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Sample records for 10-stage axial-flow compressor

  1. Investigation of X24C-2 10-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor. III - Surge Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckner, Howard A., Jr.; Downing, Richard M.

    1948-01-01

    Compressor operation at low air flows for a given speed is limited by unstable flow conditions, commonly called surge. An investigation of surge in centrifugal compressors (reference 1) showed that the pulsation of pressures and velocities occurred when the slope of the compressor characteristic curve was positive and that the magnitude and frequency, as well as the incidence of surge, depended on the capacity and resistance of the total system. Although the theory presented in reference 1 is applicable to axial-floe compressors, little experimental information is available on the surge characteristics of the individual stages of axial-flow compressors, or on the variation of the surge characteristics with operating conditions. During the investigation to determine the performance of the X24C-2 compressor (references 2 and 3), instrumentation was added to study the surge characteristics and to determine the effect of speed and inlet pressure on the frequency, amplitude, and phase relation of the pressure pulsations behind each stage.

  2. Stage effects on stalling and recovery of a high-speed 10-stage axial-flow compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Copenhaver, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    Results of a high-speed 10-stage axial-flow compressor test involving overall compressor and individual stage performance while stalling and operating in quasi-steady rotating stall are described. Test procedures and data-acquisition methods used to obtain the dynamic stalling and quasi-steady in-stall data are explained. Unstalled and in-stall time-averaged data obtained from the compressor operating at five different shaft speeds and one off-schedule variable vane condition are presented. Effects of compressor speed and variable geometry on overall compressor in-stall pressure rise and hysteresis extent are illustrated through the use of quasi-steady-stage temperature rise and pressure-rise characteristics. Results indicate that individual stage performance during overall compressor rotating stall operation varies considerably throughout the length of the compressor. The measured high-speed 10-stage test compressor individual stage pressure and temperature characteristics were input into a stage-by-stage dynamic compressor performance model. Comparison of the model results and measured pressures provided the additional validation necessary to demonstrate the model's ability to predict high-speed multistage compressor stalling and in-stall performance.

  3. Performance of the 19XB 10-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, Richard M.; Finger, Harold B.

    1947-01-01

    The 19xB compressor, which replaces the 19B coaapreseor and has the same length and diameter 88 the 19B compressor, was designed with 10 stages to deliver 30 pounds of air per second for a pressure ratio of 4.17 at an equivalent speed of 17,000 rpm; the 19B was designed with six stages for a pressure ratio of 2.7 at the same weight flow and speed as the 19XB compressor. The performance characteristics of the new compressor were determined at the NACA Cleveland laboratory at the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department. Results are presented of the investigation made to evaluate the over-all performance of the compressor, the effects of possible leakage past the rotor rear air seal, the effects of inserting instruments in each row of stator blades and in the first row of outlet guide vanes, and the effects of changing the temperature and the pressure of the inlet air. The results of the interstage surveys are also presented.

  4. Investigation of 10-Stage Axial-Flow X24C-2 Compressor. 1; Performance at Inlet Pressure of 21 Inches Mercury Absolute and Inlet Temperature of 538 R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schum, Harold J.; Buckner, Howard A., Jr.

    1947-01-01

    The performance at inlet pressure of 21 inches mercury absolute and inlet temperature of 538 R for the 10-stage axial-flow X24C-2 compressor from the X24C-2 turbojet engine was investigated. the peak adiabatic temperature-rise efficiency for a given speed generally occurred at values of pressure coefficient fairly close to 0.35.For this compressor, the efficiency data at various speeds could be correlated on two converging curves by the use of a polytropic loss factor derived.

  5. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  6. Axial flow positive displacement worm compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement compressor has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first and second sections of a compressor assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first and second twist slopes in the first and second sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. An engine including the compressor has in downstream serial flow relationship from the compressor a combustor and a high pressure turbine drivingly connected to the compressor by a high pressure shaft.

  7. Stall in axial flow aero engine compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Christopher J.

    The inception of stall in an aeroengine compressor over a range of speeds and the post stall behavior are described. Reference is made to the varying matching and system response as the speed is increased and the effects demonstrated on a single shaft gas turbine. In particular, the following are detailed: surge and stall in axial compressors, compressor matching, low speed stalls, mid speed stalls, stalls ending in rotating stalls, high speed surges, contour plots of stage 1, 4, and 7 pressures, and compressor behavior during surge.

  8. A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G

    1955-01-01

    A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature is presented in the form of brief reviews of the methods, results, and conclusions of selected reports. The reports are organized into several main categories with subdivisions, and frequent references are made within the individual reviews to pertinent material elsewhere in the survey.

  9. The new performance calculation method of fouled axial flow compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huadong; Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  10. The New Performance Calculation Method of Fouled Axial Flow Compressor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  11. Bifurcation analysis of axial flow compressor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaughan, F. E.

    1990-01-01

    With a one-mode truncation it is possible to reduce the Moore-Greitzer model for compressor instability to a set of three ordinary differential equations. These are approached from the point of view of bifurcation theory. Most of the bifurcations emerge from a degenerate Takens-Bogdanov bifurcation point. The bifurcation sets are completed using the numerical branch tracking scheme AUTO. Despite the severity of the truncation, the agreement with experimental results is excellent.

  12. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. Volume III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Irving A; Bullock, Robert O; Graham, Robert W; Costilow, Eleanor L; Huppert, Merle C; Benser, William A; Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G; Jackson, Robert J; Yohner, Peggy L; Dugan, Ames F , Jr

    1956-01-01

    Chapters XI to XIII concern the unsteady compressor operation arising when compressor blade elements stall. The fields of compressor stall and surge are reviewed in Chapters XI and XII, respectively. The part-speed operating problem in high-pressure-ratio multistage axial-flow compressors is analyzed in Chapter XIII. Chapter XIV summarizes design methods and theories that extend beyond the simplified two-dimensional approach used previously in the report. Chapter XV extends this three-dimensional treatment by summarizing the literature on secondary flows and boundary layer effects. Charts for determining the effects of errors in design parameters and experimental measurements on compressor performance are given in Chapters XVI. Chapter XVII reviews existing literature on compressor and turbine matching techniques.

  13. Investigation of an Experimental Supersonic Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, John R.; Wright, Linwood C.; Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1947-01-01

    An investigation is in progress at the Langley Laboratory of the NACA to explore the possibilities of axial-flow compressors operating with supersonic velocities relative to the blade rows. The first phase of this investigation, a study of supersonic diffusers, has been reported. The second phase, an analysis of supersonic compressors, has also been reported. Preliminary calculations have shown that very high pressure ratios across a stage, together with somewhat increased mass flows, are possible with compressors which decelerate air through the speed of sound in their rotor blading. These performance characteristics are desirable in compressors for aircraft jet propulsion units, gas turbines, or superchargers. The third phase, presented here, is a preliminary experimental investigation of a supersonic compressor designed to produce a high pressure ratio in a single stage.

  14. Blade selection for a modern axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    The procedures leading to successful design of an axial flow compressor are discussed. The three related approaches to cascade selection are: (1) experimental approach which relies on the use of experimental results from identical cascades to satisfy the velocity diagrams calculated, (2) a purely analytical procedure whereby blade shapes are calculated from the theoretical cascade and viscous flow equations, and (3) a semiempirical procedure which used experimental data together with the theoretically derived functional relations to relate the cascade parameters. Diagrams of typical transonic blade sections with uncambered leading edges are presented.

  15. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  16. Preliminary compressor design study for an advanced multistage axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marman, H. V.; Marchant, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An optimum, axial flow, high pressure ratio compressor for a turbofan engine was defined for commercial subsonic transport service starting in the late 1980's. Projected 1985 technologies were used and applied to compressors with an 18:1 pressure ratio having 6 to 12 stages. A matrix of 49 compressors was developed by statistical techniques. The compressors were evaluated by means of computer programs in terms of various airline economic figures of merit such as return on investment and direct-operating cost. The optimum configuration was determined to be a high speed, 8-stage compressor with an average blading aspect ratio of 1.15.

  17. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  18. Unsteady Flow Field in a Multistage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suryavamshi, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Prato, J.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field in a multistage compressor is three-dimensional, unsteady, and turbulent with substantial viscous effects. Some of the specific phenomena that has eluded designers include the effects of rotor-stator and rotor-rotor interactions and the physics of mixing of velocity, pressure, temperature and velocity fields. An attempt was made, to resolve experimentally, the unsteady pressure and temperature fields downstream of the second stator of a multistage axial flow compressor which will provide information on rotor-stator interaction effects and the nature of the unsteadiness in an embedded stator of a three stage axial flow compressor. Detailed area traverse measurements using pneumatic five hole probe, thermocouple probe, semi-conductor total pressure probe (Kulite) and an aspirating probe downstream of the second stator were conducted at the peak efficiency operating condition. The unsteady data was then reduced through an ensemble averaging technique which splits the signal into deterministic and unresolved components. Auto and cross correlation techniques were used to correlate the deterministic total temperature and velocity components (acquired using a slanted hot-film probe at the same measurement locations) and the gradients, distributions and relative weights of each of the terms of the average passage equation were then determined. Based on these measurements it was observed that the stator wakes, hub leakage flow region, casing endwall suction surface corner region, and the casing endwall region away from the blade surfaces were the regions of highest losses in total pressure, lowest efficiency and highest levels of unresolved unsteadiness. The deterministic unsteadiness was found to be high in the hub and casing endwall regions as well as on the pressure side of the stator wake. The spectral distribution of hot-wire and kulite voltages shows that at least eight harmonics of all three rotor blade passing frequencies are present at this

  19. Preliminary design study of advanced multistage axial flow core compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.; Koch, C. C.; Smith, L. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to identify an advanced core compressor for use in new high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines to be introduced into commercial service in the 1980's. An evaluation of anticipated compressor and related component 1985 state-of-the-art technology was conducted. A parametric screening study covering a large number of compressor designs was conducted to determine the influence of the major compressor design features on efficiency, weight, cost, blade life, aircraft direct operating cost, and fuel usage. The trends observed in the parametric screening study were used to develop three high-efficiency, high-economic-payoff compressor designs. These three compressors were studied in greater detail to better evaluate their aerodynamic and mechanical feasibility.

  20. Rotor whirl forces induced by the tip clearance effect in axial flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrich, F. )

    1993-10-01

    It is now widely recognized that destabilizing forces, tending to generate forward rotor whirl, are generated in axial flow turbines as a result of the nonuniform torque induced by the nonuniform tip-clearance in a deflected rotor--the so called Thomas/Alford force. It is also recognized that there will be a similar effect in axial flow compressors, but qualitative considerations cannot definitively establish the magnitude or even the direction of the induced whirling forces--that is, if they will tend to forward or backward whirl. Applying a parallel compressor model to simulate the operation of a compressor rotor deflected radially in its clearance, it is possible to derive a quantitative estimate of the proportionality factor [beta] which relates the Thomas/Alford force in axial flow compressors (i.e., the tangential force generated by a radial deflection of the rotor) to the torque level in the compressor. The analysis makes use of experimental data from the GE Aircraft Engines Low Speed Research Compressor facility comparing the performance of three different axial flow compressors, each with four stages (typical of a mid-block of an aircraft gas turbine compressor) at two different clearances. It is found that the value of [beta] is in the range of +0.27 to [minus]0.71 in the vicinity of the stages' nominal operating line and +0.08 to [minus]1.25 in the vicinity of the stages' operation at peak efficiency. The value of [beta] reaches a level of between [minus]1.16 and [minus]3.36 as the compressor is operated near its stalled condition.

  1. CFD Simulation of Casing Treatment of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the improvement in stall margin of an axial flow rotor due to the circumferential casing grooves. It is shown that the computational tool used predicts an increase in operating range of the rotor when casing grooves are present. A budget of the axial momentum equation is carried out at the rotor casing in the tip gap in order to uncover the physical process behind this stall margin improvement. It is shown that for the smooth casing the net axial pressure force . However in the presence of casing grooves the net axial shear stress force acting at the casing is augmented by the axial force due to the radial transport of axial momentum, which occurs across the grooves and power stream interface. This additional force adds to the net axial viscous sheer force and thus leads to an increase in the stall margin of the rotor.

  2. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Available experimental two-dimensional-cascade data for conventional compressor blade sections are correlated. The two-dimensional cascade and some of the principal aerodynamic factors involved in its operation are first briefly described. Then the data are analyzed by examining the variation of cascade performance at a reference incidence angle in the region of minimum loss. Variations of reference incidence angle, total-pressure loss, and deviation angle with cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and Reynolds number are investigated. From the analysis and the correlations of the available data, rules and relations are evolved for the prediction of the magnitude of the reference total-pressure loss and the reference deviation and incidence angles for conventional blade profiles. These relations are developed in simplified forms readily applicable to compressor design procedures.

  3. The numerical simulation of a high-speed axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulac, Richard A.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The advancement of high-speed axial-flow multistage compressors is impeded by a lack of detailed flow-field information. Recent development in compressor flow modeling and numerical simulation have the potential to provide needed information in a timely manner. The development of a computer program is described to solve the viscous form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery. Programming issues such as in-core versus out-of-core data storage and CPU utilization (parallelization, vectorization, and chaining) are addressed. Code performance is evaluated through the simulation of the first four stages of a five-stage, high-speed, axial-flow compressor. The second part addresses the flow physics which can be obtained from the numerical simulation. In particular, an examination of the endwall flow structure is made, and its impact on blockage distribution assessed.

  4. Frequency response of an axial-flow compressor exposed to inlet pressure perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, E. J.; Wenzel, L. M.; Paulovich, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results of a series of engine tests designed to obtain the stage dynamics of an eight-stage axial-flow compressor over the frequency range of 0.5 to 200 hertz are presented. The total pressure at the compressor face was varied by means of a secondary air jet system installed in the engine inlet and positioned to oppose the primary airflow. Total-pressure probes located at each compressor stage were used to obtain the frequency response of each compressor-stage total pressure to the average compressor-inlet total pressure. The engine operating conditions were chosen to illustrate the effects of changing the rotor speed, changing the exhaust nozzle area, and isolating the compressor discharge pressure perturbations from the fuel control and hence, the fuel flow.

  5. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.; Powell, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A laser anemometer system employing an efficient data acquisition technique was used to make measurements upstream, within, and downstream of the compressor rotor. A fluorescent dye technique allowed measurements within endwall boundary layers. Adjustable laser beam orientation minimized shadowed regions and enabled radial velocity measurements outside of the blade row. The flow phenomena investigated include flow variations from passage to passage, the rotor shock system, three-dimensional flows in the blade wake, and the development of the outer endwall boundary layer. Laser anemometer measurements are compared to a numerical solution of the streamfunction equations and to measurements made with conventional instrumentation.

  6. Analysis of effect of basic design variables on subsonic axial-flow-compressor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T , Jr

    1948-01-01

    A blade-element theory for axial-flow compressors has been developed and applied to the analysis of the effects of basic design variables such as Mach number, blade loading, and velocity distribution on compressor performance. A graphical method that is useful for approximate design calculations is presented. The relations among several efficiencies useful in compressor design are derived and discussed. The possible gains in useful operating range obtainable by the use of adjustable stator blades are discussed and a rapid approximate method of calculating blade-angle resettings is shown by an example. The relative Mach number is shown to be a dominant factor in determining the pressure ratio.

  7. Unsteady flow field under surge and rotating stall in a three-stage axial flow compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takayuki; Morita, Daisuke; Ohta, Yutaka; Outa, Eisuke

    2011-03-01

    The unsteady flow structure between rotor blade-to-blade passages in a three-stage axial flow compressor is experimentally investigated by detailed measurements of unsteady performance characteristics, casing wall pressure fluctuations and their wavelet analyses. The main feature of the test compressor is a capacity tank facility connected in series to the compressor outlet in order to supply compression and/or expansion waves from downstream of the compressor. Research attention is focused on the post-stall characteristics of the surge and rotating stall which occur simultaneously. The influence of the compressor operating point on the unsteady performance curve shows that the surge cycle changes irregularly depending on the steady-state resistance characteristics, and the results of the wavelet analyses of the wall pressure fluctuations suggest that the surge cycle may selectively be determined by the rotating stall cell structure within the rotor cascade.

  8. Discussion of Boundary-Layer Characteristics Near the Wall of an Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Artur; Mohoney, John J; Budinger, Ray E

    1952-01-01

    The boundary-layer velocity profiles in the tip region of an axial-flow compressor downstream of the guide vanes and downstream of the rotor were measured by use of total-pressure and claw-type yaw probes. These velocities were resolved into two components: one along the streamline of the flow outside the boundary layer, and the other perpendicular to it. The affinity among all profiles was thus demonstrated with the boundary-layer thickness and the deflection of the boundary layer at the wall as the generalizing parameters. By use of these results and the momentum-integral equations, boundary-layer characteristics on the walls of an axial-flow compressor were qualitatively evaluated.

  9. Rotor whirl forces induced by the tip clearance effect in axial flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrich, F.

    1993-10-01

    It is now widely recognized that destabilizing forces, tending to generate forward rotor whirl, are generated in axial flow turbines as a result of the nonuniform torque induced by the nonuniform tip-clearance in a deflected rotor-the so called Thomas/Alford force (Thomas, 1958, and Alford, 1965). It is also recognized that there will be a similar effect in axial flow compressors, but qualitative considerations cannot definitively establish the magnitude or even the direction of the induced whirling forces-that is, if they will tend to forward or backward whirl. Applying a 'parallel compressor' model to simulate the operation of a compressor rotor deflected radially in its clearance, it is possible to derive a quantitative estimate of the proportionality factor which relates the Thomas/Alford force in axial flow compressors (i.e., the tangential force generated by a radial deflection of the rotor) to the torque level in the compressor. The analysis makes use of experimental data from the GE Aircraft Engines Low Speed Research Compressor facility comparing the performance of three different axial flow compressors, each with four stages (typical of a mid-block of an aircraft gas turbine compressor) at two different clearances (expressed as a percent of blade length) - CL/L = 1.4 percent and CL/L = 2.8 percent. It is found that the value of Beta is in the range of + 0.27 to - 0.71 in the vicinity of the stages' nominal operating line and + 0.08 to - 1.25 in the vicinity of the stages' operation at peak efficiency. The value of Beta reaches a level of between - 1.16 and - 3.36 as the compressor is operated near its stalled condition. The final result bears a very strong resemblance to the correlation obtained by improvising a normalization of the experimental data of Vance and Laudadio (1984) and a generic relationship to the analytic results of Colding-Jorgensen (1990).

  10. Enhanced capabilities and modified users manual for axial-flow compressor conceptual design code CSPAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Modifications made to the axial-flow compressor conceptual design code CSPAN are documented in this report. Endwall blockage and stall margin predictions were added. The loss-coefficient model was upgraded. Default correlations for rotor and stator solidity and aspect-ratio inputs and for stator-exit tangential velocity inputs were included in the code along with defaults for aerodynamic design limits. A complete description of input and output along with sample cases are included.

  11. Extension of Useful Operating Range of Axial-Flow Compressors by Use of Adjustable Stator Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T; Voss, William J

    1948-01-01

    A theory has been developed for resetting the blade angles of an axial-flow compressor in order to improve the performance at speeds and flows other than the design and thus extend the useful operating range of the compressor. The theory is readily applicable to the resetting of both rotor and stator blades or to the resetting of only the stator blades and is based on adjustment of the blade angles to obtain lift coefficients at which the blades will operate efficiently. Calculations were made for resetting the stator blades of the NACA eight-stage axial-flow compressor for 75 percent of design speed and a series of load coefficients ranging from 0.28 to 0.70 with rotor blades left at the design setting. The NACA compressor was investigated with three different blade settings: (1) the design blade setting, (2) the stator blades reset for 75 percent of design speed and a load coefficient of 0.48, and (3) the stator blades reset for 75 percent of design speed and a load coefficient of 0.65.

  12. End wall flow characteristics and overall performance of an axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitaram, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1983-01-01

    This review indicates the possible future directions for research on endwall flows in axial flow compressors. Theoretical investigations on the rotor blade endwall flows in axial flow compressors reported here include the secondary flow calculation and the development of the momentum integral equations for the prediction of the annulus wall boundary layer. The equations for secondary vorticity at the rotor exit are solved analytically. The solution includes the effects of rotation and the viscosity. The momentum integral equations derived include the effect of the blade boundary layers. The axial flow compressor facility of the Department of Aerospace Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University, which is used for the experimental investigations of the endwall flows, is described in some detail. The overall performance and other preliminary experimental results are presented. Extensive radial flow surveys are carried out at the design and various off design conditions. These are presented and interpreted in this report. The following experimental investigations of the blade endwall flows are carried out. (1) Rotor blade endwall flows: The following measurements are carried out at four flow coefficients. (a) The rotor blade static pressures at various axial and radial stations (with special emphasis near the blade tips). (b) The hub wall static pressures inside the rotor blade passage at various axial and tangential stations. (2) IGV endwall flows: The following measurements are carried out at the design flow coefficient. (a) The boundary layer profiles at various axial and tangential stations inside the blade passage and at the blade exit. (b) Casing static pressures and limiting streamline angles inside the blade passage.

  13. Analysis of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial-flow compressor by actuator disk theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial-flow compressors. The analysis is based on two-dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. It is applied to a rotor blade row by considering a cascade of airfoils. The effects of shock waves and flow separation are included in the model. Calculations show that the model predicts the onset, in an unshrouded rotor, of a bending flutter mode that exhibits many of the characteristics of supersonic stall bending flutter. The validity of the analysis for predicting this flutter mode is demonstrated.

  14. AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSOR IN THE 8X6 FOOT SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL - ELECTRIC MOTORS OF 87,000 HORSEPOWER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSOR IN THE 8X6 FOOT SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL - ELECTRIC MOTORS OF 87,000 HORSEPOWER DRIVE THIS HUGE COMPRESSOR TO PRODUCE 1300 MILE PER HOUR AIRSPEEDS - THE 2 HALVES OF THE 18 FOOT DIAMETER CASING ARE SHOWN OPENED TO EXPOSE THE 7 ROW

  15. The effect of variable stator on performance of a highly loaded tandem axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraghi, Hamzeh; Boroomand, Masoud; Tousi, Abolghasem M.; Fallah, Mohammad Toude; Mohammadi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the aerodynamic load on compressor blades helps to obtain a higher pressure ratio in lower rotational speeds. Considering the high aerodynamic load effects and structural concerns in the design process, it is possible to obtain higher pressure ratios compared to conventional compressors. However, it must be noted that imposing higher aerodynamic loads results in higher loss coefficients and deteriorates the overall performance. To avoid the loss increase, the boundary layer quality must be studied carefully over the blade suction surface. Employment of advanced shaped airfoils (like CDAs), slotted blades or other boundary layer control methods has helped the designers to use higher aerodynamic loads on compressor blades. Tandem cascade is a passive boundary layer control method, which is based on using the flow momentum to control the boundary layer on the suction surface and also to avoid the probable separation caused by higher aerodynamic loads. In fact, the front pressure side flow momentum helps to compensate the positive pressure gradient over the aft blade's suction side. Also, in comparison to the single blade stators, tandem variable stators have more degrees of freedom, and this issue increases the possibility of finding enhanced conditions in the compressor off-design performance. In the current study, a 3D design procedure for an axial flow tandem compressor stage has been applied to design a highly loaded stage. Following, this design is numerically investigated using a CFD code and the stage characteristic map is reported. Also, the effect of various stator stagger angles on the compressor performance and especially on the compressor surge margin has been discussed. To validate the CFD method, another known compressor stage is presented and its performance is numerically investigated and the results are compared with available experimental results.

  16. Analysis of instability inception in high-speed multistage axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, G.J.; Sabnis, J.S.; Feulner, M.R.

    1997-10-01

    A nonlinear, two-dimensional, compressible dynamic model has been developed to study rotating stall/surge inception and development in high-speed, multistage, axial flow compressors. The flow dynamics are represented by the unsteady Euler equations, solved in each interblade row gap and inlet and exit ducts as two-dimensional domains, and in each blade passage as a one-dimensional domain. The resulting equations are solved on a computational grid. The boundary conditions between domains are represented by ideal turning coupled with empirical loss and deviation correlations. Results are presented comparing model simulations to instability inception data of an eleven stage, high-pressure-ratio compressor operating at both part and full power, and the results analyzed in the context of a linear modal analysis.

  17. Users manual for updated computer code for axial-flow compressor conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    An existing computer code that determines the flow path for an axial-flow compressor either for a given number of stages or for a given overall pressure ratio was modified for use in air-breathing engine conceptual design studies. This code uses a rapid approximate design methodology that is based on isentropic simple radial equilibrium. Calculations are performed at constant-span-fraction locations from tip to hub. Energy addition per stage is controlled by specifying the maximum allowable values for several aerodynamic design parameters. New modeling was introduced to the code to overcome perceived limitations. Specific changes included variable rather than constant tip radius, flow path inclination added to the continuity equation, input of mass flow rate directly rather than indirectly as inlet axial velocity, solution for the exact value of overall pressure ratio rather than for any value that met or exceeded it, and internal computation of efficiency rather than the use of input values. The modified code was shown to be capable of computing efficiencies that are compatible with those of five multistage compressors and one fan that were tested experimentally. This report serves as a users manual for the revised code, Compressor Spanline Analysis (CSPAN). The modeling modifications, including two internal loss correlations, are presented. Program input and output are described. A sample case for a multistage compressor is included.

  18. Computer program for aerodynamic and blading design of multistage axial-flow compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.; Gorrell, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    A code for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis codes is presented. Compressible flow, which is assumed to be steady and axisymmetric, is the basis for a two-dimensional solution in the meridional plane with viscous effects modeled by pressure loss coefficients and boundary layer blockage. The radial equation of motion and the continuity equation are solved with the streamline curvature method on calculation stations outside the blade rows. The annulus profile, mass flow, pressure ratio, and rotative speed are input. A number of other input parameters specify and control the blade row aerodynamics and geometry. In particular, blade element centerlines and thicknesses can be specified with fourth degree polynomials for two segments. The output includes a detailed aerodynamic solution and, if desired, blading coordinates that can be used for internal flow analysis codes.

  19. Performance of NACA Eight-stage Axial-flow Compressor Designed on the Basis of Airfoil Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T; Schey, Oscar W; King, J Austin

    1943-01-01

    The NACA has conducted an investigation to determine the performance that can be obtained from a multistage axial-flow compressor based on airfoil research. A theory was developed; an eight-stage axial-flow compressor was designed, constructed, and tested. The performance of the compressor was determined for speeds from 5000 to 14,000 r.p.m with varying air flow at each speed. Most of the tests were made with air at room temperature. The performance was determined in accordance with the Committee's recommended procedure for testing superchargers. The expected performance was obtained, showing that a multistage compressor of high efficiency can be designed by the application of airfoil theory.

  20. Effect of Blade-surface Finish on Performance of a Single-stage Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Jason J; Serovy, George, K

    1951-01-01

    A set of modified NACA 5509-34 rotor and stator blades was investigated with rough-machine, hand-filed, and highly polished surface finishes over a range of weight flows at six equivalent tip speeds from 672 to 1092 feet per second to determine the effect of blade-surface finish on the performance of a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Surface-finish effects decreased with increasing compressor speed and with decreasing flow at a given speed. In general, finishing blade surfaces below the roughness that may be considered aerodynamically smooth on the basis of an admissible-roughness formula will have no effect on compressor performance.

  1. Investigation of Axial-flow Fan and Compressor Rotors Designed for Three-dimensional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahane, A

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine whether three-dimensional flows may be utilized in axial-flow fan and compressor rotors so that the spanwise load distribution may be varied to obtain high pressure rise. Two rotors, one with approximately uniform and one with solid-body downstream tangential-velocity distributions, were designed and tested at the design blade angle. Radial surveys of total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle were made upstream and downstream of the test rotors through a quantity-coefficient range. Tests of the solid-body rotor were also conducted at a large value of tip clearance. The results indicated that the three-dimensional flows may be utilized with high efficiency and that the three-dimensional theory used in conjunction with two-dimensional cascade data is sufficiently accurate for design purposes. The tests also showed that the tip-clearance losses of rotors highly loaded at the tips are not excessive. The existing three-dimensional theory in simplified for and an illustrative rotor design are presented in appendixes.

  2. The Effect of Rotor Blade Speed to the Best Efficiency Point of Single Stage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukri, Mohamad Firdaus; Wasbari, Faizil; Mat, Shafizal

    2010-06-01

    The best efficiency point is ideal operational point for any turbomachinery. Selections of turbomachines in industry such as pump, turbine, compressor, etc are basically based on their operating point. The best efficiency point is a point at the highest efficiency. Therefore, turbomachines with nearest operating point to best efficiency point will be chosen due to higher efficiency thus produce great reduction in cost saving. Different speed of rotor blade will cause effect to the best efficiency point, as well as different in rotor and stator blade angle. If angle of rotor and stator blade constant while speed of rotor blade increased, the net head produced by the compressor will also increased. Thus, it will increase the brake horse power and fluid horse power. Although the efficiency of the compressor increases if fluid horse power increased, the increasing in brake horse power will produce lower efficiency. In this paper, the effect of rotor blade speed on best efficiency point of an axial flow compressor will be investigated and discussed. Through this paper, the highest efficiency is only 73 %, achieved at rotor blade speed of 750 rpm with net head of 9.4 mmWG, and air volumetric flow rate of 0.56m3/s. For higher net head, the rotor blade speed must be increased, but the efficiency will decrease simultaneously. The type of compressor used in this research is single stage axial flow compressor; model Dixson FM36, manufactured by Dixson FA Engineering Sdn. Bhd.

  3. STGSTK: A computer code for predicting multistage axial flow compressor performance by a meanline stage stacking method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer code is presented for off-design performance prediction of axial-flow compressors. Stage and compressor performance is obtained by a stage-stacking method that uses representative velocity diagrams at rotor inlet and outlet meanline radii. The code has options for: (1) direct user input or calculation of nondimensional stage characteristics; (2) adjustment of stage characteristics for off-design speed and blade setting angle; (3) adjustment of rotor deviation angle for off-design conditions; and (4) SI or U.S. customary units. Correlations from experimental data are used to model real flow conditions. Calculations are compared with experimental data.

  4. Performance of Axial-Flow Supersonic Compressor on XJ-55-FF-1 Turbojet Engine. I - Preliminary Performance of Compressor. 1; Preliminary Performance of Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Melvin J.; Graham, Robert C.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the axial-flow supersonic compressor of the XJ-55-FF-1 turbo Jet engine. The test unit consisted of a row of inlet guide vanes and a supersonic rotor; the stator vanes after the rotor were omitted. The maximum pressure ratio produced in the single stage was 2.28 at an equivalent tip speed or 1814 feet per second with an adiabatic efficiency of approximately 0.61, equivalent weight flow of 13.4 pounds per second. The maximum efficiency of 0.79 was obtained at an equivalent tip speed of 801 feet per second.

  5. Effect of Inlet Air Distortion on the Steady-State and Surge Characteristics of an Axial-Flow Turbojet Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciepluch, Carl C.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in an altitude test chamber to determine the effects of inlet airflow distortion on the compressor steady-state and surge characteristics of a high-pressure ratio, axial-flow turbojet engine. Circumferential-type inlet flow distortions were investigated, which covered a range of distortion sector angles from 20 deg to 168 deg and distortion levels up to 22 percent. The presence of inlet airflow distortions at the compressor face resulted in a substantial increase in the local pressure ratio in the distorted region, primarily for the inlet stages. The local pressure ratio in the distorted region for the inlet stages increased as either the distortion sector angle decreased or the percent distortion increased. The average compressor-surge pressure ratio was much more sensitive to inlet airflow distortions at lower engine speeds than at engine speeds near rated. Hence, compressor-surge margin reduction due to inlet airflow distortion was quite severe at the lower engine speeds. Although the average compressor-surge pressure ratio was generally reduced with inlet flow distortion, local pressure ratios across the distorted sector of the compressor were obtained during surge and were significantly greater than the normal compressor-surge pressure ratio. This was a result of increased loading of the inlet stages in the distorted region.

  6. Design and performance of a high-pressure-ratio, highly loaded axial-flow transonic compressor space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Reid, L.; Tysl, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    A 50-cm-diam. axial-flow transonic compressor stage with multiple-circular-arc blades was designed and tested. At design speed, a rotor peak efficiency of 0.85 occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 29.3 kg/sec. Stage peak efficiency was 0.79 at 28.6 kg/sec. Stage total pressure ratio at peak efficiency was 1.84. The stall margin at design speed was 5 percent. Rotor and stator losses were higher than predicted. The stator choked at design flow.

  7. Experimental investigation of stepped tip gap effects on the performance of a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.W.; King, P.I.; Rabe, D.C.

    1998-07-01

    The effects of stepped-tip gaps and clearance levels on the performance of a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor were experimentally determined. A two-stage compressor with no inlet guide vanes was tested in a modern transonic compressor research facility. The first-stage rotor was unswept and was tested for an optimum tip clearance with variations in stepped gaps machined into the casing near the aft tip region of the rotor. Nine casing geometries were investigated consisting of three step profiles at each of three clearance levels. For small and intermediate clearances, stepped tip gaps were found to improve pressure ratio, efficiency, and flow range for most operating conditions. At 100% design rotor speed, stepped tip gaps produced a doubling of mass flow range with as much as a 2.0% increase in mass flow and 1.5% improvement in efficiency. This study provides guidelines for engineers to improve compressor performance for an existing design by applying an optimum casing profile.

  8. Effect of screen-induced total-pressure distortion on axial-flow compressor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, J. E.; Johnsen, R. L.; Burstadt, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to determine the effects of screen-induced total-pressure distortions on two J85-GE-13 turbojet engines. Results were compared to those from a previous program run with a third engine. All compressors were found to be sensitive to a critical angle of circumferential distortion equal to 60 deg., and they all adhered closely to the parallel compressor model. The sensitivity of compressor exit pressure to virtually any type of distortion pattern can be determined by defining stall lines for undistorted, hub radial distorted, and tip radial distorted inflows. The effect of multiple sectors of circumferential distortion is defined.

  9. Off-design computer code for calculating the aerodynamic performance of axial-flow fans and compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, James F.

    1995-01-01

    An off-design axial-flow compressor code is presented and is available from COSMIC for predicting the aerodynamic performance maps of fans and compressors. Steady axisymmetric flow is assumed and the aerodynamic solution reduces to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. A streamline curvature method is used for calculating this flow-field outside the blade rows. This code allows for bleed flows and the first five stators can be reset for each rotational speed, capabilities which are necessary for large multistage compressors. The accuracy of the off-design performance predictions depend upon the validity of the flow loss and deviation correlation models. These empirical correlations for the flow loss and deviation are used to model the real flow effects and the off-design code will compute through small reverse flow regions. The input to this off-design code is fully described and a user's example case for a two-stage fan is included with complete input and output data sets. Also, a comparison of the off-design code predictions with experimental data is included which generally shows good agreement.

  10. Development of a transonic front stage of an axial flow compressor for industrial gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Y.; Ishii, H.; Tsuda, Y.; Yanagida, M. . Mechanical Engineering Research Lab.); Kashiwabara, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the aerodynamic blade design of a highly loaded three-stage compressor, which is a model compressor for the front stage of an industrial gas turbine. Test results are presented that confirm design performance. Some surge and rotating stall measurement results are also discussed. The first stator blade in this test compressor operates in the high subsonic range at the inlet. To reduce the pressure loss due to blade surface shock waves, a shock-free airfoil is designed to replace the first stator blade in an NACA-65 airfoil in a three-stage compressor. Comparison of the performance of both blades shows that the shock-free airfoil blade reduces pressure loss. This paper also presents some experimental results for MCA (multicircular arc) airfoils, which are used for first rotor blades.

  11. The effect of aircraft inlets on the behaviour of aero engine axial flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Christopher J.

    The air inlet and its effect on turbocompressors are described, covering the following: the engine aircraft operating envelopes, inlet loading, interaction between inlet and compressor, compression distortion tolerance, response of compressor to inlet total pressure distortion, inlet and outlet static pressure distribution, and other threats to compressor stability due to inlet. The following conclusions are made: the aircraft operating envelope is demanding of the inlet when the pressures to reduce size cost, weight, and drag are obvious; the inlet separates at the edges of the envelope; the separation can be reduced by applying well known scaling laws; this asymmetric separation can degrade the compressor surge margin; and the stability margin of the engine can be affected by other features of the inlet.

  12. Review of high-performance axial-flow-compressor blade-element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieblein, Seymour

    1954-01-01

    This report presents a review of current compressor blade-element theory with particular emphasis on application to the transonic high-performance compressor. A discussion of the significant parameters of total-pressure loss and deviation angle is presented, and an indication of the extent of available knowledge and the problems involved in the determination of blade-element characteristics is given. Some recent results and considerations in this pursuit and suggestions for further avenues of investigation are indicated.

  13. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-Flow Compressors. VII - Blade-Element Flow in Annular Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Jackson, Robert J.; Lieblein, Seymour

    1955-01-01

    Annular blade-element data obtained primarily from single-stage compressor installations are correlated over a range of inlet Mach numbers and cascade geometry. The correlation curves are presented in such a manner that they are related directly to the low-speed two-dimensional-cascade data of part VI of this series. Thus, the data serve as both an extension and a verification of the two-dimensional-cascade data. In addition, the correlation results are applied to compressor design.

  14. Comparison between optical measurements and a numerical solution of the flow field within a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.; Chima, R. V.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison between numerical and experimental results is presented for the flowfield within a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor. The rotor was tested at design speed and a wide open throttle discharge condition. The relative tip Mach number was 1.4. A laser anemometer system was used to measure velocity and flow angle upstream, within, and downstream of the rotor. A holographic interferometer was used to visualize the rotor shock system near the tip. The computational procedure solves the full three-dimensional Euler equations using a time-marching technique. Shock location and shape determined from the two optical systems are compared. Calculated relative Mach number and flow angle contours, shock locations, and shock strength are compared to values measured with the laser anemometer.

  15. Computer program for definition of transonic axial-flow compressor blade rows. [computer program for fabrication and aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A method is presented for designing axial-flow compressor blading from blade elements defined on cones which pass through the blade-edge streamline locations. Each blade-element centerline is composed of two segments which are tangent to each other. The centerline and surfaces of each segment have constant change of angle with path distance. The stacking line for the blade elements can be leaned in both the axial and tangential directions. The output of the computer program gives coordinates for fabrication and properties for aeroelastic analysis for planar blade sections. These coordinates and properties are obtained by interpolation across conical blade elements. The program is structured to be coupled with an aerodynamic design program.

  16. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. VI - Experimental Flow in Two-Dimensional Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieblein, Seymour

    1955-01-01

    Available experimental two-dimensional cascade data for conventional compressor blade sections are correlated at a reference incidence angle in the region of minimum loss. Variations of reference incidence angle, total-pressure loss, and deviation angle with cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and Reynolds number are investigated. From the analysis and the correlations of the available data, rules and relations are evolved for the prediction of blade-profile performance. These relations are developed in simplified forms readily applicable to compressor design procedures.

  17. Experimental Vibration Damping Characteristics of the Third-stage Rotor of a Three-stage Transonic Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gage output power spectra. The combined damping consists of the aerodynamic damping and the structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given corrected speed, weight flow, and pressure ratio while the structural and mechanical damping is assumed to remain constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third-stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for the design equivalent speed with the stator blades reset for maximum efficiency. The compressor overall preformance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third-stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  18. Experimental vibration damping characteristics of the third-stage rotor of a three-stage transonic axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gage output power spectra. The combined damping consists of the aerodynanmic damping and the structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given corrected speed, weight flow, and pressure ratio while the structural and mechanical damping is assumed to remain constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third-stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for the design equivalent speed with the stator blades reset for maximum efficiency. The compressor overall performance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third-stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  19. Three-dimensional flow phenomena in a transonic, high-throughflow, axial-flow compressor stage

    SciTech Connect

    Copenhaver, W.W.; Puterbaugh, S.L. ); Hah, C. )

    1993-04-01

    A detailed aerodynamic study of a transonic, high-throughflow, single-stage compressor is presented. The compressor stage was comprised of a low-aspect-ratio rotor combined alternately with two different stator designs. Both experimental and numerical studies are conducted to understand the details of the complex flow field present in this stage. Aerodynamic measurements using high-frequency, Kulite pressure transducers and conventional probes are compared with results from a three-dimensional viscous flow analysis. A steady multiple blade row approach is used in the numerical technique to examine the detailed flow structure inside the rotor and the stator passages. The comparisons indicate that many flow field features are correctly captured by viscous flow analysis, and therefore unmeasured phenomena can be studied with some level of confidence.

  20. Preliminary Analysis of Axial-Flow Compressors Having Supersonic Velocity at the Entrance of the Stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, Antonio

    1949-01-01

    A supersonic compressor design having supersonic velocity at the entrance of the stator is analyzed on the assumption of two-dimensional flow. The rotor and stator losses assumed in the analysis are based on the results of preliminary supersonic cascade tests. The results of the analysis show that compression ratios per stage of 6 to 10 can be obtained with adiabatic efficiency between 70 and 80 percent. Consideration is also given in the analysis to the starting, stability, and range of efficient performance of this type of compressor. The desirability of employing variable-geometry stators and adjustable inlet guide vanes is indicated. Although either supersonic or subsonic axial component of velocity at the stator entrance can be used, the cascade test results suggest that higher pressure recovery can be obtained if the axial component is supersonic.

  1. Study of aerodynamic noise in low supersonic operation of an axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldi, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study of compressor noise is presented, based upon supersonic, part-speed operation of a high hub/tip ratio compressor designed for spanwise uniformity of aerodynamic conditions, having straight cylindrical inlet and exit passages for acoustic simplicity. Acoustic spectra taken in the acoustically-treated inlet plenum, are presented for five operating points at each of two speeds, corresponding to relative rotor tip Mach numbers of about 1.01 and 1.12 (60 and 67 percent design speed). These spectra are analyzed for low and high frequency broadband noise, blade passage frequency noise, combination tone noise and "haystack' noise (a very broad peak somewhat below blade passage frequency, which is occasionally observed in engines and fan test rigs). These types of noise are related to diffusion factor, total pressure ratio, and relative rotor tip Mach number. Auxiliary measurements of fluctuating wall static pressures and schlieren photographs of upstream shocks in the inlet are also presented and related to the acoustic and performance data.

  2. Application of radial-equilibrium condition to axial-flow compressor and turbine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chung-Hua; Wolfenstein, Lincoln

    1950-01-01

    Basic general equations governing the three-dimensional compressible flow of gas through a compressor or turbine are given in terms of total enthalpy, entropy, and velocity components of the gas. Two methods of solution are obtained for the simplified, steady axially symmetric flow; one involves the use of a number of successive planes normal to the axis of the machine and short distances apart, and the other involves only three stations for a stage in which an appropriate radial-flow path is used. Methods of calculation for the limiting cases of zero and infinite blade aspect ratios and an approximate method of calculation for finite blade aspect ratio are also given. In these methods, the blade loading and the shape of the annular passage wall may be arbitrarily specified.

  3. The hub wall boundary layer development and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, K. N. S.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1987-01-01

    The hub wall boundary layer development in a compressor stage including the rotor passage is experimentally investigated. A miniature five-hole probe was employed to measure the hub wall boundary layer inside the inlet guide vane passage, upstream and far downstream of the rotor. The hub wall boundary layer inside the rotor passage was acquired using a rotating miniature five-hole probe. The boundary layer is well behaved upstream and far downstream of the rotor. The migration of the hub wall boundary layer towards the suction surface corner is observed. The limiting streamline angles and static pressure distribution across the stage were also measured. The mean velocity profiles and the integral properties upstream, inside and downstream of the rotor, and the losses are presented and interpreted.

  4. Prediction of axial-flow instabilities in a turbojet engine by use of a multistage compressor simulation on the digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Blaha, R. J.; Seldner, K.

    1975-01-01

    A method of estimating the undistorted stall line for an axial-flow compressor by using the digital computer is presented. The method involves linearization of nonlinear dynamic equations about an operating point on a speed line, and then application of the first method of Lyapunov to determine the stability of the nonlinear system from the stability of the linear system. The method is applied to a simulation of the J85 compressor, which utilizes stage stacking and lumped volume techniques for the interstage regions to simulate steady-state and dynamic compressor performance. The stability boundary predicted by the digital simulation compares quite well with the stall line predicted by a dynamic simulation of the J85 compressor programmed on the analog computer. Since previous studies have shown that the analog-predicted stall line agrees well with the stall line of the compressor, the digital method presented is also a good means of estimating the stall line.

  5. Effect of Various Blade Modifications on Performance of a 16-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor. III - Effect on Over-All Performance Characteristics on Increasing Stator-Blade Angles in Inlet Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medeiros, Arthur A.; Hatch, James E.

    1952-01-01

    The stator-blade angles in the first four stages of a 16-stage axial-flow compressor were increased in order to decrease the angles of attack of these stages, and thereby to improve part-speed performance. The performance of this modified compressor was compared with that of the same compressor with original blade angles.

  6. Effect of Various Blade Modifications on Performance of a 16-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor. II - Effect on Over-All Performance Characteristics of Increasing Twelfth through Fifteenth Stage Stator-Blade Angles 3 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, James E.; Medeiros, Arthur A.

    1952-01-01

    The stator-blade angles in the twelfth through fifteenth stages of a 16-stage axial-flow compressor were increased 3O. The over-all performance of this modified compressor is compared to the performance of the compressor with original blade angles. The matching characteristics of the modified compressor and a two-stage turbine were obtained and compared to those of the compressor with original blade angles and the same turbine.

  7. Investigation of Performance of Axial-Flow Compressor of XT-46 Turbine-Propeller Engine. I - Preliminary Investigation at 50-,70-, and 100-Percent Design Equivalent Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, John W.R.; Sandercrock, Donald M.

    1950-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted to determine the performance of the 12-stage axial-flow compressor of the XT-46 turbine-propeller engine. This compressor was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 9 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.86. The design pressure ratios per stage were considerably greater than any employed in current aircraft gas-turbine engines using this type of compressor. The compressor performance was evaluated at two stations. The station near the entrance section of the combustors indicated a peak pressure ratio of 6.3 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.63 for a corrected weight flow of 23.1 pounds per second. The other, located one blade-chord downstream of the last stator row, indicated a peak pressure ratio of 6.97 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.81 for a corrected weight flow of 30.4 pounds per second. The difference in performance obtained at the two stations is attributed to shock waves in the vicinity of the last stator row. These shock waves and the accompanying flow choking, together with interstage circulatory flows, shift the compressor operating curves into the region where surge would normally occur. The inability of the compressor to meet design pressure ratio is probably due to boundary-layer buildup in the last stages, which cause axial velocities greater than design values that, in turn, adversely affect the angles of attack and turning angles in these blade rows.

  8. Effect of Reynolds number on overall performance of a 3.7-inch-diameter six-stage axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, L. J.; Ball, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    A 9.4-centimeter (3.7-in.) diameter six-stage axial-flow compressor was tested in argon over a range of inlet pressures corresponding to a Reynolds number range of 30,600 to 160,000. The effect of Reynolds number on efficiency, pressure ratio, work input, maximum flow, and surge is shown. The Reynolds number effects are discussed in terms of changes in boundary-layer thickness, losses, and the resulting changes in throughflow velocity. Significant deviation was noted from the 0.2 power relation often used to express the variation of loss with Reynolds number.

  9. A comparison of typical national gas turbine establishment and NACA axial-flow compressor blade sections in cascade at low speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felix, A Richard; Emery, James C

    1953-01-01

    Comparative cascade tests of the NGTE (National Gas Turbine Establishment of Great Britain) 10C4/30C50 and NACA 65-(12)10 axial flow compressor blade sections were conducted in a 5-inch low-speed cascade tunnel at the Langley Laboratory at air-inlet angles of 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees and a solidity of 1.0 by using the porous-wall technique. These NACA data for the NGTE 10C4/30C50 section were also compared with data from NGTE design charts for the same section. British and NACA incompressible cascade force-analysis equations are included.

  10. Performance improvements of a subsonic axial-flow compressor by means of a non-axisymmetric stator hub end-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Lu, Xingen; Zhu, Junqiang

    2013-12-01

    This paper deals with the application of a non-axisymmetric hub end-wall on the stator of a single stage high subsonic axial-flow compressor. In order to obtain a state-of-the-art stator non-axisymmetric hub end-wall configuration fulfilling the requirements for higher efficiency and total pressure ratio, an automated multi-objective optimizer was used, in conjunction with 3D-RANS-flow simulations. For the purpose of quantifying the effect of the optimal stator non axis-symmetric hub contouring on the compressor performance and its effects on the subsonic axial-flow compressor stator end-wall flow field structure, the coupled flow of the compressor stage with the baseline, axisymmetric and the non-axisymmetric stator hub end-wall was simulated with a state-of-theart multi-block flow 3D CFD solver. Based on the CFD simulations, the optimal compressor hub end-wall configuration is expected to increase the peak efficiency by approximately 2.04 points and a slight increase of the total pressure ratio. Detailed analyses of the numerical flow visualization at the hub have uncovered the different hub flow topologies between the cases with axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric hub end-walls. It was found that that the primary performance enhancement afforded by the non-axisymmetric hub end-wall is a result of the end-wall flow structure modification. Compared to the smooth wall case, the non-axisymmetric hub end-wall can reduce the formation and development of in-passage secondary flow by aerodynamic loading redistribution.

  11. Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine. 4; Compressor and Turbine Performance Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallner, Lewis E.; Saari, Martin J.

    1948-01-01

    As part of an investigation of the performance and operational characteristics of the axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine, conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel, the performance characteristics of the compressor and the turbine were obtained. The data presented were obtained at a compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio of 1.00 for altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm, and turbine-inlet temperatures from 1400 to 2100 R. The highest compressor pressure ratio obtained was 6.15 at a corrected air flow of 23.7 pounds per second and a corrected turbine-inlet temperature of 2475 R. Peak adiabatic compressor efficiencies of about 77 percent were obtained near the value of corrected air flow corresponding to a corrected engine speed of 13,000 rpm. This maximum efficiency may be somewhat low, however, because of dirt accumulations on the compressor blades. A maximum adiabatic turbine efficiency of 81.5 percent was obtained at rated engine speed for all altitudes and turbine-inlet temperatures investigated.

  12. Comparison of the effect of two damper sizes on the performance of a low-solidity axial-flow transonic compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Urasek, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The experimental performance of a 20-inch-diameter axial-flow transonic compressor rotor with small dampers is presented. The compressor rotor was tested earlier with large dampers which were twice in size, and comparisons of overall performance and radial distributions of selected flow and performance parameters are made. The rotor with small dampers experienced lower losses in the damper region which resulted in locally higher values of temperature rise efficiency and total pressure ratio. However, there was no appreciable effect on overall efficiency and pressure ratio. A greater stall margin was measured for the rotor with small dampers at design speed, but at 70 and 90 percent of design speed the rotor with large dampers had somewhat greater flow range.

  13. Investigation of Blade-row Flow Distributions in Axial-flow-compressor Stage Consisting of Guide Vanes and Rotor-blade Row

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, John J; Dugan, Paul D; Budinger, Raymond E; Goelzer, H Fred

    1950-01-01

    A 30-inch tip-diameter axial-flow compressor stage was investigated with and without rotor to determine individual blade-row performance, interblade-row effects, and outer-wall boundary-layer conditions. Velocity gradients at guide-vane outlet without rotor approximated design assumptions, when the measured variation of leaving angle was considered. With rotor in operation, Mach number and rotor-blade effects changed flow distribution leaving guide vanes and invalidated design assumption of radial equilibrium. Rotor-blade performance correlated interpolated two-dimensional results within 2 degrees, although tip stall was indicated in experimental and not two-dimensional results. Boundary-displacement thickness was less than 1.0 and 1.5 percent of passage height after guide vanes and after rotor, respectively, but increased rapidly after rotor when tip stall occurred.

  14. Performance of a 1380-foot-per-second-tip-speed axial-flow compressor rotor with a blade tip solidity of 1.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, R. D.; Janetzke, D. C.; Reid, L.

    1972-01-01

    Aerodynamic design parameters are presented along the overall and blade element performance, of an axial flow compressor rotor designed to study the effects of blade solidity on efficiency and stall margin. At design speed the peak efficiency was 0.844 and occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 63.5 lb/sec with a total pressure ratio of 1.801. Design efficiency, pressure ratio, and weight flow 0.814, 1.65, and 65.3(41.1 lb/sec/sq ft of annulus area), respectively. Stall margin for design speed was 6.4 percent based on the weight flow and pressure ratio values at peak efficiency and just prior to stall.

  15. Performance of 1380 foot per second tip-speed axial-flow compressor rotor blade tip solidity of 1.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, C. L.; Janetzke, D. C.; Reid, L.

    1972-01-01

    This presents the aerodynamic design parameters along with the overall and blade element performance of an axial-flow compressor rotor designed to study the effects of blade solidity on efficiency and stall margin. At design speed the peak efficiency was 0.892 and occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 65.0 lb/sec. The total pressure ratio was 1.83 and the total temperature ratio was 1.215. Design efficiency, weight flow, pressure ratio, and temperature ratio were 0.824, 65.3, 1.65, and 1.187, respectively. Stall margin for design speed was 10 percent based on the weight flow and pressure ratio values at peak efficiency and just prior to stall.

  16. Performance of 1380-foot-per-second tip-speed axial-flow compressor rotor with blade tip solidity of 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janetzke, D. C.; Ball, C. L.; Hager, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic design parameters are presented along with the overall and blade element performance, of an axial-flow compressor rotor designed to study the effects of blade solidity on efficiency and stall margin. At design speed the peak efficiency was 0.853 and occured at an equivalent weight flow of 65.7lb/sec. The total pressure ratio was 1.68. Design efficiency, weight flow, pressure ratio, and temperature ratio were 0.822, 65.3, 1.65, and 1.187, respectively. Stall margin for design speed was 14 percent based on the weight flows and pressure ratios at peak efficiency and just prior to stall.

  17. Experimental determination of aerodynamic damping in a three-stage transonic axial-flow compressor. M.S. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Frederick A.

    1988-01-01

    Rotor blade aerodynamic damping is experimentally determined in a three-stage transonic axial flow compressor having design aerodynamic performance goals of 4.5:1 pressure ratio and 65.5 lbm/sec weight flow. The combined damping associated with each mode is determined by a least squares fit of a single degree of freedom system transfer function to the nonsynchronous portion of the rotor blade strain gauge output power spectra. The combined damping consists of aerodynamic and structural and mechanical damping. The aerodynamic damping varies linearly with the inlet total pressure for a given equivalent speed, equivalent mass flow, and pressure ratio while structural and mechanical damping are assumed to be constant. The combined damping is determined at three inlet total pressure levels to obtain the aerodynamic damping. The third stage rotor blade aerodynamic damping is presented and discussed for 70, 80, 90, and 100 percent design equivalent speed. The compressor overall performance and experimental Campbell diagrams for the third stage rotor blade row are also presented.

  18. Three-dimensional flow phenomena in a transonic, high-through-flow, axial-flow compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copenhaver, William W.; Hah, Chunill; Puterbaugh, Steven L.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed aerodynamic study of a transonic, high-through-flow, single stage compressor is presented. The compressor stage was comprised of a low-aspect-ratio rotor combined alternately with two different stator designs. Both experimental and numerical studies are conducted to understand the details of the complex flow field present in this stage. Aerodynamic measurements using high-frequency, Kulite pressure transducers and conventional probes are compared with results from a three-dimensional viscous flow analysis. A steady multiple blade row approach is used in the numerical technique to examine the detailed flow structure inside the rotor and the stator passages. The comparisons indicate that many flow field features are correctly captured by viscous flow analysis, and therefore unmeasured phenomena can be studied with some level of confidence.

  19. Nonlinear control of rotating stall and surge with axisymmetric bleed and air injection on axial flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Chung-Hei (Simon)

    The study of compressor instabilities in gas turbine engines has received much attention in recent years. In particular, rotating stall and surge are major causes of problems ranging from component stress and lifespan reduction to engine explosion. In this thesis, modeling and control of rotating stall and surge using bleed valve and air injection is studied and validated on a low speed, single stage, axial compressor at Caltech. Bleed valve control of stall is achieved only when the compressor characteristic is actuated, due to the fast growth rate of the stall cell compared to the rate limit of the valve. Furthermore, experimental results show that the actuator rate requirement for stall control is reduced by a factor of fourteen via compressor characteristic actuation. Analytical expressions based on low order models (2--3 states) and a high fidelity simulation (37 states) tool are developed to estimate the minimum rate requirement of a bleed valve for control of stall. A comparison of the tools to experiments show a good qualitative agreement, with increasing quantitative accuracy as the complexity of the underlying model increases. Air injection control of stall and surge is also investigated. Simultaneous control of stall and surge is achieved using axisymmetric air injection. Three cases with different injector back pressure are studied. Surge control via binary air injection is achieved in all three cases. Simultaneous stall and surge control is achieved for two of the cases, but is not achieved for the lowest authority case. This is consistent with previous results for control of stall with axisymmetric air injection without a plenum attached. Non-axisymmetric air injection control of stall and surge is also studied. Three existing control algorithms found in literature are modeled and analyzed. A three-state model is obtained for each algorithm. For two cases, conditions for linear stability and bifurcation criticality on control of rotating stall are

  20. Performance of Axial-Flow Supersonic Compressor of the XJ55-FF-1 Turbojet Engine. IV - Analysis of Compressor Operation over a Range of Equivalent Tip Speeds from 801 to 1614 Feet Per Second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Robert C.; Hartmann, Melvin J.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the axial-flow supersonic compressor of the XJ55-FF-1 turbojet engine. An analysis of the performance of the rotor was made based on detailed flow measurements behind the rotor. The compressor apparently did not obtain the design normal-shock configuration in this investigation. A large redistribution of mass occurred toward the root of the rotor over the entire speed range; this condition was so acute at design speed that the tip sections were completely inoperative. The passage pressure recovery at maximum pressure ratio at 1614 feet per second varied from a maximum of 0.81 near the root to 0.53 near the tip, which indicated very poor efficiency of the flow process through the rotor. The results, however, indicated that the desired supersonic operation may be obtained by decreasing the effective contraction ratio of the rotor blade passage.

  1. An experimental study on the effects of tip clearance on flow field and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zhang, J.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in the tip region of a compressor rotor was carried out using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and a Kiel probe at two different tip clearance heights. At both clearance sizes, the relative stagnation pressure and the axial and tangential components of relative velocities were measured upstream, inside the passage and downstream of the rotor, up to about 20 percent of the blade span from the annulus wall. The velocities, outlet angles, losses, momentum thickness, and force defect thickness are compared for the two clearances. A detailed interpretation of the effect of tip clearance on the flow field is given. There are substantial differences in flow field, on momentum thickness, and performance as the clearance is varied. The losses increase linearly within the passage and their values increase in direct proportion to tip clearance height. No discernable vortex (discrete) is observed downstream of the rotor.

  2. Performance of Typical Rear-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor Rotor Blade Row at Three Different Blade Setting Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, Marvin I.; Bachkin, Daniel

    1959-01-01

    A comparison of the performance of a single-stage rotor run at three different blade setting angles is presented. The rotor was of a design typical for a last stage of a multistage compressor. At each setting angle, the rotor blade row was operated from 53 to 100 percent of equivalent maximum speed (850 ft/sec tip speed) at constant inlet pressure. Hot-wire anemometry was used to observe rotating-stall and surge patterns in time unsteady flow. Results indicated that an increase in peak pressure ratio and an increase in maximum equivalent weight flow were obtained at each speed investigated when the blade setting angle was decreased. An increase in peak efficiency was achieved with decrease in blade setting angle for part of the range of speeds investigated. However, the peak efficiencies for the three blade setting angles were approximately the same at the maximum speed investigated. The flow ranges for all three configurations were about the same at minimum speed and decreased at almost the same rate when the rotative speed was increased through part of the range of speeds investigated. At maximum speed, the flow range for the smallest setting angle was considerably less than the flow range for the other two configurations. A decrease in efficiency and flow range for the smallest blade setting angle at maximum speed can be attributed primarily to a Mach number effect. In addition, because of the difference in projected axial chord lengths at the casing wall, some effect on performance could be expected from the change in three-dimensional flow occurring at the tip. Rotating-stall characteristics for the two smaller blade setting angles were essentially the same. Only surge could be detected for the largest blade setting angle in the unstable-flow region of operation.

  3. Effect of Various Blade Modifications on Performance of a 16-Stage High-pressure-ratio Axial-flow Compressor.Angles 3 deg. 1; Effect on Over-all Performance Characteristics of Decreasing Twelfth Through Fifteenth State Stator-blade Angles 3 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medeiros, Arthur A.; Hatch, James E.; Dugan, James F., Jr.

    1952-01-01

    The stator-blade angles in the twelfth to fifteenth stages of a 16-stage high-pressure-ratio axial-flow compressor were decreased 3 deg The over-all performance of this compressor is compared with the performance of the same compressor with standard blade angles. The matching characteristics of the modified compressor and a two-stage turbine were also obtained and compared with those of the compressor with the original blade angles and the same turbine.

  4. Analytical and Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Compressor Interstage Air Bleed on Performance Characteristics of a 13-stage Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, James G; Geye, Richard P; Calvert, Howard F

    1957-01-01

    Air was bled over the fifth-and tenth-stage rotor-blade rows through ports designed to pass 11 and 9 percent of the inlet flow, respectively, at 80 percent speed. Along the rated operating line the maximum speed at which rotating stall was encountered was lowered by either of these bleeds, and the stall patterns below these speeds were altered so that no dangerous resonant rotor-blade bending vibrations were excited. The combination of the two bleeds completely eliminated rotating stall to at least 50 percent speed. The compressor-discharge weight flow was decreased only at intermediate speeds, and the overall pressure ratio was affected only at intermediate speeds, and the overall pressure ratio was affected only by the combination bleed at intermediate speeds. Fifth-stage bleed increased compressor efficiency at low speeds, and tenth-stage bleed decreased efficiency at intermediate speeds.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Flow Field in a Transonic, Axial Flow Compressor with Respect to the Development of Blockage and Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation to understand and quantify the development of loss and blockage in the flow field of a transonic, axial flow compressor rotor has been undertaken. Detailed laser anemometer measurements were acquired upstream, within, and downstream of a transonic, axial compressor rotor operating at design and off-design conditions. The rotor was operated at 100%, 85%, 80%, and 60% of design speed which provided inlet relative Mach numbers at the blade tip of 1.48, 1.26, 1.18, and 0.89 respectively. At design speed the blockage is evaluated ahead of the rotor passage shock, downstream of the rotor passage shock, and near the trailing edge of the blade row. The blockage is evaluated in the core flow area as well as in the casing endwall region. Similarly at pm speed conditions for the cases of (1) where the rotor passage shock is much weaker than that at design speed and (2) where there is no rotor passage shock, the blockage and loss are evaluated and compared to the results at design speed. Specifically, the impact of the rotor passage shock on the blockage and loss development, pertaining to both the shock/boundary layer interactions and the shock/tip clearance flow interactions, is discussed. In addition, the blockage evaluated from the experimental data is compared to (1) an existing correlation of blockage development which was based on computational results, and (2) computational results on a limited basis. The results indicate that for this rotor the blockage in the endwall region is 2-3 times that of the core flow region and the blockage in the core flow region more than doubles when the shock strength is sufficient to separate the suction surface boundary layer. The distribution of losses in the care flow region indicate that the total loss is primarily comprised of the shock loss when the shock strength is not sufficient to separate the suction surface boundary layer. However, when the shock strength is sufficient to separate the

  6. Investigation of Performance of Axial-Flow Compressor of XT-46 Turbine-Propeller Engine. II - Performance of Revised Compressor at Design Equivalent Speed. II; Performance of Revised Compressor at Design Equivalent Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, John W. R.

    1950-01-01

    The compressor from the XT-46 turbine-propeller engine was revised by removing the last two rows of stator blades and by eliminating the interstage leakage paths described in a previous report. With the revised compressor, the flow choking point shifted upstream into the last rotor-blade row but the maximum weight flow was not increased over that of the original compressor. The flow range of the revised compressor was reduced to about two-thirds that obtained with the original compressor. The later stages of the compressor did not produce the design static-pressure increase probably because of excessive boundary-layer build-up in this region. Measurements obtained in the ninth-stage stator showed that the performance up to this station was promising but that the last three stages of the compressor were limiting the useful operating range of the preceding stages. Some modifications in flow-passage geometry and blade settings are believed to be necessary, however, before any major improvements in over-all compressor performance can be obtained.

  7. Performance of Axial-Flow Supersonic Compressor of XJ55-FF-1 Turbojet Engine. II - Performance of Inlet Guide Vanes as Separate Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Robert C.; Tysl, Edward R.

    1949-01-01

    The inlet wide vanes for the supersonic compressor of the XJ55-FF-1 engine were studied as a separate component in order to determine the performance prior to installation in the compressor test rig. Turning angles approached design values, and increased approximately to through the inlet Mach number range from 0.30 to choke. A sharp break in turning angle was experienced when the choke condition was reached. The total-pressure loss through the guide vanes was approximately 1 percent for the unchoked conditions and from 5 to 6 percent when choked.

  8. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  9. Effect of Various Blade Modifications in Performance of a 16-Stage Axial-flow Compressor. IV - Effect on Over-all Performance Characteristics of Decreasing Twelfth through Fifteenth Stage Stator-blade Angles 3 deg and Increasing Stator Angles in the Inlet Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, James E.; Medeiros, Arthur A.

    1952-01-01

    The performance of a 16-stage axial-flow compressor, in which two modifications of unloaded inlet stages were combined with loaded exit stages, has been determined. In the first modification the exit stages were loaded by decreasing the twelfth through fifteenth stage stator angles 3 deg. as compared with the blade angles in the original compressor, and the inlet stages were unloaded by increasing the blade angles the following amounts: guide vanes and first-stage stator, 6 deg; second- and third-stage stators, 4 deg.; and fourth-stage stators, 3 deg. The over-all performance of this configuration was compared with that of the compressor with the original blade angles. The peak efficiency was increased at all speeds below design and the weight flow was higher at speeds below 80 percent of design, the same at 80 percent of design, and lower at speeds abovce 80 percent of design. The maximum reduction in weight flow occurred at design speed. The surge limit line was higher at speeds between 75 and 90 percent of design when presented on a pressure ratio against weight flow basis. The second configuration was the same as the first with the exception that the second-, third-, and fourth-stage stator blade angles were the same as in the compressor with the original blade angles. A comparison of the performance of this configuration with that of the compressor with the original blade angles showed the same general trends of changes in performance as the first configuration. Comparisons were made of compressor configurations to show the effects upon the performance of decreased loading in the inlet stages. Below 75 percent of design speed, decreased loading results in increased weight flow and peak efficiency; above 80 percent of design speed, decreased loading in the inlet stages results in decreased weight flow and small changes in peak efficiencies. Between 75 and 90 percent of design the changes in surge weight flow and pressure ratio were such that the surge limit

  10. Performance of single-stage axial-flow transonic compressor with rotor and stator aspect ratios of 1.19 and 1.26, respectively, and with design pressure ratio of 1.82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Moore, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance of a low-aspect-ratio transonic compressor stage is presented over the stable operating flow range at 70, 90, and 100 percent design speeds. At design speed the rotor and stage achieved peak efficiencies of 0.872 and 0.845 at pressure ratios of 1.875 and 1.842, respectively. The stage stall margin at design speed was 21.8 percent.

  11. Performance of single-stage axial-flow transonic compressor with rotor and stator aspect ratios of 1.19 and 1.26 respectively, and with design pressure ratio of 2.05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1980-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performances of a low-aspect-ratio transonic compressor stage are presented over the stable operating flow range for speeds from 50 to 100 percent of design. At design speed the rotor and stage achieved peak efficiencies of 0.876 and 0.840 at pressure ratios of 2.056 and 2.000, respectively. The stage stall margin at design speed was 10 percent.

  12. Performance of single-stage axial-flow transonic compressor with rotor and stator aspect ratios of 1.63 and 1.77, respectively, and with design pressure ratio of 2.05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1982-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance of a transonic compressor stage is presented over the stable operating range for speeds from 50 to 100 percent of design. The stage was designed for a pressure ratio of 2.05 at a flow of 20.2 kg/sec and a tip speed of 455 m/sec. At design speed the rotor and stage achieved peak efficiencies of 0.849 and 0.831, respectively, at the minimum flow condition. The stage stall point occurred at a flow higher than the design flow.

  13. Performance of single-stage axial-flow transonic compressor with rotor and stator aspect ratios of 1.63 and 1.78, respectively, and with design pressure ratio of 1.82

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Reid, L.

    1982-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance of a transonic compressor stage is presented over the stable operating flow range for speeds from 50 to 100 percent of design. The stage was designed for a pressure ratio of 1.82 at a flow 20.2 kg/sec and a tip speed of 455 m/sec. At design speed the stage achieved a peak efficiency of 0.821 at a pressure ratio of 1.817. The stage stall margin at design speed based on conditions at stall and peak efficiency was about 11 percent.

  14. Stall inception and development in an axial flow aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. G.; Freeman, C.

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes the phenomenon of stall and surge in an axial flow aeroengine using fast response static pressure measurements from the compressor of a Rolls-Royce VIPER engine. It details the growth of flow instability at various speeds, from a small zone of stalled fluid involving only a few blades into the violent surge motion of the entire machine. Various observations from earlier theoretical and compressor rig results are confirmed by these new engine measurements. The main findings are as follows: (1) The point of stall inception moves rearward as engine speed increases, and is shown to be simply related to the axial matching of the compressor. (2) The final unstable operation of the machine can be divided into rotating stall at low speed and surge or multiple surge at high speed. (3) The inception process is independent of whether the final unstable operation is rotating stall or multiple surge. (4) Stall/surge always starts as a circumferentially small flow disturbance, rotating around the annulus at some fraction of rotor speed.

  15. Single Rod Vibration in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Noah; Wang, Shengfu; Bardet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Fluid structure interaction of a single rod in axial flow is a coupled dynamical system present in many application including nuclear reactors, steam generators, and towed antenna arrays. Fluid-structure response can be quantified thanks to detailed experimental data where both structure and fluid responses are recorded. Such datum deepen understanding of the physics inherent to the system and provide high-dimensionality quantitative measurements to validate coupled structural and CFD codes with various level of complexity. In this work, single rods fixed on both ends in a concentric pipe, are subjected to an axial flow with Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter of Re =4000. Rods of varying material stiffness and diameter are utilized in the experiment resulting in a range of dimensionless U between 0.5 and 1, where U = (ρA/EI)1/2uL. Experimental measurements of the velocity field around the rod are taken with PIV from time-resolved Nd:YLF laser and a high speed CMOS camera. Three-dimensional and temporal vibration and deflection of the rod is recorded with shadowgraphy utilizing two sets of pulsed high power LED and dedicated CMOS camera. Through integration of these two diagnostics, it is possible to reconstruct the full FSI domain providing unique validation data.

  16. Dynamics of Flapping Flag in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Fayed, Mohamed; Gunter, Amy-Lee; Paidoussis, Michael P.; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2010-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the phenomenon of the flapping of a flag, placed within a low turbulent axial flow inside a small scale wind tunnel test section. Flags of different sizes and flexural rigidities were used. Image processing technique was used and the time series of a given point on the edge of the flag was analyzed. The stability condition of the flag was obtained and compared to the recent theoretical models and numerical simulations. Afterwards, the nonlinear dynamics of the flapping was investigated using nonlinear time series method. The nonlinear dynamics is depicted in phase space and the correlation dimension of the attractors is determined. On the basis of observations made in this study, some conclusions on the existing models were drawn.

  17. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  18. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  19. Elliptic instability in a Rankine vortex with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, Laurent; Birbaud, Anne-Laure; Le Dizès, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    The elliptic instability of a Rankine vortex with axial flow subject to a weak strain field perpendicular to its axis is analyzed by asymptotic methods in the limit of small strain rate. General unstable modes associated with resonant Kelvin modes of arbitrary azimuthal wavenumbers are considered. Both the effects of axial flow and viscosity are analyzed in details.

  20. Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine. 3; Pressure and Temperature Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisenheyner, Robert M.; Berdysz, Joseph J.

    1948-01-01

    Performance properties and operational characteristics of an axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine were determined. Data are presented for a range of simulated altitudes from 5,000 to 35,0000 feet, compressor inlet- ram pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.17, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm.

  1. PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF AXIAL FLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of axial-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as symmetrical, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat model, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and

  2. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  3. Stability of a helical vortex tube with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yuji; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2011-11-01

    The stability of a helical vortex tube with axial flow is studied analytically. The base flow is obtained by solving the Euler equation perturbatively assuming small ratio of core to curvature radius, which is denoted by ɛ, and Rankine vortex with uniform axial flow at the leading order. We apply both local and modal stability analysis. By local stability analysis we show that the flow is subject to not only curvature instability but also Coriolis instability, both having the same resonance condition. The unstable growth rate is O(ɛ) and given by the magnitude of a sum of the complex numbers corresponding to the two instabilities. Combined effects of the axial flow and the torsion of the helical vortex tube appear as O(ɛ2) modification. These results are confirmed by the modal stability analysis.

  4. Effects of Inlet Icing on Performance of Axial-flow Turbojet Engine in Natural Icing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, Loren W; Kleinknecht, Kenneth S

    1950-01-01

    A flight investigation in natural icing conditions was conducted to determine the effect of inlet ice formations on the performance of axial-flow turbojet engines. The results are presented for icing conditions ranging from a liquid-water content of 0.1 to 0.9 gram per cubic meter and water-droplet size from 10 to 27 microns at ambient-air temperature from 13 to 26 degrees F. The data show time histories of jet thrust, air flow, tail-pipe temperature, compressor efficiency, and icing parameters for each icing encounter. The effect of inlet-guide-vane icing was isolated and shown to account for approximately one-half the total reduction in performance caused by inlet icing.

  5. Design features of fans, blowers, and compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisinoff, N. P.; Cheremisinoff, P. N.

    Fan engineering and compression machines are discussed. Basic aspects of fan performance and design are reviewed, and the design and performance characteristics of radial-flow fans, axial-flow fans, and controllable pitch fans are examined in detail. Air-conditioning systems are discussed, and noise, vibration, and mechanical considerations in fans are extensively examined. The thermodynamic principles governing compression machines are reviewed, and piston compressors, rotary compressors, blowers, and centrifugal compressors are discussed.

  6. A general representation for axial-flow fans and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perl, W; Tucker, M

    1945-01-01

    A general representation of fan and turbine arrangements on a single classification chart is presented that is made possible by a particular definition of the stage of an axial-flow fan or turbine. Several unconventional fan and turbine arrangements are indicated and the applications of these arrangements are discussed.

  7. Investigation of the Performance of an Axial-Flow-Pump Stage Designed by the Blade-Element Theory: Blade-Element Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, James E.; Soltis, Richard F.; Montgomery, John C.

    1961-01-01

    An axial-flow-pump stage was designed by utilizing blade-element methods in conjunction with axial-flow-compressor blade-element theory. This report presents the blade-element data of the pump stage in both the noncavitating and cavitating conditions. The noncavitating blade- element performance is compared with design rules. The results indicated that some modification of the compressor design equations for computing minimum-loss incidence and deviation angles may be necessary for application to an axial-flow-pump design. Minimum values of observed rotor loss were slightly lower than anticipated from compressor results. At the design flow coefficient the rotor-blade elements were not operating at the reference incidence angles, and the experimental efficiency was lower than the design value. The observed head rise was very close to the design. An attempt was made to estimate the potential of this rotor by using the minimum measured values of loss coefficient and observed energy input at the design flow. Performance of the pump at a suction specific speed of approximately 13,000 (cavitation number k approximately equals 0.12) showed only a slight dropoff in performance in the cavitation inception region from the noncavitating results. The observed performance at a suction specific speed of approximately 16,000 (k approximately equals 0.09) is also presented for comparison.

  8. Free-Surface Induced Axial Flows in Oscillating Cylinder Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, A. V.; Wei, T.

    1999-11-01

    The problem to be discussed is that of the effect of a free surface on flow along the cores of Karman vortices shed from an inverted pendulum type cylinder. The motivation for this research was to determine the nature and extent of free surface effects in flow induced vibrations of structures aligned perpendicular to and penetrating a free surface. The 2.54 cm diameter cylinder studied had a low mass ratio and was attached at the bottom end by a leaf spring; the free, upper end protruded through the free surface of a large water tunnel. It has been observed that the vortex induced oscillations of the cylinder resulted in very strong axial flows upward toward the free surface, even for small amplitude motions. Approaching the free surface, however, there was an equal likelyhood that the axial flows would be directed down away from the surface. The connection between the direction of axial flow and the cylinder motion will be described using single and two view flow visualization techniques.

  9. Computational analysis of an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Matherne, Gaynell Paul; Lim, David Scott; Peeler, Ben B; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    Longer-term (>2 weeks) mechanical circulatory support will provide an improved quality of life for thousands of pediatric cardiac failure patients per year in the United States. These pediatric patients suffer from severe congenital or acquired heart disease complicated by congestive heart failure. There are currently very few mechanical circulatory support systems available in the United States as viable options for this population. For that reason, we have designed an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device (PVAD) with an impeller that is fully suspended by magnetic bearings. As a geometrically similar, smaller scaled version of our axial flow pump for the adult population, the PVAD has a design point of 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg to meet the full physiologic needs of pediatric patients. Conventional axial pump design equations and a nondimensional scaling technique were used to estimate the PVAD's initial dimensions, which allowed for the creation of computational models for performance analysis. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the axial flow PVAD, which measures approximately 65 mm in length by 35 mm in diameter, shows that the pump will produce 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg for 8000 rpm. Fluid forces (approximately 1 N) were also determined for the suspension and motor design, and scalar stress values remained below 350 Pa with maximum particle residence times of approximately 0.08 milliseconds in the pump. This initial design demonstrated acceptable performance, thereby encouraging prototype manufacturing for experimental validation. PMID:15384993

  10. Performance analysis of axial-flow mixing impellers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Pullum, L.

    2000-03-01

    Theoretical formulations for impeller performance were evaluated based on a blade-element theory. These enable the calculation of the head and power vs. flow-rate curves of axial-flow impellers. The technique uses the life and drag coefficients of the blade section of an impeller to calculate the spanwise swirl-velocity distribution. Using the angular-momentum equation, it is possible to calculate the corresponding spanwise distribution of the energy head of the impeller. Integration of these distributions of head and torque gives the impeller's performance. Parameters including the flow number, the power number, the thrust force number, and the swirl velocity can be found at the impeller operating point, determined using the head curve and an experimentally calibrated resistance curve. A laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure the velocity distribution for different axial flow impellers in mixing tanks. Calculated flow and power numbers agreed well with the experimental results. Using the blade's spanwise head distribution and a set of calibrated flow-resistance data, it is also possible to estimate an impeller's outlet axial-velocity distribution. Predictions compared well with LDV experimental data. The effect of impeller-blade angle, number of blades, blade camber, and blade thickness on the performance of axial-flow impellers was investigated using the Agitator software.

  11. Rotor wake characteristics of a transonic axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Gertz, J.; Epstein, A.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    State of the art turbomachinery flow analysis codes are not capable of predicting the viscous flow features within turbomachinery blade wakes. Until efficient 3D viscous flow analysis codes become a reality there is therefore a need for models which can describe the generation and transport of blade wakes and the mixing process within the wake. To address the need for experimental data to support the development of such models, high response pressure measurements and laser anemometer velocity measurements were obtained in the wake of a transonic axial flow fan rotor.

  12. Regenerative growth due to axial flow induced by vortex-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Eric; Hussain, Fazle

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a vortex column embedded in fine scale homogeneous, isotropic turbulence reveals an inviscid mechanism for induction of axial flow on the column. Vortex threads, produced outside the column during vortex-turbulence interaction, are shown to drive the mechanism of axial flow generation. Oppositely oriented threads radially separate by self-induction, hence causing net axial flow. At computationally accessible Reynolds numbers (Re ≡ vortex circulation/viscosity = 10 000), the axial flow due to a pair of oppositely signed vortex threads outside the column increases both with Re and time. At high Re, the axial flow can increase sufficiently to render the vortex column unstable by the well-known q criterion. The vorticity field reveals that axial flow is another mechanism, perhaps more dominant than the parent-offspring hairpin vortex scenario (Hussain, Pradeep & Stout JFM 2011), of regenerative energy growth - likely to be important for implementing breakup of aircraft trailing vortices.

  13. Nonlinear Interactions between Slender Structures and Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Li

    2015-03-01

    For decades, dynamic behaviors of a slender structure with axial flow have been extensively studied. However, the governing equation based on expansions of small quantities is complicatedly-expressed and can be inappropriate as amplitude becomes considerably large. In this research, we are dedicated to finding an approach to study the nonlinear dynamics of a fluid-conveying slender strcture with arbitrary amplitude. By introducing the Intrinsic Coordinate, we find a concise way to describe the configuration of the system. Differential relations of such coordinate are studied and the rigorous nonlinear equation of motion is derived. Then rather than small-deflection approximation, linear dynamics are studied using Argand Diagram under a weaker condition named low-varying approximation. Nonlinear properties including Hopf bifurcation, limit-cycle motion and vibration frequencies are studied theoretically and experimentally.

  14. Mechanical axial flow blood pump to support cavopulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, A L; Kapadia, J; Madduri, D

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a collapsible, percutaneously inserted, axial flow blood pump to support the cavopulmonary circulation in infants with a failing single ventricle physiology. An initial design of the impeller for this axial flow blood pump was performed using computational fluid dynamics analysis, including pressure-flow characteristics, scalar stress estimations, blood damage indices, and fluid force predictions. A plastic prototype was constructed for hydraulic performance testing, and these experimental results were compared with the numerical predictions. The numerical predictions and experimental findings of the pump performance demonstrated a pressure generation of 2-16 mm Hg for 50-750 ml/min over 5,500-7,500 RPM with deviation found at lower rotational speeds. The axial fluid forces remained below 0.1 N, and the radial fluid forces were determined to be virtually zero due to the centered impeller case. The scalar stress levels remained below 250 Pa for all operating conditions. Blood damage analysis yielded a mean residence time of the released particles, which was found to be less than 0.4 seconds for both flow rates that were examined, and a maximum residence time was determined to be less than 0.8 seconds. We are in the process of designing a cage with hydrodynamically shaped filament blades to act as a diffuser and optimizing the impeller blade shape to reduce the flow vorticity at the pump outlet. This blood pump will improve the clinical treatment of patients with failing Fontan physiology and provide a unique catheter-based therapeutic approach as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. PMID:19089799

  15. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  16. Estimation of deviation angle for axial-flow compressor blade sections using inviscid-flow solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    Development of a method of estimating deviation angles by analytical procedures was begun. Solutions for inviscid, irrotational flow in the blade-to-blade plane were obtained with a finite-difference calculation method. Deviation angles for a plane cascade with a rounded trailing edge were estimated by using the inviscid-flow solutions and three trailing-edge hypotheses. The estimated deviation angles were compared with existing experimental data over a range of incidence angles at inlet flow angles of 30 deg and 60 deg. The results indicate that deviation angles can be estimated accurately (within 1 deg) by using one of the three trailing-edge hypotheses, but only when pressure losses are low. A new trailing-edge hypotheses is presented which is suitable (for the cascade considered) for both low- and high-loss operating points.

  17. Measurements of inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan (6 and 9 blade rotor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A large quantity of experimental data on inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan were obtained. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of design and operating variables and the type of distortion on the response of an axial flow turbomachinery rotor. Included are background information and overall trends observed in distortion attenuation and unsteady total pressure losses.

  18. Fluid dynamics aspects of miniaturized axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kang, Can; Huang, Qifeng; Li, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Rotary blood pump (RBP) is a kind of crucial ventricular assist device (VAD) and its advantages have been evidenced and acknowledged in recent years. Among the factors that influence the operation performance and the durability of various rotary blood pumps, medium property and the flow features in pump's flow passages are conceivably significant. The major concern in this paper is the fluid dynamics aspects of such a kind of miniaturized pump. More specifically, the structural features of axial-flow blood pump and corresponding flow features are analyzed in detail. The narrow flow passage between blade tips and pump casing and the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) zone may exert a negative effect on the shear stress distribution in the blood flow. Numerical techniques are briefly introduced in view of their contribution to facilitating the optimal design of blood pump and the visualization of shear stress distribution and multiphase flow analysis. Additionally, with the development of flow measurement techniques, the high-resolution, effective and non-intrusive flow measurement techniques catering to the measurement of the flows inside rotary blood pumps are highly anticipated. PMID:24211957

  19. Echocardiographic Evaluation of the Jarvik 2000 Axial-Flow LVAD

    PubMed Central

    Stainback, Raymond F.; Croitoru, Mihai; Hernandez, Antonieta; Myers, Timothy J.; Wadia, Yasmin; Frazier, O. H.

    2005-01-01

    From April 2000 through September 2001, we studied 11 patients with the Jarvik 2000 —a left ventricular assist device with an axial-flow pump that provides continuous blood flow—to determine the echocardiographic characteristics. All patients underwent complete echocardiographic examination, including outflow-graft flow evaluation 24 hours after implantation and each month thereafter for the duration of support. Data were obtained at each pump setting (8,000–12,000 rpm in 1,000-rpm increments) and with the pump off. Left ventricular dimensions and shortening fraction and the duration of aortic valve systolic opening decreased as pump speed increased. Although the aortic valve remained closed at higher pump speeds, pump outflow-graft flow remained pulsatile, because of the systolic thrust of the assisted ventricle. Systolic dominance of phasic flow was more pronounced at lower pump speeds, due to normalization of the diseased heart's Starling response. When the aortic valve was closed continuously, echocardiographic contrast (indicating blood stasis) was noted in the aortic root. Because of the pump outflow graft's proximity to the chest wall, device output could be measured independently of cardiac contributions. Mean peak outflow-graft flow velocities were 0.75 ± 0.30 m/s (systolic) and 0.41 ± 0.13 m/s (diastolic). When the pump was turned off briefly, there was minimal regurgitation through the device into the left ventricle. This 1st echocardiographic heart function analysis of the Jarvik 2000 confirms that the device unloads the ventricle and increases cardiac output. Cardiac responses to device-speed changes can be evaluated readily with echocardiography in the early and late postoperative period. PMID:16392203

  20. Advanced two-stage compressor program design of inlet stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryce, C. A.; Paine, C. J.; Mccutcheon, A. R. S.; Tu, R. K.; Perrone, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of an inlet stage for a two-stage, 10/1 pressure ratio, 2 lb/sec flow rate compressor is discussed. Initially a performance comparison was conducted for an axial, mixed flow and centrifugal second stage. A modified mixed flow configuration with tandem rotors and tandem stators was selected for the inlet stage. The term conical flow compressor was coined to describe a particular type of mixed flow compressor configuration which utilizes axial flow type blading and an increase in radius to increase the work input potential. Design details of the conical flow compressor are described.

  1. Prediction of compressor stall for distorted and undistorted flow by use of a multistage compressor simulation on the digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Teren, F.

    1974-01-01

    A simulation technique is presented for the prediction of compressor stall for axial-flow compressors for clean and distorted inlet flow. The simulation is implemented on the digital computer and uses stage stacking and lumped-volume gas dynamics. The resulting nonlinear differential equations are linearized about a steady-state operating point, and a Routh-Hurwitz stability test is performed on the linear system matrix. Parallel compressor theory is utilized to extend the technique to the distorted inlet flow problem. The method is applied to the eight-stage J85-13 compressor.

  2. Internal flows and force matrices in axial flow inducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    1994-01-01

    Axial flow inducers such as those used in high speed rocket engine turbopumps are subject to complex internal flows and fluid-induced lateral and rotordynamic forces. An investigation of these internal flows was conducted using boundary layer flow visualization on the blades, hub and housing of unshrouded and shrouded inducers. Results showed that the blade boundary layer flows have strong radial components at off-design conditions and remain attached to the blade surface at all flow coefficients tested. The origin of upstream swirling backflow was found to be at the discharge plane of the inducer. In addition, flow reversal was observed at the suction side blade tip near the leading edge in a shrouded inducer. Re-entry of the hub boundary layer flow, a downstream backflow, into the blade passage area was observed at flow coefficients below design. For unshrouded inducers the radially outward flow near the blade tip mixed with the leakage flow to form the upstream backflow. The lateral and rotordynamic forces acting on an inducer due to an imposed whirl motion was also investigated at various flow coefficients. It was found that the rotordynamic force data at various whirl frequency ratios does not allow a normal quadratic fit; consequently the conventional inertial, stiffness and damping coefficients cannot be obtained and a definite whirl ratio describing the instability region does not result. Application of an actuator disk theory proved to be inaccurate in estimating the rotordynamic tangential force in a non-whirling inducer. The effect of upstream and downstream flow distortions on the rotordynamic and lateral forces on an inducer were studied. It was found that at flow coefficients below design, large lateral forces occurred in the presence of a downstream asymmetry. Results of inlet distortion experiments show that a strong inlet shear causes a significant increase in the lateral force. Cavitation was found to have important consequences for fluid

  3. Effects of shaft supporting structure on performance test of axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Liu, S. L.; Li, M. X.; Zheng, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    CFD numerical simulation combined with theoretical analysis are used to research and discuss the obstructing effect, caused by the supporting structure of torsion meter and connecting shaft, on the outlet airflow of axial-flow fan in type-C ducted inlet device. The relations between axial flow fan's total pressure efficiency and flow rate are studied when the distance between supporting structure and outlet section is different, which may provide a reference for the proper design of the performance test device.

  4. A 10-stage reconnection demonstration launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cnare, E.G.; Widner, M.M.; Duggins, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a small-scale, 10-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher that has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Ten-gram projectiles are accelerated from rest to 317 m/s through the 0.44 m launcher assembly with a projectile kinetic energy to capacitor stored energy efficiency of 9%. Comparison of test results and computer code predictions are presented. Results of these studies have substantiated launcher scaling at small size and have provided a useful test bed for launcher components and diagnostics.

  5. Sound generation in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitor, Till; Neise, Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    An experimental study is described to explore the dominant sound generation mechanisms of the spectral components governing the overall noise level of centrifugal compressors. At the design speed with supersonic flow conditions in the rotor blade channels, blade tone noise and buzz-saw noise are the main contributors. On the inlet, rotor-alone noise is the main source while rotor-stator interaction noise dominates on the outlet side in case of vaned outlet diffusers. Over a large range of rotor speeds with subsonic flow conditions, radial compressor noise is dominated by tip clearance noise which is produced by the secondary flow through the gap between rotor blade tips and the casing wall which in turn gives rise to the rotating instability phenomena observed earlier in axial-flow machines.

  6. Study on cavitation influence for pump head in an axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, K.; Kajie, Y.; Saito, S.; Miyagawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    The size of axial flow pumps used in drainage pump stations has recently decreased, and their rotation speeds have increased, causing an increase in the risk of cavitation. Therefore, to provide highly reliable pumps, it is important to understand the internal flow of pumps under cavitating conditions. In this study, high-speed camera measurements and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed to understand the cavitation performance of an axial flow pump. The mechanism that causes the head to change as a result of cavitation under low net positive suction head values is shown to be the balance between the increasing angular momentum and the loss indicated by the changing streamlines.

  7. Comparison of NACA 65-series compressor-blade pressure distributions and performance in a rotor and in cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Willard R; Godwin, William R

    1957-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to compare the performance of NACA 65-series compressor blades in two-dimensional cascade with that in an axial flow compressor. Blade pressure distributions were obtained by the use of a mercury-seal pressure-transfer device. The comparison indicated that cascade data accurately predicted the turning angle and blade pressure distribution obtained in the compressor at design conditions.

  8. High pressure compressor component performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, S. J.; Fesler, W.; Liu, H. S.; Lovell, R. C.; Shaffer, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    A compressor optimization study defined a 10 stage configuration with a 22.6:1 pressure ratio, an adiabatic efficiency goal of 86.1%, and a polytropic efficiency of 90.6%; the corrected airflow is 53.5 kg/s. Subsequent component testing included three full scale tests: a six stage rig test, a 10 stage rig test, and another 10 stage rig test completed in the second quarter of 1982. Information from these tests is used to select the configuration for a core engine test and an integrated core/low spool test. The test results will also provide data base for the flight propulsion system. The results of the test series with both aerodynamic and mechanical performance of each compressor build are presented. The second 10 stage compressor adiabatic efficiency was 0.848 at a cruise operating point versus a test goal of 0.846.

  9. Effects of axial flow on the stability of a helical vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Y.; Fukumoto, Y.

    2012-05-01

    The effects of axial flow on the stability of a helical vortex tube are studied by short-wavelength stability analysis. By axial flow we mean the flow along the helical tube inside the vortex core. At the leading order the base flow is set to the Rankine vortex with uniform velocity along the helical tube. The exponential growth rate is obtained analytically as the magnitude of the sum of three O(ɛ) and five O(ɛ2) complex numbers, where ɛ is the ratio of the core to curvature radius. At O(ɛ) the effect of axial flow can be regarded as the effect of the Coriolis force; as a result the instability is the superposition of the curvature instability and the Coriolis or precessional instability since the two instabilities occur under the same resonance condition. At O(ɛ2) combined effects of the axial flow and the torsion appear; the maximum growth rate increases when the period of particle motion increases.

  10. Design of gas circulation system in the high power fast axial flow CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongyan; Wang, Youqing; Li, Qing; Jia, Xinting

    2009-08-01

    Increasing the output power of the fast axial flow CO2 laser requires a proportional growth of the mass flow with the laser power for convective cooling of the active laser medium. The previous research on high power CO2 laser was mostly focused on gas discharge. However, little attention was focused on the gas circulation system, which is also an essential technology to ensure the long time stable work of the high power fast axial flow CO2 laser. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the 7 KW fast axial flow CO2 laser, expounded the important role of the gas circulation system, and then analyzed the parameters, the structure and the design of the system. After that, this paper compared various types of blowers and heat exchangers, chose magnetic levitation radial turbine blower and rectangle finned heat exchanger, in light of the prominent performance and compact structure. Further more, this paper also supplied the methods of the blower and heat exchanger selection and design. The results indicate that the magnetic levitation radial turbine blower and rectangle finned heat exchanger which have been chosen are suitable to the 7 kW fast axial flow CO2 laser.

  11. Enhanced capabilities and updated users manual for axial-flow turbine preliminary sizing code TURBAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the axial-flow turbine preliminary sizing code TURBAN. Turbine cooling has been added to the analysis. New alternative input options allow direct specification of stage reaction, stage work factor, and stage work split. The Reynolds number loss dependency was modified and an internal calculation of air viscosity was added. A complete description of input and output along with sample cases are included.

  12. Prediction of overall and blade-element performance for axial-flow pump configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Okiishi, T. H.; Miller, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A method and a digital computer program for prediction of the distributions of fluid velocity and properties in axial flow pump configurations are described and evaluated. The method uses the blade-element flow model and an iterative numerical solution of the radial equilbrium and continuity conditions. Correlated experimental results are used to generate alternative methods for estimating blade-element turning and loss characteristics. Detailed descriptions of the computer program are included, with example input and typical computed results.

  13. Effect of argon on the performance of a fast-axial flow CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvani, S.; Amiri, Kh; Pazokian, H.; Montazerolghaem, M.; Mollabashi, M.; Naeimi, S. A.; Esmaeilpour, D.

    2011-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a fast-axial flow (FAF) cw CO2 laser are described. The dependences of the output power, efficiency, and discharge voltage on the discharge current of a FAF cw CO2 laser with optimised composition of the CO2:N2:He=1:4.4:7.6 gas mixture with a small amount of argon are studied experimentally at two pressures of 50 and 60 mbar in open and closed cycle regimes of the laser system.

  14. Study on the Axial-Flow-Induced Vibration of Coil Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Ito, T.; Kohno, N.; Nunokawa, K.

    1993-08-01

    Flow-induced vibration of coil springs due to an axial flow was investigated experimentally using a fundamental test apparatus. The effects of spring stiffness, gap between the spring and the inner rod and initial compression of the spring on the vibration of the coil spring were clarified, and a stability diagram is presented for this vibration. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the counter-measures developed for suppressing the flow-induced vibration are confirmed.

  15. Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine. 5; Combustion-Chamber Characterisitcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisenheyner, Robert M.; Berdysz, Joseph J.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation to determine the performance and operational characteristics of an axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. As part of this investigation, the combustion-chamber performance was determined at pressure altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratios of 1.00 and 1.09, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm. Combustion-chamber performance is presented as a function of corrected engine speed and corrected horsepower. For the range of corrected engine speeds investigated, overall total-pressure-loss ratio, cycle efficiency, and the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers were unaffected by a change in altitude or compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio. For the range of corrected horsepowers investigated, the total-pressure-loss ratio and the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers decreased with an increase in corrected horsepower at a constant corrected engine speed. The combustion efficiency remained constant for the range of corrected horsepowers investigated at all corrected engine speeds.

  16. Compressor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gresh, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    This book provides information on the selection, operation, testing, and aerodynamic maintenance of axial and centrifugal compressors. Coverage includes design information, gas properties data, flow meter calculation, and troubleshooting guidelines. Design parameters are covered to provide the user with the basic how and why of compressor design. The many example problems along with reference data furnished will provide easy analysis of compressor performance.

  17. Hydraulic Performance Comparison for Axial Flow Impeller and Mixed Flow Impeller with Same Specific Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhongyong; Ni, Yongyan; Yuan, Jianping; Ji, Pei

    2015-12-01

    An axial flow impeller and a mixed flow impeller with same specific speed were experimentally investigated, and the suction performance was studied with the help of CFD simulations. The results show that the axial impeller is roughly better than the mixed flow one. Especially under the design condition and a low flow rate condition range near the designed one, the axial flow impeller is more stable and therefore more suitable to be used in a water jet propulsion, while under these conditions the mixed flow impeller displays significant discrepancies. On the other hand, though its efficiency at the best efficiency point is lower than that of the axial flow one, the mixed flow impeller has a larger range of high efficiency conditions and is more convenient to be controlled to satisfy the irrigation and drainage systems that ought to be adjusted to varied flow rate conditions under a fixed head. In addition, the numerical investigation at the rated point shows that the axial impeller has a much better suction performance than the mixed flow impeller, which contradicts with the experience knowledge and therefore details need to be further studied.

  18. Numerical simulation of fluid-structure interaction for axial flow blade based on weak coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. B.; Guo, P. C.; Luo, X. Q.

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulation of three-dimensional flow in whole flow passage of axial flow hydraulic turbine was conducted based on the Reynolds-averaged N-S equations and the standard k-ε model. Stress analysis of axial flow blade were carried on by elasticity unsteady FEM. The fluid domain and solid domain were calculated by sequential iteration. Based on weak coupling technology, the fluid-structure interaction analysis of the axial flow blade was conducted. Instantaneous flow field characteristic and stress distribution on blade were analyzed. According to the comparing with the results of pure flow numerical simulation, the pressure difference between press side and suction side increases after considering the FSI, to a certain extent, which will worsen cavitations performance of the blade. Meanwhile, stress distribution on the blades do not change significantly, but the maximum stress value increases markedly, and the maximum displacement reduces slightly. The research demonstrates that the FSI not only changes the distribution of the flow field in blade area, but also have a greater impact on the stress of the blades.

  19. Validation of an axial flow blood pump: computational fluid dynamics results using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok Poh; Wang, Xikun

    2012-04-01

    A magnetically suspended axial flow blood pump is studied experimentally in this article. The pump casing enclosed a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller shrouded by a permanent magnet-embedded cylinder, and a three-blade diffuser. The internal flow fields were simulated earlier using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the pump characteristic curves were determined. The simulation results showed that the internal flow field was basically streamlined, except the diffuser region. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of the 1:1 pump model was conducted to validate the CFD result. In order to ensure the optical access, an acrylic prototype was fabricated with the impeller driven by a servomotor instead, as the magnet is opaque. In addition to the transparent model, the blood analog fluid with the refractive index close to that of acrylic was used to avoid refraction. According to the CFD results, the axial flow blood pump could generate adequate pressure head at the rotating speed of 9500rpm and flow rate of 5L/min, and the same flow condition was applied during the PIV measurement. Through the comparisons, it was found that the experimental results were close to those obtained by CFD and had thus validated the CFD model, which could complement the limitation of the measurement in assessing the more detailed flow fields of the axial flow pump. PMID:22040356

  20. Eliminating primary air axial flow fan stall at the D. B. Wilson station

    SciTech Connect

    Studley, B.C. ); Schmidt, E. ); Foreman, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Having originally chosen two axial flow primary air fans operating in parallel to deliver pulverized coal to this 440 Mw facility because of their high efficiencies and precise flow control, a program for first controlling and then eliminating fan stall was undertaken. An axial flow fan stalls when air flow separation occurs around the blades. This results in heavy turbulence with the fan no longer operating on its normal performance curve and consequently a rapid decrease in both pressure and flow is experienced. In addition, this condition results in high vibration which over time can be destructive to the fan. The immediate effect is obviously a sudden decrease in fuel flow followed b y both steam flow and electrical output. Although fan stall is a potential drawback of axial flow fans, the program implemented, which is described in this paper, has been successful at first controlling and recently eliminating fan stall all together. This was possible through an extensive test program and finally the installation of anti-stall rings on both fans. The net result of this operating improvement has been improved availability, reliability and capacity, in addition to higher fan discharge pressures as the anti-stall rings have modified the pressure-versus-volume curves of the fan similar to the characteristics of a cof a centrifugal fan.

  1. Dimension Determination of Precursive Stall Events in a Single Stage High Speed Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Qammar, Helen K.; Hartley, Tom T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamics for a single-stage, axial-flow, high speed compressor core, specifically, the NASA Lewis rotor stage 37. Due to the overall blading design for this advanced core compressor, each stage has considerable tip loading and higher speed than most compressor designs, thus, the compressor operates closer to the stall margin. The onset of rotating stall is explained as bifurcations in the dynamics of axial compressors. Data taken from the compressor during a rotating stall event is analyzed. Through the use of a box-assisted correlation dimension methodology, the attractor dimension is determined during the bifurcations leading to rotating stall. The intent of this study is to examine the behavior of precursive stall events so as to predict the entrance into rotating stall. This information may provide a better means to identify, avoid or control the undesirable event of rotating stall formation in high speed compressor cores.

  2. Determination of compressor in-stall characteristics from engine surge transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.; Chiaramonte, F. P.; Mehalic, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for extracting the in-stall pumping characteristics for an axial flow compressor operating in an engine system environment is developed. The technique utilizes a Hybrid computer simulation of the compressor momentum equation into which actual transient data are used to provide all terms but the desired compressor characteristic. The compressor force characteristic as a function of corrected flow and speed result from the computation. The critical problem of data filtering is addressed. Results for a compressor operating in a turbofan engine are presented and comparison is made with the conventional compressor map. The relationship of the compressor surge characteristic with its rotating stall characteristic is explored. Initial interpretation of the measured results is presented.

  3. Initial Acute Animal Experiment Using a New Miniature Axial Flow Pump in Series With the Natural Heart.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Yano, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Miura, Hidekazu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2015-08-01

    We have advocated an axial flow blood pump called "valvo pump" that is implanted at the aortic valve position, and we have developed axial flow blood pumps to realize the concept of the valvo pump. The latest model of the axial flow blood pump mainly consists of a stator, a directly driven impeller, and a hydrodynamic bearing. The axial flow blood pump has a diameter of 33 mm and length of 74 mm, and the length of anatomical occupation is 33 mm. The axial flow blood pump is anastomosed to the aorta with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cuffs worn on the inflow and outflow ports. Dp-Q curves of the axial flow blood pump are flatter than those of ordinary axial flow pumps, and pump outflow of 5 L/min was obtained against a pressure difference of 50 mm Hg at a rotational speed of 9000 rpm in vitro. The axial flow blood pump was installed in a goat by anastomosing with the thoracic descending aorta using PTFE cuffs, and it was rotated at a rotational speed of 8000 rpm. Unlike in case of the ventricular assistance in parallel with the natural heart, pulsatilities of aortic pressure and aortic flow were preserved even when the pump was on, and mean aortic flow was increased by 1.5 L/min with increase in mean aortic pressure of 30 mm Hg. In conclusion, circulatory assistance in series with the natural heart using the axial flow blood pump was able to improve hemodynamic pulsatility, and it would contribute to improvement of end-organ circulation. . PMID:26234449

  4. Experimental investigation of the performance of a supersonic compressor cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, T. L.; Schreiber, H. A.; Starken, H.

    1988-01-01

    Supersonic cascade wind tunnel results are presented for a linear, supersonic compressor cascade derived from the near-tip section of a high-throughflow axial flow compressor rotor over the inlet Mach number range of 1.30-1.71. Laser anemometry was used to obtain flow-velocity measurements showing the wave pattern in the entrance region. Attention is given to the unique-incidence relationship for this cascade, which relates the supersonic inlet Mach number to the inlet flow direction. An empirical correlation is obtained for the influence of the independent parameters of back pressure, axial velocity density ratio, and blade element performance.

  5. Axial-flow compressor turning angle and loss by inviscid-viscous interaction blade-to-blade computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, E. C.; Serovy, G. K.; Sockol, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    A method for computation of the flow field around an arbitrary airfoil cascade on an axially symmetric blade-to-blade surface was developed which takes into account the development and separation of the blade surface boundary layers and mixing in the wake. The method predicts the overall fluid turning and total pressure loss in the context of an inviscid-viscous interaction scheme. The inviscid flow solution is obtained from a compressible flow matrix method. The viscous flow is obtained from a differential boundary layer method which calculates laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layers. Provisions for the calculation of laminar and turbulent separation regions were added to the viscous scheme. The combined inviscid-viscous interaction scheme described yields results which are quantitatively consistent with experimental data. This suggests that the physical basis for the interactive system is correct and justifies continued exploration and use of the method.

  6. Three dimensional mean velocity and turbulence characteristics in the annulus wall region of an axial flow compressor rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davino, R.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1982-01-01

    The experiment was performed using the rotating hot-wire technique within the rotor blade passage and the stationary hot-wire technique for the exitflow of the rotor blade passage. The measurements reveal the effect of rotation and subsequent flow interactions upon the rotor blade flowfield and wake development in the annulus-wall region. The flow near the rotor blade tips is found to be highly complex due to the interaction of the annulus-wall boundary layer, the blade boundary layers, the tip leakage flow, and the secondary flow. Within the blade passage, this interaction results in an appreciable radial inward flow as well as a defect in the mainstream velocity near the mid-passage. Turbulence levels within this region are very high. This indicates a considerable extent of flow mixing due to the viscous flow interactions. The size and strength of this loss core is found to grow with axial distance from the blade trailing edge. The nature of the rotor blade exit-flow was dominated by the wake development.

  7. Prediction of compressor stall for distorted and undistorted flow by use of a multistage compressor simulation on the digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Teren, F.

    1975-01-01

    A simulation technique is presented for the prediction of compressor stall for axial-flow compressors for clean and distorted inlet flow. The simulation is implemented on the digital computer and uses stage stacking and lumped-volume gas dynamics. The resulting nonlinear differential equations are linearized about a steady-state operating point, and a Routh-Hurwitz stability test is performed on the linear system matrix. Parallel compressor theory is utilized to extend the technique to the distorted inlet flow problem. The method is applied to the eight-stage J85-13 compressor. Analytical stall prediction for the undistorted stall line shows good agreement with experimental results. The predicted stall line for distorted inlet flow is in agreement with experimental results only for large distortion extents and/or low distortion levels. Results for low distortion extents and high distortion level do not agree with experimental results.

  8. Discrete frequency noise and its reduction in small axial-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J. M.

    1982-03-01

    The discrete frequency noise radiated from representative types of axial-flow fans used in electronic equipment is studied in detail. Narrowband analysis of the discrete frequency noise radiated by these types of fans has been conducted in a free-field environment. The far-field sound pressure level, radiated directivity, and total radiated power of the discrete frequency noise is presented. The influence of operating point on the sound radiated from the fans is determined. The discrete frequency noise dominates the characteristic acoustic spectra at high flow coefficients.

  9. Analytical modeling of the buffeting of a rod in axial flow. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.; Wamsganss, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    Turbulent buffeting of a circular, flexible rod in axial flows is reported. The main excitation mechanisms are turbulent wall-pressure fluctuations and the motion-dependent force field caused by the rod motion. On the assumption that the turbulent wall-pressure fluctuations are independent of rod motion, a linear forced vibration model is proposed to compute the buffeting displacement of the rod with the aid of empirical constants determined from experimental measurements of wall-pressure fluctuations. Predicted and measured values of the root-mean-square rod displacement are shown to be in reasonably good agreement.

  10. Modeling Improvements and Users Manual for Axial-flow Turbine Off-design Computer Code AXOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    An axial-flow turbine off-design performance computer code used for preliminary studies of gas turbine systems was modified and calibrated based on the experimental performance of large aircraft-type turbines. The flow- and loss-model modifications and calibrations are presented in this report. Comparisons are made between computed performances and experimental data for seven turbines over wide ranges of speed and pressure ratio. This report also serves as the users manual for the revised code, which is named AXOD.

  11. Effects of diffusion factor, aspect ratio and solidity on overall performance of 14 compressor middle stages. [the effects of varying both diffusion through the rotor and compressor blades and blade aspect ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britsch, W. R.; Osborn, W. M.; Laessig, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    A series of high hub tip radius ratio compressor stages representative of the middle and latter stages of axial flow compressors is discussed. The effects of aspect ratio, diffusion factor, and solidity on rotor and stage performance are determined. Fourteen middle stages are tested to study the effects on performance of varying both diffusion through the rotor and stator blades and blade aspect ratio. The design parameters in the streamline analysis program, the blade geometry program, and the blade coordinate program are presented.

  12. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design.

  13. Axial flow effects on robustness of vortical structures about actively deflected wings in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing flight has garnered much attention in the past decade driven by our desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Nature has demonstrated the breadth of maneuverability achievable by flapping wing flight. However, despite recent advances the role of wing flexibility remains poorly understood. In an effort to develop a deeper understanding of wing deflection effects and to explore novel approaches to increasing leading-edge vortex robustness, this three-dimensional computational study explores the aerodynamics of low aspect ratio plates, in hovering kinematics, with isolated flexion lines undergoing prescribed deflection. Major flexion lines, recognized as the primary avenue for deflection in biological fliers, are isolated here in two distinct configurations, resulting in deflection about the wing root and the wing tip, respectively. Of interest is the interaction between axial flow along the span and the vortical structures about the wing. It is proposed that the modes of deflection explored may provide a means of axial flow control for favorably promoting LEV robustness over a broad range of flapping conditions, and provide insight into the nature of flexibility in flapping wing flight. National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea.

  14. Large-eddy simulations of a flexible cylinder in axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Behrouz; Balaras, Elias; Bardet, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    A slender cylinder immersed in axial flow shows different behavior for different flow and material properties. Several studies have pointed to the importance of the dimensionless velocity, U = (ρA / EI)0.5Uo D , relating the fluid and structural inertia. However, it is not clear how this behavior changes for different Reynolds numbers and flow regimes, while keeping U constant. In this study a slender cylinder immersed in axial flow is considered as an one-dimensional beam. The fluid-structure interaction is simulated using an immersed-boundary method for a series of Re numbers. A non-linear Euler-Bernouli hypothesis is utilized to account for the deflection and rotation of the cylinder. It is observed that for small dimensionless velocities the cylinder oscillates with small amplitude around its axis. Increasing U results in buckling of the cylinder. For higher U beam looses its quasi steady buckled state and flutters. It is investigated that how this behavior changes for different Re and different flow regimes (laminar vs turbulent boundary layers). Overall buckling occurs at higher U at laminar flow conditions. The results are in agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively with experiments in the literature.

  15. Hydrogen turbines for space power systems: A simplified axial flow gas turbine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen cooled, turbine powered space weapon systems require a relatively simple, but reasonably accurate hydrogen gas expansion turbine model. Such a simplified turbine model would require little computational time and allow incorporation into system level computer programs while providing reasonably accurate volume/mass estimates. This model would then allow optimization studies to be performed on multiparameter space power systems and provide improved turbine mass and size estimates for the various operating conditions (when compared to empirical and power law approaches). An axial flow gas expansion turbine model was developed for these reasons and is in use as a comparative bench mark in space power system studies at Sandia. The turbine model is based on fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and material strength considerations, but is considered simplified because it does not account for design details such as boundary layer effects, shock waves, turbulence, stress concentrations, and seal leakage. Although the basic principles presented here apply to any gas or vapor axial flow turbine, hydrogen turbines are discussed because of their immense importance on space burst power platforms.

  16. An intraventricular axial flow blood pump integrated with a bearing purge system.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kormos, R; Mori, T; Umezu, M; Kameneva, M; Antaki, J; Outa, E; Litwak, P; Kerrigan, J; Tomczak, J

    1995-01-01

    The future development of implantable axial flow blood pumps must address two major issues: mechanically induced hemolysis and shaft seal reliability. The recent revisions to our miniature intraventricular axial flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) were aimed particularly at addressing these concerns. To improve hemocompatibility, a new impeller has been designed according to the following criteria: 1) gradual pressure rise along the blade chord; 2) minimized local fluid acceleration to prevent cavitation; 3) minimum surface roughness; and 4) radius edges. Subsequent in vitro hemolysis tests conducted with bovine and ovine blood have demonstrated very low hemolysis (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.0051 +/- 0.0047 g/100 L) with this new impeller design. To address the need for a reliable seal, we have developed a purged seal system consisting of a miniature lip seal and ceramic pressure groove journal bearing that also acts as a purge pump. Several spiral grooves formed on the bearing surface provide viscous pumping of the purge fluid, generating more than 3,000 mmHg at 10,000 rpm. This purge flow flushes the lip seal and prevents blood backflow into the bearing. We have found this purge pump to offer several advantages because it is simple, compact, durable, does not require separate actuation, and offers a wide range of flow, depending upon the groove design. In vivo animal tests demonstrated the potential of the purged seal system. PMID:8573818

  17. Deformation of a soft helical filament in an axial flow at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Mohammad K; Reis, Pedro M

    2016-02-14

    We perform a numerical investigation of the deformation of a rotating helical filament subjected to an axial flow, under low Reynolds number conditions, motivated by the propulsion of bacteria using helical flagella. Given its slenderness, the helical rod is intrinsically soft and deforms due to the interplay between elastic forces and hydrodynamic loading. We make use of a previously developed and experimentally validated computational tool framework that models the elasticity of the filament using the discrete elastic rod method and the fluid forces are treated using Lighthill's slender body theory. Under axial flow, and in the absence of rotation, the initially helical rod is extended. Above a critical flow speed its configuration comprises a straight portion connected to a localized helix near the free end. When the rod is also rotated about its helical axis, propulsion is only possible in a finite range of angular velocity, with an upper bound that is limited by buckling of the soft helix arising due to viscous stresses. A systematic exploration of the parameter space allows us to quantify regimes for successful propulsion for a number of specific bacteria. PMID:26738932

  18. Performance Evaluation of Axial Flow AG-1 FC and Prototype FM (High Strength) HEPA Filters - 13123

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Wilson, John A.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are routinely used in DOE nuclear containment activities. The Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook (NACH) stipulates that air cleaning devices and equipment used in DOE nuclear applications must meet the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) standard. This testing activity evaluates two different axial flow HEPA filters, those from AG-1 Sections FC and FM. Section FM is under development and has not yet been added to AG-1 due to a lack of qualification data available for these filters. Section FC filters are axial flow units that utilize a fibrous glass filtering medium. The section FM filters utilize a similar fibrous glass medium, but also have scrim backing. The scrim-backed filters have demonstrated the ability to endure pressure impulses capable of completely destroying FC filters. The testing activities presented herein will examine the total lifetime loading for both FC and FM filters under ambient conditions and at elevated conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Results will include loading curves, penetration curves, and testing condition parameters. These testing activities have been developed through collaborations with representatives from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), New Mexico State University, and Mississippi State University. (authors)

  19. Tests of a 2-Stage, Axial-Flow, 2-Phase Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    A two phase flow turbine with two stages of axial flow impulse rotors was tested with three different working fluid mixtures at a shaft power of 30 kW. The turbine efficiency was 0.55 with nitrogen and water of 0.02 quality and 94 m/s velocity, 0.57 with Refrigerant 22 of 0.27 quality and 123 m/s velocity, and 0.30 with steam and water of 0.27 quality and 457 m/s velocity. The efficiencies with nitrogen and water and Refrigerant 22 were 86 percent of theoretical. At that fraction of theoretical, the efficiencies of optimized two phase turbines would be in the low 60 percent range with organic working fluids and in the mid 50 percent range with steam and water. The recommended turbine design is a two stage axial flow impulse turbine followed by a rotary separator for discharge of separate liquid and gas streams and recovery of liquid pressure.

  20. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  1. The Co-axial Flow of Injectable Solid Hydrogels with Encapsulated Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brandon; Pochan, Darrin; Sathaye, Sameer

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogels are quickly becoming an important biomaterial that can be used for the safe, localized injection of cancer drugs, the injection of stem cells into areas of interest or other biological applications. Our peptides can be self-assembled in a syringe where they form a gel, sheared by injection and, once in the body, immediately reform a localized pocket of stiff gel. My project has been designed around looking at the possibility of having a co-axial strand, in which one gel can surround another. This co-axial flow can be used to change the physical properties of our gel during injection, such as stiffening our gel using hyaluronic acid or encapsulating cells in the gel and surrounding the gel with growth medium or other biological factors. Rheology on hyaluron stiffened gels and cells encapsulated in gels was performed for comparison to the results from co-axial flow. Confocal microscopy was used to examine the coaxial gels after flow and to determine how the co-axial nature of the gels is affected by the concentration of peptide.

  2. Preliminary Results of Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of X24C-4B Turbojet Engine. IV - Performance of Modified Compressor. Part 4; Performance of Modified Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorman, H. Carl; Dupree, David T.

    1947-01-01

    The performance of the 11-stage axial-flow compressor, modified to improve the compressor-outlet velocity, in a revised X24C-4B turbojet engine is presented and compared with the performance of the compressor in the original engine. Performance data were obtained from an investigation of the revised engine in the MACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. Compressor performance data were obtained for engine operation with four exhaust nozzles of different outlet area at simulated altitudes from 15,OOO to 45,000 feet, simulated flight Mach numbers from 0.24 to 1.07, and engine speeds from 4000 to 12,500 rpm. The data cover a range of corrected engine speeds from 4100 to 13,500 rpm, which correspond to compressor Mach numbers from 0.30 to 1.00.

  3. Effects of perforation number of blade on aerodynamic performance of dual-rotor small axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongjun; Wang, Yanping; Li, Guoqi; Jin, Yingzi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-04-01

    Compared with single rotor small axial flow fans, dual-rotor small axial flow fans is better regarding the static characteristics. But the aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans is worse than that of single rotor small axial flow fans. In order to improve aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans, the pre-stage blades with different perforation numbers are designed in this research. The RANS equations and the standard k-ɛ turbulence model as well as the FW-H noise model are used to simulate the flow field within the fan. Then, the aerodynamic performance of the fans with different perforation number is compared and analyzed. The results show that: (1) Compared to the prototype fan, the noise of fans with perforation blades is reduced. Additionally, the noise of the fans decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (2) The vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades of perforated fans is reduced. It is found that the vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (3) Compared to the prototype fan, the total pressure rising and efficiency of the fans with perforation blades drop slightly.

  4. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 4000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. 5; Analysis of Turbine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Richard P.; Hensley, Reece V.

    1948-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the turbine of a 4000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine was determined in investigations of the complete engine in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. Characteristics are presented as functions of the total-pressure ratio across the turbine and of turbine speed and gas flow corrected to sea-level conditions. Three turbine nozzles of different areas were used to determine the area that gave optimum performance. Inasmuch as tail-pipe nozzles of different diameters were investigated in combination with the standard turbine nozzle, the effect of varying discharge conditions on turbine operation could be observed. The investigations covered a range of pressure attitudes from 5000 to 40,000 feet. The engine was investigated over the entire operable range of speeds at each altitude. At pressure altitude of 30,000 feet, the effect on turbine operation of varying the ram pressure ration over a range from 1.10 to 1.77 was evaluated. An altitude effect was apparent when turbine pressure ratio was plotted against corrected turbine speed but it was so slight as to be negligible insofar as the turbine efficiencies were concerned. A maximum turbine efficiency of slightly more than 82 percent was obtained with the configuration using the standard turbine nozzle and the low-flow compressor. This efficiency, which is somewhat lower than the actual turbine efficiency, is uncorrected for accessories drive power, bearing friction, tail-pipe pressure drop, compressor thermal radiation, and introduction of turbine-disk cooling air into the gas stream. Changes in the ram pressure ratio had a negligible effect on the turbine efficiency.

  5. Numerical simulation of tip clearance leakage vortex flow characteristic in axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, W. D.; Li, T. T.; Zhang, D. S.; Tian, F.; Zhang, G. J.

    2012-11-01

    Tip Leakage Vortex (TLV) in axial flow pump is mainly cased by the leakage flow entraining with the main stream of the blade suction side, which could interfere with the main flow field of the whole passage and the performance of pump. The low pressure area of vortex nuclear also cause the cavitation, which often induce the noise, vibration and cavitation erosion on the end wall of the impeller. The steady turbulent flow fields of the tip clearance region at different conditions with different blade tip clearance sizes (0.15 mm, 0.50 mm, 1.50 mm and 3.00mm) were simulated based on the ANSYS CFX software. The application of the different turbulent models were compared and analyzed in the whole passage flow simulation and choose a turbulent model which can adapt the tip leakage vortex flow in the axial flow pump. Furthermore, the flow fields under different tip clearance sizes were simulated, the relationship of the flow field structure and size of the tip clearance was analyzed. The numerical results show that: The SST k-ω turbulent model can predict the energy characteristics of the model pump accurately, adapt the shear flow of the adverse pressure gradient and predict the tip leakage flow very well; With the increase of the mass flow, the start position of the tip leakage vortex cores remove from near the leading edge to the trailing edge along the shroud of the blade, and the strength of the vortex cores decreased; The energy characteristic decrease with the increase of the tip clearance; The positive-slope point arrive earlier when the tip above the 1.5mm; With the increase of the tip clearance, the start position of the tip leakage vortex cores remove from near the leading edge to the trailing edge along the shroud of the blade, the pressure of the vortex cores decrease, the strength of the vortex entrainment is bigger; The leakage vortex within the tip clearance of the axial flow pump enhances as the blade tip clearance size is more than 0.50 mm, and the

  6. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial-flow fan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Suder, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    Laser anemometer surveys were made of the 3-D flow field in NASA rotor 67, a low aspect ratio transonic axial-flow fan rotor. The test rotor has a tip relative Mach number of 1.38. The flowfield was surveyed at design speed at near peak efficiency and near stall operating conditions. Data is presented in the form of relative Mach number and relative flow angle distributions on surfaces of revolution at nine spanwise locations evenly spaced from hub to tip. At each spanwise location, data was acquired upstream, within, and downstream of the rotor. Aerodynamic performance measurements and detailed rotor blade and annulus geometry are also presented so that the experimental results can be used as a test case for 3-D turbomachinery flow analysis codes.

  7. Performance of a highly loaded two stage axial-flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, R. S.; Benser, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage axial-flow fan with a tip speed of 1450 ft/sec (442 m/sec) and an overall pressure ratio of 2.8 was designed, built, and tested. At design speed and pressure ratio, the measured flow matched the design value of 184.2 lbm/sec (83.55kg/sec). The adiabatic efficiency at the design operating point was 85.7 percent. The stall margin at design speed was 10 percent. A first-bending-mode flutter of the second-stage rotor blades was encountered near stall at speeds between 77 and 93 percent of design, and also at high pressure ratios at speeds above 105 percent of design. A 5 deg closed reset of the first-stage stator eliminated second-stage flutter for all but a narrow speed range near 90 percent of design.

  8. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  9. Computational analysis of a multistage axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamidoju, Chaithanya

    Turbomachines are used extensively in Aerospace, Power Generation, and Oil & Gas Industries. Efficiency of these machines is often an important factor and has led to the continuous effort to improve the design to achieve better efficiency. The axial flow compressor is a major component in a gas turbine with the turbine's overall performance depending strongly on compressor performance. Traditional analysis of axial compressors involves throughflow calculations, isolated blade passage analysis, Quasi-3D blade-to-blade analysis, single-stage (rotor-stator) analysis, and multi-stage analysis involving larger design cycles. In the current study, the detailed flow through a 15 stage axial compressor is analyzed using a 3-D Navier Stokes CFD solver in a parallel computing environment. Methodology is described for steady state (frozen rotor stator) analysis of one blade passage per component. Various effects such as mesh type and density, boundary conditions, tip clearance and numerical issues such as turbulence model choice, advection model choice, and parallel processing performance are analyzed. A high sensitivity of the predictions to the above was found. Physical explanation to the flow features observed in the computational study are given. The total pressure rise verses mass flow rate was computed.

  10. The WISGSK: A computer code for the prediction of a multistage axial compressor performance with water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code is presented for the prediction of off-design axial flow compressor performance with water ingestion. Four processes were considered to account for the aero-thermo-mechanical interactions during operation with air-water droplet mixture flow: (1) blade performance change, (2) centrifuging of water droplets, (3) heat and mass transfer process between the gaseous and the liquid phases and (4) droplet size redistribution due to break-up. Stage and compressor performance are obtained by a stage stacking procedure using representative veocity diagrams at a rotor inlet and outlet mean radii. The Code has options for performance estimation with (1) mixtures of gas and (2) gas-water droplet mixtures, and therefore can take into account the humidity present in ambient conditions. A test case illustrates the method of using the Code. The Code follows closely the methodology and architecture of the NASA-STGSTK Code for the estimation of axial-flow compressor performance with air flow.

  11. Empirical expressions for estimating length and weight of axial-flow components of VTOL powerplants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Lieblein, S.; Krebs, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Simplified equations are presented for estimating the length and weight of major powerplant components of VTOL aircraft. The equations were developed from correlations of lift and cruise engine data. Components involved include fan, fan duct, compressor, combustor, turbine, structure, and accessories. Comparisons of actual and calculated total engine weights are included for several representative engines.

  12. Evaluation of the impeller shroud performance of an axial flow ventricular assist device using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok P; Lim, Tau M; Zhou, Tongming

    2010-09-01

    Generally, there are two types of impeller design used in the axial flow blood pumps. For the first type, which can be found in most of the axial flow blood pumps, the magnet is embedded inside the impeller hub or blades. For the second type, the magnet is embedded inside the cylindrical impeller shroud, and this design has not only increased the rotating stability of the impeller but has also avoided the flow interaction between the impeller blade tip and the pump casing. Although the axial flow blood pumps with either impeller design have been studied individually, the comparisons between these two designs have not been conducted in the literature. Therefore, in this study, two axial flow blood pumps with and without impeller shrouds were numerically simulated with computational fluid dynamics and compared with each other in terms of hydraulic and hematologic performances. For the ease of comparison, these two models have the same inner components, which include a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller, and a three-blade diffuser. The simulation results showed that the model with impeller shroud had a lower static pressure head with a lower hydraulic efficiency than its counterpart. It was also found that the blood had a high possibility to deposit on the impeller shroud inner surface, which greatly enhanced the possibility of thrombus formation. The blood damage indices in both models were around 1%, which was much lower than the 13.1% of the axial flow blood pump of Yano et al. with the corresponding experimental hemolysis of 0.033 g/100 L. PMID:20883393

  13. Effects of Inflow Distortion due to Hub Cap's Shape on the Performance of Axial Flow Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Choon-Man; Choi, Seung-Man; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    Performance characteristics of an axial flow fan having distorted inlet flow have been investigated using numerical analysis. Two kinds of hub-cap, rounded and right-angled front shape, are tested to investigate the effect of inlet flow distortion on the fan performance. In case of right-angled front shape, axisymmetric distorted inflow is induced by flow separation at the sharp edge of hub-cap, and the characteristics of the inflow depend on the distance between hub-cap and blade leading edge. Three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are introduced to analyze the flow characteristics inside the blade passage. Numerical solutions are validated in comparison with experimental data measured by a five-hole probe downstream of the fan rotor. It is found from the numerical results that non-uniform axial inlet velocity profile near the hub results in the change of inlet flow angle. Large recirculation flow upstream the fan rotor for the right-angled hub-cap induces separated flow on the blade surfaces near the hub region, and thus deteriorates the performance of fan rotor. The effect of the distance between hub-cap and blade leading edge on the efficiency is also discussed.

  14. Flapping Instability of Two Tandem Flexible Foils in Uniform Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli, Pardha Saradhi; Jaiman, Rajeev Kumar; Chua, Cassey

    2015-11-01

    We present a numerical analysis on the stability and coupled dynamics of two tandem flexible foils clamped at their leading edges in a uniform axial flow. The flexible foils considered for this study correspond to the fixed-point stable regime of the single flexible foil where the flexible foil aligns itself in the flow direction with no significant trailing edge oscillations. A high-order nonlinear coupled solver based on the variational formulation has been considered for analyzing the effects of gap between the foils on the stability and coupled behaviour of both the upstream and downstream foils. As a function of decreasing gap, it is observed that the tandem foil configuration is more prone to flapping instability than its single flexible foil counterpart. The evolution of the instability for the downstream foil shows two distinct dynamical scenarios: (i) only the downstream foil exhibits flapping motion and (ii) both the upstream and the downstream foils perform flapping. With the aid of a rigid foil in the upstream of a flexible foil, we further present a detailed analysis on the effects of the upstream wake and vortex shedding on the stability and flapping dynamics of the downstream foil.

  15. The effect of confinement on the stability of the Rankine vortex with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juniper, Matthew

    2007-11-01

    It has been shown recently that two-dimensional inviscid jets and wakes become significantly more unstable when they are confined between two flat plates, due to the interaction of Kelvin-Helmholtz modes in the inner and outer flows. It has also been shown that swirl significantly destabilizes unconfined inviscid jets and wakes, due to the interaction between Kelvin-Helmholtz modes and inertial modes. In this paper, the Rankine vortex with axial flow is confined within a duct in order to test the combined effect of confinement and swirl. The flow's stability is calculated as a function of shear, density ratio, swirl and confinement using a classic spatio-temporal instability analysis. It is found that confinement particularly destabilizes the helical m=1 and m=2 modes. These are at their most unstable when the radius of the outer flow is 1.4 times the radius of the inner flow. Experiments on coaxial fuel injectors with this geometry have shown that confined shear flows exhibit a strong helical m=1 mode, which can be exploited to increase mixing in a combustion chamber. This paper explains this effect and shows how the presence of strong helical modes can be predicted with a low order model.

  16. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  17. Interaction of impeller and guide vane in a series-designed axial-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the interaction of the impeller and guide vane in a series-designed axial-flow pump was examined through the implementation of a commercial CFD code. The impeller series design refers to the general design procedure of the base impeller shape which must satisfy the various flow rate and head requirements by changing the impeller setting angle and number of blades of the base impeller. An arc type meridional shape was used to keep the meridional shape of the hub and shroud with various impeller setting angles. The blade angle and the thickness distribution of the impeller were designed as an NACA airfoil type. In the design of the guide vane, it was necessary to consider the outlet flow condition of the impeller with the given setting angle. The meridional shape of the guide vane were designed taking into consideration the setting angle of the impeller, and the blade angle distribution of the guide vane was determined with a traditional design method using vane plane development. In order to achieve the optimum impeller design and guide vane, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and the DOE method were applied. The interaction between the impeller and guide vane with different combination set of impeller setting angles and number of impeller blades was addressed by analyzing the flow field of the computational results.

  18. The flow field investigations of no load conditions in axial flow fixed-blade turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhou, X. Z.; Xu, H. X.

    2014-03-01

    During the start-up process, the strong instabilities happened at no load operation in a low head axial flow fixed-blade turbine, with strong pressure pulsation and vibration. The rated speed can not reach until guide vane opening to some extent, and stable operation could not be maintained under the rated speed at some head, which had a negative impact on the grid-connected operation of the unit. In order to find the reason of this phenomenon, the unsteady flow field of the whole flow passage at no load conditions was carried out to analyze the detailed fluid field characteristics including the pressure pulsation and force imposed on the runner under three typical heads. The main hydraulic cause of no load conditions instability was described. It is recommended that the power station should try to reduce the no-load running time and go into the high load operation as soon as possible when connected to grid at the rated head. Following the recommendations, the plant operation practice proved the unstable degree of the unit was reduced greatly during start up and connect to the power grid.

  19. Global design optimization for an axial-flow tandem pump based on surrogate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. H.; Zhao, Y.; Y Wang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Tandem pump, compared with multistage pump, goes without guide vanes between impellers. Better cavitation performance and significant reduction of the axial geometry scale is important for high-speed propulsion. This study presents a global design optimization method based on surrogated method for an axial-flow tandem pump to enhance trade-off performances: energy and cavitation performances. At the same time, interactions between impellers and impacts on the performances are analyzed. Fixed angle of blades in impellers and phase angle are performed as design variables. Efficiency and minimum average pressure coefficient (MAPC) on axial sectional surface in front impeller are the objective function, which can represent energy and cavitation performances well. Different surrogate models are constructed, and Global Sensitivity Analysis and Pareto Front method are used. The results show that, 1) Influence from phase angle on performances can be neglected compared with other two design variables, 2) Impact ratio of fixed angle of blades in two impellers on efficiency are the same as their designed loading distributions, which is 4:6, 3) The optimization results can enhance the trade-off performances well: efficiency is improved by 0.6%, and the MAPC is improved by 4.5%.

  20. Investigation of boundary layer and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, A.; Gorton, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Yamaoka, H.

    1973-01-01

    A study of the boundary layer and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer is reported. The first part deals with the analytical and experimental investigation of the boundary layer characteristics in a four bladed flat plate inducer passage operated with no throttle. An approximate analysis for the prediction of radial and chordwise velocity profiles across the passage is carried out. The momentum integral technique is used to predict the gross properties of the boundary layer. Equations are given for the exact analysis of the turbulent boundary layer characteristics using the turbulent field method. Detailed measurement of boundary layer profiles, limiting streamline angle and skin friction stress on the rotating blade is also reported. Part two of this report deals with the prediction of the flow as well as blade static pressure measurements in a three bladed inducer with cambered blades operated at a flow coefficient of 0.065. In addition, the mean velocity and turbulence measurements carried out inside the passage using a rotating triaxial probe is reported.

  1. An experimental investigation on the tip leakage noise in axial-flow fans with rotating shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio; Milanese, Gabriele; Parodi, Davide

    2016-08-01

    The tip leakage noise generated by a shrouded rotor of an axial-flow fan has been experimentally studied. The measurements have been taken at high flow rate and at the design point in a hemi-anechoic chamber, at constant rotational speed and during speed ramps. A test plenum designed according to ISO 10302 has been employed to modify the operating conditions and different inlet configurations, ducted and unducted with standard and reduced tip gap, have been considered. The basic features of the inflow have been studied by means of aerodynamic measurements taken upstream of the rotor. To separate the noise generating mechanisms from the acoustic propagation effects, the acoustic response function of the test configuration has been computed employing the spectral decomposition method, and then it has been compared with the velocity-scaled, constant-Strouhal number SPL. In this way, the noise components related to the tip leakage flow have been identified and their connection with geometry have been highlighted. The broadband part of the spectra and the peaks related to the tip leakage flow are affected by the same propagation effects, but show a different dependence on the rotational speed and on the operating point. The upstream geometry affects the radiated noise much more than the performance and even a strong reduction in the tip-gap cannot completely eliminate the related noise.

  2. Acoustic Characterization of Axial Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Operation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner L; Royston, Thomas J; Bhat, Geetha; Tatooles, Antone J

    2016-01-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), implantable pumps used to supplement cardiac output, has become an increasingly common and effective treatment for advanced heart failure. Although modern continuous-flow LVADs improve quality of life and survival more than medical management of heart failure, device malfunction remains a common concern. Improved noninvasive methods for assessment of LVAD function are needed to detect device complications. An electronic stethoscope was used to record sounds from the HeartMate II axial flow pump in vitro and in vivo. The data were then uploaded to a computer and analyzed using two types of acoustic analysis software. Left ventricular assist device acoustics were quantified and were related to pump speed, acoustic environment, and inflow and outflow graft patency. Peak frequency values measured in vivo were found to correlate strongly with both predicted values and in vitro measurements (r > 0.999). Plots of the area under the acoustic spectrum curve, obtained by integrating over 50 Hz increments, showed strong correlations between in vivo and in vitro measurements (r > 0.966). Device thrombosis was found to be associated with reduced LVAD acoustic amplitude in two patients who underwent surgical device exchange. PMID:26536535

  3. Hydrodynamics and sediment transport in a meandering channel with a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Craig; Kozarek, Jessica; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Guala, Michele

    2016-02-01

    An investigation into the interactions between a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine (rotor diameter, dT = 0.15 m) and the complex hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes within a meandering channel was carried out in the Outdoor StreamLab research facility at the University of Minnesota St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. This field-scale meandering stream with bulk flow and sediment discharge control provided a location for high spatiotemporally resolved measurements of bed and water surface elevations around the model turbine. The device was installed within an asymmetric, erodible channel cross section under migrating bed form and fixed outer bank conditions. A comparative analysis between velocity and topographic measurements, with and without the turbine installed, highlights the local and nonlocal features of the turbine-induced scour and deposition patterns. In particular, it shows how the cross-section geometry changes, how the bed form characteristics are altered, and how the mean flow field is distorted both upstream and downstream of the turbine. We further compare and discuss how current energy conversion deployments in meander regions would result in different interactions between the turbine operation and the local and nonlocal bathymetry compared to straight channels.

  4. Effects of energetic coherent motions on the power and wake of an axial-flow turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.; Neary, V. S.; Gunawan, B.; Arndt, R. E. A.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2015-05-01

    A laboratory experiment examined the effects of energetic coherent motions on the structure of the wake and power fluctuations generated by a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine. The model turbine was placed in an open-channel flow and operated under subcritical conditions. The incoming flow was locally perturbed with vertically oriented cylinders of various diameters. An array of three acoustic Doppler velocimeters aligned in the cross-stream direction and a torque transducer were used to collect high-resolution and synchronous measurements of the three-velocity components of the incoming and wake flow as well as the turbine power. A strong scale-to-scale interaction between the large-scale and broadband turbulence shed by the cylinders and the turbine power revealed how the turbulence structure modulates the turbine behavior. In particular, the response of the turbine to the distinctive von Kármán-type vortices shed from the cylinders highlighted this phenomenon. The mean and fluctuating characteristics of the turbine wake are shown to be very sensitive to the energetic motions present in the flow. Tip vortices were substantially dampened and the near-field mean wake recovery accelerated in the presence of energetic motions in the flow. Strong coherent motions are shown to be more effective than turbulence levels for triggering the break-up of the spiral structure of the tip-vortices.

  5. Analysis of Effects of Inlet Pressure Losses on Performance of Axial-Flow Type Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Newell D; Palasics, John

    1948-01-01

    The experimentally determined performance characteristics of an axial-flow turbojet engine have been used to estimate the effects of inlet total-pressure losses on net thrust and specific fuel consumption at a constant engine speed. At low altitudes and flight Mach numbers, inlet pressure losses cause an increase in engine discharge temperature and it is possible that the maximum allowable turbine temperature maybe exceeded. An inlet absolute total-pressure loss of 10 percent will result in a thrust loss of 14 percent and a 15-percent increase in specific fuel consumption based on net thrust. At high altitudes and flight Mach numbers, choking conditions exist in the exhaust nozzle and the inlet pressure losses do not affect the discharge temperatures. Under these conditions, a 10-percent loss in inlet absolute total pressure produces a 22-percent loss in net thrust and a 16-percent increase in specific fuel consumption. If the exhaust-nozzle-outlet area is adjusted to compensate for the effect of inlet losses on discharge temperature in the nonchoking cases (low altitude and Mach numbers), the thrust and fuel consumption will be changed in a manner similar to the results obtained in the choking cases.

  6. A computational study of the interaction noise from a small axial-flow fan.

    PubMed

    Lu, H Z; Huang, Lixi; So, R M C; Wang, J

    2007-09-01

    Small axial-flow fans used for computer cooling and many other appliances feature a rotor driven by a downstream motor held by several cylindrical struts. This study focuses on the aerodynamic mechanism of rotor-strut interaction for an isolated fan. The three-dimensional, unsteady flow field is calculated using FLUENT, and the sound radiation predicted by acoustic analogy is compared with measurement data. Striking differences are found between the pressure oscillations in various parts of the structural surfaces during an interaction event. The suction surface of the blade experiences a sudden increase in pressure when the blade trailing edge sweeps past a strut, while the process of pressure decrease on the pressure side of the blade is rather gradual during the interaction. The contribution of the latter towards the total thrust force on the structure is cancelled out significantly by that on the strut. In terms of the acoustic contributions from the rotor and strut, the upstream rotor dominates and this feature differs from the usual rotor-stator interaction acoustics in which the downstream part is responsible for most of the noise. It is therefore argued that the dominant interaction mechanism is potential flow in nature. PMID:17927402

  7. Impact of Periodic Unsteadiness on Performance and Heat Load in Axial Flow Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Om P.; Stetson, Gary M.; Daniels, William A,; Greitzer, Edward M.; Blair, Michael F.; Dring, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of an analytical and experimental investigation, directed at the understanding of the impact of periodic unsteadiness on the time-averaged flows in axial flow turbomachines, are presented. Analysis of available experimental data, from a large-scale rotating rig (LSRR) (low speed rig), shows that in the time-averaged axisymmetric equations the magnitude of the terms representing the effect of periodic unsteadiness (deterministic stresses) are as large or larger than those due to random unsteadiness (turbulence). Numerical experiments, conducted to highlight physical mechanisms associated with the migration of combustor generated hot-streaks in turbine rotors, indicated that the effect can be simulated by accounting for deterministic stress like terms in the time-averaged mass and energy conservation equations. The experimental portion of this program shows that the aerodynamic loss for the second stator in a 1-1/2 stage turbine are influenced by the axial spacing between the second stator leading edge and the rotor trailing edge. However, the axial spacing has little impact on the heat transfer coefficient. These performance changes are believed to be associated with the change in deterministic stress at the inlet to the second stator. Data were also acquired to quantify the impact of indexing the first stator relative to the second stator. For the range of parameters examined, this effect was found to be of the same order as the effect of axial spacing.

  8. Mini hemoreliable axial flow LVAD with magnetic bearings: part 1: historical overview and concept advantages.

    PubMed

    Goldowsky, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Intec has been developing an ultra-miniature axial flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) turbo pump that incorporates non-contacting magnetic bearings specifically designed to eliminate thrombus. The patent pending pump is similar in size to the Jarvik 2000, being 1.0 inch in diameter and having a volume of 25cc. This paper provides two decades of historical background regarding blood pumps and discusses new advances made possible by our contactless design. Design details are left for parts two and three. This LVAD is presently the smallest magnetically suspended turbo pump. It was made possible by use of new 1/2-inch diameter fringing ring magnetic bearings. These axial field bearings are 10 times smaller than equal capacity radial field conventional magnetic bearings currently in development in turbo pumps. Our LVAD is physiologically controllable, without the use of invasive sensors, by directly measuring pump differential pressure with the magnetic bearings. This mechanism will allow attainment of cyclic, closed-loop control of impeller revolutions per minute to achieve a high degree of pressure pulsatility. Pulsatile flow is important in obtaining long-term hemodynamic reliability without thrombus being generated in either the pump or body. PMID:11814105

  9. Analysis of tonal noise generating mechanisms in low-speed axial-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Zecchin, Fabio Mazzocut

    2016-08-01

    The present paper reports a comparison of experimental SPL spectral data related to the tonal noise generated by axial-flow fans. A nine blade rotor has been operated at free discharge conditions and in four geometrical configurations in which different kinds of tonal noise generating mechanisms are present: large-scale inlet turbulent structures, tip-gap flow, turbulent wakes, and rotor-stator interaction. The measurements have been taken in a hemi-anechoic chamber at constant rotational speed and, in order to vary the acoustic source strength, during low angular acceleration, linear speed ramps. In order to avoid erroneous quantitative evaluations if the acoustic propagation effects are not considered, the acoustic response functions of the different test configurations have been computed by means of the spectral decomposition method. Then, the properties of the tonal noise generating mechanisms have been studied. To this aim, the constant-Strouhal number SPL, obtained by means of measurements taken during the speed ramps, have been compared with the propagation function. Finally, the analysis of the phase of the acoustic pressure has allowed to distinguish between random and deterministic tonal noise generating mechanisms and to collect information about the presence of important propagation effects.

  10. An analytical model of axial compressor off-design performance

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, T.R.; Horlock, J.H. . Whittle Lab.)

    1994-07-01

    An analysis is presented of the off-design performance of multistage axial-flow compressors. It is based on an analytical solution, valid for small perturbations in operating conditions from the design point, and provides an insight into the effects of choices made during the compressor design process on performance and off-design stage matching. It is shown that the mean design value of stage loading coefficient ([psi] = [Delta]h[sub 0]/U[sup 2]) has a dominant effect on off-design performance, whereas the stage-wise distribution of stage loading coefficient and the design value of flow coefficient have little influence. The powerful effects of variable stator vanes on stage-matching are also demonstrated and these results are shown to agree well with previous work. The slope of the working line of a gas turbine engine, overlaid on overall compressor characteristics, is shown to have a strong effect on the off-design stage-matching through the compressor. The model is also used to analyze design changes to the compressor geometry and to show how errors in estimates of annulus blockage, decided during the design process, have less effect on compressor performance than has previously been thought.

  11. Centrifugal Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-02-06

    The article discusses small high speed centrifugal compressors. This topic was covered in a previous ASHRAE Journal column (2003). This article reviews another configuration which has become an established product. The operation, energy savings and market potential of this offering are addressed as well.

  12. Design and numeric evaluation of a novel axial-flow left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Toptop, Koral; Kadipasaoglu, Kamuran A

    2013-01-01

    Virtual design characteristics and performance of the first Turkish axial-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are presented, with emphasis on rotor geometry. The patented rotor design includes a central flow channel carved inside the main block, which carries permanent magnets. A concentric rotor-stator gap minimizes the distance between respective magnets, improving electromagnetic efficiency and creating a second blood pathway. Dual sets of three helical blades, placed on the shaft and external surface of the rotor block, ensure unidirectionality. Hemodynamic performance was tested with computational fluid dynamics (CFD); and rotor-blade geometry was optimized, to maximize overall efficiency d and minimize backflow and wall shear stresses. For a shaft radius of 4.5 mm, rotor blade height of 2.5 mm, and blade inlet and exit metal angles of 67° and 32°, pump operation at the nominal head-flow combination (5 L/min and 100.4 mm Hg) was achieved at a rotor speed of 10,313 rpm. At the nominal point, backflow as percent of total flow was 7.29 and 29.87% at rotor inlet and exit, respectively; overall hydraulic efficiency reached 21.59%; and maximum area-averaged shroud shear was 520 Pa. Overall efficiency peaked at 24.07% for a pump flow of 6.90 L/min, and averaged at 22.57% within the flow range of 4-8 L/min. We concluded that the design satisfies initial rotor design criteria, and that continued studies with diffuser optimization and transient flow analysis are warranted. PMID:23644609

  13. Development of an axial flow ventricular assist device: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, K; Damm, G; Benkowsky, R; Aber, G; Bacak, J; Svjkovsky, P; Glueck, J; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y; Noon, G P

    1995-07-01

    A collaborative effort between Baylor College of Medicine and NASA/Johnson Space Center is underway to develop an axial flow ventricular assist device (VAD). We evaluated inducer/impeller component designs in a series of in vitro hemolysis tests. As a result of computational fluid dynamic analysis, a flow inducer was added to the front of the pump impeller. According to the surface pressure distribution, the flow inducer blades were connected to the impeller long blades. This modification eliminated high negative pressure areas at the leading edge of the impeller. Comparative studies were performed between inducer blade sections that flowed smoothly into the impeller blades (continuous blades) and those that formed discrete separate pumping sections (discontinuous blades). The inducer/impeller with continuous blades showed significantly (p < 0.003) lower hemolysis with a normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of 0.018 +/- 0.007 g/100 L (n = 3), compared with the discontinuous model, which demonstrated an NIH of 0.050 +/- 0.007 g/100 L (n = 3). The continuous blade model was evaluated in vivo for 2 days with no problems. One of the pumps evaluated ran for 5 days in vivo although thrombus formation was recognized on the flow straightener and the inducer/impeller. As a result of this study, the pump material was changed from polyether polyurethane to polycarbonate. The fabrication method was also changed to a computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling process with a final vapor polish. These changes resulted in an NIH of 0.0029 +/- 0.0009 g/100 L (n = 4), which is a significant (p < .0001) value 6 times less than that of the previous model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8572968

  14. A Guide to Axial-Flow Turbine Off-Design Computer Program AXOD2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.

    2014-01-01

    A Users Guide for the axial flow turbine off-design computer program AXOD2 is composed in this paper. This Users Guide is supplementary to the original Users Manual of AXOD. Three notable contributions of AXOD2 to its predecessor AXOD, both in the context of the Guide or in the functionality of the code, are described and discussed in length. These are: 1) a rational representation of the mathematical principles applied, with concise descriptions of the formulas implemented in the actual coding. Their physical implications are addressed; 2) the creation and documentation of an Addendum Listing of input namelist-parameters unique to AXOD2, that differ from or are in addition to the original input-namelists given in the Manual of AXOD. Their usages are discussed; and 3) the institution of proper stoppages of the code execution, encoding termination messaging and error messages of the execution to AXOD2. These measures are to safe-guard the integrity of the code execution, such that a failure mode encountered during a case-study would not plunge the code execution into indefinite loop, or cause a blow-out of the program execution. Details on these are discussed and illustrated in this paper. Moreover, this computer program has since been reconstructed substantially. Standard FORTRAN Langue was instituted, and the code was formatted in Double Precision (REAL*8). As the result, the code is now suited for use in a local Desktop Computer Environment, is perfectly portable to any Operating System, and can be executed by any FORTRAN compiler equivalent to a FORTRAN 9095 compiler. AXOD2 will be available through NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Software Repository.

  15. The Three Dimensional Flow Field at the Exit of an Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Ristic, D.; Chu, S.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic and comprehensive investigation was performed to provide detailed data on the three dimensional viscous flow phenomena downstream of a modem turbine rotor and to understand the flow physics such as origin, nature, development of wakes, secondary flow, and leakage flow. The experiment was carried out in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) at Penn State, with velocity measurements taken with a 3-D LDV System. Two radial traverses at 1% and 10% of chord downstream of the rotor have been performed to identify the three-dimensional flow features at the exit of the rotor blade row. Sufficient spatial resolution was maintained to resolve blade wake, secondary flow, and tip leakage flow. The wake deficit is found to be substantial, especially at 1% of chord downstream of the rotor. At this location, negative axial velocity occurs near the tip, suggesting flow separation in the tip clearance region. Turbulence intensities peak in the wake region, and cross- correlations are mainly associated with the velocity gradient of the wake deficit. The radial velocities, both in the wake and in the endwall region, are found to be substantial. Two counter-rotating secondary flows are identified in the blade passage, with one occupying the half span close to the casino and the other occupying the half span close to the hub. The tip leakage flow is well restricted to 10% immersion from the blade tip. There are strong vorticity distributions associated with these secondary flows and tip leakage flow. The passage averaged data are in good agreement with design values.

  16. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions. PMID:24231821

  17. Installation effects on the tonal noise generated by axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the results of experiments on a low-speed axial-flow fan flush mounted on flat panels typically employed in tests on automotive cooling fans. The experiments have been conducted in a hemi-anechoic chamber and were aimed at evaluating the installation effects of the whole test configuration, including chamber floor and size and shape of the mounting panel. The largest panels cause important SPL variations in a narrow, low frequency range. Their effect on the propagation function has been verified by means of parametric BEM computations. A regular wavy trend associated with reflections from the floor is also present. In both cases, the tonal noise is more strongly affected than the broadband one. The analysis is performed by means of an existing spectral decomposition technique and a new one, which allows to consider different noise generating mechanisms and also to separate the emitted tonal and broadband noise from the associated propagation effects. In order to better identify the features of the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) harmonics, the phase of the acoustic pressure is also analysed. Measurements are taken during speed ramps, which allow to obtain both constant-Strouhal number SPL data and constant-speed data. The former data set is employed in the new technique, while the latter may be employed in the standard spectral decomposition techniques. Based on both the similarity theory and the analysis of the Green's function of the problem, a theoretical description of the structure of the received SPL spectrum is given. Then, the possibility of discriminating between tonal and broadband noise generating mechanisms is analysed and a theoretical base for the new spectral decomposition technique is provided.

  18. Numerical analysis of head degrade law under cavitation condition of contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the flow-head characteristic curve, the SST turbulence model, homogeneous multiphase model and Rayleigh-Plesset equation were applied to simulate the cavitation characteristics in contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump under different conditions based on ANSYS CFX software. The distribution of cavity, pressure coefficient of the blade at the design point under different cavitation conditions were obtained. The analysis results of flow field show that the vapour volume distribution on the impeller indicates that the vapour first appears at the leading edge of blade and then extends to the outlet of impeller with the reduction of Net Positive Suction Head Allowance (NPSHA). The present study illustrates that the main reason for the decline of the pump performance is the development of cavitation, and the simulation can truly reflect the cavitation performance of the contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump.

  19. Effects of inlet treatment location and treatment cavity depth on compressor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of acoustic liners to reduce compressor noise inside and in front of an inlet was studied. An axial flow research compressor and a specially designed inlet were used inside an anechoic chamber. Acoustic and performance data were obtained for a range of inlet treatment locations and cavity depths to determine their effects on inlet noise over a range of blade passing frequencies. The greatest noise reductions in front of the inlet were obtained with acoustic treatment located close to the compressor and backed with the deepest cavities tested. Inside the inlet the maximum noise level reductions were obtained in the area of the treatment regardless of treatment location. No appreciable losses in compressor performance were measured.

  20. Passive magnetic bearing in the 3rd generation miniature axial flow pump-the valvo pump 2.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Ishida, Yuya; Yano, Tetsuya; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2015-06-01

    The new miniature axial flow pump (valvo pump 2) that is installed at the base of the ascending aorta consists of a six-phase stator, an impeller in which four neodymium magnets are incorporated, and passive magnetic bearings that suspend the impeller for axial levitation. The impeller is sustained by hydrodynamic force between the blade tip of the impeller and the inner housing of the stator. The passive magnetic bearing consists of a ring neodymium magnet and a columnar neodymium magnet. The ring neodymium magnet is set in the stationary side and the columnar neodymium magnet is incorporated in the impeller shaft. Both neodymium magnets are coaxially mounted, and the anterior and posterior passive magnetic bearings suspend the impeller by repulsion force against the hydrodynamic force that acts to move the impeller in the inflow port direction. The passive magnetic bearing was evaluated by a tensile test, and the levitation force of 8.5 N and stiffness of 2.45 N/mm was obtained. Performance of the axial flow pump was evaluated by an in vitro experiment. The passive magnetic bearing showed sufficient levitation capacity to suspend the impeller in an axial direction. In conclusion, the passive magnetic bearing is promising to be one of levitation technology for the third-generation axial flow blood pump. PMID:25407124

  1. Hydride compressor

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  2. Supersonic compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Novaresi, Mark A.; Cornelius, Charles C.

    2008-02-26

    A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having an axially oriented compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which forms a supersonic shockwave axially, between adjacent strakes. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the gas compression ramp on a strake, the shock capture lip on the adjacent strake, and captures the resultant pressure within the stationary external housing while providing a diffuser downstream of the compression ramp.

  3. Compressor surge prevention

    SciTech Connect

    McLeister, L.

    1995-09-01

    One of the more difficult challenges facing compressor and control engineers is designing compressor control and anti-surge packages that maximize efficiency while maintaining safe compressor operating conditions. This paper focuses specifically on centrifugal compressor anti-surge philosophies. The conditions that precipitate surge in centrifugal compressors will be explored along with risk reduction techniques. Axial and reciprocating compressors have slightly different characteristics and are topics for another discussion.

  4. Three Dimensional Viscous Flow Field in an Axial Flow Turbine Nozzle Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristic, D.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is experimental and computational study of three dimensional viscous flow field in the nozzle passage of an axial flow turbine stage. The nozzle passage flow field has been measured using a two sensor hot-wire probe at various axial and radial stations. In addition, two component LDV measurements at one axial station (x/c(sum m) = 0.56) were performed to measure the velocity field. Static pressure measurements and flow visualization, using a fluorescent oil technique, were also performed to obtain the location of transition and the endwall limiting streamlines. A three dimensional boundary layer code, with a simple intermittency transition model, was used to predict the viscous layers along the blade and endwall surfaces. The boundary layers on the blade surface were found to be very thin and mostly laminar, except on the suction surface downstream of 70% axial chord. Strong radial pressure gradient, especially close to the suction surface, induces strong cross flow components in the trailing edge regions of the blade. On the end-walls the boundary layers were much thicker, especially near the suction corner of the casing surface, caused by secondary flow. The secondary flow region near the suction-casing surface corner indicates the presence of the passage vortex detached from the blade surface. The corner vortex is found to be very weak. The presence of a closely spaced rotor downstream (20% of the nozzle vane chord) introduces unsteadiness in the blade passage. The measured instantaneous velocity signal was filtered using FFT square window to remove the periodic unsteadiness introduced by the downstream rotor and fans. The filtering decreased the free stream turbulence level from 2.1% to 0.9% but had no influence on the computed turbulence length scale. The computation of the three dimensional boundary layers is found to be accurate on the nozzle passage blade surfaces, away from the end-walls and the secondary flow region. On

  5. Initial hydrodynamic study on a new intraaortic axial flow pump: Dynamic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Zhao, H; Hu, S; Zhu, X; Wu, Q; Ren, B; Ma, W

    2001-04-01

    Rotary blood pumps have been researched as implantable ventricular assist devices for years. To further reduce the complex of implanted axial pumps, the authors proposed a new concept of intraaortic axial pump, termed previously as "dynamic aortic valve (DAV)". Instead of being driven by an intraaortic micro-electric motor, it was powered by a magnetic field from outside of body. To ensure the perfusion of coronary artery, the axial flow pump is to be implanted in the position of aortic valve. It could serve as either a blood pump or a mechanical valve depending on the power input. This research tested the feasibility of the new concept in model study. A column, made from permanent magnet, is jointed to an impeller in a concentric way to form a "rotor-impeller". Supported by a hanging shaft cantilevered in the center of a rigid cage, the rotor-impeller can be turned by the magnetic field in the surrounding space. In the present prototype, the rotor is 8 mm in diameter and 15 mm in length, the impeller has 3 vanes with an outer diameter of 18 mm. The supporting cage is 22 mm in outer diameter and 20 mm in length. When tested, the DAV prototype is inserted into the tube of a mock circuit. The alternative magnetic field is produced by a rotating magnet placed side by side with the rotor-impeller at a distance of 30 mm. Once the alternative magnetic field is presented in the surrounding space, the DAV starts to turn, leading to a pressure difference and liquid flow in the tube. The flow rate or pressure difference is proportioned to rotary speed. At the maximal output of hydraulic power, the flow rate reached 5 L/min against an afterload of 100 mmHg. The maximal pressure difference generated by DAV at a rotation rate of 12600 r/min was 147 mmHg. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of "DAV", further research on this concept is justifiable. PMID:18726438

  6. Stereoscopic PIV on multiple color-coded light sheets and its application to axial flow in flapping robotic insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pick, Simon; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2009-12-01

    Non-scanning volume flow measurement techniques such as 3D-PTV, holographic and tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) permit reconstructions of all three components (3C) of velocity and vorticity vectors in a fluid volume (3D). In this study, we present a novel 3D3C technique termed Multiple-Color-Plane Stereo Particle-Image-Velocimetry (color PIV), which allows instantaneous measurements of 3C velocity vectors in six parallel, colored light sheets. We generated the light sheets by passing white light of two strobes through dichroic color filters and imaged the slices by two 3CCD color cameras in Stereo-PIV configuration. The stereo-color images were processed by custom software routines that sorted each colored fluid particle into one of six gray-scale images according to its hue, saturation, and luminance. We used conventional Stereo PIV cross-correlation algorithms to compute a 3D planar vector field for each light sheet and subsequently interpolated a volume flow map from the six vector fields. As a first application, we quantified the wake and axial flow in the vortical structures of a robotic insect (fruit fly) model wing. In contrast to previous findings, the measured data indicate strong axial flow components on the upper wing surface, including axial flow in the leading-edge vortex core. Collectively, color PIV is robust against mechanical misalignments, avoids laser safety issues, and computes instantaneous 3D vector fields in a fraction of the time typical for other 3D systems. Color PIV might thus be of value for volume measurements of highly unsteady flows.

  7. Development of the Baylor/NASA axial flow ventricular assist device: in vitro performance and systematic hemolysis test results.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, K; Damm, G A; Bozeman, R J; Akkerman, J W; Aber, G S; Svejkovsky, P A; Bacak, J W; Orime, Y; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y

    1994-01-01

    Our newly developed axial flow pump consists of a flow tube, an internal rotating impeller, and a fixed flow stator (we call the stator) behind the impeller. This pump produces a flow of 3 to 8 L/min against 50 to 150 mm Hg pressure difference, respectively, in the range of 10,000 to 16,000 rpm. An axial flow pump that will be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) has to have low hemolytic and good antithrombogenic characteristics. This paper will show how to decrease the hemolytic properties of this axial flow pump systematically using a test matrix. The test variables evaluated were impeller blade tip geometry, impeller flow tube clearance (radial clearance), impeller stator clearance (axial clearance), impeller blade number, stator blade number, and impeller length. All in vitro hemolysis tests were performed at 5.0 L/min against 100 mm Hg pressure difference using a total of 83 bags of fresh bovine blood. The results were as follows: the impeller blade tip geometry did not significantly effect hemolysis, a 0.005-inch and a 0.009-inch radial clearance were significantly (p < 0.01 or 0.001) less hemolytic than the other clearances, a 0.075-inch axial clearance was significantly (p < 0.05) more hemolytic than the other clearances, two- and six-bladed impellers were significantly (p < 0.01 and 0.02, respectively) less hemolytic than a four-bladed impeller, a five-bladed stator was significantly (p < 0.05 or 0.01) less hemolytic than the other stators, and the impeller length did not make a significant difference. Currently, the best index of hemolysis is 0.031 +/- 0.018 g/100 L, and using parameters from these results, implantable devices are being fabricated. PMID:8141655

  8. Development of Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor for an alternative axial flow blood pump design.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2006-05-01

    A Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed to provide delivery of both motoring torque and levitation force for an alternative axial flow blood pump design with an enclosed impeller. The axial flow pumps currently available introduce electromagnetic coupling from the motor's stator to the impeller by means of permanent magnets (PMs) embedded in the tips of the pump's blades. This design has distinct disadvantages, for example, pumping efficiency and electromagnetic coupling transmission are compromised by the constrained or poor geometry of the blades and limited pole width of the PMs, respectively. In this research, a Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed. It is composed of (i) an eight-pole PM hollow-cylindrical rotor assembly supposedly to house and enclose the impeller of an axial flow blood pump, and (ii) a six-pole stator with two sets of copper wire and different winding configurations to provide the motoring torque and levitating force for the rotor assembly. MATLAB's xPC Target interface hardware was used as the rapid prototyping tool for the development of the controller for the self-bearing motor. Experimental results on a free/simply supported rotor assembly validated the design feasibility and control algorithm effectiveness in providing both the motoring torque and levitation force for the rotor. When levitated, a maximum orbital displacement of 0.3 mm corresponding to 1050 rpm of the rotor was measured by two eddy current probes placed in the orthogonal direction. This design has the advantage of eliminating the trade-off between motoring torques, levitating force, and pumping efficiency of previous studies. It also indicated the benefits of enclosed-impeller design as having good dynamic response, linearity, and better reliability. The nonmechanical contact feature between rotating and stationary parts will further reduce hemolysis and thromboembolitic tendencies in a typical blood pump application. PMID:16683951

  9. Turbine modeling technique to generate off-design performance data for both single and multistage axial-flow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    This technique is applicable to larger axial flow turbines which may or may not incorporate variable geometry in the first stage stator. A user specified option will also permit the calculation of design point cooling flow levels and the corresponding change in turbine efficiency. The modeling technique was incorporated into a time sharing computer program in order to facilitate its use. Because this report contains a description of the input output data, values of typical inputs, and example cases, it is suitable as a user's manual.

  10. Effect of argon on the performance of a fast-axial flow CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Jelvani, S; Amiri, Kh; Pazokian, H; Montazerolghaem, M; Mollabashi, M; Naeimi, S A; Esmaeilpour, D

    2011-01-31

    The performance characteristics of a fast-axial flow (FAF) cw CO{sub 2} laser are described. The dependences of the output power, efficiency, and discharge voltage on the discharge current of a FAF cw CO{sub 2} laser with optimised composition of the CO{sub 2}:N2:He=1:4.4:7.6 gas mixture with a small amount of argon are studied experimentally at two pressures of 50 and 60 mbar in open and closed cycle regimes of the laser system. (lasers)

  11. Altitude Investigation of Gas Temperature Distribution at Turbine of Three Similar Axial-Flow Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, W.R.; Schulze, F.W.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of inlet pressure, corrected engine speed, and turbine temperature level on turbine-inlet gas temperature distributions was conducted on a J40-WE-6, interim J40-WE-6, and prototype J40-WE-8 turbojet engine in the altitude wind tunnel at the NAC.4 Lewis laboratory. The engines were investigated over a range of simulated pressure altitudes from 15,000 to 55,000 feet, flight Mach numbers from 0.12 to 0.64, and corrected engine speeds from 7198 to 8026 rpm, The gas temperature distribution at the turbine of the three engines over the range of operating conditions investigated was considered satisfactory from the standpoint of desired temperature distribution with one exception - the distribution for the J40-WE-6 engine indicated a trend with decreasing engine-inlet pressure for the temperature to exceed the desired in the region of the blade hub. Installation of a compressor-outlet mixer vane assembly remedied this undesirable temperature distribution, The experimental data have shown that turbine-inlet temperature distributions are influenced in the expected manner by changes in compressor-outlet pressure or mass-flow distribution and by changes in combustor hole-area distribution. The similarity between turbine-inlet and turbine-outlet temperature distribution indicated only a small shift in temperature distribution imposed by the turbine rotors. The attainable jet thrusts of the three engines were influenced in different degrees and directions by changes in temperature distributions with change in engine-inlet pressure. Inability to match the desired temperature distribution resulted, for the J40-WE-6 engine, in an 11-percent thrust loss based on an average turbine-inlet temperature of 1500 F at an engine-inlet pressure of 500 pounds per square foot absolute. Departure from the desired temperature distribution in the Slade tip region results, for the prototype J40-WE-8 engine, in an attainable thrust increase of 3 to 4 percent as

  12. Supersonic compressor

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    2016-04-12

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  13. Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz

    2010-09-15

    A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

  14. Dimension determination of precursive stall events in a single stage high speed compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, M.M.; Qammar, H.K.; Hartley, T.T.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamics for a single-stage, axial-flow, high speed compressor core, specifically, the NASA Lewis rotor stage 37. Due to the overall blading design for this advanced core compressor, each stage has considerable tip loading and higher speed than most compressor designs, thus, the compressor operates closer to the stall margin. The onset of rotating stall is explained as bifurcations in the dynamics of axial compressors. Data taken from the compressor during a rotating stall event is analyzed. Through the use of a box-assisted correlation dimension methodology, the attractor dimension is determined during the bifurcations leading to rotating stall. The intent of this study is to examine the behavior of precursive stall events so as to predict the entrance into rotating stall. This information may provide a better means to identify, avoid or control the undersireable event of rotating stall formation in high speed compressor cores. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Centrifugal reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient compressor uses centrifugal force to compress gas. System incorporates two coupled dc motors, each driving separate centrifugal reciprocating-compressor assembly. Motors are synchronized to accelerate and decelerate alternately.

  16. Rotor tip clearance effects on overall and blade-element performance of axial-flow transonic fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of tip clearance on the overall and blade-element performance of an axial-flow transonic fan stage are presented. The 50-centimeter-diameter fan was tested at four tip clearances (nonrotating) from 0.061 to 0.178 centimeter. The calculated radial growth of the blades was 0.040 centimeter at design conditions. The decrease in overall stage performance with increasing clearance is attributed to the loss in rotor performance. For the rotor the effects of clearance on performance parameters extended to about 70 percent of blade span from the tip. The stage still margin based on an assumed operating line decreased from 15.3 to 0 percent as the clearance increased from 0.061 to 0.178 centimeter.

  17. Numerical modeling of a fast-axial-flow CO2 laser with considering viscosity and ambipolar diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, Ravil S.; Fedosov, A. A.

    1996-03-01

    A numerical method for analysis of a fast axial flow glow discharge carbon dioxide laser is developed. The method is based on the self-consistent solution to the two-dimensional steady- state Navier-Stokes equations in thin-shear-layer approximation (slender channel equations), the parabolized glow discharge equations, and the vibrational relaxation equations. The discharge equations include the continuity equations for the electrons, the positive and negative ions. The one-mode relaxation model for the vibrational kinetics and the plane-parallel optical resonator model are used. The present model is based on the assumption of the charge neutrality and limited by consideration of the positive column of discharge without taking into account the cathode-fall and anode-fall regions.

  18. Generation of azimuthally polarized beams in fast axial flow CO2 laser with hybrid circular subwavelength grating mirror.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Li, Bo; Zhao, Heng; Wang, Wenjin; Hu, Yi; Liu, Sisi; Wang, Youqing

    2014-06-10

    A hybrid circular subwavelength grating mirror is proposed and fabricated as a rear mirror in a fast axial flow CO2 laser system to generate azimuthally polarized beams (APBs). This grating mirror, with particular gold-covered ridges and nanopillar-stuffed grooves, performs wideband TE wave reflectivity and high polarization selectivity. It shows that the polarization selectivity mechanism lies in the gold ridge's high reflectivity to the TE wave and the lower TM wave reflectivity, which are the result of the mode leaking into substrate through the dielectric-like nanopillar layer. Finally, a high-quality 550 W APB is obtained in subsequent experiments, which provides potential applications in drilling and welding. PMID:24921136

  19. Analytical and experimental study of mean flow and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, C. A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1974-01-01

    The effort conducted to gather additional understanding of the complex inviscid and viscid effects existing within the passages of a three-bladed axial flow inducer operating at a flow coefficient of 0.065 is summarized. The experimental investigations included determination of the blade static pressure and blade limiting streamline angle distributions, and measurement of the three components of mean velocity, turbulence intensities and turbulence stresses at locations inside the inducer blade passage utilizing a rotating three-sensor hotwire probe. Applicable equations were derived for the hotwire data reduction analysis and solved numerically to obtain the appropriate flow parameters. Analytical investigations were conducted to predict the three-dimensional inviscid flow in the inducer by numerically solving the exact equations of motion, and to approximately predict the three-dimensional viscid flow by incorporating the dominant viscous terms into the exact equations. The analytical results are compared with the experimental measurements and design values where appropriate.

  20. Centrifugal Compressor Surge Controlled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    It shows the variation in compressor mass flow with time as the mass flow is throttled to drive the compressor into surge. Surge begins where wide variations in mass flow occur. Air injection is then turned on to bring about a recovery from the initial surge condition and stabilize the compressor. The throttle is closed further until surge is again initiated. Air injection is increased to again recover from the surge condition and stabilize the compressor.

  1. Miniature Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixsmith, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    Miniature turbocompressor designed for reliability and long life. Cryogenic system includes compressor, turboexpander, and heat exchanger provides 5 W of refrigeration at 70 K from 150 W input power. Design speed of machine 510,000 rpm. Compressor has gas-lubricated journal bearings and magnetic thrust bearing. When compressor runs no bearing contact and no wear.

  2. Experimental investigation of an axial-flow-compressor inlet stage operating at transonic relative inlet Mach numbers V : rotor blade-element performance at a reduced blade angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenk, Francis C; Lewis, George W , Jr; Lieblein, Seymour

    1957-01-01

    At a corrected speed of 1100 feet per second, the low-blade-angle rotor operated with a relative inlet Mach number of 1.2, a diffusion factor of 0.65, and an axial velocity ratio of 0.71 in the tip region (11 percent of passage height away from the outer wall). The measured minimum-loss coefficient was 0.35, and this value falls above a previous correlation of rotor losses with diffusion factor. Through a comparison with data for three other rotors, the occurrence of high losses was related to a high suction-surface Mach number. These comparisons also indicated that axial velocity ratios between 0.73 and 1.10 have no independent effect on losses.

  3. Performance of tandem-bladed transonic compressor rotor with tip speed of 1375 feet per second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, D. C.; Janetzke, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The design and experimental performance of a 20-inch diameter tandem-bladed axial-flow transonic compressor rotor is presented. Radial surveys were made of the flow conditions. At design speed the peak efficiency was 0.88 and occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 63 pounds per second. At peak efficiency the total pressure and total temperature ratios were 1.77 and 1.20, respectively. The stall margin at design speed was 10 percent based on weight flows and total pressure ratios at peak efficiency and near stall.

  4. Design geometry and design/off-design performance computer codes for compressors and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes some NASA Lewis (i.e., government owned) computer codes capable of being used for airbreathing propulsion system studies to determine the design geometry and to predict the design/off-design performance of compressors and turbines. These are not CFD codes; velocity-diagram energy and continuity computations are performed fore and aft of the blade rows using meanline, spanline, or streamline analyses. Losses are provided by empirical methods. Both axial-flow and radial-flow configurations are included.

  5. Three dimensional flow field inside compressor rotor, including blade boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galmes, J. M.; Pouagere, M.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1982-01-01

    The Reynolds stress equation, pressure strain correlation, and dissipative terms and diffusion are discussed in relation to turbulence modelling using the Reynolds stress model. Algebraic modeling of Reynolds stresses and calculation of the boundary layer over an axial cylinder are examined with regards to the kinetic energy model for turbulence modelling. The numerical analysis of blade and hub wall boundary layers, and an experimental study of rotor blade boundary layer in an axial flow compressor rotor are discussed. The Patankar-Spalding numerical method for two dimensional boundary layers is included.

  6. Three dimensional flow field inside compressor rotor, including blade boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouagare, M.; Galmes, J. M.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1982-01-01

    The flow in a turbomachinery blade passage has a predominant flow direction. The viscous diffusion in the streamwise direction is usually small and the elliptic influence is transmitted upstream through the pressure field. Starting with a guessed pressure field, it is possible to converge on the full elliptic solution by iterating between a parabolic solution and an iteration of the pressure field. The main steps of the calculation are given. The blade boundary layers which are three dimensional with laminar, transitional, turbulent, and separation zones are investigated. The kinetic energy is analyzed, and the dissipation equation is presented. Measurements were made of the three dimensional flow inside an axial flow compressor passage.

  7. Preliminary Results of Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of X34C-4B Turbojet Engine. III - Compressor Performance. 3; Compressor Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, David T.; Thorman, H. Carl

    1947-01-01

    The performance of the 11-stage axial-flow compressor in the X24C-4B turbojet engine was analyzed on the basis of results obtained from an investigation of the complete engine in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The engine was operated with four, exhaust nozzles of different outlet area over a range of engine speeds from 6000 to 12,500 rpm, corrected engine speeds from approximately 6100 to 13,600 rpm, and compressor Mach numbers from 0.45 to 1.00. Data are presented for engine operation over a range of simulated altitudes from 15,000 to 45,000 feet and simulated flight Mach numbers from 0.24 to 1.08.

  8. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 3000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. 3; Analysis of Combustion-Chamber Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Carl E.

    1948-01-01

    Combustion chamber performance properties of a 3000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine were determined. Data are presented for a range of simulated altitudes from 15,000 to 45,0000 feet and a range of Mach numbers from 0.23 to 1.05 for various modifications of the engine.

  9. Compressor blade setting angle accuracy study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic test of a small, single stage, highly loaded, axial flow transonic compressor is covered. The stage was modified by fabricating a 24 blade rotor with mis-set blades in a repeating pattern - two degrees closed from nominal, two degrees open from nominal and nominal. The unit was instrumented to determine overall performance and average blade element data. High-response, dynamic pressure probes were installed to record pressure patterns at selected points in the flowpath. Testing was conducted at speeds from 70 to 94% of design equivalent speed with a conventional casing and also with circumferential grooves over the rotor tip. Testing indicated severe performance penalties were incurred as a result of the mis-set blading. Lower flow, pressure ratio, and efficiency were observed for the stage with or without casing treatment. Periodic pressure variations were detected at every location where high response pressure sensors were located and were directly related to blading geometry.

  10. Wave Augmented Diffusers for Centrifugal Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual device is introduced which would utilize unsteady wave motion to slow and turn flows in the diffuser section of a centrifugal compressor. The envisioned device would substantially reduce the size of conventional centrifugal diffusers by eliminating the relatively large ninety degree bend needed to turn the flow from the radial/tangential to the axial direction. The bend would be replaced by a wall and the flow would instead exit through a series of rotating ports located on a disk, adjacent to the diffuser hub, and fixed to the impeller shaft. The ports would generate both expansion and compression waves which would rapidly transition from the hub/shroud (axial) direction to the radial/tangential direction. The waves would in turn induce radial/tangential and axial flow. This paper presents a detailed description of the device. Simplified cycle analysis and performance results are presented which were obtained using a time accurate, quasi-one-dimensional CFD code with models for turning, port flow conditions, and losses due to wall shear stress. The results indicate that a periodic wave system can be established which yields diffuser performance comparable to a conventional diffuser. Discussion concerning feasibility, accuracy, and integration follow.

  11. Small axial compressor technology, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.; Ware, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    A scaled single-stage, highly-loaded, axial-flow transonic compressor was tested at speeds from 70 to 110% design equivalent speed to evaluate the effects of scaling compromises and the individual and combined effects of rotor tip running clearance and rotor shroud casing treatment on the overall and blade element performance. At design speed and 1% tip clearance the stage demonstrated an efficiency of 83.2% at 96.4% design flow and a pressure ratio of 1.865. Casing treatment increased design speed surge margin 2.0 points to 12.8%. Overall performance was essentially unchanged. An increase in rotor running clearance to 2.2%, with smooth casing, reduced design speed peak efficiency 5.7 points, flow by 7.4%, pressure ratio to 1.740, and surge margin to 5.4%. Reinstalling casing treatment regained 3.5 points in design speed peak efficiency, 4.7% flow, increased pressure ratio to 1.800 and surge margin to 8.7%.

  12. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  13. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1992-01-01

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  14. Unsteady flow analysis of an axial flow hydraulic turbine with collection devices comprising a different number of blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Hirama, Sou; Kikuchi, Norio

    2015-06-01

    We previously devised a new type of portable hydraulic turbine that uses the kinetic energy of an open-channel flow to improve output power by catching and accelerating the flow. The turbine contains an axial flow runner with an appended collection device and a diffuser section that is not axisymmetric. The objective of this study is to determine how interference between the collection device and the runner influences performance characteristics of the turbine. We investigated the performance characteristics of the turbine and flow field for different numbers of blades during both unsteady and steady flow. During an unsteady flow, the maximum values of power coefficients for three and two blades increased by approximately 8.8% and 21.4%, respectively, compared to those during a steady flow. For the three-blade runner, the power coefficient showed small fluctuations, but for the two-blade runner, the power coefficient showed large fluctuations. These fluctuations in the power coefficient are attributed to fluctuations in the loading coefficient, which were generated by interference between the runner and the diffuser section of the collection device.

  15. Noninvasive blood-flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Fukuda, Kyohei; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In order to monitor the condition of a patient using a left ventricular assist system (LVAS), blood flow should be measured. However, the reliable determination of blood-flow rate has not been established. The purpose of the present study is to develop a noninvasive blood-flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation for an axial flow blood pump. The flow meter uses the centrifugal force generated by the flow rate in the curved cannula. Two strain gauges served as sensors. The first gauges were attached to the curved area to measure static pressure and centrifugal force, and the second gauges were attached to straight area to measure static pressure. The flow rate was determined by the differences in output from the two gauges. The zero compensation was constructed based on the consideration that the flow rate could be estimated during the initial driving condition and the ventricular suction condition without using the flow meter. A mock circulation loop was constructed in order to evaluate the measurement performance of the developed flow meter with zero compensation. As a result, the zero compensation worked effectively for the initial calibration and the zero-drift of the measured flow rate. We confirmed that the developed flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation was able to accurately measure the flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:24110631

  16. Finite Larmor radius magnetohydrodynamic analysis of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z pinches with sheared axial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X. M.; Huang, L.; Jian, G. D.

    2007-03-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Z pinches with sheared axial flow (SAF) is analyzed using finite Larmor radius (FLR) magnetohydrodynamic theory, in whose momentum equation the FLR effect (also referred to as the effect of gyroviscosity) is introduced through an anisotropic ion (FLR) stress tensor. A dispersion relation is derived for the linear RT instability. Both analytical and numerical solutions of the dispersion equation are given. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the RT instability can be stabilized by a sufficient FLR, whereas the long-wavelength modes can be stabilized by a sufficient SAF. In the small-wavenumber region, for normalized wavenumber K<2.4, the hybrid RT/KH (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability is shown to be the most difficult to stabilize. However the synergistic effect of the SAF and gyroviscosity can mitigate both the RT instability in the large-wavenumber region (K>2.4) and the hybrid RT/KH instability in the small-wavenumber region. In addition, this synergistic effect can compress the RT instability to a narrow wavenumber region. Even the thorough stabilization of the RT instability in the large-wavenumber region is possible with a sufficient SAF and a sufficient gyroviscosity.

  17. Turbulent flow and pressure fluctuation prediction of the impeller in an axial-flow pump based on LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. F.; Li, Y. J.; Liu, Z. Q.; Tang, X. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Large Eddy Simulation method with sliding mesh technique has been used for analyzing the unsteady flow in an axial-flow pump at five different flow rates. The tip leakage flow in the tip-gap region and the pressure pulsations on the blade surface were examined. The results indicate that the agreement between predicted pump performance and experimental data was reasonably good. The dominate tip-leakage vortex(TLV) extended to the pressure side of the neighboring blade for all five investigated flow rates. As the flow rate increases from 0.7Qd to 1.2Qd, the angle between the dominate TLV and the blade reduced from 20 deg to 14 deg. The results also showed that the amplitude of pressure fluctuation on the near-tip zone of the blade surface increases as the flow rate farer from the design flow rate, especially on the pressure side of the blade. At the 0.7Qd operation condition, the pressure fluctuation amplitude of the monitoring point PP3 (at the near-tip zone on the pressure side of the blade close to the blade leading edge) was 8.5 times of the one at design flow rate, and the high-frequency(18fr) pulsation occurred due to tip leakage vortex. When the flow rate was more than 1.0Qd, the pressure fluctuations of PP3 was dominated by the rotation frequency(fr).

  18. Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft Engines. Part 1; Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shu-cheng, S.

    2009-01-01

    For the preliminary design and the off-design performance analysis of axial flow turbines, a pair of intermediate level-of-fidelity computer codes, TD2-2 (design; reference 1) and AXOD (off-design; reference 2), are being evaluated for use in turbine design and performance prediction of the modern high performance aircraft engines. TD2-2 employs a streamline curvature method for design, while AXOD approaches the flow analysis with an equal radius-height domain decomposition strategy. Both methods resolve only the flows in the annulus region while modeling the impact introduced by the blade rows. The mathematical formulations and derivations involved in both methods are documented in references 3, 4 for TD2-2) and in reference 5 (for AXOD). The focus of this paper is to discuss the fundamental issues of applicability and compatibility of the two codes as a pair of companion pieces, to perform preliminary design and off-design analysis for modern aircraft engine turbines. Two validation cases for the design and the off-design prediction using TD2-2 and AXOD conducted on two existing high efficiency turbines, developed and tested in the NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine (GE-E3) Program, the High Pressure Turbine (HPT; two stages, air cooled) and the Low Pressure Turbine (LPT; five stages, un-cooled), are provided in support of the analysis and discussion presented in this paper.

  19. Effects of the Tip Clearance on Vortical Flow and Its Relation to Noise in an Axial Flow Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Choon-Man; Fukano, Tohru; Furukawa, Masato

    Three-dimensional vortical flow structures and velocity fluctuation near the rotor tip in an axial flow fan having two different tip clearances have been investigated by experimental analysis using a rotating hot wire probe and a numerical simulation. It is found that a tip leakage vortex is observed in the blade passage, which has a major role near the rotor tip. The tip leakage vortex formed close to the leading edge of the blade tip on suction side grows in the streamwise direction, and forms a local recirculation region resulting from a vortex breakdown inside the blade passage. The recirculation region is enlarged by increasing the tip clearance. The larger recirculation region induces the acceleration of the through flow, thus resulting in the increase of the broadband noise. High velocity fluctuation is observed at the interference region between the tip leakage vortex and the through flow in the flow field where the tip leakage vortex is tightly rolled up without its breakdown. Near the casing wall, a discrete frequency is formed between tip leakage vortex core and rotor trailing edge.

  20. Experimental and analytical dynamic flow characteristics of an axial-flow fan from an air cushion landing system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. C.; Boghani, A. B.; Leland, T. J. W.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare the steady-state and dynamic flow characteristics of an axial-flow fan which had been used previously as the air supply fan for some model air cushion landing system studies. Steady-state flow characteristics were determined in the standard manner by using differential orifice pressures for the flow regime from free flow to zero flow. In this same regime, a correlative technique was established so that fan inlet and outlet pressures could be used to measure dynamic flow as created by a rotating damper. Dynamic tests at damper frequencies up to 5 Hz showed very different flow characteristics when compared with steady-state flow, particularly with respect to peak pressures and the pressure-flow relationship at fan stall and unstall. A generalized, rational mathematical fan model was developed based on physical fan parameters and a steady-state flow characteristic. The model showed good correlation with experimental tests at damper frequencies up to 5 Hz.

  1. Analytical and experimental study of mean flow and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, C. A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1980-01-01

    The inviscid and viscid effects existing within the passages of a three bladed axial flow inducer operating at a flow coefficient of 0.065 are investigated. The blade static pressure and blade limiting streamline angle distributions were determined and the three components of mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and turbulence stresses were measured at locations inside the inducer blade passage utilizing a rotating three sensor hotwire probe. Applicable equations were derived for the hotwire data reduction analysis and solved numerically to obtain the appropriate flow parameters. The three dimensional inviscid flow in the inducer was predicted by numerically solving the exact equations of motion, and the three dimensional viscid flow was predicted by incorporating the dominant viscous terms into the exact equations. The analytical results are compared with the experimental measurements and design values where appropriate. Radial velocities are found to be of the same order as axial velocities within the inducer passage, confirming the highly three dimensional characteristic of inducer flow. Total relative velocity distribution indicate a substantial velocity deficiency near the tip at mid-passage which expands significantly as the flow proceeds toward the inducer trailing edge. High turbulence intensities and turbulence stresses are concentrated within this core region. Considerable wake diffusion occurs immediately downstream of the inducer trailing edge to decay this loss core. Evidence of boundary layer interactions, blade blockage effects, radially inward flows, annulus wall effects, and backflows are all found to exist within the long, narrow passages of the inducer.

  2. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  3. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  4. Axial flow plasma shutter

    DOEpatents

    Krausse, George J.

    1988-01-01

    A shutter (36) is provided for controlling a beam, or current, of charged particles in a device such as a thyratron (10). The substrate (38) defines an aperture (60) with a gap (32) which is placeable within the current. Coils (48) are formed on the substrate (38) adjacent the aperture (60) to produce a magnetic field for trapping the charged particles in or about aperture (60). The proximity of the coils (48) to the aperture (60) enables an effective magnetic field to be generated by coils (48) having a low inductance suitable for high frequency control. The substantially monolithic structure including the substrate (38) and coils (48) enables the entire shutter assembly (36) to be effectively located with respect to the particle beam.

  5. Piezoelectric axial flow microvalve

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, Randall; Thornton, Jimmy; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Clark, William W.

    2007-01-09

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell operable with a quantity of fuel and a quantity of an oxidizer to produce electrical power, the fuel cell including a fuel cell body including a labyrinth system structured to permit the fuel and the oxidizer to flow therethrough; at least a first catalyst in fluid communication with the labyrinth; and at least a first microvalve operably disposed within at least a portion of the labyrinth. The microvalve utilizes a deflectable member operable upon the application of a voltage from a voltage source. The microvalve includes an elongated flow channel formed therein and extending substantially longitudinally between the first and second ends to permit substantially longitudinal flow of the fluid therethrough and between the first and second ends; and the deflectable member disposed on the valve body, the deflectable member including at least a first piezoelectric portion that is piezoelectrically operable to deflect the deflectable member between an open position and a closed position upon the application of a voltage, the deflectable member in the closed position being operable to resist the flow of the fluid through the flow channel.

  6. Experimental Investigation of a 0.35 Hub-Tip Radius Ratio Transonic Axial Flow Rotor Designed for 40 Pounds per Second per Square Foot with a Design Tip Diffusion Factor of 0.20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasaki, Paul T.; Montgomery, John C.

    1959-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of a low design diffusion factor on the performance of a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor, a high-specific-flow rotor with a 0.35 hub-tip radius ratio was designed, fabricated and tested. This rotor used a design tip diffusion factor of 0.20 with a design corrected specific weight flow of 40 pounds per second per square foot of frontal area, a total-pressure ratio of 1.27, and an adiabatic efficiency of 0.96. The design, rotor performance, and blade element performance are presented with a discussion on rotor shock losses and a comparison with a similarly designed rotor with a tip diffusion factor of 0.35. At the design corrected tip speed of 1100 feet per second, a peak rotor adiabatic efficiency of 0.88 was attained at a corrected specific weight flow of 39 pounds per second per square foot of frontal area with a mass-averaged total-pressure ratio of 1.27. The blade element tip diffusion factor was 0.281, which is 0.08 higher than the design value of 0.20. Peak efficiencies of 0.95, 0.91, 0.89, and 0.85 were obtained at 70, 80, 90, and 110 percent of design speed, respectively. Comparison of the performance of the rotor reported herein and a similarly designed rotor with increased blade loading indicates that higher blade loading results in a more desirable rotor because of a higher pressure ratio and equivalent efficiency. Computed values of shock losses at the rotor tip section indicate that the losses at peak efficiency are primarily a function of shock losses since the profile losses are only a small percentage of the total loss.

  7. Bidirectional grating compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Zhaoyang; Li, Shuai; Liu, Yanqi; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin

    2016-07-01

    A bidirectional grating compressor for chirped pulse amplifiers is presented. It compresses a laser beam simultaneously in two opposite directions. The pulse compressor is shown to promote chirped pulse amplifiers' output energy without grating damages. To verify the practicability, an experiment is carried out. In addition, a crosscorrelation instrument is designed and set up to test the time synchronization between these two femtosecond pulses.

  8. Unsteady design-point flow phenomena in transonic compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertz, J. B.; Epstein, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    High-frequency response probes which had previously been used exclusively in the MIT Blowndown Facility were successfully employed in two conventional steady state axial flow compressor facilities to investigate the unsteady flowfields of highly loaded transonic compressors at design point operation. Laser anemometry measurements taken simultaneously with the high response data were also analyzed. The time averaged high response data of static and total pressure agreed quite well with the conventional steady state instrumentation except for flow angle which showed a large spread in values at all radii regardless of the type of instrumentation used. In addition, the time resolved measurements confirmed earlier test results obtained in the MIT Blowdown Facility for the same compressor. The results of these tests have further revealed that the flowfields of highly loaded transonic compressors are heavily influenced by unsteady flow phenomena. The high response measurements exhibited large variations in the blade to blade flow and in the blade passage flow. The observed unsteadiness in the blade wakes is explained in terms of the rotor blades' shed vorticity in periodic vortex streets. The wakes were modeled as two-dimensional vortex streets with finite size cores. The model fit the data quite well as it was able to reproduce the average wake shape and bi-modal probability density distributions seen in the laser anemometry data. The presence of vortex streets in the blade wakes also explains the large blade to blade fluctuations seen by the high response probes which is simply due to the intermittent sampling of the vortex street as it is swept past a stationary probe.

  9. Flutter analysis of supersonic axial flow cascades using a high resolution Euler solver. Part 1: Formulation and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Huff, Dennis L.; Swafford, Timothy W.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents, in two parts, a dynamic aeroelastic stability (flutter) analysis of a cascade of blades in supersonic axial flow. Each blade of the cascade is modeled as a typical section having pitching and plunging degrees of freedom. Aerodynamic forces are obtained from a time accurate, unsteady, two-dimensional cascade solver based on the Euler equations. The solver uses a time marching flux-difference splitting (FDS) scheme. Flutter stability is analyzed in the frequency domain. The unsteady force coefficients required in the analysis are obtained by harmonically oscillating (HO) the blades for a given flow condition, oscillation frequency, and interblade phase angle. The calculated time history of the forces is then Fourier decomposed to give the required unsteady force coefficients. An influence coefficient (IC) method and a pulse response (PR) method are also implemented to reduce the computational time for the calculation of the unsteady force coefficients for any phase angle and oscillation frequency. Part 1, this report, presents these analysis methods and their validation by comparison with results obtained from linear theory for a selected flat plate cascade geometry. A typical calculation for a rotor airfoil is also included to show the applicability of the present solver for airfoil configurations. The predicted unsteady aerodynamic forces for a selected flat plate cascade geometry and flow conditions correlated well with those obtained from linear theory for different interblade phase angles and oscillation frequencies. All the three methods of predicting unsteady force coefficients, namely, HO, IC, and PR, showed good correlations with each other. It was established that only a single calculation with four blade passages is required to calculate the aerodynamic forces for any phase angle for a cascade consisting of any number of blades, for any value of the oscillation frequency. Flutter results, including mistuning effects, for a cascade of

  10. Axial Flows in Kármán Vortices Due to Amplitude Modulation and a Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, A.; Benaroya, H.; Wei, T.

    2000-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction experiments were conducted in a large free-surface water tunnel facility using a low-mass ratio circular cylinder. The 2.54-cm cylinder was attached at the lower end to the tunnel floor by a leaf spring and the upper end protruded through the free surface. In this manner, the cylinder was free to oscillate as an inverted pendulum in response to the Kármán vortex shedding phenomenon. Far from the free-surface, strong axial flows directed toward the free-surface were observed along the cores of Kármán vortices shed from the oscillating cylinder; such flows were not observed for matched Reynolds number flows where the cylinder was held stationary. However, near the free-surface fluid motion along vortex cores traveled both up and down, i.e. to and from the free-surface. It has been found that this phenomenon is directly linked to an observed beating of the cylinder when the oscillation frequency approaches the cylinder's natural frequency. In this study, the Reynolds number based on cylinder diameter and free stream velocity was 3800. The problem to be discussed is that of the interaction between the amplitude modulated cylinder motion, the ensuing vortex-street, and the free-surface. These interactions will be described using DPIV measurements taken over a range of levels beneath the free-surface. A phenomenological description of the axial vortex induction process will be developed using Kármán vortex strength as a function of distance from the free-surface.

  11. Supersonic gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Novaresi, Mark A.; Cornelius, Charles C.

    2007-11-13

    A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by the use of a pre-swirl compressor, and using a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the intermediate pressure gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor back to the inlet of the pre-swirl compressor. Inlet guide vanes to the compression ramp enhance overall efficiency.

  12. Compressor surge control method

    SciTech Connect

    Dziubakowski, D.J.; Keys, M.A.I.V.; Shaffer, J.J.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes a method of controlling surge in a centrifugal compressor having a predetermined surge condition line and providing a combined output with a base load means. It comprises: establishing a main surge control line offset from the centrifugal compressor surge condition line according to a function of pressure differentials across the centrifugal compressor and across an orifice in the inlet line of the centrifugal compressor; establishing a feed forward control signal which is a function of a variable associated with the base load means which may cause the surge condition in the centrifugal compressor; and establishing an anticipatory surge control line offset from the main surge control line as a function of the established main surge control line and the established feed forward control signal.

  13. Altitude-wind-tunnel investigation of a 4000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine VI : combustion-chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, I Irving; Shames, Harold

    1948-01-01

    An analysis of the performance of the types A, B, and C combustion chambers of the 4000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine is presented. The data were obtained from investigations of the complete engine over a range of pressure altitudes from 5000 to 40,000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.86. The combustion-chamber pressure losses, the effect of the losses on cycle efficiency, and the combustion efficiency are discussed.

  14. Cold air performance of a 12.766-centimeter-tip-diameter axial-flow cooled turbine. 2: Effect of air ejection on turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    An air cooled version of a single-stage, axial-flow turbine was investigated to determine aerodynamic performance with and without air ejection from the stator and rotor blades surfaces to simulate the effect of cooling air discharge. Air ejection rate was varied from 0 to 10 percent of turbine mass flow for both the stator and the rotor. A primary-to-air ejection temperature ratio of about 1 was maintained.

  15. Cold-air performance of a 12.766-centimeter-tip-diameter axial-flow cooled turbine. 1: Design and performance of a solid blade configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    A solid blade version of a single-stage, axial-flow turbine was investigated to determine its performance over a range of speeds from 0 to 105 percent of equivalent design speed and over a range of total to static pressure ratios from 1.62 to 5.07. The results of this investigation will be used as a baseline for comparison with those obtained from a cooled version of this turbine.

  16. Assessment of HTGR Helium Compressor Analysis Tool Based on Newton-Raphson Numerical Application to Through-flow Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hwan Kim; Hyeun Min Kim; Hee Cheon NO

    2006-07-01

    This study describes the development of a computer program for analyzing the off-design performance of axial flow helium compressors, which is one of the major concerns for the power conversion system of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The compressor performance has been predicted by the aerodynamic analysis of meridional flow with allowances for losses. The governing equations have been derived from Euler turbomachine equation and the streamline curvature method, and then they have been merged into linearized equations based on the Newton-Raphson numerical method. The effect of viscosity is considered by empirical correlations to introduce entropy rises caused by primary loss sources. Use of the method has been illustrated by applying it to a 20-stage helium compressor of the GTHTR300 plant. As a result, the flow throughout the stages of the compressor has been predicted and the compressor characteristics have been also investigated according to the design specification. The program results show much better stability and good convergence with respect to other through-flow methods, and good agreement with the compressor performance map provided by JAEA. (authors)

  17. Controlling Compressor Vane Flow Vectoring Angles at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, Matthew; Rempfer, Dietmar; Williams, David; Acharya, Mukund

    2003-11-01

    The ability to control flow separation angles from compressor inlet guide vanes with a Coanda-type actuator is demonstrated using both wind tunnel experiments and finite element simulations. Vectoring angles up to 40 degrees from the uncontrolled baseline state were measured with helium schlieren visualization at transonic Mach numbers ranging from 0.1 to 0.6, and with airfoil chord Reynolds numbers ranging from 89,000 to 710,000. The magnitude of the vectoring angle is shown to depend upon the geometry of the trailing edge, and actuator slot size, and the momentum flux coefficient. Under certain conditions the blowing has no effect on the vectoring angle indicating that the Coanda effect is not present. DNS simulations with the finite element method investigated the effects of geometry changes and external flow. Continuous control of the vectoring angle is demonstrated, which has important implications for application to rotating machinery. The technique is shown to reduce the stall flow coefficient by 15 percent in an axial flow compressor.

  18. Experimental investigation of the performance of a supersonic compressor cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, D. L.; Schreiber, H. A.; Starken, H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation of a linear, supersonic, compressor cascade tested in the supersonic cascade wind tunnel facility at the DFVLR in Cologne, Federal Republic of Germany. The cascade design was derived from the near-tip section of a high-through-flow axial flow compressor rotor with a design relative inlet Mach number of 1.61. Test data were obtained over a range of inlet Mach numbers from 1.23 to 1.71, and a range of static pressure ratios and axial-velocity-density ratios (AVDR) at the design inlet condition. Flow velocity measurements showing the wave pattern in the cascade entrance region were obtained using a laser transit anemometer. From these measurements, some unique-incidence conditions were determined, thus relating the supersonic inlet Mach number to the inlet flow direction. The influence of static pressure ratio and AVDR on the blade passage flow and the blade-element performance is described, and an empirical correlation is used to show the influence of these two (independent) parameters on the exit flow angle and total-pressure loss for the design inlet condition.

  19. Compressor diaphragm assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Scalzo, A.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes, in a combustion turbine having a casing, one or more slots of a first predetermined cross-section formed circumferentially within the casing at a compressor portion of the turbine, and a compressor diaphragm assembly adapted to be suspended from each of the one or more slots to provide a labyrinth seal with a plurality of compressor discs, a method of forming each compressor diaphragm assembly. It comprises: providing a plurality of vane airfoils each of which have an inner shroud formed integrally with the vane airfoil, and an outer portion attached to the vane airfoil; providing outer ring means for suspending each of the plurality of van airfoils at a stagger angle; suspending the plurality of vane airfoils from the outer ring means, thereby disposing each the vane airfoil and its respective outer portion at the stagger angle; and providing seal carrier means for engagement with each the inner shroud.

  20. Rotary-Wing Relevant Compressor Aero Research and Technology Development Activities at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Skoch, Gary J.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Technical challenges of compressors for future rotorcraft engines are driven by engine-level and component-level requirements. Cycle analyses are used to highlight the engine-level challenges for 3000, 7500, and 12000 SHP-class engines, which include retention of performance and stability margin at low corrected flows, and matching compressor type, axial-flow or centrifugal, to the low corrected flows and high temperatures in the aft stages. At the component level: power-to-weight and efficiency requirements impel designs with lower inherent aerodynamic stability margin; and, optimum engine overall pressure ratios lead to small blade heights and the associated challenges of scale, particularly increased clearance-to-span ratios. The technical challenges associated with the aerodynamics of low corrected flows and stability management impel the compressor aero research and development efforts reviewed herein. These activities include development of simple models for clearance sensitivities to improve cycle calculations, full-annulus, unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations used to elucidate stall, its inception, and the physics of stall control by discrete tip-injection, development of an actuator-duct-based model for rapid simulation of nonaxisymmetric flow fields (e.g., due inlet circumferential distortion), advanced centrifugal compressor stage development and experimentation, and application of stall control in a T700 engine.

  1. Hermetically Sealed Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hermetically sealed pump compresses fluid to pressure up to 4,000 atm (400 MPa). Pump employs linear electric motor instead of rotary motor to avoid need for leakage-prone rotary seals. In addition, linear-motor-powered pump would not require packings to seal its piston. Concept thus eliminates major cause of friction and wear. Pump is double-ended diaphragm-type compressor. All moving parts sealed within compressor housing.

  2. Selecting and sizing process compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, A.K. )

    1994-07-01

    Proper compressor selection and sizing requires understanding the main types of compressors and their operation, using the right mathematical models for sizing both polytropic and adiabatic compressors, and providing for surge control and compressor discharge fluid treatment. There is no single type of compressor that can be adapted to a particular application. The operating conditions, space and weight restrictions must be reviewed before the appropriate compressor is selected. In addition, the type of driver must be selected since its operation and process conditions are interrelated. The different types of compressors can be classified into two basic types: reciprocating and centrifugal. Compressor performance often varies with changes in process conditions. Sometimes performance curves supplied by the manufacturer as discharge pressure and power requirement versus an inlet volumetric flow may not be valid for variations in process conditions. Lapina has provided a technique for obtaining a usable performance curve that is valid for the actual process conditions. The paper describes centrifugal and reciprocating compressors, compressor equations, the polytropic compressor, the adiabatic compressor, efficiency, mechanical losses, multicomponent gas streams, compressor surge control, and compressor fluids treatment.

  3. Cooled spool piston compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hydraulically powered gas compressor receives low pressure gas and outputs a high pressure gas. The housing of the compressor defines a cylinder with a center chamber having a cross-sectional area less than the cross-sectional area of a left end chamber and a right end chamber, and a spool-type piston assembly is movable within the cylinder and includes a left end closure, a right end closure, and a center body that are in sealing engagement with the respective cylinder walls as the piston reciprocates. First and second annual compression chambers are provided between the piston enclosures and center housing portion of the compressor, thereby minimizing the spacing between the core gas and a cooled surface of the compressor. Restricted flow passageways are provided in the piston closure members and a path is provided in the central body of the piston assembly, such that hydraulic fluid flows through the piston assembly to cool the piston assembly during its operation. The compressor of the present invention may be easily adapted for a particular application, and is capable of generating high gas pressures while maintaining both the compressed gas and the compressor components within acceptable temperature limits.

  4. Measurements on Compressor-Blade Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinig, F.

    1948-01-01

    At the end & 1940 an investigation of a guide-vane lattice for the compressor of a TL unit [NACA comment: Turbojet] was requested. The greatest possible Mach number had to be attained. The investigation was conducted with an annular lattice subjected to axial flow. A direct-current shunt motor with a useful output of 235 horsepower at en engine speed of 1800 qm was available for driving the necessary blower. In designing the blower the speed was set at 10,000 rpm. A gear box fran an armored car was used as gearing in which supplementary fresh oil lubrication was installed. The gear box was used to step up from low to high speeds. The blower that was designed is two stage. The hub-tip ratios are 0.79 to 0.82; the design pressure coefficient for each stage is 0.6 and the design flow coefficient is 0.4. The rotor dosimeter D sub a is 0.39 meters and the resulting peripheral speed is u sub a = 204 meters per second [NACA comment: Value corrected from the German]. The blower was entirely satisfactory. The construction of the test stand is shown in figure 1. The air flows in through an annular Inlet, which is used in the measurement of the quantity of air, and is deflected into an inward-pointing radial slot. A spiral motion is imparted to the air by a guide-vane installation manually adjustable as desired, which enables injection of the air, after it has been deflected from the radial direction to the axial direction, into the lattice being investigated at any desired angle.

  5. Effects of four inlet and outlet tip-annulus-area blockage configurations on the performance of an axial-flow fan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Hager, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An axial-flow fan rotor was tested with four configurations of tip-annulus-area blockage to speeds as high as 0.8 of design speed. The rotor performance with the four blockage configurations is compared with the unblocked rotor performance and with blockage configurations previously investigated. The blockage configurations enable the rotor to operate in a stable condition, to much lower flows than the unblocked rotor, with no evidence of rotating stall. The blockage configurations were effective in reducing rotor torque and weight flow but were accompanied by reductions in pressure ratio and efficiency.

  6. Effect of rotor tip clearance and configuration on overall performance of a 12.77-centimeter tip diameter axial-flow turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1979-01-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was made to determine the effect of varying the rotor tip clearance of a 12.77-cm-tip diameter, single-stage, axial-flow reaction turbine. In this investigation, the rotor tip clearance was obtained by use of a recess in the casing above the rotor blades and also by use of a reduced blade height. For the recessed casing configuration, the optimum rotor blade height was found to be the one where the rotor tip diameter was equal to the stator tip diameter. The tip clearance loss associated with this optimum recessed casing configuration was less than that for the reduced blade height configuration.

  7. Compressor map prediction tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Arjun; Sznajder, Lukasz; Bennett, Ian

    2015-08-01

    Shell Global Solutions uses an in-house developed system for remote condition monitoring of centrifugal compressors. It requires field process data collected during operation to calculate and assess the machine's performance. Performance is assessed by comparing live results of polytropic head and efficiency versus design compressor curves provided by the Manufacturer. Typically, these design curves are given for specific suction conditions. The further these conditions on site deviate from those prescribed at design, the less accurate the health assessment of the compressor becomes. To address this specified problem, a compressor map prediction tool is proposed. The original performance curves of polytropic head against volumetric flow for varying rotational speeds are used as an input to define a range of Mach numbers within which the non-dimensional invariant performance curve of head and volume flow coefficient is generated. The new performance curves of polytropic head vs. flow for desired set of inlet conditions are then back calculated using the invariant non-dimensional curve. Within the range of Mach numbers calculated from design data, the proposed methodology can predict polytropic head curves at a new set of inlet conditions within an estimated 3% accuracy. The presented methodology does not require knowledge of detailed impeller geometry such as throat areas, blade number, blade angles, thicknesses nor other aspects of the aerodynamic design - diffusion levels, flow angles, etc. The only required mechanical design feature is the first impeller tip diameter. Described method makes centrifugal compressor surveillance activities more accurate, enabling precise problem isolation affecting machine's performance.

  8. Standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  9. Novel Compressor Blade Design Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Abhay

    Jet engine efficiency goals are driving compressors to higher pressure ratios and engines to higher bypass ratios, each one driving to smaller cores. This is leading to larger tip gaps relative to the blade height. These larger relative tip clearances would negate some of the cycle improvements, and ways to mitigate this effect must be found. A novel split tip blade geometry has been created which helps improve the efficiency at large clearances while also improving operating range. Two identical blades are leaned in opposite directions starting at 85% span. They are cut at mid chord and the 2 halves then merged together so a split tip is created. The result is similar to the alula feathers on a soaring bird. The concept is that the split tip will energize the tip flow and increase range. For higher relative tip clearance, this will also improve efficiency. The 6th rotor of a highly loaded 10 stage machine was chosen as the baseline for this study. Three dimensional CFD simulations were performed using CD Adapco's Star-CCM+ at 5 clearances for the baseline and split tip geometry. The choking flow and stall margin of the split tip blade was higher than that of the baseline blade for all tip clearances. The pressure ratio of the novel blade was higher than that of the baseline blade near choke, but closer to stall it decreased. The sensitivity of peak efficiency to clearance was improved. At tight clearances of 0.62% of blade height, the maximum efficiency of the new design was less than the baseline blade, but as the tip clearance was increased above 2.5%, the maximum efficiency increased. Structural analysis was also performed to ascertain the feasibility of the design.

  10. Compressor surge counter

    DOEpatents

    Castleberry, Kimberly N.

    1983-01-01

    A surge counter for a rotating compressor is provided which detects surging by monitoring the vibration signal from an accelerometer mounted on the shaft bearing of the compressor. The circuit detects a rapid increase in the amplitude envelope of the vibration signal, e.g., 4 dB or greater in less than one second, which is associated with a surge onset and increments a counter. The circuit is rendered non-responsive for a period of about 5 seconds following the detection which corresponds to the duration of the surge condition. This prevents multiple registration of counts during the surge period due to rapid swings in vibration amplitude during the period.

  11. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine, NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program - Commercial Supersonic Technology Project - AeroServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  12. A helium regenerative compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, W.L.; Nutt, W.E.; Sixsmith, H.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a regenerative compressor that was developed primarily for use in cryogenic helium systems. The objectives for the development were to achieve acceptable efficiency in the machine using conventional motor and bearing technology while reducing the complexity of the system required to control contamination from the lubricants. A single stage compressor was built and tested. The compressor incorporates aerodynamically shaped blades on a 218 mm (8.6 inches) diameter impeller to achieve high efficiency. A gas-buffered non-contact shaft seal is used to oppose the diffusion of lubricant from the motor bearings into the cryogenic circuit. Since it is a rotating machine, the flow is continuous and steady, and the machine is very quiet. During performance testing with helium, the single stage machine has demonstrated a pressure ratio of 1.5 at a flow rate of 12 g/s with measured isothermal efficiencies in excess of 30%. This performance compares favorably with efficiencies generally achieved in oil flooded screw compressors.

  13. Extended parametric representation of compressor fans and turbines. Volume 2: Part user's manual (parametric turbine)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverse, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    A turbine modeling technique has been developed which will enable the user to obtain consistent and rapid off-design performance from design point input. This technique is applicable to both axial and radial flow turbine with flow sizes ranging from about one pound per second to several hundred pounds per second. The axial flow turbines may or may not include variable geometry in the first stage nozzle. A user-specified option will also permit the calculation of design point cooling flow levels and corresponding changes in efficiency for the axial flow turbines. The modeling technique has been incorporated into a time-sharing program in order to facilitate its use. Because this report contains a description of the input output data, values of typical inputs, and example cases, it is suitable as a user's manual. This report is the second of a three volume set. The titles of the three volumes are as follows: (1) Volume 1 CMGEN USER's Manual (Parametric Compressor Generator); (2) Volume 2 PART USER's Manual (Parametric Turbine); (3) Volume 3 MODFAN USER's Manual (Parametric Modulation Flow Fan).

  14. Advanced electric heat pump dual-stroke compressor and system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyo, S. E.; Fagan, T. J.

    1983-12-01

    The development of an advanced electric heat pump is discussed. A two-capacity, residential, advanced electric heat pump utilizing a unique dual-stroke compressor was developed. Two nearly identical preprototype split systems of nominally 3.5 tons maximum cooling capacity were designed, built and laboratory tested. The estimated annual energy efficiency of this advanced system is 20 percent better than a two-speed electric heat pump available at contract inception in 1979. This superior performance is due to the synergism of a high-efficiency, dual-stroke reciprocating compressor, a dual-strength high-efficiency single-speed single-phase hermetic drive motor, a single-width, single-entry high-efficiency indoor blower with backward curved cambered plate blades, a high-efficiency multivane axial flow outdoor fan, high-efficiency two-speed air mover motors and a microprocessor control system. The relative proportions of heat exchangers, air flows and compressor size as well as the ratio between high and low capacity were optimized so as to minimize the annual cost of ownership in a northern climate. Constraints placed upon the optimization and design process to ensure comfort provide heating air with a temperature of at least 90(0)F and provide cooling with a sensible-to-total capacity ratio of not more than 0.7. System performance was measured in the laboratory in accordance with applicable codes and procedures. Performance data plus hardware details are provided.

  15. 23. Station Compressor Room 1 with Air Compressors and Accumulator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Station Compressor Room 1 with Air Compressors and Accumulator Tanks, view to the south. One of the two large station air compressor units used for depressing the draft tube water level is visible atop a concrete pedestal on the left side of photograph (the second identical compressor is located in an adjacent room). Two of the six station air accumulator tanks are visible in the background. The smaller station service air compressor is visible in right foreground of the photograph was installed in the early 1980s, and replaced the original station service air compressor. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  16. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 4000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. Part 1; Performance and Windmilling Drag Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A.

    1948-01-01

    The results of altitude-wind-tunnel tests conducted to determine the performance of an axial-flow-type 4000.pound-thrust turboJet engine for a range of pressure altitudes from 5000 to 40,000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.02 to 1.86 are presented and the experimental and analytical methods employed are discussed. By means of suitable generalizing factors applied to the measured performance data, curves were obtained from which the engine performance at any altitude for a given ram pressure ratio can be estimated. The data presented include the windmilling drag characteristics of the turbojet engine for the ranges of altitudes and ram pressure ratios covered by the performance data.

  17. 10. Station Air Compressors, view to the north. The compressors, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Station Air Compressors, view to the north. The compressors, visible in the center of the photograph, are linked to the large accumulator tanks visible in the right background of the photograph. Note that part of the compressor in the center foreground of the photograph is disassembled for maintenance. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  18. A Mock Circulatory System to Assess the Performance of Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices (LVADs): Does Axial Flow Unload Better Than Centrifugal LVAD?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic performances comparisons between different types of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) remain difficult in a clinical context. The aim of this study was to create an experimental model to assess and compare two types of LVAD under hemodynamic conditions that simulated physical effort and pulmonary hypertension. An experimental mock circulatory system was created to simulate the systemic and pulmonary circulations and consisted of pulsatile left and right cardiac simulators (cardiowest pump), air/water tanks to model compliances, and tubes to model the venous and arterial resistances. Two types of continuous-flow ventricular assist devices were connected to this pulsated model: an axial flow pump, Heartmate II (HTM II), and a centrifugal pump, VentrAssist (VTA). The hemodynamic conditions at rest and during exercise were replicated. Mean aortic pressures were not significantly different at rest and during effort but mean flow under maximum pump speed was higher with HTM II (13 L vs. 10 L, p = 0.02). Left atrial pressure was lower at rest and during effort for the HTM II (11 mm Hg vs. 3 mm Hg, p = 0.02 and 9 mm Hg vs. 2 mm Hg, p = 0.008) than with the VTA, but with greater risk of left-ventricle suck-down for the axial flow. Power consumption for a similar flow was lower with the VTA during rest (4.7 W vs. 6.9 W, p = 0.002) and during effort (4.3 W vs. 6.6 W, p = 0.008). In case of high pulmonary vascular resistance with preserved right ventricular function, lower right ventricular pressure was obtained with HTM II (21 mm Hg vs. 28 mm Hg, p = 0.03). Observed results are in favor of a better discharge of the left and right cavities with the HTM II compared to the VTA yet with a higher risk of left cavity collapse occurrence. PMID:24577368

  19. A mock circulatory system to assess the performance of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs): does axial flow unload better than centrifugal LVAD?

    PubMed

    Sénage, Thomas; Février, Dorothée; Michel, Magali; Pichot, Emmanuel; Duveau, Daniel; Tsui, Steven; Trochu, Jean Noel; Roussel, Jean Christian

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic performances comparisons between different types of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) remain difficult in a clinical context. The aim of this study was to create an experimental model to assess and compare two types of LVAD under hemodynamic conditions that simulated physical effort and pulmonary hypertension. An experimental mock circulatory system was created to simulate the systemic and pulmonary circulations and consisted of pulsatile left and right cardiac simulators (cardiowest pump), air/water tanks to model compliances, and tubes to model the venous and arterial resistances. Two types of continuous-flow ventricular assist devices were connected to this pulsated model: an axial flow pump, Heartmate II (HTM II), and a centrifugal pump, VentrAssist (VTA). The hemodynamic conditions at rest and during exercise were replicated. Mean aortic pressures were not significantly different at rest and during effort but mean flow under maximum pump speed was higher with HTM II (13 L vs. 10 L, p = 0.02). Left atrial pressure was lower at rest and during effort for the HTM II (11 mm Hg vs. 3 mm Hg, p = 0.02 and 9 mm Hg vs. 2 mm Hg, p = 0.008) than with the VTA, but with greater risk of left-ventricle suck-down for the axial flow. Power consumption for a similar flow was lower with the VTA during rest (4.7 W vs. 6.9 W, p = 0.002) and during effort (4.3 W vs. 6.6 W, p = 0.008). In case of high pulmonary vascular resistance with preserved right ventricular function, lower right ventricular pressure was obtained with HTM II (21 mm Hg vs. 28 mm Hg, p = 0.03). Observed results are in favor of a better discharge of the left and right cavities with the HTM II compared to the VTA yet with a higher risk of left cavity collapse occurrence. PMID:24577368

  20. Separation Control in a Multistage Compressor Using Impulsive Surface Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2006-01-01

    Control of flow separation using impulsive surface injection is investigated within the multistage environment of a low speed axial-flow compressor. Measured wake profiles behind a set of embedded stator vanes treated with suction-surface injection indicate significant reduction in flow separation at a variety of injection-pulse repetition rates and durations. The corresponding total pressure losses across the vanes reveal a bank of repetition rates at each pulse duration where the separation control remains nearly complete. This persistence allows for demands on the injected-mass delivery system to be economized while still achieving effective flow control. The response of the stator-vane boundary layers to infrequently applied short injection pulses is described in terms of the periodic excitation of turbulent strips whose growth and propagation characteristics dictate the lower bound on the band of optimal pulse repetition rates. The eventual falloff in separation control at higher repetition rates is linked to a competition between the benefits of pulse-induced mixing and the aggravation caused by the periodic introduction of low-momentum fluid. Use of these observations for impulsive actuator design is discussed and their impact on modeling the time-average effect of impulsive surface injection for multistage steady-flow simulation is considered.

  1. New technology enhances compressor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports on new technology using active magnetic bearings and dry gas seals for oil-free compressors, a modified crankshaft arrangement for high-pressure centrifugal compressors, and a grid valve for steam turbines which enhances compressor reliability and longevity. Thermodyn, a division of Framatome, reports it has incorporated this new compressor technology in high-performance facilities equipped with advanced computers to improve its compressor and turbine design and manufacturing. Powerful computer programs associated with CAD were used for accurate geometric design of complex-shape parts which were then produced on N-C machine tools. These precise geometric designs have benefited centrifugal compressors with high or low volume flow, high molecular weight or high flow pressure.

  2. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  3. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-02-06

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  4. Single-stage experimental evaluation of low aspect ratio, highly loaded blading for compressors. Part 9: Stage F and stage G, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, J. G.; Smith, J. D.; Wright, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Two single-stage, 0.77 hub/tip ratio axial-flow compressors were tested to evaluate the effectiveness of low aspect ratio blading as a means of obtaining higher stage loadings. One compressor, designated Stage F, was comprised of circular arc blading with an aspect ratio of 0.9 for both the rotor and stator. This compressor was tested with uniform inlet flow, hub radial, tip radial, and 180 deg arc circumferential inlet distortion. The second compressor, designated Stage G, was comprised of multiple circular arc blading with an aspect ratio of 1.0 for both the rotor and stator. This compressor was tested with uniform inlet flow only. Design rotor tip speeds for Rotor F and Rotor G were 285 m/sec (934 ft/sec) and 327 m/sec (1,074 ft/sec) respectively. Both stages operated at high loading levels with adequate efficiency and operating range. The peak efficiencies and corresponding average stage diffusion factors for Stages F and G at design rotor speed were 86.4% and 84.1% and 0.59 and 0.55 respectively. The surge margin at peak efficiency for Stage F was 12.6% and the corresponding value for Stage G was 16.5%. Both stages experienced a loss in efficiency with increasing rotor speed; however, the multiple circular arc rotor delayed the characteristic loss in efficiency within increasing Mach number to higher Mach number.

  5. VIEW OF COMPRESSOR ROOM AT GROUND LEVEL SHOWING COMPRESSOR EQUIPMENT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF COMPRESSOR ROOM AT GROUND LEVEL SHOWING COMPRESSOR EQUIPMENT. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. General view of low pressure compressor (unit #3) with compressor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of low pressure compressor (unit #3) with compressor in foreground and engines in background. High pressure stage is on left, low pressure stage is on right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  7. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 1: Blading design. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    A baseline compressor test stage was designed as well as a candidate rotor and two candidate stators that have the potential of reducing endwall losses relative to the baseline stage. These test stages are typical of those required in the rear stages of advanced, highly-loaded core compressors. The baseline Stage A is a low-speed model of Stage 7 of the 10 stage AMAC compressor. Candidate Rotor B uses a type of meanline in the tip region that unloads the leading edge and loads the trailing edge relative to the baseline Rotor A design. Candidate Stator B embodies twist gradients in the endwall region. Candidate Stator C embodies airfoil sections near the endwalls that have reduced trailing edge loading relative to Stator A. Tests will be conducted using four identical stages of blading so that the designs described will operate in a true multistage environment.

  8. NASA low speed centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a low speed centrifugal compressor were examined at NASA Lewis Research Center to improve understanding of the flow in centrifugal compressors, to provide models of various flow phenomena, and to acquire benchmark data for three dimensional viscous flow code validation. The paper describes the objectives, test facilities' instrumentation, and experiment preliminary comparisons.

  9. Analysis of fully stalled compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis yields a model for energy transfer in compressor stages operating in the closed-throttle condition. The derivation indicates that three geometry parameters (hub/tip ration, aspect ration, and rotor blade setting angle) influence the values of pressure coefficient when the compressor flow is close to zero.

  10. OMC Compressor Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes efforts expended in the development of an all-composite compressor case. Two pre-production units have been built, one utilizing V-CAP and one utilizing AFR-700B resin systems. Both units have been rig tested at elevated temperatures well above design limit loads. This report discusses the manufacturing processes, test results, and Finite Element Analysis performed. The V-CAP unit was funded by NASA-Lewis Research Center in 1994 under contract number NAS3- 27442 for Development of an All-Composite OMC Compressor Case. This contract was followed by an Air Force study in 1996 to build and identical unit using the AFR-700B resin system in place of the V-CAP system. The second compressor case was funded under U.S. Air Force contract F33615-93-D-5326, Advanced Materials for Aerospace Structures Special Studies (AMAS3), Delivery Order 0021 entitled "Advanced Polymeric Composite Materials and Structures Technology for Advanced High Temperature Gas Turbine Engines.' Initial studies using the V-CAP resin system were undertaken in 1993 under a NASA Lewis contract (NAS3-26829). A first prototype unit was developed in a joint program between Textron-Lycoming (now Allied Signal) and Brunswick (now Lincoln Composites). This unit included composite end closures using low density, high temperature molded end closures. The units was similar in size and shape to a titanium case currently used on the PT-21 0 engine and was funded as part of the integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (EHPTET) initiative of DOD and NASA.

  11. QRFXFreeze: Queryable Compressor for RFX

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, Radha; Nandagopal, Gomathi; Ronald, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    The verbose nature of XML has been mulled over again and again and many compression techniques for XML data have been excogitated over the years. Some of the techniques incorporate support for querying the XML database in its compressed format while others have to be decompressed before they can be queried. XML compression in which querying is directly supported instantaneously with no compromise over time is forced to compromise over space. In this paper, we propose the compressor, QRFXFreeze, which not only reduces the space of storage but also supports efficient querying. The compressor does this without decompressing the compressed XML file. The compressor supports all kinds of XML documents along with insert, update, and delete operations. The forte of QRFXFreeze is that the textual data are semantically compressed and are indexed to reduce the querying time. Experimental results show that the proposed compressor performs much better than other well-known compressors. PMID:26065027

  12. QRFXFreeze: Queryable Compressor for RFX.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Radha; Nandagopal, Gomathi; Ronald, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    The verbose nature of XML has been mulled over again and again and many compression techniques for XML data have been excogitated over the years. Some of the techniques incorporate support for querying the XML database in its compressed format while others have to be decompressed before they can be queried. XML compression in which querying is directly supported instantaneously with no compromise over time is forced to compromise over space. In this paper, we propose the compressor, QRFXFreeze, which not only reduces the space of storage but also supports efficient querying. The compressor does this without decompressing the compressed XML file. The compressor supports all kinds of XML documents along with insert, update, and delete operations. The forte of QRFXFreeze is that the textual data are semantically compressed and are indexed to reduce the querying time. Experimental results show that the proposed compressor performs much better than other well-known compressors. PMID:26065027

  13. Practical experience with unstable compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malanoski, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Using analytical mathematical modeling techniques for the system components, an attempt is made to gauge the destabilizing effects in a number of compressor designs. In particular the overhung (or cantilevered) compressor designs and the straddle-mounted (or simply supported) compressor designs are examined. Recommendations are made, based on experiences with stable and unstable compressors, which can be used as guides in future designs. High and low pressure compressors which operate well above their fundamental rotor-bearing lateral natural frequencies can suffer from destructive subsynchronous vibration. Usually the elements in the system design which contribute to this vibration, other than the shafting and the bearings, are the seals (both gas labyrinth and oil breakdown bushings) and the aerodynamic components.

  14. Centrifugal-reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor is described which includes at least one pair of cylinders arranged in coaxial alignment and supported for angular displacement about a common axis of rotation normally disecting a common longitudinal axis of symmetry for the cylinders. The cylinders are characterized by ported closures located at the mutually remote ends thereof through which the cylinders are charged and discharged, and a pair of piston heads seated within the cylinders and supported for floating displacement in compressive strokes in response to unidirectional angular displacement imparted to the cylinders.

  15. Unsteady Flows in a Single-Stage Transonic Axial-Flow Fan Stator Row. Ph.D. Thesis - Iowa State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the unsteady velocity field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan were acquired using a laser anemometer. Measurements were obtained on axisymmetric surfaces located at 10 and 50 percent span from the shroud, with the fan operating at maximum efficiency at design speed. The ensemble-average and variance of the measured velocities are used to identify rotor-wake-generated (deterministic) unsteadiness and turbulence, respectively. Correlations of both deterministic and turbulent velocity fluctuations provide information on the characteristics of unsteady interactions within the stator row. These correlations are derived from the Navier-Stokes equation in a manner similar to deriving the Reynolds stress terms, whereby various averaging operators are used to average the aperiodic, deterministic, and turbulent velocity fluctuations which are known to be present in multistage turbomachines. The correlations of deterministic and turbulent velocity fluctuations throughout the axial fan stator row are presented. In particular, amplification and attenuation of both types of unsteadiness are shown to occur within the stator blade passage.

  16. One-step fabrication of triple-layered microcapsules by a tri-axial flow focusing device for microencapsulation of soluble drugs and imaging agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Wu, Qiang; Lei, Fan; Li, Guangbin; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the microencapsulation of water-soluble drug (doxorubicin, Dox) and imaging agent (perfluorocarbon, PFC) is performed by a novel liquid driven tri-axial flow focusing (LDTFF) device. The formation of stable triple-layered cone-jet mode can be observed in the simple well-assembled LDTFF device, providing an easy approach to fabricate mono-disperse triple-layered microcapsules with high encapsulation efficiency, high throughput and low cost in just one step. The fluorescence images show that the microcapsules have a satisfactory core-shell structure. The SEM micrographs show spherical and smooth surface views of the triple-layered microcapsules after being stirred 72h to remove the organic solvent totally. The results of thermo-responsive release experiments of the produced triple-layered microcapsules show these multifunctional capsules can be well stimulated when the environment temperature is beyond 55 degree centigrade. In a word, this novel approach has a great potential in applications such as drug delivery and image-guided therapy.

  17. On the effects of energetic coherent motions on power and wake dynamics of an axial-flow marine turbine in an open channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo; Neary, Vincent; Gunawan, Budi; Arndt, Roger; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; U. of MN-SAFL Team; ORNL Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Laboratory experiments are carried out to study the effect of energetic coherent motions on the performance of a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine in the main channel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. A mechanical system allows the turbine angular velocity to be precisely specified and maintained via a controller. Power fluctuations are tracked using a torque sensor connected to the turbine structure. Periodic energetic coherent motions are introduced in the flow by placing a cylinder at various locations upstream of the turbine on the plane of symmetry. Three acoustic Doppler velocimeters and a torque sensor are used to obtain synchronous high resolution measurements of the flow and turbine power at a rate of 200 Hz, respectively. Flow measurements are obtained at various locations upstream and downstream of the turbine. The measurements provide novel insights into the role of strong energetic coherent motions on turbine power fluctuations, tip vortex instability, and mean wake recovery. The implications of these findings for the efficient operation of hydrokinetic turbines in natural waterways will be discussed. Support and funding provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy of the Department of Energy under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  18. Contributions of the secondary jet to the maximum tangential velocity and to the collection efficiency of the fixed guide vane type axial flow cyclone dust collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Akira; Anzou, Hideki; Yamamoto, So; Shimagaki, Mituru

    2015-11-01

    In order to control the maximum tangential velocity Vθm(m/s) of the turbulent rotational air flow and the collection efficiency ηc (%) using the fly ash of the mean diameter XR50=5.57 µm, two secondary jet nozzles were installed to the body of the axial flow cyclone dust collector with the body diameter D1=99mm. Then in order to estimate Vθm (m/s), the conservation theory of the angular momentum flux with Ogawa combined vortex model was applied. The comparisons of the estimated results of Vθm(m/s) with the measured results by the cylindrical Pitot-tube were shown in good agreement. And also the estimated collection efficiencies ηcth (%) basing upon the cut-size Xc (µm) which was calculated by using the estimated Vθ m(m/s) and also the particle size distribution R(Xp) were shown a little higher values than the experimental results due to the re-entrainment of the collected dust. The best method for adjustment of ηc (%) related to the contribution of the secondary jet flow is principally to apply the centrifugal effect Φc (1). Above stated results are described in detail.

  19. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  20. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  1. Review - Axial compressor stall phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greitzer, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    Stall in compressors can be associated with the initiation of several types of fluid dynamic instabilities. These instabilities and the different phenomena, surge and rotating stall, which result from them, are discussed in this paper. Assessment is made of the various methods of predicting the onset of compressor and/or compression system instability, such as empirical correlations, linearized stability analyses, and numerical unsteady flow calculation procedures. Factors which affect the compressor stall point, in particular inlet flow distortion, are reviewed, and the techniques which are used to predict the loss in stall margin due to these factors are described. The influence of rotor casing treatment (grooves) on increasing compressor flow range is examined. Compressor and compression system behavior subsequent to the onset of stall is surveyed, with particular reference to the problem of engine recovery from a stalled condition. The distinction between surge and rotating stall is emphasized because of the very different consequences on recoverability. The structure of the compressor flow field during rotating stall is examined, and the prediction of compressor performance in rotating stall, including stall/unstall hysteresis, is described.

  2. Automatic efficiency optimization of an axial compressor with adjustable inlet guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jichao; Lin, Feng; Nie, Chaoqun; Chen, Jingyi

    2012-04-01

    The inlet attack angle of rotor blade reasonably can be adjusted with the change of the stagger angle of inlet guide vane (IGV); so the efficiency of each condition will be affected. For the purpose to improve the efficiency, the DSP (Digital Signal Processor) controller is designed to adjust the stagger angle of IGV automatically in order to optimize the efficiency at any operating condition. The A/D signal collection includes inlet static pressure, outlet static pressure, outlet total pressure, rotor speed and torque signal, the efficiency can be calculated in the DSP, and the angle signal for the stepping motor which control the IGV will be sent out from the D/A. Experimental investigations are performed in a three-stage, low-speed axial compressor with variable inlet guide vanes. It is demonstrated that the DSP designed can well adjust the stagger angle of IGV online, the efficiency under different conditions can be optimized. This establishment of DSP online adjustment scheme may provide a practical solution for improving performance of multi-stage axial flow compressor when its operating condition is varied.

  3. The Multistage Compressor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie

    2004-01-01

    Research and developments of new aerospace technologies is one of Glenn Research Center's specialties. One facility that deals with the research of aerospace technologies is the High-speed Multistage Compressor Facility. This facility will be testing the performance and efficiency of an Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) two-stage compressor. There is a lot of preparation involved with testing something of this caliber. Before the test article can be installed into the test rig, the facility must be fully operational and ready to run. Meaning all the necessary instrumentation must be calibrated and installed in the facility. The test rig should also be in safe operating condition, and the proper safety permits obtained. In preparation for the test, the Multistage Compressor Facility went through a few changes. For instance the facility will now be utilizing slip rings, the gearbox went through some maintenance, new lubrications systems replaced the old ones, and special instrumentation needs to be fine tuned to achieve the maximum amount of accurate data. Slips rings help gather information off of a rotating device - in this case from a shaft - onto stationary contacts. The contacts (or brushes) need to be cooled to reduce the amount of frictional heat produced between the slip ring and brushes. The coolant being run through the slip ring is AK-225, a material hazardous to the ozone. To abide by the safety regulations the coolant must be run through a closed chiller system. A new chiller system was purchased but the reservoir that holds the coolant was ventilated which doesn t make the system truly closed and sealed. My task was to design and have a new reservoir built for the chiller system that complies with the safety guidelines. The gearbox had some safety issues also. Located in the back of the gearbox an inching drive was set up. When the inching drive is in use the gears and chain are bare and someone can easily get caught up in it. So to prevent

  4. PURDU-WINCOF: A computer code for establishing the performance of a fan-compressor unit with water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonardo, M.; Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    A model for predicting the performance of a multi-spool axial-flow compressor with a fan during operation with water ingestion was developed incorporating several two-phase fluid flow effects as follows: (1) ingestion of water, (2) droplet interaction with blades and resulting changes in blade characteristics, (3) redistribution of water and water vapor due to centrifugal action, (4) heat and mass transfer processes, and (5) droplet size adjustment due to mass transfer and mechanical stability considerations. A computer program, called the PURDU-WINCOF code, was generated based on the model utilizing a one-dimensional formulation. An illustrative case serves to show the manner in which the code can be utilized and the nature of the results obtained.

  5. Improved blade profile loss and deviation angle models for advanced transonic compressor bladings. Part 1: A model for subsonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, W.M.; Hennecke, D.K.; Fottner, L.

    1996-01-01

    New blading concepts as used in modern transonic axial-flow compressors require improved loss and deviation angle correlations. The new model presented in this paper incorporates several elements and treats blade-row flows having subsonic and supersonic inlet conditions separately. In the first part of this paper two proved and well-established profile loss correlations for subsonic flows are extended to quasi-two-dimensional conditions and to custom-tailored blade designs. Instead of a deviation angle correlation, a simple method based on singularities is utilized. The comparison between the new model and a recently published model demonstrates the improved accuracy in prediction of cascade performance achieved by the new model.

  6. Improved blade profile loss and deviation angle models for advanced transonic compressor bladings. Part 2: A model for supersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, W.M.; Hennecke, D.K.; Fottner, L.

    1996-01-01

    New blading concepts as used in modern transonic axial-flow compressors require improved loss and deviation angle correlations. The new model presented in this paper incorporates several elements and treats blade-row flows having subsonic and supersonic inlet conditions separately. The second part of the present report focuses on the extension of a well-known correlation for cascade losses at supersonic inlet flows. It was originally established for DCA bladings and is now modified to reflect the flow situation in blade rows having low-cambered, arbitrarily designed blades including precompression blades. Finally, the steady loss increase from subsonic to supersonic inlet-flow velocities demonstrates the matched performance of the different correlations of the new model.

  7. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    David P. Bloomfield; Brian S. MacKenzie

    2006-05-01

    The Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor EHC was evaluated against DOE applications for compressing hydrogen at automobile filling stations, in future hydrogen pipelines and as a commercial replacement for conventional diaphragm hydrogen compressors. It was also evaluated as a modular replacement for the compressors used in petrochemical refineries. If the EHC can be made inexpensive, reliable and long lived then it can satisfy all these applications save pipelines where the requirements for platinum catalyst exceeds the annual world production. The research performed did not completely investigate Molybdenum as a hydrogen anode or cathode, it did show that photoetched 316 stainless steel is inadequate for an EHC. It also showed that: molybdenum bipolar plates, photochemical etching processes, and Gortex Teflon seals are too costly for a commercial EHC. The use of carbon paper in combination with a perforated thin metal electrode demonstrated adequate anode support strength, but is suspect in promoting galvanic corrosion. The nature of the corrosion mechanisms are not well understood, but locally high potentials within the unit cell package are probably involved. The program produced a design with an extraordinary high cell pitch, and a very low part count. This is one of the promising aspects of the redesigned EHC. The development and successful demonstration of the hydraulic cathode is also important. The problem of corrosion resistant metal bipolar plates is vital to the development of an inexpensive, commercial PEM fuel cell. Our research suggests that there is more to the corrosion process in fuel cells and electrochemical compressors than simple, steady state, galvanic stability. It is an important area for scientific investigation. The experiments and analysis conducted lead to several recommended future research directions. First, we need a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms involved. The diagnosis of experimental cells with titration to

  8. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, R.W.

    1984-10-30

    A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

  9. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  10. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, William D. C.; Bilodeau, Denis; Marusak, Thomas; Dutram, Jr., Leonard; Brady, Joseph

    1981-01-01

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to excape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  11. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, W.D.C.; Bilodeau, D.; Marusak, T.; Dutram, L. Jr.; Brady, J.

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to escape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  12. Mixing enhancement using axial flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papamoschou, Dimitri (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for enhancing fluid mixing. The method comprises the following: (a) configuring a duct to have an effective outer wall, an effective inner wall, a cross-sectional shape, a first cross-sectional area and an exit area, the first cross-sectional area and the exit area being different in size; (b) generating a first flow at the first cross-sectional area, the first flow having a total pressure and a speed equal to or greater than a local speed of sound; and (c) generating a positive streamwise pressure gradient in a second flow in proximity of the exit area. The second flow results from the first flow. Fluid mixing is enhanced downstream from the duct exit area.

  13. Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Richard T.; Middleton, Marc G.

    1983-01-01

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell.

  14. Understand multistage compressor antisurge control

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, S.A.Z.

    1985-03-01

    Methods for, and the principles of antisurge control for multistage centrifugal compressors will be discussed without going into the mathematical details of the theories. Application of these principles is illustrated with an example for a three-stage centrifugal compressor with side suction lines. These principles are not normally discussed in the literature, so this article should be useful to beginners in this field and also serve as a review for more experienced engineers.

  15. Semi-active compressor valve

    DOEpatents

    Brun, Klaus; Gernentz, Ryan S.

    2010-07-27

    A method and system for fine-tuning the motion of suction or discharge valves associated with cylinders of a reciprocating gas compressor, such as the large compressors used for natural gas transmission. The valve's primary driving force is conventional, but the valve also uses an electromagnetic coil to sense position of the plate (or other plugging element) and to provide an opposing force prior to impact.

  16. Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, R.T.; Middleton, M.G.

    1983-01-25

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell. 5 figs.

  17. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  18. Efficient Vent Unloading of Air Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhonen, Alvin J.

    1987-01-01

    Method for unloading one-and two-stage reciprocating air compressors increases energy efficiency and inhibits deterioration of components. In new unloader configuration, compressor vented to atmosphere on downstream side. Method implemented expeditiously as modification of existing systems.

  19. Engineering report: Oxygen boost compressor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tera, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    An oxygen boost compressor is described which supports a self-contained life support system. A preliminary analysis of the compressor is presented along with performance test results, and recommendations for follow-on efforts.

  20. Numerical and experimental analysis of an axial flow left ventricular assist device: the influence of the diffuser on overall pump performance.

    PubMed

    Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Throckmorton, Amy L; Patel, Sonna M; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E; Olsen, Don B

    2005-07-01

    Thousands of adult cardiac failure patients may benefit from the availability of an effective, long-term ventricular assist device (VAD). We have developed a fully implantable, axial flow VAD (LEV-VAD) with a magnetically levitated impeller as a viable option for these patients. This pump's streamlined and unobstructed blood flow path provides its unique design and facilitates continuous washing of all surfaces contacting blood. One internal fluid contacting region, the diffuser, is extremely important to the pump's ability to produce adequate pressure but is challenging to manufacture, depending on the complex blade geometries. This study examines the influence of the diffuser on the overall LEV-VAD performance. A combination of theoretical analyses, computational fluid (CFD) simulations, and experimental testing was performed for three different diffuser models: six-bladed, three-bladed, and no-blade configuration. The diffuser configurations were computationally and experimentally investigated for flow rates of 2-10 L/min at rotational speeds of 5000-8000 rpm. For these operating conditions, CFD simulations predicted the LEV-VAD to deliver physiologic pressures with hydraulic efficiencies of 15-32%. These numerical performance results generally agreed within 10% of the experimental measurements over the entire range of rotational speeds tested. Maximum scalar stress levels were estimated to be 450 Pa for 6 L/min at 8000 rpm along the blade tip surface of the impeller. Streakline analysis demonstrated maximum fluid residence times of 200 ms with a majority of particles exiting the pump in 80 ms. Axial fluid forces remained well within counter force generation capabilities of the magnetic suspension design. The no-bladed configuration generated an unacceptable hydraulic performance. The six-diffuser-blade model produced a flow rate of 6 L/min against 100 mm Hg for 6000 rpm rotational speed, while the three-diffuser-blade model produced the same flow rate and

  1. Rotor-generated unsteady aerodynamic interactions in a 1½ stage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalia, John J.

    Because High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) remains the predominant surprise failure mode in gas turbine engines, HCF avoidance design systems are utilized to identify possible failures early in the engine development process. A key requirement of these analyses is accurate determination of the aerodynamic forcing function and corresponding airfoil unsteady response. The current study expands the limited experimental database of blade row interactions necessary for calibration of predictive HCF analyses, with transonic axial-flow compressors of particular interest due to the presence of rotor leading edge shocks. The majority of HCF failures in aircraft engines occur at off-design operating conditions. Therefore, experiments focused on rotor-IGV interactions at off-design are conducted in the Purdue Transonic Research Compressor. The rotor-generated IGV unsteady aerodynamics are quantified when the IGV reset angle causes the vane trailing edge to be nearly aligned with the rotor leading edge shocks. A significant vane response to the impulsive static pressure perturbation associated with a shock is evident in the point measurements at 90% span, with details of this complex interaction revealed in the corresponding time-variant vane-to-vane flow field data. Industry wide implementation of Controlled Diffusion Airfoils (CDA) in modern compressors motivated an investigation of upstream propagating CDA rotor-generated forcing functions. Whole field velocity measurements in the reconfigured Purdue Transonic Research Compressor along the design speedline reveal steady loading had a considerable effect on the rotor shock structure. A detached rotor leading edge shock exists at low loading, with an attached leading edge and mid-chord suction surface normal shock present at nominal loading. These CDA forcing functions are 3--4 times smaller than those generated by the baseline NACA 65 rotor at their respective operating points. However, the IGV unsteady aerodynamic response to the CDA

  2. Positive Displacement Compressor Technology for Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Shigemi

    Trends of compressor technologies for refrigerators, freezers and condensing units are presented in this paper. HFC refrigerants such as R134a and R404C are promising candidates as an altemative for R12. Performance of reciprocating and rotary compressors in the operation with R134A is described. In addition, compressor technologies such as efficiency improvement are described in the cases of reciprocating, rotary and scroll compressors.

  3. Water injected fuel cell system compressor

    DOEpatents

    Siepierski, James S.; Moore, Barbara S.; Hoch, Martin Monroe

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

  4. El Paso automates main line compressor stations

    SciTech Connect

    Kind, R.H. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports how an El Paso natural gas company has automated 27 compressor stations on its main line gas-transmission system, ahead of its 5-year schedule begun in 1984. The project involved the total automation (unmanned operation) of one reciprocating engine-driven compressor station and 21 turbine-driven compressor facilities; the semi-automation (computer-assisted operation) of six reciprocating engine-driven compressor stations; and the addition of a central control facility located in El Paso.

  5. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus....

  6. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus....

  7. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus....

  8. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus....

  9. 46 CFR 154.1415 - Air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air compressor. 154.1415 Section 154.1415 Shipping COAST... Equipment § 154.1415 Air compressor. Each vessel must have an air compressor to recharge the bottles for the air-breathing apparatus....

  10. Isothermal compressors for process gases

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederuh, E.; Meinhart, D. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports on isothermal compressors which are more efficient for all gases. The study of several representative gases considered stage efficiencies, pressure ratios and pressure losses of the intercoolers. Generally there are two ways to reduce power consumption of a gas compression process: minimize losses of the compressor or improve the thermodynamics of the process. But there are some new ways to reduce losses of turbocompressors. Losses of the impeller labyrinth seals and the balance piston labyrinth seal can be reduced by optimizing the labyrinth geometry and minimizing labyrinth clearances. Therefore, conventional labyrinth seals are still being studied and will be improved.

  11. Positive Displacement Compressor Technology for Air Congitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Shigemi

    Trends of compressor technologies for air conditioners are presented in this paper. HFC refrigerants such is R410A and R407C are promising candidates as an alternative for R22. Performance of rotary and scroll compressors in the operation with R410A and R407C are described. In addition, compressor technologies such as efficiency improvement, reliability and simulation methods are described in both cases of rotary and scroll compressors. Advanced compressor technologies developed for air conditioners are desired in the field of the global environment protection and the energy saving.

  12. Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

  13. A modeling study of a centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, P.; Shapiro, H.N.

    1998-12-31

    A centrifugal compressor, which is part of a chlorofluorocarbon R-114 chiller installation, was investigated, operating with a new refrigerant, hydrofluorocarbon R-236ea, a proposed alternative to R-114. A large set of R-236ea operating data, as well as a limited amount of R-114 data, were available for this study. A relatively simple analytical compressor model was developed to describe compressor performance. The model was built upon a thorough literature search, experimental data, and some compressor design parameters. Two original empirical relations were developed, providing a new approach to the compressor modeling. The model was developed in a format that would permit it to be easily incorporated into a complete chiller simulation. The model was found to improve somewhat on the quantitative and physical aspects of a compressor model of the same format found in the literature. It was found that the compressor model is specific to the particular refrigerant.

  14. Plasma Spraying Reclaims Compressor Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissler, George W.; Yuhas, John S.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-spraying process used to build up material in worn and pitted areas. Newly applied material remachined to specified surface contours. Effective technique for addition of metal to out-of-tolerance magnesium-alloy turbine-engine compressor housings.

  15. Constraints complicate centrifugal compressor depressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Key, B. ); Colbert, F.L. )

    1993-05-10

    Blowdown of a centrifugal compressor is complicated by process constraints that might require slowing the depressurization rate and by mechanical constraints for which a faster rate might be preferred. The paper describes design constraints such as gas leaks; thrust-bearing overload; system constraints; flare extinguishing; heat levels; and pressure drop.

  16. Experimental and numerical investigation on compressor cascade flows with tip clearance at a low Reynolds number condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiromasa; Taniguchi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazunari; Funazaki, Ken-Ichi; Kato, Dai; Pallot, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    High flow rate aeroengines typically employ axial flow compressors, where aerodynamic loss is predominantly due to secondary flow features such as tip leakage and corner vortices. In very high altitude missions, turbomachinery operates at low density ambient atmosphere, and the recent trend toward more compact engine core inevitably leads to the reduction of blade size, which in turn increases the relative height of the blade tip clearance. Low Reynolds number flowfield as a result of these two factors amplifies the relative importance of secondary flow effects. This paper focuses on the behavior of tip leakage flow, investigating by use of both experimental and numerical approaches. In order to understand the complex secondary flow behavior, cascade tests are usually conducted using intrusive probes to determine the loss. However relatively few experimental studies are published on tip leakage flows which take into account the interaction between a rotating blade row and its casing wall. Hence a new linear cascade facility has been designed with a moving belt casing in order to reproduce more realistic flowfield as encountered by a rotating compressor row. Numerical simulations were also performed to aid in the understanding of the complex flow features. The experimental results indicate a significant difference in the flowfield when the moving belt casing is present. The numerical simulations reveal that the leakage vortex is pulled by the shearing motion of the endwall toward the pressure side of the adjacent blade. The results highlight the importance of casing wall relative motion in analyzing leakage flow effects.

  17. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors. Part 7: Data and performance for stage E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    An axial flow compressor stage, having tandem airfoil blading, was designed for zero rotor prewhirl, constant rotor work across the span, and axial discharge flow. The stage was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 1.265 at a rotor tip velocity of 757 ft/sec. The rotor has an inlet hub/tip ratio of 0.8. The design procedure accounted for the rotor inlet boundary layer and included the effects of axial velocity ratio and secondary flow on blade row performance. The objectives of this experimental program were (1) to obtain performance with uniform and distorted inlet flow for comparison with the performance of a stage consisting of single-airfoil blading designed for the same vector diagrams and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of accounting for the inlet boundary layer, axial velocity ratio, and secondary flows in the stage design.

  18. Flow Range of Centrifugal Compressor Being Extended

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2001-01-01

    General Aviation will benefit from turbine engines that are both fuel-efficient and reliable. Current engines fall short of their potential to achieve these attributes. The reason is compressor surge, which is a flow stability problem that develops when the compressor is subjected to conditions that are outside of its operating range. Compressor surge can occur when fuel flow to the engine is increased, temporarily back pressuring the compressor and pushing it past its stability limit, or when the compressor is subjected to inlet flow-field distortions that may occur during takeoff and landing. Compressor surge can result in the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. Unfortunately, the most efficient operating line for the compressor is usually closer to its stability limit line than it is to the line that provides an adequate margin of safety. A wider stable flow range will permit operation along the most efficient operating line of the compressor, improving the specific fuel consumption of the engine and reducing emissions. The NASA Glenn Research Center is working to extend the stable flow range of the compressor. Significant extension has been achieved in axial compressors by injecting air upstream of the compressor blade rows. Recently, the technique was successfully applied to a 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor by injecting streams of air into the diffuser. Both steady and controlled unsteady injection were used to inject air through the diffuser shroud surface and extend the range. Future work will evaluate the effect of air injection through the diffuser hub surface and diffuser vanes with the goal of maximizing the range extension while minimizing the amount of injected air that is required.

  19. Experimental investigation of rapid flow transients in an inlet/compressor system, induced by short-duration acoustic and entropy disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalski, Anthony Benedict

    Highly sophisticated and extensively tested computational fluid dynamics codes are available to simulate the operation of inlet and compressor systems in high-speed airbreathing propulsion devices. In contrast, the methods used to couple these codes during the simulation of an unsteady flow transient are in a significantly less advanced state. In engineering practice the computations are typically performed separately for each device, while representing the adjacent component through a boundary condition. Unfortunately, the lack of experimentally validated compressor face boundary conditions leaves the accuracy of these models open to doubt. From the viewpoint of inlet computations, the compressor face boundary condition amounts to an approximate description of the manner in which upstream moving acoustic waves are induced by the arrival of downstream moving acoustic and entropy (temperature) disturbances to the compressor. This dissertation presents the results of an experimental investigation involving such rapid flow transients in a facility that combined a constant area circular inlet with a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Inlet Mach numbers ranged from 0.15 to 0.45. The experiment employed an impulse method, in which short-duration, large amplitude acoustic and entropy pulses were generated within the inlet utilizing an exploding wire technique. The incident acoustic pulse, its reflection from the compressor and the acoustic wave transmitted across the compressor were tracked by fast response pressure transducers, while entropy pulses were detected by dual-element hotfilm probes. Frequency domain analysis of the data yielded transfer functions that may be thought of as non-dimensional frequency-resolved reflection, transmission and induction coefficients. Transfer functions have been demonstrated to be suitable for the prediction of transients induced by small amplitude, incident acoustic and entropy pulses, thereby representing a powerful method for

  20. Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET), Proof of Concept Compressor, Advanced Compressor Casing T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET), Proof of Concept Compressor, Advanced Compressor Casing Treatment testing; close up - throttle valve -wide open; oil and air lines plus instrumentation between collector and gearbox.

  1. The influence of shrouded stator cavity flows on multistage compressor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Okiishi, T.H.

    1999-07-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved systematic changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Rig data indicate increasing seal-tooth leakage substantially degraded compressor performance. For every 1 percent increase in seal-tooth clearance-to-span ratio, the decrease in pressure rise was 3 percent and the reduction in efficiency was 1 point. These observed performance penalties are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. The performance degradation observed with increased leakage was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near-hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit flow conditions, caused by increased leakage, impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the stator. These trends caused the performance of downstream stages to deteriorate progressively. Numerical simulations of the test rig stator flow field were also conducted to help resolve important fluid mechanic details associated with the interaction between the primary and cavity flows. Simulation results show that fluid originating in the upstream cavity collected on the stator suction surface when the cavity tangential momentum was low and on the pressure side when it was high. The convection of cavity fluid to the suction surface was a mechanism that reduced stator performance when leakage increased.

  2. Particle flow within a transonic compressor rotor passage with application to laser-Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was conducted of the dynamic behavior of micron size particles moving in the three-dimensional flow field of a rotating transonic axial-flow air compressor rotor. The particle velocity lag and angular deviation relative to the gas were determined as functions of particle diameter, mass density and radial position. Particle size and density were varied over ranges selected to correspond to typical laser-Doppler velocimeter (LDV) flow field mapping applications. It was found that the particles move essentially on gas stream surfaces and that particle tracking is relatively insensitive to the rotor radial coordinate. Velocity lag and angular deviation increased whenever particle size or mass density increased, and particle tracking was more sensitive to a change in particle diameter than to a corresponding change in mass density. Results indicated that velocity and angular deviations generally less than 1 percent and 1 degree could be achieved with 1 gm/cc tracer particles with diameters of 1 micron or less.

  3. Algorithm for Controlling a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for controlling a centrifugal compressor that serves as the prime mover in a heatpump system. Experimental studies have shown that the operating conditions for maximum compressor efficiency are close to the boundary beyond which surge occurs. Compressor surge is a destructive condition in which there are instantaneous reversals of flow associated with a high outlet-to-inlet pressure differential. For a given cooling load, the algorithm sets the compressor speed at the lowest possible value while adjusting the inlet guide vane angle and diffuser vane angle to maximize efficiency, subject to an overriding requirement to prevent surge. The onset of surge is detected via the onset of oscillations of the electric current supplied to the compressor motor, associated with surge-induced oscillations of the torque exerted by and on the compressor rotor. The algorithm can be implemented in any of several computer languages.

  4. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuhovcak, Jan; Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  5. Screw Compressor Characteristics for Helium Refrigeration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Creel, J.; Arenius, D.; Casagrande, F.; Howell, M.

    2008-03-01

    The oil injected screw compressors have practically replaced all other types of compressors in modern helium refrigeration systems due to their large displacement capacity, minimal vibration, reliability and capability of handling helium's high heat of compression. At the present state of compressor system designs for helium systems, typically two-thirds of the lost input power is due to the compression system. Therefore it is important to understand the isothermal and volumetric efficiencies of these machines to help properly design these compression systems to match the refrigeration process. This presentation summarizes separate tests that have been conducted on Sullair compressors at the Superconducting Super-Collider Laboratory (SSCL) in 1993, Howden compressors at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in 2006 and Howden compressors at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in 2006. This work is part of an ongoing study at JLab to understand the theoretical basis for these efficiencies and their loss mechanisms, as well as to implement practical solutions.

  6. District nebuliser compressor service: reliability and costs.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, M. E.; Hanley, S. P.; Johnson, S. C.; Webb, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is little information on the costs of maintaining a district nebuliser compressor service. This retrospective study examines the issue, reliability, and maintenance costs of electrical compressors to assist the prediction of future costs, taking into account recent safety legislation. METHODS--Records of issue, repair, and replacement for the period 1982-91 were reviewed. The current policy of repairing and replacing as necessary, and three other theoretical costings, were considered. RESULTS--The number of compressors being issued is increasing. Repaired compressors are less reliable and frequency of repair is a function of compressor age. The current policy is the most cost effective. CONCLUSIONS--To repair and replace nebuliser compressors as necessary is the most economical policy under the present terms offered by the manufacturers, but changes in safety legislation will affect the provision of such services. PMID:7886657

  7. Compressor solves solution gas bottleneck

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, K.J.; Lowe, F.

    1996-08-05

    A new turbine-driven, centrifugal compressor installation increased gas handling capacity in the Westerose D-3 oil reservoir, about 100 km south of Edmonton. Gulf Canada Resources Ltd.`s Westerose D-3 oil reservoir has prolifically produced oil for the last 3 decades. Produced gas has been reinjected into the gas cap to maintain heterogeneity and reservoir fluid interfaces. As oil production continues, increased quantities of solution gas must be handled by the Westerose facility. The cost-effective design of the new compressor installation was based on Gulf`s aggressive drilling program for recovering oil as quickly and economically as possible to reach full blowdown. The paper describes the design considerations, auxiliary equipment, costs, process flow, construction contracts, equipment and systems, and startup.

  8. Magnetic power piston fluid compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Max G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A compressor with no moving parts in the traditional sense having a housing having an inlet end allowing a low pressure fluid to enter and an outlet end allowing a high pressure fluid to exit is described. Within the compressor housing is at least one compression stage to increase the pressure of the fluid within the housing. The compression stage has a quantity of magnetic powder within the housing, is supported by a screen that allows passage of the fluid, and a coil for selectively providing a magnetic field across the magnetic powder such that when the magnetic field is not present the individual particles of the powder are separated allowing the fluid to flow through the powder and when the magnetic field is present the individual particles of the powder pack together causing the powder mass to expand preventing the fluid from flowing through the powder and causing a pressure pulse to compress the fluid.

  9. Lubrication free centrifugal compressor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschlich, J.M.; Scaringe, R.P.; Gui, F.

    1994-04-22

    This paper describes an effort to demonstrate the benefits of an innovative, lightweight, lubrication free centrifugal compressor that allows the use of environmentally sale alternate refrigerants with improved system efficiencies over current state-of-the-art technology. This effort couples the recently developed 3-D high efficiency centrifugal compressor and fabrication technologies with magnetic bearing technology and will then prove the performance, life and reliability of the compressor.

  10. MTR COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA651. TWO JOY COMPRESSORS ARE INSTALLED. OUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA-651. TWO JOY COMPRESSORS ARE INSTALLED. OUT OF VIEW ON RIGHT WERE TWO INGERSOLL-RAND COMPRESSORS. NOTE FRAME STRUCTURE OF METAL-SIDING BUILDING. COMPARE WITH ID-33-G-4. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-1257. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 4/20/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor

    DOEpatents

    English, William A.; Young, Robert R.

    1985-01-01

    A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler 18 and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor 24 where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap 50 which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator 26 and then out to a multiplicity of holes 52 to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber 58 to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole 62 also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator 68 from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe 66 to the suction plenum 64 and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum 64.

  12. Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor

    DOEpatents

    English, W.A.; Young, R.R.

    1985-05-14

    A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator and then out to a multiplicity of holes to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe to the suction plenum and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum. 3 figs.

  13. Gas turbine compressor unit repowering

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents how a major US gas transmission and storage company restored gas storage peaking capacity by repowering obsolete gas turbine compressor units. Consumers Power Company`s Ray Field located in Macomb County, Michigan, USA, was developed as a 44 BCF working capacity gas storage field in 1966. Due to the high deliverability, the field is operated as a peaking reservoir, handling rates as high as 500 MMCFD on injection and 1,200 MMCFD on withdrawal. Ten 2,750 horsepower gas turbine driven 4-stage centrifugal compressor units were installed in the mid to late 1960`s at the field. The compression is operated 2, 4 and 8 stage, as needed, to cover storage pressures of 450 to 1,800 psig. Each centrifugal compressor is driven by a Pratt Whitney (PW) GG-12 Gas Generator firing into a Cooper-Bessemer (CB) RT-27 Power Turbine. By 1980 parts and maintenance services for the PW GG-12 Gas Generator became very expensive to non-existent. In 1994 Consumers Power committed to a gas turbine unit repowering program as the preferred choice over unit replacement. Two refurbished Solar Centaur T4500 Gas Turbine drives were purchased and installed to repower 2 of the obsolete turbine units. This paper describes the retrofit.

  14. Linear Motor Free Piston Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, David P.

    1995-02-01

    A Linear Motor Free Piston Compressor (LMFPC), a free piston pressure recovery system for fuel cell powerplants was developed. The LMFPC consists of a reciprocating compressor and a reciprocating expander which are separated by a piston. In the past energy efficient turbochargers have been used for pressure large (over 50 kW) fuel cell powerplants by recovering pressure energy from the powerplant exhaust. A free piston compressor allows pressurizing 3 - 5 kW sized fuel cell powerplants. The motivation for pressurizing PEM fuel cell powerplants is to improve fuel cell performance. Pressurization of direct methanol fuel cells will be required if PEM membranes are to be used Direct methanol oxidation anode catalysts require high temperatures to operate at reasonable power densities. The elevated temperatures above 80 C will cause high water loss from conventional PEM membranes unless pressurization is employed. Because pressurization is an energy intensive process, recovery of the pressure energy is required to permit high efficiency in fuel cell powerplants. A complete LMFPC which can pressurize a 3 kW fuel cell stack was built. This unit is one of several that were constructed during the course of the program.

  15. An Experimental Characterization of Tip Leakage Flows and Corresponding Effects on Multistage Compressor Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdanier, Reid Adam

    The effect of rotor tip clearances in turbomachinery applications has been a primary research interest for nearly 80 years. Over that time, studies have shown increased tip clearance in axial flow compressors typically has a detrimental effect on overall pressure rise capability, isentropic efficiency, and stall margin. With modern engine designs trending toward decreased core sizes to increase propulsive efficiency (by increasing bypass ratio) or additional compression stages to increase thermal efficiency by increasing the overall pressure ratio, blade heights in the rear stages of the high pressure compressor are expected to decrease. These rear stages typically feature smaller blade aspect ratios, for which endwall flows are more important, and the rotor tip clearance height represents a larger fraction of blade span. As a result, data sets collected with large relative rotor tip clearance heights are necessary to facilitate these future small core design goals. This research seeks to characterize rotor tip leakage flows for three tip clearance heights in the Purdue three-stage axial compressor facility (1.5%, 3.0%, and 4.0% as a percentage of overall annulus height). The multistage environment of this compressor provides the unique opportunity to examine tip leakage flow effects due to stage matching, stator-rotor interactions, and rotor-rotor interactions. The important tip leakage flow effects which develop as a result of these interactions are absent for previous studies which have been conducted using single-stage machines or isolated rotors. A series of compressor performance maps comprise points at four corrected speeds for each of the three rotor tip clearance heights. Steady total pressure and total temperature measurements highlight the effects of tip leakage flows on radial profiles and wake shapes throughout the compressor. These data also evaluate tip clearance effects on efficiency, stall margin, and peak pressure rise capability. An emphasis of

  16. Improved heat switch for gas sorption compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal conductivities of the charcoal bed and the copper matrix for the gas adsorption compressor were measured by the concentric-cylinder method. The presence of the copper matrix in the charcoal bed enhanced the bed conductance by at least an order of magnitude. Thermal capacities of the adsorbent cell and the heat leaks to two compressor designs were measured by the transient method. The new gas adsorption compressor had a heat switch that could transfer eight times more heat than the previous one. The cycle time for the new prototype compressor is also improved by a factor of eight to within the minute range.

  17. Simulation of centrifugal compressor transient performance for process plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougal, I.; Elder, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a theoretical model capable of simulating centrifugal compressor transient performance (including compressor surge) is detailed. Simulation results from a Fortran computer program are compared with measured compressor transient data. Good simulation of compressor transients between stable operating points, and compressor presurge flow oscillations has been obtained. General application criteria are presented for the geometric distribution of model elements within a compressor system. Model applications and future work are outlined.

  18. Compressor Flow Control Concepts. 2; UEET Compressor Flow Control Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2001-01-01

    Several passive flow control devices have been modeled computationally in the Swift CFD code. The models were applied to the first stage rotor and stator of the baseline UEET compressor in an attempt to improve efficiency and/or stall margin. The devices included suction surface bleed, tip injection, self-aspirated rotors, area-ruled casing, and vortex generators. The models and computed results will be described in the presentation. None of the results have shown significant gains in efficiency; however, casing vortex generators have shown potential improvements in stall margin.

  19. Regenerative sorption compressors for cryogenic refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven; Jones, Jack A.

    1990-01-01

    Dramatic efficiency improvements for sorption coolers appear possible with use of compressor heat regeneration techniques. The general theory of sorption compressor heat regeneration is discussed in this paper, and several design concepts are presented. These designs result in long-life, low-vibration cryocoolers that potentially have efficiencies comparable to Stirling refrigerators for 65 to 90 K spacecraft instrument cooling applications.

  20. Tolerances of TTF-2 First Bunch Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, Paul J

    2003-08-08

    In bunch compressors for SASE-FEL facilities, the projected transverse emittance can be diluted by magnetic multipole component errors in dipoles and dipole misalignments as well as by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). In this paper, we describe the multipole field tolerances and the misalignment tolerances of the first bunch compressor (BC2) for the TESLA Test Facility Phase-2 (TTF-2).

  1. 40 CFR 65.112 - Standards: Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Compressors. 65.112 Section 65.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... times with an instrument reading of less than 500 parts per million. A compressor so designated...

  2. Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1992-01-01

    A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

  3. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yang, M.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.; Zhuge, W. L.; Qureshi, U.; Richards, B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically.

  4. Scroll Compressor Oil Pump Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, S.

    2015-08-01

    Scroll compressors utilize three journal bearings to absorb gas, friction and inertial loads exerted on the crankshaft. To function properly, these bearings must be lubricated with a certain amount of oil. The focus of this paper will be to discuss how computational fluid dynamics can be used to predict oil flow out of a single-stage oil pump. The effects of speed and lubricant viscosity on pump output will also be presented. The comparisons will look at mass flow rates, differences in pressure, and torque at various speeds and dynamic viscosities. The computational fluid dynamic analysis results will be compared with actual lab testing where a crankshaft bench tester was built.

  5. Active suppression of compressor instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, A. H.; Ffowcs Williams, J. E.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A strategy is proposed for controlling aerodynamic instabilities which limit the useful range of both axial and centrifugal turbomachines. Both local and global instabilities (incipient rotating stall and surge) are analyzed. A theory is developed which shows how an additional disturbance, driven from real time data measured within the machine, can be generated so as to realize a device with characteristics fundamentally different from those of the turbomachine without control; for the particular compressor analyzed, the control led to a 20 percent increase in the extent of the stable operating range. The use of structural dynamics to enhance stability is also discussed.

  6. Cold-air performance of a 15.41-cm-tip-diameter axial-flow power turbine with variable-area stator designed for a 75-kW automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Kofskey, M. G.; Wong, R. Y.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of the axial flow, variable area stator power turbine stage for the Department of Energy upgraded automotive gas turbine engine was conducted in cold air. The interstage transition duct, the variable area stator, the rotor, and the exit diffuser were included in the evaluation of the turbine stage. The measured total blading efficiency was 0.096 less than the design value of 0.85. Large radial gradients in flow conditions were found at the exit of the interstage duct that adversely affected power turbine performance. Although power turbine efficiency was less than design, the turbine operating line corresponding to the steady state road load power curve was within 0.02 of the maximum available stage efficiency at any given speed.

  7. 30 CFR 57.13010 - Reciprocating-type air compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reciprocating-type air compressors. 57.13010... Air and Boilers § 57.13010 Reciprocating-type air compressors. (a) Reciprocating-type air compressors... than 25 percent. (b) However, this standard does not apply to reciprocating-type air compressors...

  8. 30 CFR 57.13010 - Reciprocating-type air compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reciprocating-type air compressors. 57.13010... Air and Boilers § 57.13010 Reciprocating-type air compressors. (a) Reciprocating-type air compressors... than 25 percent. (b) However, this standard does not apply to reciprocating-type air compressors...

  9. 49 CFR 192.169 - Compressor stations: Pressure limiting devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Pressure limiting devices... Pipeline Components § 192.169 Compressor stations: Pressure limiting devices. (a) Each compressor station... compressor station must extend to a location where the gas may be discharged without hazard....

  10. 30 CFR 57.13012 - Compressor air intakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressor air intakes. 57.13012 Section 57... and Boilers § 57.13012 Compressor air intakes. Compressor air intakes shall be installed to ensure that only clean, uncontaminated air enters the compressors....

  11. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment... Pipeline Components § 192.171 Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment. (a) Each compressor station... operation may not be affected by the emergency shutdown system. (b) Each compressor station prime...

  12. 40 CFR 204.57-3 - Test compressor preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test compressor preparation. 204.57-3... PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.57-3 Test compressor preparation. (a) Prior to the official test, the test compressor selected in accordance with §...

  13. 40 CFR 204.57-2 - Test compressor sample selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test compressor sample selection. 204... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.57-2 Test compressor sample selection. (a) Compressors comprising the batch sample which are required to...

  14. 30 CFR 56.13012 - Compressor air intakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressor air intakes. 56.13012 Section 56... Boilers § 56.13012 Compressor air intakes. Compressor air intakes shall be installed to ensure that only clean, uncontaminated air enters the compressors....

  15. 49 CFR 192.167 - Compressor stations: Emergency shutdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Emergency shutdown. 192.167... Components § 192.167 Compressor stations: Emergency shutdown. (a) Except for unattended field compressor stations of 1,000 horsepower (746 kilowatts) or less, each compressor station must have an...

  16. 33 CFR 154.826 - Vapor compressors and blowers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Excessive shaft bearing temperature. (d) If a centrifugal compressor, fan, or lobe blower handles vapor in....826 Vapor compressors and blowers. (a) Each inlet and outlet to a compressor or blower which handles... system acceptable to the Commandant (CG-522). (b) If a reciprocating or screw-type compressor...

  17. 33 CFR 154.826 - Vapor compressors and blowers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Excessive shaft bearing temperature. (d) If a centrifugal compressor, fan, or lobe blower handles vapor in....826 Vapor compressors and blowers. (a) Each inlet and outlet to a compressor or blower which handles... system acceptable to the Commandant (CG-522). (b) If a reciprocating or screw-type compressor...

  18. 49 CFR 192.163 - Compressor stations: Design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., each main compressor building of a compressor station must be located on property under the control of... property. There must be enough open space around the main compressor building to allow the free movement of fire-fighting equipment. (b) Building construction. Each building on a compressor station site must...

  19. 49 CFR 192.163 - Compressor stations: Design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., each main compressor building of a compressor station must be located on property under the control of... property. There must be enough open space around the main compressor building to allow the free movement of fire-fighting equipment. (b) Building construction. Each building on a compressor station site must...

  20. 49 CFR 192.163 - Compressor stations: Design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., each main compressor building of a compressor station must be located on property under the control of... property. There must be enough open space around the main compressor building to allow the free movement of fire-fighting equipment. (b) Building construction. Each building on a compressor station site must...

  1. 49 CFR 192.163 - Compressor stations: Design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., each main compressor building of a compressor station must be located on property under the control of... property. There must be enough open space around the main compressor building to allow the free movement of fire-fighting equipment. (b) Building construction. Each building on a compressor station site must...

  2. Numerical prediction of wakes in cascades and compressor rotors including the effects of mixing. II - Rotor passage flow and wakes including the effects of spanwise mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Suryavamshi, N.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a numerical investigation to predict the flow field including wakes and mixing in axial-flow compressor rotors are presented. The wake behavior in a moderately loaded compressor rotor is studied numerically using a 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes solver with a high Reynolds number form of a turbulence model. The equations are solved using a time dependent implicit technique. The agreement between the measured data and the predictions is good; including the blade boundary-layer profiles, wake mean-velocity profiles, and decay. The ability of the pseudocompressibility scheme to predict the entire flow field including the near and far wake profiles and its decay characteristics, effect of loading, and the viscous losses of a 3D rotor flow field are demonstrated. The mixing in the downstream regions away from the hub and annulus walls is dominated by wake diffusion. In regions away from the walls the radial mixing is predominantly caused by the transport of mass, momentum, and energy by the radial component of velocity in the wake.

  3. Integrated Heat Switch/Oxide Sorption Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Thermally-driven, nonmechanical compressor uses container filled with compressed praseodymium cerium oxide powder (PrCeOx) to provide high-pressure flow of oxygen gas for driving closed-cycle Joule-Thomson-expansion refrigeration unit. Integrated heat switch/oxide sorption compressor has no moving parts except check valves, which control flow of oxygen gas between compressor and closed-cycle Joule-Thomson refrigeration system. Oxygen expelled from sorbent at high pressure by evacuating heat-switch gap and turning on heater.

  4. CSR instability in a Bunch Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakov, G. V.

    2002-03-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation of a bunch in a bunch compressor may lead to the microwave instability producing longitudinal modulation of the bunch with wavelengths small compared to the bunch length. It can also be a source of an undesirable emittance growth in the compressor. We derive and analyze the equation that describes linear evolution of the microwave modulation taking into account incoherent energy spread and nite emittance of the beam. Numerical solution of this equatierenton for the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) bunch compressor gives the amplication factor for different wavelengths of the beam microbunching.

  5. Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling

    DOEpatents

    Elpern, David G.; McCabe, Niall; Gee, Mark

    2011-08-02

    A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

  6. Improved Regenerative Sorbent-Compressor Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Conceptual regenerative sorbent-compressor refrigerator attains regeneration efficiency and, therefore, overall power efficiency and performance greater than conventional refrigerators. Includes two fluid loops. In one, CH2FCF3 (R134a) ciculates by physical adsorption and desorption in four activated-charcoal sorption compressors. In other, liquid or gas coolant circulated by pump. Wave of regenerative heating and cooling propagates cyclically like peristatic wave among sorption compressors and associated heat exchangers. Powered by electricity, oil, gas, solar heat, or waste heat. Used as air conditioners, refrigerators, and heat pumps in industrial, home, and automotive applications.

  7. On-Orbit Compressor Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deffenbaugh, Danny M.; Svedeman, Steven J.; Schroeder, Edgar C.; Gerlach, C. Richard

    1990-01-01

    A synopsis of the On-Orbit Compressor Technology Program is presented. The objective is the exploration of compressor technology applicable for use by the Space Station Fluid Management System, Space Station Propulsion System, and related on-orbit fluid transfer systems. The approach is to extend the current state-of-the-art in natural gas compressor technology to the unique requirements of high-pressure, low-flow, small, light, and low-power devices for on-orbit applications. This technology is adapted to seven on-orbit conceptual designs and one prototype is developed and tested.

  8. Compressor Has No Moving Macroscopic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Max

    1995-01-01

    Compressor containing no moving macroscopic parts functions by alternating piston and valve actions of successive beds of magnetic particles. Fabricated easily because no need for precisely fitting parts rotating or sliding on each other. Also no need for lubricant fluid contaminating fluid to be compressed. Compressor operates continuously, eliminating troublesome on/off cycling of other compressors, and decreasing consumption of energy. Phased cells push fluid from bottom to top, adding increments of pressure. Each cell contains magnetic powder particles loose when electromagnet coil deenergized, but tightly packed when coil energized.

  9. Investigation of axial positioning for flexural compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggle, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The testing of the research compressor is presented. The research compressor was assembled and disassembled in order to show the consistency in which the piston and rod could be aligned with a .0004 inch radial gap around the piston. A full set of tests was completed for the first assembly, which is referred to as assembly no. 1. The compressor was disassembled and assembled a second time (assembly no. 2). Assembly no. 2 was only tested statically due to the time constraint. Results are discussed.

  10. Performance of single-stage compressor designed on basis of constant total enthalpy with symmetrical velocity diagram at all radii and velocity ratio of 0.7 at rotor hub / Jack R. Burtt and Robert J. Jackson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtt, Jack R; Jackson, Robert J

    1951-01-01

    A typical inlet axial-flow compressor inlet stage, which was designed on the basis of constant total enthalpy with symmetrical velocity diagram at all radii, was investigated. At a tip speed of 1126 feet per second, a peak pressure ratio of 1.28 was obtained at an efficiency of 0.76. At a tip speed, the highest practical flow was 28 pounds per second per square foot frontal area with an efficiency of 0.78. Data for a rotor relative inlet Mach number range of from 0.5 to 0.875 indicates that the critical value for any stage radial element is approximately 0.80 for the stage investigated.

  11. Bearing construction for refrigeration compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, M.G.; Nelson, R.T.

    1988-01-12

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor has a cylinder block and a crankshaft rotatable about a vertical axis to reciprocate a piston in a cylinder on the cylinder block. A separate bearing housing is secured to the central portion of the cylinder block and extends vertically along the crankshaft, where it carries a pair of roller bearings to journal the crankshaft. The crankshaft has a radially extending flange which is journaled by a thrust-type roller bearing above the bearing housing to absorb the vertical forces on the crankshaft so that all three of the roller bearings are between the crankshaft and the bearing housing to maintain and control the close tolerances required by such bearings. 4 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for starting supersonic compressors

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P

    2013-08-06

    A supersonic gas compressor with bleed gas collectors, and a method of starting the compressor. The compressor includes aerodynamic duct(s) situated for rotary movement in a casing. The aerodynamic duct(s) generate a plurality of oblique shock waves for efficiently compressing a gas at supersonic conditions. A convergent inlet is provided adjacent to a bleed gas collector, and during startup of the compressor, bypass gas is removed from the convergent inlet via the bleed gas collector, to enable supersonic shock stabilization. Once the oblique shocks are stabilized at a selected inlet relative Mach number and pressure ratio, the bleed of bypass gas from the convergent inlet via the bypass gas collectors is effectively eliminated.

  13. Refrigeration system having dual suction port compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Guolian

    2016-01-05

    A cooling system for appliances, air conditioners, and other spaces includes a compressor, and a condenser that receives refrigerant from the compressor. The system also includes an evaporator that receives refrigerant from the condenser. Refrigerant received from the condenser flows through an upstream portion of the evaporator. A first portion of the refrigerant flows to the compressor without passing through a downstream portion of the evaporator, and a second portion of the refrigerant from the upstream portion of the condenser flows through the downstream portion of the evaporator after passing through the upstream portion of the evaporator. The second portion of the refrigerant flows to the compressor after passing through the downstream portion of the evaporator. The refrigeration system may be configured to cool an appliance such as a refrigerator and/or freezer, or it may be utilized in air conditioners for buildings, motor vehicles, or other such spaces.

  14. Abradable compressor and turbine seals, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, D. V.; Dennis, R. E.; Hurst, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The applications and advantages of abradable coatings as gas path seals in a general aviation turbofan engine were investigated. Abradable materials were evaluated for the high pressure radial compressor and the axial high and low pressure turbine shrouds.

  15. Turbofan compressor dynamics during afterburner transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of afterburner light-off and shut-down transients on the compressor stability are investigated. The reported experimental results are based on detailed high response pressure and temperature measurements on the TF30-P-3 turbofan engine. The tests were performed in an altitude test chamber simulating high altitude engine operation. It is shown that during both types of transients, flow breaks down in the forward part of the fan bypass duct. At a sufficiently low engine inlet pressure this resulted in a compressor stall. Complete flow breakdown within the compressor was preceded by a rotating stall. At some locations in the compressor, rotating stall cells initially extended only through part of the blade span. For the shutdown transient the time between first and last detected occurrence of rotating stall is related to the flow Reynolds number. An attempt was made to deduce the number and speed of propagation of rotating stall cells.

  16. Turbofan compressor dynamics during afterburner transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of afterburner light-off and shut-down transients on the compressor stability are investigated. The reported experimental results are based on detailed high-response pressure and temperature measurements on the TF30-P-3 turbofan engine. The tests were performed in an altitude test chamber simulating high-altitude engine operation. It is shown that during both types of transients, flow breaks down in the forward part of the fan-bypass duct. At a sufficiently low engine inlet pressure this resulted in a compressor stall. Complete flow breakdown within the compressor was preceded by a rotating stall. At some locations in the compressor, rotating stall cells initially extended only through part of the blade span. For the shut-down transient the time between first and last detected occurrence of rotating stall is related to the flow Reynolds number. An attempt was made to deduce the number and speed of propagation of rotating stall cells.

  17. Turbofan compressor dynamics during afterburner transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of afterburner light-off and shut-down transients on compressor stability were investigated. Experimental results are based on detailed high-response pressure and temperature measurements on the Tf30-p-3 turbofan engine. The tests were performed in an altitude test chamber simulating high-altitude engine operation. It is shown that during both types of transients, flow breaks down in the forward part of the fan-bypass duct. At a sufficiently low engine inlet pressure this resulted in a compressor stall. Complete flow breakdown within the compressor was preceded by a rotating stall. At some locations in the compressor, rotating stall cells initially extended only through part of the blade span. For the shutdown transient, the time between first and last detected occurrence of rotating stall is related to the flow Reynolds number. An attempt was made to deduce the number and speed of propagation of rotating stall cells.

  18. Hydrogen pipeline compressors annual progress report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.

    2011-07-15

    The objectives are: (1) develop advanced materials and coatings for hydrogen pipeline compressors; (2) achieve greater reliability, greater efficiency, and lower capital in vestment and maintenance costs in hydrogen pipeline compressors; and (3) research existing and novel hydrogen compression technologies that can improve reliability, eliminate contamination, and reduce cost. Compressors are critical components used in the production and delivery of hydrogen. Current reciprocating compressors used for pipeline delivery of hydrogen are costly, are subject to excessive wear, have poor reliability, and often require the use of lubricants that can contaminate the hydrogen (used in fuel cells). Duplicate compressors may be required to assure availability. The primary objective of this project is to identify, and develop as required, advanced materials and coatings that can achieve the friction, wear, and reliability requirements for dynamically loaded components (seal and bearings) in high-temperature, high-pressure hydrogen environments prototypical of pipeline and forecourt compressor systems. The DOE Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop identified critical needs in the development of advanced hydrogen compressors - notably, the need to minimize moving parts and to address wear through new designs (centrifugal, linear, guided rotor, and electrochemical) and improved compressor materials. The DOE is supporting several compressor design studies on hydrogen pipeline compression specifically addressing oil-free designs that demonstrate compression in the 0-500 psig to 800-1200 psig range with significant improvements in efficiency, contamination, and reliability/durability. One of the designs by Mohawk Innovative Technologies Inc. (MiTi{reg_sign}) involves using oil-free foil bearings and seals in a centrifual compressor, and MiTi{reg_sign} identified the development of bearings, seals, and oil-free tribological coatings as crucial to the successful

  19. Electrochemical oxygen concentrator as an oxygen compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) oxygen compressor is described which generates pressures of 3000 psi. The SPE is a cation exchange membrane with chemical compatibility, and has the capability of withstanding 5000 psi. Other features of the compressor described include: gasketless sealing, porus plate cell supports, and conductive cooling. Results are presented of a computer program which defines the power of the system as a function of density, temperature, pressure, membrane thickness, and water content.

  20. Improved internal seals for pipeline centrifugal compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Lee, C.

    1988-05-31

    Internal labyrinth seals are used extensively in pipeline compressors as impeller inlet seals, interstage seals, and balance piston seals (for beam-type machines). The purposes of this program were to determine the effects on compressor performance of internal seal leakage, consider variations in labyrinth configurations to improve performance, and determine the feasibility of other types of seals that might provide improved performance. In addition, rotordynamic studies of an overhung machine were conducted to establish whether unbalance response was sufficient to cause seal contact and consequent wear. The program involved consultation with both users and manufacturers of pipeline compressors to obtain information regarding the nature of problems, description of the machinery and seal configurations, operating conditions, contemporary design procedures, and advanced seal developments. The results indicated that internal leakage can significantly reduce compressor efficiency; in some machines as much as 3 to 6%, depending on seal clearance. Optimized step seal geometries will provide improved performance, especially for seals that have worn from rubbing contact. A principal problem is seal wear that results from compressor surge. During normal operation, impeller motions are constrained within seal clearances, but when surge occurs severe rubbing can take place. Abradable seals do not address the surge wear problem, except that wear may take longer since abradable seals start out with tighter clearances. A variety of advanced concepts were considered. The most promising are resilient labyrinths that can elastically respond to impeller movements created by compressor surge without excessive damage or wear. 10 refs., 74 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. The problem of the turbo-compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devillers, Rene

    1920-01-01

    In terminating the study of the adaptation of the engine to the airplane, we will examine the problem of the turbo-compressor,the first realization of which dates from the war; this will form an addition to the indications already given on supercharging at various altitudes. This subject is of great importance for the application of the turbo-compressor worked by the exhaust gases. As a matter of fact, a compressor increasing the pressure in the admission manifold may be controlled by the engine shaft by means of multiplication gear or by a turbine operated by the exhaust gas. Assuming that the increase of pressure in the admission manifold is the same in both cases, the pressure in the exhaust manifold would be greater in the case in which the compressor is worked by the exhaust gas and there would result a certain reduction of engine power which we must be able to calculate. On the other hand , if the compressor is controlled by the engine shaft, a certain fraction of the excess power supplied is utilized for the rotation of the compressor. In order to compare the two systems, it is there-fore necessary to determine the value of the reduction of power due to back pressure when the turbine is employed.

  2. Alternatives to compressor cooling in California climates

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H. ); de Almeida, A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Blumstein, C. . Universitywide Energy Research Group)

    1991-01-01

    This review and discussion has been prepared for the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) to examine research on alternatives to compressor cooling. The report focuses on strategies for eliminating compressors in California's transition climates -- moderately warm areas located between the cool coastal regions and the hot central regions. Many of these strategies could also help reduce compressor use in hotter climates. Compressor-driven cooling of residences in California's transition climate regions is an undesirable load for California's electric utilities because load factor is poor and usage is typically high during periods of system peak demand. We review a number of alternatives to compressors, including low-energy strategies: evaporative cooling, natural and induced ventilation, reflective coatings, shading with vegetation and improved glazing, thermal storage, and radiative cooling. Also included are two energy-intensive strategies: absorption cooling and desiccant cooling. Our literature survey leads us to conclude that many of these strategies, used either singly or in combination, are technically and economically feasible alternatives to compressor-driven cooling. 78 refs., 8 figs.

  3. RELAP5-3D Compressor Model

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Fisher; Cliff B. Davis; Walter L. Weaver

    2005-06-01

    A compressor model has been implemented in the RELAP5-3D© code. The model is similar to that of the existing pump model, and performs the same function on a gas as the pump performs on a single-phase or two-phase fluid. The compressor component consists of an inlet junction and a control volume, and optionally, an outlet junction. This feature permits cascading compressor components in series. The equations describing the physics of the compressor are derived from first principles. These equations are used to obtain the head, the torque, and the energy dissipation. Compressor performance is specified using a map, specific to the design of the machine, in terms of the ratio of outlet-to-inlet total (or stagnation) pressure and adiabatic efficiency as functions of rotational velocity and flow rate. The input quantities are specified in terms of dimensionless variables, which are corrected to stagnation density and stagnation sound speed. A small correction was formulated for the input of efficiency to account for the error introduced by assumption of constant density when integrating the momentum equation. Comparison of the results of steady-state operation of the compressor model to those of the MIT design calculation showed excellent agreement for both pressure ratio and power.

  4. Core compressor exit stage study, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behlke, R. F.; Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Korn, N. D.

    1979-01-01

    A total of two three-stage compressors were designed and tested to determine the effects of aspect ratio on compressor performance. The first compressor was designed with an aspect ratio of 0.81; the other, with an aspect ratio of 1.22. Both compressors had a hub-tip ratio of 0.915, representative of the rear stages of a core compressor, and both were designed to achieve a 15.0% surge margin at design pressure ratios of 1.357 and 1.324, respectively, at a mean wheel speed of 167 m/sec. At design speed the 0.81 aspect ratio compressor achieved a pressure ratio of 1.346 at a corrected flow of 4.28 kg/sec and an adiabatic efficiency of 86.1%. The 1.22 aspect ratio design achieved a pressure ratio of 1.314 at 4.35 kg/sec flow and 87.0% adiabatic efficiency. Surge margin to peak efficiency was 24.0% with the lower aspect ratio blading, compared with 12.4% with the higher aspect ratio blading.

  5. Effects of inlet flow field conditions on the performance of centrifugal compressor diffusers: Part 1 -- Discrete-passage diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Filipenco, V.G.; Deniz, S.; Johnston, J.M.; Greitzer, E.M.; Cumpsty, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    This is Part 1 of a two-part paper considering the performance of radial diffusers for use in a high-performance centrifugal compressor. Part 1 reports on discrete-passage diffusers, while Part 2 describes a test of a straight-channel diffuser designed for equivalent duty. Two builds of discrete-passage diffuser were tested, with 30 and 38 separate passages. Both the 30 and 38 passage diffusers investigated showed comparable range of unstalled operation and similar level of overall diffuser pressure recovery. The paper concentrates on the influence of inlet flow conditions on the pressure recovery and operating range of radial diffusers for centrifugal compressor stages. The flow conditions examined include diffuser inlet Mach number, flow angle, blockage, and axial flow nonuniformity. The investigation was carried out in a specially built test facility, designed to provide a controlled inlet flow field to the test diffusers. The facility can provide a wide range of diffuser inlet velocity profile distortion and skew with Mach numbers up to unity and flow angles of 63 to 75 deg from the radical direction. The consequences of different averaging methods for the inlet total pressure distributions, which are needed in the definition of diffuser pressure recovery coefficient for nonuniform diffuser inlet conditions, were also assessed. The overall diffuser pressure recovery coefficient, based on suitably averaged inlet total pressure, was found to correlate well with the momentum-averaged flow angle into the diffuser. It is shown that the generally accepted sensitivity of diffuser pressure recovery performance to inlet flow distortion and boundary layer blockage can be largely attributed to inappropriate quantification of the average dynamic pressure at diffuser inlet. Use of an inlet dynamic pressure based on availability or mass-averaging in combination with definition of inlet flow angle based on mass average of the radial and tangential velocity at diffuser inlet

  6. Design of 9.271-pressure-ratio 5-stage core compressor and overall performance for first 3 stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    Overall aerodynamic design information is given for all five stages of an axial flow core compressor (74A) having a 9.271 pressure ratio and 29.710 kg/sec flow. For the inlet stage group (first three stages), detailed blade element design information and experimental overall performance are given. At rotor 1 inlet tip speed was 430.291 m/sec, and hub to tip radius ratio was 0.488. A low number of blades per row was achieved by the use of low-aspect-ratio blading of moderate solidity. The high reaction stages have about equal energy addition. Radial energy varied to give constant total pressure at the rotor exit. The blade element profile and shock losses and the incidence and deviation angles were based on relevant experimental data. Blade shapes are mostly double circular arc. Analysis by a three-dimensional Euler code verified the experimentally measured high flow at design speed and IGV-stator setting angles. An optimization code gave an optimal IGV-stator reset schedule for higher measured efficiency at all speeds.

  7. NASA Low-speed Axial Compressor for Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.; Weaver, Harold F.; Senyitko, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A low-speed multistage axial compressor built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The purpose of this compressor is to increase the understanding of the complex flow phenomena within multistage axial compressors and to obtain detailed data from a multistage compressor environment for use in developing and verifying models for computational fluid dynamic code assessment. The compressor has extensive pressure instrumentation in both stationary and rotating frames of reference, and has provisions for flow visualization and laser velocimetry. The compressor will accommodate rotational speeds to 1050 rpm and is rated at a pressure ratio of 1.042.

  8. ETR COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA643. COMPRESSORS AND OTHER EQUIPMENT INSTALLED. METAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA-643. COMPRESSORS AND OTHER EQUIPMENT INSTALLED. METAL ROOF AND CONCRETE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 61-4536. Unknown Photographer, ca. 1961. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Compressor seal rub energetics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverty, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The rub mechanics of compressor abradable blade tip seals at simulated engine conditions were investigated. Twelve statistically planned, instrumented rub tests were conducted with titanium blades and Feltmetal fibermetal rubstrips. The tests were conducted with single stationary blades rubbing against seal material bonded to rotating test disks. The instantaneous rub torque, speed, incursion rate and blade temperatures were continuously measured and recorded. Basic rub parameters (incursion rate, rub depth, abradable density, blade thickness and rub velocity) were varied to determine the effects on rub energy and heat split between the blade, rubstrip surface and rub debris. The test data was reduced, energies were determined and statistical analyses were completed to determine the primary and interactive effects. Wear surface morphology, profile measurements and metallographic analysis were used to determine wear, glazing, melting and material transfer. The rub energies for these tests were most significantly affected by the incursion rate while rub velocity and blade thickness were of secondary importance. The ratios of blade wear to seal wear were representative of those experienced in engine operation of these seal system materials.

  10. Effects of Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows on Multistage Axial Compressor Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Data collected enabled differences in overall individual stage and the third stage blade element performance parameters to be compared. The results show conclusively that seal-tooth leakage ran have a large impact on compressor aerodynamic performance while the presence of the shrouded stator cavities alone seemed to have little influence. Overall performance data revealed that for every 1% increase in the seal-tooth clearance to blade-height ratio the pressure rise dropped up to 3% while efficiency was reduced by 1 to 1.5 points. These observed efficiency penalty slopes are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. Therefore, it appears that in order to correctly predict overall performance it is equally important to account for the effects of seal-tooth leakage as it is to include the influence of tip clearance flows. Third stage blade element performance data suggested that the performance degradation observed when leakage was increased was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit now conditions caused by increased leakage impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the downstream rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the downstream stator. These trends caused downstream stages to progressively perform worse. Other measurements were acquired to determine spatial and temporal flow field variations within the up-and-downstream shrouded stator cavities. Flow within the cavities involved low momentum fluid traveling primarily

  11. Compressor Stall Recovery Through Tip Injection Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Ken L.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability is a fundamental limit in the compressor design process. The development of robust techniques for increasing stability has several benefits: enabling higher loading and fewer blades, increasing safety throughout a mission, increasing tolerance to stage mismatch during part-speed operation and speed transients, and providing an opportunity to match stages at the compressor maximum efficiency point, thus reducing fuel burn. Mass injection upstream of the tip of a high-speed axial compressor rotor is a stability enhancement approach known to be effective in suppressing stall in tip-critical rotors if the injection is activated before stall occurs. This approach to stall suppression requires that a reliable stall warning system be available. Tests have recently been performed to assess whether steady injection can also be used to recover from fully developed stall. If mass injection is effective in recovering from stall quickly enough to avoid structural damage or loss of engine power, then a stall warning system may not be required. The stall recovery tests were performed on a transonic compressor rotor at its design tip speed of 1475 ft/sec using four injectors evenly spaced around the compressor case upstream of the rotor. The injectors were connected to an external air source. In an actual engine application, the injected air would be supplied with compressor bleed air. The injectors were isolated from the air source by a fast-acting butterfly valve. With the injectors turned off, the compressor was throttled into stall. Air injection was then activated with no change in throttle setting by opening the butterfly valve. The compressor recovered from stall at a fixed throttle setting with the aid of tip injection. The unsteady operating characteristic of the rotor was measured during these tests using high-response pressure sensors located upstream and downstream of the rotor. The figure shows the results, where the unsteady pressure and mass

  12. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Compressor size Single strokes per minute Diameter of orifice(in inches) Air pressure maintained(in pounds... feet the speed of compressor may be increased 5 single strokes per minute for each 1,000 feet...

  13. 49 CFR 230.71 - Orifice testing of compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Compressor size Single strokes per minute Diameter of orifice(in inches) Air pressure maintained(in pounds... feet the speed of compressor may be increased 5 single strokes per minute for each 1,000 feet...

  14. 30 CFR 57.13010 - Reciprocating-type air compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be set or adjusted to the compressor when the normal operating temperature is exceeded by more... over 10 horsepower if equipped with fusible plugs that were installed in the compressor discharge...

  15. 30 CFR 56.13010 - Reciprocating-type air compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be set or adjusted to the compressor when the normal operating temperature is exceeded by more... over 10 horsepower if equipped with fusible plugs that were installed in the compressor discharge...

  16. 49 CFR 192.163 - Compressor stations: Design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... property. There must be enough open space around the main compressor building to allow the free movement of... wall must be mounted to swing outward. (d) Fenced areas. Each fence around a compressor station...

  17. Efficiency study of oil cooling of a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; McKellar, M.G.

    1989-04-01

    One of the major goals of all compressor manufacturers is to build as efficient a compressor as possible. Over the last several years improvements to the design of screw compressors has made them efficiently competitive with other types of compressors, especially at large loads. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate four different methods of cooling a 250 horsepower compressor and determine their effects on the efficiency of the compressor. Two conventional methods, liquid injection and thermosyphon cooling, and two new methods, V-PLUS and Fresco oil injection, are investigated. The screw compressor used in the tests was a VRS-500 screw compressor made by the Vilter Manufacturing Corporation. 6 figs.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Centrifugal Compressor Stabilization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate techniques for extending the stable flow range of a centrifugal compressor are reported. The research was conducted in a high-speed centrifugal compressor at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The stabilizing effect of steadily flowing air-streams injected into the vaneless region of a vane-island diffuser through the shroud surface is described. Parametric variations of injection angle, injection flow rate, number of injectors, injector spacing, and injection versus bleed were investigated for a range of impeller speeds and tip clearances. Both the compressor discharge and an external source were used for the injection air supply. The stabilizing effect of flow obstructions created by tubes that were inserted into the diffuser vaneless space through the shroud was also investigated. Tube immersion into the vaneless space was varied in the flow obstruction experiments. Results from testing done at impeller design speed and tip clearance are presented. Surge margin improved by 1.7 points using injection air that was supplied from within the compressor. Externally supplied injection air was used to return the compressor to stable operation after being throttled into surge. The tubes, which were capped to prevent mass flux, provided 9.3 points of additional surge margin over the baseline surge margin of 11.7 points.

  19. 30 CFR 56.13017 - Compressor discharge pipes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressor discharge pipes. 56.13017 Section 56.13017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Boilers § 56.13017 Compressor discharge pipes. Compressor discharge pipes where carbon build-up may...

  20. 30 CFR 56.13017 - Compressor discharge pipes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressor discharge pipes. 56.13017 Section 56.13017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Boilers § 56.13017 Compressor discharge pipes. Compressor discharge pipes where carbon build-up may...

  1. 30 CFR 57.13017 - Compressor discharge pipes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressor discharge pipes. 57.13017 Section 57.13017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Boilers § 57.13017 Compressor discharge pipes. Compressor discharge pipes where carbon...

  2. 30 CFR 57.13017 - Compressor discharge pipes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressor discharge pipes. 57.13017 Section 57.13017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Boilers § 57.13017 Compressor discharge pipes. Compressor discharge pipes where carbon...

  3. 30 CFR 57.13017 - Compressor discharge pipes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compressor discharge pipes. 57.13017 Section 57.13017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Boilers § 57.13017 Compressor discharge pipes. Compressor discharge pipes where carbon...

  4. 30 CFR 56.13017 - Compressor discharge pipes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compressor discharge pipes. 56.13017 Section 56.13017 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Boilers § 56.13017 Compressor discharge pipes. Compressor discharge pipes where carbon build-up may...

  5. 33 CFR 154.826 - Vapor compressors and blowers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vapor compressors and blowers... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.826 Vapor compressors and blowers. (a) Each inlet and outlet to a compressor or blower which...

  6. 33 CFR 154.826 - Vapor compressors and blowers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vapor compressors and blowers... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.826 Vapor compressors and blowers. (a) Each inlet and outlet to a compressor or blower which...

  7. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  8. 46 CFR 197.310 - Air compressor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air compressor system. 197.310 Section 197.310 Shipping... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.310 Air compressor system. A compressor used to supply breathing air to a diver must have— (a) A volume tank that is— (1) Built and stamped...

  9. 30 CFR 56.13012 - Compressor air intakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressor air intakes. 56.13012 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13012 Compressor air intakes. Compressor air intakes shall be installed to ensure that...

  10. 21 CFR 868.6250 - Portable air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Portable air compressor. 868.6250 Section 868.6250...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6250 Portable air compressor. (a) Identification. A portable air compressor is a device intended to provide compressed air for medical purposes,...

  11. 21 CFR 868.6250 - Portable air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Portable air compressor. 868.6250 Section 868.6250...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6250 Portable air compressor. (a) Identification. A portable air compressor is a device intended to provide compressed air for medical purposes,...

  12. 30 CFR 57.13012 - Compressor air intakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compressor air intakes. 57.13012 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13012 Compressor air intakes. Compressor air intakes shall be installed to...

  13. 46 CFR 197.310 - Air compressor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air compressor system. 197.310 Section 197.310 Shipping... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.310 Air compressor system. A compressor used to supply breathing air to a diver must have— (a) A volume tank that is— (1) Built and stamped...

  14. 30 CFR 56.13012 - Compressor air intakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressor air intakes. 56.13012 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13012 Compressor air intakes. Compressor air intakes shall be installed to ensure that...

  15. 21 CFR 868.6250 - Portable air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Portable air compressor. 868.6250 Section 868.6250...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6250 Portable air compressor. (a) Identification. A portable air compressor is a device intended to provide compressed air for medical purposes,...

  16. 30 CFR 56.13012 - Compressor air intakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compressor air intakes. 56.13012 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13012 Compressor air intakes. Compressor air intakes shall be installed to ensure that...

  17. 49 CFR 192.169 - Compressor stations: Pressure limiting devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compressor stations: Pressure limiting devices... Pipeline Components § 192.169 Compressor stations: Pressure limiting devices. (a) Each compressor station must have pressure relief or other suitable protective devices of sufficient capacity and...

  18. 40 CFR 61.242-3 - Standards: Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under 40 CFR part 60, shall not be in VOC service. (d) Each barrier fluid system as described in... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Compressors. 61.242-3... Leaks (Fugitive Emission Sources) § 61.242-3 Standards: Compressors. (a) Each compressor shall...

  19. 21 CFR 870.5200 - External cardiac compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External cardiac compressor. 870.5200 Section 870.5200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... compressor. (a) Identification. An external cardiac compressor is an external device that is...

  20. 49 CFR 192.173 - Compressor stations: Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Ventilation. 192.173 Section 192.173 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS....173 Compressor stations: Ventilation. Each compressor station building must be ventilated to...

  1. 40 CFR 60.482-3 - Standards: Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Standards: Compressors. (a) Each compressor shall be equipped with a seal system that includes a barrier...) shall be: (1) Operated with the barrier fluid at a pressure that is greater than the compressor stuffing box pressure; or (2) Equipped with a barrier fluid system degassing reservoir that is routed to...

  2. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  3. 21 CFR 868.6250 - Portable air compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Portable air compressor. 868.6250 Section 868.6250...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6250 Portable air compressor. (a) Identification. A portable air compressor is a device intended to provide compressed air for medical purposes,...

  4. Calculations of inlet distortion induced compressor flow field instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chue, R.; Greitzer, E. M.; Tan, C. S.; Hynes, T. P.; Longley, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations of the onset of flow instability are carried out for low-speed multistage axial compressors operating with asymmetric inlet flow. The modeling of the fluid dynamic interaction between the spoiled and unspoiled sectors of the compressor is the most important feature of the calculation procedure. The calculations show that annulus average slope of the compressor pressure rise characteristic equal to zero is a useful approximate stability criterion for situations where the dynamics of the compressor flow field do not couple strongly to the compression system or the structure of the imposed distortion is not similar to that of the eigenmodes of the flow in the compressor annulus. This criterion is employed to investigate the relationship between the present model and the 'parallel compressor' model. Calculations are also presented for cases when compressor and compressor system are closely coupled, and situations in which the compressor is subjected to a rotating distortion. These first-of-a-kind computations, and the accompanying description of the physical mechanisms, show that the stability of the flow in the compressor can be adversely affected if the temporal or spatial structure of the distortion is such that resonant type responses can be evoked either from the compressor or from compressor/compression system interactions.

  5. Advanced Compressor Designs for High Energy Petawatt Pulse Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D N; Wattellier, B; Barty, C P J

    2003-09-09

    We discuss compressor designs for a proposed multikilojoule, sub-picosecond beamline at the National Ignition Facility. A novel grating configuration reduces the size of the compressor chamber. Optimization of the design leads to a 4.7 x 1.4 x 0.4 m{sup 3} minimum compressor volume.

  6. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  7. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.338-17 Section 178.338... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps and gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately protected against breakage...

  8. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.338-17 Section 178.338... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps and gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately protected against breakage...

  9. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.338-17 Section 178.338... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps and gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately...

  10. 49 CFR 178.337-15 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.337-15 Section 178.337... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-15 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps or gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately protected against breakage...

  11. 49 CFR 178.337-15 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.337-15 Section 178.337... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-15 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps or gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately protected against breakage...

  12. 49 CFR 178.337-15 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.337-15 Section 178.337... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-15 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps or gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately protected against breakage...

  13. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.338-17 Section 178.338... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps and gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately protected against breakage...

  14. 49 CFR 178.338-17 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.338-17 Section 178.338... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-17 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps and gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately protected against breakage...

  15. 49 CFR 178.337-15 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pumps and compressors. 178.337-15 Section 178.337... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-15 Pumps and compressors. (a) Liquid pumps or gas compressors, if used, must be of suitable design, adequately protected against breakage...

  16. Sorption compressor/mechanical expander hybrid refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Britcliffe, M.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with Deep Space Network (DSN) ground-based cryogenic refrigerators has proved the reliability of the basic two-stage Gifford-McMahon helium refrigerator. A very long life cryogenic refrigeration system appears possible by combining this expansion system or a turbo expansion system with a hydride sorption compressor in place of the usual motor driven piston compressor. To test the feasibility of this system, a commercial Gifford-McMahon refrigerator was tested using hydrogen gas as the working fluid. Although no attempt was made to optimize the system for hydrogen operation, the refrigerator developed 1.3 W at 30 K and 6.6 W at 60 K. The results of the test and of theoretical performances of the hybrid compressor coupled to these expansion systems are presented.

  17. Interconnecting compressors control coalbed gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Payton, R.; Niederhofer, J. )

    1992-10-05

    This paper reports that centralized compressors afford Taurus Exploration Inc.'s coalbed gas operations optimum control of gas production. Unlike satellite stations, the centralized system allows methane gas to e shifted from station to station via the interconnecting low-pressure pipeline network. The operations area encompasses approximately 40,000 acres, about 40 miles southwest of Birmingham, Ala. The project includes about 250-miles of low-pressure gas flow lines to almost 400 wells. The centralized system is less costly than a satellite station to build and operate. Unlike a satellite station that requires each compressor to have a complete set of ancillary equipment, the centralized system requires only one suction manifold, one dehydration setup, and one metering facility for every five compressor sets.

  18. Compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system

    SciTech Connect

    Little, David A.; Pu, Zhengxiang

    2015-08-18

    A compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system for reducing a gap between a tip of a compressor airfoil and a radially adjacent component of a turbine engine is disclosed. The turbine engine may include ID and OD flowpath boundaries configured to minimize compressor airfoil tip clearances during turbine engine operation in cooperation with one or more clearance reduction systems that are configured to move the rotor assembly axially to reduce tip clearance. The configurations of the ID and OD flowpath boundaries enhance the effectiveness of the axial movement of the rotor assembly, which includes movement of the ID flowpath boundary. During operation of the turbine engine, the rotor assembly may be moved axially to increase the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  19. Compressor optimization with compressor-based multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan (MIIPS).

    PubMed

    Hou, B; Easter, J H; Nees, J A; He, Z; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2012-04-15

    The multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan (MIIPS) technique is modified to optimize the compressor settings of a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser system. Here, we use the compressor itself to perform the phase scan inherent in MIIPS measurement . A frequency-resolved optical gating measurement shows that the pulse duration of the compressor optimized using the modified MIIPS technique is 33.8 fs with a 2.24 rad temporal phase variation above 2% intensity. The measured time-bandwidth product is 0.60, which is close to that of transform-limited Gaussian pulse (0.44). PMID:22513694

  20. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  1. Transonic airfoil and axial flow rotary machine

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Naonori; Iwatani, Junji

    2015-09-01

    Sectional profiles close to a tip 124 and a part between a midportion 125 and a hub 123 are shifted to the upstream of an operating fluid flow in a sweep direction. Accordingly, an S shape is formed in which the tip 124 and the part between the midportion 125 and the hub 123 protrude. As a result, it is possible reduce various losses due to shook, waves, thereby forming a transonic airfoil having an excellent aerodynamic characteristic.

  2. Cold Climate Heat Pumps Using Tandem Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Abdelaziz, Omar; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2016-01-01

    In cold climate zones, e.g. ASHRAE climate regions IV and V, conventional electric air-source heat pumps (ASHP) do not work well, due to high compressor discharge temperatures, large pressure ratios and inadequate heating capacities at low ambient temperatures. Consequently, significant use of auxiliary strip heating is required to meet the building heating load. We introduce innovative ASHP technologies as part of continuing efforts to eliminate auxiliary strip heat use and maximize heating COP with acceptable cost-effectiveness and reliability. These innovative ASHP were developed using tandem compressors, which are capable of augmenting heating capacity at low temperatures and maintain superior part-load operation efficiency at moderate temperatures. Two options of tandem compressors were studied; the first employs two identical, single-speed compressors, and the second employs two identical, vapor-injection compressors. The investigations were based on system modeling and laboratory evaluation. Both designs have successfully met the performance criteria. Laboratory evaluation showed that the tandem, single-speed compressor ASHP system is able to achieve heating COP = 4.2 at 47 F (8.3 C), COP = 2.9 at 17 F (-8.3 C), and 76% rated capacity and COP = 1.9 at -13 F (-25 C). This yields a HSPF = 11.0 (per AHRI 210/240). The tandem, vapor-injection ASHP is able to reach heating COP = 4.4 at 47 F, COP = 3.1 at 17 F, and 88% rated capacity and COP = 2.0 at -13 F. This yields a HSPF = 12.0. The system modeling and further laboratory evaluation are presented in the paper.

  3. Method and apparatus for starting supersonic compressors

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2012-04-10

    A supersonic gas compressor. The compressor includes aerodynamic duct(s) situated on a rotor journaled in a casing. The aerodynamic duct(s) generate a plurality of oblique shock waves for efficiently compressing a gas at supersonic conditions. The convergent inlet is adjacent to a bleed air collector, and during acceleration of the rotor, bypass gas is removed from the convergent inlet via a collector to enable supersonic shock stabilization. Once the oblique shocks are stabilized at a selected inlet relative Mach number and pressure ratio, the bleed of bypass gas from the convergent inlet via the bypass gas collectors is eliminated.

  4. Active magnetic bearings applied to industrial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Hustak, J. F.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high-speed eight-stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the basic operation of active magnetic bearings and the required rotor dynamics analysis are presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofits of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four-stage centrifugal compressor. The current status of industrial machinery in North America using this new support system is presented and recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  5. Misalignment study of NLC bunch compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, R.P.; Kheifets, S.A.

    1991-05-01

    Results of computer simulations of the misalignments in the 180{degree}-bend angle second-stage bunch compressor for the NLC are described. The aim of this study was to evaluate alignment and production error tolerances. Three versions of the second stage, differing in their minimum obtainable bunch length (44 {mu}, 60 {mu}, and 86 {mu}) were studied. Simulations included orbit correction produced by errors and misalignments of the compressor elements. The orbit correction itself was done within some error margins. The effects of misalignments on transverse emittance growth were found. Recommendations for alleviating alignment tolerances are discussed. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Development of a J-T Micro Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, P.; Olson, J. R.; Nast, T.; Roth, E.; Collaco, A.; Kaldas, G.; Saito, E.; Loung, V.

    2015-12-01

    Lockheed Martin has developed and tested a space-quality compressor capable of delivering closed-loop gas flow with a high pressure ratio, suitable for driving a Joule- Thomson cold head. The compressor is based on a traditional “Oxford style” dual-opposed piston compressor with linear drive motors and flexure-bearing clearance-seal technology for high reliability and long life. This J-T compressor retains the approximate size, weight, and cost of the ultra-compact, 200 gram Lockheed Martin Pulse Tube Micro Compressor, despite the addition of a flow-rectifying system to convert the AC pressure wave into a steady flow.

  7. Counterrotatable booster compressor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniz, Thomas Ory (Inventor); Orlando, Robert Joseph (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A counterrotatable booster compressor assembly for a gas turbine engine having a counterrotatable fan section with a first fan blade row connected to a first drive shaft and a second fan blade row axially spaced from the first fan blade row and connected to a second drive shaft, the counterrotatable booster compressor assembly including a first compressor blade row connected to the first drive shaft and a second compressor blade row interdigitated with the first compressor blade row and connected to the second drive shaft. A portion of each fan blade of the second fan blade row extends through a flowpath of the counterrotatable booster compressor so as to function as a compressor blade in the second compressor blade row. The counterrotatable booster compressor further includes a first platform member integral with each fan blade of the second fan blade row at a first location so as to form an inner flowpath for the counterrotatable booster compressor and a second platform member integral with each fan blade of the second fan blade row at a second location so as to form an outer flowpath for the counterrotatable booster compressor.

  8. Study on Efficiency Improvement of Hermetic Rotary Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Masatoshi; Nomura, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Iyota, Hiroyuki; Inaba, Koichi

    This research was conducted in order to better identify the torque loss of a hermetic rotary compressor for one revolution, and to directly obtain the actual shaft power of the compressor. A testing compressor and a gas cycle type simplified calorimeter were developed for direct measurement of the compressor torque. A strain gauge was stuck on the shaft between a compressor and a motor. Thus, the compressor torque could be measured directly by the strain gauge and data were transmitted to out of the compressor's vessel through a slip ring. Rotational speed of the compressor was measured by using a gap sensor also. From these measurement results, actual shaft power was calculated experimentally. On the other hand, effective compressive torque for compressing refrigerant gas was predicted theoretically. From both experimental and theoretical results, torque loss of the compressor was determined as the difference of the compressor torque from the effective compressive torque. Consequently, a loss of over-compression could be revealed from the torque loss experimentally. Furthermore, overall adiabatic efficiencies of compressors obtained by the actual shaft power were 1.1∼3.5% higher than former overall adiabatic efficiencies obtained by the motor output.

  9. Jumplike fatigue crack growth in compressor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limar', L. V.; Demina, Yu. A.; Botvina, L. R.

    2014-04-01

    It is shown that power relations between the two main fractographic characteristics of fracture surfaces forming during jumplike fatigue crack growth, namely, the crack depth and the corresponding crack front length, can be used to estimate the fracture stress during vibration tests of the compressor blades of an aviation gas turbine engine, which are made of VT3-1 titanium alloy.

  10. 30 CFR 75.344 - Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air course or to the surface and equipped with sensors to monitor for heat and for carbon monoxide or smoke. The sensors shall deenergize power to the compressor, activate a visual and audible alarm located... every 31 days, sensors installed to monitor for carbon monoxide shall be calibrated with a...

  11. 40 CFR 265.1053 - Standards: Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipped with a sensor that will detect failure of the seal system, barrier fluid system, or both. (e)(1) Each sensor as required in paragraph (d) of this section shall be checked daily or shall be equipped... compressor is located within the boundary of an unmanned plant site, in which case the sensor must be...

  12. 40 CFR 264.1053 - Standards: Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipped with a sensor that will detect failure of the seal system, barrier fluid system, or both. (e)(1) Each sensor as required in paragraph (d) of this section shall be checked daily or shall be equipped... compressor is located within the boundary of an unmanned plant site, in which case the sensor must be...

  13. Computation of Flow in Screw Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalitzin, Georgi; Cai, Xiaodan; Reba, Ramons; Medic, Gorazd

    2015-08-01

    A CFD model enabling accurate and computationally affordable simulation of unsteady flow in screw compressors has been developed. This paper focuses on computational aspects, including real-gas CFD using hybrid structured/unstructured moving grids, and specifics of grid generation for moving rotors and their communication with the discharge plenum.

  14. 30 CFR 75.344 - Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air course or to the surface and equipped with sensors to monitor for heat and for carbon monoxide or smoke. The sensors shall deenergize power to the compressor, activate a visual and audible alarm located... every 31 days, sensors installed to monitor for carbon monoxide shall be calibrated with a...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1012 - Compressor standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compressor standards. 63.1012 Section 63.1012 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Equipment...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1012 - Compressor standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 60.14 or 60.15 is exempt from paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section provided the owner or... system that includes a barrier fluid system and that prevents leakage of process fluid to the atmosphere...) Operated with the barrier fluid at a pressure that is greater than the compressor stuffing box pressure...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1012 - Compressor standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 60.14 or 60.15 is exempt from paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section provided the owner or... system that includes a barrier fluid system and that prevents leakage of process fluid to the atmosphere...) Operated with the barrier fluid at a pressure that is greater than the compressor stuffing box pressure...

  18. 40 CFR 264.1053 - Standards: Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... equipped with a sensor that will detect failure of the seal system, barrier fluid system, or both. (e)(1) Each sensor as required in paragraph (d) of this section shall be checked daily or shall be equipped... compressor is located within the boundary of an unmanned plant site, in which case the sensor must be...

  19. 30 CFR 75.344 - Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air course or to the surface and equipped with sensors to monitor for heat and for carbon monoxide or smoke. The sensors shall deenergize power to the compressor, activate a visual and audible alarm located... every 31 days, sensors installed to monitor for carbon monoxide shall be calibrated with a...

  20. 30 CFR 75.344 - Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air course or to the surface and equipped with sensors to monitor for heat and for carbon monoxide or smoke. The sensors shall deenergize power to the compressor, activate a visual and audible alarm located... every 31 days, sensors installed to monitor for carbon monoxide shall be calibrated with a...

  1. 40 CFR 265.1053 - Standards: Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... equipped with a sensor that will detect failure of the seal system, barrier fluid system, or both. (e)(1) Each sensor as required in paragraph (d) of this section shall be checked daily or shall be equipped... compressor is located within the boundary of an unmanned plant site, in which case the sensor must be...

  2. 30 CFR 75.344 - Compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air course or to the surface and equipped with sensors to monitor for heat and for carbon monoxide or smoke. The sensors shall deenergize power to the compressor, activate a visual and audible alarm located... every 31 days, sensors installed to monitor for carbon monoxide shall be calibrated with a...

  3. Experimental study on performance of BOG compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Tao; Peng, Xueyuan; Feng, Jianmei

    2015-08-01

    The boil-off gas (BOG) compressor is widely used for recycling the excessive boil-off gas of liquefied natural gas (LNG), and the extra-low suction temperature brings about great challenges to design of the BOG compressor. In this paper, a test system was built to examine the effects of low suction temperature on the compressor performance, in which the lowest temperature reached -178°C by means of a plate-fin heat exchanger with liquefied nitrogen. The test results showed that, as the suction temperature decreased from 20°C to -150°C, the volumetric efficiency of the compressor dropped by 37.0%, and the power consumption decreased by 10.0%. The preheat of the gas by the pipe through the suction flange to suction valve was larger than 20°C as the suction temperature was -150°C, and this value increased with the decreased suction temperature. The pressure loss through the suction valve at lower suction temperature was larger than that at ambient temperature while the volume flow rate was kept the same.

  4. Compressor diagnostic software package guides cost control

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, A.J.; Berry, A.R. ); Kothari, K.M. )

    1993-08-01

    This paper discusses a new compressor performance software program which helps minimizing operating costs by detecting malfunctions, optimizing component functions, monitoring performance, and guiding sizing and application decisions. Field tests have evaluated the package's abilities for leak detection, clearance error detection, throughput determination, on-line monitoring, and various engineering applications. This paper reviews the test results for each area of the software modules.

  5. Composite hub/metal blade compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, S.

    1978-01-01

    A low cost compressor rotor was designed and fabricated for a small jet engine. The rotor hub and blade keepers were compression molded with graphite epoxy. Each pair of metallic blades was held in the hub by a keeper. All keepers were locked in the hub with circumferential windings. Feasibility of fabrication was demonstrated in this program.

  6. High-efficiency axial compressor: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bettner, J.L.; Sehra, A.K.

    1986-12-01

    An aerodynamic design study was conducted to configure an industrial-size gas turbine compressor of 14.0:1 pressure ratio and 800 lb/sec flow for achieving maximum efficiency. Starting with an initial configuration based on conventional design practice, compressor design parameters were progressively optimized, leading to a 1.8% improvement in the adiabatic efficiency over that of the conventional design. To further improve the efficiency potential of this design, several advanced design concepts were investigated. It was found that incorporation of airfoils with swept leading edges and customization of the airfoil camber and endwall region would result in an additional adiabatic efficiency potential of 1%. The projected polytropic efficiency of the final advanced concept compressor design was estimated at 92.8%, which is 2 to 3% higher than the current high-efficiency aircraft turbine engine compressors. As a part of this design study, the influence of variable geometry on the flow and efficiency (at design speed) was also investigated. It was estimated that the efficiency decrement associated with a 25% reduction in the design flow, achieved by a system of variable inlet guide vanes and the front five stators, was about 4.0%. The corresponding efficiency penalty with variable IGV-only was estimated to be in excess of 10%.

  7. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor stator blading for compressors. Part 6: Data and performance for stage D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    An axial flow compressor stage, having single-airfoil blading, was designed for zero rotor prewhirl, constant rotor work across the span, and axial discharge flow. The stage was designed to produce a pressure ratio of 1.265 at a rotor tip velocity of 757 ft/sec. The rotor had an inlet hub/tip ratio of 0.8. The design procedure accounted for the rotor inlet boundary layer and included the effects of axial velocity ratio and secondary flow on blade row performance. The objectives of this experimental program were: (1) to obtain performance with uniform and distorted inlet flow for comparison with the performance of a stage consisting of tandem-airfoil blading designed for the same vector diagrams; and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of accounting for the inlet boundary layer, axial velocity ratio, and secondary flows in the stage design. With uniform inlet flow, the rotor achieved a maximum adiabatic efficiency of 90.1% at design equivalent rotor speed and a pressure ratio of 1.281. The stage maximum adiabatic efficiency at design equivalent rotor speed with uniform inlet flow was 86.1% at a pressure ratio of 1.266. Hub radial, tip radial, and circumferential distortion of the inlet flow caused reductions in surge pressure ratio of approximately 2, 10 and 5%, respectively, at design rotor speed.

  8. IEMDC - In-Line Electric Motor Driven Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Crowley

    2004-03-31

    This report covers the fifth quarter (01/01/04 to 03/31/04) of the In-Line Electric Motor Driven Compressor (IEMDC) project. Design efforts on the IEMDC continued with compressor efforts focused on performing aerodynamic analyses. These analyses were conducted using computational fluid dynamics. Compressor efforts also entailed developing mechanical designs of components through the use of solid models and working on project deliverables. Electric motor efforts focused on the design of the magnetic bearing system, motor pressure housing, and the motor-compressor interface. The mechanical evaluation of the main interface from both the perspective of the compressor manufacturer and electric motor manufacturer indicates that an acceptable design has been achieved. All mechanical and aerodynamic design efforts have resulted in considerable progress being made towards the completion of the compressor and electric motor design and towards the successful completion of the IEMDC unit.

  9. Performance characteristics of the Cooper PC-9 centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, R.E.; Neely, R.F.

    1988-06-30

    Mathematical performance modeling of the PC-9 centrifugal compressor has been completed. Performance characteristics curves have never been obtained for them in test loops with the same degree of accuracy as for the uprated axial compressors and, consequently, computer modeling of the top cascade and purge cascades has been very difficult and of limited value. This compressor modeling work has been carried out in an attempt to generate data which would more accurately define the compressor's performance and would permit more accurate cascade modeling. A computer code, COMPAL, was used to mathematically model the PC-9 performance with variations in gas composition, flow ratios, pressure ratios, speed and temperature. The results of this effort, in the form of graphs, with information about the compressor and the code, are the subject of this report. Compressor characteristic curves are featured. 13 figs.

  10. Efficiency study of oil cooling of a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; McKellar, M.G. . Ray W. Herrick Labs.); Fresco, A. )

    1990-01-01

    One of the major goals of all compressor manufacturers is to design and build as efficient a compressor as possible. In a screw compressor it appears that the way the compressor is cooled can have an effect on the compressor's efficiency. This paper presents experimental data on three different screw compressor cooling methods: Liquid Refrigerant Injection Cooling System; Thermosyphon Cooling System; and Oil Injection System. All tests were conducted on a hot gas bypass system using refrigerant R-22. The data taken shows that the Oil Injection System is slightly better than the other two. These tests should be repeated with a higher oil flow rate and ammonia as the working fluid. 10 figs.

  11. Cost-effective and detailed modelling of compressor manifold vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eijk, A.; Egas, G.; Smeulers, J.P.M.

    1996-12-01

    In systems with large reciprocating compressors, so-called compressor manifold vibrations can contribute to fatigue failure of the pipe system. These vibrations are excited by pulsation-induced forces and by forces generated by the compressor. This paper describes an advanced and accurate method for predicting vibration levels and cyclic stresses in critical parts of the piping, based on detailed modelling of the pulsations and compressor parts. Although detailed finite element modelling is applied, the method can compete in ease of use with analytical methods and is far more accurate. The effectiveness of this approach will be demonstrated by a case study in which a detailed compressor manifold vibration analysis has been carried out. The compressor is used for underground storage of natural gas.

  12. High stability design for new centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, H.; Katayama, K.; Morii, S.; Mouri, Y.; Umemura, S.; Ozawa, U.; Oda, T.

    1989-01-01

    It is essential that high-performance centrifugal compressors be free of subsynchronous vibrations. A new high-performance centrifugal compressor has been developed by applying the latest rotordynamics knowledge and design techniques: (1) To improve the system damping, a specially designed oil film seal was developed. This seal attained a damping ratio three times that of the conventional design. The oil film seal contains a special damper ring in the seal cartridge. (2) To reduce the destabilizing effect of the labyrinth seal, a special swirl canceler (anti-swirl nozzle) was applied to the balance piston seal. (3) To confirm the system damping margin, the dynamic simulation rotor model test and the full load test applied the vibration exciting test in actual load conditions.

  13. Asynchronous vibration problem of centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, T.; Ishiguro, N.; Ito, M.

    1980-01-01

    An unstable asynchronous vibration problem in a high pressure centrifugal compressor and the remedial actions against it are described. Asynchronous vibration of the compressor took place when the discharge pressure (Pd) was increased, after the rotor was already at full speed. The typical spectral data of the shaft vibration indicate that as the pressure Pd increases, pre-unstable vibration appears and becomes larger, and large unstable asynchronous vibration occurs suddenly (Pd = 5.49MPa). A computer program was used which calculated the logarithmic decrement and the damped natural frequency of the rotor bearing systems. The analysis of the log-decrement is concluded to be effective in preventing unstable vibration in both the design stage and remedial actions.

  14. Instability of multistage compressor K1501

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Ren-Mu

    1987-01-01

    The K1501 compressor, driven by a steam turbine, is used to transport synthetic gas in fertilizer plants of 1000 tons daily production. The turbo-compressor set, which had been in operation since 1982, vibrated rather intensely, and its maximum load was only about 95 percent of the normal value. Damaging vibration to pads and gas-sealing labyrinths occurred three times from 1982 to 1983 and resulted in considerable economic loss. From the characteristics of the vibration, we suspected its cause to be rotor instability due to labyrinth-seal excitation. But, for lack of experience, the problem was not addressed for two years. Finally, we determined that the instability was indeed produced by labyrinth-seal excitation and corrected this problem by injecting gas into the middle-diaphragm labyrinths. This paper primarily discusses the failure and the remedy described above.

  15. Rotating flux compressor for energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.; Linton, T.W.; Phillips, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The rotating flux compressor (RFC) converts rotational kinetic energy into an electrical output pulse which would have higher energy than the electrical energy initially stored in the compressor. An RFC has been designed in which wedge-shaped rotor blades pass through the air gaps between successive turns of a solenoid, the stator. Magnetic flux is generated by pulsing the stator solenoids when the inductance is a maximum, i.e., when the flux fills the stator-solenoid volume. Connecting the solenoid across a load conserves the flux which is compressed within the small volume surrounding the stator periphery when the rotor blades cut into the free space between the stator plates, creating a minimum-inductance condition. The unique features of this design are: (1) no electrical connections (brushes) to the rotor; (2) no conventional windings; and (3) no maintenance. The device has been tested up to 5000 rpm of rotor speed.

  16. Surge and stall in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbraembussche, R.

    Surge and stall are defined, and experimental and theoretical investigations of surge in compressors, stall in vaned flow passages, and stall in vaneless flow passages are reviewed. Ways to delay surge and stall are outlined. Actions to influence the surge limit during design or to correct for an eventual misprediction often decrease efficiency when the range has to be increased. The main action to avoid surge and stall is a safe design of impeller and diffuser and a correct matching of both components.

  17. High-Temperature Compressor Material Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    1998-01-01

    The next generation of subsonic commercial aircraft will require engines with improved efficiency and greater durability at lower costs. To help achieve these goals, manufacturing technologies for the disks, airfoils, and impellers in the compressors of these advanced turbine engines are being developed by a team representing all four U.S. aircraft engine companies--GE Aircraft Engines, Pratt & Whitney, AlliedSignal Inc., and Allison Engine Company. This work is being funded by NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) project.

  18. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  19. Combined cold compressor/ejector helium refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.P.

    1984-06-05

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.

  20. combined cold compressor ejector helium refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. P.

    1985-10-22

    A refrigeration apparatus having an ejector operatively connected with a cold compressor to form a two-stage pumping system. This pumping system is used to lower the pressure, and thereby the temperature of a bath of boiling refrigerant (helium). The apparatus as thus arranged and operated has substantially improved operating efficiency when compared to other processes or arrangements for achieving a similar low pressure.