clear whether experiencing first-hand physical pain may also evoke other-oriented emotion and thus influence people’s moral judgment. Based on the embodied simulation literature and neuroimaging evidence, the present research tested the idea that participants who experienced physical pain would be more sympathetic in their moral judgments. Study 1 showed that ice-induced physical pain facilitated higher self-assessments of empathy, which motivated participants to be more sympathetic in their moral judgments. Study 2 confirmed findings in study 1 and also showed that State Perspective Taking subscale of the State Empathy Scale mediated the effects of physical pain on moral judgment. These results provide support for embodied view of morality and for the view that pain can serve a positive psychosocial function. PMID:26465603

  2. Structural Health Monitoring: Leveraging Pain in the Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Subhadarshi

    2012-07-01

    Tissue damage, or the perception thereof, is managed through pain experience. The neurobiological process of pain triggers most effective defense mechanisms for our safety. Structural health monitoring (SHM) is also a very similar function, albeit in engineering systems. SHM technology can leverage many aspects of pain mechanisms to progress in several critical areas. Discrimination between features from the undamaged and damaged structures can follow the threshold gate mechanism of the pain perception. Furthermore, the sensing mechanisms can be adaptive to changes by adjusting the threshold as does the pain perception. A distributed sensor network, often advanced by SHM, can be made fault-tolerant and robust by following the perception way of self-organization and redundancy. Data handling in real life is a huge challenge for large-scale SHM. As sensory data of pain is first cleaned, the threshold is then processed through experiential information gathering and use.

  3. [Management of breakthrough cancer pain].

    PubMed

    Sláma, O

    2013-01-01

    Breakthrough cancer pain has been defined as a transitory increase in pain intensity that occurs despite relatively stable and adequately controlled background pain. More than half of cancer patients with chronic pain suffer by some form of breakthrough cancer pain. The management of breakthrough cancer pain is comprehensive and includes pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches. The principal treatment strategies are optimization of regular analgesic medication combined with effective rescues medication. The new transmucosal forms of fentanyl represent an important improvement in our treatment options.

  4. Motor Adaptations to Pain during a Bilateral Plantarflexion Task: Does the Cost of Using the Non-Painful Limb Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Paul W.; Carroll, Timothy J.; De Martino, Enrico; Magnard, Justine; Tucker, Kylie

    2016-01-01

    During a force-matched bilateral task, when pain is induced in one limb, a shift of load to the non-painful leg is classically observed. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that this adaptation to pain depends on the mechanical efficiency of the non-painful leg. We studied a bilateral plantarflexion task that allowed flexibility in the relative force produced with each leg, but constrained the sum of forces from both legs to match a target. We manipulated the mechanical efficiency of the non-painful leg by imposing scaling factors: 1, 0.75, or 0.25 to decrease mechanical efficiency (Decreased efficiency experiment: 18 participants); and 1, 1.33 or 4 to increase mechanical efficiency (Increased efficiency experiment: 17 participants). Participants performed multiple sets of three submaximal bilateral isometric plantarflexions with each scaling factor during two conditions (Baseline and Pain). Pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline into the soleus. Force was equally distributed between legs during the Baseline contractions (laterality index was close to 1; Decreased efficiency experiment: 1.16±0.33; Increased efficiency experiment: 1.11±0.32), with no significant effect of Scaling factor. The laterality index was affected by Pain such that the painful leg contributed less than the non-painful leg to the total force (Decreased efficiency experiment: 0.90±0.41, P<0.001; Increased efficiency experiment: 0.75±0.32, P<0.001), regardless of the efficiency (scaling factor) of the non-painful leg. When compared to the force produced during Baseline of the corresponding scaling condition, a decrease in force produced by the painful leg was observed for all conditions, except for scaling 0.25. This decrease in force was correlated with a decrease in drive to the soleus muscle. These data highlight that regardless of the overall mechanical cost, the nervous system appears to prefer to alter force sharing between limbs such that force produced by the painful

  5. [The multimodal interdisciplinary therapeutic program in chronic back pain. A new treatment strategy].

    PubMed

    Casser, H; Riedel, T; Schrembs, C; Ingenhorst, A; Kühnau, D

    1999-11-01

    The epidemic-like rise in chronic low back pain in western industrial nations is less an expression of a medical than a psychosocial phenomenon. Differentiation between acute, chronic or chronifying pain is of crucial importance for therapeutic procedures. Pain syndromes in the muscular-skeletal system tend to become chronic to a far larger extent than expected. More than 80 % of low back pain represents a functional pain syndrome and does not show any pathoanatomical correlate. Pain existing independently seems to be predestined by a somatic and psychosocial deconditioning syndrome. Those at risk of chronifying pain or those whose pain is already chronic should be given an interdisciplinary, multimodal therapeutic program. A pilot study was carried out in our clinic: multidisciplinary treatment was given to our patients (of which over 90 % belonged to stages II and III on the Gerbershagen scale) and the result was significant improvement in the measurements of pain intensity, sensoric and affective pain perception, their list of complaints, the common scale of depression and the pain disability index. Taking previously published studies into consideration, it is safe to say that a multidisciplinary, multimodal program of therapy even after stay in hospital results in considerable relief of pain and improvement in the ability to cope with the pain for patients with chronified pain syndromes in the muscular-skeletal system which are resistant to treatment on an outpatient basis.

  6. New therapeutic strategy for chronifying back pain. The multimodal, interdisciplinary therapeutic program.

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Riedel, T; Schrembs, C; Ingenhorst, A; Kühnau, D

    1999-11-01

    The epidemic-like rise in chronic low back pain in western industrial nations is less an expression of a medical than a psychosocial phenomenon. Differentiation between acute, chronic or chronifying pain is of crucial importance for therapeutic procedures. Pain syndromes in the muscular-skeletal system tend to become chronic to a far larger extent than expected. More than 80 % of low back pain represents a functional pain syndrome and does not show any pathoanatomical correlate. Pain existing independently seems to be predestined by a somatic and psychosocial deconditioning syndrome. Those at risk of chronifying pain or those whose pain is already chronic should be given an interdisciplinary, multimodal therapeutic program. A pilot study was carried out in our clinic: multidisciplinary treatment was given to our patients (of which over 90 % belonged to stages II and III on the Gerbershagen scale) and the result was significant improvement in the measurements of pain intensity, sensoric and affective pain perception, their list of complaints, the common scale of depression and the pain disability index. Taking previously published studies into consideration, it is safe to say that a multidisciplinary, multimodal program of therapy even after stay in hospital results in considerable relief of pain and improvement in the ability to cope with the pain for patients with chronified pain syndromes in the muscular-skeletal system which are resistant to treatment on an outpatient basis.

  7. Nurses' assessment of postoperative pain: can it be an alternative to patients' self-reports?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, I. S.; Sim, W. S.; Kim, G. S.; Park, S. H.; Park, Y. S.; Cha, K. J.; Park, Y. S.; Lim, Y. J.; Lee, S. C.; Kim, Y. C.

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether the nurses' assessment of postoperative pain can be an alternative to patients' self-reporting. We examined 187 patients receiving postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. The nurses assessed the patients' pain with three pain indices (therapeutic efficacy, pain intensity, and facial pain expression) 8 hr after operation. The patients recorded their resting and movement pain using 100-mm visual analog scales immediately following the nurses' assessment. There was an acceptable correlation between overall pain measurement assessed by patients and that assessed by nurses (canonical correlation coefficient=0.72, p=0.0001). The resting pain was more reliably reflected than the movement pain in overall measurement assessed both by nurses and by patients. Among the three pain indices assessed by nurses, the pain intensity most reliably reflected the patients' self-reports. The pain intensity assessed with a simple verbal descriptor scale therefore is believed to be an effective alternative to the patients' self-reports of postoperative pain at rest. However, it mirrored the patients' self-reports during movement less reliably. Therapeutic efficacy and facial pain expression indices were not effective alternatives to patients' self-reporting. PMID:11748363

  8. The effects of the "physical BEMER® vascular therapy", a method for the physical stimulation of the vasomotion of precapillary microvessels in case of impaired microcirculation, on sleep, pain and quality of life of patients with different clinical pictures on the basis of three scientifically validated scales.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Wolfgang; Hess, Lorenzo; Burger, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    As part of the statutory market monitoring of certified medical devices, 658 valid patient questionnaires were evaluated between April 2011 and March 2013. The questions consisted mainly of three scientifically recognized scales for assessing the changes of sleep, pain and quality of life in patients who had used the "physical BEMER® vascular therapy" for different diseases over 6 weeks. The result clearly shows that there are significant improvements in all areas surveyed through the application of this complementary treatment option, regardless of the underlying disease.

  9. Spirituality and Religion in Pain and Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Dedeli, Ozden; Kaptan, Gulten

    2013-01-01

    Pain relief is a management problem for many patients, their families, and the medical professionals caring for them. Although everyone experiences pain to some degree, responses to it vary from one person to another. Recognizing and specifying someone else’s pain is clinically a well know challenge. Research on the biology and neurobiology of pain has given us a relationship between spirituality and pain. There is growing recognition that persistent pain is a complex and multidimensional experience stemming from the interrelations among biological, psychological, social, and spiritual factors. Patients with pain use a number of cognitive and behavioral strategies to cope with their pain, including religious/spiritual factors, such as prayers, and seeking spiritual support to manage their pain. This article provides an overview of the complex phenomenon of pain, with a focus on spiritual and religious issues in pain management. PMID:26973914

  10. Implications of Pain in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Efficacy of Duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Hartford, James T.; Endicott, Jean; Kornstein, Susan G.; Allgulander, Christer; Wohlreich, Madelaine M.; Russell, James M.; Perahia, David G. S.; Erickson, Janelle S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a post hoc evaluation of the prevalence of clinically significant pain and the efficacy of duloxetine in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and concurrent pain. Method: Data from two 9- to 10-week double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of duloxetine (60 to 120 mg) in DSM-IV–defined GAD were analyzed (study 1 was conducted from July 2004 to September 2005; study 2 was conducted from August 2004 to June 2005). Efficacy was assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A), visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement of Illness (CGI-I) scale, the Patient Global Impressions-Improvement (PGI-I) scale, and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) global functional impairment scale. Results: Of 840 patients randomly assigned to treatment, 61.3% (302 duloxetine, 213 placebo) had VAS scores ≥ 30 mm on at least 1 of the pain scales, indicating clinically significant pain. Among those patients with concurrent pain at baseline, change from baseline to endpoint in the HAM-A total score (42.9% change in mean scores for duloxetine, 31.4% for placebo), HADS anxiety scale (40.3% vs. 22.8%), HADS depression scale (36.1% vs. 20.5%), HAM-A psychic factor (45.9% vs. 29.9%), and SDS global functional improvement score (45.5% vs. 22.1%) was significantly (all p's < .001) greater for duloxetine compared with placebo. Improvement on the CGI-I (p = .003) and PGI-I (p < .001) was also significantly greater for duloxetine. Response (HAM-A total score decrease ≥ 50%) (49% vs. 29%) and remission (HAM-A total score ≤ 7 at endpoint) (29% vs. 18%) rates were significantly greater for duloxetine compared with placebo (p < .001 and p = .041, respectively). Duloxetine demonstrated statistically significantly greater reduction in pain on all 6 VAS pain scales (all p's < .001 except headaches with p < .002) (for duloxetine, percent change in means from

  11. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    PubMed Central

    Culp, William C; Yousaf, Mohammed; Lowry, Benjamin; McCowan, Timothy C; Culp, William C

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement. Methods Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L), buffered 1% lidocaine (LB), or 2% chloroprocaine (CP) injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable. Results Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L. Conclusion Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine. PMID:22915859

  12. An Epidemiological Study of Neuropathic Pain Symptoms in Canadian Adults

    PubMed Central

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G.; Mann, Elizabeth G.; Torrance, Nicola; Smith, Blair H.; Johnson, Ana; Gilron, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The reported prevalence of neuropathic pain ranges from 6.9% to 10%; however the only Canadian study reported 17.9%. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of neuropathic pain in Canada. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a random sample of Canadian adults. The response rate was 21.1% (1504/7134). Likely or possible neuropathic pain was defined using a neuropathic pain-related diagnosis and a positive outcome on the Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale (S-LANSS) or the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) Questions. The prevalence of likely neuropathic pain was 1.9% (S-LANSS) and 3.4% (DN4) and that of possible neuropathic pain was 5.8% (S-LANSS) and 8.1% (DN4). Neuropathic pain was highest in economically disadvantaged males. There is a significant burden of neuropathic pain in Canada. The low response rate and a slightly older and less educated sample than the Canadian population may have led to an overestimate of neuropathic pain. Population prevalence varies by screening tool used, indicating more work is needed to develop reliable measures. Population level screening targeted towards high risk groups should improve the sensitivity and specificity of screening, while clinical examination of those with positive screening results will further refine the estimate of prevalence. PMID:27445636

  13. Errors in managing postsurgical pediatric pain in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bravo Matus, Carlos A; Flores Zúñiga, Rosa María

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a subjective symptom that has been extensively studied in adults, but only minimally in children. In children, use of low analgesic doses and failure to document the pain and its management are common concerns. In newborns and infants pain is difficult to interpret. This was a double-blind, prospective, multicenter observational study conducted in four public Mexican hospitals to identify analgesic use. One hundred subjects were enrolled at each institution and monitored for 24 to 48 hours following surgery. Data were collected on 152 girls and 248 boys ranging in age from newborns to 14 years. Nearly 300 (290) underwent major procedures; 110 had short stay surgery. The most common analgesics used were paracetamol and dipyrone at low doses. Less frequently ibuprofen or another anti-inflammatory was used. Many children received no analgesic, including 30 newborns, and others received only one or two analgesic doses. Fifteen burn patients received ketorolac. The occurrence and characteristics of the pain were poorly documented in all four hospitals. Postoperative pain causes suffering and can prolong hospital stays. Graphic pain intensity scales exist to evaluate pain, but use of them was not documented in medial records. Nurses and doctors in training did not have the skills needed to evaluate pain. The study revealed errors in pain management and fear among staff in using high doses of common analgesics. The study results document patterns of care in most Mexican hospitals today and indicate a need for pain management training for Mexican doctors and nurses.

  14. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Procedures & Devices Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Drugs, Procedures & DevicesProcedures & DevicesYour Health Resources ...

  15. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  16. Institutionalizing pain management: the Post-Operative Pain Management Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Dahl, June L; Gordon, Deb; Ward, Sandra; Skemp, Marty; Wochos, Sarah; Schurr, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Clinical practice and quality improvement (QI) guidelines for acute postoperative pain management have been developed to address the well-documented problem of undertreatment of postoperative pain. The Post-Operative Pain Management Quality Improvement Project (the POP Project) was initiated to determine whether an intervention designed to support hospitals in the development of QI efforts would lead to improvements in structures, processes, and outcomes consistent with recommended guidelines. A nationwide sample of 233 hospitals joined the project. The intervention consisted of written resource materials accompanied by support services that included an e-mail list server, a resource Web page, and assistance from POP Project staff via telephone. Data regarding critical structures, processes (practice patterns), and patient outcomes were collected at baseline before the intervention began and at follow-up 12 to 18 months later. Results showed a statistically significant increase from baseline (45%) to follow-up (72%) in the presence of structural elements that are critical to improving pain management. There were statistically significant improvements in practices including documented use of pain rating scales, decreased use of intramuscular opioids, and increased use of nonpharmacologic strategies. Patient survey data showed no change in pain outcomes. Evaluation data showed that 70% of hospitals were very or extremely satisfied with their participation in the POP Project and 90% of them planned to continue efforts to improve pain management after the POP Project ended. Further research is needed to determine how to translate the excellent results obtained for structure and process into meaningful outcomes for patients.

  17. Investigation of the paradoxical painful sensation ('illusion of pain') produced by a thermal grill.

    PubMed

    Bouhassira, Didier; Kern, Delphine; Rouaud, Jean; Pelle-Lancien, Emilie; Morain, Françoise

    2005-03-01

    A paradoxical painful sensation can be elicited by the simultaneous application of innocuous warm and cold stimuli to the skin. In the present study, we analyzed the conditions of production of this unique experimental illusion of pain in 52 healthy volunteers (27 men, 25 women). The stimuli were produced by a thermode composed of six bars whose temperature was controlled by Peltier elements. The temperature of alternate (even- and odd-numbered) bars could be controlled independently to produce various patterns of the 'thermal grill'. After measuring the cold and heat pain thresholds, a series of combinations of warm and cold stimuli, whose distance to the thermal pain threshold was at least 4 degrees C, were applied on the palmar surface of the right hand during 30s. After each stimulus, the subjects had to describe and rate their sensations on visual analog scales. Paradoxical painful sensations, mostly described as burning, were reported by all the subjects but three. However, the phenomenon was less frequent in approximately one third of ('low responder') volunteers. The frequency and intensity of such painful sensations were directly related to the magnitude (i.e. 5-25 degrees C) of the difference of the temperature between the warm and cold bars of the grill. The combination of increasingly colder temperature to a given warm temperature induces similar effects as combining increasingly warmer temperature to a given cold temperature. These results suggest that pain can be the result of a simple addition of non-noxious warm and cold signals.

  18. Intensive interdisciplinary outpatient pain management program for chronic back pain: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Artner, Juraj; Kurz, Stephan; Cakir, Balkan; Reichel, Heiko; Lattig, Friederike

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic back pain is relatively resistant to unimodal therapy regimes. The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate the short-term outcome of a three-week intensive multidisciplinary outpatient program for patients with back pain and sciatica, measured according to decrease of functional impairment and pain. Methods The program was designed for patients suffering from chronic back pain to provide intensive interdisciplinary therapy in an outpatient setting, consisting of interventional injection techniques, medication, exercise therapy, back education, ergotherapy, traction, massage therapy, medical training, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, aquatraining, and relaxation. Results Based on Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) scores, a significant improvement in pain intensity and functionality of 66.83% NRS and an ODI of 33.33% were achieved by our pain program within 3 weeks. Conclusion This paper describes the organization and short-term outcome of an intensive multidisciplinary program for chronic back pain on an outpatient basis provided by our orthopedic department, with clinically significant results. PMID:22826641

  19. Continuous assessment of labour pain using handgrip force

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Nadine; Savoldelli, Georges; Rehberg-Klug, Benno

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of dynamic changes in painful experiences, such as labour, using conventional rating scales (eg, numerical rating scale [NRS]) has limitations. An alternative for continuous pain evaluation could be a signal generated by voluntary action of the parturient. Remifentanil administration for obstetric analgesia could be improved by these dynamic measures of labour pain. In the present study, handgrip force was measured by a dynamometer to signal labour pain. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate: whether continuous monitoring of labour pain using handgrip force allows for determination of pain measurement during contractions; and the correlation between handgrip force and pain intensity on NRS. METHODS: The present observational, single-centre study included 43 parturients. After calibration of the dynamometer for individual hand muscle strength, pain was recorded during early and late labour using a dynamometer and an NRS. The primary end point was the correlation coefficient between NRS ratings and peak intensity recorded by the dynamometer. RESULTS: All dynamometer-registered readings were also registered by the external tocogram. All contractions recorded by external tocogram were also registered by the dynamometer. Handgrip force was moderately correlated with pain scores on the NRS. Mean handgrip force during contractions had the highest correlation coefficient (Pearson’s r=0.67) compared with peak handgrip force (r=0.56) and area under the curve of handgrip force (r=0.55). CONCLUSIONS: Pain intensity and duration can be assessed continuously using handgrip force measured via a dynamometer. The feedback of intensity and duration of pain could optimize patient-controlled remifentantil application for obstetric analgesia and other situations of highly variable pain intensity. PMID:25996768

  20. Pain in adults post surgical repair of congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise; Rebeyka, Darlene; Urquhart, Gayle; Roschkov, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe pain in adults post surgical repair for congenital heart defects. What is the intensity, sensory, and affective dimensions of pain experienced post-operatively? What is the trend in pain experienced post-operatively over time? What is the effectiveness of post-operative pain management strategies? What factors influence the dimensions of post-operative pain experienced? A descriptive prospective repeated measures design was used with 30 adult congenital heart (ACH) post-operative patients. Pain assessments using the McGill Short Form Questionnaire (MSFQ), a visual analogue pain scale (VAP), and recordings of other variables (analgesic, anxiety, activity level, non-pharmacologic intervention) were performed three times daily until hospital discharge. Mean pain intensity scores ranged from 2.44 +/- 1.31 following extubation to 1.30 +/- 0.66 on post-operative day (POD) five (scale, 0-5). Mean MSFQ scores ranged from 9.26 +/- 7.21 following extubation to 4.40 +/- 5.22 on POD five (scale, 0-45). Mean VAP scores ranged from 50.77 +/- 25.79 following extubation to 18.76 +/- 18.50 on POD five (scale, 0-100). Mean number of narcotic doses per day ranged from 4.61 +/- 2.01 to 1.88 +/- 1.98 on PODs one and five, respectively. Anxiety predicted VAP and MSFQ scores on PODs one and two; anxiety and analgesia doses predicted VAP and MSFQ scores on POD three; analgesia doses predicted MSFQ scores, analgesia and anxiety predicted VAP scores on POD four; analgesia doses and anxiety predicted VAP and MSFQ scores on POD five. No relationships were found among pain and other demographic, treatment, or clinical variables. Overall, pain was reported as mild to moderate intensity, variable in sensations, decreased over time, and adequately managed.

  1. Neuropathic pain in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Raicher, Irina; Stump, Patrick Raymond Nicolas Andre Ghislain; Baccarelli, Rosemari; Marciano, Lucia H S C; Ura, Somei; Virmond, Marcos C L; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Nerve impairment is a key clinical aspect of leprosy and may present the distribution of mononeuropathy or multiple nerve trunks, small cutaneous nerve fibers, and free nerve endings. The clinical range of leprosy is determined by individual cell-mediated immune response to infection that also may play a role in different types of pain syndromes in leprosy. Previous studies reported a high prevalence of neuropathic pain in leprosy. In an Ethiopian study with 48 patients, pure nociceptive pain was experienced by 43% of patients and pure neuropathic pain (NeP) by 11% of patients. In an Indian study, 21.8% of leprosy patients had pain with neuropathic characteristics. These rates underlie the need to develop tools for the early diagnosis and detection of infection and its complications, such as nerve damage and pain. In a larger sample with leprosy-associated NeP (n = 90), we have applied the Douleur Neuropathique en 4 questions (DN4) and found sensitivity = 97.1% and specificity = 57.9%. The high sensitivity of this tool in leprosy patients suggests that it could be a valuable tool to screen for neuropathic pain in this population and could be used as part of health care programs aimed at detecting, treating, and rehabilitating leprosy in endemic areas.

  2. Low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Low back pain is a leading cause of disability. It occurs in similar proportions in all cultures, interferes with quality of life and work performance, and is the most common reason for medical consultations. Few cases of back pain are due to specific causes; most cases are non-specific. Acute back pain is the most common presentation and is usually self-limiting, lasting less than three months regardless of treatment. Chronic back pain is a more difficult problem, which often has strong psychological overlay: work dissatisfaction, boredom, and a generous compensation system contribute to it. Among the diagnoses offered for chronic pain is fibromyalgia, an urban condition (the diagnosis is not made in rural settings) that does not differ materially from other instances of widespread chronic pain. Although disc protrusions detected on X-ray are often blamed, they rarely are responsible for the pain, and surgery is seldom successful at alleviating it. No single treatment is superior to others; patients prefer manipulative therapy, but studies have not demonstrated that it has any superiority over others. A WHO Advisory Panel has defined common outcome measures to be used to judge the efficacy of treatments for studies. PMID:14710509

  3. [Congenital insensitivity to pain].

    PubMed

    Danziger, N; Willer, J-C

    2009-02-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare syndrome with various clinical expressions, characterized by a dramatic impairment of pain perception since birth. In the 1980s, progress in nerve histopathology allowed to demonstrate that CIP was almost always a manifestation of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) involving the small-calibre (A-delta and C) nerve fibres which normally transmit nociceptive inputs along sensory nerves. Identification of the genetic basis of several clinical subtypes has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, emphasizing in particular the crucial role of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the development and survival of nociceptors. Recently, mutations of the gene coding for the sodium channel Nav1.7--a voltage-dependent sodium channel expressed preferentially on peripheral nociceptors and sympathetic ganglia--have been found to be the cause of CIP in patients showing a normal nerve biopsy. This radical impairment of nociception mirrors the hereditary pain syndromes associated with "gain of function" mutations of the same ion channel, such as familial erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder. Future research with CIP patients may identify other proteins specifically involved in nociception, which might represent potential targets for chronic pain treatment. Moreover, this rare clinical syndrome offers the opportunity to address interesting neuropsychological issues, such as the role of pain experience in the construction of body image and in the empathic representation of others' pain.

  4. Pain in autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, Katherine A; Kerr, Bradley J

    2016-07-22

    Most autoimmune diseases are associated with pathological pain development. Autoimmune diseases with pathological pain include complex regional pain syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and Guillian-Barré syndrome to name a few. The present Review explores research linking the immune system to the development of pathological pain in autoimmune diseases. Pathological pain has been linked to T-cell activation and the release of cytokines from activated microglia in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. New research on the role of autoantibodies in autoimmunity has generated insights into potential mechanisms of pain associated with autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies may act through various mechanisms in autoimmune disorders. These include the alteration of neuronal excitability via specific antigens such as the voltage-gated potassium channel complexes or by mediating bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Although more research must be done to understand better the role of autoantibodies in autoimmune disease related pain, this may be a promising area of research for new analgesic therapeutic targets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Knee kinetic pattern during gait and anterior knee pain before and after rehabilitation in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Claudon, B; Poussel, M; Billon-Grumillier, C; Beyaert, C; Paysant, J

    2012-05-01

    Patellofemoral pain is likely due to compressive force acting on the patella related in turn to knee extension moment. The latter variable was assumed to be (i) reduced during short-distance free walking in case of patellofemoral pain syndrome and (ii) increased after therapeutic pain reduction. Peak knee extension moment at beginning of stance phase was recorded by three-dimensional gait analysis in 22 controls and in 23 patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome before and after rehabilitation of knee extensors and flexors to reduce the pain. Pain would occur mainly in stressful activities such as stair negotiation or squatting and was quantified by the anterior knee pain scale. Peak knee extension moment was significantly reduced in all the patients before treatment (n=23) compared to controls, although no one had pain during free walking. In the 17 patients who experienced significant post-rehabilitation pain reduction in their stressful activities, the peak knee extension moment was significantly reduced before treatment compared to controls and significantly increased after treatment, reaching values similar to control values. The peak knee extension moment during free walking appears to be a good kinetic variable related to a compensatory mechanism limiting or avoiding anterior knee pain and may be of interest in assessing knee dynamics alteration in patients with PFPS.

  6. Observer trait anxiety is associated with response bias to patient facial pain expression independent of pain catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Rash, Joshua A; Prkachin, Kenneth M; Campbell, Tavis S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Top-down characteristics of an observer influence the detection and estimation of a sufferer’s pain. A comprehensive understanding of these characteristics is important because they influence observer helping behaviours and the sufferer’s experience of pain. OBJECTIVES: To examine the hypothesis that individuals who score high in trait anxiety would perceive more intense pain in others, as indicated by a larger negative response bias, and that this association would persist after adjusting for pain catastrophizing. METHODS: Healthy young adult participants (n=99; 50 male) watched videos containing excerpts of facial expressions taken from patients with shoulder pain and were asked to rate how much pain the patient was experiencing using an 11-point numerical rating scale. Sensitivity and response bias were calculated using signal detection methods. RESULTS: Trait anxiety was a predictor of response bias after statistically adjusting for pain catastrophizing and observer sex. More anxious individuals had a proclivity toward imputing greater pain to a sufferer. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals scoring higher on trait anxiety were more likely to impute pain to a sufferer. Anxious caregivers may be better able to respond with appropriate intervention once pain behaviour is detected, or they may exacerbate symptoms by engaging in excessive palliative care and solicitous behaviour. PMID:25299592

  7. Painful neuropathy: Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2014-01-01

    Painful neuropathy, like the other complications of diabetes, is a growing healthcare concern. Unfortunately, current treatments are of variable efficacy and do not target underlying pathogenic mechanisms, in part because these mechanisms are not well defined. Rat and mouse models of type 1 diabetes are frequently used to study diabetic neuropathy, with rats in particular being consistently reported to show allodynia and hyperalgesia. Models of type 2 diabetes are being used with increasing frequency, but the current literature on the progression of indices of neuropathic pain is variable and relatively few therapeutics have yet been developed in these models. While evidence for spontaneous pain in rodent models is sparse, measures of evoked mechanical, thermal and chemical pain can provide insight into the pathogenesis of the condition. The stocking and glove distribution of pain tantalizingly suggests that the generator site of neuropathic pain is found within the peripheral nervous system. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that amplification in the spinal cord, via spinal disinhibition and neuroinflammation, and also in the brain, via enhanced thalamic activity or decreased cortical inhibition, likely contribute to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy. Several potential therapeutic strategies have emerged from preclinical studies, including prophylactic treatments that intervene against underlying mechanisms of disease, treatments that prevent gains of nociceptive function, treatments that suppress enhancements of nociceptive function, and treatments that impede normal nociceptive mechanisms. Ongoing challenges include unraveling the complexity of underlying pathogenic mechanisms, addressing the potential disconnect between the perceived location of pain and the actual pain generator and amplifier sites, and finding ways to identify which mechanisms operate in specific patients to allow rational and individualized choice of targeted therapies.

  8. Chronic Widespread Pain Drawn on a Body Diagram is a Screening Tool for Increased Pain Sensitization, Psycho-Social Load, and Utilization of Pain Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Visser, Eric J; Ramachenderan, Jonathan; Davies, Stephanie J; Parsons, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that chronic widespread pain, (CWP) drawn by patients on a body diagram, could be used as a screening tool for increased pain sensitization, psycho-social load, and utilization of pain management strategies. The triage questionnaires of 144 adults attending a chronic pain outpatients' clinic were audited and the percentage pain surface area (PPSA) drawn on their body diagrams was calculated using the "rule of nines" (RON) method for burns area assessment. Outcomes were measured using the painDETECT Questionnaire (PD-Q) and other indices and compared using a nonrandomized, case-control method. It was found that significantly more subjects with CWP (defined as a PPSA ≥ 20%) reported high (≥ 19) PD-Q scores (suggesting pain "sensitization" or neuropathic pain) (P = 0.0002), "severe" or "extremely severe" anxiety scores on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 Items Questionnaire (P = 0.0270), ≥ 5 psycho-social stressors (P = 0.0022), ≥ 5 significant life events (P = 0.0098), and used ≥ 7 pain management strategies (PMS) (P < 00001), compared to control subjects with a lower PPSA. A Widespread Pain Index score ≥ 7 (OR = 11.36), PD-Q score ≥ 19 (OR = 4.46) and use of ≥ 7 PMS (OR = 5.49) were independently associated with CWP. This study demonstrates that calculating PPSA on a body diagram (using the RON method) is a valid and convenient "snapshot" screening tool to identify patients with an increased likelihood of pain sensitization, psycho-social load, and utilizing pain management resources.

  9. Back pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed.

  10. Rheumatologists and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Smythe, H A

    2000-01-01

    Many authors have suggested that chronic pain syndromes are psychosocial in origin; maladaptive behaviours favoured by psychosocial and political factors. Sometimes this may be true, but neither the individual patients nor the accumulated scientific evidence deserve such a routine dismissal. In this editorial I will review issues of responsibility, the nature of referred pain and referred tenderness, evidence for the value of tender point examination as an objective measure, techniques of assessment of the cervical spine, techniques of assessment of pain behaviour, and the determinants of the specific symptom patterns associated with cervical injury.

  11. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Kotarinos, Rhonda

    2012-10-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain is fraught with many unknowns. Is it the organs of the pelvis, is it the muscles of the pelvis, or is the origin of the pelvic pain from an extrapelvic muscle? Is there a single source or multiple? In this state of confusion what is the best way to manage the many symptoms that can be associated with myofascial pelvic pain. This article reviews current studies that attempt to answer some of these questions. More questions seem to develop as each study presents its findings.

  12. Pain Interference Mediates the Relationship between Pain and Functioning in Pediatric Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wicksell, Rikard K.; Kanstrup, Marie; Kemani, Mike K.; Holmström, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric chronic pain is a major health problem commonly associated with impaired functioning. There is a great need for more knowledge regarding the complex interplay between demographic variables such as age and gender, pain, and functioning in pediatric chronic pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate if; (1) pediatric chronic pain patients with high and low levels of functioning differ in demographic variables, pain, and pain interference; (2) explore the mediating function of pain interference in the relationship between pain and functioning (i.e., depression and functional disability). Method: The study includes a consecutive sample of children and adolescents referred to a tertiary pain clinic due to chronic pain (n = 163). Cross-sectional data was analyzed to investigate the interrelationships between variables. Analyses of indirect effects were used to assess the impact of pain interference on the relation between pain and depression. Results: Findings illustrate high levels of depression, school absence and pain interference in this sample. Furthermore, pain interference mediated the relationship between pain and depression. Conclusion: Thus, this study adds to the growing support of findings suggesting that functioning and pain interference should be routinely assessed in pediatric chronic pain and a central target in treatment. Particularly, these findings imply a need for interventions specifically aimed at improved functioning for patients with chronic debilitating pain. PMID:28082931

  13. Behaviour-focused pain coping: consistency and convergence to work capability of the swedish version of the chronic pain coping inventory.

    PubMed

    Ektor-Andersen, John; Orbaek, Palle; Isacsson, Sven-Olof

    2002-01-01

    The aim was to study the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory. The material consisted of a group of 100 subjects recruited from a large population study. Pain status and the absence of pain-related sick leave during the previous year conditioned inclusion. Another group comprised 160 patients on the long-term sick list and who had been referred to a multidisciplinary pain clinic for evaluation. The psychometric properties in terms of internal consistency of the scales were good or very good for all scales of behaviour-focused pain coping. Use of the strategies "Guarding", "Resting", "Asking for assistance", "Relaxation", "Task persistence", "Coping self-statements" and "Seeking social support" was significantly related to vocational capability. "Guarding". "Asking for assistance", "Relaxation", "Exercise and stretch" and "Coping self-statements" increased in parallel to increasing pain from localized to intermediate or widespread. No gender difference was found in cases reporting more pronounced pain.

  14. Low-dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Acute Pain In the ED: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Original Contribution Low-dose ketamine vs morphine for acute pain in the ED: a randomized controlled trial☆,☆☆ Joshua P. Miller, MD a,b,⁎, Steven G...numeric rating scale (NRS) pain scores, in patients receiving low-dose ketamine (LDK) or morphine (MOR) for acute pain in the emergency department...convenience sample of patients aged 18 to 59 years with acute abdominal, flank, low back, or extremity pain were enrolled. Subjects were consented and

  15. Capacitively Coupled Electric Field for Pain Relief in Patients with Vertebral Fractures and Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Viapiana, Ombretta; Gatti, Davide; de Terlizzi, Francesca; Adami, Silvano

    2009-01-01

    Fragility vertebral fractures often are associated with chronic back pain controlled by analgesic compounds. Capacitive coupling electrical stimulation is a type of electrical stimulation technology approved by the US FDA to noninvasively enhance fracture repair and spinal fusion. These uses suggest it would be a possible treatment for patients with back pain attributable to vertebral fractures. We therefore randomized 51 postmenopausal women with multiple fractures and chronic pain to the use of one of two indistinguishable devices delivering either the standard capacitive coupling electrical stimulation by Osteospine™ (active group) or low intensity pulse (control group). Twenty patients of the active group and 21 of the control group (80%) completed the study for a total duration of 3 months. The mean visual analog scale values for pain and the Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis (QUALEFFO) scores improved in both groups. We observed a relationship between hours of treatments and reductions in pain intensity only in the active group. Capacitive coupling electrical stimulation was not more effective than control treatment when comparing mean visual analog scale pain and QALEFFO scores in the two groups and when adjusting for the hours of treatment. However, the proportion of patients able to discontinue NSAIDs owing to elimination or reduction of pain was greater in the active group than in the control group. We interpret these findings as suggesting capacitive coupling electrical stimulation controls pain in some patients and reduces the use of NSAIDs. Level of Evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19756902

  16. No gain without pain: using pain tracking mobile Apps

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain often remains untreated because tracking its causes and symptoms is difficult. By recording details of pain episodes, retrospectively analyzing data around pain and sharing it with experts, pain management can be demystified and better treatment options can be suggested. PMID:28293601

  17. Maintenance of pain in children with functional abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdomina...

  18. Pain and nociception: mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain.

    PubMed

    Falk, Sarah; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2014-06-01

    Cancer pain, especially pain caused by metastasis to bone, is a severe type of pain, and unless the cause and consequences can be resolved, the pain will become chronic. As detection and survival among patients with cancer have improved, pain has become an increasing challenge, because traditional therapies are often only partially effective. Until recently, knowledge of cancer pain mechanisms was poor compared with understanding of neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. We now view cancer-induced bone pain as a complex pain state involving components of both inflammatory and neuropathic pain but also exhibiting elements that seem unique to cancer pain. In addition, the pain state is often unpredictable, and the intensity of the pain is highly variable, making it difficult to manage. The establishment of translational animal models has started to reveal some of the molecular components involved in cancer pain. We present the essential pharmacologic and neurobiologic mechanisms involved in the generation and continuance of cancer-induced bone pain and discuss these in the context of understanding and treating patients. We discuss changes in peripheral signaling in the area of tumor growth, examine spinal cord mechanisms of sensitization, and finally address central processing. Our aim is to provide a mechanistic background for the sensory characteristics of cancer-induced bone pain as a basis for better understanding and treating this condition.

  19. Pain Duration and Resolution Following Surgery: An Inception Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ian R.; Hah, Jennifer M.; Barelka, Peter L.; Wang, Charlie KM.; Wang, Bing M.; Gillespie, Matthew J.; McCue, Rebecca; Younger, Jarred W.; Trafton, Jodie; Humphreys, Keith; Goodman, Stuart B.; Dirbas, Fredrick M.; Mackey, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Preoperative determinants of pain duration following surgery are poorly understood. We identified preoperative predictors of prolonged pain after surgery in a mixed surgical cohort. Methods We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of patients undergoing mastectomy, lumpectomy, thoracotomy, total knee replacement, or total hip replacement. We measured preoperative psychological distress and substance use, and then measured pain and opioid use after surgery until patients reported the cessation of both opioid consumption and pain. The primary endpoint was time to opioid cessation, and those results have been previously reported. Here we report preoperative determinants of time to pain resolution following surgery in Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Between January 2007 and April 2009 we enrolled 107 of 134 consecutively approached patients undergoing the aforementioned surgical procedures. In the final multivariate model, preoperative self-perceived risk of addiction predicted more prolonged pain. Unexpectedly, anxiety sensitivity predicted more rapid pain resolution after surgery. Each one-point increase (on a four point scale) of self-perceived risk of addiction was associated with a 38% (95% CI 3 - 61) reduction in the rate of pain resolution (p= 0.04). Furthermore, higher anxiety sensitivity was associated with an 89% (95% CI 23–190) increased rate of pain resolution (p=0.004). Conclusions Greater preoperative self-perceived risk of addiction, and lower anxiety sensitivity predicted a slower rate of pain resolution following surgery. Each of these factors was a better predictor of pain duration than preoperative depressive symptoms, PTSD symptoms, past substance use, fear of pain, gender, age, preoperative pain, or preoperative opioid use. PMID:26179223

  20. Pain assessment: subjectivity, objectivity, and the use of neurotechnology.

    PubMed

    Giordano, James; Abramson, Kim; Boswell, Mark V

    2010-01-01

    The pain clinician is confronted with the formidable task of objectifying the subjective phenomenon of pain so as to determine the right treatments for both the pain syndrome and the patient in whom the pathology is expressed. However, the experience of pain - and its expression - remains enigmatic. Can currently available evaluative tools, questionnaires, and scales actually provide adequately objective information about the experiential dimensions of pain? Can, or will, current and future iterations of biotechnology - whether used singularly or in combination (with other technologies as well as observational-behavioral methods) - afford objective validation of pain? And what of the clinical, ethical, legal and social issues that arise in and from the use - and potential misuse - of these approaches? Subsequent trajectories of clinical care depend upon the findings gained through the use of these techniques and their inappropriate employment - or misinterpretation of the results they provide - can lead to misdiagnoses and incorrect treatment. This essay is the first of a two-part series that explicates how the intellectual tasks of knowing about pain and the assessment of its experience and expression in the pain patient are constituent to the moral responsibility of pain medicine. Herein, we discuss the problem of pain and its expression, and those methods, techniques, and technologies available to bridge the gap between subjective experience and objective evaluation. We address how these assessment approaches are fundamental to apprehend both pain as an objective, neurological event, and its impact upon the subjective experience, existence, and expectations of the person in pain. In this way, we argue that the right use of technology - together with inter-subjectivity, compassion, and insight - can sustain the good of pain care as both a therapeutic and moral enterprise.

  1. Shoulder Strength and Physical Activity Predictors of Shoulder Pain in People With Paraplegia From Spinal Injury: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hatchett, Patricia; Eberly, Valerie J.; Lighthall Haubert, Lisa; Conners, Sandy; Requejo, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder joint pain is a frequent secondary complaint for people following spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective The purpose of this study was to determine predictors of shoulder joint pain in people with paraplegia. Methods/Design A 3-year longitudinal study was conducted. Participants were people with paraplegia who used a manual wheelchair for at least 50% of their mobility and were asymptomatic for shoulder pain at study entry. Participants were classified as having developed shoulder pain if they experienced an increase of ≥10 points on the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index in the 3-year follow-up period. Measurements of maximal isometric shoulder torques were collected at study entry (baseline), 18 months, and 3 years. Daily activity was measured using a wheelchair odometer, and self-reported daily transfer and raise frequency data were collected by telephone every 6 weeks. Results Two hundred twenty-three participants were enrolled in the study; 39.8% developed shoulder pain over the 3-year follow-up period. Demographic variables and higher activity levels were not associated with shoulder pain onset. Baseline maximal isometric torque (normalized by body weight) in all shoulder muscle groups was 10% to 15% lower in participants who developed shoulder pain compared with those who remained pain-free. Lower shoulder adduction torque was a significant predictor of shoulder pain development (log-likelihood test=11.38), but the model explained only 7.5% of shoulder pain onset and consequently is of limited clinical utility. Limitations Time since SCI varied widely among participants, and transfer and raise activity was measured by participant recall. Conclusions Participants who developed shoulder pain had decreased muscle strength, particularly in the shoulder adductors, and lower levels of physical activity prior to the onset of shoulder pain. Neither factor was a strong predictor of shoulder pain onset. PMID:25721123

  2. Deficient conditioned pain modulation after spinal cord injury correlates with clinical spontaneous pain measures.

    PubMed

    Albu, Sergiu; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Avila-Martin, Gerardo; Taylor, Julian

    2015-02-01

    The contribution of endogenous pain modulation dysfunction to clinical and sensory measures of neuropathic pain (NP) has not been fully explored. Habituation, temporal summation, and heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulus-induced modulation of tonic heat pain intensity were examined in healthy noninjured subjects (n = 10), and above the level of spinal cord injury (SCI) in individuals without (SCI-noNP, n = 10) and with NP (SCI-NP, n = 10). Thermoalgesic thresholds, Cz/AFz contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs), and phasic or tonic (30 seconds) heat pain intensity were assessed within the C6 dermatome. Although habituation to tonic heat pain intensity (0-10) was reported by the noninjured (10 s: 3.5 ± 0.3 vs 30 s: 2.2 ± 0.5 numerical rating scale; P = 0.003), loss of habituation was identified in both the SCI-noNP (3.8 ± 0.3 vs 3.6 ± 0.5) and SCI-NP group (4.2 ± 0.4 vs 4.9 ± 0.8). Significant temporal summation of tonic heat pain intensity was not observed in the 3 groups. Inhibition of tonic heat pain intensity induced by heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulus was identified in the noninjured (-29.7% ± 9.7%) and SCI-noNP groups (-19.6% ± 7.0%), but not in subjects with SCI-NP (+1.1% ± 8.0%; P < 0.05). Additionally, the mean conditioned pain modulation response correlated positively with Cz/AFz CHEP amplitude (ρ = 0.8; P = 0.015) and evoked heat pain intensity (ρ = 0.8; P = 0.007) in the SCI-NP group. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the mean conditioned pain modulation (R = 0.72) correlated with pain severity and pressing spontaneous pain in the SCI-NP group. Comprehensive assessment of sensory dysfunction above the level of injury with tonic thermal test and conditioning stimuli revealed less-efficient endogenous pain modulation in subjects with SCI-NP.

  3. No pain, no gain: pain behaviour in the armed forces.

    PubMed

    Harper, Phil

    Pain is a unique phenomenon that is difficult to express and is influenced by many different factors, including cultural expectations. A dichotomy exists within the British Armed Forces between pain being seen as necessary--the "no pain, no gain" view--and the opposite image of stoical service personnel who suppress their emotions--the "roughie-toughie" image. This dichotomy was explored through an ethnographic study of pain behaviour experienced during a training course. Pain behaviour was found to be consistent with cultural expectations and this supported the "no pain, no gain" perspective. Physical and psychological pain were expressed differently, reinforcing the western, scientific mind-body dichotomy. In addition, personnel frequently tried to suppress their pain and this supported the "roughie-toughie" philosophy. Thus, pain expression varies according to the context in which it occurs. Nurses need to be aware of this to ensure they interpret and manage their patients' pain appropriately.

  4. Safety of "pain exposure" physical therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    van de Meent, Hendrik; Oerlemans, Margreet; Bruggeman, Almar; Klomp, Frank; van Dongen, Robert; Oostendorp, Rob; Frölke, Jan Paul

    2011-06-01

    "Pain exposure" physical therapy (PEPT) is a new treatment for patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) that consists of a progressive-loading exercise program and management of pain-avoidance behavior without the use of specific CRPS-1 medication or analgesics. The aim of this study was to investigate primarily whether PEPT could be applied safely in patients with CRPS-1. Twenty patients with CRPS-1 were consecutively enrolled in the study after giving informed consent. The diagnosis of CRPS-1 was defined using the Bruehl and Harden/IASP diagnostic criteria. CRPS-1 was diagnosed between 3 and 18 months after the inciting event (trauma). According to a multiple single-case design (baseline [A1], treatment [B], follow-up [A2]), multiple baseline and follow-up measurements were performed to evaluate changes in CRPS signs and symptoms and to assess functional parameters. When comparing the baseline with the follow-up phase, patients improved significantly with respect to pain on the visual analogue scale (57%), pain intensity (48%), muscle strength (52%), arm/shoulder/hand disability (36%), 10-meter walking speed (29%), pain disability index (60%), kinesiophobia (18%), and the domains of perceived health change in the SF-36 survey (269%). Three patients initially showed increased vegetative signs but improved in all other CRPS parameters and showed good functional recovery at follow-up. We conclude that PEPT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with CRPS-1. A progressive-loading exercise program and management of pain-avoidance behavior without the use of specific medication ("pain exposure" physical therapy) is safe and effective for patients with complex regional pain syndrome.

  5. Over-the-counter pain relievers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Analgesics; Acetaminophen; NSAID; Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug; Pain medicine - over-the-counter; Pain medicine - OTC ... Pain medicines are also called analgesics. Each kind of pain medicine has benefits and risks. Some types of pain ...

  6. Angina - when you have chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain; ACS - chest pain; Heart attack - chest pain; Myocardial infarction - chest pain; MI - chest pain ... AHA guideline for the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: executive summary: a report of the American College ...

  7. Nonulcer Stomach Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative treatments, talk to your doctor about: Herbal supplements. Herbal remedies that may be of some benefit for nonulcer stomach pain include a combination of peppermint and caraway oil. These supplements may relieve some of the symptoms of nonulcer ...

  8. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of their therapy. If your doctor prescribes narcotics for your pain, be sure to carefully follow ... when taking these medicines.When you're taking narcotics, it's important to remember that there is a ...

  9. Phantom limb pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2015:chap 54. Nikolajsen L, Springer JS, Haroutiunian S. Phantom limb pain. In: Benzon HT, ... medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- ...

  10. [Greater trochanteric pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, H; Opitz, G; Gerdesmeyer, L; Hauschild, M

    2014-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain is one of the common complaints in orthopedics. Frequent diagnoses include myofascial pain, trochanteric bursitis, tendinosis and rupture of the gluteus medius and minimus tendon, and external snapping hip. Furthermore, nerve entrapment like the piriformis syndrome must be considered in the differential diagnosis. This article summarizes essential diagnostic and therapeutic steps in greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Careful clinical evaluation, complemented with specific imaging studies and diagnostic infiltrations allows determination of the underlying pathology in most cases. Thereafter, specific nonsurgical treatment is indicated, with success rates of more than 90 %. Resistant cases and tendon ruptures may require surgical intervention, which can provide significant pain relief and functional improvement in most cases.

  11. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancer Infection of the tubes (salpingitis) Ectopic pregnancy Fibroid tumors of the uterus (womb) Malignant tumors of the uterus or cervix Endometriosis Adhesions (scars) Screening and Diagnosis How is the cause of abdominal pain determined? ...

  12. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  13. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... often made worse by touch, movement, emotions, and temperature changes, usually cold temperatures. Individuals experience one or more types of pain ... often made worse by touch, movement, emotions, and temperature changes, usually cold temperatures. Individuals experience one or ...

  14. Tips for Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Tips for Chronic Pain The SSF thanks Stuart S. Kassan, MD, FACP, Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, for authoring ...

  15. Pain and your emotions

    MedlinePlus

    ... feelings and emotions can worsen your back pain. Mind-body Relationship The mind and body work together, they cannot be separated. The way your mind controls thoughts and attitudes affects the way your ...

  16. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... bookstores. Provide pleasant activities. Being active takes the mind off the pain. Distractions such as pleasant visits with friends and grandchildren should be encouraged. Watching television, reading, and listening to music may also decrease a ...

  17. Pain: A Statistical Account

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Michael A.; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2017-01-01

    Perception is seen as a process that utilises partial and noisy information to construct a coherent understanding of the world. Here we argue that the experience of pain is no different; it is based on incomplete, multimodal information, which is used to estimate potential bodily threat. We outline a Bayesian inference model, incorporating the key components of cue combination, causal inference, and temporal integration, which highlights the statistical problems in everyday perception. It is from this platform that we are able to review the pain literature, providing evidence from experimental, acute, and persistent phenomena to demonstrate the advantages of adopting a statistical account in pain. Our probabilistic conceptualisation suggests a principles-based view of pain, explaining a broad range of experimental and clinical findings and making testable predictions. PMID:28081134

  18. A Model-Based Approach for Joint Analysis of Pain Intensity and Opioid Consumption in Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Juul, Rasmus V; Knøsgaard, Katrine R; Olesen, Anne E; Pedersen, Katja V; Kreilgaard, Mads; Christrup, Lona L; Osther, Palle J; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Lund, Trine M

    2016-07-01

    Joint analysis of pain intensity and opioid consumption is encouraged in trials of postoperative pain. However, previous approaches have not appropriately addressed the complexity of their interrelation in time. In this study, we applied a non-linear mixed effects model to simultaneously study pain intensity and opioid consumption in a 4-h postoperative period for 44 patients undergoing percutaneous kidney stone surgery. Analysis was based on 748 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores of pain intensity and 51 observed morphine and oxycodone dosing events. A joint model was developed to describe the recurrent pattern of four key phases determining the development of pain intensity and opioid consumption in time; (A) Distribution of pain intensity scores which followed a truncated Poisson distribution with time-dependent mean score ranging from 0.93 to 2.45; (B) Probability of transition to threshold pain levels (NRS ≥ 3) which was strongly dependent on previous pain levels ranging from 2.8-15.2% after NRS of 0-2; (C) Probability of requesting opioid when allowed (NRS ≥ 3) which was strongly correlated with the number of previous doses, ranging from 89.8% for requesting the first dose to 26.1% after three previous doses; (D) Reduction in pain scores after opioid dosing which was significantly related to the pain intensity at time of opioid request (P < 0.001). This study highlights the importance of analyzing pain intensity and opioid consumption in an integrated manner. Non-linear mixed effects modeling proved a valuable tool for analysis of interventions that affect pain intensity, probability of rescue dosing or the effect of opioids in the postoperative pain period.

  19. Exercise-induced pain intensity predicted by pre-exercise fear of pain and pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D; Horn, Maggie E; George, Steven Z

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Our primary goals were to determine whether pre-existing fear of pain and pain sensitivity contributed to post-exercise pain intensity. Methods Delayed onset muscle pain was induced in the trunk extensors of 60 healthy volunteers using an exercise paradigm. Levels of fear of pain and experimental pain sensitivity were measured before exercise. Pain intensity in the low back was collected at 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. Participants were grouped based on pain intensity. Group membership was used as the dependent variable in separate regression models for 24 and 48 hours. Predictor variables included fear, pain sensitivity, torque lost during the exercise protocol, and demographic variables. Results The final models predicting whether a participant reported clinically meaningful pain intensity at 24 hours only included baseline fear of pain at each level of pain intensity tested. The final model at 48 hours included average baseline pain sensitivity and the loss of muscle performance during the exercise protocol for one level of pain intensity tested (greater than 35mm out of 100). Discussion Combined, these findings suggest that the initial reports of pain after injury maybe more strongly influenced by fear while the inflammatory process and pain sensitivity may play a larger role for later pain intensity reports. PMID:21415719

  20. Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reuler, James B.

    1985-01-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common and costly afflictions of our Society. The majority of adults will have at least one episode of acute low back pain that will likely resolve regardless of treatment. Lumbar spine radiographs are overused and there is little scientific support for many of the therapeutic interventions advocated. Even for those patients with symptomatic herniated disc, only a small fraction will ultimately require surgical intervention. PMID:2930949

  1. Low back pain (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point in their lives. Acute low back pain can be self-limiting; however, 1 year after an initial episode, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. Acute low back pain has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Although acute episodes may resolve completely, they may increase in severity and duration over time. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatments for acute low back pain? What are the effects of local injections for acute low back pain? What are the effects of non-drug treatments for acute low back pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics (paracetamol, opioids), back exercises, back schools, bed rest, behavioural therapy, electromyographic biofeedback, epidural corticosteroid injections, lumbar supports, massage, multidisciplinary treatment programmes, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), spinal manipulation, temperature treatments (short-wave diathermy, ultrasound, ice, heat), traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

  2. Neurofibromatosis and the Painful Neuroma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    clinical treatment of neuropathic pain and pain from neuroma formation. Systemic administration of lidocaine has also been used to treat neuropathic... pain . We performed an experiment to compare the effect of pregabalin(PGB), morphine, and lidocaine (LDC) on the TNT model. Method: TNT model...of mechanical hyperalgesia (partially dennervated skin). Further, systemic lidocaine can be expected to impact neuroma sensitivity related pain

  3. 13. Sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pascal; Szadek, Karolina; Cohen, Steven P; De Witte, Jan; Lataster, Arno; Patijn, Jacob; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Van Zundert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint accounts for approximately 16% to 30% of cases of chronic mechanical low back pain. Pain originating in the sacroiliac joint is predominantly perceived in the gluteal region, although pain is often referred into the lower and upper lumbar region, groin, abdomen, and/ or lower limb(s). Because sacroiliac joint pain is difficult to distinguish from other forms of low back pain based on history, different provocative maneuvers have been advocated. Individually, they have weak predictive value, but combined batteries of tests can help ascertain a diagnosis. Radiological imaging is important to exclude "red flags" but contributes little in the diagnosis. Diagnostic blocks are the diagnostic gold standard but must be interpreted with caution, because false-positive as well as false-negative results occur frequently. Treatment of sacroiliac joint pain is best performed in the context of a multidisciplinary approach. Conservative treatments address the underlying causes (posture and gait disturbances) and consist of exercise therapy and manipulation. Intra-articular sacroiliac joint infiltrations with local anesthetic and corticosteroids hold the highest evidence rating (1 B+). If the latter fail or produce only short-term effects, cooled radiofrequency treatment of the lateral branches of S1 to S3 (S4) is recommended (2 B+) if available. When this procedure cannot be used, (pulsed) radiofrequency procedures targeted at L5 dorsal ramus and lateral branches of S1 to S3 may be considered (2 C+).

  4. TRPs and pain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Nociception is the process of transmission of painful signals by nociceptors in the primary afferent nerve fibers, which specifically respond to noxious stimuli. These noxious stimuli are detected by nociceptors and converted into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the spinal cord, thalamus, and the cerebral cortex, where pain is finally sensed. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels have emerged as a family of evolutionarily conserved ligand-gated ion channels that function as molecular detectors of physical stimuli. Several member of this family, at least six channels from three TRP family subtypes (TRPV1-4, TRPM8, and TRPA1), are expressed in nociceptors, where they act as transducers for signals from thermal, chemical, and mechanical stimuli and play crucial roles in the generation and development of pathological pain perception. This review focuses on the increasing evidence of TRP channel involvement and contribution in nociceptive pain and the pain hypersensitivity associated with peripheral inflammation or neuropathy, and on the renewed interest in targeting TRP channels for pain relief.

  5. Mechanisms of Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jafri, M. Saleet

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is an important health problem. It affects a majority of the general population, impairs mobility, causes pain, and reduces the overall sense of well-being. Underlying this syndrome is the existence of painful taut bands of muscle that contain discrete, hypersensitive foci called myofascial trigger points. In spite of the significant impact on public health, a clear mechanistic understanding of the disorder does not exist. This is likely due to the complex nature of the disorder which involves the integration of cellular signaling, excitation-contraction coupling, neuromuscular inputs, local circulation, and energy metabolism. The difficulties are further exacerbated by the lack of an animal model for myofascial pain to test mechanistic hypothesis. In this review, current theories for myofascial pain are presented and their relative strengths and weaknesses are discussed. Based on new findings linking mechanoactivation of reactive oxygen species signaling to destabilized calcium signaling, we put forth a novel mechanistic hypothesis for the initiation and maintenance of myofascial trigger points. It is hoped that this lays a new foundation for understanding myofascial pain syndrome and how current therapies work, and gives key insights that will lead to the improvement of therapies for its treatment. PMID:25574501

  6. [Pain management in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Kandreli, M G; Vadachkoriia, N R; Gumberidze, N Sh; Mandzhavidze, N A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the most effective dose of Ibuprofen - one of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs frequently used in dental practice for pain management. According to our observations, Ibuprofen markedly softens and quickly reduces procedural pain in 55 (91.67%) patients and post-procedural pain in 44 (73.33%) patients, reduces the post-procedural need for or the amount of the drug, removes the fear of anesthesia and endodontic treatment; with irreversible pulpits significantly increases the efficiency of the inferior alveolar nerve block by local anesthetics. Our clinical observation of taking ibuprofen pre-procedurally demonstrates its effectiveness not only as a means for the relief of pain episodes, but also as an excellent anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic toothache Based on our research, the appointment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs before dental interventions, in this case - Ibuprofen turned out to be the key to the success of effective pain management. We suggest that administration of analgesics in order to relieve and effectively pre-empt pain before, during or after treatment should start before surgery and furthermore, this treatment should be extended into the postoperative period. Premedication with ibuprofen significantly increased the success rates of inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia in teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

  7. [Chronic pain in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Kennes, B

    2001-06-01

    Pain is frequent in communicative or no-communicative, ambulatory, institutionalized or hospitalized veterans. It is associated with severe comorbidity so much more than chronic pain could be neglected and expressed of atypical manner or masked by the absence of classical symptoms in particular in case of dementia or of sensory disorders. Pain detection by clinic examination or by pain assessment's methods and adequate approach by pharmacological and non pharmacological therapies are essential for correct pain management. On pharmacological plan, the strategy of the O.M.S. landings is applicable owing to a more particular attention to secondary effects and drugs interactions. AINS must be manipulated with prudence. There are no reasons to exclude opioides from the therapeutic arsenal but with a reduction of the starting doses, a regular adaptation and a very attentive survey. In drugs of landing 2, tramadol reveals itself as efficient and better tolerated as the codeine and dextropropoxyphene has to be to avoid. The obtaining of a satisfactory result depends on a regular assessment of the pain in a context of polydisciplinar approach (physicians, nurses, paramedicals, other care givers).

  8. POSTOPERATIVE PAIN: MANAGEMENT AND DOCUMENTATION BY IRANIAN NURSES

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Foozieh; Soltaninejad, Maryam; Aflatoonian, Mohamad Reza; Mashayekhi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain is one of the most common symptoms experienced by patients after surgeries. Inadequate postoperative pain management is an international problem and the need to improve its management is well documented. The aim of the study was to assess nursing reports related to the patients’ pain intensity and quality, concomitant symptoms, use of scales in pain assessment, and compliance with the national guideline after surgery. Methods: This study was a retrospective cohort; samples were nurse records of patients who had elective surgery. Result: Only 6% of the patients’ pain records included pain intensity which was not measured with standard scales. More than half of all injections were opioid analgesic which is in contrast to the guidelines of the Iranian Ministry of Health. Pain assessment was higher in women and by nurses with more than 15 years of working experience. Conclusion: to conclude, the patients’ pain was not assessed properly in terms of intensity, quality, and associated symptoms. Therefore, training and motivating nurses is very important in this context and should be incorporated in nurses’ academic and continuous educational courses. PMID:27047265

  9. Intractable pain with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C. P.; Evans, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines retrospectively the cause, clinical features, natural history and results of treatment of intractable pain associated with breast cancer in 210 patients. The three chief types of pain were that due to skeletal metastases or brachial plexus neuropathy and pain of psychogenic origin. Onset at the time of cancer diagnosis characterized the psychogenic pain, whereas pain from metastases first occurred after a median latency of 3.7 years. Treatment was custom-tailored to the specific patient and pain problem, with several factors taken into account. The onset of intractable pain due to metastatic disease indicated a short survival (median, 9 months). PMID:6277445

  10. Applying Joint Mobilization at Different Cervical Vertebral Levels does not Influence Immediate Pain Reduction in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Rafaela L; Caires, Priscila M; Furtado, Fernanda C; Loureiro, Aline V; Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of applying joint mobilization at symptomatic and asymptomatic cervical levels in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Forty-eight patients aged between 18 and 65 years and presenting nonspecific neck pain with a minimum duration of 3 months were recruited for the study. Included patients were randomized to one of two treatment groups: (i) control group: the most symptomatic vertebral level was mobilized; (ii) experimental group: a randomly selected vertebral level was chosen and mobilized. All patients received one treatment session. Pain intensity in resting position during the most painful active cervical movement as well as during vertebral palpation was quantified using an 11-point pain scale. Follow-up measures were taken immediately after intervention by a blinded assessor. The results showed no significant difference in pain intensity immediately after treatment between groups (symptomatic level treated vs. randomly chosen cervical vertebral level treated) during resting position, painful active movement, or vertebral palpation. Within-group comparisons showed significant pain relief after treatment during the most painful active movement as well as during vertebral palpation for both groups, but not during resting position. Significant change in immediate pain intensity during painful active movement and vertebral palpation was achieved after vertebral mobilization. however, both groups presented similar pain reductions suggesting that pain reduction due to joint mobilization is not specific to the vertebral level being mobilized. PMID:20046551

  11. Assessment of pain (distribution and onset), Symptoms, SCL-90-R Inventory responses, and the association with infectious events in patients with chronic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    McGregor, N R; Butt, H L; Zerbes, M; Klineberg, I J; Dunstan, R H; Roberts, T K

    1996-01-01

    A visual analog pain scale and scalar responses to 13 pain/symptom indicator Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) questions were used to assess symptom prevalence and pain severity in 43 chronic orofacial muscle pain patients and 40 control subjects. The orofacial muscle pain group reported pain in an axial skeletal distribution; neurocognitive, gastrogenitourinary, and musculoskeletal symptoms; infectious events at or preceding onset; similar symptoms in sexual partners; and low prevalence of trauma. Sudden onset was reported by 30.2% of pain patients. Strong associations were found between chronic orofacial muscle pain and (1) onset-related infectious-like events (67.4%); (2) a higher prevalence of history of respiratory and gastrogenitourinary infectious events; and (3) high prevalences of similar pain symptoms in long-term sexual partners. The SCL-90-R somatization scores (> 62) had a higher prevalence in the chronic pain group. No prevalence differences or associations with pain/symptom indicators were found for depression or anxiety dimension scores. These data suggest that patients with recurrent systemic infectious events have a higher prevalence of reporting of chronic orofacial muscle pain compared with control subjects, and these infectious events are associated with the onset of chronic orofacial muscle pain in 67% of patients.

  12. Intrarater Reliability of Pain Intensity, Tissue Blood Flow, Thermal Pain Threshold, Pressure Pain Threshold and Lumbo-Pelvic Stability Tests in Subjects with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Paungmali, Aatit; Sitilertpisan, Patraporn; Taneyhill, Khanittha; Pirunsan, Ubon; Uthaikhup, Sureeporn

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This preliminary study aimed to determine the intrarater reliability of the quantitative tests for the study of non-specific low back pain. Methods Test-retest reliability of the measurements of ratio data was determined by an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurements (SEMs), coefficient of variation (CV), and one-way repeated measures ANOVA using the values collected from 13 young individuals (25.8 ± 6.2 years) with chronic non-specific low back pain on two occasions separated by 2 days. Percent agreement of the ordinal data was also determined by Cohen's Kappa statistics (kappa). The measures consisted of tissue blood flow (BF), average pain visual analog scales (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain threshold (CPT), heat pain threshold (HPT) and lumbo-pelvic stability test (LPST). An acceptable reliability was determined as the ICC values of greater than 0.85, SEMs less than 5%, CV less than 15%, the kappa scores of greater than 80% and no evidence of systematic error (ANOVA, P>0.05). Results ICC of all measures in the lumbo-sacral area were greater than 0.87. The kappa was also greater than 83%. Most measures demonstrated a minimal error of measurements and less potential of systemic error in nature. Only the SEMs and the CV of the CPT exceeded the acceptable level. Conclusions It is concluded that most of the quantitative measurements are reliable for the study of non-specific low back pain, however the CPT should be applied with care as it has a great variation among individuals and potential of measurement error. PMID:22461960

  13. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neck pain (NP) is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP). The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI), and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P > 0.05). One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P > 0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS.

  14. Helicopter pilot back pain: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, D F; Reading, T E

    1984-02-01

    Because of the high prevalence of back pain experienced by U.S. Army helicopter pilots, a study was conducted to ascertain the feasibility of reproducing these symptoms in the laboratory. A mock-up of a UH-1H seat and control configuration was mounted to a multi-axis vibration simulator (MAVS). Eleven subjects were tested on the apparatus for two 120-min periods. During one period, the MAVS was programmed to reproduce vibrations recorded from a UH-1H in cruise flight. The subjects received no vibration during the other test period. All subjects reported back pain which they described as identical to the pain they experience during flight, during one or more of their test periods. There was no statistical difference between the vibration and nonvibration test conditions (p greater than 0.05) in terms of time of onset of pain or intensity of pain as measured by a visual analog scale. It appears the vibration at the frequencies and amplitudes tested plays little or no role in the etiology of the back symptoms reported by these pilots. It is proposed that the primary etiological factor for these symptoms is the poor posture pilots are obliged to assume for extended periods while operating helicopters.

  15. Expected and Experienced Pain Levels in Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    YALINAY DİKMEN, Pınar; ILGAZ AYDINLAR, Elif; KARLIKAYA, Geysu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to assess pain using a visual analogue scale (VAS) in patients awaiting an EMG procedure (i.e., expected VAS) and after an EMG procedure (i.e., experienced VAS). Methods Expected and experienced pain in response to nerve conduction studies (NCS) and needle EMG were assessed in 108 patients (61 females, 47 males; mean age 43.2±11.6) using a VAS. Results No significant correlations were noted between the expected or the experienced VAS in response to EMG and demographic features of the patients. The expected VAS was significantly higher than the experienced VAS in response to needle EMG (p=0.005). The highest VAS level was noted in the expected VAS in response to needle EMG (4.7±2.2). The lowest VAS level was noted in the experienced VAS in response to NCS (3.6±2.5). Conclusion The present study demonstrated that neither the expected nor the experienced pain associated with EMG exceeded a moderate level. Interestingly, we found that expected pain levels in response to needle EMG were significantly higher than experienced pain levels. Therefore, it may be possible to increase compliance if patients are provided with this information before undergoing electrophysiological procedures.

  16. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervico-Craniofacial Pain Patients Express Similar Levels of Neck Pain-Related Disability, Pain Catastrophizing, and Cervical Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-López, Almudena; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neck pain (NP) is strongly associated with cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP). The primary aim of the present study was to compare the neck pain-related disability, pain catastrophizing, and cervical and mandibular ROM between patients with chronic mechanical NP and patients with CCFP, as well as asymptomatic subjects. Methods. A total of 64 participants formed three groups. All participants underwent a clinical examination evaluating the cervical range of motion and maximum mouth opening, neck disability index (NDI), and psychological factor of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Results. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with NP and CCFP for NDI and PCS (P > 0.05). One- way ANOVA revealed significant differences for all ROM measurements. The post hoc analysis showed no statistically significant differences in cervical extension and rotation between the two patient groups (P > 0.05). The Pearson correlation analysis shows a moderate positive association between NDI and the PCS for the group of patients with NP and CCFP. Conclusion. The CCFP and NP patient groups have similar neck disability levels and limitation in cervical ROM in extension and rotation. Both groups had positively correlated the NDI with the PCS. PMID:27119020

  17. The effects of failure feedback and pain-related fear on pain report, pain tolerance, and pain avoidance in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    van den Hout, J H; Vlaeyen, J W; Houben, R M; Soeters, A P; Peters, M L

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of non-pain-related failure experiences and pain-related fear on pain report, pain tolerance and pain avoidance in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. Moreover, the mediating and moderating role of negative affectivity (trait-NA) in the relationship between failure experiences and pain was examined. Seventy-six patients were divided into high and low pain-related fear groups and within each group they were randomly assigned to the failure or success feedback condition. In the first part of the study patients completed a 'social empathy test' and experimenter 1 subsequently delivered false failure or success feedback. A second experimenter, who was blind for the condition, subsequently administered two lifting tasks in order to obtain measures of pain report, tolerance and avoidance. Failure feedback did have an effect on pain avoidance but unexpectedly, and not as hypothesized, pain avoidance was reduced instead of enhanced. With regard to pain report and pain tolerance similar patterns were found, but these were not statistically significant. The effect of failure feedback on pain avoidance was moderated by trait-NA. Only in the subgroup of patients who scored low on trait-NA did failure feedback decrease pain avoidance. State-NA did not mediate the effects of feedback. In line with previous findings, pain-related fear resulted in lower pain tolerance. Moreover, this study was the first to show that pain-related fear predicted higher pain report in CLBP patients. Pain-related fear did not predict pain avoidance when pre-lifting pain and gender were controlled for. Finally, pre-lifting pain turned out to be the strongest predictor with regard to all pain measures. The role of pain-related fear and unexpected findings with regard to feedback are discussed as well as some clinical implications.

  18. Cancer Pain Management: Basic Information for the Young Pain Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Rana, SPS; Gupta, Rahul; Chaudhary, Prakash; Khurana, Deepa; Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain is multifactorial and complex. The impact of cancer pain is devastating, with increased morbidity and poor quality of life, if not treated adequately. Cancer pain management is a challenging task both due to disease process as well as a consequence of treatment-related side-effects. Optimization of analgesia with oral opioids, adjuvant analgesics, and advanced pain management techniques is the key to success for cancer pain. Early access of oral opioid and interventional pain management techniques can overcome the barriers of cancer pain, with improved quality of life. With timely and proper anticancer therapy, opioids, nerve blocks, and other non-invasive techniques like psychosocial care, satisfactory pain relief can be achieved in most of the patients. Although the WHO Analgesic Ladder is effective for more than 80% cancer pain, addition of appropriate adjuvant drugs along with early intervention is needed for improved Quality of Life. Effective cancer pain treatment requires a holistic approach with timely assessment, measurement of pain, pathophysiology involved in causing particular type of pain, and understanding of drugs to relieve pain with timely inclusion of intervention. Careful evaluation of psychosocial and mental components with good communication is necessary. Barriers to cancer pain management should be overcome with an interdisciplinary approach aiming to provide adequate analgesia with minimal side-effects. Management of cancer pain should comprise not only a physical component but also psychosocial and mental components and social need of the patient. With risk–b