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Sample records for 10-year cardiovascular event

  1. Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke Events in Methamphetamine Users: A 10-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Chyi; Yang, Shu-Yu; Lin, Shih-Ku; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Kuo, Chian-Jue; Hung, Yen-Ni

    2016-10-01

    Long-term follow-up data regarding the association between methamphetamine use and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications are scarce. We investigated the risk of complications in methamphetamine users over a decade. A total of 1,315 inpatients treated for methamphetamine use were recruited from the Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claims database in Taiwan between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2000, and matched with a population proxy comparison group at a ratio of 1:4 through propensity score matching. All patients were monitored for any incident complication until December 31, 2010. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of ICD-9-CM cardiovascular diseases and stroke events. The patients were mostly male, and approximately half were younger than 30 years. The methamphetamine cohort had higher incidences of cardiovascular diseases and stroke events than the comparison cohort (87.5/10,000 vs 55.3/10,000 person-years, P < .001) and was significantly associated with an increased risk of the complications (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.55, P < .001), particularly arrhythmia (HR = 1.92, P = .014) and hemorrhagic stroke (HR = 2.09, P = .001). The risk of cardiovascular sequelae was more significant in younger patients (< 30 y) (HR = 2.22, P = .001), whereas the risk of stroke events was higher among the older patients (≥ 30 y) (HR = 1.86, P = .001). Methamphetamine use is significantly associated with a risk of subsequent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. Age appears to be an effect modifier for the risk estimation.

  2. Low-Dose Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: 10-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshihiko; Okada, Sadanori; Ogawa, Hisao; Soejima, Hirofumi; Sakuma, Mio; Nakayama, Masafumi; Doi, Naofumi; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Waki, Masako; Masuda, Izuru; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2017-02-14

    The long-term efficacy and safety of low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are still inconclusive. The JPAD trial (Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis With Aspirin for Diabetes) was a randomized, open-label, standard care-controlled trial examining whether low-dose aspirin affected cardiovascular events in 2539 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and without preexisting cardiovascular disease. Patients were randomly allocated to receive aspirin (81 or 100 mg daily; aspirin group) or no aspirin (no-aspirin group) in the JPAD trial. After that trial ended in 2008, we followed up with the patients until 2015, with no attempt to change the previously assigned therapy. Primary end points were cardiovascular events, including sudden death, fatal or nonfatal coronary artery disease, fatal or nonfatal stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. For the safety analysis, hemorrhagic events, consisting of gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic stroke, and bleeding from any other sites, were also analyzed. The primary analysis was conducted for cardiovascular events among patients who retained their original allocation (a per-protocol cohort). Analyses on an intention-to-treat cohort were conducted for hemorrhagic events and statistical sensitivity. The median follow-up period was 10.3 years; 1621 patients (64%) were followed up throughout the study; and 2160 patients (85%) retained their original allocation. Low-dose aspirin did not reduce cardiovascular events in the per-protocol cohort (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.42). Multivariable Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for age, sex, glycemic control, kidney function, smoking status, hypertension, and dyslipidemia showed similar results (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.30), with no heterogeneity of efficacy in subgroup analyses stratified by each of these factors (all interaction P>0

  3. Prediction of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality at 10 years in the hypertensive aged population.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Quan L; Reid, Christopher M; Chowdhury, Enayet K; Huq, Molla M; Billah, Baki; Wing, Lindon M H; Tonkin, Andrew M; Simons, Leon A; Nelson, Mark R

    2015-05-01

    We have previously developed a score for predicting cardiovascular events in the intermediate term in an elderly hypertensive population. In this study, we aimed to extend this work to predict 10-year cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in the hypertensive aged population. Ten-year follow-up data of 5,378 hypertensive participants in the Second Australian National Blood Pressure study who were aged 65-84 years at baseline (1995-2001) and without prior cardiovascular events were analyzed. By using bootstrap resampling variable selection methods and comparing the Akaike and Bayesian information criterion and C-indices of the potential models, optimal and parsimonious multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed to predict 10-year cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The models were validated using bootstrap validation method internally and using the Dubbo Study dataset externally. The final model for cardiovascular mortality included detrimental (age, smoking, diabetes, waist-hip ratio, and disadvantaged socioeconomic status) and protective factors (female sex, alcohol consumption, and physical activity). The final model for all-cause mortality also included detrimental (age, smoking, random blood glucose, and disadvantaged socioeconomic status) and protective factors (female sex, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and statin use). Blood pressure did not appear in either model in this patient group. The C-statistics for internal validation were 0.707 (cardiovascular mortality) and 0.678 (all-cause mortality), and for external validation were 0.729 (cardiovascular mortality) and 0.772 (all-cause mortality). These algorithms allow reliable estimation of 10-year risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality for hypertensive aged individuals. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Increased 10-year cardiovascular disease and mortality risk scores in asymptomatic patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hasan; Yencilek, Faruk; Erihan, Ismet Bilger; Okan, Binnur; Sarica, Kemal

    2011-12-01

    Both the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and event rate are increased in patients with urolithiasis. Screening is recommended to all patients who have high cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to document 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in asymptomatic patients with urolithiasis. Consecutive 200 patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis were compared with 200 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Ten-year cardiovascular disease risk was calculated with the Framingham Risk Score and mortality risk with SCORE risk score. Calcium, oxalate, and citrate excretion were studied as urinary stone risk factors. The results indicate that patients with urolithiasis had higher total cholesterol (p < 0.0001), lower HDL-cholesterol (p < 0.0001), and higher systolic blood pressure (p < 0.0001) and hsCRP (p < 0.0001) compared with controls. Patients with urolithiasis had a higher Framingham Risk Scores [OR 8.36 (95% CI 3.81-18.65), p = 0.0001] and SCORE risk score [OR 3.02 (95% CI 1.30-7.02), p = 0.0006] compared with controls. The Framingham and SCORE risk score were significantly correlated with urinary calcium (p = 0.0001, r = 0.460, and p = 0.005, r = 0.223, respectively) and oxalate excretion (p = 0.0001, r = 0.516, p = 0.001, r = 0.290, respectively). In multiple linear regression analysis, urinary calcium and oxalate excretion, age, sex, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, hsCRP and smoking were the independent predictors of 10-year cardiovascular disease risk and urinary calcium and oxalate excretion, age, sex, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose for 10-year cardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis carry high risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. All patients should be screened at the initial diagnosis of urolithiasis for the risk factors.

  5. Visit-to-visit SBP variability and cardiovascular disease in a multiethnic primary care setting: 10-year retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yook Chin; Ching, Siew Mooi; Lim, Hooi Min

    2017-05-01

    The current study aims to determine the relationship of long-term visit-to-visit variability of SBP to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a multiethnic primary care setting. This is a retrospective study of a cohort of 807 hypertensive patients over a period of 10 years. Three-monthly clinic blood pressure readings were used to derive blood pressure variability (BPV), and CVD events were captured from patient records. Mean age at baseline was 57.2 ± 9.8 years with 63.3% being women. The BPV and mean SBP over 10 years were 14.7 ± 3.5 and 142 ± 8 mmHg, respectively. Prevalence of cardiovascular event was 13%. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, BPV was the predictor of CVD events, whereas the mean SBP was not independently associated with cardiovascular events in this population. Those with lower SBP and lower BPV had fewer cardiovascular events than those with the same low mean SBP but higher BPV (10.5 versus 12.8%). Similarly those with higher mean SBP but lower BPV also had fewer cardiovascular events than those with the same high mean and higher BPV (11.6 versus 16.7%). Other variables like being men, diabetes and Indian compared with Chinese are more likely to be associated with cardiovascular events. BPV is associated with an increase in CVD events even in those who have achieved lower mean SBP. Thus, we should prioritize not only control of SBP levels but also BPV to reduce CVD events further.

  6. The Boehringer Ingelheim employee study (Part 2): 10-year cardiovascular diseases risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Kempf, K; Martin, S; Döhring, C; Dugi, K; Haastert, B; Schneider, M

    2016-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) may cause an economic burden to companies, but CVD risk estimations specific to working populations are lacking. To estimate the 10-year CVD risk in the Boehringer Ingelheim (BI) employee cohort and analyse the potential effect of hypothetical risk reduction interventions. We estimated CVD risk using the Framingham (FRS), PROCAM (PRS) and Reynolds (RRS) risk scores, using cross-sectional baseline data on BI Pharma employees collected from 2005 to 2011. Results were compared using Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon tests. The predictive ability of the score estimates was assessed using receiver-operating characteristics analyses. Among the 4005 study subjects, we estimated 10-year CVD risks of 35% (FRS), 9% (PRS) and 6% (RRS) for men and 10% (FRS), 4% (PRS) and 1% (RRS) for women. One hundred and thirty-four (6%) men and 111 (6%) women employees had current CVD. The best predictors of prevalent CVD were the FRS and the RRS for men [area-under-the-curve 0.62 (0.57-0.67) for both]. A hypothetical intervention that would improve systolic blood pressure, HbA1c (for diabetes), C-reactive protein, triglycerides and total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 10% each would potentially reduce expected CVD cases by 36-41% in men and 30-45% in women, and if smoking cessation is incorporated, by 39-45% and 30-55%, respectively, depending on the pre-intervention risk score. There was a substantial risk of developing CVD in this working cohort. Occupational health programmes with lifestyle interventions for high-risk individuals may be an effective risk reduction measure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Evaluation of 6 and 10 Year-Old Child Human Body Models in Emergency Events.

    PubMed

    Gras, Laure-Lise; Stockman, Isabelle; Brolin, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Emergency events can influence a child's kinematics prior to a car-crash, and thus its interaction with the restraint system. Numerical Human Body Models (HBMs) can help understand the behaviour of children in emergency events. The kinematic responses of two child HBMs-MADYMO 6 and 10 year-old models-were evaluated and compared with child volunteers' data during emergency events-braking and steering-with a focus on the forehead and sternum displacements. The response of the 6 year-old HBM was similar to the response of the 10 year-old HBM, however both models had a different response compared with the volunteers. The forward and lateral displacements were within the range of volunteer data up to approximately 0.3 s; but then, the HBMs head and sternum moved significantly downwards, while the volunteers experienced smaller displacement and tended to come back to their initial posture. Therefore, these HBMs, originally intended for crash simulations, are not too stiff and could be able to reproduce properly emergency events thanks, for instance, to postural control.

  8. Evaluation of 6 and 10 Year-Old Child Human Body Models in Emergency Events

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Emergency events can influence a child’s kinematics prior to a car-crash, and thus its interaction with the restraint system. Numerical Human Body Models (HBMs) can help understand the behaviour of children in emergency events. The kinematic responses of two child HBMs–MADYMO 6 and 10 year-old models–were evaluated and compared with child volunteers’ data during emergency events–braking and steering–with a focus on the forehead and sternum displacements. The response of the 6 year-old HBM was similar to the response of the 10 year-old HBM, however both models had a different response compared with the volunteers. The forward and lateral displacements were within the range of volunteer data up to approximately 0.3 s; but then, the HBMs head and sternum moved significantly downwards, while the volunteers experienced smaller displacement and tended to come back to their initial posture. Therefore, these HBMs, originally intended for crash simulations, are not too stiff and could be able to reproduce properly emergency events thanks, for instance, to postural control. PMID:28099505

  9. Relationship of lipid oxidation with subclinical atherosclerosis and 10-year coronary events in general population.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Miquel; Vila, Joan; Elosua, Roberto; Molina, Lluís; Bruguera, Jordi; Sala, Joan; Masià, Rafel; Covas, Maria Isabel; Marrugat, Jaume; Fitó, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    To assess 1) the association of lipid oxidation biomarkers with 10-year coronary artery disease (CAD) events and subclinical atherosclerosis, and 2) the reclassification capacity of these biomarkers over Framingham-derived CAD risk functions, in a general population. Within the framework of the REGICOR study, 4782 individuals aged between 25 and 74 years were recruited in a population-based cohort study. Follow-up of the 4042 who met the eligibility criteria was carried out. Plasma, circulating oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL antibodies (OLAB) were measured in a random sample of 2793 participants. End-points included fatal and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and angina. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in the highest quintile and ankle-brachial index <0.9 were considered indicators of subclinical atherosclerosis. Mean age was 50.0 (13.4) years, and 52.4% were women. There were 103 CAD events (34 myocardial infarction, 43 angina, 26 coronary deaths), and 306 subclinical atherosclerosis cases. Oxidized LDL was independently associated with higher incidence of CAD events (HR = 1.70; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.02-2.84), but not with subclinical atherosclerosis. The net classification index of the Framingham-derived CAD risk function was significantly improved when ox-LDL was included (NRI = 14.67% [4.90; 24.45], P = 0.003). No associations were found between OLAB and clinical or subclinical events. The reference values for oxLDL and OLAB are also provided (percentiles). OxLDL was independently associated with 10-year CAD events but not subclinical atherosclerosis in a general population, and improved the reclassification capacity of Framingham-derived CAD risk functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Change in predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: who benefits?

    PubMed

    Donadelli, Simara P; Salgado, Wilson; Marchini, Julio S; Schmidt, Andre; Amato, Cristiana A F; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Dos Santos, Jose Ernesto; Nonino, Carla Barbosa

    2011-05-01

    The risk of developing cardiovascular disease is higher in obese than in non-obese individuals. Surgery for obesity is effective in reducing weight and resolution of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Our aim was to assess the estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk of obese patients before and after treatment of obesity with a gastric bypass. Weight, body mass index systolic and diastolic blood pressure, lipid profile, glycemia, and history of cardiovascular disease were obtained for obese patients before and 2 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Ten-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Framingham score. Forty-two patients were included in the study. We observed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of 10-year cardiovascular risk mainly associated with weight reduction and improvement of comorbidities associated with obesity. The benefits were greater among patients who already presented known risk factors such as diabetes and hypertension. Superobese patients benefited as early as 2 years after surgery, when weight loss was greater. Weight loss secondary to surgery was sustained after 2 years and promoted improvement of comorbidities, with an important reduction of 10-year cardiovascular risk especially among patients with previous risk factors.

  11. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  12. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  13. Habitual sleep duration and predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk using the pooled cohort risk equations among US adults.

    PubMed

    Ford, Earl S

    2014-12-02

    The association between sleep duration and predicted cardiovascular risk has been poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk among US adults. Data from 7690 men and nonpregnant women who were aged 40 to 79 years, who were free of self-reported heart disease and stroke, and who participated in a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2005 to 2012 were analyzed. Sleep duration was self-reported. Predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the pooled cohort equations. Among the included participants, 13.1% reported sleeping ≤5 hours, 24.4% reported sleeping 6 hours, 31.9% reported sleeping 7 hours, 25.2% reported sleeping 8 hours, 4.0% reported sleeping 9 hours, and 1.3% reported sleeping ≥10 hours. After adjustment for covariates, geometric mean-predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk was 4.0%, 3.6%, 3.4%, 3.5%, 3.7%, and 3.7% among participants who reported sleeping ≤5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and ≥10 hours per night, respectively (PWald chi-square<0.001). The age-adjusted percentages of predicted cardiovascular risk ≥20% for the 6 intervals of sleep duration were 14.5%, 11.9%, 11.0%, 11.4%, 11.8%, and 16.3% (PWald chi-square=0.022). After maximal adjustment, however, sleep duration was not significantly associated with cardiovascular risk ≥20% (PWald chi-square=0.698). Mean-predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk was lowest among adults who reported sleeping 7 hours per night and increased as participants reported sleeping fewer and more hours. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  14. [The 10-year stroke risk in hypertensive outpatients combined with diabetes in cardiovascular clinics of 36 tertiary hospitals in China].

    PubMed

    Bao, Bingnan; Zhou, Yingsheng; Liu, Jun; Huo, Yong

    2014-12-01

    To assess the estimated 10-year risk of stroke among hypertensive outpatients known with diabetes from cardiovascular clinics of 36 tertiary hospitals in China and to analyze the characteristics of the risk factors and the 10-year risk of stroke between the southern and the northern patients. A multi-center prevalence survey was conducted from October 2011 to June 2012. Hypertensive outpatients known with diabetes were enrolled from cardiovascular clinics of 36 tertiary hospitals in China. A total of 15 914 outpatients were included in the final analysis. The 10-year probability of stroke was evaluated by the Framingham stroke risk profile. According to the 10-year probability of stroke, patients were divided into low risk ( ≤ 5%), medium risk (6%∼9%) and high risk ( ≥ 10%). (1) Of all the hypertensive outpatients known with diabetes, the mean age was (64.6 ± 10.1) years and the mean systolic pressure was (138.7 ± 19.3) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa). Among them, 7.4% with atrial fibrillation, 11.2% with left ventricular hypertrophy, 57.2% with cardiovascular diseases, 17.1% smokers and 37.0% using mono-hypoglycemic agent. The southern patients who were older with more smokers had higher proportions of men and left ventricular hypertrophy, lower levels of systolic blood pressure, and lower proportions of other cardiovascular diseases than those of the northern patients ( all P < 0.05). (2) The mean 10-year probability of stroke was (20.9 ± 16.2) %. The southern patients had a higher mean 10-year probability of stroke than that of the northern patients [(22.4 ± 17.1) % vs (19.7 ± 15.2) %] (P < 0.01) . After adjusted by age and sex, the southern patients still had a higher mean 10-year probability of stroke (P < 0.05) . (3) All the patients had 7.7% with low risk, 17.4% with medium risk, and 74.9% with high risk. The southern patients had lower proportions of low and medium risk than those of the northern patients (6.7% vs 8.4%, 15.5% vs 18.9%), but had a

  15. [Association between metabolic syndrome and the 10 years mortality of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases in the senile population].

    PubMed

    Jin, Meng-meng; Pan, Chang-Yu; Tian, Hui; Liu, Min; Su, Hai-yan

    2008-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its association with mortality of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases in senile population. Data were collected from 1926 people aged 60 and over, who took part in routine health examination in our hospital from 1996 to 1997. All subjects were followed up for 10 years. MS was diagnosed by using the definition recommended by Chinese Diabetic Society in 2004. Cox-proportional hazards models were used in survival analyses and to calculate the relative risk (RR) of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases mortality. The prevalence of MS was 25.03% (n = 482, Group 2) in this population. The 10 year mortality of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases was significantly higher (6.82/1000-person year vs. 2.55/1000-person year, P < 0.05) and the cumulative survival rate was significantly lower (92.46%vs. 97.14%, P < 0.05) in group 2 compared that in group 1 (non-MS, n = 1444). Compared with group 1, RR of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases mortality was 2.52 (95% CI 1.367 - 4.661, P < 0.05) in group 2. There was a high prevalence of MS in the senile population and MS was associated with higher 10 years mortality of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Derivation and validation of a set of 10-year cardiovascular risk predictive functions in Spain: the FRESCO Study.

    PubMed

    Marrugat, Jaume; Subirana, Isaac; Ramos, Rafel; Vila, Joan; Marín-Ibañez, Alejandro; Guembe, María Jesús; Rigo, Fernando; Tormo Díaz, María José; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Cabré, Joan Josep; Segura, Antonio; Baena-Díez, José Miguel; de la Cámara, Agustín Gómez; Lapetra, José; Grau, María; Quesada, Miquel; Medrano, María José; González Diego, Paulino; Frontera, Guiem; Gavrila, Diana; Aicua, Eva Ardanaz; Basora, Josep; García, José María; García-Lareo, Manuel; Gutierrez, José Antonio; Mayoral, Eduardo; Sala, Joan; D'Agostino, Ralph; Elosua, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    To derive and validate a set of functions to predict coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, and validate the Framingham-REGICOR function. Pooled analysis of 11 population-based Spanish cohorts (1992-2005) with 50,408 eligible participants. Baseline smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure (SBP), lipid profile, and body mass index were recorded. A ten-year follow-up included re-examinations/telephone contact and cross-linkage with mortality registries. For each sex, two models were fitted for CHD, stroke, and both end-points combined: model A was adjusted for age, smoking, and body mass index and model B for age, smoking, diabetes, SBP, total and HDL cholesterol, and for hypertension treatment by SBP, and age by smoking and by SBP interactions. The 9.3-year median follow-up accumulated 2973 cardiovascular events. The C-statistic improved from model A to model B for CHD (0.66 to 0.71 for men; 0.70 to 0.74 for women) and the combined CHD-stroke end-points (0.68 to 0.71; 0.72 to 0.75, respectively), but not for stroke alone. Framingham-REGICOR had similar C-statistics but overestimated CHD risk. The new functions accurately estimate 10-year stroke and CHD risk in the adult population of a typical southern European country. The Framingham-REGICOR function provided similar CHD prediction but overestimated risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interaction analysis of the new pooled cohort equations for 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk estimation: a simulation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schiros, Chun G; Denney, Thomas S; Gupta, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the individual and interacting impacts of the continuous variables (age, total cholesterol (total-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and systolic blood pressure(BP)) on 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk and better understand the pattern of predicted 10-year risk with change of each variable using recently published new pooled cohort equations. Design Simulation analysis was performed across the whole range of the boundary limits suggested for the continuous variables for groupings based on race and gender in the pooled cohort 10-year risk equations. Setting Computer-based simulation analysis. Participants Data were generated by simulation using prespecified variable ranges. Intervention Data simulation and visual display of the hazard analysis. Main outcome measures Interactions of age with other variables were analysed using multidimensional visualisation and hazard analysis. Results In African–American females, due to the interaction of age with HDL-C, treated BP and untreated BP, increasing age may not always increase 10-year risk. Furthermore, in the same cohort, increasing HDL-C level may result in higher 10-year risk for older individuals. For Caucasian females, due to square of Ln (age) term in the equation, the age-risk curve does not monotonically increase with age. The vertex is within the given age range of 40–79 years for a certain range of total-C and HDL-C, indicating that age may not always result in increased predicted 10-year risk. Conclusions The new pooled cohort equations are sophisticated as they take into account the interactions of the continuous variables in predicting 10-year risk. We find situations where the estimated 10-year risk does not follow the general secular trends. The impact of such interesting patterns may be substantial and therefore further exploration is needed as it has direct implications in clinical management for primary prevention. PMID:25941176

  18. Relation between pulmonary function and 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease among healthy men and women in Italy: the Moli-sani Project.

    PubMed

    Arcari, Antonella; Magnacca, Sara; Bracone, Francesca; Costanzo, Simona; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; de Curtis, Amalia; Zito, Franco; Schünemann, Holger J; Donati, Maria B; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary dysfunction could influence the onset and the evolution of cardiovascular disorders. This study evaluated whether pulmonary dysfunction based on spirometry, plethysmography and carbon monoxide diffusion test is associated with the estimated risk of cardiovascular disease in 10 years. We performed a cross-sectional general population-based cohort study. The Moli-sani Project is a population-based cohort study of subjects aged ≥35 years, randomly recruited from the general population in Italy. Cardiovascular risk in 10 years was predicted by the CUORE score which provides an estimate of the probability of a first coronary or cerebrovascular event in the next 10 years, based on a risk equation derived from Italian cohorts. Out of 12,933 subjects with high-quality flow/volume manoeuvre, 8,132 subjects had suitable plethysmography and 3,422 carbon monoxide diffusion (carbon monoxide alveolar diffusion test [DLCO]). In multivariate analyses, reduced pulmonary function expressed by forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and total lung capacity (TLC) were inversely associated with CUORE score both in men and in women, independently of other risk factors such as age, height, smoking habits, total cigarettes exposure (pack-years), pulmonary disease, body mass index, social status and physical activity. In contrast, there was no association between FEV1/FVC ratio, residual volume, DLCO and CUORE risk score. In both genders from an adult general Italian population, pulmonary function decline is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. These results suggest that pulmonary monitoring could be useful to more accurately predict cardiovascular risk.

  19. Arsenic Exposure and Predicted 10-Year Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk Using the Pooled Cohort Equations in U.S. Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Nong, Qingjiao; Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Zhong, Qiuan

    2016-11-07

    This study was to evaluate the association of urine arsenic with predicted 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk in U.S. adults with hypertension. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted in 1570 hypertensive adults aged 40-79 years in the 2003-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with determinations of urine arsenic. Predicted 10-year ASCVD risk was estimated by the Pooled Cohort Equations, developed by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association in 2013. For men, after adjustment for sociodemographic factors, urine dilution, ASCVD risk factors and organic arsenic intake from seafood, participants in the highest quartiles of urine arsenic had higher 10-year predicted ASCVD risk than in the lowest quartiles; the increases were 24% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2%, 53%) for total arsenic, 13% (95% CI: 2%, 25%) for dimethylarsinate and 22% (95% CI: 5%, 40%) for total arsenic minus arsenobetaine separately. For women, the corresponding increases were 5% (95% CI: -15%, 29%), 10% (95% CI: -8%, 30%) and 0% (95% CI: -15%, 19%), respectively. Arsenic exposure, even at low levels, may contribute to increased ASCVD risk in men with hypertension. Furthermore, our findings suggest that particular circumstances need urgently to be considered while elucidating cardiovascular effects of low inorganic arsenic levels.

  20. Arsenic Exposure and Predicted 10-Year Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk Using the Pooled Cohort Equations in U.S. Hypertensive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Qingjiao; Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Zhong, Qiuan

    2016-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the association of urine arsenic with predicted 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk in U.S. adults with hypertension. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted in 1570 hypertensive adults aged 40–79 years in the 2003–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with determinations of urine arsenic. Predicted 10-year ASCVD risk was estimated by the Pooled Cohort Equations, developed by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association in 2013. For men, after adjustment for sociodemographic factors, urine dilution, ASCVD risk factors and organic arsenic intake from seafood, participants in the highest quartiles of urine arsenic had higher 10-year predicted ASCVD risk than in the lowest quartiles; the increases were 24% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2%, 53%) for total arsenic, 13% (95% CI: 2%, 25%) for dimethylarsinate and 22% (95% CI: 5%, 40%) for total arsenic minus arsenobetaine separately. For women, the corresponding increases were 5% (95% CI: −15%, 29%), 10% (95% CI: −8%, 30%) and 0% (95% CI: −15%, 19%), respectively. Arsenic exposure, even at low levels, may contribute to increased ASCVD risk in men with hypertension. Furthermore, our findings suggest that particular circumstances need urgently to be considered while elucidating cardiovascular effects of low inorganic arsenic levels. PMID:27828001

  1. Metabolic syndrome, adherence to the Mediterranean diet and 10-year cardiovascular disease incidence: The ATTICA study.

    PubMed

    Kastorini, Christina-Maria; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Chrysohoou, Christina; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi; Pitaraki, Evangelia; Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-03-01

    To better understand the metabolic syndrome (MS) spectrum through principal components analysis and further evaluate the role of the Mediterranean diet on MS presence. During 2001-2002, 1514 men and 1528 women (>18 y) without any clinical evidence of CVD or any other chronic disease, at baseline, living in greater Athens area, Greece, were enrolled. In 2011-2012, the 10-year follow-up was performed in 2583 participants (15% of the participants were lost to follow-up). Incidence of fatal or non-fatal CVD was defined according to WHO-ICD-10 criteria. MS was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment panel III (revised NCEP ATP III) definition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the MedDietScore (range 0-55). Five principal components were derived, explaining 73.8% of the total variation, characterized by the: a) body weight and lipid profile, b) blood pressure, c) lipid profile, d) glucose profile, e) inflammatory factors. All components were associated with higher likelihood of CVD incidence. After adjusting for various potential confounding factors, adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern for each 10% increase in the MedDietScore, was associated with 15% lower odds of CVD incidence (95%CI: 0.71-1.06). For the participants with low adherence to the Mediterranean diet all five components were significantly associated with increased likelihood of CVD incidence. However, for the ones following closely the Mediterranean pattern positive, yet not significant associations were observed. Results of the present work propose a wider MS definition, while highlighting the beneficial role of the Mediterranean dietary pattern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of depression and anxiety status with 10-year cardiovascular disease incidence among apparently healthy Greek adults: The ATTICA Study.

    PubMed

    Kyrou, Ioannis; Kollia, Natasa; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi; Chrysohoou, Christina; Tsigos, Constantine; Randeva, Harpal S; Yannakoulia, Mary; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic stress frequently manifests with anxiety and/or depressive symptomatology and may have detrimental cardiometabolic effects over time. As such, recognising the potential links between stress-related psychological disorders and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is becoming increasingly important in cardiovascular epidemiology research. The primary aim of this study was to explore prospectively potential associations between clinically relevant depressive symptomatology and anxiety levels and the 10-year CVD incidence among apparently healthy Greek adults. Design A population-based, health and nutrition prospective survey. Methods In the context of the ATTICA Study (2002-2012), 853 adult participants without previous CVD history (453 men (45 ± 13 years) and 400 women (44 ± 18 years)) underwent psychological evaluations through validated, self-reporting depression and anxiety questionnaires. Results After adjustment for multiple established CVD risk factors, both reported depression and anxiety levels were positively and independently associated with the 10-year CVD incidence, with depression markedly increasing the CVD risk by approximately fourfold (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 3.6 (1.3, 11) for depression status; 1.03 (1.0, 1.1) for anxiety levels). Conclusions Our findings indicate that standardised psychological assessments focusing on depression and anxiety should be considered as an additional and distinct aspect in the context of CVD preventive strategies that are designed and implemented by health authorities at the general population level.

  3. Effect of Change in Systolic Blood Pressure Between Clinic Visits on Estimated 10-Year Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Siqin; Wang, Y. Claire; Shimbo, Daichi; Newman, Jonathan D.; Levitan, Emily B.; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Systolic blood pressure (SBP) often varies between clinic visits within individuals, which can affect estimation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Methods and Results We analyzed data from participants with two clinic visits separated by a median of 17 days in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=808). Ten-year CVD risk was calculated with SBP obtained at each visit using the Pooled Cohort Equations. The mean age of participants was 46.1 years and 47.3% were male. The median SBP difference between the two visits was −1 mmHg (1st – 99th percentiles: −23 to 32 mmHg). The median estimated 10-year CVD risk was 2.5% and 2.4% at the first and second visit, respectively (1st – 99th percentiles −5.2% to +7.1%). Meaningful risk reclassification (i.e., across the guideline recommended 7.5% threshold for statin initiation) occurred in 12 (11.3%) of 106 participants whose estimated CVD risk was between 5% to 10%, but only in 2 (0.3%) of 702 participants who had a 10-year estimated CVD risk of <5% or >10%. Conclusions SBP variability can affect CVD risk estimation, and can influence statin eligibility for individuals with an estimated 10-year CVD risk between 5% and 10%. PMID:24462238

  4. Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Augustovski, Federico A.; Cantor, Scott B.; Thach, Chau T.; Spann, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The use of aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in the general population is controversial. The purpose of this study was to create a versatile model to evaluate the effects of aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with different risk profiles. DESIGN A Markov decision-analytic model evaluated the expected length and quality of life for the cohort's next 10 years as measured by quality-adjusted survival for the options of taking or not taking aspirin. SETTING Hypothetical model of patients in a primary care setting. PATIENTS Several cohorts of patients with a range of risk profiles typically seen in a primary care setting were considered. Risk factors considered included gender, age, cholesterol levels, systolic blood pressure, smoking status, diabetes, and presence of left ventricular hypertrophy. The cohorts were followed for 10 years. Outcomes were myocardial infarction, stroke, gastrointestinal bleed, ulcer, and death. MAIN RESULTS For the cases considered, the effects of aspirin varied according to the cohort's risk profile. By taking aspirin, the lowest-risk cohort would be the most harmed with a loss of 1.8 quality-adjusted life days by taking aspirin; the highest risk cohort would achieve the most benefit with a gain of 11.3 quality-adjusted life days. Results without quality adjustment favored taking aspirin in all the cohorts, with a gain of 0.73 to 8.04 days. The decision was extremely sensitive to variations in the utility of taking aspirin and to aspirin's effects on cardiovascular mortality. The model was robust to other probability and utility changes within reasonable parameters. CONCLUSIONS The decision of whether to take aspirin as primary prevention for cardiovascular events depends on patient risk. It is a harmful intervention for patients with no risk factors, and it is beneficial in moderate and high-risk patients. The benefits of aspirin in this population are comparable to those

  5. Cardiovascular assessment of asymptomatic patients with juvenile-onset localized and systemic scleroderma: 10 years prospective observation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, A; Dabrowski, R; Wozniak, J; Jasek, S; Chwyczko, T; Kowalik, I; Musiej-Nowakowska, E; Szwed, H

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was non-invasive evaluation of the cardiovascular system in asymptomatic young adult patients with juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS) and juvenile systemic sclerosis (JSS). A group of 34 consecutive children with scleroderma were prospectively observed in the study. The control group (CG) consisted of 20 healthy subjects. In each subject 12-lead electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, ECG Holter, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring examinations were performed at the baseline visit and after 10 years. Additionally, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations were measured after 10 years. Examinations were performed in 13 patients with JLS and 15 with JSS at the final visit. Two children had died (one from each group). Four patients were alive but refused the final visit. After 10 years, a higher prevalence of ventricular extrasystoles (p = 0.01) and an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (JLS: p = 0.04, JSS: p = 0.03) were observed in both groups, but in comparison with the controls there was no significant difference at the final visit. In JLS patients more cases of left ventricle diastolic dysfunction, hypertension, and sinus tachycardia were diagnosed at the final visit (p ≤ 0.05). More atrioventricular block episodes in both groups of scleroderma patients were observed. Over the 10 years, arterial hypertension was diagnosed in three patients from the JLS group and in two with JSS. There were no significant differences in BNP concentrations at the final visit. The results of the present study show that juvenile scleroderma seems to be more benign than adult-onset disease. This observational study shows subclinical, not severe, cardiac abnormalities in adult patients with juvenile-onset disease.

  6. Usefulness of Left Ventricular Mass and Geometry for Determining 10-Year Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults Aged >65 Years (from the Cardiovascular Health Study).

    PubMed

    Desai, Chintan S; Bartz, Traci M; Gottdiener, John S; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Gardin, Julius M

    2016-09-01

    Left ventricular (LV) mass and geometry are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We sought to determine whether LV mass and geometry contribute to risk prediction for CVD in adults aged ≥65 years of the Cardiovascular Health Study. We indexed LV mass to body size, denoted as LV mass index (echo-LVMI), and we defined LV geometry as normal, concentric remodeling, and eccentric or concentric LV hypertrophy. We added echo-LVMI and LV geometry to separate 10-year risk prediction models containing traditional risk factors and determined the net reclassification improvement (NRI) for incident coronary heart disease (CHD), CVD (CHD, heart failure [HF], and stroke), and HF alone. Over 10 years of follow-up in 2,577 participants (64% women, 15% black, mean age 72 years) for CHD and CVD, the adjusted hazards ratios for a 1-SD higher echo-LVMI were 1.25 (95% CI 1.14 to 1.37), 1.24 (1.15 to 1.33), and 1.51 (1.40 to 1.62), respectively. Addition of echo-LVMI to the standard model for CHD resulted in an event NRI of -0.011 (95% CI -0.037 to 0.028) and nonevent NRI of 0.034 (95% CI 0.008 to 0.076). Addition of echo-LVMI and LV geometry to the standard model for CVD resulted in an event NRI of 0.013 (95% CI -0.0335 to 0.0311) and a nonevent NRI of 0.043 (95% CI 0.011 to 0.09). The nonevent NRI was also significant with addition of echo-LVMI for HF risk prediction (0.10, 95% CI 0.057 to 0.16). In conclusion, in adults aged ≥65 years, echo-LVMI improved risk prediction for CHD, CVD, and HF, driven primarily by improved reclassification of nonevents.

  7. Comparison of Diachronic Thinking and Event Ordering in 5- to 10-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brandy D.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rabin, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Two main theoretical constructs seek to describe the elaborated sense of time that may be a uniquely human attribute: diachronic thinking (the ability to think about the past and use that information to predict future events) and event ordering (the ability to sequence events in temporal order). Researchers utilize various tasks to measure the…

  8. Comparison of Diachronic Thinking and Event Ordering in 5- to 10-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brandy D.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rabin, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Two main theoretical constructs seek to describe the elaborated sense of time that may be a uniquely human attribute: diachronic thinking (the ability to think about the past and use that information to predict future events) and event ordering (the ability to sequence events in temporal order). Researchers utilize various tasks to measure the…

  9. Distribution of Estimated 10-Year Risk of Recurrent Vascular Events and Residual Risk in a Secondary Prevention Population.

    PubMed

    Kaasenbrood, Lotte; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Ray, Kausik K; Peters, Ron J G; Kastelein, John J P; Amarenco, Pierre; LaRosa, John C; Cramer, Maarten J M; Westerink, Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; de Borst, Gert J; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-11-08

    Among patients with clinically manifest vascular disease, the risk of recurrent vascular events is likely to vary. We assessed the distribution of estimated 10-year risk of recurrent vascular events in a secondary prevention population. We also estimated the potential risk reduction and residual risk that can be achieved if patients reach guideline-recommended risk factor targets. The SMART score (Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease) for 10-year risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or vascular death was applied to 6904 patients with vascular disease. The risk score was externally validated in 18 436 patients with various manifestations of vascular disease from the TNT (Treating to New Targets), IDEAL (Incremental Decrease in End Points Through Aggressive Lipid Lowering), SPARCL (Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels), and CAPRIE (Clopidogrel Versus Aspirin in Patients at Risk of Ischemic Events) trials. The residual risk at guideline-recommended targets was estimated by applying relative risk reductions from meta-analyses to the estimated risk for targets for systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, physical activity, and use of antithrombotic agents. The external performance of the SMART risk score was reasonable, apart from overestimation of risk in patients with 10-year risk >40%. In patients with various manifestations of vascular disease, median 10-year risk of a recurrent major vascular event was 17% (interquartile range, 11%-28%), varying from <10% in 18% to >30% in 22% of the patients. If risk factors were at guideline-recommended targets, the residual 10-year risk would be <10% in 47% and >30% in 9% of the patients (median, 11%; interquartile range, 7%-17%). Among patients with vascular disease, there is very substantial variation in estimated 10-year risk of recurrent vascular events. If all modifiable risk factors were at guideline-recommended targets, half of the patients would have a 10

  10. 10-year risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease among Korean adults: findings from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayoung

    2014-09-20

    This study examined the distribution of the 10-year risk for development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD), and the proportion of participants eligible for lipid management, in the Korean population. The risk was estimated using the Pooled Cohort Equations for non-Hispanic Whites and the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III equations. Eligibility for lipid-lowering treatment was assessed using the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Blood Cholesterol Guideline and the ATP III recommendation. Complex sampling design and area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) were used. Among 7594 ASCVD-free Korean adults, aged 40-79 years, 31.3% (men, 44.1%; women, 19%) had a 10-year risk for an ASCVD event of ≥ 7.5%, and 27.1% (men, 39.4%; women, 15.2%) had a 10-year risk for a CHD event of ≥ 10%. These proportions differed according to age groups, ranging from 6.1 to 91.9% and 8.7 to 58.7% for patients in their 40s-70s, using the ASCVD and CHD risk estimations, respectively. Overall, 78.7% of individuals remain in the same risk stratum. Those eligible for lipid management included 32.8% of the participants using the ACC/AHA Guideline and 11.9% of those using the ATP III recommendation. In discriminating ASCVD, AUCs for the ASCVD risk assessment method and the CHD risk assessment method were 0.70 and 0.64, respectively (P<0.001). The distribution of 10-year ASCVD and CHD risk was different according to the risk assessment methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of physical activity category on incidence of cardiovascular disease: Results from the 10-year follow-up of the ATTICA Study (2002-2012).

    PubMed

    Tambalis, Konstantinos D; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi N; Mellor, Duane D; Chrysohoou, Christina; Kouli, Georgia-Maria; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of physical activity (PA) level on 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence, taking into consideration several clinical and lifestyle risk factors along with the potential moderating role of gender. An analysis was undertaken on data from the ATTICA prospective cohort study (10-year follow-up, 2002-2012), which followed a Greek adult population (aged 18-89years). A total n=317 of fatal and nonfatal CVD events occurred among the 2020 participants. After adjusting for the lifestyle and clinical risk factors as potential confounders, odds ratio (ORs) of CVD risk of individuals who reported being sufficiently active and highly active were decreased by 58% (95% CI: 0.30, 0.58) and 70% (95% CI: 0.15, 0.56), when compared to those who were inactive/insufficiently active, respectively. Men had nearly two-fold increase in risk of CVD (95% CI: 1.62, 2.18) versus women. Stratified analysis by gender, revealed that sufficiently active men, had 52% (95% CI: 0.24, 0.97) reduced risk of CVD incidence when compared to inactive males, while, for women, the role of PA lost significance following adjusting for lifestyle factors. The current data suggests a beneficial effect of even moderate physical activity levels on 10-year incidence of CVD, reinforcing the importance of physically activity, especially for men.

  12. Trends in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Prevalence and Estimated 10-Year Cardiovascular Risk Scores in a Large Untreated French Urban Population: The CARVAR 92 Study.

    PubMed

    Karam, Carma; Beauchet, Alain; Czernichow, Sebastien; de Roquefeuil, Florence; Bourez, Alain; Mansencal, Nicolas; Dubourg, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Surveys measuring effectiveness of public awareness campaigns in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence have yielded equivocal findings. The aim of this study was to describe cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) changes over the years in an untreated population-based study. Between 2007 and 2012, we conducted a screening campaign for CVRFs in men aged 40 to 65 yrs and women aged 50 to 70 yrs in the western suburbs of Paris. Data were complete for 20,324 participants of which 14,709 were untreated. The prevalence trend over six years was statistically significant for hypertension in men from 25.9% in 2007 to 21.1% in 2012 (p=0.002) and from 23% in 2007 to 12.7% in 2012 in women (p<0.0001). The prevalence trend of tobacco smoking decreased from 38.6% to 27.7% in men (p=0.0001) and from 22.6% to 16.8% in women (p=0.113). The Framingham 10-year risk for CVD decreased from 13.3 ± 8.2 % in 2007 to 11.7 ± 9.0 % in 2012 in men and from 8.0 ± 4.1 % to 5.9 ± 3.4 % in women. The 10-year risk of fatal CVD based on the European Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) decreased in men and in women (p <0.0001). Over a 6-year period, several CVRFs have decreased in our screening campaign, leading to decrease in the 10-year risk for CVD and the 10-year risk of fatal CVD. Cardiologists should recognize the importance of community prevention programs and communication policies, particularly tobacco control and healthier diets to decrease the CVRFs in the general population.

  13. Trends in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Prevalence and Estimated 10-Year Cardiovascular Risk Scores in a Large Untreated French Urban Population: The CARVAR 92 Study

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Carma; Beauchet, Alain; Czernichow, Sebastien; de Roquefeuil, Florence; Bourez, Alain; Mansencal, Nicolas; Dubourg, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveys measuring effectiveness of public awareness campaigns in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence have yielded equivocal findings. The aim of this study was to describe cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) changes over the years in an untreated population-based study. Methods Between 2007 and 2012, we conducted a screening campaign for CVRFs in men aged 40 to 65 yrs and women aged 50 to 70 yrs in the western suburbs of Paris. Data were complete for 20,324 participants of which 14,709 were untreated. Results The prevalence trend over six years was statistically significant for hypertension in men from 25.9% in 2007 to 21.1% in 2012 (p=0.002) and from 23% in 2007 to 12.7% in 2012 in women (p<0.0001). The prevalence trend of tobacco smoking decreased from 38.6% to 27.7% in men (p=0.0001) and from 22.6% to 16.8% in women (p=0.113). The Framingham 10-year risk for CVD decreased from 13.3 ± 8.2 % in 2007 to 11.7 ± 9.0 % in 2012 in men and from 8.0 ± 4.1 % to 5.9 ± 3.4 % in women. The 10-year risk of fatal CVD based on the European Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) decreased in men and in women (p <0.0001). Conclusions Over a 6-year period, several CVRFs have decreased in our screening campaign, leading to decrease in the 10-year risk for CVD and the 10-year risk of fatal CVD. Cardiologists should recognize the importance of community prevention programs and communication policies, particularly tobacco control and healthier diets to decrease the CVRFs in the general population. PMID:25906186

  14. Bicycle injury events among older adults in Northern Sweden: a 10-year population based study.

    PubMed

    Scheiman, Simeon; Moghaddas, Hossein S; Björnstig, Ulf; Bylund, Per-Olof; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2010-03-01

    Bicycles are a common mode of transportation and injured bicyclists cause a substantial burden on the medical sector. In Sweden, about half of fatally injured bicyclists are 65 years or older. This study analyzes the injury mechanisms, injuries, and consequences among bicyclists 65 years or older and compare with younger bicyclists (< or =64) and older adults as passenger car drivers, to give a basis for an injury preventive discussion for this age group. Umeå University Hospital's primary catchments area had 142,000 inhabitants in 2006. Nearly all injured road users in the well-defined geographic area are treated at this hospital and a 10-year data set (N=456) of injured bicyclists aged 65+ from the hospital's continuous injury registration (1997-2006) was analyzed. The results show that the annual injury incidence was 2.4 and 2.2 per 1000 men and women, respectively, aged 65 or older. For men the incidence rate was constant in the three age groups 65-74, 75-84 and 85+, while it decreased strongly for women. The incidence rate for old adults as passenger car drivers and younger bicyclists was 1.0 and 4.6, respectively. Most frequent injury mechanisms were falls when getting on or off a bicycle (20%) and by potholes or irregularities on the ground, edge of a sidewalk, or similar (13%). Only 6% were hit by cars, trucks, or buses. Half of the injured suffered fractures or dislocations, and 10% suffered concussion or more serious intracranial injuries. Getting on or off the bicycle caused most fractures (especially a high fraction of the hip and femur fractures) and resulted in 27% of all inpatient days in hospital. Three individuals died. One-third of the injured were treated as inpatients for a total of 1413 days (on average 9 days), with 69% of the days being caused by fractures. The cost for out- and inpatient acute treatment was approximately USD 4700 (SEK 33,000) per injured. The results merit an interest for this target group; bicycle injuries among older

  15. Education status determines 10-year (2002-2012) survival from cardiovascular disease in Athens metropolitan area: the ATTICA study, Greece.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi; Notara, Venetia; Pitaraki, Evangelia; Kokkou, Eleni; Chrysohoou, Christina; Skoumas, Yannis; Metaxa, Vassiliki; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and educational level seems to be an important determinant of the disease occurrence. The aim of this work was to investigate the association between education status and 10-year incidence of CVD, controlling for various socio-demographic lifestyle and clinical factors. From May 2001 to December 2002, 1514 men and 1528 women (>18 years) without any clinical evidence of CVD or any other chronic disease, at baseline, living in greater Athens area, Greece, were enrolled. In 2011-2012, the 10-year follow-up was performed in 2583 participants (15% of the participants were lost to follow-up). Incidence of fatal or non-fatal CVD was defined according to WHO-ICD-10 criteria. Education status was measured in years of schooling. The 10-year incidence of CVD was 15.7% [95% confidence intervals (CI) 14.1%-17.4%], 19.7% in men and 11.7% in women (Pgender < 0.001). Age-and gender-adjusted analyses revealed that those with low education (<9 years of schooling) were 1.52 times more likely (95% CI 1.03-2.23%) to have CVD compared with those with high education (>12 years of schooling). People in the low education group had higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemias, were more likely to be smokers and sedentary, had less healthy dietary habits, as compared with those in the high education group. When controlling for participants' medical history, smoking, dietary and lifestyle habits, low education was no longer significantly associated with CVD, illustrating the mediating effect of clinical and behavioural factors in the link between education and disease. It was of interest that low education status interacted with alcohol drinking, enhancing the adverse effect of low education on CVD risk (relative risk 1.44, 95% CI 0.94%-2.20%), after various adjustments made. In this study, it was concluded that low educational level was associated with increased CVD risk. This was

  16. Prediction of 10-year Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk among Adults Aged 40-79 Years in China: a Nationally Representative Survey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Li Min; Li, Yi Chong; Huang, Zheng Jing; Li, Jian Hong; Zhou, Mai Geng; Zhao, Wen Hua

    2017-04-01

    To establish the distribution of 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk among Chinese adults. We estimated the 10-year ASCVD risk by applying the 2013 American College of Cardiology/ American Heart Association pooled cohort equations (PCEs) to the data obtained from the 2010 China Chronic Disease and Risk Factor Surveillance that involved 61,541 participants (representing 520,158,652 Chinese adults) aged 40-79 years. We also compared the ASCVD risk with the 10-year ischemic cardiovascular disease (ICVD) risk, which was calculated using the simplified scoring tables recommended by the Chinese Guidelines for Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases (Chinese model). Based on the PCEs, the average 10-year ASCVD risk among adults without self-reported stroke or myocardial infraction was 12.5%. Approximately 247 million (47.4%) and 107 million (20.6%) adults had ⋝ 7.5% and > 20% 10-year ASCVD risks, respectively. The 10-year ASCVD risk > 20% was higher among men, less educated individuals, smokers, drinkers, and physically inactive individuals than among their counterparts. Overall, 29.0% of adults categorized using the Chinese model were overclassified with the PCEs. Our results define the distribution of 10-year ASCVD risk among Chinese adults. The 10-year ASCVD risk predicted by the PCEs was higher than the ICVD risk predicted by the Chinese model. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity screening tool and cardiovascular disease risk factors in 10-year old children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Kimbo Edward

    Purpose. To examine the association of the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity (FNPA) screening tool, a behaviorally based screening tool designed to assess the obesogenic family environment and behaviors, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in 10-year old children. Methods. One hundred nineteen children were assessed for body mass index (BMI), percent body fat (%BF), waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and resting blood pressure. A continuous CVD risk score was created using total cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol ratio (TC:HDL), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and WC. The FNPA survey was completed by parents. The associations between the FNPA score and individual CVD risk factors and the continuous CVD risk score were examined using correlation analyses. Results. Approximately 35% of the sample were overweight (19%) or obese (16%). The mean FNPA score was 24.6 +/- 2.5 (range 18 to 29). Significant correlations were found between the FNPA score and WC (r = -.35, p<.01), BMI percentile (r = -.38, p<.01), %BF (r = -.43, p<.01), and the continuous CVD risk score (r = -.22, p = .02). No significant association was found between the FNPA score and TC:HDL (r=0.10, p=0.88) or MAP (r=-0.12, p=0.20). Conclusion. Children from a high-risk, obesogenic family environment as indicated with a lower FNPA score have a higher CVD risk factor profile than children from a low-risk family environment.

  18. Exploring the path of Mediterranean diet on 10-year incidence of cardiovascular disease: the ATTICA study (2002-2012).

    PubMed

    Panagiotakos, D B; Georgousopoulou, E N; Pitsavos, C; Chrysohoou, C; Skoumas, I; Pitaraki, E; Georgiopoulos, G A; Ntertimani, M; Christou, A; Stefanadis, C

    2015-03-01

    A Mediterranean diet has been associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, but the clinical and behavioral pathway has not been well understood and appreciated. The aim of this work was to explore the path between adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet, lifestyle behaviors, clinical status, and a 10-year incidence of CVD. The ATTICA study was carried out in the Athens area during 2001-2002 and included 3042 participants free of CVD at baseline (49.8% men, aged 18-89). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed using the MedDietScore (range 0-55). During 2011-2012, 2583 out of the 3042 participants were found during the 10-year follow-up (15% lost to follow-up). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet decreased CVD risk (relative Risk (RR) per 1/55 unit = 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.00), independently of various sociodemographic, lifestyle, and clinical factors. Subgroup analyses revealed that participants with an unhealthy lifestyle (i.e., smokers, and obese and sedentary persons) remained protected from CVD through a greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet (RR for smokers = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.88, 0.97; RR for obese participants = 0.90, 95%CI: 0.82, 0.979; and RR for sedentary participants = 0.95, 95%CI: 0.90, 0.99). Path analysis revealed that adherence to a Mediterranean diet not only decreases the levels of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 but also has an independent protective role against CVD risk per se (total effect of the MedDietScore on CVD = -0.003, 95%CI: -0.005 to 0.000). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet confers a considerable reduction on CVD risk, independent of various factors. Therefore, even subjects with unhealthy lifestyle behaviors may benefit from adherence to this diet, suggesting another dimension to prevention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationships of different types of event to cardiovascular death in trials of antihypertensive treatment: an aid to definition of total cardiovascular disease risk in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zambon, Antonella; Arfè, Andrea; Corrao, Giovanni; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Guidelines for management of cardiovascular diseases stratify absolute cardiovascular risk into categories with a high-risk threshold defined at a 20% cardiovascular events risk in 10 years, but it is unclear whether only major events or the Framingham-extended definition should be considered. The 2013 ESH-ESC hypertension guidelines, instead, define cardiovascular risk as a risk of cardiovascular death in 10 years, as in the SCORE model, setting the threshold for high risk at the 5% level. It would be therefore convenient to know the quantitative relationship between the risks of the different outcomes adopted by the different guidelines, especially because some outcome definitions include serious nonfatal cardiovascular events relevant in cardiovascular prevention. We have therefore analysed these relationships in trials of antihypertensive therapy as an aid to defining total cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. Sixty-one trials were identified, and 51 retained for analysis of the relationship of cardiovascular death to the incidence of all-cause death, major cardiovascular events and inclusive (Framingham) cardiovascular events. The relationship between cardiovascular death rates and each type of event rates was explored by fitting flexible regression models. The included trials provided 15164 cardiovascular deaths and 1674427 patient-years. The relation of each event rate to cardiovascular death rate was best explained by a model considering the logarithm of each event rate as a dependent variable and the logarithm of cardiovascular death rate as a predictor. Mean patients' age and treatment were also predictors, but to a minor extent. The increase of the incidence rates of all types of events was less steep the higher the CV death rate: the rate ratios of all-cause death to cardiovascular death were 2.2, 1.9 and 1.8 at low-moderate (cardiovascular death <5% in 10 years), high (cardiovascular death 5% to <10%) and very high risk (cardiovascular death

  20. Potentially traumatic events as predictors of disability pension: A 10-year follow-up study in Norway.

    PubMed

    Lassemo, Eva; Sandanger, Inger

    2017-08-01

    Are potentially traumatic events associated with subsequent disability pension? Traumatic exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may represent a disabling state with both personal and professional consequences for the affected individual. Despite this, there is a scarcity of research studying the effects of traumatic exposure on disability pension. This study examined the differences in risk for disability pension among unexposed, exposed to trauma and PTSD cases. An ambidirectional Norwegian cohort study, consisting of 1238 individuals aged 18-66 years who were at risk of disability pension, were interviewed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and linked with registry data on disability pension. Registry follow-up in the Norwegian Insurance Database lasted ten years following interview in 2000-01. The risk of disability pension after traumatic exposure, divided into accidental and premeditated, was assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. In 10 years, 9.5% of the cohort had been granted disability pension. Overall exposure to traumatic events did not alter the risk of disability pension. However, among women, exposure to premeditated traumas did increase the risk (HR 2.96 (95% CI 1.54-5.68)), and was an independent risk factor. Fulfilling criteria for PTSD caseness further increased the risk (HR 4.69 (95% CI 1.78-12.40)). There was no increased risk found between traumatic exposure and disability pension for men. Exposure to trauma, particularly premeditated trauma, seems to be an independent risk factor for disability pension in women.

  1. Excess Cardiovascular Risk Burden in Jamaican Women Does Not Influence Predicted 10-Year CVD Risk Profiles of Jamaica Adults: An Analysis of the 2007/08 Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Survey.

    PubMed

    Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Younger, Novie O; Ferguson, Trevor S; Francis, Damian K; Abdulkadri, Abdullahi O; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana M; McFarlane, Shelly R; Cunningham-Myrie, Colette A; Wilks, Rainford J; Anderson, Simon G

    2013-01-01

    Black Caribbean women have a higher burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors than their male counterparts. Whether this results in a difference in incident cardiovascular events is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the 10 year World Health Organization/International Society for Hypertension (WHO/ISH) CVD risk score for Jamaica and explore the effect of sex as well as obesity, physical activity and socioeconomic status on these estimates. Data from 40-74 year old participants in the 2007/08 Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Survey were used. Trained interviewers administered questionnaires and measured anthropometrics, blood pressure, fasting glucose and cholesterol. Education and occupation were used to assess socioeconomic status. The Americas B tables were used to estimate the WHO/ISH 10 year CVD risk scores for the population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated. Data from 1,432 (450 men, 982 women) participants were analysed, after excluding those with self-reported heart attack and stroke. The women had a higher prevalence of diabetes (19%W;12%M), hypertension (49%W;47%M), hypercholesterolemia (25%W;11%M), obesity (46%W;15%M) and physical inactivity (59%W;29%M). More men smoked (6%W;31%M). There was good agreement between the 10-year cardiovascular risk estimates whether or not cholesterol measurements were utilized for calculation (kappa -0.61). While 90% had a 10 year WHO/ISH CVD risk of less than 10%, approximately 2% of the population or 14,000 persons had a 10 year WHO/ISH CVD risk of ≥30%. As expected CVD risk increased with age but there was no sex difference in CVD risk distribution despite women having a greater risk factor burden. Women with low socioeconomic status had the most adverse CVD risk profile. Despite women having a higher prevalence of CVD risk factors there was no sex difference in 10-year WHO/ISH CVD risk in Jamaican adults.

  2. The 2013 ACC/AHA 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk index is better than SCORE and QRisk II in rheumatoid arthritis: is it enough?

    PubMed

    Ozen, Gulsen; Sunbul, Murat; Atagunduz, Pamir; Direskeneli, Haner; Tigen, Kursat; Inanc, Nevsun

    2016-03-01

    To determine the ability of the new American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk algorithm in detecting high cardiovascular (CV) risk, RA patients identified by carotid ultrasonography (US) were compared with Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) and QRisk II algorithms. SCORE, QRisk II, 2013 ACC/AHA 10-year ASCVD risk and EULAR recommended modified versions were calculated in 216 RA patients. In sonographic evaluation, carotid intima-media thickness >0.90 mm and/or carotid plaques were used as the gold standard test for subclinical atherosclerosis and high CV risk (US+). Eleven (5.1%), 15 (6.9%) and 44 (20.4%) patients were defined as having high CV risk according to SCORE, QRisk II and ACC/AHA 10-year ASCVD risk, respectively. Fifty-two (24.1%) patients were US + and of those, 8 (15.4%), 7 (13.5%) and 23 (44.2%) patients were classified as high CV risk according to SCORE, QRisk II and ACC/AHA 10-year ASCVD risk, respectively. The ACC/AHA 10-year ASCVD risk index better identified US + patients than SCORE and QRisk II (P < 0.0001). With EULAR modification, reclassification from moderate to high risk occurred only in two, five and seven patients according to SCORE, QRisk II and ACC/AHA 10-year ASCVD risk, respectively. The 2013 ACC/AHA 10-year ASCVD risk estimator was better than the SCORE and QRisk II indices in RA, but still failed to identify 55% of high risk patients. Furthermore adjustment of threshold and EULAR modification did not work well. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Attributable Risk Estimate of Severe Psoriasis on Major Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nehal N.; Yu, YiDing; Pinnelas, Rebecca; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Shin, Daniel B.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that psoriasis, particularly if severe, may be a risk factor for major adverse cardiac events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and mortality from cardiovascular disease. We compared the risk of major adverse cardiac events between patients with psoriasis and the general population and estimated the attributable risk of severe psoriasis. Methods We performed a cohort study in the General Practice Research Database. Severe psoriasis was defined as receiving a psoriasis diagnosis and systemic therapy (N=3,603). Up to 4 patients without psoriasis were selected from the same practices and start dates for each patient with psoriasis (N=14,330). Results Severe psoriasis was a risk factor for major adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.26, 1.85) after adjusting for age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, tobacco use and hyperlipidemia. After fully adjusted analysis, severe psoriasis conferred an additional 6.2% absolute risk of 10-year major adverse cardiac events. Conclusions Severe psoriasis confers an additional 6.2% absolute risk of 10-year rate of major adverse cardiac events compared to the general population. This potentially has important therapeutic implications for cardiovascular risk stratification and prevention in patients with severe psoriasis. Future prospective studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:21787906

  4. Framingham Risk Score and Estimated 10-Year Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction by a Short-Term Yoga-Based LifeStyle Intervention.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rashmi; Yadav, Raj Kumar; Sarvottam, Kumar; Netam, Ritesh

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a short-term yoga-based lifestyle intervention program in lowering Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk. This was a single-arm, pre-post interventional study including data from a historical cohort with low to moderate risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). It was conducted in a tertiary-care hospital. Participants with low (0 or 1 CVD risk factors) to moderately high risk (10-year risk between 10% and 20% and two or more CVD risk factors) were included. Participants with previously diagnosed CVD, defined as a history of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or cerebrovascular accident, were excluded from the analysis. However, those with controlled hypertension were included. Intervention included a pretested short-term yoga-based lifestyle intervention, which included asanas (physical postures), pranayama (breathing exercises), meditation, relaxation techniques, stress management, group support, nutrition awareness program, and individualized advice. The intervention was for 10 days, spread over 2 weeks. However, participants were encouraged to include it in their day-to-day life. Outcomes included changes in FRS, and estimated 10-year CVD risk from baseline to week 2. A gender-based subgroup analysis was also done, and correlation between changes in FRS and cardiovascular risk factors was evaluated. Data for 554 subjects were screened, and 386 subjects (252 females) were included in the analysis. There was a significant reduction in FRS (p < 0.001) and estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk (p < 0.001) following the short-term yoga-based intervention. There was a strong positive correlation between reduction in FRS and serum total cholesterol (r = 0.60; p < 0.001). There was a moderate positive correlation between reduction in FRS and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.58; p < 0.001), and a weak but positive correlation between

  5. Elevated lipoprotein(a) levels predict cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 10-year prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Seok; Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) level is known to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the data that has been reported on the association between the Lp(a) level and CVD in type 2 diabetes has been limited and incoherent. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the Lp(a) concentration and new onset CVD in type 2 diabetes. From March 2003 to December 2004, patients with type 2 diabetes without a prior history of CVD were consecutively enrolled. CVD was defined as the occurrence of coronary artery disease or ischemic stroke. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify the associations between the Lp(a) and CVD after adjusting for confounding variables. Of the 1,183 patients who were enrolled, 833 participants were evaluated with a median follow-up time of 11.1 years. A total of 202 participants were diagnosed with CVD (24.2%). The median Lp(a) level for 1st and 4th quartile group was 5.4 (3.5 to 7.1) and 55.7 mg/dL (43.1 to 75.3). Compared with patients without CVD, those with CVD were older, had a longer duration of diabetes and hypertension, and used more insulin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers at baseline. A Cox hazard regression analysis revealed that the development of CVD was significantly associated with serum Lp(a) level (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26 to 2.92; p < 0.001, comparing the 4th vs. 1st quartile of Lp[a]). Elevated Lp(a) level was an independent predictable risk factor for CVD in type 2 diabetes. Other cardiovascular risk factors should be treated more intensively in type 2 diabetic patients with high Lp(a) levels.

  6. Elevated lipoprotein(a) levels predict cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 10-year prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tae-Seok; Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) level is known to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the data that has been reported on the association between the Lp(a) level and CVD in type 2 diabetes has been limited and incoherent. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the Lp(a) concentration and new onset CVD in type 2 diabetes. Methods From March 2003 to December 2004, patients with type 2 diabetes without a prior history of CVD were consecutively enrolled. CVD was defined as the occurrence of coronary artery disease or ischemic stroke. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify the associations between the Lp(a) and CVD after adjusting for confounding variables. Results Of the 1,183 patients who were enrolled, 833 participants were evaluated with a median follow-up time of 11.1 years. A total of 202 participants were diagnosed with CVD (24.2%). The median Lp(a) level for 1st and 4th quartile group was 5.4 (3.5 to 7.1) and 55.7 mg/dL (43.1 to 75.3). Compared with patients without CVD, those with CVD were older, had a longer duration of diabetes and hypertension, and used more insulin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers at baseline. A Cox hazard regression analysis revealed that the development of CVD was significantly associated with serum Lp(a) level (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26 to 2.92; p < 0.001, comparing the 4th vs. 1st quartile of Lp[a]). Conclusions Elevated Lp(a) level was an independent predictable risk factor for CVD in type 2 diabetes. Other cardiovascular risk factors should be treated more intensively in type 2 diabetic patients with high Lp(a) levels. PMID:27756118

  7. Sex specific differences in the predictive value of cholesterol homeostasis markers and 10-Year CVD event rate in Framingham Offspring Study participants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Available data are inconsistent on factors influencing plasma cholesterol homeostasis marker concentrations and their value in predicting subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. To address this issue the relationship between markers of cholesterol absorption (campesterol, sitosterol, cholest...

  8. Testosterone therapy, thrombosis, thrombophilia, cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Wang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    There are similar time intervals between starting testosterone therapy (TT) and development of thrombotic (~4.5 months) or cardiovascular (CVD) events (~3 months) which may, speculatively, reflect a shared pathophysiology. We have described thrombotic events 5 months (median) after starting TT in 38 men and 4 women, including 27 with deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolism, 12 with osteonecrosis, 1 with central retinal vein thrombosis, 1 with amaurosis fugax, and 1 with spinal cord infarction. In 8 men whose TT was continued, second thrombotic events occurred despite adequate anticoagulation with Coumadin in 8 men, 3 of whom had a third thrombotic event. Of these 42 cases, 40 had measures of thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, and 39 were found to have previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Before beginning TT, especially in men with previous history of thrombotic events, we suggest that, at a minimum, measurements be made for the Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin mutations, Factors VIII and XI, and homocysteine, to identify men who should not receive TT. We need prospective data focused on whether there should be pre-TT screening based on history of previous venous thromboembolism or for all subjects for major gene thrombophilias. To better resolve questions about TT and all cause and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and thrombosis, a long term, prospective, randomized, blinded study following the example of the Women's Health Initiative is needed. While we wait for prospective placebo-controlled TT outcome data, TT should be restricted to men with well-defined androgen deficiency syndromes.

  9. Anxiety predicted premature all-cause and cardiovascular death in a 10-year follow-up of middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Denollet, Johan; Maas, Kristel; Knottnerus, André; Keyzer, Jules J; Pop, Victor J

    2009-04-01

    Research on emotional distress and mortality has largely focused on depression in men and in elderly populations. We examined the relation between anxiety and mortality in women at midlife, adjusting for depression. At baseline, 5,073 healthy Dutch women aged 46-54 years (mean=50.4+/-2.1) and living in Eindhoven, completed a three-item anxiety scale ("being anxious/worried," "feeling scared/panicky," "ruminating about things that went wrong;" Cronbach's alpha=0.77). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 10-year follow-up; secondary outcomes were cardiovascular and lung/breast cancer death. At follow-up, 114 (2.2%) women had died at the mean age of 56.4+/-3.1 years. Lung cancer (23%), cardiovascular disease (18%), and breast cancer (15%) were the major causes of death. Smoking, living alone, and lower education were related to mortality, but depression was not. Adjusting for these variables, anxiety was associated with a 77% increase in mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR]=1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-2.74, P=0.011). Anxiety was related to cardiovascular death (HR=2.77, 95% CI: 1.17-6.58, P=0.021); there was also a trend for lung cancer death (HR=1.91, 95% CI: 0.90-4.06, P=0.095) but not for breast cancer death. Anxiety predicted premature all-cause and cardiovascular death in middle-aged women, after adjustment for standard risk factors and depression.

  10. Mt Everest Base Camp Medical Clinic "Everest ER": epidemiology of medical events during the first 10 years of operation.

    PubMed

    Némethy, Mária; Pressman, Andrew B; Freer, Luanne; McIntosh, Scott E

    2015-03-01

    As the highest peak on the planet, Mt Everest provides a truly austere environment in which to practice medicine. We examined records of all visits to the Everest Base Camp Medical Clinic (Everest ER) to characterize the medical problems that occur in these patients. A retrospective analysis of medical records from the first 10 years of operation (2003 to 2012) was performed. Medical reasons accounted for 85.3% (3045) of diagnoses, whereas 14.0% (500) were for trauma. The most common medical diagnoses were pulmonary causes such as high altitude cough and upper respiratory infection, comprising more than 38% of medical diagnoses. For traumatic diagnoses, 56% were for dermatologic causes, most commonly for frostbite and lacerations. Pulmonary and dermatologic diagnoses were also the most frequent causes for evacuation from Everest Base Camp, most commonly for high altitude pulmonary edema and frostbite, respectively. Medical professionals treating patients at extreme altitude should have a broad scope of practice and be well prepared to deal with serious trauma from falls, cold exposure injuries, and altitude illness. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Homocysteine lowering interventions for preventing cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Salanti, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease such as coronary artery disease, stroke and congestive heart failure, is a leading cause of death worldwide. A postulated risk factor is elevated circulating total homocysteine (tHcy) levels which is influenced mainly by blood levels of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12), folic acid (vitamin B9) and pyridoxine (vitamin B6). There is uncertainty regarding the strength of association between tHcy and the risk of cardiovascular disease. Objectives To assess the clinical effectiveness of homocysteine-lowering interventions (HLI) in people with or without pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library (issue 3 2008), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2008), EMBASE (1988 to August 2008), and LILACS (1982 to September 2, 2008). We also searched in Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED; 1985 to August 2008), ISI Web of Science (1993 to August 2008), and the Cochrane Stroke Group Specialised Register (April 2007). We hand searched pertinent journals and the reference lists of included papers. We also contacted researchers in the field. There was no language restriction in the search. Selection criteria We included randomised clinical trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of HLI for preventing cardiovascular events with a follow-up period of 1 year or longer. We considered myocardial infarction and stroke as the primary outcomes. We excluded studies in patients with end-stage renal disease. Data collection and analysis We independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We estimated relative risks (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using I2. We used a random-effects model to synthesise the findings. Main results We included eight RCTs involving 24,210 participants with a low risk of bias in general terms. HLI did not reduce the risk of non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, or

  12. Adiposity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in 9–10-year-old Indian children: relationships with birth size and postnatal growth

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaveni, G. V.; Veena, S. R.; Wills, A. K.; Hill, J. C.; Karat, S. C.; Fall, C. H. D.

    2011-01-01

    Lower birthweight, and rapid childhood weight gain predict elevated cardiovascular risk factors in children. We examined associations between serial, detailed, anthropometric measurements from birth to 9.5 years of age and cardiovascular risk markers in Indian children. Children (n = 663) born at the Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India were measured at birth and 6–12 monthly thereafter. At 9.5 years, 539 (255 boys) underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test, and blood pressure (BP) and fasting lipid concentrations were measured. Insulin resistance was calculated using the HOMA equation. These outcomes were examined in relation to birth measurements and changes in measurements (growth) during infancy (0–2 years), 2–5 years and 5–9.5 years using conditional s.d. scores. Larger current weight, height and skinfold thickness were associated with higher risk markers at 9.5 years (P<0.05). Lower weight, smaller length and mid-arm circumference at birth were associated with higher fasting glucose concentrations at 9.5 years (P≤0.01). After adjusting for current weight/height, there were inverse associations between birthweight and/or length and insulin concentrations, HOMA, systolic and diastolic BP and plasma triglycerides (P<0.05). Increases in conditional weight and height between 0–2, 2–5 and 5–9.5 years were associated with higher insulin concentrations, HOMA and systolic BP. In conclusion, in 9–10-year-old Indian children, as in other studies, cardiovascular risk factors were highest in children who were light or short at birth but heavy or tall at 9 years. Greater infant and childhood weight and height gain were associated with higher risk markers. PMID:22318657

  13. The effectiveness of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) counselling on estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk among patients with newly diagnosed grade 1 hypertension: A randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Wang, Harry H X; Kwan, Mandy W M; Li, Shannon T S; Liang, Miaoyin; Fung, Franklin D H; Yeung, Ming Sze; Fong, Brian C Y; Zhang, De Xing; Chan, David K L; Yan, Bryan P; Coats, Andrew J S; Griffiths, Sian M

    2016-12-01

    The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) has been shown to lower blood pressure in the West. However, the real-life impact of DASH on reducing cardiovascular (CV) risk in routine clinical setting has not been studied. A parallel-group, open-labelled, physician-blinded, randomised controlled trial was conducted in January-June 2013 and followed up for 6- and 12-months in primary care settings in Hong Kong. Patients newly diagnosed with grade 1 hypertension (aged 40-70years) who had no concomitant medical conditions requiring dietary modifications were consecutively recruited. Subjects were randomised to standard education (usual care) (n=275), or usual care plus dietitian-delivered DASH-based dietary counselling in a single one-to-one session (intervention) (n=281). Primary outcomes were the changes in estimated 10-year CV risk. Outcome data were available for 504 (90.6%) and 485 (87.2%) patients at 6 and 12months, respectively. There was no difference in the reduction of 10-year CV risk between the two groups at 6months (-0.13%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] -0.50% to 0.23%, p=0.477) and 12months (-0.08%, 95% CI -0.33% to 0.18%, p=0.568). Multivariate regression analyses showed that male subjects, younger patients, current smokers, subjects with lower educational level, and those who dined out for main meals for ≥4 times in a typical week were significantly associated with no improvements in CV risk. The findings may not support automatic referral of newly diagnosed grade 1 hypertensive patients for further one-to-one dietitian counselling on top of primary care physician's usual care. Patients with those risk factors identified should receive more clinical attention to reduce their CV risk. ChiCTR-TRC-13003014 (http://www.chictr.org.cn/enindex.aspx). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Impact of Educational Status on 10-Year (2004-2014) Cardiovascular Disease Prognosis and All-cause Mortality Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Greek Acute Coronary Syndrome (GREECS) Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Notara, Venetia; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Kogias, Yannis; Stravopodis, Petros; Antonoulas, Antonis; Zombolos, Spyros; Mantas, Yannis; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-07-01

    The association between educational status and 10-year risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and all-cause mortality was evaluated. From October 2003 to September 2004, 2172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals were enrolled. In 2013 to 2014, a 10-year follow-up (2004-2014) assessment was performed for 1918 participants (participation rate, 88%). Each patient's educational status was classified as low (<9 years of school), intermediate (9 to 14 years), or high (>14 years). Overall all-cause mortality was almost twofold higher in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (40% vs. 22% and 19%, respectively, p<0.001). Additionally, 10-year recurrent ACS events (fatal and non-fatal) were more common in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (42% vs. 30% and 35%, p<0.001), and no interactions between sex and education on the investigated outcomes were observed. Moreover, patients in the high-education group were more physically active, had a better financial status, and were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, or ACS than the participants with the least education (p<0.001); however, when those characteristics and lifestyle habits were accounted for, no moderating effects regarding the relationship of educational status with all-cause mortality and ACS events were observed. A U-shaped association may be proposed for the relationship between ACS prognosis and educational status, with participants in the low-education and high-education groups being negatively affected by other factors (e.g., job stress, depression, or loneliness). Public health policies should be aimed at specific social groups to reduce the overall burden of cardiovascular disease morbidity.

  15. The Impact of Educational Status on 10-Year (2004-2014) Cardiovascular Disease Prognosis and All-cause Mortality Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Greek Acute Coronary Syndrome (GREECS) Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Notara, Venetia; Kogias, Yannis; Stravopodis, Petros; Antonoulas, Antonis; Zombolos, Spyros; Mantas, Yannis; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The association between educational status and 10-year risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and all-cause mortality was evaluated. Methods: From October 2003 to September 2004, 2172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals were enrolled. In 2013 to 2014, a 10-year follow-up (2004-2014) assessment was performed for 1918 participants (participation rate, 88%). Each patient’s educational status was classified as low (<9 years of school), intermediate (9 to 14 years), or high (>14 years). Results: Overall all-cause mortality was almost twofold higher in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (40% vs. 22% and 19%, respectively, p<0.001). Additionally, 10-year recurrent ACS events (fatal and non-fatal) were more common in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (42% vs. 30% and 35%, p<0.001), and no interactions between sex and education on the investigated outcomes were observed. Moreover, patients in the high-education group were more physically active, had a better financial status, and were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, or ACS than the participants with the least education (p<0.001); however, when those characteristics and lifestyle habits were accounted for, no moderating effects regarding the relationship of educational status with all-cause mortality and ACS events were observed. Conclusions: A U-shaped association may be proposed for the relationship between ACS prognosis and educational status, with participants in the low-education and high-education groups being negatively affected by other factors (e.g., job stress, depression, or loneliness). Public health policies should be aimed at specific social groups to reduce the overall burden of cardiovascular disease morbidity. PMID:27499164

  16. Cardiovascular Events in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Rúa-Figueroa, Íñigo; López-Longo, Francisco J.; Galindo-Izquierdo, María; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé-Marqués, Alejandro; Ordóñez-Cañizares, Carmen; Martín-Martínez, María A.; Blanco, Ricardo; Melero-González, Rafael; Ibáñez-Rúan, Jesús; Bernal-Vidal, José Antonio; Tomero-Muriel, Eva; Uriarte-Isacelaya, Esther; Horcada-Rubio, Loreto; Freire-González, Mercedes; Narváez, Javier; Boteanu, Alina L.; Santos-Soler, Gregorio; Andreu, José L.; Pego-Reigosa, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article estimates the frequency of cardiovascular (CV) events that occurred after diagnosis in a large Spanish cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and investigates the main risk factors for atherosclerosis. RELESSER is a nationwide multicenter, hospital-based registry of SLE patients. This is a cross-sectional study. Demographic and clinical variables, the presence of traditional risk factors, and CV events were collected. A CV event was defined as a myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, and/or peripheral artery disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the possible risk factors for atherosclerosis. From 2011 to 2012, 3658 SLE patients were enrolled. Of these, 374 (10.9%) patients suffered at least a CV event. In 269 (7.4%) patients, the CV events occurred after SLE diagnosis (86.2% women, median [interquartile range] age 54.9 years [43.2–66.1], and SLE duration of 212.0 months [120.8–289.0]). Strokes (5.7%) were the most frequent CV event, followed by ischemic heart disease (3.8%) and peripheral artery disease (2.2%). Multivariate analysis identified age (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.03 [1.02–1.04]), hypertension (1.71 [1.20–2.44]), smoking (1.48 [1.06–2.07]), diabetes (2.2 [1.32–3.74]), dyslipidemia (2.18 [1.54–3.09]), neurolupus (2.42 [1.56–3.75]), valvulopathy (2.44 [1.34–4.26]), serositis (1.54 [1.09–2.18]), antiphospholipid antibodies (1.57 [1.13–2.17]), low complement (1.81 [1.12–2.93]), and azathioprine (1.47 [1.04–2.07]) as risk factors for CV events. We have confirmed that SLE patients suffer a high prevalence of premature CV disease. Both traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to this higher prevalence. Although it needs to be verified with future studies, our study also shows—for the first time—an association between diabetes and CV events in SLE patients. PMID:26200625

  17. Novel and conventional biomarkers for the prediction of incident cardiovascular events in the community

    PubMed Central

    Melander, Olle; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Almgren, Peter; Hedblad, Bo; Berglund, Göran; Engström, Gunnar; Persson, Margaretha; Smith, J. Gustav; Magnusson, Martin; Christensson, Anders; Struck, Joachim; Morgenthaler, Nils G.; Bergmann, Andreas; Pencina, Michael; Wang, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Context Prior studies have conflicted regarding how much information novel biomarkers add to cardiovascular risk assessment. Objective To evaluate the utility of biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular risk when added to conventional risk factors, using contemporary biomarkers and newer statistical approaches. Design, Setting, Participants Between 1991 and 1994, 5067 participants (mean age 58, 60% women) without cardiovascular disease from a prospective cohort in Malmö, Sweden underwent measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP), mid-regional-pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (N-BNP), mid-regional-pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase-2, and cystatin C. Participants were followed until 2006. First cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary death) were ascertained using the Swedish national hospital discharge and cause-of-death registers. Low-, intermediate-, and high-risk were defined as 10-year risks of <6%, 6–19%, or ≥20%, respectively. Main Outcome Measures Incident cardiovascular and coronary events. Results During median follow-up of 12.8 years, there were 418 cardiovascular and 230 coronary events. Models with conventional risk factors had c-statistics of 0.758 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.734–0.781) and 0.760 (0.730–0.789) for cardiovascular and coronary events. Biomarkers retained in backward-elimination models were N-BNP and CRP for cardiovascular events, and N-BNP and MR-proADM for coronary events, which raised the c-statistic by 0.007 (p=0.04) and 0.009 (p=0.08), respectively. The proportion of participants reclassified was modest (8% for cardiovascular risk, 5% for coronary risk). The net reclassification improvement (NRI) was non-significant for cardiovascular events (0.0%, 95%CI, −4.3%–4.3%) and coronary events (4.7%, −0.76%–10.1%). Greater improvements were observed in analyses restricted to intermediate-risk individuals (cardiovascular

  18. A 10-year time-series analysis of respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity in Nicosia, Cyprus: the effect of short-term changes in air pollution and dust storms

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Nicos; Yiallouros, Panayiotis; Kleanthous, Savvas; Kolokotroni, Ourania; Schwartz, Joel; Dockery, Douglas W; Demokritou, Phil; Koutrakis, Petros

    2008-01-01

    of hospitalization on dust storm days, particularly for cardiovascular causes. While inference from these associations is limited due to the small number of dust storm days in the study period, it would appear imperative to issue health warnings for these natural events, particularly directed towards vulnerable population groups. PMID:18647382

  19. Physical Activity Frequency on the 10-Year Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) Prognosis; The Interaction With Cardiovascular Disease History and Diabetes Mellitus: The GREECS Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Papataxiarchis, Evangelos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Notara, Venetia; Kouvari, Matina; Kogias, Yannis; Stravopodis, Petros; Papanagnou, George; Zombolos, Spyros; Mantas, Yannis; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-10-01

    The association between physical activity, diabetes mellitus (DM), and long-term acute coronary syndrome (ACS) prognosis was evaluated. The GREECS study included 2,172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals (2003-2004). In 2013-2014, a 10-year follow up was performed with 1,918 patients. Physical activity was categorized in never, rarely (monthly basis), 1-2 and ≥ 3 times/week. Multi-adjusted analysis revealed that 1-2 and ≥ 3 times/week vs. no physical activity had a protective effect on ACS incidence (OR = 0.63 95% CI 0.38, 1.05) and (OR = 0.63 95% CI 0.40, 0.99) respectively, only in patients without prior baseline CVD event. In a subgroup analysis, with DM as strata in these patients, engagement in physical activity (i.e., 1-2 times/week) had a significant protective effect among patients with diabetes (OR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.27, 0.96, p = .037). These findings revealed the beneficial role of exercise in secondary ACS prevention, even in DM patients. Public health-oriented policies should incorporate regular physical activity as a key protective factor in disease prognosis.

  20. Perceived Discrimination and Incident Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Everson-Rose, Susan A.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Roetker, Nicholas S.; Lewis, Tené T.; Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Alonso, Alvaro; Diez Roux, Ana V.

    2015-01-01

    Perceived discrimination is positively related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; its relationship with incident CVD is unknown. Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a population-based multiethnic cohort study of 6,508 adults aged 45–84 years who were initially free of clinical CVD, we examined lifetime discrimination (experiences of unfair treatment in 6 life domains) and everyday discrimination (frequency of day-to-day occurrences of perceived unfair treatment) in relation to incident CVD. During a median 10.1 years of follow-up (2000–2011), 604 incident events occurred. Persons reporting lifetime discrimination in ≥2 domains (versus none) had increased CVD risk, after adjustment for race/ethnicity and sociodemographic factors, behaviors, and traditional CVD risk factors (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.70) and after control for chronic stress and depressive symptoms (HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.60). Reported discrimination in 1 domain was unrelated to CVD (HR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.86, 1.30). There were no differences by race/ethnicity, age, or sex. In contrast, everyday discrimination interacted with sex (P = 0.03). Stratified models showed increased risk only among men (for each 1–standard deviation increase in score, adjusted HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.27); controlling for chronic stress and depressive symptoms slightly reduced this association (HR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.25). This study suggests that perceived discrimination is adversely related to CVD risk in middle-aged and older adults. PMID:26085044

  1. Impact of pre-operative coronary artery disease on cardiovascular events following lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Jyothula, Soma; Jhun, Hye Yeon; Estep, Jerry; Loebe, Matthias; Scheinin, Scott; Torre-Amione, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the correlation between pre-operative coronary artery disease (CAD) and post-operative cardiovascular events in lung transplant recipients. Consecutive isolated lung transplant recipients from 2007 to 2013 in our institution were identified and categorized as having significant CAD (≥ 50% coronary stenosis in at least 1 artery or history of coronary revascularization) or no-mild CAD. Patient records and death index data were analyzed for a median of 2 years for death or cardiovascular events, including coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral artery events. The study comprised 280 patients (62% male) with mean age of 60 ± 10 years. Cardiovascular events occurred in 5.7% (16 of 280) of the entire cohort. Patients with significant CAD had a higher annualized rate of cardiovascular events than those with no-mild CAD (11.9% vs 0.6%; p < 0.001). Significant CAD was an independent predictor of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 20.32; 95% confidence interval, 5.79-71.26; p < 0.001) but not all-cause mortality (log-rank p = 0.66). Adding significant CAD to clinical risk factors gave incremental prognostic performance compared with clinical risk factors alone (p < 0.001 for increase in global chi-square). Selected lung transplant candidates with significant CAD can undergo transplantation with equal mortality risk to those without CAD but are at a higher risk of non-fatal cardiovascular events. These data support the current practice of accepting a selected group of patients with CAD for lung transplantation and suggest that they should be monitored early and treated to prevent cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. LPA Gene, Ethnicity, and Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Rok; Prasad, Anand; Choi, Yun-Seok; Xing, Chao; Clopton, Paul; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-01-17

    The relationship of LPA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), apolipoprotein(a) isoforms, and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in different ethnic groups is not well known. LPA SNPs, apolipoprotein(a) isoforms, Lp(a), and oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-100 (OxPL-apoB) levels were measured in 1792 black, 1030 white, and 597 Hispanic subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study. Their interdependent relationships and prospective association with MACE after median 9.5-year follow-up were determined. LPA SNP rs3798220 was most prevalent in Hispanics (42.38%), rs10455872 in whites (14.27%), and rs9457951 in blacks (32.92%). The correlation of each of these SNPs with the major apolipoprotein(a) isoform size was highly variable and in different directions among ethnic groups. In the entire cohort, Cox regression analysis with multivariable adjustment revealed that quartiles 4 of Lp(a) and OxPL-apoB were associated with hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for time to MACE of 2.35 (1.50-3.69, P<0.001) and 1.89 (1.26-2.84, P=0.003), respectively, versus quartile 1. Addition of the major apolipoprotein(a) isoform and the 3 LPA SNPs to these models attenuated the risk, but significance was maintained for both Lp(a) and OxPL-apoB. Evaluating time to MACE in specific ethnic groups, Lp(a) was a positive predictor and the size of the major apolipoprotein(a) isoform was an inverse predictor in blacks, the size of the major apolipoprotein(a) isoform was an inverse predictor in whites, and OxPL-apoB was a positive predictor in Hispanics. The prevalence and association of LPA SNPs with size of apolipoprotein(a) isoforms, Lp(a), and OxPL-apoB levels are highly variable and ethnicity-specific. The relationship to MACE is best explained by elevated plasma Lp(a) or OxPL-apoB levels, despite significant ethnic differences in LPA genetic markers. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Determination of selected cardiovascular active compounds in environmental aquatic samples--Methods and results, a review of global publications from the last 10 years.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Albert; Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Stankiewicz, Urszula; Wroczyński, Piotr; Nałęcz-Jawecki, Grzegorz

    2015-11-01

    In recent years cardiovascular diseases were the second most common cause of death worldwide. Therefore, the consumption of cardiovascular drugs is high, which might result in an increase of them in the environment. The major source of aquatic environmental contamination is still effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Unfortunately removal of cardiovascular active compounds and/or their metabolites in WWTP is still unsatisfactory. Among microbial and abiotic degradation of these compounds during wastewater processes, photolysis and photodegradation of cardiovascular drugs also play an important role. New formed compounds may be more toxic or retain the properties of parent compounds. Thus the main goal of this paper was to provide a detailed and comprehensive review of used analytical methods, coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, to determine the presence of cardiovascular compounds in surface waters as well as WTTPs effluents and influents. Exhaustive preparation for mass spectrometry detection and quantitation including samples pre-treatment, and the common problem of the matrix effect are thoroughly explored in this paper. Additionally, the article provides some hints in respect of recently noted problematic issue related to the availability of specific standards for the analysis of drug's metabolites. Furthermore, information concerning the metabolism of cardiovascular active compounds including differences in metabolism within enantiomers is described. This article also touches on the problems associated with environmental risk assessment due to the presence of cardiovasculars in the environment. The paper also tries to explain differences in concentrations among cardiovascular compounds between countries worldwide.

  4. Regional variations in ambulatory care and incidence of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jack V; Chu, Anna; Maclagan, Laura; Austin, Peter C; Johnston, Sharon; Ko, Dennis T; Cheung, Ingrid; Atzema, Clare L; Booth, Gillian L; Bhatia, R Sacha; Lee, Douglas S; Jackevicius, Cynthia A; Kapral, Moira K; Tu, Karen; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Alter, David A; Udell, Jacob A; Manuel, Douglas G; Mondal, Prosanta; Hogg, William

    2017-04-03

    Variations in the prevalence of traditional cardiac risk factors only partially account for geographic variations in the incidence of cardiovascular disease. We examined the extent to which preventive ambulatory health care services contribute to geographic variations in cardiovascular event rates. We conducted a cohort study involving 5.5 million patients aged 40 to 79 years in Ontario, Canada, with no hospital stays for cardiovascular disease as of January 2008, through linkage of multiple population-based health databases. The primary outcome was the occurrence of a major cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular-related death) over the following 5 years. We compared patient demographics, cardiac risk factors and ambulatory health care services across the province's 14 health service regions, known as Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs), and evaluated the contribution of these variables to regional variations in cardiovascular event rates. Cardiovascular event rates across LHINs varied from 3.2 to 5.7 events per 1000 person-years. Compared with residents of high-rate LHINs, those of low-rate health regions received physician services more often (e.g., 4.2 v. 3.5 mean annual family physician visits, p value for LHIN-level trend = 0.01) and were screened for risk factors more often. Low-rate LHINs were also more likely to achieve treatment targets for hypercholes-terolemia (51.8% v. 49.6% of patients, p = 0.03) and controlled hypertension (67.4% v. 53.3%, p = 0.04). Differences in patient and health system factors accounted for 74.5% of the variation in events between LHINs, of which 15.5% was attributable to health system factors alone. Preventive ambulatory health care services were provided more frequently in health regions with lower cardiovascular event rates. Health system interventions to improve equitable access to preventive care might improve cardiovascular outcomes. © 2017 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  5. Regional variations in ambulatory care and incidence of cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jack V.; Chu, Anna; Maclagan, Laura; Austin, Peter C.; Johnston, Sharon; Ko, Dennis T.; Cheung, Ingrid; Atzema, Clare L.; Booth, Gillian L.; Bhatia, R. Sacha; Lee, Douglas S.; Jackevicius, Cynthia A.; Kapral, Moira K.; Tu, Karen; Wijeysundera, Harindra C.; Alter, David A.; Udell, Jacob A.; Manuel, Douglas G.; Mondal, Prosanta; Hogg, William

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variations in the prevalence of traditional cardiac risk factors only partially account for geographic variations in the incidence of cardiovascular disease. We examined the extent to which preventive ambulatory health care services contribute to geographic variations in cardiovascular event rates. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study involving 5.5 million patients aged 40 to 79 years in Ontario, Canada, with no hospital stays for cardiovascular disease as of January 2008, through linkage of multiple population-based health databases. The primary outcome was the occurrence of a major cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular-related death) over the following 5 years. We compared patient demographics, cardiac risk factors and ambulatory health care services across the province’s 14 health service regions, known as Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs), and evaluated the contribution of these variables to regional variations in cardiovascular event rates. RESULTS: Cardiovascular event rates across LHINs varied from 3.2 to 5.7 events per 1000 person-years. Compared with residents of high-rate LHINs, those of low-rate health regions received physician services more often (e.g., 4.2 v. 3.5 mean annual family physician visits, p value for LHIN-level trend = 0.01) and were screened for risk factors more often. Low-rate LHINs were also more likely to achieve treatment targets for hypercholes-terolemia (51.8% v. 49.6% of patients, p = 0.03) and controlled hypertension (67.4% v. 53.3%, p = 0.04). Differences in patient and health system factors accounted for 74.5% of the variation in events between LHINs, of which 15.5% was attributable to health system factors alone. INTERPRETATION: Preventive ambulatory health care services were provided more frequently in health regions with lower cardiovascular event rates. Health system interventions to improve equitable access to preventive care might improve cardiovascular outcomes. PMID

  6. Efficacy, safety, Low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering, and calculated 10-year cardiovascular risk reduction of alirocumab and evolocumab in addition to maximal tolerated cholesterol lowering therapy: a post-commercialization study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parth; Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Min, Sarah; Mahida, Chris; Schlam, Ilana; Rothschild, Matan; Huda, Ali; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-23

    Efficacy and safety of proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, alirocumab (ALI) and evolocumab (EVO) have previously been evaluated through controlled clinical trials with selective patient groups. Post-commercially, in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) and/or cardiovascular disease (CVD) with suboptimal LDL cholesterol (LDLC) lowering on maximal tolerated cholesterol lowering therapy, we assessed efficacy and safety of ALI and EVO. Post-commercially, we started 25 patients on ALI 75 mg, 15 on ALI 150 mg, and 32 on EVO 140 mg bi-weekly added to entry LDLC lowering regimen, with follow-up for a median 24 weeks. History, physical exam, demographics, and adverse event data were collected. Changes in LDLC and AHA and NIH calculated 10-year CVD risks were assessed on ALI and EVO. Of 72 patients, 25 had HeFH only, 25 CVD only, 22 had both, median age was 65 years, 63% females, 38% males, 86% Caucasian, 11% African-Americans, 17% diabetics, 63% on anti-hypertensives, and 7% smokers. At entry, 30 (42%) were on a statin and 42 (58%) could not tolerate any statins. At 24-weeks, median LDLC decreased on ALI 75 mg from 117 to 62 mg/dL (-54%), on ALI 150 mg from 175 to 57 mg/dL (-63%), and on EVO 140 mg from 165 to 69 mg/dL (-63%), p <0.0001 for all. Absolute and percent LDLC reduction did not differ (p >.05) between ALI 150 and EVO 140 mg, but were less on ALI 75 mg vs ALI 150 mg and EVO 140 mg (p <.05). Percent reductions in 10-year CVD risks by AHA and NIH calculators, respectively were ALI 75 mg -22 and -44%, ALI 150 mg -31 and -50%, and EVO 140 mg -29 and -56%, p ≤.002 for all. The three most common adverse events included flu-like myositis 10%, respiratory tract symptoms 8%, and injection site reaction 6%. In patients with HeFH and/or CVD, LDLC was lowered by 63% on EVO and ALI 150 mg, and 54% on ALI 75 mg. Adverse events were minimal and tolerable. ALI and EVO represent paradigm shifts

  7. Abdominal aortic atherosclerosis at MR imaging is associated with cardiovascular events: the Dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Maroules, Christopher D; Rosero, Eric; Ayers, Colby; Peshock, Ronald M; Khera, Amit

    2013-10-01

    To determine the value of two abdominal aortic atherosclerosis measurements at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for predicting future cardiovascular events. This study was approved by the institutional review board and complied with HIPAA regulations. The study consisted of 2122 participants from the multiethnic, population-based Dallas Heart Study who underwent abdominal aortic MR imaging at 1.5 T. Aortic atherosclerosis was measured by quantifying mean aortic wall thickness (MAWT) and aortic plaque burden. Participants were monitored for cardiovascular death, nonfatal cardiac events, and nonfatal extracardiac vascular events over a mean period of 7.8 years ± 1.5 (standard deviation [SD]). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess independent associations of aortic atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Increasing MAWT was positively associated with male sex (odds ratio, 3.66; P < .0001), current smoking (odds ratio, 2.53; P < .0001), 10-year increase in age (odds ratio, 2.24; P < .0001), and hypertension (odds ratio, 1.66; P = .0001). A total of 143 participants (6.7%) experienced a cardiovascular event. MAWT conferred an increased risk for composite events (hazard ratio, 1.28 per 1 SD; P = .001). Aortic plaque was not associated with increased risk for composite events. Increasing MAWT and aortic plaque burden both conferred an increased risk for nonfatal extracardiac events (hazard ratio of 1.52 per 1 SD [P < .001] and hazard ratio of 1.46 per 1 SD [P = .03], respectively). MR imaging measures of aortic atherosclerosis are predictive of future adverse cardiovascular events. © RSNA, 2013.

  8. Failure of fertility therapy and subsequent adverse cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Udell, Jacob A.; Lu, Hong; Redelmeier, Donald A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infertility may indicate an underlying predisposition toward premature cardiovascular disease, yet little is known about potential long-term cardiovascular events following fertility therapy. We investigated whether failure of fertility therapy is associated with subsequent adverse cardiovascular events. METHODS: We performed a population-based cohort analysis of women who received gonadotropin-based fertility therapy between Apr. 1, 1993, and Mar. 31, 2011, distinguishing those who subsequently gave birth and those who did not. Using multivariable Poisson regression models, we estimated the relative rate ratio of adverse cardiovascular events associated with fertility therapy failure, accounting for age, year, baseline risk factors, health care history and number of fertility cycles. The primary outcome was subsequent treatment for nonfatal coronary ischemia, stroke, transient ischemic attack, heart failure or thromboembolism. RESULTS: Of 28 442 women who received fertility therapy, 9349 (32.9%) subsequently gave birth and 19 093 (67.1%) did not. The median number of fertility treatments was 3 (interquartile range 1–5). We identified 2686 cardiovascular events over a median 8.4 years of follow-up. The annual rate of cardiovascular events was 19% higher among women who did not give birth after fertility therapy than among those who did (1.08 v. 0.91 per 100 patient-years, p < 0.001), equivalent to a 21% relative increase in the annual rate (95% confidence interval 13%–30%). We observed no association between event rates and number of treatment cycles. INTERPRETATION: Fertility therapy failure was associated with an increased risk of long-term adverse cardiovascular events. These women merit surveillance for subsequent cardiovascular events. PMID:28385819

  9. Sleep characteristics and cardiovascular events in a large Swedish cohort.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Anna; Bellocco, Rino; Sundström, Johan; Adami, Hans-Olov; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva

    2013-06-01

    Limited evidence suggests that the association between sleep duration and cardiovascular events is strongest in individuals who also report sleep disturbances. We investigated sleep duration and insomnia symptoms in relation to incident cardiovascular events in the Swedish National March Cohort comprising 41,192 adults. Habitual sleep duration and difficulty falling asleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, and nonrestorative sleep were self-reported in 1997. During 13.2 years of follow-up, we identified 4,031 events (myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or death from cardiovascular disease) in the Swedish National Patient Register and the Cause of Death Register. After adjustment for potential confounders, short sleep duration (≤5 h) was associated with slightly increased risks of overall cardiovascular events and, specifically, myocardial infarction: hazard ratio, HR (95% confidence interval) 1.24 (1.06-1.44) and 1.42 (1.15-1.76), respectively. These HRs were attenuated as we included BMI, depressive symptoms and other relevant covariates in our analysis. Insomnia symptoms per se were unrelated to risk. However, in a joint analysis, there was some evidence that short sleepers who reported frequent insomnia symptoms had the highest HRs (1.26-1.39) of overall cardiovascular events. Short sleep or insomnia symptoms without the other conferred no increased risk. Our results suggest that symptoms of sleep disturbance should be taken into account when assessing the association between short sleep and cardiovascular disease.

  10. Novel approach to examining first cardiovascular events after hypertension onset.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Leip, Eric P; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Levy, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Hypertension confers risk for multiple types of cardiovascular events, but competing risks for these outcomes are unknown. We estimated the competing risks over 12 years after hypertension onset among cases and age-, sex-, and examination-matched controls using competing Cox cumulative incidence and proportional hazards models. We included all Framingham Heart Study subjects examined after 1977 with new-onset hypertension who were free of cardiovascular disease. There were 645 men and 702 women with new-onset hypertension (mean age: men, 55+/-12 years; women, 59+/-12 years). Compared with matched nonhypertensive controls, subjects with new-onset hypertension were more likely to experience a cardiovascular event first rather than noncardiovascular death. Among new-onset hypertensives, the 12-year competing cumulative incidence of any cardiovascular end point as a first event in men was 24.7%, compared with 9.8% for noncardiovascular death (hazards ratio [HR], 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.83 to 3.50); in women, the competing incidences were 16.0% versus 10.1%, respectively (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.20). The most common first major cardiovascular events were hard coronary disease (8.2%) in men and stroke (5.2%) in women. Type and incidence of first cardiovascular events varied by age and severity of hypertension at onset, with stroke predominating among older subjects with new-onset hypertension. After hypertension onset, cardiovascular events are more likely to occur first as opposed to noncardiovascular death. Types of initial events differ by gender, age, and severity of hypertension at onset. These results represent a novel approach to understanding the complications of hypertension and may help target therapies for patients with new-onset hypertension to optimize prevention strategies.

  11. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and cardiovascular events: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nezafati, Mohammad Hassan; Eshraghi, Ali; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Abtahi, Saeed; Nezafati, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Given the importance of the role of depression in predicting the outcome of cardiovascular disorders, current medications for treating depression, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are taken into consideration. This study aimed to systematically review the published findings in the use of SSRIs and the risk for cardiac events. Materials and Methods: An independent review of the Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, CINAHL, index Copernicus, and Google Scholar, up to 2014, was performed. We identified studies evaluating the effect of SSRIs, on cardiovascular events. Articles in English with full text availability, review articles, and experimental studies were included in the study. Among 150 studies reviewed based on the included keywords, 17 met the study criteria and were finally reviewed. Results: The use of some types of SSRIs may prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation; control the cardiovascular risk profile including hypertension, insulin resistance, and body weight; and also inhibit inflammatory processes. The appearance of adverse cardiac events, including cardiac arrhythmias (torsade de pointes and QT prolongation), syncope, increased systolic and diastolic right ventricular volume, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines leading atherosclerosis development, has also been expected with the chronic use of some types of SSRIs. Conclusion: According to our systematic review, both beneficial and adverse cardiovascular events can be established following the chronic use of various types of SSRIs. Therefore, when taking SSRIs, the cardiovascular effect of each SSRI has to be carefully considered, based on patients’ cardiovascular risk profiles. PMID:27904611

  12. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and cardiovascular events: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nezafati, Mohammad Hassan; Eshraghi, Ali; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Abtahi, Saeed; Nezafati, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of the role of depression in predicting the outcome of cardiovascular disorders, current medications for treating depression, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are taken into consideration. This study aimed to systematically review the published findings in the use of SSRIs and the risk for cardiac events. An independent review of the Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, CINAHL, index Copernicus, and Google Scholar, up to 2014, was performed. We identified studies evaluating the effect of SSRIs, on cardiovascular events. Articles in English with full text availability, review articles, and experimental studies were included in the study. Among 150 studies reviewed based on the included keywords, 17 met the study criteria and were finally reviewed. The use of some types of SSRIs may prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation; control the cardiovascular risk profile including hypertension, insulin resistance, and body weight; and also inhibit inflammatory processes. The appearance of adverse cardiac events, including cardiac arrhythmias (torsade de pointes and QT prolongation), syncope, increased systolic and diastolic right ventricular volume, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines leading atherosclerosis development, has also been expected with the chronic use of some types of SSRIs. According to our systematic review, both beneficial and adverse cardiovascular events can be established following the chronic use of various types of SSRIs. Therefore, when taking SSRIs, the cardiovascular effect of each SSRI has to be carefully considered, based on patients' cardiovascular risk profiles.

  13. Cardiovascular risk score and cardiovascular events among airline pilots: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wirawan, I Made Ady; Larsen, Peter D; Aldington, Sarah; Griffiths, Robin F; Ellis, Chris J

    2012-05-01

    A cardiovascular risk prediction score is routinely applied by aviation authorities worldwide. We examined the accuracy of the Framingham-based risk chart used by the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority in predicting cardiovascular events among airline pilots. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of 5-yr cardiovascular risk score and cardiovascular events in Oceania-based airline pilots. Cases were pilots with cardiovascular events as recorded on their medical records. Each case was age and gender matched with four controls that were randomly selected from the pilot population. To collect data before the events, 5-yr retrospective evaluations were conducted. Over a 16-yr study period we identified 15 cases of cardiovascular events, 9 (60%) of which were sudden clinical presentations and only 6 (40%) of which were detected using cardiovascular screening. There were 8 cases (53%) and 16 controls (27%) who had a 5-yr risk of > or = 10-15%. Almost half of the events (7/15) occurred in pilots whose highest 5-yr risk was in the 5-10% range. Cases were 3.91 times more likely to have highest 5-yr risk score of > or =10-15% than controls (OR = 3.91, 95% CI 1.04-16.35). The accuracy of the highest risk scores were moderate (AUC = 0.723, 95% CI 0.583-0.863). The cutoff point of 10% is valid, with a specificity of 0.73, but low sensitivity (0.53). Despite a valid and appropriate cutoff point, the tool had low sensitivity and was unable to predict almost half of the cardiovascular events.

  14. AERUS-GEO: a MSG/SEVIRI satellite-based aerosol product allowing to capture dust events for the last 10 years over Europe and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrer, Dominique; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Ceamanos, Xavier; Six, Bruno; Moparthy, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol signal derived from visible and near-infrared remote sensing observations can now be isolated thanks to a method allowing a proper separation of the atmosphere and surface components. This product is called AERUS-Geo (Aerosol and surface albEdo Retrieval Using a directional Splitting method - application to Geo data) and covers Europe, Africa, and the Eastern part of South America. It fully exploits the directional and temporal dimensions of the MSG/SEVIRI satellite signal through the use of a semi-empirical kernel-driven BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) model mimicking the radiative anisotropy for the surface/atmosphere coupled system. The AOD values estimated at 0.63 μm and 1.64 μm serve to calculate an Ångström coefficient that is further used to classify the aerosol layer into a continental, maritime, or a desert type. The AERUS-GEO product compares favourably with measurements of several AERONET stations, MODIS-derived (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer), and MISR-derived (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) products within a 20% of accuracy. The method proves to be competitive, not only in tracking anthropogenic aerosol emissions in the troposphere but also in estimating dust events. In addition, the higher frequency of AOD products with AERUS-GEO provides the means to quantify the aerosol radiative forcing in a more accurate manner than using low-orbit satellite data. The AERUS-GEO algorithm was implemented by the ICARE Data Center (http://www.icare.univ-lille1.fr), which operationally disseminates in near real time (NRT) a daily AOD product at 0.63 μm over the MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) disk since 2014. In addition to an NRT AOD product, also a long term reprocessing of satellite derived AOD still based on MSG/SEVIRI observations has been implemented. This allows to perform a thorough monitoring of the dust events over Europe and Africa for the last 10 years (2005 to 2015) for the benefit of a

  15. Association between trajectories of statin adherence and subsequent cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Jessica M; Krumme, Alexis A; Tong, Angela Y; Shrank, William H; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2015-10-01

    Trajectory models have been shown to (1) identify groups of patients with similar patterns of medication filling behavior and (2) summarize the trajectory, the average adherence in each group over time. However, the association between adherence trajectories and clinical outcomes remains unclear. This study investigated the association between 12-month statin trajectories and subsequent cardiovascular events. We identified patients with insurance coverage from a large national insurer who initiated a statin during January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010. We assessed medication adherence during the 360 days following initiation and grouped patients based on the proportion of days covered (PDC) and trajectory models. We then measured cardiovascular events during the year after adherence assessment. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between adherence measures and cardiovascular outcomes; strength of association was quantified by the hazard ratio, the increase in model C-statistic, and the net reclassification index (NRI). Among 519 842 statin initiators, 8777 (1.7%) had a cardiovascular event during follow-up. More consistent medication use was associated with a lower likelihood of clinical events, whether adherence was measured through trajectory groups or PDC. When evaluating the prediction of future cardiovascular events by including a measure of adherence in the model, the best model reclassification was observed when adherence was measured using three or four trajectory groups (NRI = 0.189; 95% confidence interval: [0.171, 0.210]). Statin adherence trajectory predicted future cardiovascular events better than measures categorizing PDC. Thus, adherence trajectories may be useful for targeting adherence interventions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Association of 10-year and lifetime predicted cardiovascular disease risk with subclinical atherosclerosis in South Asians: findings from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study.

    PubMed

    Kandula, Namratha R; Kanaya, Alka M; Liu, Kiang; Lee, Ji Young; Herrington, David; Hulley, Stephen B; Persell, Stephen D; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Huffman, Mark D

    2014-10-02

    Ten-year and lifetime cardiovascular risk assessment algorithms have been adopted into atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) prevention guidelines, but these prediction models are not based on South Asian populations and may underestimate the risk in Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Nepali, and Sri Lankans in the United States. Little is known about ASCVD risk prediction and intermediate endpoints such as subclinical atherosclerosis in US individuals of South Asian ancestry. South Asians (n=893) from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study who were 40 to 79 years and free of ASCVD were included. Ten-year ASCVD predicted risk was calculated using the 2013 Pooled Cohort Equations. Lifetime predicted risk was based on risk factor burden. Baseline levels of subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcium [CAC] and carotid intima media thickness [CIMT]) were compared across 10-year and lifetime risk strata: (1) high (≥7.5%) 10-year and low (<7.5%) 10-year risk; (2) high (≥39%) lifetime and low (<39%) lifetime risk. South Asian men and women with high 10-year predicted risk had a significantly greater CAC burden than those with low 10-year risk. South Asians with high lifetime predicted risk had a significantly increased odds for CAC higher than 0 (odds ratio: men 1.97; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.2; women 3.14; 95% CI, 1.5, 6.6). Associations between risk strata and CIMT were also present. This study is the first to provide evidence that contemporary ASCVD risk assessment algorithms derived from non-Hispanic white and African-American samples can successfully identify substantial differences in atherosclerotic burden in US South Asians. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  17. Keep off the grass: marijuana use and acute cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Caldicott, David G E; Holmes, James; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C; Mahar, Leo

    2005-10-01

    Marijuana is one of the most widely used recreational substances in the world, considered by many consumers as a relatively safe drug with few significant side-effects. We report the case of a 21-year-old man who suffered an acute myocardial infarction following the use of marijuana, despite having no other identifiable risk factors for an acute cardiovascular event. We review the published medical literature regarding acute cardiovascular events following marijuana use and postulate a possible mechanism for this unusual pathological consequence of marijuana use.

  18. Adverse life events, cardiovascular responses, and sports performance under pressure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee J; Young, Tom; Freeman, Paul; Sarkar, Mustafa

    2017-06-05

    Research suggests that experiencing a moderate number of adverse life events can benefit future stress responses. This study explored the relationship between adverse life (ie, non-sport) events and cardiovascular responses to, and performance during, a pressurized sporting task. One hundred participants (64 men, 36 women; Mage =21.94 years, SDage =4.98) reported the number of adverse life events (eg, serious accident or injury) they had encountered before completing a pressurized dart-throwing task during which performance was recorded. Before the task, participants' demand and resource evaluations and cardiovascular reactivity were assessed. Adverse life events did not impact demand and resource evaluations. However, participants who reported 4-7 adverse life events displayed cardiovascular responses more reflective of a challenge state (relatively lower total peripheral resistance and/or higher cardiac output) compared to those who reported a lower (<4) or higher (>7) number of events. Furthermore, participants who reported 3-13 adverse life events outperformed those who reported a lower (<3) or higher (>13) number of events. Supplementary analyses suggested that this relationship might be due to a small number of extreme values. However, after outlier analyses, a significant linear relationship remained suggesting that a higher number of adverse life events facilitated performance. The results suggest that experiencing a moderate to high number of adverse life events might have beneficial effects on subsequent cardiovascular responses and performance under pressure. Practitioners should therefore consider prior brushes with adversity when identifying athletes who are likely to excel during stressful competition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Kidney Stones and Cardiovascular Events: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R. Todd; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Wiebe, Natasha; Bello, Aminu; Samuel, Susan; Klarenbach, Scott W.; Curhan, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Kidney stones are common in general clinical practice, and their prevalence is increasing. Kidney stone formers often have risk factors associated with atherosclerosis, but it is uncertain whether having a kidney stone is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. This study sought to assess the association between one or more kidney stones and the subsequent risk of cardiovascular events. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Cohort study of 3,195,452 people aged≥18 years registered in the universal health care system in Alberta, Canada, between 1997 and 2009 (median follow-up of 11 years). People undergoing dialysis or with a kidney transplant at baseline were excluded. The primary outcome was the first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during follow-up. We also considered other cardiovascular events, including death due to coronary heart disease, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and stroke. Results In total, 25,532 (0.8%) participants had at least one kidney stone, and 91,465 (3%) individuals had at least one cardiovascular event during follow-up. Compared with people without kidney stones and after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and other potential confounders, people who had at least one kidney stone had a higher risk of subsequent AMI (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.40; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.30 to 1.51), PTCA/CABG (HR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.51 to 1.76), and stroke (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.42). The magnitude of the excess risk associated with a kidney stone appeared more pronounced for younger people than for older people (P<0.001) and for women than men (P=0.01). Conclusions The occurrence of a kidney stone is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including AMI, PTCA/CABG, and stroke. PMID:24311706

  20. ADHD Medications and Serious Cardiovascular Events in Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, William O.; Habel, Laurel A.; Sox, Colin M.; Chan, K. Arnold; Arbogast, Patrick G.; Cheetham, T. Craig; Murray, Katherine T.; Quinn, Virginia P.; Stein, C. Michael; Callahan, S. Todd; Fireman, Bruce H.; Fish, Frank A.; Kirshner, Howard S.; O’Duffy, Anne; Selby, Joe V.; Connell, Frederick A.; Ray, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adverse event reports from North America have raised concerns that medications for attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increase risk of serious cardiovascular events. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study with automated data from four health plans (Tennessee Medicaid, Kaiser Permanente California, OptumInsight Epidemiology, Washington State Medicaid), with 1,200,438 children and youth aged 2–24 years and 2,579,104 person-years of follow-up, including 373,667 person-years of current ADHD medication use. We identified serious cardiovascular events (sudden cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, and stroke) from health plan data and vital records, with endpoints validated by medical record review. We estimated the relative risk for endpoints in current users compared to nonusers with hazard ratios from Cox regression models. RESULTS Cohort members had 81 serious cardiovascular events (3.1/100,000 person-years). Current ADHD medication users had no increased risk for serious cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31 to 1.85). Risk was not increased for any of the individual endpoints, or for current users compared to former users (adjusted hazard ratio 0.70; 95% CI 0.29 to 1.72). Alternative analyses addressing several study assumptions also found no significant association between ADHD medication use and the risk of study endpoints. CONCLUSIONS Although there was no evidence of increased risk of serious cardiovascular events for current users of ADHD medications, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval indicates that up to a two-fold increased risk cannot be ruled out. However, the absolute magnitude of such an increased risk would be low. PMID:22043968

  1. Dietary studies and the relationship of diet to cardiovascular disease risk factor variables in 10-year-old children--The Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Frank, G C; Berenson, G S; Webber, L S

    1978-02-01

    A dietary study of 10-year-old children was incorporated into a larger epidemiological survey investigating the distributions, interrelationships, and course-over-time of arteriosclerosis risk factor variables in children. Food intakes, eating patterns, and diet-risk factor interrelationships are described for 185 children (35% black, 65% white) using an improved 24-hr dietary recall method. Protein intakes were high. The polyunsaturated-to-saturated fatty acid ratio averaged 0.4 and a sucrose-to-starch proportion of 1.1 was noted. Eggs were the main food source of cholesterol and milk was the prime source of saturated fatty acids and protein. Black girls had a significantly greater mean sodium intake than the three other sex-race groups. Intermittent snacks provided the most calories; breakfast and dinner contributed most of the day's cholesterol, and lunch was the prime source of lactose and calcium. Longer eating spans reflected significantly greater intakes of calories, protein, fat, carbohydrate, and sodium, and greater levels of total serum cholesterol. A lack of correlations was noted in large matrices of dietary components and risk factor variables, but results of the comparison of mean intakes of dietary components for children grouped according to serum cholesterol showed significant differences in the intakes of various forms of fat and carbohydrate.

  2. n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular events after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kromhout, Daan; Giltay, Erik J; Geleijnse, Johanna M

    2010-11-18

    Results from prospective cohort studies and randomized, controlled trials have provided evidence of a protective effect of n-3 fatty acids against cardiovascular diseases. We examined the effect of the marine n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and of the plant-derived alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) on the rate of cardiovascular events among patients who have had a myocardial infarction. In a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 4837 patients, 60 through 80 years of age (78% men), who had had a myocardial infarction and were receiving state-of-the-art antihypertensive, antithrombotic, and lipid-modifying therapy to receive for 40 months one of four trial margarines: a margarine supplemented with a combination of EPA and DHA (with a targeted additional daily intake of 400 mg of EPA-DHA), a margarine supplemented with ALA (with a targeted additional daily intake of 2 g of ALA), a margarine supplemented with EPA-DHA and ALA, or a placebo margarine. The primary end point was the rate of major cardiovascular events, which comprised fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events and cardiac interventions. Data were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle, with the use of Cox proportional-hazards models. The patients consumed, on average, 18.8 g of margarine per day, which resulted in additional intakes of 226 mg of EPA combined with 150 mg of DHA, 1.9 g of ALA, or both, in the active-treatment groups. During the follow-up period, a major cardiovascular event occurred in 671 patients (13.9%). Neither EPA-DHA nor ALA reduced this primary end point (hazard ratio with EPA-DHA, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87 to 1.17; P=0.93; hazard ratio with ALA, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.78 to 1.05; P=0.20). In the prespecified subgroup of women, ALA, as compared with placebo and EPA-DHA alone, was associated with a reduction in the rate of major cardiovascular events that approached significance (hazard ratio

  3. CPAP for Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, R Doug; Antic, Nick A; Heeley, Emma; Luo, Yuanming; Ou, Qiong; Zhang, Xilong; Mediano, Olga; Chen, Rui; Drager, Luciano F; Liu, Zhihong; Chen, Guofang; Du, Baoliang; McArdle, Nigel; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Tripathi, Manjari; Billot, Laurent; Li, Qiang; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Barbe, Ferran; Redline, Susan; Wang, Jiguang; Arima, Hisatomi; Neal, Bruce; White, David P; Grunstein, Ron R; Zhong, Nanshan; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-09-08

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events; whether treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) prevents major cardiovascular events is uncertain. After a 1-week run-in period during which the participants used sham CPAP, we randomly assigned 2717 eligible adults between 45 and 75 years of age who had moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and coronary or cerebrovascular disease to receive CPAP treatment plus usual care (CPAP group) or usual care alone (usual-care group). The primary composite end point was death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina, heart failure, or transient ischemic attack. Secondary end points included other cardiovascular outcomes, health-related quality of life, snoring symptoms, daytime sleepiness, and mood. Most of the participants were men who had moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and minimal sleepiness. In the CPAP group, the mean duration of adherence to CPAP therapy was 3.3 hours per night, and the mean apnea-hypopnea index (the number of apnea or hypopnea events per hour of recording) decreased from 29.0 events per hour at baseline to 3.7 events per hour during follow-up. After a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, a primary end-point event had occurred in 229 participants in the CPAP group (17.0%) and in 207 participants in the usual-care group (15.4%) (hazard ratio with CPAP, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.32; P=0.34). No significant effect on any individual or other composite cardiovascular end point was observed. CPAP significantly reduced snoring and daytime sleepiness and improved health-related quality of life and mood. Therapy with CPAP plus usual care, as compared with usual care alone, did not prevent cardiovascular events in patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and established cardiovascular disease. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia

  4. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Population and methods Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. Results There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR = 1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p = 0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR= 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p = 0.63). Conclusion In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. PMID:26388119

  5. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR=1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p=0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p=0.63). In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Birth weight and risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in US children and adolescents: 10 year results from NHANES.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiying; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Hartman, Terryl J

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that birth weight and other birth characteristics may be associated with risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life; however, results using large US national survey data are limited. Our goal was to determine the aforementioned associations using nationally representative data. We studied children and adolescents 6-15 years using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey cycles 2001-2010. Survey and examination data included demographic and early childhood characteristics, current health status, physical activity information, anthropometric measurements, dietary data (total energy, saturated fat, sodium, and sugar intakes), biomarkers related to selected risk factors of CVD [systolic blood pressure (SBP), plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipid profiles], and type 2 diabetes [fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)]. Birth weight (proxy-reported) was inversely associated with SBP among girls; SBP levels increased 1.4 mmHg for each 1,000 g decrease in birth weight (p = 0.003) after controlling for potential confounders. Birth weight was not associated with levels of CRP or lipid profiles across the three racial groups. In addition, birth weight was inversely related to levels of fasting insulin and HOMA among non-Hispanic Whites; for each 1,000 g decrease in birth weight, fasting insulin levels increased 9.1% (p = 0.007) and HOMA scores increased 9.8% (p = 0.007). Birth weight was inversely associated with the levels of SBP, fasting insulin, and HOMA. These results support a role for birth weight, independent of the strong effects of current body weight status, in increasing risk for CVD and type 2 diabetes.

  7. Aspirin Use and Cardiovascular Events in Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Strully, Kate W.; Fowler, James H.; Murabito, Joanne; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Levy, Daniel; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether friends’ and family members’ cardiovascular health events and also their own aspirin use are associated with the likelihood that an individual takes aspirin regularly. Analyses were based on longitudinal data on 2,724 members of the Framingham Heart Study (based in Massachusetts, U.S.A) who were linked to friends and family members who were also participants in the same study. Men were more likely to take aspirin if a male friend had recently been taking aspirin (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.03, 2.13), and women were more likely to take aspirin if a brother (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.03, 1.77) had recently been taking aspirin. Men were also more likely to take aspirin if a brother recently had a cardiovascular event (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.04, 1.93), and women were more likely to take aspirin if a female friend recently experienced a cardiovascular event (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.27, 6.37). Aspirin use is correlated with the health and behavior of friends and family. These findings add to a growing body of evidence, which suggests that behavioral changes that promote cardiovascular health may spread through social networks. PMID:22361089

  8. Prognostic Value of Stress Echocardiography in Patients With Low-Intermediate or High Short-Term (10 Years) Versus Low (<39%) or High (≥39%) Lifetime Predicted Risk of Cardiovascular Disease According to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 Cardiovascular Risk Calculator.

    PubMed

    Yao, Siu-Sun; Supariwala, Azhar; Yao, Amanda; Dukkipati, Sai Sreenija; Wyne, Jamshad; Chaudhry, Farooq A

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluates the prognostic value of stress echocardiography (Secho) in short-term (10 years) and lifetime atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk-defined groups according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 cardiovascular risk calculator. The ideal risk assessment and management of patients with low-to-intermediate or high short-term versus low (<39%) or high (≥39%) lifetime CV risk is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of Secho in short-term and lifetime CV risk-defined groups. We evaluated 4,566 patients (60 ± 13 years; 46% men) who underwent Secho (41% treadmill and 59% dobutamine) with low-intermediate short-term (<20%) risk divided into low (<39%, n = 368) or high (≥39%, n = 661) lifetime CV risk and third group with high short-term risk (≥20%, n = 3,537). Follow-up (3.2 ± 1.5 years) for nonfatal myocardial infarction (n = 102) and cardiac death (n = 140) were obtained. By univariate analysis, age (p <0.001) and ≥3 new ischemic wall motion abnormalities (WMAs, p <0.001) were significant predictors of cardiac events. Cumulative survival in patients was significantly worse in patients with ≥3 WMA versus <3 WMA in low-intermediate short-term and low (3.3% vs 0.3% per year, p <0.001) or high (2.0% vs 0% per year, p <0.001) lifetime risk and also in those with high short-term CV risk group (3.5% vs 1.0% per year, p <0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified ≥3 new ischemic WMAs as the strongest predictor of cardiac events (hazard ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 2.3 to 3.9, p <0.001). In conclusion, Secho results (absence or presence of ≥3 new ischemic segments) can further refine risk assessment in patients with low-intermediate or high short-term versus low or high lifetime cardiovascular risk. Event rate with normal Secho is low (≤1% per year) but higher in patients with high short-term CV risk by the American College of

  9. Estimation of the Long-term Cardiovascular Events Using UKPDS Risk Engine in Metabolic Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shivakumar, V.; Kandhare, A. D.; Rajmane, A. R.; Adil, M.; Ghosh, P.; Badgujar, L. B.; Saraf, M. N.; Bodhankar, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term cardiovascular complications in metabolic syndrome are a major cause of mortality and morbidity in India and forecasted estimates in this domain of research are scarcely reported in the literature. The aim of present investigation is to estimate the cardiovascular events associated with a representative Indian population of patients suffering from metabolic syndrome using United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine. Patient level data was collated from 567 patients suffering from metabolic syndrome through structured interviews and physician records regarding the input variables, which were entered into the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine. The patients of metabolic syndrome were selected according to guidelines of National Cholesterol Education Program – Adult Treatment Panel III, modified National Cholesterol Education Program – Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation criteria. A projection for 10 simulated years was run on the engine and output was determined. The data for each patient was processed using the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine to calculate an estimate of the forecasted value for the cardiovascular complications after a period of 10 years. The absolute risk (95% confidence interval) for coronary heart disease, fatal coronary heart disease, stroke and fatal stroke for 10 years was 3.79 (1.5–3.2), 9.6 (6.8–10.7), 7.91 (6.5–9.9) and 3.57 (2.3–4.5), respectively. The relative risk (95% confidence interval) for coronary heart disease, fatal coronary heart disease, stroke and fatal stroke was 17.8 (12.98–19.99), 7 (6.7–7.2), 5.9 (4.0–6.6) and 4.7 (3.2–5.7), respectively. Simulated projections of metabolic syndrome patients predict serious life-threatening cardiovascular consequences in the representative cohort of patients in western India. PMID:24843193

  10. Estimation of the Long-term Cardiovascular Events Using UKPDS Risk Engine in Metabolic Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, V; Kandhare, A D; Rajmane, A R; Adil, M; Ghosh, P; Badgujar, L B; Saraf, M N; Bodhankar, S L

    2014-03-01

    Long-term cardiovascular complications in metabolic syndrome are a major cause of mortality and morbidity in India and forecasted estimates in this domain of research are scarcely reported in the literature. The aim of present investigation is to estimate the cardiovascular events associated with a representative Indian population of patients suffering from metabolic syndrome using United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine. Patient level data was collated from 567 patients suffering from metabolic syndrome through structured interviews and physician records regarding the input variables, which were entered into the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine. The patients of metabolic syndrome were selected according to guidelines of National Cholesterol Education Program - Adult Treatment Panel III, modified National Cholesterol Education Program - Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation criteria. A projection for 10 simulated years was run on the engine and output was determined. The data for each patient was processed using the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine to calculate an estimate of the forecasted value for the cardiovascular complications after a period of 10 years. The absolute risk (95% confidence interval) for coronary heart disease, fatal coronary heart disease, stroke and fatal stroke for 10 years was 3.79 (1.5-3.2), 9.6 (6.8-10.7), 7.91 (6.5-9.9) and 3.57 (2.3-4.5), respectively. The relative risk (95% confidence interval) for coronary heart disease, fatal coronary heart disease, stroke and fatal stroke was 17.8 (12.98-19.99), 7 (6.7-7.2), 5.9 (4.0-6.6) and 4.7 (3.2-5.7), respectively. Simulated projections of metabolic syndrome patients predict serious life-threatening cardiovascular consequences in the representative cohort of patients in western India.

  11. Long-term cardiovascular risk and coronary events in morbidly obese patients treated with laparoscopic gastric banding.

    PubMed

    Busetto, Luca; De Stefano, Fabio; Pigozzo, Sabrina; Segato, Gianni; De Luca, Maurizio; Favretti, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Long-term studies reporting the effects of bariatric surgery on cardiovascular risk factors and events are scarce. The aim of this study was to analyze reduction of multiple cardiovascular risk factors and rates of coronary events in morbidly obese patients treated with bariatric surgery and with>10 years of follow-up. This was a prospective uncontrolled study with laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Cardiovascular risk factors (fasting glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-C, triglycerides, blood pressure) have been previously determined both at surgery and 12-18 months after in 650 patients treated with laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding from 1993 to 1999. Cardiovascular risk status was again determined in 2010, and the rate of coronary events during long-term (>10 years) follow-up was collected. A total of 318 patients (58 men and 260 women) were retrieved. Age at surgery was 38.6 ± 10.4 years. Body mass index was 46.7 ± 7.2 kg/m(2). Follow-up was 12.7 ± 1.5 years. Weight loss was 17.6% ± 15.7% of baseline weight at 12-18 months and 17.1% ± 14.8% at 12.7 years. A significant reduction in blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed at the short-term evaluation and confirmed in the long term. HDL-C was unchanged at 12-18 months and significantly increased at 12.7 years. Five coronary events (1.6%) were recorded during long-term follow-up. The rate of observed events was compared with the rate of events expected according to baseline 10-year probability of myocardial infarction calculated with the Prospective Cardiovascular Munster study (PROCAM) score. Observed rate (1.6%) was slightly lower than the expected rate (2.0%± 4.9%). Stable weight loss and significant improvement of cardiovascular risk profile were observed in morbidly obese patients 10 years after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Identifying Individuals at Risk for Cardiovascular Events Across the Spectrum of Blood Pressure Levels

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Kunal N; Ning, Hongyan; Goff, David C; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    Background We determined the proportion of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events that occur across the spectrum of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and assessed whether multivariable risk assessment can identify persons who experience ASCVD events at all levels of SBP, including those with goal levels. Methods and Results Participants aged 45 to 64 years from the Framingham Offspring and Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities studies were stratified based on treated and untreated SBP levels (<120, 120 to 129, 130 to 139, 140 to 149, 150 to 159, ≥160 mm Hg). We determined the number of excess ASCVD events in each SBP stratum by calculating the difference between observed and expected events (ASCVD event rate in untreated SBP <120 mm Hg was used as the reference). We categorized participants into 10-year ASCVD risk groups using the Pooled Cohort risk equations. There were 18 898 participants (78% white; 22% black) who were followed for 10 years. We estimated 427 excess ASCVD events, of which 56% (109 of 197) and 50% (115 of 230), respectively, occurred among untreated and treated participants with elevated SBP who were not recommended for antihypertensive therapy. Among untreated participants, 10-year ASCVD risk ≥7.5% identified 64% of those who experienced an ASCVD at 10 years and 30% of those who did not. Multivariable risk assessment was less useful in baseline-treated participants. Conclusions Half of excess ASCVD events occurred in persons with elevated SBP who were not currently recommended for antihypertensive therapy. Multivariable risk assessment may help identify those likely to benefit from further risk-reducing therapies. These findings support consideration of multivariable risk in guiding prevention across the spectrum of SBP. PMID:26391134

  13. Telmisartan to prevent recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-09-18

    Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pressure with a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor soon after a stroke has not been clearly established. We evaluated the effects of therapy with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, telmisartan, initiated early after a stroke. In a multicenter trial involving 20,332 patients who recently had an ischemic stroke, we randomly assigned 10,146 to receive telmisartan (80 mg daily) and 10,186 to receive placebo. The primary outcome was recurrent stroke. Secondary outcomes were major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or new or worsening heart failure) and new-onset diabetes. The median interval from stroke to randomization was 15 days. During a mean follow-up of 2.5 years, the mean blood pressure was 3.8/2.0 mm Hg lower in the telmisartan group than in the placebo group. A total of 880 patients (8.7%) in the telmisartan group and 934 patients (9.2%) in the placebo group had a subsequent stroke (hazard ratio in the telmisartan group, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 1.04; P=0.23). Major cardiovascular events occurred in 1367 patients (13.5%) in the telmisartan group and 1463 patients (14.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.01; P=0.11). New-onset diabetes occurred in 1.7% of the telmisartan group and 2.1% of the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.04; P=0.10). Therapy with telmisartan initiated soon after an ischemic stroke and continued for 2.5 years did not significantly lower the rate of recurrent stroke, major cardiovascular events, or diabetes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00153062.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  14. Telmisartan to Prevent Recurrent Stroke and Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L.; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood pressure with a renin–angiotensin system inhibitor soon after a stroke has not been clearly established. We evaluated the effects of therapy with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, telmisartan, initiated early after a stroke. METHODS In a multicenter trial involving 20,332 patients who recently had an ischemic stroke, we randomly assigned 10,146 to receive telmisartan (80 mg daily) and 10,186 to receive placebo. The primary outcome was recurrent stroke. Secondary outcomes were major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or new or worsening heart failure) and new-onset diabetes. RESULTS The median interval from stroke to randomization was 15 days. During a mean followup of 2.5 years, the mean blood pressure was 3.8/2.0 mm Hg lower in the telmisartan group than in the placebo group. A total of 880 patients (8.7%) in the telmisartan group and 934 patients (9.2%) in the placebo group had a subsequent stroke (hazard ratio in the telmisartan group, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 1.04; P = 0.23). Major cardiovascular events occurred in 1367 patients (13.5%) in the telmisartan group and 1463 patients (14.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.01; P = 0.11). New-onset diabetes occurred in 1.7% of the telmisartan group and 2.1% of the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.04; P = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS Therapy with telmisartan initiated soon after an ischemic stroke and continued for 2.5 years did not significantly lower the rate of recurrent stroke, major cardiovascular events, or diabetes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00153062.) PMID:18753639

  15. Prediction models for early risk detection of cardiovascular event.

    PubMed

    Purwanto; Eswaran, Chikkannan; Logeswaran, Rajasvaran; Abdul Rahman, Abdul Rashid

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of death globally. More people die of CVDs each year than from any other disease. Over 80% of CVD deaths occur in low and middle income countries and occur almost equally in male and female. In this paper, different computational models based on Bayesian Networks, Multilayer Perceptron,Radial Basis Function and Logistic Regression methods are presented to predict early risk detection of the cardiovascular event. A total of 929 (626 male and 303 female) heart attack data are used to construct the models.The models are tested using combined as well as separate male and female data. Among the models used, it is found that the Multilayer Perceptron model yields the best accuracy result.

  16. A 10-year prospective-longitudinal study of daily hassles and incident psychopathology among adolescents and young adults: interactions with gender, perceived coping efficacy, and negative life events.

    PubMed

    Asselmann, Eva; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lieb, Roselind; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2017-09-09

    To prospectively examine whether higher daily hassles predict a variety of incident mental disorders and respective associations vary by gender, age, perceived coping efficacy and number of negative life events. Data comes from the Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology Study (EDSP), a prospective-longitudinal study among adolescents and young adults from the community (n = 2797, aged 14-24 at baseline) followed up in up to 3 assessment waves over 10 years. Mental disorders were assessed at each wave using the DSM-IV/M-CIDI. Daily hassles, perceived coping efficacy, and negative life events were assessed at baseline using the Daily Hassles Scale, Scale for Self-Control and Coping Skills, and Munich Life Event List. In logistic regressions adjusted for gender, age, other mental disorders, perceived coping efficacy and number of negative life events at baseline, higher daily hassles at baseline predicted the incidence of any anxiety disorder, specific phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, any affective disorder, and major depressive episodes at follow-up (OR 1.2-1.9 per standard deviation). Daily hassles interacted with perceived coping efficacy at baseline in predicting incident panic attacks (OR 1.3) and panic disorder (OR 1.3) at follow-up, i.e., higher daily hassles only predicted incident panic pathology among individuals with low perceived coping efficacy (OR 1.6-2.0) but not high perceived coping efficacy. Moreover, the associations between daily hassles and incident mental disorders partially varied by gender and age but not by negative life events at baseline. Targeted stress management interventions among individuals with increased daily hassles might be useful to prevent the onset of anxiety and affective disorders.

  17. Dietary sodium intake and prediction of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Äijälä, M; Malo, E; Santaniemi, M; Bloigu, R; Silaste, M-L; Kesäniemi, Y A; Ukkola, O

    2015-09-01

    The association of dietary sodium and cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as the reduction of sodium intake in the prevention of CVD, has been under debate. To study whether sodium consumption has a role as a risk factor for fatal and non-fatal CVD. A well-defined population-based cohort of 1045 subjects collected between 1991 and 1993 (mean age 51.4 years) was used with approximately 19 years' follow-up. At the baseline, 716 subjects filled in a 1-week food follow-up diary, which was used to calculate the daily sodium intake (mg/1000 kcal). The baseline sodium intake correlated significantly with age (rs=0.117, P=0.002), BMI (rs=0.216, P=0.000), waist circumference (rs=0.268, P=0.000), smoking (rs=0.144, P=0.000), alcohol consumption (rs=0.111, P=0.003), systolic blood pressure (rs=0.106, P=0.005) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (rs=0.081, P=0.033). Those who had cardiovascular events in the follow-up consumed more sodium at the baseline (mean 2010.4 mg/1000 kcal/day, s.d. 435.2, n=101) compared with the subjects without events (mean 1849.9 mg/1000 kcal/day, s.d. 361.2, n=589; t-test; P=0.001). The incidence of cardiovascular events was greater in the highest quartile (22.1%) than in the lower quartiles (first 11.0%, second 9.9% and third 15.6%; X(2); P=0.005). Cox regression analysis showed that sodium intake as a continuous variable predicts CVD events (P=0.031) independently when age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and waist circumference were added as covariates. This predictive role is seen especially in the group of subjects on hypertensive medication (P=0.001). Dietary sodium intake is a significant independent predictor of cardiovascular events in the study population.

  18. Urinary potassium excretion and risk of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Kieneker, Lyanne M; Gansevoort, Ron T; de Boer, Rudolf A; Brouwers, Frank P; Feskens, Edith Jm; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan Jl; Joosten, Michel M

    2016-05-01

    Observational studies on dietary potassium and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have reported weak-to-modest inverse associations. Long-term prospective studies with multiple 24-h urinary samples for accurate estimation of habitual potassium intake, however, are scarce. We examined the association between urinary potassium excretion and risk of blood pressure-related cardiovascular outcomes. We studied 7795 subjects free of cardiovascular events at baseline in the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-stage Disease study, a prospective, observational cohort with oversampling of subjects with albuminuria at baseline. Main cardiovascular outcomes were CVD [including ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, and vascular interventions], IHD, stroke, and new-onset heart failure (HF). Potassium excretion was measured in two 24-h urine specimens at the start of the study (1997-1998) and midway through follow-up (2001-2003). Baseline median urinary potassium excretion was 70 mmol/24 h (IQR: 56-84 mmol/24 h). During a median follow-up of 10.5 y (IQR: 9.9-10.8 y), a total of 641 CVD, 465 IHD, 172 stroke, and 265 HF events occurred. After adjustment for age and sex, inverse associations were observed between potassium excretion and risk [HR per each 26-mmol/24-h (1-g/d) increase; 95% CI] of CVD (0.87; 0.78, 0.97) and IHD (0.86; 0.75, 0.97), as well as nonsignificant inverse associations for risk of stroke (0.85; 0.68, 1.06) and HF (0.94; 0.80, 1.10). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, education, and urinary sodium and magnesium excretion, urinary potassium excretion was not statistically significantly associated with risk (multivariable-adjusted HR per 1-g/d increment; 95% CI) of CVD (0.96; 0.85, 1.09), IHD (0.90; 0.81, 1.04), stroke (1.09; 0.86, 1.39), or HF (0.99; 0.83, 1.18). No associations were observed between the sodium-to-potassium excretion ratio and risk of CVD, IHD, stroke, or HF. In this cohort with oversampling of subjects

  19. Cardiovascular Events During General Elections In Bayamon, Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mercado, Arnaldo E.; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; del Rio, José Rivera; Mellado, Robert F. Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Emotional stress has been linked to acute coronary events. We examined whether the emotional response to elections in Puerto Rico induced a similar response. Methods We reviewed records at HIMA San Pablo Hospital (HIMASP) and Ramon Ruiz Arnau University Hospital (HURRA) in Bayamón and identified patients admitted with ICD-9 codes 410, 411, and 413 or corresponding diagnoses during a period surrounding the general elections and compared them with the same time period in non-election years. Results Cardiovascular events accounted for 3.24% of election-year admissions vs. 5.51% during non-election years in HURRA (p=0.036, N=37), while accounting for 2.86% of election-year admissions in HIMASP vs. 3.27% during non-election years (non-significant). Discussion There was a trend towards a lower rate of admission for cardiovascular events during general elections in both hospitals, reaching statistical significance at HURRA. Further study may elucidate reasons for this behavior and determine whether similar trends hold true in other populations. PMID:23875518

  20. Associations between common carotid artery diameter, Framingham risk score and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Kozakova, M; Morizzo, C; La Carrubba, S; Fabiani, I; Della Latta, D; Jamagidze, J; Chiappino, D; Di Bello, V; Palombo, C

    2017-04-01

    Vascular biomarkers are associated with risk burden and are capable to predict the development of future cardiovascular (CV) events; yet, their additive predictive value over and above established risk algorithms seems to be only modest. The present study evaluated the cross-sectional associations between vascular biomarkers, 10-year Framingham risk (FR) and prevalent CV events in a population with a high prevalence of hypertension and diabetes. As many as 681 subjects (419 men, age = 60 ± 10 years, 282 diabetics, 335 hypertensives, mean FR score = 22.5 ± 16.5%) underwent an integrated vascular examination including: radiofrequency-based ultrasound of common carotid artery (cca) to measure intima-media thickness (IMT), inter-adventitial diameter (IAD) and local pulse wave velocity (PWV); applanation tonometry to assess carotid pulse pressure (PP) and augmentation index (AIx); carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) measurement. One hundred and thirty-five subjects (19.8%) had history of CV events, and CV events were independently associated with male sex, age, antihypertensive treatment, current smoking, HDL-cholesterol and ccaIAD. In logistic regression model, only ccaIAD was associated with prevalence of CV events after adjustment for FR score, with the OR of 1.71 [1.34-2.19] (P < 0.0001) that remained unchanged when ccaIMT was included into the model (OR = 1.76 [1.36-2.27]; P < 0.0001). The association between prevalent CV events and ccaIAD was significant (OR of 1.65 [1.24-2.20]; P = 0.0005) also in a subgroup of subjects being at a high 10-year risk of CV disease (N = 330). In a population with a high prevalence of diabetes and hypertension, ccaIAD was the only vascular measure associated with prevalent CV events, independently of FR score. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II

  1. Serum Triglyceride Levels and Cardiovascular Disease Events in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Jung Bok; Kim, Seon Ha; Jo, Min-Woo; Hwang, Jenie Yoonoo; Bae, Sung Jin; Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Choe, Jaewon

    2015-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia, especially elevated levels of LDL-cholesterol, is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the role of triglycerides in CVD risk remains controversial. We enrolled 86,476 individuals who had undergone a general health checkup at Asan Medical Center between January 2007 and June 2011. After exclusion criteria were applied to the total cohort, 76,434 participants were included. CVD events and death were gathered from the nationwide health insurance claims database and death certificates using ICD-10 codes. Age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of the higher triglyceride group were significantly increased: 1.52 (95% CI: 1.27-1.82) for major CVD events, 1.53 (95% CI: 1.24-1.88) for major ischemic heart disease events, and 1.49 (95% CI: 1.37-1.63) for overall CVD events. After adjustment for multiple risk factors including HDL-cholesterol, ORs for overall CVD events were significantly increased in the higher triglyceride group. When the analysis was stratified according to BMI, hypertension, and glycemic status at baseline, age- and sex-adjusted ORs for the outcomes were significantly increased in the higher triglyceride group with nonobese, normotensive, or nondiabetic subjects. Hypertriglyceridemia is independently associated with an increased risk for CVD, especially in nonobese, normotensive, or nondiabetic individuals. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Canagliflozin and Cardiovascular and Renal Events in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Neal, Bruce; Perkovic, Vlado; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; de Zeeuw, Dick; Fulcher, Greg; Erondu, Ngozi; Shaw, Wayne; Law, Gordon; Desai, Mehul; Matthews, David R

    2017-08-17

    cardiovascular disease, patients treated with canagliflozin had a lower risk of cardiovascular events than those who received placebo but a greater risk of amputation, primarily at the level of the toe or metatarsal. (Funded by Janssen Research and Development; CANVAS and CANVAS-R ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01032629 and NCT01989754 , respectively.).

  3. Cardiovascular events and intensity of treatment in polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Marchioli, Roberto; Finazzi, Guido; Specchia, Giorgina; Cacciola, Rossella; Cavazzina, Riccardo; Cilloni, Daniela; De Stefano, Valerio; Elli, Elena; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Lunghi, Francesca; Lunghi, Monia; Marfisi, Rosa Maria; Musto, Pellegrino; Masciulli, Arianna; Musolino, Caterina; Cascavilla, Nicola; Quarta, Giovanni; Randi, Maria Luigia; Rapezzi, Davide; Ruggeri, Marco; Rumi, Elisa; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Santini, Simone; Scarano, Marco; Siragusa, Sergio; Spadea, Antonio; Tieghi, Alessia; Angelucci, Emanuele; Visani, Giuseppe; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Barbui, Tiziano

    2013-01-03

    Current treatment recommendations for patients with polycythemia vera call for maintaining a hematocrit of less than 45%, but this therapeutic strategy has not been tested in a randomized clinical trial. We randomly assigned 365 adults with JAK2-positive polycythemia vera who were being treated with phlebotomy, hydroxyurea, or both to receive either more intensive treatment (target hematocrit, <45%) (low-hematocrit group) or less intensive treatment (target hematocrit, 45 to 50%) (high-hematocrit group). The primary composite end point was the time until death from cardiovascular causes or major thrombotic events. The secondary end points were cardiovascular events, cardiovascular hospitalizations, incidence of cancer, progression to myelofibrosis, myelodysplasia or leukemic transformation, and hemorrhage. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed. After a median follow-up of 31 months, the primary end point was recorded in 5 of 182 patients in the low-hematocrit group (2.7%) and 18 of 183 patients in the high-hematocrit group (9.8%) (hazard ratio in the high-hematocrit group, 3.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45 to 10.53; P=0.007). The primary end point plus superficial-vein thrombosis occurred in 4.4% of patients in the low-hematocrit group, as compared with 10.9% in the high-hematocrit group (hazard ratio, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.19 to 6.12; P=0.02). Progression to myelofibrosis, myelodysplasia or leukemic transformation, and bleeding were observed in 6, 2, and 2 patients, respectively, in the low-hematocrit group, as compared with 2, 1, and 5 patients, respectively, in the high-hematocrit group. There was no significant between-group difference in the rate of adverse events. In patients with polycythemia vera, those with a hematocrit target of less than 45% had a significantly lower rate of cardiovascular death and major thrombosis than did those with a hematocrit target of 45 to 50%. (Funded by the Italian Medicines Agency and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number

  4. Effects of Cinacalcet on Atherosclerotic and Nonatherosclerotic Cardiovascular Events in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis: The EValuation Of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower CardioVascular Events (EVOLVE) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David C.; London, Gerard M.; Parfrey, Patrick S.; Block, Geoffrey A.; Correa‐Rotter, Ricardo; Dehmel, Bastian; Drüeke, Tilman B.; Floege, Jürgen; Kubo, Yumi; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Goodman, William G.; Moe, Sharon M.; Trotman, Marie‐Louise; Abdalla, Safa; Chertow, Glenn M.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Premature cardiovascular disease limits the duration and quality of life on long‐term hemodialysis. The objective of this study was to define the frequency of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events attributable to atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic mechanisms, risk factors for these events, and the effects of cinacalcet, using adjudicated data collected during the EValuation of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower CardioVascular Events (EVOLVE) Trial. Methods and Results EVOLVE was a randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled clinical trial that randomized 3883 hemodialysis patients with moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism to cinacalcet or matched placebo for up to 64 months. For this post hoc analysis, the outcome measure was fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events reflecting atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. During the trial, 1518 patients experienced an adjudicated cardiovascular event, including 958 attributable to nonatherosclerotic disease. Of 1421 deaths during the trial, 768 (54%) were due to cardiovascular disease. Sudden death was the most frequent fatal cardiovascular event, accounting for 24.5% of overall mortality. Combining fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, randomization to cinacalcet reduced the rates of sudden death and heart failure. Patients randomized to cinacalcet experienced fewer nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular events (adjusted relative hazard 0.84, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.96), while the effect of cinacalcet on atherosclerotic events did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Accepting the limitations of post hoc analysis, any benefits of cinacalcet on cardiovascular disease in the context of hemodialysis may result from attenuation of nonatherosclerotic processes. Clinical Trials Registration Unique identifier: NCT00345839. URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:25404192

  5. Niacin for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Schandelmaier, Stefan; Briel, Matthias; Saccilotto, Ramon; Olu, Kelechi K; Arpagaus, Armon; Hemkens, Lars G; Nordmann, Alain J

    2017-06-14

    Nicotinic acid (niacin) is known to decrease LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides, and increase HDL-cholesterol levels. The evidence of benefits with niacin monotherapy or add-on to statin-based therapy is controversial. To assess the effectiveness of niacin therapy versus placebo, administered as monotherapy or add-on to statin-based therapy in people with or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in terms of mortality, CVD events, and side effects. Two reviewers independently and in duplicate screened records and potentially eligible full texts identified through electronic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, two trial registries, and reference lists of relevant articles (latest search in August 2016). We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that either compared niacin monotherapy to placebo/usual care or niacin in combination with other component versus other component alone. We considered RCTs that administered niacin for at least six months, reported a clinical outcome, and included adults with or without established CVD. Two reviewers used pre-piloted forms to independently and in duplicate extract trials characteristics, risk of bias items, and outcomes data. Disagreements were resolved by consensus or third party arbitration. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses, sensitivity analyses based on risk of bias and different assumptions for missing data, and used meta-regression analyses to investigate potential relationships between treatment effects and duration of treatment, proportion of participants with established coronary heart disease and proportion of participants receiving background statin therapy. We used GRADE to assess the quality of evidence. We included 23 RCTs that were published between 1968 and 2015 and included 39,195 participants in total. The mean age ranged from 33 to 71 years. The median duration of treatment was 11.5 months, and the median dose of niacin was 2 g/day. The proportion of participants with

  6. Hypertension in Pregnancy and Future Cardiovascular Event Risk in Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Stephen T.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Hanis, Craig L.; Milic, Natasa M.; Garovic, Vesna D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is a risk factor for future hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This may reflect an underlying familial predisposition or persistent damage caused by the hypertensive pregnancy. We sought to isolate the effect of hypertension in pregnancy by comparing the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in women who had hypertension in pregnancy and their sisters who did not using the dataset from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study, which examined the genetics of hypertension in white, black, and Hispanic siblings. This analysis included all sibships with at least one parous woman and at least one other sibling. After gathering demographic and pregnancy data, BP and serum analytes were measured. Disease-free survival was examined using Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression. Compared with their sisters who did not have hypertension in pregnancy, women who had hypertension in pregnancy were more likely to develop new onset hypertension later in life, after adjusting for body mass index and diabetes (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.42). A sibling history of hypertension in pregnancy was also associated with an increased risk of hypertension in brothers and unaffected sisters, whereas an increased risk of cardiovascular events was observed in brothers only. These results suggest familial factors contribute to the increased risk of future hypertension in women who had hypertension in pregnancy. Further studies are needed to clarify the potential role of nonfamilial factors. Furthermore, a sibling history of hypertension in pregnancy may be a novel familial risk factor for future hypertension. PMID:26315531

  7. Hypertension in Pregnancy and Future Cardiovascular Event Risk in Siblings.

    PubMed

    Weissgerber, Tracey L; Turner, Stephen T; Mosley, Thomas H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Hanis, Craig L; Milic, Natasa M; Garovic, Vesna D

    2016-03-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is a risk factor for future hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This may reflect an underlying familial predisposition or persistent damage caused by the hypertensive pregnancy. We sought to isolate the effect of hypertension in pregnancy by comparing the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in women who had hypertension in pregnancy and their sisters who did not using the dataset from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study, which examined the genetics of hypertension in white, black, and Hispanic siblings. This analysis included all sibships with at least one parous woman and at least one other sibling. After gathering demographic and pregnancy data, BP and serum analytes were measured. Disease-free survival was examined using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression. Compared with their sisters who did not have hypertension in pregnancy, women who had hypertension in pregnancy were more likely to develop new onset hypertension later in life, after adjusting for body mass index and diabetes (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.42). A sibling history of hypertension in pregnancy was also associated with an increased risk of hypertension in brothers and unaffected sisters, whereas an increased risk of cardiovascular events was observed in brothers only. These results suggest familial factors contribute to the increased risk of future hypertension in women who had hypertension in pregnancy. Further studies are needed to clarify the potential role of nonfamilial factors. Furthermore, a sibling history of hypertension in pregnancy may be a novel familial risk factor for future hypertension.

  8. Cardiovascular thromboembolic events associated with febuxostat: investigation of cases from the FDA adverse event reporting system database.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Pranav K; Gentry, William M; Bottorff, Michael B

    2013-06-01

    Uloric (Febuxostat) has been linked with cardiovascular thromboembolic events in gout patients. However, no post-marketing data analysis has investigated these drug-associated adverse event reports. The study objective was to identify febuxostat-associated cardiovascular thromboembolic event reports in the US using the Food and Drug Administration adverse event reporting system (AERS) database. Reports listing uloric and febuxostat as the suspect drug and cardiovascular thromboembolic events (combined in a single term based on adverse event reports of myocardial infarction, stroke, among others) as the adverse event were extracted from the drug's approval date through the fourth quarter of 2011. Bayesian statistics within the neural network architecture was implemented to identify potential signals of febuxostat-associated cardiovascular thromboembolic events. A potential signal for the drug-adverse event combination reports is generated when the lower limit of the 95% two-sided confidence interval of the information component (IC), denoted by IC025 is greater than zero. Twenty-one combination reports of febuxostat-associated cardiovascular thromboembolic events were identified in gout patients in the US. The mean age of combination cases was 64 years. Potential signals (IC025 = 4.09) was generated for combination reports of febuxostat-associated cardiovascular thromboembolic events. AERS indicated potential signals of febuxostat-associated cardiovascular thromboembolic events. AERS is not capable of establishing the causal link and detecting the true frequency of an adverse event associated with a drug. The positive IC value found in this study merits continued surveillance and assessment of cardiovascular thromboembolic events associated with Febuxostat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Basic mechanisms for adverse cardiovascular events associated with air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is a significant cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although the epidemiologic association between air pollution exposures and exacerbation of cardiovascular disease is well established, the mechanisms by which these exposures promote cardiovascular disease are incompletely understood. In this review I will give an overview of the components of air pollution, an overview of the cardiovascular effects of air pollution exposure and a review of the basic mechanisms that are activated by exposure to promote cardiovascular disease. PMID:25552258

  10. Road traffic noise, air pollution components and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    de Kluizenaar, Yvonne; van Lenthe, Frank J; Visschedijk, Antoon J H; Zandveld, Peter Y J; Miedema, Henk M E; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2013-01-01

    Traffic noise and air pollution have been associated with cardiovascular health effects. Until date, only a limited amount of prospective epidemiological studies is available on long-term effects of road traffic noise and combustion related air pollution. This study investigates the relationship between road traffic noise and air pollution and hospital admissions for ischemic heart disease (IHD: International Classification of Diseases (ICD9) 410-414) or cerebrovascular disease (cerebrovascular event [CVE]: ICD9 430-438). We linked baseline questionnaire data to 13 years of follow-up on hospital admissions and road traffic noise and air pollution exposure, for a large random sample (N = 18,213) of inhabitants of the Eindhoven region, Netherlands. Subjects with cardiovascular event during follow-up on average had higher road traffic noise day, evening, night level (L den) and air pollution exposure at the home. After adjustment for confounders (age, sex, body mass index, smoking, education, exercise, marital status, alcohol use, work situation, financial difficulties), increased exposure did not exert a significant increased risk of hospital admission for IHD or cerebrovascular disease. Relative risks (RRs) for a 5 (th) to 95 (th) percentile interval increase were 1.03 (0.88-1.20) for L den; 1.04 (0.90-1.21) for particulate matter (PM 10 ); 1.05 (0.91-1.20) for elemental carbon (EC); and 1.12 (096-1.32) for nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in the full model. While the risk estimate seemed highest for NO 2 , for a 5 (th) to 95 (th) percentile interval increase, expressed as RRs per 1 μg/m 3 increases, hazard ratios seemed highest for EC (RR 1.04 [0.92-1.18]). In the subgroup of study participants with a history of cardiovascular disease, RR estimates seemed highest for noise exposure (1.19 [0.87-1.64] for L den); in the subgroup of elderly RR seemed highest for air pollution exposure (RR 1.24 [0.93-1.66] for NO 2 ).

  11. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  12. Homocysteine-lowering interventions for preventing cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Dayer, Mark

    2017-08-17

    Cardiovascular disease, which includes coronary artery disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Homocysteine is an amino acid with biological functions in methionine metabolism. A postulated risk factor for cardiovascular disease is an elevated circulating total homocysteine level. The impact of homocysteine-lowering interventions, given to patients in the form of vitamins B6, B9 or B12 supplements, on cardiovascular events has been investigated. This is an update of a review previously published in 2009, 2013, and 2015. To determine whether homocysteine-lowering interventions, provided to patients with and without pre-existing cardiovascular disease are effective in preventing cardiovascular events, as well as reducing all-cause mortality, and to evaluate their safety. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1946 to 1 June 2017), Embase (1980 to 2017 week 22) and LILACS (1986 to 1 June 2017). We also searched Web of Science (1970 to 1 June 2017). We handsearched the reference lists of included papers. We also contacted researchers in the field. There was no language restriction in the search. We included randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of homocysteine-lowering interventions for preventing cardiovascular events with a follow-up period of one year or longer. We considered myocardial infarction and stroke as the primary outcomes. We excluded studies in patients with end-stage renal disease. We performed study selection, 'Risk of bias' assessment and data extraction in duplicate. We estimated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We calculated the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB). We measured statistical heterogeneity using the I(2) statistic. We used a random-effects model. We conducted trial sequential analyses, Bayes factor, and fragility indices where appropriate. In this third update, we identified three

  13. Bisphosphonates and Risk of Cardiovascular Events: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Rogers, James R.; Fulchino, Lisa A.; Kim, Caroline A.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Kim, Seoyoung C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Some evidence suggests that bisphosphonates may reduce atherosclerosis, while concerns have been raised about atrial fibrillation. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the effects of bisphosphonates on total adverse cardiovascular (CV) events, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and CV death in adults with or at risk for low bone mass. Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE through July 2014 identified 58 randomized controlled trials with longer than 6 months in duration that reported CV events. Absolute risks and the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effects odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of total CV events, atrial fibrillation, MI, stroke, and CV death were estimated. Subgroup analyses by follow-up duration, population characteristics, bisphosphonate types, and route were performed. Results Absolute risks over 25–36 months in bisphosphonate-treated versus control patients were 6.5% versus 6.2% for total CV events; 1.4% versus 1.5% for atrial fibrillation; 1.0% versus 1.2% for MI; 1.6% versus 1.9% for stroke; and 1.5% versus 1.4% for CV death. Bisphosphonate treatment up to 36 months did not have any significant effects on total CV events (14 trials; ORs [95% CI]: 0.98 [0.84–1.14]; I2 = 0.0%), atrial fibrillation (41 trials; 1.08 [0.92–1.25]; I2 = 0.0%), MI (10 trials; 0.96 [0.69–1.34]; I2 = 0.0%), stroke (10 trials; 0.99 [0.82–1.19]; I2 = 5.8%), and CV death (14 trials; 0.88 [0.72–1.07]; I2 = 0.0%) with little between-study heterogeneity. The risk of atrial fibrillation appears to be modestly elevated for zoledronic acid (6 trials; 1.24 [0.96–1.61]; I2 = 0.0%), not for oral bisphosphonates (26 trials; 1.02 [0.83–1.24]; I2 = 0.0%). The CV effects did not vary by subgroups or study quality. Conclusions Bisphosphonates do not have beneficial or harmful effects on atherosclerotic CV events, but zoledronic acid may modestly increase the risk of atrial fibrillation. Given the large

  14. 24-Hour Urine Phosphorus Excretion and Mortality and Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Heather L.; Rifkin, Dena E.; Anderson, Cheryl; Criqui, Michael H.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Higher morning serum phosphorus has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with or without CKD. In patients with CKD and a phosphorous level >4.6 mg/dl, the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend dietary phosphorus restriction. However, whether phosphorus restriction influences serum phosphorus concentrations and whether dietary phosphorus is itself associated with CVD or death are uncertain. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Among 880 patients with stable CVD and normal kidney function to moderate CKD, 24-hour urine phosphorus excretion (UPE) and serum phosphorus were measured at baseline. Participants were followed for a median of 7.4 years for CVD events and all-cause mortality. Results Mean ± SD age was 67±11 years, estimated GFR (eGFR) was 71±22 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and serum phosphorus was 3.7±0.6 mg/dl. Median UPE was 632 (interquartile range, 439, 853) mg/d. In models adjusted for demographic characteristics and eGFR, UPE was weakly and nonsignificantly associated with serum phosphorus (0.03 mg/dl higher phosphorus per 300 mg higher UPE; P=0.07). When adjusted for demographics, eGFR, and CVD risk factors, each 300-mg higher UPE was associated with 17% lower risk of CVD events. The association of UPE with all-cause mortality was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.05). Results were similar irrespective of CKD status (P interactions > 0.87). Conclusions Among outpatients with stable CVD, the magnitude of the association of UPE with morning serum phosphorus is modest. Greater UPE is associated with lower risk for CVD events. The association was similar for all-cause mortality but was not statistically significant. PMID:23539231

  15. Vasomotor symptoms and cardiovascular events in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Szmuilowicz, Emily D.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Howard, Barbara V.; Margolis, Karen L.; Greep, Nancy C.; Brzyski, Robert G.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Wu, Chunyuan; Allison, Matthew; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Johnson, Karen C.; Ockene, Judith K.; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; Sarto, Gloria E.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Seely, Ellen W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Emerging evidence suggests that women with menopausal vasomotor symptoms (VMS) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk as measured by surrogate markers. We investigated the relationships between VMS and clinical CVD events and all-cause mortality in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS). Methods We compared the risk of incident CVD events and all-cause mortality between four groups of women (total N=60,027): (1) No VMS at menopause onset and no VMS at WHI-OS enrollment (no VMS [referent group]); (2) VMS at menopause onset, but not at WHI-OS enrollment (early VMS); (3) VMS at both menopause onset and WHI-OS enrollment (persistent VMS [early and late]); and (4) VMS at WHI-OS enrollment, but not at menopause onset (late VMS). Results For women with early VMS (N=24,753), compared to no VMS (N=18,799), hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in fully-adjusted models were: major CHD, 0.94 (0.84, 1.06); stroke, 0.83 (0.72, 0.96); total CVD, 0.89 (0.81, 0.97); and all-cause mortality, 0.92 (0.85, 0.99). For women with persistent VMS (N=15,084), there was no significant association with clinical events. For women with late VMS (N=1,391) compared to no VMS, HRs and 95% CIs were: major CHD, 1.32 (1.01, 1.71); stroke, 1.14 (0.82, 1.59); total CVD, 1.23 (1.00, 1.52); and all-cause mortality, 1.29 (1.08, 1.54). Conclusions Early VMS were not associated with increased CVD risk. Rather, early VMS were associated with decreased risk of stroke, total CVD events, and all-cause mortality. Late VMS were associated with increased CHD risk and all-cause mortality. The predictive value of VMS for clinical CVD events may vary with onset of VMS at different stages of menopause. Further research examining the mechanisms underlying these associations is needed. Future studies will also be necessary to investigate whether VMS that develop for the first time in the later postmenopausal years represent a pathophysiologic process distinct

  16. Potential impact of single-risk-factor versus total risk management for the prevention of cardiovascular events in Seychelles

    PubMed Central

    Ndindjock, Roger; Gedeon, Jude; Mendis, Shanthi; Paccaud, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in Seychelles, a middle-income African country, and compare the cost-effectiveness of single-risk-factor management (treating individuals with arterial blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg and/or total serum cholesterol ≥ 6.2 mmol/l) with that of management based on total CV risk (treating individuals with a total CV risk ≥ 10% or ≥ 20%). Methods CV risk factor prevalence and a CV risk prediction chart for Africa were used to estimate the 10-year risk of suffering a fatal or non-fatal CV event among individuals aged 40–64 years. These figures were used to compare single-risk-factor management with total risk management in terms of the number of people requiring treatment to avert one CV event and the number of events potentially averted over 10 years. Treatment for patients with high total CV risk (≥ 20%) was assumed to consist of a fixed-dose combination of several drugs (polypill). Cost analyses were limited to medication. Findings A total CV risk of ≥ 10% and ≥ 20% was found among 10.8% and 5.1% of individuals, respectively. With single-risk-factor management, 60% of adults would need to be treated and 157 cardiovascular events per 100 000 population would be averted per year, as opposed to 5% of adults and 92 events with total CV risk management. Management based on high total CV risk optimizes the balance between the number requiring treatment and the number of CV events averted. Conclusion Total CV risk management is much more cost-effective than single-risk-factor management. These findings are relevant for all countries, but especially for those economically and demographically similar to Seychelles. PMID:21479093

  17. Prevalence and predictors of early cardiovascular events after kidney transplantation: evaluation of pre-transplant cardiovascular work-up.

    PubMed

    Delville, Marianne; Sabbah, Laurent; Girard, Delphine; Elie, Caroline; Manceau, Sandra; Piketty, Marie; Martinez, Frank; Méjean, Arnaud; Legendre, Christophe; Sberro-Soussan, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality after renal transplantation. The purpose of this study was to analyze cardiovascular risk factors at transplantation, occurrence of cardiovascular events in the first year after transplantation and evaluate pre-transplant work-up. In total, 244 renal transplant recipients older than 50 years were included. The results of pre-transplant work-up, including clinical evaluation, electrocardiogram, echocardiography, myocardial perfusion testing and coronary angiography were analyzed. Patients had multiple risk factors at inclusion on renal transplantation waiting list as high blood pressure (94.7%), dyslipidemia (81.1%), smoking (45.3%), diabetes (23.6%), past history of cardiovascular disease (21.3%) and obesity (12.7%). Following transplantation, 15.5% (n = 38) of patients experienced a cardiovascular event, including 2.8% (n = 7) acute coronary syndrome, 5.8% (n = 14) isolated increase in troponin level and 5.3% (n = 13) new onset atrial fibrillation. The pre-transplant parameters associated with a cardiovascular event were a past medical history of cardiovascular disease (HR = 2.06 [1.06-4.03], p = 0.03), echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (HR = 2.04 [1.04-3.98], p = 0.037) and abnormal myocardial perfusion testing (HR = 2.25 [1.09 -5.96], p = 0.03). Pre-transplantation evaluation allowed the diagnosis of unknown coronary artery lesions in 8.9% of patients.

  18. Racial Disparities for Age at Time of Cardiovascular Events and Cardiovascular Death in SLE Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scalzi, Lisabeth V.; Hollenbeak, Christopher S.; Wang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if there are racial disparities in regard to the age at which SLE patients experience CVD and CVD associated death. Methods Using the 2003–2006 National Inpatient Sample, we calculated the age difference between SLE patients and their race and gender-matched controls at the time of hospitalization for a cardiovascular (CVD) event and for CVD-associated death. In addition, we also calculated the age difference for the same outcomes between White SLE patients and gender-matched controls for each minority group. Results The mean age difference at the time of CVD event between women with and without SLE was 10.5 years. All age differences between women with SLE (n=3,625) and women without SLE admitted for CVD were significant (p<0.0001). Black women were the youngest female SLE racial group to be admitted with CVD (53.9 years) and have a CVD associated inhospital mortality (52.8 years; n=218). Black SLE women were 19.8 years younger than race and gender-matched controls at the time of CVD associated death. Admission trends for CVD were reversed for Black women such that the highest proportions of these patients were admitted before age 55 and then steadily decreased across age categories. There were 805 men with SLE admitted with a CVD event, with Black and Hispanic groups being the youngest. Conclusions There are significant racial disparities with regard to age at the time of hospital admission for CVD events and a CVD-related hospitalization resulting in death in patients with SLE. PMID:20506536

  19. Development and validation of an ankle brachial index risk model for the prediction of cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Fowkes, FGR; Murray, GD; Butcher, I; Folsom, AR; Hirsch, AT; Couper, DJ; DeBacker, G; Kornitzer, M; Newman, AB; Sutton-Tyrrell, KC; Cushman, M; Lee, AJ; Price, JF; D’Agostino, RB; Murabito, JM; Norman, PE; Masaki, KH; Bouter, LM; Heine, RJ; Stehouwer, CDA; McDermott, MM; Stoffers, HEJH; Knottnerus, JA; Ogren, M; Hedblad, B; Koenig, W; Meisinger, C; Cauley, JA; Franco, OH; Hunink, MGM; Hofman, A; Witteman, JC; Criqui, MH; Langer, RD; Hiatt, WR; Hamman, RF

    2015-01-01

    Background The ankle brachial index (ABI) is related to risk of cardiovascular events independent of the Framingham risk score (FRS). The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a risk model for cardiovascular events incorporating the ABI and FRS. Design An analysis of participant data from 18 cohorts in which 24,375 men and 20,377 women free of coronary heart disease had ABI measured and were followed up for events. Methods Subjects were divided into a development and internal validation dataset and an external validation dataset. Two models, comprising FRS and FRS + ABI, were fitted for the primary outcome of major coronary events. Results In predicting events in the external validation dataset, C-index for the FRS was 0.672 (95% CI 0.599 to 0.737) in men and 0.578 (95% CI 0.492 to 0.661) in women. The FRS + ABI led to a small increase in C-index in men to 0.685 (95% CI 0.612 to 0.749) and large increase in women to 0.690 (95% CI 0.605 to 0.764) with net reclassification improvement (NRI) of 4.3% (95% CI 0.0 to 7.6%, p = 0.050) and 9.6% (95% CI 6.1 to 16.4%, p < 0.001), respectively. Restricting the FRS + ABI model to those with FRS intermediate 10-year risk of 10 to 19% resulted in higher NRI of 15.9% (95% CI 6.1 to 20.6%, p < 0.001) in men and 23.3% (95% CI 13.8 to 62.5%, p = 0.002) in women. However, incorporating ABI in an improved newly fitted risk factor model had a nonsignificant effect: NRI 2.0% (95% CI 2.3 to 4.2%, p = 0.567) in men and 1.1% (95% CI 1.9 to 4.0%, p = 0.483) in women. Conclusions An ABI risk model may improve prediction especially in individuals at intermediate risk and when performance of the base risk factor model is modest. PMID:24367001

  20. Associations between immune depression and cardiovascular events in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Caroline A; Ryom, Lene; De Wit, Stephane; Mocroft, Amanda; Phillips, Andrew N; Worm, Signe W; Weber, Rainer; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Reiss, Peter; Kamara, David; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Pradier, Christian; Dabis, Francois; Law, Matthew; Lundgren, Jens

    2013-11-13

    To consider associations between the latest/nadir CD4 cell count, and time spent with CD4 cell count less than 200 cells/μl (duration of immune depression), and myocardial infarction (MI), coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, or cardiovascular disease (CVD) (CHD or stroke) in 33 301 HIV-positive individuals. Longitudinal cohort study. Analyses were undertaken using Poisson regression. To investigate whether analyses of stroke were robust to the type of endpoint, we additionally included stroke-like events and rejected strokes into the stroke endpoint. Participants experienced 716 MI, 1056 CHD, 303 stroke, and 1284 CVD events. Whereas there was no evidence of a higher MI/CHD risk in those with lower latest/nadir CD4 cell counts after adjustment [current CD4 <100 cells/μl: relative rate (95% confidence interval) 0.96 (0.62-1.50) for MI, 0.89 (0.30-2.36) for CHD; nadir CD4 <100 cells/μl: 1.36 (0.57-3.23) for MI, 0.98 (0.45-2.16) for CHD], stroke and CVD rates were higher in those with a latest CD4 cell count less than 100 cells/μl [2.26 (1.29-3.94) and 1.14 (0.84-1.56), respectively]. All events occurred less frequently in those who had not experienced immune depression, although evidence for a linear association with duration of immune depression was weak. The association between stroke risk and the latest CD4 cell count strengthened as stroke-like and rejected strokes were included; conversely, associations with established stroke risk factors weakened. We do not find strong evidence that HIV-positive individuals with a low CD4 cell count are more likely to experience MI/CHD. Although strokes appear to occur more commonly at low CD4 cell counts, this may be partly explained by misclassification or other biases.

  1. Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors as Predictors of Cardiovascular Events in the U.S. Astronaut Corps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halm, M. K.; Clark, A.; Wear, M. L.; Murray, J. D.; Polk, J. D.; Amirian, E.

    2009-01-01

    Risk prediction equations from the Framingham Heart Study are commonly used to predict the absolute risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary heart disease (CHD) related death. Predicting CHD-related events in the U.S. astronaut corps presents a monumental challenge, both because astronauts tend to live healthier lifestyles and because of the unique cardiovascular stressors associated with being trained for and participating in space flight. Traditional risk factors may not hold enough predictive power to provide a useful indicator of CHD risk in this unique population. It is important to be able to identify individuals who are at higher risk for CHD-related events so that appropriate preventive care can be provided. This is of special importance when planning long duration missions since the ability to provide advanced cardiac care and perform medical evacuation is limited. The medical regimen of the astronauts follows a strict set of clinical practice guidelines in an effort to ensure the best care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the Framingham risk score (FRS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein levels, blood pressure, and resting pulse as predictors of CHD-related death and MI in the astronaut corps, using Cox regression. Of these factors, only two, LDL and pulse at selection, were predictive of CHD events (HR(95% CI)=1.12 (1.00-1.25) and HR(95% CI)=1.70 (1.05-2.75) for every 5-unit increase in LDL and pulse, respectively). Since traditional CHD risk factors may lack the specificity to predict such outcomes in astronauts, the development of a new predictive model, using additional measures such as electron-beam computed tomography and carotid intima-media thickness ultrasound, is planned for the future.

  2. Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors as Predictors of Cardiovascular Events in the U.S. Astronaut Corps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halm, M. K.; Clark, A.; Wear, M. L.; Murray, J. D.; Polk, J. D.; Amirian, E.

    2009-01-01

    Risk prediction equations from the Framingham Heart Study are commonly used to predict the absolute risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary heart disease (CHD) related death. Predicting CHD-related events in the U.S. astronaut corps presents a monumental challenge, both because astronauts tend to live healthier lifestyles and because of the unique cardiovascular stressors associated with being trained for and participating in space flight. Traditional risk factors may not hold enough predictive power to provide a useful indicator of CHD risk in this unique population. It is important to be able to identify individuals who are at higher risk for CHD-related events so that appropriate preventive care can be provided. This is of special importance when planning long duration missions since the ability to provide advanced cardiac care and perform medical evacuation is limited. The medical regimen of the astronauts follows a strict set of clinical practice guidelines in an effort to ensure the best care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the Framingham risk score (FRS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein levels, blood pressure, and resting pulse as predictors of CHD-related death and MI in the astronaut corps, using Cox regression. Of these factors, only two, LDL and pulse at selection, were predictive of CHD events (HR(95% CI)=1.12 (1.00-1.25) and HR(95% CI)=1.70 (1.05-2.75) for every 5-unit increase in LDL and pulse, respectively). Since traditional CHD risk factors may lack the specificity to predict such outcomes in astronauts, the development of a new predictive model, using additional measures such as electron-beam computed tomography and carotid intima-media thickness ultrasound, is planned for the future.

  3. Ideal cardiovascular health predicts functional status independently of vascular events: the Northern Manhattan Study.

    PubMed

    Dhamoon, Mandip S; Dong, Chuanhui; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Sacco, Ralph L

    2015-02-12

    We hypothesized that the American Heart Association's metric of ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) predicts improved long-term functional status after adjusting for incident stroke and myocardial infarction. In the prospective, multiethnic Northern Manhattan Study, stroke-free individuals in northern Manhattan aged ≥40 years had annual assessments of the primary outcome of functional status with the Barthel index (BI), for a median of 13 years. Ideal CVH was calculated as a composite of 7 measures, each scored on a scale of 0 to 2. Primary predictors were (1) number of ideal CVH metrics, and (2) total score of all CVH metrics. Of 3219 participants, mean age was 69 years (SD 10), 63% were female, 21% were white, 25% were non-Hispanic black, and 54% were Hispanic. Twenty percent had 0 to 1 ideal CVH metrics, 32% had 2, 30% had 3, 14% had 4, and 4% had 5 to 7. Both number of ideal CVH categories and higher CVH metric scores were associated with higher mean BI scores at 5 and 10 years. 0047 Gradients persisted when results were adjusted for incident stroke and myocardial infarction, when mobility and nonmobility domains of the BI were analyzed separately, and when BI was analyzed dichotomously. At 10 years, in a fully adjusted model, differences in mean BI score were lower for poor versus ideal physical activity (3.48 points, P<0.0001) and fasting glucose (4.58 points, P<0.0001). Ideal CVH predicts functional status, even after accounting for incident vascular events. Vascular functional impairment is an important outcome that can be reduced by optimizing vascular health. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Plasma COOH-terminal proendothelin-1: a marker of fatal cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, and new-onset albuminuria in type 2 diabetes? (ZODIAC-29).

    PubMed

    Drion, Iefke; Kleefstra, Nanne; Landman, Gijs W D; Alkhalaf, Alaa; Struck, Joachim; Groenier, Klaas H; Bakker, Stephan J L; Bilo, Henk J G

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between plasma COOH-terminal proendothelin-1 (CT-proET-1) and fatal cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, and new-onset albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 1,225 patients with type 2 diabetes participated in this prospective observational study of two combined cohorts. Three clinical end points were studied: fatal cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, and new-onset albuminuria. After a median follow-up of 3 or 10 years, Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to investigate the association between CT-proET-1 and the end points. Harrell C statistic, the Groennesby and Borgan test, the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), and the net reclassification improvement (NRI) were used to evaluate whether CT-proET-1 is of additional value compared with classic cardiovascular and renal risk factors. During follow-up, 364 (30%) patients died, 150 (42%) of whom died of cardiovascular disease; 182 (26.7%) of 688 patients with normoalbuminuria at baseline developed albuminuria. CT-proET-1 was associated with fatal cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, and new-onset albuminuria with hazard ratios of 1.59 (95% CI 1.15-2.20), 1.41 (95% CI 1.14-1.74), and 1.48 (95% CI 1.10-2.01), respectively. Addition of CT-proET-1 to a model containing traditional risk factors leads only to improved prediction of fatal cardiovascular events. The IDI appeared significant for fatal cardiovascular events (0.82 [0.1-1.54]) and all-cause mortality (0.4 [0.05-0.92]), but not for new-onset albuminuria. CT-proET-1 has additional value for the prediction of fatal cardiovascular events and new-onset albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes, compared with conventional risk factors, but not for all-cause mortality.

  5. Performance of four current risk algorithms in predicting cardiovascular events in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Arts, E E A; Popa, C; Den Broeder, A A; Semb, A G; Toms, T; Kitas, G D; van Riel, P L; Fransen, J

    2015-04-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the predictive ability of 4 established cardiovascular (CV) risk models for the 10-year risk of fatal and non-fatal CV diseases in European patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Prospectively collected data from the Nijmegen early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) inception cohort was used. Discriminatory ability for CV risk prediction was estimated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Calibration was assessed by comparing the observed versus expected number of events using Hosmer-Lemeshov tests and calibration plots. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the cut-off values of 10% and 20% predicted risk. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.78-0.80, indicating moderate to good discrimination between patients with and without a CV event. The CV risk models Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE), Framingham risk score (FRS) and Reynolds risk score (RRS) primarily underestimated CV risk at low and middle observed risk levels, and mostly overestimated CV risk at higher observed risk levels. The QRisk II primarily overestimated observed CV risk. For the 10% and 20% cut-off values used as indicators for CV preventive treatment, sensitivity ranged from 68-87% and 40-65%, respectively and specificity ranged from 55-76% and 77-88%, respectively. Depending on the model, up to 32% of observed CV events occurred in patients with RA who were classified as low risk (<10%) for CV disease. Established risk models generally underestimate (Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation score, Framingham Risk Score, Reynolds risk score) or overestimate (QRisk II) CV risk in patients with RA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Risk of cardiovascular events and death in the life after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Nieuwkamp, Dennis J; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Algra, Ale; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Bots, Michiel L

    2014-12-01

    The increased mortality rates of survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage have been attributed to an increased risk of cardiovascular events in a registry study in Sweden. Swedish registries have however not been validated for subarachnoid haemorrhage and Scandinavian incidences of cardiovascular disease differ from that in Western European countries. We assessed risks of vascular disease and death in subarachnoid haemorrhage survivors in the Netherlands. From the Dutch hospital discharge register, we identified all patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage admission between 1997 and 2008. We determined the accuracy of coding of the diagnosis subarachnoid haemorrhage for patients admitted to our centre. Conditional on survival of three-months after the subarachnoid haemorrhage, we calculated standardized incidence and mortality ratios for fatal or nonfatal vascular diseases, vascular death, and all-cause death. Cumulative risks were estimated with survival analysis. The diagnosis of nontraumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage was correct in 95·4% of 1472 patients. Of 11,263 admitted subarachnoid haemorrhage patients, 6999 survived more than three-months. During follow-up (mean 5·1 years), 874 (12·5%) died. The risks of death were 3·3% within one-year, 11·3% within five-years, and 21·5% within 10 years. The standardized mortality ratio was 3·4 (95% confidence interval: 3·1 to 3·7) for vascular death and 2·2 (95% confidence interval: 2·1 to 2·3) for all-cause death. The standardized incidence ratio for fatal or nonfatal vascular diseases was 2·7 (95% confidence interval: 2·6 to 2·8). Dutch hospital discharge and cause of death registries are a valid source of data for subarachnoid haemorrhage, and show that the increased mortality rate in subarachnoid haemorrhage survivors is explained by increased risks for vascular diseases and death. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  7. Basic mechanisms for adverse cardiovascular events associated with air pollution.

    PubMed

    Chin, Michael T

    2015-02-01

    Air pollution is a significant cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although the epidemiologic association between air pollution exposures and exacerbation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established, the mechanisms by which these exposures promote CVD are incompletely understood. This review provides an overview of the components of air pollution, an overview of the cardiovascular effects of air pollution exposure, and a review of the basic mechanisms that are activated by exposure to promote CVD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Family Resource Coalition: 10 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Resource Coalition Report, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter issue focuses on the 10 years of leadership provided by the Family Resource Coalition in the support of families. The centerpiece of this anniversary issue is an interview with Coalition founder and President Bernice Weissbourd, exploring how the original ideas of the family resource movement have been implemented over the past 10…

  9. Reductions in Atherogenic Lipids and Major Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Henry N.; Davidson, Michael H.; Pordy, Robert; Bessac, Laurence; Minini, Pascal; Eckel, Robert H.; Cannon, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A continuous relationship between reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) has been observed in statin and ezetimibe outcomes trials down to achieved levels of 54 mg/dL. However, it is uncertain whether this relationship extends to LDL-C levels <50 mg/dL. We assessed the relationship between additional LDL-C, non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B100 reductions and MACE among patients within the ODYSSEY trials that compared alirocumab with controls (placebo/ezetimibe), mainly as add-on therapy to maximally tolerated statin. Methods: Data were pooled from 10 double-blind trials (6699 patient-years of follow-up). Randomization was to alirocumab 75/150 mg every 2 weeks or control for 24 to 104 weeks, added to background statin therapy in 8 trials. This analysis included 4974 patients (3182 taking alirocumab, 1174 taking placebo, 618 taking ezetimibe). In a post hoc analysis, the relationship between average on-treatment lipid levels and percent reductions in lipids from baseline were correlated with MACE (coronary heart disease death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or unstable angina requiring hospitalization) in multivariable analyses. Results: Overall, 33.1% of the pooled cohort achieved average LDL-C <50 mg/dL (44.7%–52.6% allocated to alirocumab, 6.5% allocated to ezetimibe, and 0% allocated to placebo). In total, 104 patients experienced MACE (median time to event, 36 weeks). For every 39 mg/dL lower achieved LDL-C, the risk of MACE appeared to be 24% lower (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.63–0.91; P=0.0025). Percent reductions in LDL-C from baseline were inversely correlated with MACE rates (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.57–0.89 per additional 50% reduction from baseline; P=0.003). Strengths of association materially similar to those described for LDL-C were observed with achieved non

  10. Metabolic Syndrome, Endothelial Dysfunction, and Risk of Cardiovascular Events: the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takeki; Hirata, Kumiko; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Jin, Zhezhen; Rundek, Tanja; Miyake, Yumiko; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Sacco, Ralph; Homma, Shunichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) predisposes to cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction is thought to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that both MetS and endothelial dysfunction are vascular risk factors and provide additive prognostic values in predicting cardiovascular events in a multi-ethnic community sample. Methods The study population consisted of 819 subjects (467 female, mean age 66.5±8.8 years, 66% Hispanic) enrolled in the Northern Manhattan Study. MetS was defined using the revised Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. Endothelial dysfunction was defined as FMD < 8.44% (lower three quartiles). Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effect of MetS and endothelial dysfunction on risk of cardiovascular events. Results During 81±21 months of follow-up, events occurred in 84 subjects. MetS was independently associated with cardiovascular events in a multivariate model including cardiovascular risk factors (adjusted HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.27–3.40). Subjects with both MetS and endothelial dysfunction were at higher risk for cardiovascular events than those with either one of them alone (adjusted HR 2.60, 95% CI 1.14–5.92). Conclusions MetS is associated with incident cardiovascular events. Combined use of MetS and FMD identifies those who are at higher risk of cardiovascular events. MetS and non-invasive FMD testing can be used concurrently for cardiovascular risk prediction. PMID:18657678

  11. Impact of postmenopausal hormone therapy on cardiovascular events and cancer: pooled data from clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, E.; McPherson, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and cancer from published clinical trials that studied other outcomes of postmenopausal hormone therapy as some surveys have suggested that it may decrease the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and increase the incidence of hormone dependent cancers. DESIGN: Trials that compared hormone therapy with placebo, no therapy, or vitamins and minerals in comparable groups of postmenopausal women and reported cardiovascular or cancer outcomes were searched from the literature. SUBJECTS: 22 trials with 4124 women were identified. In each group, the numbers of women with cardiovascular and cancer events were summed and divided by the numbers of women originally allocated to the groups. RESULTS: Data on cardiovascular events and cancer were usually given incidentally, either as a reason for dropping out of a study or in a list of adverse effects. The calculated odds ratios for women taking hormones versus those not taking hormones was 1.39 (95% confidence interval 0.48 to 3.95) for cardiovascular events without pulmonary embolus and deep vein thrombosis and 1.64 (0.55 to 4.18) with them. It is unlikely that such results would have occurred if the true odds ratio were 0.7 or less. For cancers, the numbers of reported events were too low for a useful conclusion. CONCLUSIONS: The results of these pooled data do not support the notion that postmenopausal hormone therapy prevents cardiovascular events. PMID:9251544

  12. Differential gene expression analysis and network construction of recurrent cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiangquan; Chen, Zhong; He, Qinghong; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Recurrent cardiovascular events are vital to the prevention and treatment strategies in patients who have experienced primary cardiovascular events. However, the susceptibility of recurrent cardiovascular events varies among patients. Personalized treatment and prognosis prediction are urged. Microarray profiling of samples from patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with or without recurrent cardiovascular events, were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Bioinformatics analysis, including Gene Oncology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), were used to identify genes and pathways specifically associated with recurrent cardiovascular events. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed and visualized. A total of 1,329 genes were differentially expressed in the two group samples. Among them, 1,023 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 76.98%) were upregulated in the recurrent cardiovascular events group and 306 DEGs (23.02%) were downregulated. Significantly enriched GO terms for molecular functions were nucleotide binding and nucleic acid binding, for biological processes were signal transduction and regulation of transcription (DNA-dependent), and for cellular component were cytoplasm and nucleus. The most significant pathway in our KEGG analysis was Pathways in cancer (P=0.000336681), and regulation of actin cytoskeleton was also significantly enriched (P=0.00165229). In the PPI network, the significant hub nodes were GNG4, MAPK8, PIK3R2, EP300, CREB1 and PIK3CB. The present study demonstrated the underlying molecular differences between patients with AMI, with and without recurrent cardiovascular events, including DEGs, their biological function, signaling pathways and key genes in the PPI network. With the use of bioinformatics and genomics these findings can be used to investigate the pathological mechanism, and improve the prevention and treatment of recurrent cardiovascular events.

  13. Comparison of SCORE-predicted risk of death due to cardiovascular events in women before and after menopause

    PubMed Central

    Brzostek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 55% of women in Europe die from cardiovascular events, mostly as a result of coronary diseases and cerebral stroke. There is a 10-year shift in the cardiovascular risk between women and men. The risk in a 55-year-old female patient is similar to that of a 45-year-old man, thus the risk among women increases rapidly around the age of 50, when menopause prevails to occur. The purpose of the study was to assess and compare the SCORE-predicted risk of a fatal cardiovascular incident in pre- and postmenopausal women. Material and methods The cross-sectional study was conducted as part of community nursing practice. It covered 219 women – inhabitants of Krakow, aged from 30 to 65, without clinically validated cardiovascular diseases of arteriosclerotic and/or diabetic origin, who volunteered to take part in the study. The group was divided into three subgroups: K1 – menstruating women (n = 113), K2a – women after natural menopause (n = 88), and K2b – women after surgical menopause (n = 18). The study made use of a lifestyle questionnaire, which concerned the social and economic status, and lifestyle habits including tobacco smoking. Arterial blood pressure was measured, and total cholesterol concentration in blood (mmol/l) was recorded. Results A high (≥ 5%) level of the SCORE risk was discovered in 14.3% of postmenopausal women, as compared to 0.9% in the group of menstruating women. An average risk of a fatal cardiovascular incident during the following 10 years was significantly higher among women from groups K2a (2.61%) and K2b (2.32%) as compared to K1 – menstruating women (0.38%). No difference was, however, discovered between groups of naturally (K2a) and surgically menopausal women (K2b). Conclusions A significantly higher risk of SCORE-predicted death caused by a cardiovascular incident, as compared to the group of women in the premenopausal period, is characteristic of women in the postmenopausal period. PMID:26528104

  14. Comparison of SCORE-predicted risk of death due to cardiovascular events in women before and after menopause.

    PubMed

    Piskorz, Anna; Brzostek, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 55% of women in Europe die from cardiovascular events, mostly as a result of coronary diseases and cerebral stroke. There is a 10-year shift in the cardiovascular risk between women and men. The risk in a 55-year-old female patient is similar to that of a 45-year-old man, thus the risk among women increases rapidly around the age of 50, when menopause prevails to occur. The purpose of the study was to assess and compare the SCORE-predicted risk of a fatal cardiovascular incident in pre- and postmenopausal women. The cross-sectional study was conducted as part of community nursing practice. It covered 219 women - inhabitants of Krakow, aged from 30 to 65, without clinically validated cardiovascular diseases of arteriosclerotic and/or diabetic origin, who volunteered to take part in the study. The group was divided into three subgroups: K1 - menstruating women (n = 113), K2a - women after natural menopause (n = 88), and K2b - women after surgical menopause (n = 18). The study made use of a lifestyle questionnaire, which concerned the social and economic status, and lifestyle habits including tobacco smoking. Arterial blood pressure was measured, and total cholesterol concentration in blood (mmol/l) was recorded. A high (≥ 5%) level of the SCORE risk was discovered in 14.3% of postmenopausal women, as compared to 0.9% in the group of menstruating women. An average risk of a fatal cardiovascular incident during the following 10 years was significantly higher among women from groups K2a (2.61%) and K2b (2.32%) as compared to K1 - menstruating women (0.38%). No difference was, however, discovered between groups of naturally (K2a) and surgically menopausal women (K2b). A significantly higher risk of SCORE-predicted death caused by a cardiovascular incident, as compared to the group of women in the premenopausal period, is characteristic of women in the postmenopausal period.

  15. Electronic circuit detects left ventricular ejection events in cardiovascular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebben, V. D.; Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Electronic circuit processes arterial blood pressure waveform to produce discrete signals that coincide with beginning and end of left ventricular ejection. Output signals provide timing signals for computers that monitor cardiovascular systems. Circuit operates reliably for heart rates between 50 and 200 beats per minute.

  16. Aortic valve calcium independently predicts coronary and cardiovascular events in a primary prevention population.

    PubMed

    Owens, David S; Budoff, Matthew J; Katz, Ronit; Takasu, Junichiro; Shavelle, David M; Carr, J Jeffrey; Heckbert, Susan R; Otto, Catherine M; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Kronmal, Richard A; O'Brien, Kevin D

    2012-06-01

    This study sought to test whether aortic valve calcium (AVC) is independently associated with coronary and cardiovascular events in a primary-prevention population. Aortic sclerosis is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among the elderly, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain controversial. Also, it is unknown whether this association extends to younger individuals. We performed a prospective analysis of 6,685 participants in MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). All subjects, ages 45 to 84 years and free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline, underwent computed tomography for AVC and coronary artery calcium scoring. The primary, pre-specified combined endpoint of cardiovascular events included myocardial infarctions, fatal and nonfatal strokes, resuscitated cardiac arrest, and cardiovascular death, whereas a secondary combined endpoint of coronary events excluded strokes. The association between AVC and clinical events was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression with incremental adjustments for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, inflammatory biomarkers, and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Over a median follow-up of 5.8 years (interquartile range: 5.6 to 5.9 years), adjusting for demographics and cardiovascular risk factors, subjects with AVC (n = 894, 13.4%) had higher risks of cardiovascular (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10 to 2.03) and coronary (HR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.19 to 2.49) events compared with those without AVC. Adjustments for inflammatory biomarkers did not alter these associations, but adjustment for coronary artery calcium substantially attenuated both cardiovascular (HR: 1.32; 95% CI: 0.98 to 1.78) and coronary (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 0.98 to 2.02) event risk. AVC remained predictive of cardiovascular mortality even after full adjustment (HR: 2.51; 95% CI: 1.22 to 5.21). In this MESA cohort, free of clinical cardiovascular disease, AVC predicts

  17. Carotid Atherosclerotic Disease Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Hemodialysis Patients: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Carlos; Pons, Mercedes; Cruzado, Josep M

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the predictive value of carotid atherosclerotic disease (CAD) and intima-media thickness (IMT) on incident cardiovascular disease and mortality in hemodialysis patients. Methods Multicenter, observational, prospective study including 110 patients, followed-up to 6 years. Carotid doppler ultrasonographic findings were classified in 4 degrees of severity: 1) IMT <0.9 mm, 2) IMT >0.9 mm, 3) carotid plaque with stenosis <50% and 4) plaque with stenosis >50%. The associations between IMT and CAD and cardiovascular events, total and cardiovascular mortality were assessed. Results 83% of the patients had atherosclerotic plaques (CAD degrees 3-4). During follow-up, 29.1% of patients experienced cardiovascular events, and 28.2% died, 38.7% of cardiovascular origin. The presence of plaques was associated with cardiovascular events (p = 0.03) while calcified plaques were associated with both cardiovascular events (p = 0.01), cardiovascular mortality (p = 0.03) and non-significantly with overall mortality (p = 0.08) in the survival analysis. Carotid IMT was not associated with outcomes. Cardiovascular events correlated with CAD severity (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.13-4.54), age (HR 1.04, 1.01-1.06), previous cardiovascular disease (HR 1.75, 1.05-4.42), dyslipidemia (HR 2.25, 1.11-4.53), lipoprotein (a) (HR 1.01, 1.00-1.02), troponin I (HR 3.89, 1.07-14.18), fibrinogen levels (HR 1.38, 0.98-1.94) and antiplatelet therapy (HR 2.14, 1.04-4.4). In an age-adjusted multivariate model, cardiovascular events were independently associated with previous coronary artery disease (HR 3.29, 1.52-7.15) and lipoprotein (a) (HR 1.01, 1.00-1.02). Conclusions The presence of carotid plaques and, especially, calcified plaques, are predictors of new cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients, while IMT was not. The prognostic value of calcified plaques should be confirmed in future studies. PMID:26029907

  18. Immediate Risk for Cardiovascular Events and Suicide Following a Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mucci, Lorelei A.; Ye, Weimin; Andrén, Ove; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Sparén, Pär; Klein, Georg; Stampfer, Meir; Adami, Hans-Olov; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur

    2009-01-01

    Background Stressful life events have been shown to be associated with altered risk of various health consequences. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the emotional stress evoked by a prostate cancer diagnosis increases the immediate risks of cardiovascular events and suicide. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective cohort study by following all men in Sweden who were 30 y or older (n = 4,305,358) for a diagnosis of prostate cancer (n = 168,584) and their subsequent occurrence of cardiovascular events and suicide between January 1, 1961 and December 31, 2004. We used Poisson regression models to calculate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cardiovascular events and suicide among men who had prostate cancer diagnosed within 1 y to men without any cancer diagnosis. The risks of cardiovascular events and suicide were elevated during the first year after prostate cancer diagnosis, particularly during the first week. Before 1987, the RR of fatal cardiovascular events was 11.2 (95% CI 10.4–12.1) during the first week and 1.9 (95% CI 1.9–2.0) during the first year after diagnosis. From 1987, the RR for cardiovascular events, nonfatal and fatal combined, was 2.8 (95% CI 2.5–3.2) during the first week and 1.3 (95% CI 1.3–1.3) during the first year after diagnosis. While the RR of cardiovascular events declined, the RR of suicide was stable over the entire study period: 8.4 (95% CI 1.9–22.7) during the first week and 2.6 (95% CI 2.1–3.0) during the first year after diagnosis. Men 54 y or younger at cancer diagnosis demonstrated the highest RRs of both cardiovascular events and suicide. A limitation of the present study is the lack of tumor stage data, which precluded possibilities of investigating the potential impact of the disease severity on the relationship between a recent diagnosis of prostate cancer and the risks of cardiovascular events and suicide. In addition, we cannot exclude residual

  19. Anemia and left ventricular hypertrophy with renal function decline and cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Szu-Chia; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Su, Ho-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2014-03-01

    Anemia is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which may initiate or accelerate left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). This study is designed to assess whether the coexistence of anemia and LVH is independently associated with the rate of renal function decline and increased cardiovascular events in patients with CKD stages 3 to 5. This longitudinal study enrolled 415 patients, who were classified into 4 groups according to sex-specific median values of hemoglobin and with/without LVH. The change in renal function was measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate slope. Cardiovascular events were defined as cardiovascular death, hospitalization for unstable angina, nonfatal myocardial infarction, sustained ventricular arrhythmia, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, transient ischemia attack, and stroke. The relative risk of cardiovascular events was analyzed by Cox's regression method. The estimated glomerular filtration rate slope was significantly lower in the group with lower hemoglobin and LVH than in the other groups (P ≤ 0.031). In addition, patients with lower hemoglobin and LVH were independently associated with increased cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 4.269; 95% confidence interval, 1.402-13.000; P = 0.011). Our findings showed that the coexistence of anemia and LVH was independently associated with faster renal function decline and poor cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD. Assessments of serum hemoglobin level and LVH by echocardiography may help identify a high-risk group of poor renal and cardiovascular prognosis in patients with CKD stages 3 to 5.

  20. Sarcopenia is a risk factor for cardiovascular events experienced by patients with critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Takuya; Inoue, Kentaro; Matsuda, Daisuke; Yoshiga, Ryosuke; Yoshiya, Keiji; Furuyama, Tadashi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-05-01

    Prognosis is poor for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI), and the most frequent cause of death is cardiovascular disease. Low grip strength is a risk factor for cardiovascular events, and sarcopenia may be associated as well. Thus, we hypothesized that sarcopenia is a risk factor for cardiovascular events experienced by patients with CLI. If this is true and appropriate therapy becomes available, the prognosis of patients with CLI will improve with appropriate risk management strategies to prevent cardiovascular events. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify this hypothesis. We studied 114 patients who underwent revascularization and computed tomography between January 2002 and December 2012 in the Department of Surgery and Sciences at Kyushu University in Japan. Sarcopenia was defined as skeletal muscle area measured by L3-level computed tomography scan <114.0 cm(2) and <89.8 cm(2) for men and women, respectively. Clinical characteristics, cardiovascular event-free survival, <2-year death, causes of death, and effective treatments for sarcopenia were investigated. We identified 53 (46.5%) patients with sarcopenia. Three-year cardiovascular event-free survival rates were 43.1% and 91.2% for patients with and without sarcopenia, respectively (P < .01). During follow-up, cardiovascular disease caused the deaths of 4 and 15 patients without and with sarcopenia (P < .01), respectively, and in particular, ischemic heart disease caused the deaths of 0 and 5 patients without or with sarcopenia (P < .05), respectively. Single antiplatelet therapy (SAPT; hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.82; P < .01) and statin therapy (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.78; P < .01) were independent factors associated with improved cardiovascular event-free survival. Three-year cardiovascular event-free survival rates for patients with sarcopenia who received SAPT, dual antiplatelet therapies, and no antiplatelet therapy were 75

  1. Physical distress is associated with cardiovascular events in a high risk population of elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Einvik, Gunnar; Ekeberg, Øivind; Klemsdal, Tor O; Sandvik, Leiv; Hjerkinn, Elsa M

    2009-01-01

    Background Self-reported health perceptions such as physical distress and quality of life are suggested independent predictors of mortality and morbidity in patients with established cardiovascular disease. This study examined the associations between these factors and three years incidence of cardiovascular events in a population of elderly men with long term hyperlipidemia. Methods We studied observational data in a cohort of 433 men aged 64–76 years from a prospective, 2 × 2 factorial designed, three-year interventional trial. Information of classical risk factors was obtained and the following questionnaires were administered at baseline: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Physical Symptom Distress Index and Life Satisfaction Index. The occurrence of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular incidences and peripheral arterial disease were registered throughout the study period. Continuous data with skewed distribution was split into tertiles. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated from Cox regression analyses to assess the associations between physical distress, quality of life and cardiovascular events. Results After three years, 49 cardiovascular events were registered, with similar incidence among subjects with and without established cardiovascular disease. In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, smoking, systolic blood pressure, serum glucose, HADS-anxiety and treatment-intervention, physical distress was positively associated (HR 3.1, 95% CI 1.2 – 7.9 for 3rd versus 1st tertile) and quality of life negatively associated (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1–5.8 for 3rd versus 1st tertile) with cardiovascular events. The association remained statistically significant only for physical distress (hazard ratio 2.8 95% CI 1.2 – 6.8, p < 0.05) when both variables were evaluated in the same model. Conclusion Physical distress, but not quality of life, was independently associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in an observational study

  2. [Arterial calcification and risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Iwai, Kunimitu; Morimoto, Shigeto

    2010-11-01

    The cohort studies reported the subclinical vascular calcification including atheroslerosis starts during prediabetic state characterized by impaired fasting glucose. In the cardiovascular systems of diabetes mellitus there is an original mechanism to induce the medial calcification other than intimal calcification observed in the classical atherosclerosis. This is characterized as the ectipic osteogenesis induced by paracrine signals from inflammatory lesions in the adventitia. On the other hand, many internal systems have been discovered to inhibit vascular calcification.

  3. Risk of Cardiovascular Events after Infection-Related Hospitalizations in Older Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Sandra M.; Mu, Yi; Johansen, Kirsten L.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Grimes, Barbara; Kaysen, George A.; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Infection and cardiovascular disease are leading causes of hospitalization and death in patients on dialysis. The objective of this study was to determine whether an infection-related hospitalization increased the short-term risk of a cardiovascular event in older patients on dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements With use of the United States Renal Data System, patients aged 65 to 100 years who started dialysis between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2002, were examined. All hospitalizations were examined from study entry until time of transplant, death, or December 31, 2004. All discharge diagnoses were examined to determine if an infection occurred during hospitalization. Only principal discharge diagnoses were examined to ascertain cardiovascular events of interest. We used the self-controlled case-series method to estimate the relative incidence of a cardiovascular event within 90 days after an infection-related hospitalization as compared with other times not within 90 days of such a hospitalization. Results A total of 16,874 patients had at least one cardiovascular event and were included in the self-controlled case-series analysis. The risk of a cardiovascular event was increased by 25% in the first 30 days after an infection and was overall increased 18% in the 90 days after an infection-related hospitalization relative to control periods. Conclusions The first 90 days, and in particular the first 30 days, after an infection-related hospitalization is a high-risk period for cardiovascular events and may be an important timeframe for cardiovascular risk reduction, monitoring, and intervention in older patients on dialysis. PMID:21566109

  4. [Is stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance really useful to detect ischemia and predict events in patients with different cardiovascular risk profile?

    PubMed

    Esteban-Fernández, Alberto; Coma-Canella, Isabel; Bastarrika, Gorka; Barba-Cosials, Joaquín; Azcárate-Agüero, Pedro M

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (stress CMR) in patients with different cardiovascular risk profile and to assess if the degree of hypoperfusion is important to guide clinical decisions. We included patients submitted to adenosine stress CMR to rule out myocardial ischemia. We evaluated its diagnostic accuracy with likelihood ratio (LR) and its prognostic value with survival curves and a Cox regression model. 295 patients were studied. The positive LR was 3.40 and the negative one 0.47. The maximal usefulness of the test was found in patients without previous ischemic cardiomyopathy (positive LR 4.85), patients with atypical chest pain (positive LR 8.56), patients with low or intermediate cardiovascular risk (positive LR 3.87) and those with moderate or severe hypoperfusion (positive LR 8.63). Sixty cardiovascular major events were registered. The best survival prognosis was found in patients with a negative result (p=0.001) or mild hypoperfusion (p=0.038). In the multivariate analysis, a moderate or severe hypoperfusion increased cardiovascular event probability (HR=2.2; IC 95% 1.26-3.92), with no differences between a mild positive and a negative result (HR=0.93; IC 95% 0.38-2.28). Stress CMR was specially useful in patients with low or intermediate cardiovascular risk, patients with atypical chest pain, patients without previous ischemic cardiomyopathy and those with moderate or severe hypoperfusion. Hypoperfusion degree was the main issue factor to guide clinical decisions. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Inflammation, Coronary Artery Calcification and Cardiovascular Events in Incident Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Peter; Wolfe, Megan; Joffe, Marshall; Rosas, Sylvia E

    2010-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery calcification (CAC) predicts cardiovascular events in the general population. We conducted a prospective study to determine if inflammatory markers were predictive of CAC and if CAC predicted cardiovascular events and mortality in incident renal transplant recipients. Methods A prospective cohort of 112 asymptomatic incident renal transplant recipients who had no prior history of coronary artery revascularization or myocardial infarction had coronary calcifications measured early post-transplant and at least 18 months later by Agatston score and volume method. Results The mean CAC score was 367.7 (682.3). Inflammatory markers such as WBC and CRP were predictive of CAC severity. Recipients with cardiovascular events (n=11) or death (n=12) during the follow-up period had higher mean [675.1 (669.3) vs. 296.8(669.0), p=0.02] and median [434.8 vs. 28.9, p=0.01] CAC score compared to those without them. Recipients with CAC score less than 100 had a better cumulative survival rate compared to the recipients with CAC score greater than 100 [95.1 vs. 82.3%, p=0.03]. We found a significant unadjusted and adjusted association between CAC score and cardiovascular events and mortality. A quarter (25.9%) of recipients had CAC progression. Coronary calcification progression also predicted cardiovascular events and mortality after adjustment for diabetes, age, dialysis vintage and presence of CAC at time of transplant. Conclusion CAC is prevalent in renal recipients and is predictive of cardiovascular events and mortality. Changes in coronary calcification are common and predict clinical outcomes. Inflammatory markers are predictive of CAC severity at time of transplant, but are not predictive of future cardiovascular event or mortality. PMID:20934074

  6. Association Between the Presence of Carotid Artery Plaque and Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Genetic Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Bea, Ana M; Civeira, Fernando; Jarauta, Estíbaliz; Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Marco-Benedí, Victoria; Cenarro, Ana; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío

    2017-07-01

    The equations used in the general population to calculate cardiovascular risk are not useful in genetic hypercholesterolemia (GH). Carotid plaque detection has proved useful in cardiovascular prediction and risk reclassification but there have been no studies of its usefulness in GH. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the presence of carotid artery plaque and the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with GH. This study included 1778 persons with GH. The mean follow-up until the occurrence of cardiovascular events was 6.26 years. At presentation, the presence of carotid artery plaque was studied by high-resolution ultrasound. Carotid artery plaque was found in 661 (37.2%) patients: 31.9% with familial hypercholesterolemia, 39.8% with familial combined hyperlipidemia, 45.5% with dysbetalipoproteinemia, and 43.2% with polygenic hypercholesterolemia. During follow-up, 58 patients had a cardiovascular event. Event rates were 6354/100 000 (95%CI, 4432.4-8275.6) in the group with plaque and 1432/100 000 (95%CI, 730.6-2134.3) in the group without plaque, with significant differences between the 2 groups (P < .001). The relative risk of an event was 4.34 (95CI%, 2.44-7.71; P < .001) times higher in patients with plaque and was 2.40 (95%CI, 1.27-4.56; P = .007) times higher after adjustment for major risk factors. The number of carotid artery plaques was positively associated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Most cardiovascular events occur in a subgroup of patients who can be identified by carotid plaque detection. These results support the use of plaque screening in this population and should help in risk stratification and treatment in GH. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. High plasma omentin predicts cardiovascular events independently from the presence and extent of angiographically determined atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Saely, Christoph H; Leiherer, Andreas; Muendlein, Axel; Vonbank, Alexander; Rein, Philipp; Geiger, Kathrin; Malin, Cornelia; Drexel, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    No prospective data on the power of the adipocytokine omentin to predict cardiovascular events are available. We aimed at investigating i) the association of plasma omentin with cardiometabolic risk markers, ii) its association with angiographically determined coronary atherosclerosis, and iii) its power to predict cardiovascular events. We measured plasma omentin in 295 patients undergoing coronary angiography for the evaluation of established or suspected stable coronary artery disease (CAD), of whom 161 had significant CAD with coronary artery stenoses ≥50% and 134 did not have significant CAD. Over 3.5 years, 17.6% of our patients suffered cardiovascular events, corresponding to an annual event rate of 5.0%. At baseline, plasma omentin was not significantly associated with metabolic syndrome stigmata and did not differ significantly between patients with and subjects without significant CAD (17.2 ± 13.6 ng/ml vs. 17.5 ± 15.1 ng/ml; p = 0.783). Prospectively, however, cardiovascular event risk significantly increased over tertiles of omentin (12.1%, 13.8%, and 29.5%, for tertiles 1 through 3; ptrend = 0.003), and omentin as a continuous variable significantly predicted cardiovascular events after adjustment for age, gender, BMI, diabetes, hypertension, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and smoking (standardized adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.41 [95% CI 1.16-1.72]; p < 0.001), as well as after additional adjustment for the presence and extent of significant CAD at baseline (HR 1.59 [95% CI 1.29-1.97, p < 0.001). From this first prospective evaluation of the cardiovascular risk associated with omentin we conclude that elevated plasma omentin significantly predicts cardiovascular events independently from the presence and extent of angiographically determined baseline CAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Early cardiovascular events in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Goueslard, Karine; Cottenet, Jonathan; Mariet, Anne-Sophie; Giroud, Maurice; Cottin, Yves; Petit, Jean-Michel; Quantin, Catherine

    2016-01-27

    The effect of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is not assessed within the first 10 years postpartum, regardless of subsequent diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of CVD events related to GDM within 7 years of postpartum. This nationwide population-based study of deliveries in 2007 and 2008 with a follow-up of 7 years was based on data from the French medico-administrative database. Two groups were formed: women with a history of GDM and women without GDM or previous diabetes. CVD included angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, stroke, heart bypass surgery, coronary angioplasty, carotid endarterectomy and fibrinolysis. Hypertensive disease was assessed separately. Determinants studied included age, obesity, subsequent diabetes mellitus and hypertensive diseases during pregnancy. Adjusted odds ratios for outcomes were calculated using multiple logistic regressions. The hospital database recorded 1,518,990 deliveries in 2007 and 2008. Among these, 62,958 women had a history of GDM. After adjusting for age, DM, obesity and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, GDM was significantly associated with a higher risk of CVD (adjusted Odds Ratio aOR = 1.25 [1.09-1.43]). Considering each variable in a separate model, GDM was associated with angina pectoris (aOR = 1.68 [1.29-2.20]), myocardial infarction (aOR = 1.92 [1.36-2.71]) and hypertension (aOR = 2.72 [2.58-2.88]) but not with stroke. A history of GDM was identified as a risk factor of CVD, especially coronary vascular diseases, within the 7 years postpartum. A lifestyle changes from postpartum onwards can be recommended and supported.

  9. Cardiovascular event-free survival after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients stratified by cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Onwudiwe, Nneka C; Kwok, Young; Onukwugha, Eberechukwu; Sorkin, John D; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Shaya, Fadia T; Daniel Mullins, C

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of a cardiovascular event or death associated with modern radiation in a population of elderly female breast cancer patients with varying baseline cardiovascular risk. The data used for this analysis are from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database. The retrospective cohort study included women aged 66 years and older with stage 0-III breast cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2005. Women were grouped as low, intermediate, or high cardiovascular risk based on the presence of certain clinical diagnoses. The risk for the combined outcome of a hospitalization for a cardiovascular event or death within 6 months and 24 months of diagnosis was estimated using a multivariable Cox model. The median follow-up time was 24 months. Among the 91,612 women with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage 0-III breast cancer: 39,555 (43.2%) were treated with radiation therapy and 52,057 (56.8%) were not. The receipt of radiation therapy in the first 6 months was associated with a statistically significant increased risk for the combined outcome in women categorized as high risk (HR = 1.510; 95% CI, 1.396-1.634) or intermediate risk (HR = 1.415; 95% CI, 1.188-1.686) but not low risk (HR = 1.027; 95% CI, 0.798-1.321). Women with a prior medical history of cardiovascular disease treated with radiation therapy are at increased risk for an event and should be monitored for at least 6 months following treatment with radiation therapy. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Allopurinol use and the risk of acute cardiovascular events in patients with gout and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Ramachandaran, Rekha; Yu, Shaohua; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2017-03-14

    Few studies, if any, have examined cardiovascular outcomes in patients with diabetes and gout. Both diabetes and gout are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of allopurinol on the risk of incident acute cardiovascular events in patients with gout and diabetes. We used the 2007-2010 Multi-Payer Claims Database (MPCD) that linked health plan data from national commercial and governmental insurances, representing beneficiaries with United Healthcare, Medicare, or Medicaid coverage. In patients with gout and diabetes, we assessed the current allopurinol use, defined as a new filled prescription for allopurinol, as the main predictor of interest. Our outcome of interest was the occurrence of the first Incident hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke (composite acute cardiovascular event), after which observations were censored. We employed multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models that simultaneously adjusted for patient demographics, cardiovascular risk factors and other medical comorbidities. We calculated hazard ratios [HR] (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for incident composite (MI or stroke) acute cardiovascular events. We performed sensitivity analyses that additionally adjusted for the presence of immune diseases and colchicine use, as potential confounders. There were 2,053,185 person days (5621.3 person years) of current allopurinol use and 1,671,583 person days (4576.5 person years) of prior allopurinol use. There were 158 incident MIs or strokes in current and 151 in prior allopurinol users, respectively. Compared to previous allopurinol users, current allopurinol users had significantly lower adjusted hazard of incident acute cardiovascular events (incident stroke or MI), with an HR of 0.67 (95% CI, 0.53, 0.84). Sensitivity analyses, additionally adjusted for immune diseases or colchicine use, confirmed this association. Current allopurinol use protected against the occurrence

  11. AKI and Long-Term Risk for Cardiovascular Events and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Wong, Christopher X; Farkouh, Michael; Altman, Douglas G; Hopewell, Sally; Emdin, Connor A; Hunn, Benjamin H

    2017-01-01

    AKI associates with increased long-term risk of mortality, but the prognostic significance of AKI in terms of long-term cardiovascular disease remains unconfirmed. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess whether AKI associates with long-term cardiovascular disease. We included cohort studies that examined adults with and without AKI and reported a multivariable-adjusted relative risk (RR) for the association between AKI and cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and disease-specific events: congestive heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and stroke. Twenty-five studies involving 254,408 adults (55,150 with AKI) were included. AKI associated with an 86% and a 38% increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and major cardiovascular events, respectively ([RR 1.86; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.72 to 2.01] and [RR 1.38; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.55], respectively). For disease-specific events, AKI associated with a 58% increased risk of heart failure (RR 1.58; 95% CI, 1.46 to 1.72) and a 40% increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (RR 1.40; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.59). The elevated risk of heart failure and acute myocardial infarction persisted in subgroup analyses on the basis of AKI severity and the proportion of adults with baseline ischemic heart disease. Finally, AKI was associated with a 15% increased risk of stroke (RR 1.15; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.28). In conclusion, AKI associates with an elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality and major cardiovascular events, particularly heart failure and acute myocardial infarction.

  12. Left ventricular shape predicts different types of cardiovascular events in the general population.

    PubMed

    Ambale-Venkatesh, Bharath; Yoneyama, Kihei; Sharma, Ravi K; Ohyama, Yoshiaki; Wu, Colin O; Burke, Gregory L; Shea, Steven; Gomes, Antoinette S; Young, Alistair A; Bluemke, David A; Lima, João Ac

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether sphericity volume index (SVI), an indicator of left ventricular (LV) remodelling, predicts incident cardiovascular events (coronary heart disease, CHD; all cardiovascular disease, CVD; heart failure, HF; atrial fibrillation, AF) over 10 years of follow-up in a multiethnic population (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). 5004 participants free of known CVD had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 2000-2002. Cine images were analysed to compute, [Formula: see text] equivalent to LV volume/volume of sphere with length of LV as the diameter. The highest (greatest sphericity) and lowest (lowest sphericity) quintiles of SVI were compared against the reference group (2-4 quintiles combined). Risk-factor adjusted hazard's ratio (HR) from Cox regression assessed the predictive performance of SVI at end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) to predict incident outcomes over 10 years in retrospective interpretation of prospective data. At baseline, participants were aged 61±10 years; 52% men and 39%/13%/26%/22% Cauc/Chinese/Afr-Amer/Hispanic. Low sphericity was associated with higher Framingham CVD risk, greater coronary calcium score and higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP); while increased sphericity was associated with higher NT-proBNP and lower ejection fraction. Low sphericity predicted incident CHD (HR: 1.48, 1.55-2.59 at ED) and CVD (HR: 1.82, 1.47-2.27 at ED). However, both low (HR: 1.81, 1.20-2.73 at ES) and high (HR: 2.21, 1.41-3.46 at ES) sphericity predicted incident HF. High sphericity also predicted AF. In a multiethnic population free of CVD at baseline, lowest sphericity was a predictor of incident CHD, CVD and HF over a 10-year follow-up period. Extreme sphericity was a strong predictor of incident HF and AF. SVI improved risk prediction models beyond established risk factors only for HF, but not for all CVD or CHD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  13. Acute and recent air pollution exposure and cardiovascular events at labour and delivery

    PubMed Central

    Männistö, Tuija; Mendola, Pauline; Grantz, Katherine Laughon; Leishear, Kira; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Sherman, Seth; Ying, Qi; Liu, Danping

    2017-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between acute air pollution exposure and cardiovascular events during labour/delivery. Methods The Consortium on Safe Labor (2002–2008), an observational US cohort with 223 502 singleton deliveries provided electronic medical records. Air pollution exposure was estimated by modified Community Multiscale Air Quality models. Cardiovascular events (cardiac failure/arrest, stroke, myocardial infarcts and other events) were recorded in the hospital discharge records for 687 pregnancies (0.3%). Logistic regression with generalised estimating equations estimated the relationship between cardiovascular events and daily air pollutant levels for delivery day and the 7 days preceding delivery. Results Increased odds of cardiovascular events were observed for each IQR increase in exposure to nitric oxides at 5 and 6 days prior to delivery (OR=1.17, 99% CI 1.04 to 1.30 and OR=1.15, 1.03 to 1.28, respectively). High exposure to toxic air pollution species such as ethylbenzene (OR=1.50, 1.08 to 2.09), m-xylene (OR=1.54, 1.11 to 2.13), o-xylene (OR=1.51, 1.09 to 2.09), p-xylene (OR=1.43, 1.03 to 1.99) and toluene (OR=1.42, 1.02 to 1.97) at 5 days prior to delivery were also associated with cardiovascular events. Decreased odds of events were observed with exposure to ozone. Conclusions Air pollution in the days prior to delivery, especially nitrogen oxides and some toxic air pollution species, was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events during the labour/delivery admission. PMID:26105036

  14. Acute and recent air pollution exposure and cardiovascular events at labour and delivery.

    PubMed

    Männistö, Tuija; Mendola, Pauline; Laughon Grantz, Katherine; Leishear, Kira; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Sherman, Seth; Ying, Qi; Liu, Danping

    2015-09-01

    To study the relationship between acute air pollution exposure and cardiovascular events during labour/delivery. The Consortium on Safe Labor (2002-2008), an observational US cohort with 223,502 singleton deliveries provided electronic medical records. Air pollution exposure was estimated by modified Community Multiscale Air Quality models. Cardiovascular events (cardiac failure/arrest, stroke, myocardial infarcts and other events) were recorded in the hospital discharge records for 687 pregnancies (0.3%). Logistic regression with generalised estimating equations estimated the relationship between cardiovascular events and daily air pollutant levels for delivery day and the 7 days preceding delivery. Increased odds of cardiovascular events were observed for each IQR increase in exposure to nitric oxides at 5 and 6 days prior to delivery (OR=1.17, 99% CI 1.04 to 1.30 and OR=1.15, 1.03 to 1.28, respectively). High exposure to toxic air pollution species such as ethylbenzene (OR=1.50, 1.08 to 2.09), m-xylene (OR=1.54, 1.11 to 2.13), o-xylene (OR=1.51, 1.09 to 2.09), p-xylene (OR=1.43, 1.03 to 1.99) and toluene (OR=1.42, 1.02 to 1.97) at 5 days prior to delivery were also associated with cardiovascular events. Decreased odds of events were observed with exposure to ozone. Air pollution in the days prior to delivery, especially nitrogen oxides and some toxic air pollution species, was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events during the labour/delivery admission. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Left atrial dimension and traditional cardiovascular risk factors predict 20-year clinical cardiovascular events in young healthy adults: the CARDIA study

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Anderson C.; Liu, Kiang; Lewis, Cora E.; Sidney, Stephen; Colangelo, Laura A.; Kishi, Satoru; Ambale-Venkatesh, Bharath; Arynchyn, Alex; Jacobs, David R.; Correia, Luís C.L.; Gidding, Samuel S.; Lima, João A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We investigated whether the addition of left atrial (LA) size determined by echocardiography improves cardiovascular risk prediction in young adults over and above the clinically established Framingham 10-year global CV risk score (FRS). Methods and results We included white and black CARDIA participants who had echocardiograms in Year-5 examination (1990–91). The combined endpoint after 20 years was incident fatal or non-fatal cardiovascular disease: myocardial infarction, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral artery disease, and atrial fibrillation/flutter. Echocardiography-derived M-mode LA diameter (LAD; n = 4082; 149 events) and 2D four-chamber LA area (LAA; n = 2412; 77 events) were then indexed by height or body surface area (BSA). We used Cox regression, areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC), and net reclassification improvement (NRI) to assess the prediction power of LA size when added to calculated FRS or FRS covariates. The LAD and LAA cohorts had similar characteristics; mean LAD/height was 2.1 ± 0.3 mm/m and LAA/height 9.3 ± 2.0 mm2/m. After indexing by height and adjusting for FRS covariates, hazard ratios were 1.31 (95% CI 1.12, 1.60) and 1.43 (95% CI 1.13, 1.80) for LAD and LAA, respectively; AUC was 0.77 for LAD and 0.78 for LAA. When LAD and LAA were indexed to BSA, the results were similar but slightly inferior. Both LAD and LAA showed modest reclassification ability, with non-significant NRIs. Conclusion LA size measurements independently predict clinical outcomes. However, it only improves discrimination over clinical parameters modestly without altering risk classification. Indexing LA size by height is at least as robust as by BSA. Further research is needed to assess subgroups of young adults who may benefit from LA size information in risk stratification. PMID:24534011

  16. Long-Term Effects of Unprovoked Venous Thromboembolism on Mortality and Major Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Ting; Chang, Chia-Li; Ho, Chung-Han; Hong, Chon-Seng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Zhih-Cherng

    2017-05-03

    Patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) are at an increased risk of mortality, but whether their cardiovascular risks also increase remains to be determined. We aimed to investigate the factors associated with overall mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with unprovoked VTE. We identified 2154 patients newly diagnosed with unprovoked VTE from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Database between 2000 and 2013, excluding those with reversible etiologies, underlying cancer, or autoimmune diseases. These patients with VTE were compared with an age-, sex-, and cardiovascular risk-matched cohort of 4308 controls. The risk of mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with VTE was 2.23 (CI, 1.93-2.57; P<0.0001) and 1.86 (CI, 1.65-2.09; P<0.0001) times, respectively, higher than that of the conditions in controls. These events mostly occurred during the first year after the diagnosis of unprovoked VTE. Among patients with VTE, advanced age, male sex, and comorbid diabetes mellitus indicated a higher incidence of mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events. Conversely, comorbid hyperlipidemia attenuated these risks. This nation-wide cohort study revealed that patients with unprovoked VTE, particularly older males with diabetes mellitus, had an elevated risk of both mortality and cardiovascular events. Risk of mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events were highest within the first year after diagnosis and persisted during the 10 years of follow-up. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  17. Acute and chronic impact of cardiovascular events on health state utilities.

    PubMed

    Matza, Louis S; Stewart, Katie D; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Delio, Philip R; Fenster, Brett E; Davies, Evan W; Jordan, Jessica B; Lothgren, Mickael; Feeny, David H

    2015-04-22

    Cost-utility models are frequently used to compare treatments intended to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular events. Most published utilities represent post-event health states without incorporating the disutility of the event or reporting the time between the event and utility assessment. Therefore, this study estimated health state utilities representing cardiovascular conditions while distinguishing between acute impact including the cardiovascular event and the chronic post-event impact. Health states were drafted and refined based on literature review, clinician interviews, and a pilot study. Three cardiovascular conditions were described: stroke, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and heart failure. One-year acute health states represented the event and its immediate impact, and post-event health states represented chronic impact. UK general population respondents valued the health states in time trade-off tasks with time horizons of one year for acute states and ten years for chronic states. A total of 200 participants completed interviews (55% female; mean age = 46.6 y). Among acute health states, stroke had the lowest utility (0.33), followed by heart failure (0.60) and ACS (0.67). Utility scores for chronic health states followed the same pattern: stroke (0.52), heart failure (0.57), and ACS (0.82). For stroke and ACS, acute utilities were significantly lower than chronic post-event utilities (difference = 0.20 and 0.15, respectively; both p < 0.0001). Results add to previously published utilities for cardiovascular events by distinguishing between chronic post-event health states and acute health states that include the event and its immediate impact. Findings suggest that acute versus chronic impact should be considered when selecting scores for use in cost-utility models. Thus, the current utilities provide a unique option that may be used to represent the acute and chronic impact of cardiovascular conditions in economic models

  18. Effect of nateglinide on the incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Holman, Rury R; Haffner, Steven M; McMurray, John J; Bethel, M Angelyn; Holzhauer, Björn; Hua, Tsushung A; Belenkov, Yuri; Boolell, Mitradev; Buse, John B; Buckley, Brendan M; Chacra, Antonio R; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Charbonnel, Bernard; Chow, Chun-Chung; Davies, Melanie J; Deedwania, Prakash; Diem, Peter; Einhorn, Daniel; Fonseca, Vivian; Fulcher, Gregory R; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Gaztambide, Sonia; Giles, Thomas; Horton, Edward; Ilkova, Hasan; Jenssen, Trond; Kahn, Steven E; Krum, Henry; Laakso, Markku; Leiter, Lawrence A; Levitt, Naomi S; Mareev, Viacheslav; Martinez, Felipe; Masson, Chantal; Mazzone, Theodore; Meaney, Eduardo; Nesto, Richard; Pan, Changyu; Prager, Rudolf; Raptis, Sotirios A; Rutten, Guy E H M; Sandstroem, Herbert; Schaper, Frank; Scheen, Andre; Schmitz, Ole; Sinay, Isaac; Soska, Vladimir; Stender, Steen; Tamás, Gyula; Tognoni, Gianni; Tuomilehto, Jaako; Villamil, Alberto S; Vozár, Juraj; Califf, Robert M

    2010-04-22

    The ability of short-acting insulin secretagogues to reduce the risk of diabetes or cardiovascular events in people with impaired glucose tolerance is unknown. In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, we assigned 9306 participants with impaired glucose tolerance and either cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular risk factors to receive nateglinide (up to 60 mg three times daily) or placebo, in a 2-by-2 factorial design with valsartan or placebo, in addition to participation in a lifestyle modification program. We followed the participants for a median of 5.0 years for incident diabetes (and a median of 6.5 years for vital status). We evaluated the effect of nateglinide on the occurrence of three coprimary outcomes: the development of diabetes; a core cardiovascular outcome that was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or hospitalization for heart failure; and an extended cardiovascular outcome that was a composite of the individual components of the core composite cardiovascular outcome, hospitalization for unstable angina, or arterial revascularization. After adjustment for multiple testing, nateglinide, as compared with placebo, did not significantly reduce the cumulative incidence of diabetes (36% and 34%, respectively; hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.15; P=0.05), the core composite cardiovascular outcome (7.9% and 8.3%, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.94, 95% CI, 0.82 to 1.09; P=0.43), or the extended composite cardiovascular outcome (14.2% and 15.2%, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.93, 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.03; P=0.16). Nateglinide did, however, increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Among persons with impaired glucose tolerance and established cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular risk factors, assignment to nateglinide for 5 years did not reduce the incidence of diabetes or the coprimary composite cardiovascular outcomes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00097786.) 2010

  19. Adding pharmacists to primary care teams reduces predicted long-term risk of cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients without established cardiovascular disease: results from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, N N; Majumdar, S R; Johnson, J A; Tsuyuki, R T; Lewanczuk, R Z; Spooner, R; Simpson, S H

    2012-11-01

    To determine the impact of adding pharmacists to primary care teams on predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular events in patients with Type 2 diabetes without established cardiovascular disease. This was a pre-specified secondary analysis of randomized trial data. The main study found that, compared with usual care, addition of a pharmacist resulted in improvements in blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia for primary care patients with Type 2 diabetes. In this sub-study, predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular events at baseline and 1 year were calculated for patients free of cardiovascular disease at enrolment. The primary outcome was change in UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk score; change in Framingham risk score was a secondary outcome. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 102 intervention patients and 93 control subjects: 59% women, median (interquartile range) age 57 (50-64) years, diabetes duration 3 (1-6.5) years, systolic blood pressure 128 (120-140) mmHg, total cholesterol 4.34 (3.75-5.04) mmol/l and HbA(1c) 54 mmol/mol (48-64 mmol/mol) [7.1% (6.5-8.0%)]. Median baseline UKPDS risk score was 10.2% (6.0-16.7%) for intervention patients and 9.5% (5.8-15.1%) for control subjects (P = 0.80). One-year post-randomization, the median absolute reduction in UKPDS risk score was 1.0% greater for intervention patients compared with control subjects (P = 0.032). Similar changes were seen with the Framingham risk score (median reduction 1.2% greater for intervention patients compared with control subjects, P = 0.048). The two risk scores were highly correlated (rho = 0.83; P < 0.001). Adding pharmacists to primary care teams for 1 year significantly reduced the predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular events for patients with Type 2 diabetes without established cardiovascular disease. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  20. Cystatin C as a Marker of Progressing Cardiovascular Events during Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Gevorgyan, M M; Voronina, N P; Goncharova, N V; Kozaruk, T V; Russkikh, G S; Bogdanova, L A; Korolenko, T A

    2017-02-01

    The role of cystatin C, an inhibitor of cysteine proteases, as an alternative and potent predictor of acute cardiovascular events in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients was examined and compared to that of other markers of cardiorenal abnormalities. The patients with CHD demonstrated elevated serum cystatin C, especially in cases with serious risk of cardiovascular complications. In comparison with other indicators of cardiorenal dysfunction, cystatin C can be viewed as an alternative predictor of cardiovascular complications, although its sensitivity is inferior to that of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and natriuretic peptide.

  1. An update on predictive biomarkers for major adverse cardiovascular events in patients undergoing vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Kouvelos, George N; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Moris, Demetrios; Matsagkas, Miltiadis I; Arnaoutoglou, Eleni

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular complications signify a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing vascular surgery adversely affecting both short- and long-term prognosis. During the last decade, unmet needs for a distinct cardiovascular risk assessment have led to an intensive research for establishment of biomarkers with sufficient predictive value. This literature review aims in examining the value of several biomarkers in predicting the incidence of major adverse cardiac events in vascular surgery patients. We reviewed the English language literature and analyzed the biomarkers as independent predictors or in correlation with other factors. We found several biomarkers showing a significant predictive value for a major adverse cardiovascular event in patients undergoing vascular surgery. These biomarkers can be used in clinical practice as outcome predictors, although sensitivity and specificity varies. Detection of subclinical cardiovascular damage may improve total risk estimation and facilitate clinical assessment of patients at risk for future cardiovascular events. The wide variety of sensitivity and specificity in predicting a MACE of these biomarkers exert the need for future trials in which these markers will be tested as adjunctive tools of cardiovascular risk estimation scoring systems.

  2. Prediction of cardiovascular events with aortic stiffness in patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Ioakeimidis, Nikolaos; Aznaouridis, Konstantinos; Terentes-Printzios, Dimitrios; Rokkas, Konstantinos; Aggelis, Athanasios; Panagiotakos, Dimosthenis; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2014-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction confers an independent risk for cardiovascular events and total mortality. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. We investigated whether PWV predicts major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in patients with erectile dysfunction beyond traditional risk factors. MACEs in relation to PWV were analyzed with proportional hazards models in 344 patients (mean age, 56 years) without established cardiovascular disease. During a mean follow-up of 4.7 years (range, 1-8.5 years), 24 of 344 participants (7.0%) experienced a MACE. Subjects in the highest PWV tertile (>8.8 m/s) had a 4-fold higher risk of MACEs compared with those in the lowest PWV tertile (<7.6 m/s; adjusted hazard ratio, 3.97; P=0.035). A PWV value of 7.81 m/s was associated with a negative predictive value (ability to rule out MACE) of 98.1%. Addition of PWV to standard risk factor model yielded correct patient reclassification to higher or lower risk category by 27.6% (P=0.0332) in the whole cohort. Our results show that higher aortic stiffness is associated with increased risk for a MACE in patients with erectile dysfunction without known cardiovascular disease. Aortic PWV improves risk prediction when added to standard risk factors and may represent a valuable biomarker of prediction of cardiovascular disease risk in these patients.

  3. The Risk of Cardiovascular Events After an Acute Coronary Event Remains High, Especially During the First Year, Despite Revascularization.

    PubMed

    Abu-Assi, Emad; López-López, Andrea; González-Salvado, Violeta; Redondo-Diéguez, Alfredo; Peña-Gil, Carlos; Bouzas-Cruz, Noelia; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Riziq-Yousef Abumuaileq, Rami; García-Acuña, José M; González-Juanatey, José R

    2016-01-01

    There is little information on the incidence and predictors of infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death after acute coronary syndrome. We investigated these aspects and developed tools for predicting these events according to the time of their occurrence. A retrospective study was conducted of 4858 patients who survived an acute coronary event. We analyzed the incidence and predictors of acute myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death during the first year (n=4858) vs successive years (n=4345 patients free of composite events during the first year). There were 329 events in the first year (cumulative incidence function: 7.3% person-years) and 616 in successive years (21.5% person-years; follow-up 4.9±2.4 years). The risk of events during the first year per tertile was 2.5% person-years in the low-risk tertile (< 3 points), 4.8% person-years in the intermediate-risk tertile (3-6 points), and 15.5% person-years in the high-risk tertile (> 6 points) (P<.001). The risk of events in the cohort that had a combined event in successive years increased from 10.7% person-years in the low-risk tertile (< 3 points) to 40.3% person-years in the high-risk tertile (> 6 points) (P<.001). The 2 scales showed the following predictive indexes: C statistic, 0.74 and 0.69, respectively; P (Hosmer-Lemeshow test)≥0.44 CONCLUSION: The risk of recurrence of cardiovascular events remains high after acute coronary syndrome. The level of risk can be easily quantified with acceptable predictive ability. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk of cardiovascular events in people prescribed glucocorticoids with iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is an increased risk of cardiovascular events in people who exhibit iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome during treatment with glucocorticoids. Design Cohort study. Setting 424 UK general practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database. Participants People prescribed systemic glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (n=547) and two comparison groups: those prescribed glucocorticoids and with no diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (n=3231) and those not prescribed systemic glucocorticoids (n=3282). Main outcome measures Incidence of cardiovascular events within a year after diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome or after a randomly selected date, and association between iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome and risk of cardiovascular events. Results 417 cardiovascular events occurred in 341 patients. Taking into account only the first event by patient (coronary heart disease n=177, heart failure n=101, ischaemic stroke n=63), the incidence rates of cardiovascular events per 100 person years at risk were 15.1 (95% confidence interval 11.8 to 18.4) in those prescribed glucocorticoids and with a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome, 6.4 (5.5 to 7.3) in those prescribed glucocorticoids without a diagnosis of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome, and 4.1 (3.4 to 4.8) in those not prescribed glucocorticoids. In multivariate analyses adjusted for sex, age, intensity of glucocorticoid use, underlying disease, smoking status, and use of aspirin, diabetes drugs, antihypertensive drugs, lipid lowering drugs, or oral anticoagulant drugs, the relation between iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome and cardiovascular events was strong (adjusted hazard ratios 2.27 (95% confidence interval 1.48 to 3.47) for coronary heart disease, 3.77 (2.41 to 5.90) for heart failure, and 2.23 (0.96 to 5.17) for ischaemic cerebrovascular events). The adjusted hazard ratio for any cardiovascular event was 4

  5. Sporting events affect spectators' cardiovascular mortality: it is not just a game.

    PubMed

    Leeka, Justin; Schwartz, Bryan G; Kloner, Robert A

    2010-11-01

    Physiologic and clinical triggers, including mental stress, anxiety, and anger, often precipitate acute myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. Sporting events can acutely increase cardiovascular event and death rates. A greater impact is observed in patients with known coronary artery disease and when stressful features are present, including a passionate fan, a high-stakes game, a high-intensity game, a loss, and a loss played at home. Sporting events affect cardiovascular health through neuroendocrine responses and possibly an increase in high-risk behaviors. Acute mental stress increases the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system while impairing vagal tone and endothelial function. Collectively, these mechanisms increase myocardial oxygen demand and decrease myocardial oxygen supply while also increasing the risk of arrhythmias and thrombosis. Measures can be taken to reduce cardiovascular risk, including the use of beta-blockers and aspirin, stress management, transcendental meditation, and avoidance of high-risk activities, such as smoking, eating fatty foods, overeating, and abusing alcohol and illicit drugs. Sporting events have the potential to adversely affect spectators' cardiovascular health, and protective measures should be considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Associations of Coffee, Tea, and Caffeine Intake with Coronary Artery Calcification and Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Miller, P Elliott; Zhao, Di; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Michos, Erin D; Averill, Michelle; Sandfort, Veit; Burke, Gregory L; Polak, Joseph F; Lima, Joao A C; Post, Wendy S; Blumenthal, Roger S; Guallar, Eliseo; Martin, Seth S

    2017-02-01

    Coffee and tea are 2 of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. The association of coffee and tea intake with coronary artery calcium and major adverse cardiovascular events remains uncertain. We examined 6508 ethnically diverse participants with available coffee and tea data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Intake for each was classified as never, occasional (<1 cup per day), and regular (≥1 cup per day). A coronary artery calcium progression ratio was derived from mixed effect regression models using loge(calcium score+1) as the outcome, with coefficients exponentiated to reflect coronary artery calcium progression ratio versus the reference. Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to evaluate the association between beverage intake and incident cardiovascular events. Over a median follow-up of 5.3 years for coronary artery calcium and 11.1 years for cardiovascular events, participants who regularly drank tea (≥1 cup per day) had a slower progression of coronary artery calcium compared with never drinkers after multivariable adjustment. This correlated with a statistically significant lower incidence of cardiovascular events for ≥1 cup per day tea drinkers (adjusted hazard ratio 0.71; 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.95). Compared with never coffee drinkers, regular coffee intake (≥1 cup per day) was not statistically associated with coronary artery calcium progression or cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio 0.97; 95% confidence interval 0.78-1.20). Caffeine intake was marginally inversely associated with coronary artery calcium progression. Moderate tea drinkers had slower progression of coronary artery calcium and reduced risk for cardiovascular events. Future research is needed to understand the potentially protective nature of moderate tea intake. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Vitamin D: epidemiology of cardiovascular risks and events.

    PubMed

    Leu, Monica; Giovannucci, Edward

    2011-08-01

    Vitamin D may influence blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone levels, myocardial function, inflammation, and vascular calcification. In the past several years, a number of high-quality prospective studies have examined 25(OH)vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in relation to risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies consistently show that levels of 25(OH)D below 20-25 ng/mL are associated with an increased risk of CVD incidence or mortality. Risk appears especially elevated at 25(OH)D levels below 10 or 15 ng/mL. It is unclear if levels higher that 25 ng/mL provide further benefits for CVD disease. Currently, results from randomized clinical trials are sparse and do not allow a definitive conclusion. Given other potential benefits of vitamin D, and low potential for toxicity, deficient levels below 25-30 ng/mL should be avoided and treated when identified. Further observational and randomized clinical trial data are important to better characterize the optimal range for 25(OH)D.

  8. Rationale and design of the EXenatide Study of Cardiovascular Event Lowering (EXSCEL) trial.

    PubMed

    Holman, Rury R; Bethel, Mary Angelyn; George, Jyothis; Sourij, Harald; Doran, Zoë; Keenan, Joanne; Khurmi, Nardev S; Mentz, Robert J; Oulhaj, Abderrahim; Buse, John B; Chan, Juliana C; Iqbal, Nayyar; Kundu, Sudeep; Maggioni, Aldo P; Marso, Steven P; Öhman, Peter; Pencina, Michael J; Poulter, Neil; Porter, Lisa E; Ramachandran, Ambady; Zinman, Bernard; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2016-04-01

    Exenatide once-weekly is an extended release formulation of exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, which can improve glycemic control, body weight, blood pressure, and lipid levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The EXenatide Study of Cardiovascular Event Lowering (EXSCEL) will compare the impact of adding exenatide once-weekly to usual care with usual care alone on major cardiovascular outcomes. EXSCEL is an academically led, phase III/IV, double-blind, pragmatic placebo-controlled, global trial conducted in 35 countries aiming to enrol 14,000 patients with T2DM and a broad range of cardiovascular risk over approximately 5 years. Participants will be randomized (1:1) to receive exenatide once-weekly 2 mg or matching placebo by subcutaneous injections. The trial will continue until 1,360 confirmed primary composite cardiovascular end points, defined as cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke, have occurred. The primary efficacy hypothesis is that exenatide once-weekly is superior to usual care with respect to the primary composite cardiovascular end point. EXSCEL is powered to detect a 15% relative risk reduction in the exenatide once-weekly group, with 85% power and a 2-sided 5% alpha. The primary safety hypothesis is that exenatide once-weekly is noninferior to usual care with respect to the primary cardiovascular composite end point. Noninferiority will be concluded if the upper limit of the CI is <1.30. EXSCEL will assess whether exenatide once-weekly can reduce cardiovascular events in patients with T2DM with a broad range of cardiovascular risk. It will also provide long-term safety information on exenatide once-weekly in people with T2DM. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01144338.

  9. Risk of cardiovascular events and mortality among a population-based cohort of immigrants and long-term residents with diabetes: Are all immigrants healthier and if so, for how long?

    PubMed

    Okrainec, Karen; Bell, Chaim M; Hollands, Simon; Booth, Gillian L

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular events are responsible for half of all deaths among individuals with diabetes. Immigrants to Western countries may experience an acceleration of cardiovascular risk in the first 10 years of arrival because of a sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, or barriers to accessing care, leading to higher levels of obesity and diabetes. To compare the risk of cardiovascular events and mortality between immigrants to Canada and long-term residents with diabetes and to assess whether immigrants experience acceleration in risk after arrival. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using linked health and immigration data from Ontario, Canada, of 87,707 immigrants who immigrated to Canada between 1985 and 2005 matched to 87,707 long-term residents with diabetes (age ≥20 years). Individuals were followed up from April 1, 2005, until February 29, 2012, for the primary composite outcome of a cardiovascular event (acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, congestive heart failure, transient ischemic attack, stroke) or all-cause mortality. There was a lower adjusted risk of cardiovascular events or mortality among immigrants (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, 95% CI 0.74-0.78) after accounting for differences in baseline age, gender, socioeconomic status, neighborhood, and health care utilization-which persisted beyond 10 years from immigration. However, this healthy immigrant advantage was not found among more recent refugees (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.81-1.08), immigrants with no previous education (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.84-1.40), and those who were unmarried (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.62-1.03). Immigrants with diabetes are at lower risk for cardiovascular events and mortality compared with long-term residents, an effect that persists more than 10 years after arrival. Not all immigrants demonstrate this health advantage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High-molecular-weight adiponectin does not predict cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, Katarzyna; Aso, Yoshimasa; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Inukai, Toshihiko; Brix, Johanna; Schernthaner, Guntram

    2009-04-01

    Low circulating high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between HMW adiponectin and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. The investigation took place in a specialized outpatient clinic for metabolic diseases and included 147 patients with T2DM following a cross-sectional and a prospective study protocol. Ninety patients had macrovascular disease at baseline defined as preexisting coronary artery disease, previous stroke, or peripheral artery disease. HMW adiponectin measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan) and routine clinical parameters were determined in all patients at baseline. The occurrence of new cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, and all-cause mortality) during the follow-up period was evaluated. No significant correlations between traditional cardiovascular risk markers and HMW adiponectin could be detected. HMW adiponectin did not differ between subjects with and without macrovascular disease at baseline (3.5 [interquartile range [IQR]: 2.2-5.7] mg/L vs 4.0 [IQR: 2.5-7.1] mg/L). During a follow-up of 19.3 (IQR: 16-25) months, 61 endpoints (41 myocardial infarctions, 10 strokes, and 10 deaths) were observed. A 1-standard-deviation increment of log-transformed HMW adiponectin was not significantly associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular events (Adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.58-1.54; P = 0.835). In conclusion, HMW adiponectin was not related to present macrovascular disease and is not associated with future cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with T2DM. It is unlikely that HMW adiponectin has significant vasoprotective effects in these patients.

  11. Influence of common genetic variation on blood lipid levels, cardiovascular risk, and coronary events in two British prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sonia; Casas, Juan P.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Cooper, Jackie; Drenos, Fotios; Zabaneh, Delilah; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Palmen, Jutta; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Ebrahim, Shah; Smith, George Davey; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Day, Ian N.M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to quantify the collective effect of common lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on blood lipid levels, cardiovascular risk, use of lipid-lowering medication, and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods and results Analysis was performed in two prospective cohorts: Whitehall II (WHII; N = 5059) and the British Women’s Heart and Health Study (BWHHS; N = 3414). For each participant, scores were calculated based on the cumulative effect of multiple genetic variants influencing total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). Compared with the bottom quintile, individuals in the top quintile of the LDL-C genetic score distribution had higher LDL-C {mean difference of 0.85 [95% confidence interval, (CI) = 0.76–0.94] and 0.63 [95% CI = 0.50–0.76] mmol/l in WHII and BWHHS, respectively}. They also tended to have greater odds of having ‘high-risk’ status (Framingham 10-year cardiovascular disease risk >20%) [WHII: odds ratio (OR) = 1.36 (0.93–1.98), BWHHS: OR = 1.49 (1.14–1.94)]; receiving lipid-lowering treatment [WHII: OR = 2.38 (1.57–3.59), BWHHS: OR = 2.24 (1.52–3.29)]; and CHD events [WHII: OR = 1.43 (1.02–2.00), BWHHS: OR = 1.31 (0.99–1.72)]. Similar associations were observed for the TC score in both studies. The TG score was associated with high-risk status and medication use in both studies. Neither HDL nor TG scores were associated with the risk of coronary events. The genetic scores did not improve discrimination over the Framingham risk score. Conclusion At the population level, common SNPs associated with LDL-C and TC contribute to blood lipid variation, cardiovascular risk, use of lipid-lowering medications and coronary events. However, their effects are too small to discriminate future lipid-lowering medication requirements or coronary events. PMID:22977227

  12. Cinacalcet, dialysate calcium concentration, and cardiovascular events in the EVOLVE trial.

    PubMed

    Pun, Patrick H; Abdalla, Safa; Block, Geoffrey A; Chertow, Glenn M; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Dehmel, Bastian; Drüeke, Tilman B; Floege, Jürgen; Goodman, William G; Herzog, Charles A; London, Gerard M; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Moe, Sharon M; Parfrey, Patrick S; Wheeler, David C; Middleton, John P

    2016-07-01

    Among patients receiving hemodialysis, abnormalities in calcium regulation have been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Cinacalcet lowers serum calcium concentrations through its effect on parathyroid hormone secretion and has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. In observational cohort studies, prescriptions of low dialysate calcium concentration and larger observed serum-dialysate calcium gradients have been associated with higher risks of in-dialysis facility or peri-dialytic sudden cardiac arrest. We performed this study to examine the risks associated with dialysate calcium and serum-dialysate gradients among participants in the Evaluation of Cinacalcet Hydrochloride Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events (EVOLVE) trial. In EVOLVE, 3883 hemodialysis patients were randomized 1:1 to cinacalcet or placebo. Dialysate calcium was administered at the discretion of treating physicians. We examined whether baseline dialysate calcium concentration or the serum-dialysate calcium gradient modified the effect of cinacalcet on the following adjudicated endpoints: (1) primary composite endpoint (death or first non-fatal myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, heart failure, or peripheral vascular event); (2) cardiovascular death; and (3) sudden death. In EVOLVE, use of higher dialysate calcium concentrations was more prevalent in Europe and Latin America compared with North America. There was a significant fall in serum calcium concentration in the cinacalcet group; dialysate calcium concentrations were changed infrequently in both groups. There was no association between baseline dialysate calcium concentration or serum-dialysate calcium gradient and the endpoints examined. Neither the baseline dialysate calcium nor the serum-dialysate calcium gradient significantly modified the effects of cinacalcet on the outcomes examined. The effects of cinacalcet on cardiovascular death and major cardiovascular events

  13. A simple score predicts future cardiovascular events in an inception cohort of dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, J P; Neyer, U; Sprenger-Mähr, H; Kollerits, B; Mündle, M; Längle, M; Kronenberg, F

    2006-08-01

    Vascular calcifications are very common in dialysis patients and have been shown to be associated independently with outcome. However, all of these studies used prevalent patients on dialysis since many years. We investigated vascular calcifications in an inception cohort of dialysis patients and followed them for cardiovascular disease outcomes during an average observation period of 66 months. One hundred and fifty-four Caucasian dialysis patients were enrolled in one Austrian dialysis center. Standardized plain radiographs from the pelvis and calves were carried out in all patients at the start of dialysis therapy. Vascular calcifications were assessed by a single radiologist. At the start of renal replacement therapy, 67.5% of the patients showed vascular calcifications. During follow-up, 29.9% of patients suffered a cardiovascular event. An additive 'vascular risk score', constructed from the presence of vascular calcifications and/or previous cardiovascular events before the start of dialysis treatment, showed the strongest independent association with cardiovascular events in the Cox regression model adjusted for various risk factors. The presence of each of these two conditions was associated with a hazard ratio of 2.03 (95% confidence interval 1.19-3.46) and a hazard ratio twice as high if both conditions were present. In summary, vascular calcifications on plain X-rays of pelvis and calves are largely present in incident dialysis patients. A history of a cardiovascular event in the predialysis period together with vascular calcifications at the beginning of dialysis therapy is a more powerful predictor of a cardiovascular event than age, smoking, diabetes, or other traditional risk factors.

  14. Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus on β-Blockers.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Sugiyama, Takehiro; Shapiro, Martin F; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Kajio, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    Although the use of β-blockers may help in achieving maximum effects of intensive glycemic control because of a decrease in the adverse effects after severe hypoglycemia, they pose a potential risk for the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia. This study aimed to evaluate whether the use of β-blockers is effective in patients with diabetes mellitus and whether its use is associated with the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia. Using the ACCORD trial (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) data, we performed Cox proportional hazards analyses with a propensity score adjustment. The primary outcome was the first occurrence of a cardiovascular event during the study period, which included nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, nonfatal stroke, and cardiovascular death. The mean follow-up periods (±SD) were 4.6±1.6 years in patients on β-blockers (n=2527) and 4.7±1.6 years in those not on β-blockers (n=2527). The cardiovascular event rate was significantly higher in patients on β-blockers than in those not on β-blockers (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-1.72; P<0.001). In patients with coronary heart disease or heart failure, the cumulative event rate for cardiovascular events was also significantly higher in those on β-blockers than in those not on β-blockers (hazard ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.60; P=0.03). The incidence of severe hypoglycemia was significantly higher in patients on β-blockers than in those not on β-blockers (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.64; P=0.02). In conclusion, the use of β-blockers in patients with diabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. Association of urinary injury biomarkers with mortality and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Sarnak, Mark J; Katz, Ronit; Newman, Anne; Harris, Tamara; Peralta, Carmen A; Devarajan, Prasad; Bennett, Michael R; Fried, Linda; Ix, Joachim H; Satterfield, Suzanne; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Parikh, Chirag R; Shlipak, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    Kidney damage is a common sequela of several chronic pathologic conditions. Whether biomarkers of kidney damage are prognostic for more severe outcomes is unknown. We measured three urinary biomarkers (kidney injury molecule-1 [KIM-1], IL-18, and albumin) in 3010 individuals enrolled in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study and used Cox proportional hazards models to investigate the associations of urinary KIM-1/creatinine (cr), IL-18/cr, and albumin/cr (ACR) with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Multivariable models adjusted for demographics, traditional CVD risk factors, and eGFR. Mean age of participants was 74 years, 49% of participants were men, and 41% of participants were black. During the median 12.4 years of follow-up, 1450 deaths and 797 CVD outcomes occurred. Compared with the lowest quartile, successive quartiles had the following adjusted hazard ratios (HRs; 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]) for mortality: KIM-1/cr: (1.21; 1.03 to 1.41), (1.13; 0.96 to 1.34), and (1.28; 1.08 to 1.52); IL-18/cr: (1.02; 0.88 to 1.19), (1.16; 0.99 to 1.35), and (1.06; 0.90 to 1.25); ACR: (1.08; 0.91 to 1.27), (1.24; 1.06 to 1.46), and (1.63; 1.39 to 1.91). In similar analyses, only ACR quartiles associated with CVD: (1.19; 0.95 to 1.48), (1.35; 1.08 to 1.67), and (1.54; 1.24 to 1.91). Urinary KIM-1 had a modest association with all-cause mortality but did not associate with CVD, and urinary IL-18 did not associate with either outcome. In contrast, albuminuria strongly associated with all-cause mortality and CVD. Future studies should evaluate reasons for these differences in the prognostic importance of individual kidney injury markers. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. The polypill: An effective approach to increasing adherence and reducing cardiovascular event risk.

    PubMed

    Bramlage, Peter; Sims, Helen; Minguet, Joan; Ferrero, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    Background Despite a wide range of medications being available for the prevention of cardiovascular events such as stroke, myocardial infarction and mortality in both a primary and secondary setting, patient adherence to complex therapy regimens involving different drug classes remains low worldwide. Combining antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering and potentially further drugs into one 'polypill' has the potential to increase adherence, thereby reducing risk factors to a greater extent and for a longer duration. The World Health Organization has recently highlighted increased adherence as a key development need for reducing cardiovascular disease. Methods Recent clinical trial data regarding adherence, reductions in cardiovascular risk and outcomes, safety and tolerability and the cost-effectiveness of the polypill approach are summarised and reviewed. In addition, ongoing trials and the questions they intend to answer are considered. References were retrieved from a PubMed literature search (date range 1990-2016) using the terms 'polypill', 'cardiovascular events' and 'adherence', and selected based on relevance. The website www.clinicaltrials.gov was also consulted for the identification of ongoing trials. Conclusions To date, the polypill approach has been conclusively shown to increase adherence relative to usual care in all patients, with those in a primary care setting or with poor baseline adherence potentially standing to benefit most. Concomitant risk factor reductions have also been suggested. However, whether this translates into a reduction in cardiovascular events and generates good cost-effectiveness in a given healthcare environment is currently under further investigation.

  17. Anti-Hypertensive Medications and Cardiovascular Events in Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Mary E.; Han, Ling; McAvay, Gail J.; Lee, David S. H.; Peduzzi, Peter; Dodson, John A.; Gross, Cary P.; Zhou, Bingqing; Lin, Haiqun

    2014-01-01

    Importance Randomized trials of anti-hypertensive treatment demonstrating reduced risk of cardiovascular events in older adults included participants with less comorbidity than clinical populations. Whether these results generalize to all older adults, most of whom have multiple chronic conditions, is uncertain. Objective To determine the association between anti-hypertensive medications and CV events and mortality in a nationally representative population of older adults. Design Competing risk analysis with propensity score adjustment and matching in the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey cohort over three-year follow-up through 2010. Participants and Setting 4,961 community-living participants with hypertension. Exposure Anti-hypertensive medication intensity, based on standardized daily dose for each anti-hypertensive medication class participants used. Main Outcomes and Measures Cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, cardiac revascularization, stroke, and hospitalizations for heart failure) and mortality. Results Of 4,961 participants, 14.1% received no anti-hypertensives; 54.6% received moderate, and 31.3% received high, anti-hypertensive intensity. During follow-up, 1,247 participants (25.1%) experienced cardiovascular events; 837 participants (16.9%) died. Of deaths, 430 (51.4%) occurred in participants who experienced cardiovascular events during follow-up. In the propensity score adjusted cohort, after adjusting for propensity score and other covariates, neither moderate (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.08 [95% CI, 0.89–1.32]) nor high (1.16 [0.94–1.43]) anti-hypertensive intensity was associated with experiencing cardiovascular events. The hazard ratio for death among all participants was 0.79 [0.65–0.97] in the moderate, and 0.72 [0.58–0.91] in the high intensity groups compared with those receiving no anti-hypertensives. Among participants who experienced cardiovascular events, the hazard ratio for death was 0.65 [0.48–0

  18. Anti-hypertensive medications and cardiovascular events in older adults with multiple chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Mary E; Han, Ling; McAvay, Gail J; Lee, David S H; Peduzzi, Peter; Dodson, John A; Gross, Cary P; Zhou, Bingqing; Lin, Haiqun

    2014-01-01

    Randomized trials of anti-hypertensive treatment demonstrating reduced risk of cardiovascular events in older adults included participants with less comorbidity than clinical populations. Whether these results generalize to all older adults, most of whom have multiple chronic conditions, is uncertain. To determine the association between anti-hypertensive medications and CV events and mortality in a nationally representative population of older adults. Competing risk analysis with propensity score adjustment and matching in the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey cohort over three-year follow-up through 2010. 4,961 community-living participants with hypertension. Anti-hypertensive medication intensity, based on standardized daily dose for each anti-hypertensive medication class participants used. Cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, cardiac revascularization, stroke, and hospitalizations for heart failure) and mortality. Of 4,961 participants, 14.1% received no anti-hypertensives; 54.6% received moderate, and 31.3% received high, anti-hypertensive intensity. During follow-up, 1,247 participants (25.1%) experienced cardiovascular events; 837 participants (16.9%) died. Of deaths, 430 (51.4%) occurred in participants who experienced cardiovascular events during follow-up. In the propensity score adjusted cohort, after adjusting for propensity score and other covariates, neither moderate (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.08 [95% CI, 0.89-1.32]) nor high (1.16 [0.94-1.43]) anti-hypertensive intensity was associated with experiencing cardiovascular events. The hazard ratio for death among all participants was 0.79 [0.65-0.97] in the moderate, and 0.72 [0.58-0.91] in the high intensity groups compared with those receiving no anti-hypertensives. Among participants who experienced cardiovascular events, the hazard ratio for death was 0.65 [0.48-0.87] and 0.58 [0.42-0.80] in the moderate and high intensity groups, respectively. Results were similar in the

  19. A score including ADAM17 substrates correlates to recurring cardiovascular event in subjects with atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rizza, Stefano; Copetti, Massimiliano; Cardellini, Marina; Menghini, Rossella; Pecchioli, Chiara; Luzi, Alessio; Di Cola, Giovanni; Porzio, Ottavia; Ippoliti, Arnaldo; Romeo, Franco; Pellegrini, Fabio; Federici, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Atherosclerosis disease is a leading cause for mortality and morbidity. The narrowing/rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque is accountable for acute cardiovascular events. However, despite of an intensive research, a reliable clinical method which may disclose a vulnerable patient is still unavailable. We tested the association of ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and Metallo Protease Domain 17) circulating substrates (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sIL6R and sTNFR1) with a second major cardiovascular events [MACEs] (cardiovascular death, peripheral artery surgeries, non-fatal myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke) in 298 patients belonging to the Vascular Diabetes (AVD) study. To evaluate ADAM17 activity we create ADAM17 score through a RECPAM model. Finally we tested the discrimination ability and the reclassification of clinical models. At follow-up (mean 47 months, range 1-118 months), 55 MACEs occurred (14 nonfatal MI, 14 nonfatal strokes, 17 peripheral artery procedures and 10 cardiovascular deaths) (incidence = 7.8% person-years). An increased risk for incident events was observed among the high ADAM17 score individuals both in univariable (HR 19.20, 95% CI 15.82-63.36, p < 0.001) and multivariable analysis (HR 3.42, 95% CI 1.55-7.54, p < 0.001). Finally we found that ADAM17 score significantly increases the prediction accuracy of the Framingham Recurring-Coronary-Heart-Disease-Score, with a significant improvement in discrimination (integrated discrimination improvement = 9%, p = 0.012) and correctly reclassifying 10% of events and 41% of non-events resulting in a cNRI = 0.51 (p = 0.005). We demonstrated a positive role of ADAM17 activity to predicting CV events. We think that an approach that targets strategies beyond classic cardiovascular risk factors control is necessary in individuals with an established vascular atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Empagliflozin and Cerebrovascular Events in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at High Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Zinman, Bernard; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Lachin, John M; Wanner, Christoph; Fitchett, David; Kohler, Sven; Mattheus, Michaela; Woerle, Hans J; Broedl, Uli C; Johansen, Odd Erik; Albers, Gregory W; Diener, Hans Christoph

    2017-05-01

    In the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial (Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients), empagliflozin added to standard of care in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk reduced the risk of 3-point major adverse cardiovascular events, driven by a reduction in cardiovascular mortality, with no significant difference between empagliflozin and placebo in risk of myocardial infarction or stroke. In a modified intent-to-treat analysis, the hazard ratio for stroke was 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.56; P=0.26). We further investigated cerebrovascular events. Patients were randomized to empagliflozin 10 mg, empagliflozin 25 mg, or placebo; 7020 patients were treated. Median observation time was 3.1 years. The numeric difference in stroke between empagliflozin and placebo in the modified intent-to-treat analysis was primarily because of 18 patients in the empagliflozin group with a first event >90 days after last intake of study drug (versus 3 on placebo). In a sensitivity analysis based on events during treatment or ≤90 days after last dose of drug, the hazard ratio for stroke with empagliflozin versus placebo was 1.08 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.45; P=0.60). There were no differences in risk of recurrent, fatal, or disabling strokes, or transient ischemic attack, with empagliflozin versus placebo. Patients with the largest increases in hematocrit or largest decreases in systolic blood pressure did not have an increased risk of stroke. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk, there was no significant difference in the risk of cerebrovascular events with empagliflozin versus placebo. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01131676. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Effect of valsartan on the incidence of diabetes and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    McMurray, John J; Holman, Rury R; Haffner, Steven M; Bethel, M Angelyn; Holzhauer, Björn; Hua, Tsushung A; Belenkov, Yuri; Boolell, Mitradev; Buse, John B; Buckley, Brendan M; Chacra, Antonio R; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Charbonnel, Bernard; Chow, Chun-Chung; Davies, Melanie J; Deedwania, Prakash; Diem, Peter; Einhorn, Daniel; Fonseca, Vivian; Fulcher, Gregory R; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Gaztambide, Sonia; Giles, Thomas; Horton, Edward; Ilkova, Hasan; Jenssen, Trond; Kahn, Steven E; Krum, Henry; Laakso, Markku; Leiter, Lawrence A; Levitt, Naomi S; Mareev, Viacheslav; Martinez, Felipe; Masson, Chantal; Mazzone, Theodore; Meaney, Eduardo; Nesto, Richard; Pan, Changyu; Prager, Rudolf; Raptis, Sotirios A; Rutten, Guy E H M; Sandstroem, Herbert; Schaper, Frank; Scheen, Andre; Schmitz, Ole; Sinay, Isaac; Soska, Vladimir; Stender, Steen; Tamás, Gyula; Tognoni, Gianni; Tuomilehto, Jaako; Villamil, Alberto S; Vozár, Juraj; Califf, Robert M

    2010-04-22

    It is not known whether drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular events in patients with impaired glucose tolerance. In this double-blind, randomized clinical trial with a 2-by-2 factorial design, we assigned 9306 patients with impaired glucose tolerance and established cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular risk factors to receive valsartan (up to 160 mg daily) or placebo (and nateglinide or placebo) in addition to lifestyle modification. We then followed the patients for a median of 5.0 years for the development of diabetes (6.5 years for vital status). We studied the effects of valsartan on the occurrence of three coprimary outcomes: the development of diabetes; an extended composite outcome of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, hospitalization for heart failure, arterial revascularization, or hospitalization for unstable angina; and a core composite outcome that excluded unstable angina and revascularization. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was 33.1% in the valsartan group, as compared with 36.8% in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the valsartan group, 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.92; P<0.001). Valsartan, as compared with placebo, did not significantly reduce the incidence of either the extended cardiovascular outcome (14.5% vs. 14.8%; hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.07; P=0.43) or the core cardiovascular outcome (8.1% vs. 8.1%; hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.14; P=0.85). Among patients with impaired glucose tolerance and cardiovascular disease or risk factors, the use of valsartan for 5 years, along with lifestyle modification, led to a relative reduction of 14% in the incidence of diabetes but did not reduce the rate of cardiovascular events. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00097786.) 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society

  2. Cardiovascular Event Prediction and Risk Reclassification by Coronary, Aortic, and Valvular Calcification in the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Udo; Massaro, Joseph M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Kathiresan, Sekar; Fox, Caroline S; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2016-02-22

    We determined whether vascular and valvular calcification predicted incident major coronary heart disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and all-cause mortality independent of Framingham risk factors in the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Coronary artery calcium (CAC), thoracic and abdominal aortic calcium, and mitral or aortic valve calcium were measured by cardiac computed tomography in participants free of CVD. Participants were followed for a median of 8 years. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine association of CAC, thoracic and abdominal aortic calcium, and mitral and aortic valve calcium with end points. Improvement in discrimination beyond risk factors was tested via the C-statistic and net reclassification index. In this cohort of 3486 participants (mean age 50±10 years; 51% female), CAC was most strongly associated with major coronary heart disease, followed by major CVD, and all-cause mortality independent of Framingham risk factors. Among noncoronary calcifications, mitral valve calcium was associated with major CVD and all-cause mortality independent of Framingham risk factors and CAC. CAC significantly improved discriminatory value beyond risk factors for coronary heart disease (area under the curve 0.78-0.82; net reclassification index 32%, 95% CI 11-53) but not for CVD. CAC accurately reclassified 85% of the 261 patients who were at intermediate (5-10%) 10-year risk for coronary heart disease based on Framingham risk factors to either low risk (n=172; no events observed) or high risk (n=53; observed event rate 8%). CAC improves discrimination and risk reclassification for major coronary heart disease and CVD beyond risk factors in asymptomatic community-dwelling persons and accurately reclassifies two-thirds of the intermediate-risk population. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Stimulants and Cardiovascular Events in Youth with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olfson, Mark; Huang, Cecilia; Gerhard, Tobias; Winterstein, Almut G.; Crystal, Stephen; Allison, Paul D.; Marcus, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined associations between stimulant use and risk of cardiovascular events and symptoms in youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and compared the risks associated with methylphenidate and amphetamines. Method: Claims were reviewed of privately insured young people 6 to 21 years old without known…

  4. Relationship between pulmonary hypertension, peripheral vascular calcification, and major cardiovascular events in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Chul; Chang, Hyo Jung; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung; Cho, Won-Yong; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is a recently recognized complication of chronic kidney disease. In this study, we investigated the association between PHT, peripheral vascular calcifications (VCs), and major cardiovascular events. In this retrospective study, we included 172 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing dialysis [hemodialysis (HD)=84, peritoneal dialysis=88]. PHT was defined as an estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure>37 mmHg using echocardiography. The Simple Vascular Calcification Score (SVCS) was measured using plain radiographic films of the hands and pelvis. The prevalence of PHT was significantly higher in HD patients (51.2% vs. 22.7%). Dialysis patients with PHT had a significantly higher prevalence of severe VCs (SVCS≥3). In multivariate analysis, the presence of severe VCs [odds ratio (OR), 2.68], mitral valve disease (OR, 7.79), HD (OR, 3.35), and larger left atrial diameter (OR, 11.39) were independent risk factors for PHT. In addition to the presence of anemia, severe VCs, or older age, the presence of PHT was an independent predictor of major cardiovascular events in ESRD patients. The prevalence of PHT was higher in HD patients and was associated with higher rates of major cardiovascular events. Severe VCs are thought to be an independent risk factor for predicting PHT in ESRD patients. Therefore, in dialysis patients with PHT, careful attention should be paid to the presence of VCs and the occurrence of major cardiovascular events.

  5. Associations of coffee, tea, and caffeine intake with coronary artery calcification and cardiovascular events

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coffee and tea are 2 of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. The association of coffee and tea intake with coronary artery calcium and major adverse cardiovascular events remains uncertain. We examined 6508 ethnically diverse participants with available coffee and tea data from the Mul...

  6. The Sports Guide: NHLBI Planning Guide for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Projects at Sporting Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The most recent national surveys of public awareness and knowledge of treatment and control of cardiovascular disease (CVD) show that health initiatives targeting specific populations are effective ways to support health promotion and disease prevention. Projects and activities outlined in this guide are directed to spectators at sporting events,…

  7. Multiple Biomarkers for the Prediction of First Major Cardiovascular Events and Death

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Few investigations have evaluated the incremental usefulness of multiple biomarkers from distinct biologic pathways for predicting the risk of cardiovascular events. We measured 10 biomarkers in 3209 participants attending a routine examination cycle of the Framingham Heart Study: the levels of C-r...

  8. Stimulants and Cardiovascular Events in Youth with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olfson, Mark; Huang, Cecilia; Gerhard, Tobias; Winterstein, Almut G.; Crystal, Stephen; Allison, Paul D.; Marcus, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined associations between stimulant use and risk of cardiovascular events and symptoms in youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and compared the risks associated with methylphenidate and amphetamines. Method: Claims were reviewed of privately insured young people 6 to 21 years old without known…

  9. The association between B vitamins supplementation and adverse cardiovascular events: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Xia, Ji-Tian; Wen, Shan-Fan; Guo, Jun; Li, Zi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This study is to explore the association of adverse cardiovascular events with B vitamins supplementation. Rev.Man 5.1 and Stata 11.0 software were applied for the meta-analysis. The number of cardiovascular events was collected and calculated using indicates of odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals in a fixed-effects or a random-effects model when appropriate. The study includes 15 studies which consists of 37,358 study objects (experimental group: 19,601; control group: 17,757). This study showed that the pooled ORs was 1.01 (95% CI = 0.96~1.06, P > 0.05) for objects with Experimental group (B vitamins supplementation) vs. Control group (placebo or regular treatment), which suggests no significant differences were found in the overall effect of the number of cardiovascular events between the two groups. Further stratification of subgroup analysis indicates no significant differences were found between the two groups as well. There were also no publication bias existing by the Egger’s linear regression test (P > 0.05). Our result indicates that the number of cardiovascular events in experimental group using B vitamins supplementation during the treatment is equal to placebo or regular treatment group thus further studies is necessary. PMID:25232372

  10. Residual Risk Factors to Predict Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Patients with and without Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Ju; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Yeh, Hung-I; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Wu, Chau-Chung

    2017-08-23

    A prospective observational study was conducted to investigate the residual risk factors to predict recurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) patients with a high prevalence under lipid-lowering therapy, particularly in the subpopulations of diabetic and nondiabetic individuals. A total of 5,483 adults (with a mean age of 66.4 and 73.3% male) with established coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral artery disease were identified from the T-SPARCLE multi-center registry. Of them, 38.6% had diabetes. The residual risk factors for MACE are divergent in these atherosclerotic patients with and without diabetes. In diabetic subpopulation, the risk of MACE was significantly increased with heart failure (HF), chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 4-5 (vs. stage 1-2), without beta blocker use, and higher non-HDL-C, after controlling for covariates including statin use and the intensity of therapy. Increased LDL-C and TG levels were also associated with increased risk, but to a much less extent. Among nondiabetic individuals, HF, CKD stage 4-5, and history of myocardial infarction were the significant independent predictors of MACE. It is suggested that ASCVD patients with concomitant diabetes need stricter control of lipid, particularly non-HDL-C levels, to reduce cardiovascular risk when on statin therapy.

  11. Maternal Obesity During Pregnancy Associates With Premature Mortality and Major Cardiovascular Events in Later Life.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan Ken; Raja, Edwin A; Lee, Amanda J; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Norman, Jane E; Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2015-11-01

    One in 5 pregnant women is obese but the impact on later health is unknown. We aimed to determine whether maternal obesity during pregnancy associates with increased premature mortality and later life major cardiovascular events. Maternity records of women who gave birth to their first child between 1950 and 1976 (n=18 873) from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal databank were linked to the National Register of Deaths, Scotland and Scottish Morbidity Record. The effect of maternal obesity at first antenatal visit on death and hospital admissions for cardiovascular events was tested using time-to-event analysis with Cox proportional hazard regression to compare outcomes of mothers in underweight, overweight, or obese body mass index (BMI) categories compared with normal BMI. Median follow-up was at 73 years. All-cause mortality was increased in women who were obese during pregnancy (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) versus normal BMI after adjustment for socioeconomic status, smoking, gestation at BMI measurement, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.77). In adjusted models, overweight and obese mothers had increased risk of hospital admission for a cardiovascular event (1.16; 1.06-1.27 and 1.26; 1.01-1.57) compared with normal BMI mothers. Adjustment for parity largely unchanged the hazard ratios (mortality: 1.43, 1.09-1.88; cardiovascular events overweight: 1.17, 1.07-1.29; and obese: 1.30, 1.04-1.62). In conclusion, maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of premature death and cardiovascular disease. Pregnancy and early postpartum could represent an opportunity for interventions to identify obesity and reduce its adverse consequences.

  12. Relationship between inter-arm blood pressure differences and future cardiovascular events in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Tokitsu, Takanori; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujisue, Koichiro; Sugamura, Koichi; Maeda, Hirofumi; Tsujita, Kenichi; Kaikita, Koichi; Hokimoto, Seiji; Sugiyama, Seigo; Ogawa, Hisao

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that inter-arm blood pressure differences (IAD) may be a risk factor for cardiovascular events; however, none have addressed them in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We measured blood pressure bilaterally with the ankle brachial index (ABI) in 657 patients with suspected CAD and assessed the presence of CAD by coronary angiography, and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis with the Gensini score. Mean IADs were significantly greater in risk factor matched patients with CAD than in those without it (P = 0.01), whereas Gensini scores were significantly greater in those with high IAD (≥10  mmHg) than in those with low-IAD (P = 0.01) according to cross-sectional analysis. Patients with high IAD had a significantly greater probability of cardiovascular events than those in whom it was low (log-rank test, P < 0.01, mean follow-up range; 827.3 ± 268.1 days). The presence of hypertension, ABI, usage of calcium channel blocker and high IAD were independent predictors of cardiovascular events according to longitudinal analysis (IAD; hazard ratio: 2.90, 95% confidence interval: 1.41-5.94, P < 0.01) in these patients. Patients with high IAD and peripheral artery disease had the highest Gensini scores according to cross-sectional analysis (P < 0.01) and highest probability of cardiovascular events according to longitudinal analysis (log-rank test, P < 0.001). IADs were increased in CAD patients and correlated with its severity. Greater than 10  mmHg of IAD was independently associated with future cardiovascular events. Assessing IAD by ABI measurement may facilitate risk stratification in CAD patients.

  13. Esomeprazole and aspirin fixed combination for the prevention of cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Katelyn W; Cheng, Judy WM; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2013-01-01

    Low dose aspirin therapy plays a fundamental role in both the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Although the evidence using low dose aspirin for secondary prevention is well-established, the decision to use aspirin for primary prevention is based on an evaluation of the patient’s risk of cardiovascular events compared to their risk of adverse events, such as bleeding. In addition to the risk of bleeding associated with long term aspirin administration, upper gastrointestinal side effects, such as dyspepsia often lead to discontinuation of therapy, which places patients at an increased risk for cardiovascular events. One option to mitigate adverse events and increase adherence is the addition of esomeprazole to the medication regimen. This review article provides an evaluation of the literature on the concomitant use of aspirin and esomeprazole available through February 2013. The efficacy, safety, tolerability, cost effectiveness, and patient quality of life of this regimen is discussed. A summary of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between aspirin and esomeprazole, as well as other commonly used cardiovascular medications are also reviewed. The addition of esomeprazole to low dose aspirin therapy in patients at high risk of developing gastric ulcers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, significantly reduced their risk of ulcer development. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies suggested that esomeprazole did not affect the pharmacokinetic parameters or the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Therefore, for those patients who are at a high risk of developing a gastrointestinal ulcer, the benefit of adding esomeprazole likely outweighs the risks of longer term proton pump inhibitor use, and the combination can be recommended. Administering the two agents separately may also be more economical. On the other hand, for those patients at lower risk of developing a gastrointestinal ulcer, both the additional risk

  14. Systemic Hemodynamic Atherothrombotic Syndrome and Resonance Hypothesis of Blood Pressure Variability: Triggering Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits different variabilities and surges with different time phases, from the shortest beat-by-beat to longest yearly changes. We hypothesized that the synergistic resonance of these BP variabilites generates an extraordinarily large dynamic surge in BP and triggers cardiovascular events (the resonance hypothesis). The power of pulses is transmitted to the peripheral sites without attenuation by the large arteries, in individuals with stiffened arteries. Thus, the effect of a BP surge on cardiovascular risk would be especially exaggerated in high-risk patients with vascular disease. Based on this concept, our group recently proposed a new theory of systemic hemodynamic atherothromboltic syndrome (SHATS), a vicious cycle of hemodynamic stress and vascular disease that advances organ damage and triggers cardiovascular disease. Clinical phenotypes of SHATS are large-artery atherothombotic diseases such as stroke, coronary artery disease, and aortic and pheripheral artery disease; small-artery diseases, and microcirculation-related disease such as vascular cognitive dysfunction, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The careful consideration of BP variability and vascular diseases such as SHATS, and the early detection and management of SHATS, will achieve more effective individualized cardiovascular protection. In the near future, information and communication technology-based 'anticipation medicine' predicted by the changes of individual BP values could be a promising approach to achieving zero cardiovascular events. PMID:27482253

  15. Does calcium intake affect cardiovascular risk factors and/or events?

    PubMed

    Torres, Márcia Regina Simas Gonçalves; Sanjuliani, Antonio Felipe

    2012-07-01

    Dietary intervention is an important approach in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Over the last decade, some studies have suggested that a calcium-rich diet could help to control body weight, with anti-obesity effects. The potential mechanism underlying the impact of calcium on body fat has been investigated, but it is not fully understood. Recent evidence has also suggested that a calcium-rich diet could have beneficial effects on other cardiovascular risk factors, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension and inflammatory states. In a series of studies, it was observed that a high intake of milk and/or dairy products (the main sources of dietary calcium) is associated with a reduction in the relative risk of cardiovascular disease. However, a few studies suggest that supplemental calcium (mainly calcium carbonate or citrate) may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This review will discuss the available evidence regarding the relationship between calcium intake (dietary and supplemental) and different cardiovascular risk factors and/or events.

  16. Systemic Hemodynamic Atherothrombotic Syndrome and Resonance Hypothesis of Blood Pressure Variability: Triggering Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-07-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits different variabilities and surges with different time phases, from the shortest beat-by-beat to longest yearly changes. We hypothesized that the synergistic resonance of these BP variabilites generates an extraordinarily large dynamic surge in BP and triggers cardiovascular events (the resonance hypothesis). The power of pulses is transmitted to the peripheral sites without attenuation by the large arteries, in individuals with stiffened arteries. Thus, the effect of a BP surge on cardiovascular risk would be especially exaggerated in high-risk patients with vascular disease. Based on this concept, our group recently proposed a new theory of systemic hemodynamic atherothromboltic syndrome (SHATS), a vicious cycle of hemodynamic stress and vascular disease that advances organ damage and triggers cardiovascular disease. Clinical phenotypes of SHATS are large-artery atherothombotic diseases such as stroke, coronary artery disease, and aortic and pheripheral artery disease; small-artery diseases, and microcirculation-related disease such as vascular cognitive dysfunction, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The careful consideration of BP variability and vascular diseases such as SHATS, and the early detection and management of SHATS, will achieve more effective individualized cardiovascular protection. In the near future, information and communication technology-based 'anticipation medicine' predicted by the changes of individual BP values could be a promising approach to achieving zero cardiovascular events.

  17. Peripheral Endothelial Function and Cardiovascular Events in High‐Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Sumida, Hitoshi; Sugamura, Koichi; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Ohba, Keisuke; Matsubara, Junichi; Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Fujisue, Koichiro; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Sakamoto, Kenji; Iwashita, Satomi; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Taguri, Masataka; Morita, Satoshi; Matsui, Kunihiko; Kimura, Kazuo; Umemura, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is a key component of vascular vulnerability. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI), as assessed by the peripheral arterial tonometry, can noninvasively evaluate endothelial function. This study was designed to determine the additional prognostic value of endothelial function to the Synergy Between PCI With Taxus and Cardiac Surgery Score (SYNTAXsc) and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) in predicting cardiovascular events in high‐risk patients. Methods and Results We undertook a two‐center prospective study in 528 stable patients at high‐risk for cardiovascular events from the years 2006–2011. The RHI was measured before coronary angiography and coronary complexity was assessed by SYNTAXsc. After optimal therapies including coronary revascularization, there was follow‐up with patients until August 2012. Cardiovascular events consist of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, ischemic stroke, coronary revascularization, heart failure‐induced hospitalization, aortic disease, and peripheral arterial disease. During 1468 person‐years of follow‐up, 105 patients developed cardiovascular events. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified B‐type natriuretic peptide (BNP), SYNTAXsc, and RHI as independent cardiovascular event predictors (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: natural logarithm of BNP per 0.1: 1.019 [1.002 to 1.037]; P=0.023, SYNTAXsc per tertile: 2.426 [1.825 to 3.225]; P<0.0001, RHI per 0.1: 0.761 [0.673 to 0.859]; P<0.0001). When RHI was added to the FRS, BNP, and SYNTAXsc, net reclassification index was significantly improved (27.5%; P<0.0001), with a significant increase in the C‐statistic (from 0.728 [0.679 to 0.778] to 0.766 [0.726 to 0.806]; P=0.031). Conclusions Advanced endothelial dysfunction significantly correlated with near future cardiovascular events in high‐risk patients. This physiological vascular measurement improved risk discrimination when added to the

  18. Cardiovascular Event Prediction by Machine Learning: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ambale-Venkatesh, Bharath; Yang, Xiaoying; Wu, Colin O; Liu, Kiang; Hundley, W G; McClelland, Robyn L; Gomes, Antoinette S; Folsom, Aaron R; Shea, Steven; Guallar, Eliseo; Bluemke, David A; Lima, João A

    2017-08-09

    Rationale: Machine learning may be useful to characterize cardiovascular risk, predict outcomes and identify biomarkers in population studies. Objective: To test the ability of random survival forests (RF), a machine learning technique, to predict six cardiovascular outcomes in comparison to standard cardiovascular risk scores. Methods and Results: We included participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Baseline measurements were used to predict cardiovascular outcomes over 12 years of follow-up. MESA was designed to study progression of subclinical disease to cardiovascular events where participants were initially free of CV disease. All 6814 participants from MESA, aged 45 to 84 years, from 4 ethnicities, and 6 centers across USA were included. 735 variables from imaging and non-invasive tests, questionnaires and biomarker panels were obtained. We used the RF technique to identify the top 20 predictors of each outcome. Imaging, electrocardiography and serum biomarkers featured heavily on the top-20 lists as opposed to traditional CV risk factors. Age was the most important predictor for all-cause mortality. Fasting glucose levels and carotid ultrasonography measures were important predictors of stroke. Coronary artery calcium score was the most important predictor of coronary heart disease and all atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease combined outcomes. Left ventricular structure and function, and cardiac troponin-T were among the top predictors for incident heart failure. Creatinine, age and ankle brachial index were among the top predictors of atrial fibrillation. Tissue necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2 soluble receptors, and N-terminal pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide levels were important across all outcomes. The RF technique performed better than established risk scores with increased prediction accuracy (decreased Brier score by 10-25%). Conclusions: Machine learning in conjunction with deep phenotyping improve prediction accuracy

  19. Systemic glucocorticoid therapy: a review of its metabolic and cardiovascular adverse events.

    PubMed

    Fardet, Laurence; Fève, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of use of long-term systemic glucocorticoid therapy in the general adult population is 1 %. This figure increases to up to 3 % in elderly women. Metabolic (i.e. diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, weight gain, lipodystrophy) and cardiovascular (i.e. hypertension, cardiovascular events) adverse events are commonly observed in these patients and can be life threatening. Paradoxically, there is very few data on some of these adverse events and many of the available studies remain inconclusive. Incidence of and risk factors for dyslipidemia, weight gain and lipodystrophy are poorly defined. The optimal treatment plan for patients diagnosed with glucocorticoid-induced diabetes or hypertension is undetermined. Finally, there is no medical consensus on the best strategies for the prevention and detection of these complications. However, certain of these questions can be answered by looking at available data on patients with endogenous hypercortisolism (i.e. Cushing's syndrome). This article reviews the pathophysiology, incidence, risk factors, screening, and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced weight gain, lipodystrophy, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular events. It also focuses on the possible prevention of these adverse events by targeting the glucocorticoid receptor using selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators.

  20. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and development of cardiovascular events in high-risk patients included in the Spanish ABPM registry: the CARDIORISC Event study.

    PubMed

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Banegas, José R; Segura, Julián; Gorostidi, Manuel; Ruilope, Luis M

    2012-04-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is superior to conventional BP measurement in predicting outcome, with baseline 24-h, daytime and night-time absolute values, as well as relative nocturnal decline, as powerful determinants of prognosis. We aimed to evaluate ABPM estimates on the appearance of cardiovascular events and mortality in a cohort of high-risk treated hypertensive patients. A total of 2115 treated hypertensive patients with high or very high added risk were evaluated by means of office and 24-h ABPM. Cardiovascular events and mortality were assessed after a median follow-up of 4 years. Two hundred and sixty-eight patients (12.7%) experienced a primary event (nonfatal coronary or cerebrovascular event, heart failure hospitalization or cardiovascular death) and 114 died (45 from cardiovascular causes). In a multiple Cox regression model, and after adjusting for baseline cardiovascular risk and office BP, night-time SBP predicted cardiovascular events [hazard ratio for each SD increase: 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-1.59]. Values above 130 mmHg increased the risk by 52% in comparison to values less than 115 mmHg. In addition to clinical determinants of cardiovascular risk and conventional BP, ABPM performed during treatment adds prognostic significance on the development of cardiovascular events in high-risk hypertensive patients. Among different ABPM-derived values, night-time SBP is the most potent predictor of outcome.

  1. Ambient temperature and risk of cardiovascular events at labor and delivery: A case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sandie; Nguyen, Kelly; Liu, Danping; Männistö, Tuija; Nobles, Carrie; Sherman, Seth; Mendola, Pauline

    2017-11-01

    Extreme ambient temperatures are linked to cardiac events in the general population, but this relationship is unclear among pregnant women. We estimated the associations and attributable risk between ambient temperature and the risk of cardiovascular event at labor/delivery, and investigated whether these associations vary by maternal race/ethnicity. We identified 680 women with singleton deliveries affected by cardiovascular events across 12 US sites (2002-2008). Average daily temperature during the week before, delivery day, and each of the seven days before delivery was estimated for each woman. In a case-crossover analysis, exposures during these hazard periods were compared to two control periods before and after delivery using conditional logistic regression adjusted for other environmental factors. During the cold season (October-April), 1°C lower during the week prior to delivery was associated with a 4% (95% CI: 1-7%) increased risk of having a labor/delivery affected by cardiovascular events including cardiac arrest and stroke. During the warm season (May-September), 1°C higher during the week prior was associated with a 7% (95% CI: 3-12%) increased risk. These risks translated to 13.4 and 23.9 excess events per 100,000 singleton deliveries during the cold and warm season, respectively. During the warm season, the risks were more pronounced on days closer to delivery and Black women appeared to be more susceptible to the same temperature increase. Small changes in temperature appear to affect the risk of having cardiovascular events at labor/delivery. Black women had a differentially higher warm season risk. These findings merit further investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Cardiovascular risk and events in 17 low-, middle-, and high-income countries.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Salim; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Teo, Koon; Islam, Shofiqul; Li, Wei; Liu, Lisheng; Bo, Jian; Lou, Qinglin; Lu, Fanghong; Liu, Tianlu; Yu, Liu; Zhang, Shiying; Mony, Prem; Swaminathan, Sumathi; Mohan, Viswanathan; Gupta, Rajeev; Kumar, Rajesh; Vijayakumar, Krishnapillai; Lear, Scott; Anand, Sonia; Wielgosz, Andreas; Diaz, Rafael; Avezum, Alvaro; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Lanas, Fernando; Yusoff, Khalid; Ismail, Noorhassim; Iqbal, Romaina; Rahman, Omar; Rosengren, Annika; Yusufali, Afzalhussein; Kelishadi, Roya; Kruger, Annamarie; Puoane, Thandi; Szuba, Andrzej; Chifamba, Jephat; Oguz, Aytekin; McQueen, Matthew; McKee, Martin; Dagenais, Gilles

    2014-08-28

    More than 80% of deaths from cardiovascular disease are estimated to occur in low-income and middle-income countries, but the reasons are unknown. We enrolled 156,424 persons from 628 urban and rural communities in 17 countries (3 high-income, 10 middle-income, and 4 low-income countries) and assessed their cardiovascular risk using the INTERHEART Risk Score, a validated score for quantifying risk-factor burden without the use of laboratory testing (with higher scores indicating greater risk-factor burden). Participants were followed for incident cardiovascular disease and death for a mean of 4.1 years. The mean INTERHEART Risk Score was highest in high-income countries, intermediate in middle-income countries, and lowest in low-income countries (P<0.001). However, the rates of major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, stroke, or heart failure) were lower in high-income countries than in middle- and low-income countries (3.99 events per 1000 person-years vs. 5.38 and 6.43 events per 1000 person-years, respectively; P<0.001). Case fatality rates were also lowest in high-income countries (6.5%, 15.9%, and 17.3% in high-, middle-, and low-income countries, respectively; P=0.01). Urban communities had a higher risk-factor burden than rural communities but lower rates of cardiovascular events (4.83 vs. 6.25 events per 1000 person-years, P<0.001) and case fatality rates (13.52% vs. 17.25%, P<0.001). The use of preventive medications and revascularization procedures was significantly more common in high-income countries than in middle- or low-income countries (P<0.001). Although the risk-factor burden was lowest in low-income countries, the rates of major cardiovascular disease and death were substantially higher in low-income countries than in high-income countries. The high burden of risk factors in high-income countries may have been mitigated by better control of risk factors and more frequent use of proven pharmacologic

  3. Cardiovascular thrombotic events in arthritis trials of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib.

    PubMed

    White, William B; Faich, Gerald; Borer, Jeffrey S; Makuch, Robert W

    2003-08-15

    To determine whether the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib affects cardiovascular thrombotic risk, we analyzed the incidence of cardiovascular events for celecoxib, placebo, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the entire controlled, arthritis clinical trial database for celecoxib. The primary analysis used the Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration end points, which include: (1) cardiovascular, hemorrhagic, and unknown deaths, (2) nonfatal myocardial infarction, and (3) nonfatal stroke. Other secondary thrombotic events were also examined. Separate analyses were performed for all patients and for those not taking aspirin. Data from all controlled, completed arthritis trials of > or =4 weeks duration, including 13 new drug application studies and 2 large post-marketing trials (CLASS and SUCCESS) were included for analyses. Patients were randomized to celecoxib at doses from 100 to 400 mg twice daily (18,942 patients; 5,668.2 patient-years of exposure), diclofenac 50 to 75 mg twice daily, ibuprofen 800 mg thrice daily, naproxen 500 mg twice daily (combined NSAID exposure of 11,143 patients; 3,612.2 patient-years), or placebo (1,794 subjects; 199.9 subject-years). Data from a long-term uncontrolled trial with 5,209 patients (6,950 patients-years) treated with celecoxib were included in a supplemental analysis. The entire 15-trial database was searched for possible serious thrombotic events as well as to identify all deaths. For these patients, detailed clinical data were obtained and reviewed by 2 of the investigators (WBW and JSB), who were independently and blinded to exposure, to classify the event as primary, secondary, or neither. All analyses were done using the intent-to-treat population, and time-to-event analyses were performed using per-patient data. To examine heterogeneity of results among studies, tests of interaction were performed using the Cox model. Incidences of the primary and secondary events were not significantly

  4. Prevention of cardiovascular events by treating hypertension in older adults: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Firdaus, Muhammad; Sivaram, Chittur A; Reynolds, Dwight W

    2008-03-01

    Hypertension in older adults is not well controlled in clinical practice. Isolated systolic hypertension is often more difficult to manage. A systematic PubMed search was conducted to look for evidence showing benefits of lowering blood pressure (BP) in older hypertensive adults. Lowering BP in these individuals significantly reduces the risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Based on trial evidence, a low-dose diuretic should be considered the most appropriate first-step treatment for preventing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therapy with >1 medication is often necessary to reduce BP in these patients. There is unequivocal evidence that cardiovascular events can be prevented in older adults, even those older than 80 years, by treating hypertension.

  5. Neopterin is associated with cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Pihlstrøm, Hege; Mjøen, Geir; März, Winfried; Olav Dahle, Dag; Abedini, Sadollah; Holme, Ingar; Fellström, Bengt; Jardine, Alan; Pilz, Stefan; Holdaaas, Hallvard

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory markers show significant associations with cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality after kidney transplantation. Neopterin, reflecting interferon-γ-release, may better reflect the proinflammatory state of recipients than less specific markers. Kidney transplant recipients in the Assessment of LEscol in Renal Transplant (ALERT) trial were examined and investigated for an association between serum neopterin and subsequent clinical events: graft loss, major cardiovascular events (MACE) and all-cause mortality. After adjustment for established and emerging risk factors neopterin expressed as neopterin-to-creatinine ratio was significantly associated with MACE (p = 0.009) and all-cause mortality (p = 0.002). Endpoints were more frequent with increasing quartiles of neopterin-to-creatinine ratio. The incidence rates of MACE and all-cause mortality were significantly increased in the upper quartiles compared with the first. This long-term prospective analysis in stable kidney allograft recipients suggests that neopterin is associated with long-term risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, but not renal outcomes. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Transplantation Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Neopterin is associated with cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Pihlstrøm, Hege; Mjøen, Geir; März, Winfried; Olav Dahle, Dag; Abedini, Sadollah; Holme, Ingar; Fellström, Bengt; Jardine, Alan; Pilz, Stefan; Holdaas, Hallvard

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory markers show significant associations with cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality after kidney transplantation. Neopterin, reflecting interferon-γ-release, may better reflect the proinflammatory state of recipients than less specific markers. Methods Kidney transplant recipients in the Assessment of LEscol in Renal Transplant (ALERT) trial were examined and investigated for an association between serum neopterin and subsequent clinical events: graft loss, major cardiovascular events (MACE) and all-cause mortality. Results After adjustment for established and emerging risk factors neopterin expressed as neopterin-to-creatinine ratio was significantly associated with MACE (p = 0.009) and all-cause mortality (p = 0.002). Endpoints were more frequent with increasing quartiles of neopterin-to-creatinine ratio. The incidence rates of MACE and all-cause mortality were significantly increased in the upper quartiles compared with the first. Conclusions This long-term prospective analysis in stable kidney allograft recipients suggests that neopterin is associated with long-term risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, but not renal outcomes. PMID:24372612

  7. Coronary artery calcifications predict long term cardiovascular events in non diabetic Caucasian hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Noce, Annalisa; Canale, Maria Paola; Capria, Ambrogio; Rovella, Valentina; Tesauro, Manfredi; Splendiani, Giorgio; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Manzuoli, Micol; Simonetti, Giovanni; Di Daniele, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcifications are frequent in chronic renal disease and are associated to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The long term predictive value of coronary artery calcifications detected by multi-layer spiral computed tomography for major cardiovascular events was evaluated in non-diabetic Caucasian patients on maintenance hemodialysis free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Two-hundred and five patients on maintenance hemodialysis were enrolled into this observational, prospective cohort study. Patients underwent a single cardiac multi-layer spiral computed tomography. Calcium load was quantified and patients grouped according to the Agatston score: group 1 (Agatston score: 0), group 2 (Agatston score 1-400), group 3 (Agatston score 401-1000) and group 4 (Agatston score >1000). Follow-up was longer than seven years. Primary endpoint was death from a major cardiovascular event. Actuarial survival was calculated separately in the four groups with Kaplan-Meier method. Patients who died from causes other than cardiovascular disease and transplanted patients were censored. The “log rank” test was employed to compare survival curves. One-hundred two patients (49.7%) died for a major cardiovascular event during the follow-up period. Seven-year actuarial survival was more than 90% for groups 1 and 2, but failed to about 50% for group 3 and to <10% for group 4. Hence, Agatston score >400 predicts a significantly higher cardiovascular mortality compared with Agatston score <400 (p<0.0001); furthermore, serum Parathyroid hormone levels > 300 pg/l were associated to a lower survival (p < 0.05). Extended coronary artery calcifications detected by cardiac multi-layer spiral computed tomography, strongly predicted long term cardiovascular mortality in non-diabetic Caucasian patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Moreover, it was not related to conventional indices of atherosclerosis, but to other non-traditional risk factors, as serum Parathyroid

  8. Dose Escalation Improves Cancer-Related Events at 10 Years for Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Hypofractionated High-Dose-Rate Boost and External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gonzalez, Jose; Ye Hong; Ghilezan, Mihai; Shetty, Sugandh; Kernen, Kenneth; Gustafson, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank; Kestin, Larry

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 10-year outcomes of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a prospective dose escalation hypofractionated trial of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (P-EBRT) with a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Methods and Materials: From 1992 to 2007, 472 patients were treated with a HDR boost at William Beaumont Hospital. They had at least one of the following: a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of >10 ng/ml, a Gleason score of {>=}7, or clinical stage {>=}T2b. Patients received 46-Gy P-EBRT and an HDR boost. The HDR dose fractionation was divided into two dose levels. The prostate biologically equivalent dose (BED) low-dose-level group received <268 Gy, and the high-dose group received >268 Gy . Phoenix biochemical failure (BF) definition was used. Results: Median follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.4-17 years). The 10-year biochemical failure rate of 43.1% vs. 18.9%, (p < 0.001), the clinical failure rate of 23.4% vs. 7.7%, (p < 0.001), and the distant metastasis of 12.4% vs. 5.7%, (p = 0.028) were all significantly better for the high-dose level group. On Cox multivariate analysis, higher BED levels (p = 0.017; hazard ratio [HR]= 0.586), pretreatment PSA assays (p < 0.001, HR = 1.022), and Gleason scores (p = 0.004) were significant variables for reduced biochemical failure. Higher dose levels (p, 0.002; HR, 0.397) and Gleason scores (p < 0.001) were significant for clinical failure. Grade 3 genitourinary complications were 2% and 3%, respectively, and grade 3 gastrointestinal complication was <0.5%. Conclusions: This prospective trial using P-EBRT with HDR boost and hypofractionated dose escalation demonstrates a strong dose-response relationship for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients. The improvement at 10 years for locoregional control with higher radiation doses (BED, > 268Gy) has significantly decreased biochemical and clinical failures as well as distant metastasis.

  9. Metabolite Profiling and Cardiovascular Event Risk: A Prospective Study of Three Population-Based Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S; Soininen, Pasi; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Prieto-Merino, David; Tillin, Therese; Ghorbani, Anahita; Artati, Anna; Wang, Qin; Tiainen, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Kettunen, Johannes; Kaikkonen, Jari; Mikkilä, Vera; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lawlor, Debbie A; Gaunt, Tom R; Hughes, Alun D; Sattar, Naveed; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Wang, Thomas J; Perola, Markus; Ripatti, Samuli; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Raitakari, Olli T; Gerszten, Robert E; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Salomaa, Veikko

    2015-01-01

    Background High-throughput profiling of circulating metabolites may improve cardiovascular risk prediction over established risk factors. Methods and Results We applied quantitative NMR metabolomics to identify biomarkers for incident cardiovascular disease during long-term follow-up. Biomarker discovery was conducted in the FINRISK study (n=7256; 800 events). Replication and incremental risk prediction was assessed in the SABRE study (n=2622; 573 events) and British Women’s Health and Heart Study (n=3563; 368 events). In targeted analyses of 68 lipids and metabolites, 33 measures were associated with incident cardiovascular events at P<0.0007 after adjusting for age, sex, blood pressure, smoking, diabetes and medication. When further adjusting for routine lipids, four metabolites were associated with future cardiovascular events in meta-analyses: higher serum phenylalanine (hazard ratio per standard deviation: 1.18 [95%CI 1.12–1.24]; P=4×10−10) and monounsaturated fatty acid levels (1.17 [1.11–1.24]; P=1×10−8) were associated with increased cardiovascular risk, while higher omega-6 fatty acids (0.89 [0.84–0.94]; P=6×10−5) and docosahexaenoic acid levels (0.90 [0.86–0.95]; P=5×10−5) were associated with lower risk. A risk score incorporating these four biomarkers was derived in FINRISK. Risk prediction estimates were more accurate in the two validation cohorts (relative integrated discrimination improvement 8.8% and 4.3%), albeit discrimination was not enhanced. Risk classification was particularly improved for persons in the 5–10% risk range (net reclassification 27.1% and 15.5%). Biomarker associations were further corroborated with mass spectrometry in FINRISK (n=671) and the Framingham Offspring Study (n=2289). Conclusions Metabolite profiling in large prospective cohorts identified phenylalanine, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids as biomarkers for cardiovascular risk. This study substantiates the value of high

  10. Metabolite profiling and cardiovascular event risk: a prospective study of 3 population-based cohorts.

    PubMed

    Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S; Soininen, Pasi; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Prieto-Merino, David; Tillin, Therese; Ghorbani, Anahita; Artati, Anna; Wang, Qin; Tiainen, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Kettunen, Johannes; Kaikkonen, Jari; Mikkilä, Vera; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lawlor, Debbie A; Gaunt, Tom R; Hughes, Alun D; Sattar, Naveed; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Wang, Thomas J; Perola, Markus; Ripatti, Samuli; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Raitakari, Olli T; Gerszten, Robert E; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Salomaa, Veikko

    2015-03-03

    High-throughput profiling of circulating metabolites may improve cardiovascular risk prediction over established risk factors. We applied quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics to identify the biomarkers for incident cardiovascular disease during long-term follow-up. Biomarker discovery was conducted in the National Finnish FINRISK study (n=7256; 800 events). Replication and incremental risk prediction was assessed in the Southall and Brent Revisited (SABRE) study (n=2622; 573 events) and British Women's Health and Heart Study (n=3563; 368 events). In targeted analyses of 68 lipids and metabolites, 33 measures were associated with incident cardiovascular events at P<0.0007 after adjusting for age, sex, blood pressure, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and medication. When further adjusting for routine lipids, 4 metabolites were associated with future cardiovascular events in meta-analyses: higher serum phenylalanine (hazard ratio per standard deviation, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.24; P=4×10(-10)) and monounsaturated fatty acid levels (1.17; 1.11-1.24; P=1×10(-8)) were associated with increased cardiovascular risk, while higher omega-6 fatty acids (0.89; 0.84-0.94; P=6×10(-5)) and docosahexaenoic acid levels (0.90; 0.86-0.95; P=5×10(-5)) were associated with lower risk. A risk score incorporating these 4 biomarkers was derived in FINRISK. Risk prediction estimates were more accurate in the 2 validation cohorts (relative integrated discrimination improvement, 8.8% and 4.3%), albeit discrimination was not enhanced. Risk classification was particularly improved for persons in the 5% to 10% risk range (net reclassification, 27.1% and 15.5%). Biomarker associations were further corroborated with mass spectrometry in FINRISK (n=671) and the Framingham Offspring Study (n=2289). Metabolite profiling in large prospective cohorts identified phenylalanine, monounsaturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids as biomarkers for cardiovascular risk

  11. Optimal Blood Pressure Goals in Patients With Hypertension at High Risk for Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2016-01-01

    Existing epidemiologic and clinical trial data suggest that the blood pressure in patients with hypertension at high risk for cardiovascular events because of coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, stroke, or heart failure should be reduced to <140/90 mm Hg in patients younger than 80 years and the systolic blood pressure be reduced to 140-145 mm Hg if tolerated in patients aged 80 years and older. Studies from patients with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, stroke, and heart failure will be discussed that support a blood pressure goal of <140/90 mm Hg in patients younger than 80 years at high risk for cardiovascular events.

  12. Affective and Cardiovascular Responding to Unpleasant Events from Adolescence to Old Age: Complexity of Events Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrzus, Cornelia; Muller, Viktor; Wagner, Gert G.; Lindenberger, Ulman; Riediger, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Two studies investigated the "overpowering hypothesis" as a possible explanation for the currently inconclusive empirical picture on age differences in affective responding to unpleasant events. The overpowering hypothesis predicts that age differences in affective responding are particularly evident in highly resource-demanding situations that…

  13. Association Between Diabetic Macular Edema and Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leveziel, Nicolas; Ragot, Stéphanie; Gand, Elise; Lichtwitz, Olivier; Halimi, Jean Michel; Gozlan, Julien; Gourdy, Pierre; Robert, Marie-Françoise; Dardari, Dured; Boissonnot, Michèle; Roussel, Ronan; Piguel, Xavier; Dupuy, Olivier; Torremocha, Florence; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Maréchaud, Richard; Hadjadj, Samy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual loss associated with diabetes but any association between DME and cardiovascular events is unclear. This study aims to describe the possible association between DME and cardiovascular events in a multicenter cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes. Two thousand eight hundred seven patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes and nephrology clinical institutional centers participating in the DIAB 2 NEPHROGENE study focusing on diabetic complications. DME (presence/absence) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) classification were based on ophthalmological report and/or on 30° color retinal photographs. DR was defined as absent, nonproliferative (background, moderate, or severe) or proliferative. Cardiovascular events were stroke, myocardial infarction, and lower limb amputation. Details regarding associations between DME and cardiovascular events were evaluated. The study included 2807 patients with type 2 diabetes, of whom 355 (12.6%) had DME. DME was significantly and independently associated with patient age, known duration of diabetes, HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and DR stage. Only the prior history of lower limb amputation was strongly associated with DME in univariate and multivariate analyses, whereas no association was found with regard to myocardial infarction or stroke. Moreover, both major (n = 32) and minor lower limb (n = 96) amputations were similarly associated with DME, with respective odds ratio of 3.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–7.74; P = 0.0012) and of 4.29 (95% CI, 2.79–6.61; P < 0.001). DME is strongly and independently associated with lower limb amputation in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:26287408

  14. Meta-Analysis of Relation of Vital Exhaustion to Cardiovascular Disease Events.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Randy; Bavishi, Chirag; Haider, Syed; Thankachen, Jincy; Rozanski, Alan

    2017-04-15

    To assess the net impact of vital exhaustion on cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, we conducted a systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, and PsychINFO (through April 2016) to identify all studies which investigated the relation between vital exhaustion (VE) and health outcomes. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) a cohort study (prospective cohort or historical cohort) consisting of adults (>18 years); (2) at least 1 self-reported or interview-based assessment of VE or exhaustion; (3) evaluated the association between vital exhaustion or exhaustion and relevant outcomes; and (4) reported adjusted risk estimates of vital exhaustion/exhaustion for outcomes. Maximally adjusted effect estimates with 95% CIs along with variables used for adjustment in multivariate analysis were also abstracted. Primary study outcome was cardiovascular events. Secondary outcomes were stroke and all-cause mortality. Seventeen studies (19 comparisons) with a total of 107,175 participants were included in the analysis. Mean follow-up was 6 years. VE was significantly associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events (relative risk 1.53, 95% CI 1.28 to 1.83, p <0.001) and all-cause mortality (relative risk 1.48, 95% CI 1.28 to 1.72, p <0.001). VE also showed a trend for increased incident stroke (relative risk 1.46, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.21, p = 0.07). Subgroup analyses yielded similar results. VE is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular events, comparable in potency to common psychosocial risk factors. Our results imply a need to more closely study VE, and potentially related states of exhaustion, such as occupational burnout.

  15. Event Rates in Randomized Clinical Trials Evaluating Cardiovascular Interventions and Devices.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Karim D; Lennon, Ryan J; Holmes, David R

    2015-08-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard for evidence-based medicine. However, an accurate estimation of the event rate is crucial for their ability to test clinical hypotheses. Overestimation of event rates reduces the required sample size but can compromise the statistical power of the RCT. Little is known about the prevalence, extent, and impact of overestimation of event rates. The latest RCTs on 10 preselected topics in the field of cardiovascular interventions and devices were selected, and actual primary event rates in the control group were compared with their respective event rate estimations. We also assessed what proportion of the nonsignificant RCTs was truly able to exclude a relevant treatment effect. A total of 27 RCTs randomizing 19,436 patients were included. The primary event rate in the control group was overestimated in 20 of the 27 RCTs (74.1%) resulting in a substantial relative difference between observed and estimated event rates (mean -22.9%, 95% confidence interval -33.5% to -12.2%; median -16.3%, 95% confidence interval -30.3% to -6.5%). Event rates were particularly overestimated in RCTs on biodegradable polymer drug-eluting coronary stents and renal artery stenting. Of the 14 single end point superiority trials with nonsignificant results, only 3 (21.4%) actually resulted in truly negative conclusions. In conclusion, event rates in RCTs evaluating cardiovascular interventions and devices are frequently overestimated. This under-reported phenomenon has fundamental impact on the design of RCTs and can have an adverse impact on the statistical power of these trials to answer important questions about therapeutic strategies.

  16. Depression, dietary habits, and cardiovascular events among women with suspected myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Thomas; Kenkre, Tanya S; Thompson, Diane V; Bittner, Vera A; Whittaker, Kerry; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Cornell, Carol E; Krantz, David S; Pepine, Carl J; Johnson, B Delia; Handberg, Eileen M; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2014-09-01

    Dietary habits and depression are associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Patients with depression often report poor eating habits, and dietary factors may help explain commonly observed associations between depression and cardiovascular disease. From 1996 to 2000, 936 women were enrolled in the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation at 4 US academic medical centers at the time of clinically indicated coronary angiography and then assessed (median follow-up, 5.9 years) for adverse outcomes (cardiovascular disease death, heart failure, myocardial infarction, stroke). Participants completed a protocol including coronary angiography (coronary artery disease severity) and depression assessments (Beck Depression Inventory scores, antidepressant use, and depression treatment history). A subset of 201 women (mean age, 58.5 years; standard deviation, 11.4) further completed the Food Frequency Questionnaire for Adults (1998 Block). We extracted daily fiber intake and daily servings of fruit and vegetables as measures of dietary habits. In separate Cox regression models adjusted for age, smoking, and coronary artery disease severity, Beck Depression Inventory scores (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.10), antidepressant use (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.01-5.9), and a history of treatment for depression (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1-5.3) were adversely associated with time to cardiovascular disease outcomes. Fiber intake (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.97) and fruit and vegetable consumption (HR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.19-0.70) were associated with a decreased time to cardiovascular disease event risk. In models including dietary habits and depression, fiber intake and fruit and vegetable consumption remained associated with time to cardiovascular disease outcomes, whereas depression relationships were reduced by 10% to 20% and nonsignificant. Among women with suspected myocardial ischemia, we observed consistent relationships among depression, dietary habits, and time to

  17. Older Adults' Residential Proximity to Their Children: Changes After Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Choi, HwaJung; Schoeni, Robert F; Langa, Kenneth M; Heisler, Michele M

    2015-11-01

    To assess changes in family residential proximity after a first cardiovascular (CV) event among older adults and to identify families most likely to experience such moves. Using a nationally representative longitudinal study of older adults in the United States, we identified respondents with no prior diagnosis of CV disease (CVD). We examined subsequent development of stroke, heart attack, and/or heart failure among these older adults and examined changes in their residential proximity to their closest child before and after the CV event. We then compared the likelihood of changes in proximity between families with and without CV events. Finally, we determined which types of families are most likely to relocate following a CV event. Having a first CV event increases the 2-year predicted probability of children and adult parents moving in with and closer to each other (relative risk ratio = 1.61 and 1.55, respectively). Families are especially likely to move after a first CV event if the older person experiencing the event is spouseless or has a daughter. CVD is a leading cause of disability, which in turn creates a significant need for personal care among older adults. Assessment of changes in family residential proximity responding to CV events is important to fully understand the consequences of older adults' CV events including the cost of caregiving. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Design of DEVOTE (Trial Comparing Cardiovascular Safety of Insulin Degludec vs Insulin Glargine in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes at High Risk of Cardiovascular Events) - DEVOTE 1.

    PubMed

    Marso, Steven P; McGuire, Darren K; Zinman, Bernard; Poulter, Neil R; Emerson, Scott S; Pieber, Thomas R; Pratley, Richard E; Haahr, Poul-Martin; Lange, Martin; Frandsen, Kirstine Brown; Rabøl, Rasmus; Buse, John B

    2016-09-01

    DEVOTE was designed to evaluate the cardiovascular safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) vs insulin glargine U100 (IGlar) in patients with T2D at high risk of cardiovascular events. DEVOTE is a phase 3b, multicenter, international, randomized, double-blind, active comparator-controlled trial, designed as an event-driven trial that would continue until 633 positively adjudicated primary events were accrued. The primary end point was the time from randomization to a composite outcome consisting of the first occurrence of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Patients with T2D at high risk of cardiovascular complications were randomized 1:1 to receive either IDeg or IGlar, each added to background therapies. This trial was designed to demonstrate statistical noninferiority of IDeg vs IGlar for the primary end point. DEVOTE enrolled 7,637 patients between October 2013 and November 2014 at 436 sites in 20 countries. Of these, 6,506 patients had prior cardiovascular disease or chronic kidney disease, and the remainder had multiple cardiovascular risk factors. DEVOTE was designed to provide conclusive evidence regarding the cardiovascular safety of IDeg relative to IGlar in a high-risk population of patients with T2D. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coronary Artery Calcification, Epicardial Fat Burden, and Cardiovascular Events in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Esther I.; Possner, Mathias; Stehli, Julia; Sievi, Noriane A.; Clarenbach, Christian F.; Dey, Damini; Slomka, Piotr J.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) suffer from significantly more cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality than would be anticipated from conventional risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine whether COPD patients have a higher coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and epicardial fat burden, compared to control subjects, and their association with cardiovascular events. Methods From a registry of 1906 patients 81 patients with clinically diagnosed COPD were one-to-one matched to 81 non-COPD control subjects with a smoking history, according to their age, sex, and the number of classic cardiovascular risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, family history of premature coronary artery disease). CACS, epicardial fat, and subsequent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) during follow-up were compared between groups. Results Patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease-classification I: 5%, II: 23%, III: 16% and IV: 56%) showed no difference in CACS (median difference 68 Agatston Units [95% confidence interval -176.5 to 192.5], p=0.899) or epicardial fat volume (mean difference -0.5 cm3 [95% confidence interval -20.9 to 21.9], p=0.961) compared with controls. After a median follow-up of 42.6 months a higher incidence of MACE was observed in COPD patients (RR=2.80, p=0.016) compared with controls. Cox proportional hazard regression identified cardiac ischemias and CACS as independent predictors for MACE. Conclusion COPD patients experienced a higher MACE incidence compared to controls despite no baseline differences in coronary calcification and epicardial fat burden. Other mechanisms such as undersupply of medication seem to account for an excess cardiovascular comorbidity in COPD patients. PMID:26011039

  20. Design and baseline characteristics of participants in the Researching cardiovascular Events with a Weekly INcretin in Diabetes (REWIND) trial on the cardiovascular effects of dulaglutide.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Hertzel C; Colhoun, Helen M; Dagenais, Gilles R; Diaz, Rafael; Lakshmanan, Mark; Pais, Prem; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Riddle, Matthew C; Rydén, Lars; Xavier, Denis; Atisso, Charles M; Avezum, Alvaro; Basile, Jan; Chung, Namsik; Conget, Ignacio; Cushman, William C; Franek, Edward; Hancu, Nicolae; Hanefeld, Markolf; Holt, Shaun; Jansky, Petr; Keltai, Matyas; Lanas, Fernando; Leiter, Lawrence A; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Cardona-Munoz, Ernesto G; Pirags, Valdis; Pogosova, Nana; Raubenheimer, Peter J; Shaw, Jonathan; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Temelkova-Kurktschiev, Theodora

    2017-06-01

    The aim was to determine the effects of dulaglutide, a synthetic once-weekly, injectable human glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue that lowers blood glucose, body weight, appetite and blood pressure, on cardiovascular outcomes. People with type 2 diabetes, aged ≥50 years, with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≤9.5%, and either a previous cardiovascular event, evidence of cardiovascular disease or ≥2 cardiovascular risk factors were randomly allocated to a weekly subcutaneous injection of either dulaglutide (1.5 mg) or placebo and followed within the ongoing Researching cardiovascular Events with a Weekly INcretin in Diabetes (REWIND) trial every 3 to 6 months. The primary cardiovascular outcome is the first occurrence of the composite of cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction or non-fatal stroke. Secondary outcomes include each component of the primary composite cardiovascular outcome, a composite clinical microvascular outcome comprising retinal or renal disease, hospitalization for unstable angina, heart failure requiring hospitalization or an urgent heart failure visit, and all-cause mortality. Follow-up will continue until the accrual of 1200 confirmed primary outcomes. Recruitment of 9901 participants (mean age 66 years, 46% women) occurred in 370 sites located in 24 countries over a period of 2 years. The mean duration of diabetes was 10 years, mean baseline HbA1c was 7.3%, and 31% had prior cardiovascular disease. The REWIND trial's international scope, high proportion of women, high proportion of people without prior cardiovascular disease and inclusion of participants whose mean baseline HbA1c was 7.3% suggests that its cardiovascular and safety findings will be directly relevant to the typical middle-aged patient seen in general practice throughout the world. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Increased risk of acute cardiovascular events after partner bereavement: a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Carey, Iain M; Shah, Sunil M; DeWilde, Stephen; Harris, Tess; Victor, Christina R; Cook, Derek G

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE The period immediately after bereavement has been reported as a time of increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, this risk has not been well quantified, and few large population studies have examined partner bereavement. OBJECTIVE To compare the rate of cardiovascular events between older individuals whose partner dies with those of a matched control group of individuals whose partner was still alive on the same day. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Matched cohort study using a UK primary care database containing availale data of 401 general practices from February 2005 through September 2012. In all, 30 447 individuals aged 60 to 89 years at study initiation who experienced partner bereavement during follow-up were matched by age, sex, and general practice with the nonbereaved control group (n = 83 588) at the time of bereavement. EXPOSURES Partner bereavement. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was occurrence of a fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke within 30 days of bereavement. Secondary outcomes were non-MI acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism. All outcomes were compared between the groups during prespecified periods after bereavement (30, 90, and 365 days). Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) from a conditional Poisson model were adjusted for age, smoking status, deprivation, and history of cardiovascular disease. RESULTS Within 30 days of their partner's death, 50 of the bereaved group (0.16%) experienced an MI or a stroke compared with 67 of the matched nonbereaved controls (0.08%) during the same period (IRR, 2.20 [95% CI, 1.52-3.15]). The increased risk was seen in bereaved men and women and attenuated after 30 days. For individual outcomes, the increased risk was found separately for MI (IRR, 2.14 [95% CI, 1.20-3.81]) and stroke (2.40 [1.22-4.71]). Associations with rarer events were also seen after bereavement, including elevated risk of non-MI acute coronary syndrome (IRR, 2.20 [95% CI, 1

  2. Are 12-lead ECG findings associated with the risk of cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke in young adults?

    PubMed

    Pirinen, Jani; Putaala, Jukka; Aarnio, Karoliina; Aro, Aapo L; Sinisalo, Juha; Kaste, Markku; Haapaniemi, Elena; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Lehto, Mika

    2016-11-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) in a young patient is a disaster and recurrent cardiovascular events could add further impairment. Identifying patients with high risk of such events is therefore important. The prognostic relevance of ECG for this population is unknown. A total of 690 IS patients aged 15-49 years were included. A 12-lead ECG was obtained 1-14 d after the onset of stroke. We adjusted for demographic factors, comorbidities, and stroke characteristics, Cox regression models were used to identify independent ECG parameters associated with long-term risks of (1) any cardiovascular event, (2) cardiac events, and (3) recurrent stroke. Median follow-up time was 8.8 years. About 26.4% of patients experienced a cardiovascular event, 14.5% had cardiac events, and 14.6% recurrent strokes. ECG parameters associated with recurrent cardiovascular events were bundle branch blocks, P-terminal force, left ventricular hypertrophy, and a broader QRS complex. Furthermore, more leftward P-wave axis, prolonged QTc, and P-wave duration >120 ms were associated with increased risks of cardiac events. No ECG parameters were independently associated with recurrent stroke. A 12-lead ECG can be used for risk prediction of cardiovascular events but not for recurrent stroke in young IS patients. KEY MESSAGES ECG is an easy, inexpensive, and useful tool for identifying young ischemic stroke patients with a high risk for recurrent cardiovascular events and it has a statistically significant association with these events even after adjusting for confounding factors. Bundle branch blocks, P-terminal force, broader QRS complex, LVH according to Cornell voltage duration criteria, more leftward P-wave axis, prolonged QTc, and P-wave duration >120 ms are predictors for future cardiovascular or cardiac events in these patients. No ECG parameters were independently associated with recurrent stroke.

  3. Exercise and Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Women With Nonmetastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Habel, Laurel A.; Weltzien, Erin; Castillo, Adrienne; Gupta, Dipti; Kroenke, Candyce H.; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Scott, Jessica; Sternfeld, Barbara; Yu, Anthony; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Caan, Bette J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death among women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Whether exercise is associated with reductions in CVD risk in patients with breast cancer with an elevated CVD risk phenotype is not known. Methods Using a prospective design, women (n = 2,973; mean age, 57 years) diagnosed with nonmetastatic breast cancer participating in two registry-based, regional cohort studies, completed a questionnaire that assessed leisure-time recreational physical activity (metabolic equivalent task [MET]-h/wk). The primary end point was the first occurrence of any of the following: new diagnosis of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valve abnormality, arrhythmia, stroke, or CVD death, occurring after study enrollment. Results Median follow-up was 8.6 years (range, 0.2 to 14.8 years). In multivariable analysis, the incidence of cardiovascular events decreased across increasing total MET-h/wk categories (Ptrend < .001). Compared with < 2 MET-h/wk, the adjusted hazard ratio was 0.91 (95% CI, 0.76 to 1.09) for 2 to 10.9 MET-h/wk, 0.79 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.96) for 11 to 24.5 MET-h/wk, and 0.65 (95% CI, 0.53 to 0.80) for ≥ 24.5 MET-h/wk. Similar trends were observed for the incidence of coronary artery disease and heart failure (P values < .05). Adherence to national exercise guidelines for adult patients with cancer (ie, ≥ 9 MET-h/wk) was associated with an adjusted 23% reduction in the risk of cardiovascular events in comparison with not meeting the guidelines (< 9 MET-h/wk; P < .001). The association with exercise did not differ according to age, CVD risk factors, menopausal status, or anticancer treatment. Conclusion Exercise is associated with substantial, graded reductions in the incidence of cardiovascular events in women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. PMID:27217451

  4. Plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine and cardiovascular events in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dückelmann, Christina; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Haider, Dominik G; Altenberger, Johann; Wolzt, Michael

    2008-07-01

    This prospective study investigated whether plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentrations are related to cardiovascular events in patients with acute heart failure. It has been reported that increased plasma ADMA concentrations are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome in chronic heart failure. In 118 patients with acute decompensated heart failure and impaired left ventricular function, ADMA and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography and by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Venous blood was collected at admission and after 1 week, and clinical events were observed during follow-up. All patients (median age 73 years, 96 males) were followed up for a median of 10.7 months. A clinical endpoint (cardiac decompensation, major adverse cardiovascular event, or all-cause mortality) occurred in 66 patients. In 81 patients, changes (Delta) in ADMA or NT-proBNP between admission and a median of 7 days were available. ADMA, NT-proBNP at admission, and DeltaADMA or DeltaNT-proBNP were comparable in patients with and without a clinical endpoint. In contrast to ADMA, NT-proBNP concentrations above the median were associated with higher adjusted hazard ratio for occurrence of an endpoint (HR 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.9; P = 0.013). An inverse relationship was observed between DeltaNT-proBNP and endpoints before (P = 0.010) and after (P = 0.015) adjustment for confounders. In patients with acute heart failure, ADMA did not detect patients at future cardiovascular risk.

  5. Gender differences in the association between education and the incidence of cardiovascular events in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giovanni; Ferrario, Marco M; Chambless, Lloyd E; Sega, Roberto; Mancia, Giuseppe; Corrao, Giovanni; Fornari, Carla; Cesana, Giancarlo

    2011-12-01

    The educational differences in the incidence of major cardiovascular events are under-studied in Southern Europe and among women. The study sample includes n = 5084 participants to 4 population-based Northern Italian cohorts, aged 35-74 at baseline and with no previous cardiovascular events. The follow-up to ascertain the first onset of coronary heart disease (CHD) or ischaemic stroke ended in 2002. At baseline, major cardiovascular risk factors were investigated adopting the standardized MONICA procedures. Two educational classes were obtained from years of schooling. Age- and risk factors-adjusted hazard ratios of first CHD or ischaemic stroke were estimated through sex-specific separate Cox models (high education as reference). Median follow-up time was 12 years. Event rates were 6.38 (CHD) and 2.12 (ischaemic stroke) per 1000 person-years in men; and 1.59 and 0.94 in women. In men, low education was associated with higher mean Body Mass Index and prevalence of diabetes and cigarette smokers; but also with higher HDL cholesterol and a more favourable alcohol intake pattern. Less-educated women had higher mean systolic blood pressure, Body Mass Index and HDL cholesterol and were more likely to have diabetes. Men and women in the low educational class had a 2-fold increase in ischaemic stroke and CHD incidence, respectively, after controlling for major risk factors. Education was not associated with CHD incidence in men. Higher ischaemic stroke rates were observed among more educated women. In this northern Italian population, the association between education and cardiovascular risk seems to vary by gender.

  6. Factor XI deficiency is associated with lower risk for cardiovascular and venous thromboembolism events.

    PubMed

    Preis, Meir; Hirsch, Julianna; Kotler, Antonio; Zoabi, Ahmad; Stein, Nili; Rennert, Gad; Saliba, Walid

    2017-03-02

    Factor XI deficiency is one of the rare inherited coagulation factor deficiencies. However, its incidence is high within the Ashkenazi Jewish community. Because factor XI displays both procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activities, it has been postulated that an underlying cardiovascular benefit may exist with factor XI deficiency. This historical cohort study was performed using the electronic database of Clalit Health Services, the largest health care provider in Israel. All adults tested for factor XI activity between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Factor XI activity was classified into 3 categories: normal (activity >50%), mild deficiency (activity = 30%-50%), and moderate-severe deficiency (activity ≤30%). The cohort was followed until 31 December 2015 for incidence of cardiovascular events (composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, and transient ischemic attack) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Of the 10 193 included patients, 8958 (88.9%) had normal factor XI activity, 690 (6.8%) had mild deficiency, and 542 (5.3%) had moderate-severe deficiency. Compared with individuals with normal activity, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for cardiovascular events was 0.52 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.87) in those with mild deficiency, and 0.57 (95% CI, 0.35-0.93) in those with moderate-severe factor XI deficiency. The incidence of VTE was lower in those with factor XI deficiency (activity <50%) compared with those with normal activity; adjusted HR = 0.26 (95% CI, 0.08-0.84). In summary, factor XI deficiency is associated with decreased incidence of cardiovascular events and VTE. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Risk of Cardiovascular Events Associated With Current Exposure to HIV Antiretroviral Therapies in a US Veteran Population

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Manisha; Joyce, Vilija; Bendavid, Eran; Olshen, Richard A.; Hlatky, Mark; Chow, Adam; Holodniy, Mark; Barnett, Paul; Owens, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To characterize the association of antiretroviral drug combinations on risk of cardiovascular events. Methods. Certain antiretroviral medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been implicated in increasing risk of cardiovascular disease. However, antiretroviral drugs are typically prescribed in combination. We characterized the association of current exposure to antiretroviral drug combinations on risk of cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass surgery. We used the Veterans Health Administration Clinical Case Registry to analyze data from 24 510 patients infected with HIV from January 1996 through December 2009. We assessed the association of current exposure to 15 antiretroviral drugs and 23 prespecified combinations of agents on the risk of cardiovascular event by using marginal structural models and Cox models extended to accommodate time-dependent variables. Results. Over 164 059 person-years of follow-up, 934 patients had a cardiovascular event. Current exposure to abacavir, efavirenz, lamivudine, and zidovudine was significantly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular event, with odds ratios ranging from 1.40 to 1.53. Five combinations were significantly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular event, all of which involved lamivudine. One of these—efavirenz, lamivudine, and zidovudine—was the second most commonly used combination and was associated with a risk of cardiovascular event that is 1.60 times that of patients not currently exposed to the combination (odds ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval, 1.25–2.04). Conclusions. In the VA cohort, exposure to both individual drugs and drug combinations was associated with modestly increased risk of a cardiovascular event. PMID:25908684

  8. Risk of cardiovascular events associated with current exposure to HIV antiretroviral therapies in a US veteran population.

    PubMed

    Desai, Manisha; Joyce, Vilija; Bendavid, Eran; Olshen, Richard A; Hlatky, Mark; Chow, Adam; Holodniy, Mark; Barnett, Paul; Owens, Douglas K

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the association of antiretroviral drug combinations on risk of cardiovascular events. Certain antiretroviral medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been implicated in increasing risk of cardiovascular disease. However, antiretroviral drugs are typically prescribed in combination. We characterized the association of current exposure to antiretroviral drug combinations on risk of cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass surgery. We used the Veterans Health Administration Clinical Case Registry to analyze data from 24 510 patients infected with HIV from January 1996 through December 2009. We assessed the association of current exposure to 15 antiretroviral drugs and 23 prespecified combinations of agents on the risk of cardiovascular event by using marginal structural models and Cox models extended to accommodate time-dependent variables. Over 164 059 person-years of follow-up, 934 patients had a cardiovascular event. Current exposure to abacavir, efavirenz, lamivudine, and zidovudine was significantly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular event, with odds ratios ranging from 1.40 to 1.53. Five combinations were significantly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular event, all of which involved lamivudine. One of these-efavirenz, lamivudine, and zidovudine-was the second most commonly used combination and was associated with a risk of cardiovascular event that is 1.60 times that of patients not currently exposed to the combination (odds ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.04). In the VA cohort, exposure to both individual drugs and drug combinations was associated with modestly increased risk of a cardiovascular event. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Soluble TWEAK and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Laso, Valvanera; Sastre, Cristina; Valdivielso, Jose M.; Betriu, Angels; Fernández, Elvira; Egido, Jesús; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Soluble TNF–like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) is a proinflammatory cytokine belonging to the TNF superfamily. sTWEAK concentrations have been associated with the presence of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We hypothesized that sTWEAK levels may relate to a higher prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques, vascular calcification, and cardiovascular outcomes observed in patients with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A 4-year prospective, multicenter, longitudinal study was conducted in 1058 patients with CKD stages 3–5D (mean age =58±13 years old; 665 men) but without any history of CVD from the NEFRONA Study (a study design on the prevalence of surrogate markers of CVD). Ankle-brachial index and B-mode ultrasound were performed to detect the presence of carotid and/or femoral atherosclerotic plaques together with biochemical measurements and sTWEAK assessment. Patients were followed for cardiovascular outcomes (follow-up of 3.13±1.15 years). Results Patients with more advanced CKD had lower sTWEAK levels. sTWEAK concentrations were independently and negatively associated with carotid intima-media thickness. sTWEAK levels were lower in patients with carotid atherosclerotic plaques but not in those with femoral plaques. After adjustment by confounders, the odds ratio (OR) for presenting carotid atherosclerotic plaques in patients in the lowest versus highest tertile of sTWEAK was 4.18 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.89 to 6.08; P<0.001). Furthermore, sTWEAK levels were lower in patients with calcified carotid atherosclerotic plaques. The OR for presenting calcified carotid plaques was 1.77 (95% CI, 1.06 to 2.93; P=0.02) after multivariable adjustment. After the follow-up, 41 fatal and 68 nonfatal cardiovascular events occurred. In a Cox model, after controlling for potential confounding factors, patients in the lowest tertile of sTWEAK concentrations had a higher risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular

  10. The role of vitamin supplementation in the prevention of cardiovascular disease events.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag K; Huang, Jennifer; Lokhandwala, Adil; Fernandez, Aaron; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Alpert, Joseph S

    2014-09-01

    The production, sale, and consumption of multiple vitamins is a multibillion-dollar industry. Most Americans take some form of supplement ostensibly for prevention of cardiovascular disease. It has been claimed that vitamin A retards atherogenesis. Vitamin C is an antioxidant and is thought to possibly decrease free radical-induced endothelial injury, which can lead to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Vitamin E has been extensively studied for its possible effects on platelet function as well as inhibition of foam-cell formation. Low levels of vitamin D have been thought to negatively impact myocardial structure and increase the risk for cardiovascular events. Increased intake of vitamin B6, B12, and folate has been associated with reduction of homocysteine levels; elevated homocysteine blood levels have been associated with the occurrence of stroke, heart attack, and cardiovascular death. The purpose of this study was to review the currently available literature for vitamin supplementation with respect to prevention of cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, the current evidence suggests no benefit exists with vitamin supplementation in the general US population. Further research is needed to evaluate whether there are specific populations that might benefit from vitamin supplementation.

  11. Brain volumes and risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. The SMART-MR study.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Pieternella H; Muller, Majon; Vincken, Koen L; Mali, Willem P T M; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Geerlings, Mirjam I

    2014-07-01

    Brain atrophy is a strong predictor for cognitive decline and dementia, and these are, in turn, associated with increased mortality in the general population. Patients with cardiovascular disease have more brain atrophy and a higher morbidity and mortality. We investigated if brain volumes on magnetic resonance imaging were associated with the risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with manifest arterial disease (n = 1215; mean age 58 years). Automated brain segmentation was used to quantify intracranial volume, and volumes of total brain, sulcal cerebrospinal fluid, and ventricles. After a median follow-up of 8.3 years, 184 patients died, 49 patients had an ischemic stroke, and 100 patients had an ischemic cardiac complication. Smaller relative brain volumes increased the risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR] per standard deviation decrease in total brain volume: 1.58, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.33-1.88), vascular death (HR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.35-2.13), and ischemic stroke (HR 1.96, 95% CI: 1.43-2.69), independent of cardiovascular risk factors. These results suggest that brain volumes are an important determinant of poor outcome in patients with high cardiovascular risk.

  12. Protein-bound uremic toxins: new culprits of cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2014-02-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been considered a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Although great advances have recently been made in the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, CKD remains a major global health problem. Moreover, the occurrence rates of cardiovascular events among CKD patients increase even in cases in which patients undergo hemodialysis, and the mechanisms underlying the so-called "cardiorenal syndrome" are not clearly understood. Recently, small-molecule uremic toxins have been associated with cardiovascular mortality in CKD and/or dialysis patients. These toxins range from small uncharged solutes to large protein-bound structures. In this review, we focused on protein-bound uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate, which are poorly removed by current dialysis techniques. Several studies have demonstrated that protein-bound uremic toxins, especially indoxyl sulfate, induce vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular calcification, which may explain the relatively poor prognosis of CKD and dialysis patients. The aim of this review is to provide novel insights into the effects of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  13. Relationship Between Measures of Adiposity, Arterial Inflammation, and Subsequent Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Amparo L.; Takx, Richard A. P.; MacNabb, Megan H.; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R.; Kaplan, Rebecca S.; Truong, Quynh A.; Lo, Janet; Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Grinspoon, Steven K.; Hoffmann, Udo; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate how different measures of adiposity are related to both arterial inflammation and the risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. Methods and Results We included individuals who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological evaluation. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) volume, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume and VAT/SAT ratio were determined. Additionally BMI, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and, aortic FDG uptake (a measure of arterial inflammation) were determined. Subsequent development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events was adjudicated. The analysis included 415 patients with a median age of 55 (P25–P75: 45–65) and a median BMI of 26.4 (P25– P75: 23.4–30.9) kg/m2. VAT and SAT volume were significantly higher in obese individuals. VAT volume (r=0.290, p<0.001) and VAT/SAT ratio (r=0.208, p<0.001) were positively correlated with arterial inflammation. 32 subjects experienced CVD event during a median follow-up of 4 years. Cox proportional hazard models showed that VAT volume, and VAT/SAT ratio were associated with CVD events (hazard ratio, HR (95% CI): 1.15 (1.06–1.25, p<0.001; 3.60 (1.88–6.92), p<0.001 respectively). BMI, MetS and SAT were not predictive of CVD events. Conclusions Measures of visceral fat are positively related to arterial inflammation and are independent predictors of subsequent CVD events. Individuals with higher measures of visceral fat as well as elevated arterial inflammation are at highest risk for subsequent CVD events. The findings suggest that arterial inflammation may explain some of the CVD risk associated with adiposity. PMID:27072302

  14. Relationship Between Measures of Adiposity, Arterial Inflammation, and Subsequent Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Amparo L; Takx, Richard A P; MacNabb, Megan H; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R; Kaplan, Rebecca S; Truong, Quynh A; Lo, Janet; Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Grinspoon, Steven K; Hoffmann, Udo; Tawakol, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate how different measures of adiposity are related to both arterial inflammation and the risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. We included individuals who underwent (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging for oncological evaluation. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) volume, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume, and VAT/SAT ratio were determined. Additionally, body mass index, metabolic syndrome, and aortic (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (a measure of arterial inflammation) were determined. Subsequent development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events was adjudicated. The analysis included 415 patients with a median age of 55 (P25-P75: 45-65) and a median body mass index of 26.4 (P25-P75: 23.4-30.9) kg/m(2). VAT and SAT volume were significantly higher in obese individuals. VAT volume (r=0.290; P<0.001) and VAT/SAT ratio (r=0.208; P<0.001) were positively correlated with arterial inflammation. Thirty-two subjects experienced a CVD event during a median follow-up of 4 years. Cox proportional hazard models showed that VAT volume and VAT/SAT ratio were associated with CVD events (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.15 [1.06-1.25]; P<0.001; 3.60 [1.88-6.92]; P<0.001, respectively). Body mass index, metabolic syndrome, and SAT were not predictive of CVD events. Measures of visceral fat are positively related to arterial inflammation and are independent predictors of subsequent CVD events. Individuals with higher measures of visceral fat as well as elevated arterial inflammation are at highest risk for subsequent CVD events. The findings suggest that arterial inflammation may explain some of the CVD risk associated with adiposity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bell, David S H

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes imparts a substantial increased risk for cardiovascular disease-related mortality and morbidity. Because of this, current medical guidelines recommend prophylactic treatment with once-daily, low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular (CV) events in high-risk patients. However, only modest reductions in CV events and mortality have been observed with once-daily aspirin treatment in patients with diabetes, including patients with a previous CV event, perhaps because of disparity between aspirin pharmacokinetics and diabetes-related platelet abnormalities. Once-daily aspirin irreversibly inactivates platelets for only a short duration (acetylsalicylic acid half-life, approximately 15-20 minutes), after which time newly generated, active platelets enter the circulation and weaken aspirin's effect. Platelets from patients with diabetes are more reactive and are turned over more rapidly than platelets from normal individuals; the short inhibitory window provided by once-daily aspirin may therefore be insufficient to provide 24-h protection against CV events. Alternative conventional aspirin regimens (e.g. higher daily dose, twice-daily dosing, combination with clopidogrel) and newer formulations (e.g. 24-h, extended-release) have been proposed to overcome the apparent limited efficacy of conventional aspirin in patients with diabetes; however, tolerability concerns and limited clinical efficacy data need to be taken into account when considering the use of such regimens.

  16. Microvascular Function Contributes to the Relation Between Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Events: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leroy L; Palmisano, Joseph N; Benjamin, Emelia J; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Mitchell, Gary F; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2016-12-01

    Arterial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD) progression and clinical events. Inter-relations of aortic stiffness and vasodilator function with incident CVD remain incompletely studied. We used proportional hazards models to relate individual measures of vascular function to incident CVD in 4547 participants (mean age, 51±11 years; 54% women) in 2 generations of Framingham Heart Study participants. During follow-up (0.02-13.83 years), 232 participants (5%) experienced new-onset CVD events. In multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, both higher carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (hazard ratio [HR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.63; P=0.01) and lower hyperemic mean flow velocity (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.71-0.99; P=0.04) were associated significantly with incident CVD, whereas primary pressure wave amplitude (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.99-1.27; P=0.06), baseline brachial diameter (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.90-1.31; P=0.39), and flow-mediated vasodilation (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69-1.04; P=0.12) were not. In mediation analyses, 8% to 13% of the relation between aortic stiffness and CVD events was mediated by hyperemic mean flow velocity. Our results suggest that associations between aortic stiffness and CVD events are mediated by pathways that include microvascular damage and remodeling. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in the elderly: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ward, Stephanie A; Demos, Lisa; Workman, Barbara; McNeil, John J

    2012-04-01

    The role of aspirin in the secondary prevention of occlusive cardiovascular events has now been well established. Given this, aspirin in primary prevention has been the focus of several large trials and subsequent meta-analyses over the past 3 decades, and yet the issue remains controversial. Recent studies in populations with high baseline risk - such as diabetics and those with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease - have not found the expected benefits of aspirin on cardiovascular endpoints, which contrasts with earlier studies that reported a reduced relative risk for outcomes such as myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke, but not for mortality. Furthermore, in healthy populations, the absolute risk reduction conferred by aspirin is small and needs to be balanced against the risk of a major haemorrhage. Older adults have a higher risk for cardiovascular events and therefore might represent the group in which aspirin for primary prevention could deliver the greatest absolute benefit, yet at the same time, the elderly bear an increased vulnerability to major haemorrhage, including haemorrhagic stroke. It is also not known whether older adults experience the same risk reduction from aspirin as middle-aged individuals. The current evidence base does not sufficiently clarify whether aspirin for primary prevention confers a meaningful net benefit in the elderly.

  18. Left Ventricular Structure and Risk of Cardiovascular Events: A Framingham Heart Study Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Connie W; Gona, Philimon N; Salton, Carol J; Chuang, Michael L; Levy, Daniel; Manning, Warren J; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2015-09-15

    Elevated left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and concentric left ventricular (LV) remodeling are related to adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The predictive utility of LV concentric remodeling and LV mass in the prediction of CVD events is not well characterized. Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort members without prevalent CVD (n=1715, 50% men, aged 65±9 years) underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance for LVMI and geometry (2002-2006) and were prospectively followed for incident CVD (myocardial infarction, coronary insufficiency, heart failure, stroke) or CVD death. Over 13 808 person-years of follow-up (median 8.4, range 0.0 to 10.5 years), 85 CVD events occurred. In multivariable-adjusted proportional hazards regression models, each 10-g/m(2) increment in LVMI and each 0.1 unit in relative wall thickness was associated with 33% and 59% increased risk for CVD, respectively (P=0.004 and P=0.009, respectively). The association between LV mass/LV end-diastolic volume and incident CVD was borderline significant (P=0.053). Multivariable-adjusted risk reclassification models showed a modest improvement in CVD risk prediction with the incorporation of cardiovascular magnetic resonance LVMI and measures of LV concentricity (C-statistic 0.71 [95% CI 0.65 to 0.78] for the model with traditional risk factors only, improved to 0.74 [95% CI 0.68 to 0.80] for the risk factor model additionally including LVMI and relative wall thickness). Among adults free of prevalent CVD in the community, greater LVMI and LV concentric hypertrophy are associated with a marked increase in adverse incident CVD events. The potential benefit of aggressive primary prevention to modify LV mass and geometry in these adults requires further investigation. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  19. Association between polymorphism of the AGTR1 and cardiovascular events in a Japanese general sample (The Shigaraki Study).

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Shinji; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Tabara, Yasuharu; Okamura, Tomonori; Kanda, Hideyuki; Kita, Yoshikuni; Kadowaki, Takashi; Tsujita, Yasuyuki; Chowdhury Turin, Tanvir; Horie, Minoru; Miki, Tetsuro; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2009-08-21

    We examined whether the A1166C polymorphism of the angiotensin II type I receptor gene (AGTR1) affects cardiovascular event occurrence in a Japanese prospective cohort study. The 2212 participants who gave informed consent for genetic analysis were enrolled in this study (the Shigaraki Study). The average observation period was 1954 days. Cardiovascular events occurred in 37 individuals (1.7%). The independent factors which specified cardiovascular events were age (hazard ratio (HR)=1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.16; p<0.0001) and sex (HR=2.18; 95%CI: 1.23-3.85; p=0.007). However, the A1166C polymorphism of AGTR1 was not a predictive factor for cardiovascular events (HR=1.11; 95%CI: 0.61-2.02; p=0.731).

  20. High Sodium Intake: Review of Recent Issues on Its Association with Cardiovascular Events and Measurement Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There has been a long-known association between high dietary sodium intake and hypertension, as well as the increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Reduction of sodium intake is a major challenge for public health. Recently, there have been several controversial large population-based studies regarding the current recommendation for dietary sodium intake. Although these studies were performed in a large population, they aroused controversies because they had a flaw in the study design and methods. In addition, knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of the methods is essential in order to obtain an accurate estimation of sodium intake. I have reviewed the current literatures on the association between sodium intake and cardiovascular events, as well as the methods for the estimation of sodium intake. PMID:26023304

  1. Could erlotinib treatment lead to acute cardiovascular events in patients with lung adenocarcinoma after chemotherapy failure?

    PubMed Central

    Kus, Tulay; Aktas, Gokmen; Sevinc, Alper; Kalender, Mehmet Emin; Camci, Celaletdin

    2015-01-01

    Erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor and tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is a targeted drug that was approved for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancers and pancreatic cancers. Targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors are known to have cardiotoxic effects. However, erlotinib does not have a statistically proven effect of increasing acute cardiovascular event (ACE) risk. Preclinical studies showed that beta agonist stimulation among rats that were administered erlotinib led to cardiovascular damage. Thus, there would be an aggregate effect of erlotinib on ACE, although it is not thought to be a cardiotoxic drug itself. In this paper, we present two non-small-cell lung cancer cases that developed ACE under erlotinib treatment. PMID:26150726

  2. Relation of Adiponectin to All-Cause Mortality, Cardiovascular Mortality, and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events (from the Dallas Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Witberg, Guy; Ayers, Colby R; Turer, Aslan T; Lev, Eli; Kornowski, Ran; de Lemos, James; Neeland, Ian J

    2016-02-15

    Adiponectin is a key component in multiple metabolic pathways. Studies evaluating associations of adiponectin with clinical outcomes in older adults have reported conflicting results. We investigated the association of adiponectin with mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity in a young, multiethnic adult population. We analyzed data from participants in the Dallas Heart Study without baseline CVD who underwent assessment of total adiponectin from 2000 to 2002. The primary outcome of all-cause mortality was assessed over median 10.4 years of follow-up using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. Secondary outcomes included CVD mortality, major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE), and heart failure (HF). The study cohort included 3,263 participants, mean age 43.4 years, 44% women, and 50% black. There were 184 deaths (63 CVD), 207 MACCE, and 46 HF events. In multivariable models adjusted for age, gender, race, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-C, hyperlipidemia, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and body mass index, increasing adiponectin quartiles were positively associated with all-cause mortality Q4 versus Q1 (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.47, 3.50); CVD mortality Q4 versus Q1 (HR = 2.43; 95% CI 1.15, 5.15); MACCE Q4 versus Q1 (HR = 1.71; 95% CI 1.13, 2.60); and HF Q4 versus Q1 (HR = 2.95; 95% CI 1.14, 7.67). Findings were similar with adiponectin as a continuous variable and consistent across subgroups defined by age, gender, race, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, or elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. In conclusion, higher adiponectin was associated with increased mortality and CVD morbidity in a young, multiethnic population. These findings may have implications for strategies aimed at lowering adiponectin to prevent adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between triglycerides and cardiovascular events in primary populations: a meta-regression analysis and synthesis of evidence.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Melissa E; Weisenfluh, Lauren; Morrison, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Triglyceride levels were found to be independently predictive of the development of primary coronary heart disease in epidemiologic studies. The objective of this study was to determine whether triglyceride levels were predictive of cardiovascular events in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of lipid-modifying drugs. We performed a systematic review and meta-regression analysis of 40 RCTs of lipid-modifying drugs with cardiovascular events as an outcome. The log of the rate ratio of cardiovascular events (eg, coronary death or myocardial infarction) was plotted against the proportional difference between treatment and control groups in triglyceride and other lipid levels (high density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], and total cholesterol) for all trials and for trials of primary and secondary prevention populations. Linear regression was used to determine the statistical significance of the relationship between lipid values and cardiovascular events. The proportional difference in triglyceride levels was predictive of cardiovascular events in all trials (P=0.005 for the slope of the regression line; N=40) and in primary prevention trials (P=0.010; N=11), but not in secondary prevention trials (P=0.114; N=25). The proportional difference in HDL-C was not predictive of cardiovascular events in all trials (P=0.822; N=40), or in trials of primary (P=0.223; N=11) or secondary (P=0.487; N=25) prevention. LDL-C levels were predictive of cardiovascular events in both primary (P=0.002; N=11) and secondary (P<0.001; N=25) populations. Changes in triglyceride levels were predictive of cardiovascular events in RCTs. This relationship was significant in primary prevention populations but not in secondary prevention populations.

  4. Association between triglycerides and cardiovascular events in primary populations: a meta-regression analysis and synthesis of evidence

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Melissa E; Weisenfluh, Lauren; Morrison, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background Triglyceride levels were found to be independently predictive of the development of primary coronary heart disease in epidemiologic studies. The objective of this study was to determine whether triglyceride levels were predictive of cardiovascular events in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of lipid-modifying drugs. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-regression analysis of 40 RCTs of lipid-modifying drugs with cardiovascular events as an outcome. The log of the rate ratio of cardiovascular events (eg, coronary death or myocardial infarction) was plotted against the proportional difference between treatment and control groups in triglyceride and other lipid levels (high density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], and total cholesterol) for all trials and for trials of primary and secondary prevention populations. Linear regression was used to determine the statistical significance of the relationship between lipid values and cardiovascular events. Results The proportional difference in triglyceride levels was predictive of cardiovascular events in all trials (P=0.005 for the slope of the regression line; N=40) and in primary prevention trials (P=0.010; N=11), but not in secondary prevention trials (P=0.114; N=25). The proportional difference in HDL-C was not predictive of cardiovascular events in all trials (P=0.822; N=40), or in trials of primary (P=0.223; N=11) or secondary (P=0.487; N=25) prevention. LDL-C levels were predictive of cardiovascular events in both primary (P=0.002; N=11) and secondary (P<0.001; N=25) populations. Conclusions Changes in triglyceride levels were predictive of cardiovascular events in RCTs. This relationship was significant in primary prevention populations but not in secondary prevention populations. PMID:24204156

  5. Elevated Homocysteine Levels Are Associated With the Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Events in Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Catena, Cristiana; Colussi, Gianluca; Nait, Francesca; Capobianco, Frine; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2015-07-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia and the metabolic syndrome are established cardiovascular risk factors and are frequently associated with hypertension. The relationship of plasma homocysteine (Hcy) with the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, however, is debated and studies in hypertensive patients are limited. In this study, we have investigated the association of Hcy with the metabolic syndrome and cerebro- cardiovascular events in hypertension. In 562 essential hypertensive patients who underwent accurate assessment of fasting and postload glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and renal function, we measured plasma levels of Hcy, vitamin B12, folate, and fibrinogen and assessed the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and of coronary heart and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Patients with the metabolic syndrome had significantly higher plasma Hcy levels. After correction for covariates, increasing Hcy levels were associated with an increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease, and CVD. Plasma Hcy was directly correlated with age, waist circumference, fasting glucose, triglyceride, uric acid, and fibrinogen levels, and homeostatic model assessment index and inversely with creatinine clearance and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, vitamin B12, and folate levels. Logistic regression analysis showed an independent association of Hcy levels with age, male gender, vitamin B12 and folate levels, and the metabolic syndrome. Logistic regression indicated also an independent association of Hcy with cerebro-cardiovascular disease that was independent of the metabolic syndrome. Elevated plasma Hcy is associated with the metabolic syndrome in hypertensive patients. Prevalence of events increases with increasing plasma Hcy levels suggesting a contribution of Hcy to cerebro-cardiovascular diseases in these patients. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Aspirin Resistance Predicts Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Pasala, Tilak; Hoo, Jennifer Soo; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Waheed, Rehan; Sengodan, Prasanna; Alexander, Jeffrey; Gandhi, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and vascular death in patients who have symptomatic peripheral artery disease. However, a subset of patients who take aspirin continues to have recurrent cardiovascular events. There are few data on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease who manifest aspirin resistance. Patients with peripheral artery disease on long-term aspirin therapy (≥4 wk) were tested for aspirin responsiveness by means of the VerifyNow Aspirin Assay. The mean follow-up duration was 22.6 ± 8.3 months. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. Secondary endpoints were the incidence of vascular interventions (surgical or percutaneous), or of amputation or gangrene caused by vascular disease. Of the 120 patients enrolled in the study, 31 (25.8%) were aspirin-resistant and 89 (74.2%) were aspirin-responsive. The primary endpoint occurred in 10 (32.3%) patients in the aspirin-resistant group and in 13 (14.6%) patients in the aspirin-responsive group (hazard ratio=2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-5.66; P=0.03). There was no significant difference in the secondary outcome of revascularization or tissue loss. By multivariate analysis, aspirin resistance and history of chronic kidney disease were the only independent predictors of long-term adverse cardiovascular events. Aspirin resistance is highly prevalent in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease and is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular risk. Whether intervening in these patients with additional antiplatelet therapies would improve outcomes needs to be explored.

  7. Aspirin Resistance Predicts Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pasala, Tilak; Hoo, Jennifer Soo; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Waheed, Rehan; Sengodan, Prasanna; Alexander, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and vascular death in patients who have symptomatic peripheral artery disease. However, a subset of patients who take aspirin continues to have recurrent cardiovascular events. There are few data on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease who manifest aspirin resistance. Patients with peripheral artery disease on long-term aspirin therapy (≥4 wk) were tested for aspirin responsiveness by means of the VerifyNow Aspirin Assay. The mean follow-up duration was 22.6 ± 8.3 months. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. Secondary endpoints were the incidence of vascular interventions (surgical or percutaneous), or of amputation or gangrene caused by vascular disease. Of the 120 patients enrolled in the study, 31 (25.8%) were aspirin-resistant and 89 (74.2%) were aspirin-responsive. The primary endpoint occurred in 10 (32.3%) patients in the aspirin-resistant group and in 13 (14.6%) patients in the aspirin-responsive group (hazard ratio=2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–5.66; P=0.03). There was no significant difference in the secondary outcome of revascularization or tissue loss. By multivariate analysis, aspirin resistance and history of chronic kidney disease were the only independent predictors of long-term adverse cardiovascular events. Aspirin resistance is highly prevalent in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease and is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular risk. Whether intervening in these patients with additional antiplatelet therapies would improve outcomes needs to be explored. PMID:28100965

  8. Elevated Circulating Interleukin 33 Levels in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients at High Risk for Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, Holly; Soliman, Mahmoud; Elmoselhi, Hamdi; Shoker, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background The Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events calculator (CRCRTR-MACE) estimates the burden of cardiovascular risk in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Our recent study of 95 RTR reported the 7-year median risk of cardiovascular events (CVE) to be 9.97%, ranging from 1.93 to 84.27%. Nearly a third (28.4%) of the cohort was above 20% risk for a CVE. Since interleukins (ILs) as part of the inflammatory response may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), we extended this study to identify which ILs are associated with high cardiovascular risk in this population. Methods Twenty-two ILs were measured by multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay in 95 RTR and 56 normal controls. Stepwise analysis after multivariate determination of significant demographic and inflammatory variables was performed between the high and low-CVD risk groups (which were arbitrarily set at scores <10% and ≥20%, respectively). Normalized data was presented as mean ± SD and non-normalized data as median (minimum–maximum). Significance was measured at <0.05. Results 27.5% of the low-risk and 31.3% of the high-risk groups had mean IL levels above the 95 percentile of the normal control levels. In the non-parametric analysis IL-6, 9, 16, 17 and 33 were significantly higher in the high-risk group compared to the control. Univariate analysis (UVA) of the high-risk group identified IL-33 as the only IL that remained significantly higher than the control and low-risk groups (p = 0.000). The percentage of patients with IL-33 levels above the 90 percentile of control value in the low and high-risk groups were 15.6% and 52.0%, respectively (p<0.002). UVA of factors significant to high IL-33 levels included estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), while diabetes mellitus, serum phosphorus, microalbuminuria and age also remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Circulating IL-33 level is positively associated with high CRCRTR-MACE score

  9. Evidence Linking Hypoglycemic Events to an Increased Risk of Acute Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Stephen S.; Conner, Christopher; Aagren, Mark; Smith, David M.; Bouchard, Jonathan; Brett, Jason

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This retrospective study examined the association between ICD-9-CM–coded outpatient hypoglycemic events (HEs) and acute cardiovascular events (ACVEs), i.e., acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, revascularization, percutaneous coronary intervention, and incident unstable angina, in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were derived from healthcare claims for individuals with employer-sponsored primary or Medicare supplemental insurance. A baseline period (30 September 2006 to 30 September 2007) was used to identify eligible patients and collect information on their clinical and demographic characteristics. An evaluation period (1 October 2007 to 30 September 2008) was used to identify HEs and ACVEs. Patients aged ≥18 years with type 2 diabetes were selected for analysis by a modified Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set algorithm. Data were analyzed with multiple logistic regression and backward stepwise selection (maximum P = 0.01) with adjustment for important confounding variables, including age, sex, geography, insurance type, comorbidity scores, cardiovascular risk factors, diabetes complications, total baseline medical expenditures, and prior ACVEs. RESULTS Of the 860,845 patients in the analysis set, 27,065 (3.1%) had ICD-9-CM–coded HEs during the evaluation period. The main model retained 17 significant independent variables. Patients with HEs had 79% higher regression-adjusted odds (HE odds ratio [OR] 1.79; 95% CI 1.69–1.89) of ACVEs than patients without HEs; results in patients aged ≥65 years were similar to those for the entire population (HE OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.65–1.92). CONCLUSIONS ICD-9-CM–coded HEs were independently associated with an increased risk of ACVEs. Further studies of the relationship between hypoglycemia and the risk of ACVEs are warranted. PMID:21421802

  10. Combination of Flow-Mediated Vasodilation and Nitroglycerine-Induced Vasodilation Is More Effective for Prediction of Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Masato; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Hida, Eisuke; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Ayumu; Noma, Kensuke; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation has been performed to differentiate endothelium-dependent vasodilation from endothelium-independent vasodilation as a control test for flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD). Recently, nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation per se has been reported to be a useful marker of the grade of atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of FMD combined with nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation for future cardiovascular events. We measured FMD and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in 402 subjects, including patients with cardiovascular diseases. During a median follow-up period of 32.3 months, 38 first major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and coronary revascularization) occurred. Receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis revealed that FMD alone and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation alone can predict cardiovascular events with areas under the curve of 0.671 (cutoff 3.3%) and 0.692 (cutoff 11.6%), respectively. FMD combined with nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation predicts cardiovascular events with an area under the curve of 0.701. After adjustment for age, sex, and cardiovascular risk factors, above cutoff FMD (≥3.3%) and below cutoff nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation (<11.6%; hazard ratio, 5.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.61-25.46;P=0.006) and below cutoff FMD (<3.3%) and below cutoff nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation (<11.6%; hazard ratio, 7.20; 95% confidence interval, 2.37-31.36;P<0.001) remained strong independent indicator of cardiovascular events. These findings suggest that the combination of FMD and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation measurements can more accurately predict cardiovascular events compared with FMD alone. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: UMIN000001167. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Number of recent stressful life events and incident cardiovascular disease: Moderation by lifetime depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Berntson, Jessica; Patel, Jay S; Stewart, Jesse C

    2017-08-01

    We investigated whether number of recent stressful life events is associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and whether this relationship is stronger in adults with a history of clinical depression. Prospective data from 28,583 U.S. adults (mean age=45years) initially free of CVD who participated in Waves 1 (2001-2002) and 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) were examined. Number of past-year stressful life events (Wave 1), lifetime depressive disorder (Wave 1), and incident CVD (Wave 2) were determined by structured interviews. There were 1069 cases of incident CVD. Each additional stressful life event was associated with a 15% increased odds of incident CVD [Odds Ratio (OR)=1.15, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.11, 1.19]. As hypothesized, a stressful life events by lifetime depressive disorder interaction was detected (P=0.003). Stratified analyses indicated that stressful life events had a stronger association with incident CVD among adults with (OR=1.18, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.27, n=4908) versus without (OR=1.10, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.14, n=23,675) a lifetime depressive disorder. Our findings suggest that a greater number of recent stressful life events elevate the risk of new-onset CVD and that this risk is potentiated in adults with a history of clinical depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High-sensitivity troponin T and cardiovascular events in systolic blood pressure categories: atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Sun, Wensheng; de Lemos, James A; Taffet, George E; Virani, Salim S; Ndumele, Chiadi E; Mosley, Thomas H; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Coresh, Josef; Wright, Jacqueline D; Heiss, Gerardo; Boerwinkle, Eric A; Bozkurt, Biykem; Solomon, Scott D; Ballantyne, Christie M; Nambi, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Based on observational studies, there is a linear increase in cardiovascular risk with higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), yet clinical trials have not shown benefit across all SBP categories. We assessed whether troponin T measured using high-sensitivity assay was associated with cardiovascular disease within SBP categories in 11 191 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study participants. Rested sitting SBP by 10-mm Hg increments and troponin categories were identified. Incident heart failure hospitalization, coronary heart disease, and stroke were ascertained for a median of 12 years after excluding individuals with corresponding disease. Approximately 53% of each type of cardiovascular event occurred in individuals with SBP<140 mm Hg and troponin T ≥3 ng/L. Higher troponin T was associated with increasing cardiovascular events across most SBP categories. The association was strongest for heart failure and least strong for stroke. There was no similar association of SBP with cardiovascular events across troponin T categories. Individuals with troponin T ≥3 ng/L and SBP <140 mm Hg had higher cardiovascular risk compared with those with troponin T <3 ng/L and SBP 140 to 159 mm Hg. Higher troponin T levels within narrow SBP categories portend increased cardiovascular risk, particularly for heart failure. Individuals with lower SBP but measurable troponin T had greater cardiovascular risk compared with those with suboptimal SBP but undetectable troponin T. Future trials of systolic hypertension may benefit by using high-sensitivity troponin T to target high-risk patients. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Short Sleep Duration is an Independent Predictor of Cardiovascular Events in Japanese Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Kazuo; Pickering, Thomas G.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Hoshide, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Joji; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Kario, Kazuomi

    2013-01-01

    Context It is not known whether short duration of sleep is a predictor of future cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients. Objective To test the hypothesis that short duration of sleep is independently associated with incident cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Design, Setting, and Participants We performed ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in 1255 subjects with hypertension (mean age: 70.4±9.9 years) and they were followed for an average of 50±23 months. Short sleep duration was defined as <7.5 hrs (20th percentile). Multivariable Cox hazard models predicting CVD events were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI for short sleep duration. A riser pattern was defined when average nighttime SBP exceeded daytime SBP. Main Outcome Measures The end point was cardiovascular events: stroke, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), and sudden cardiac death. Results In multivariable analyses, short duration of sleep (<7.5 hrs) was associated with incident CVD (HR=1.68; 1.06–2.66, P=.03). A synergistic interaction was observed between short sleep duration and the riser pattern (P=.089). When subjects were categorized on the basis of their sleep time and riser/non-riser patterns, the shorter sleep+riser group had a substantially and significantly higher incidence of CVD than the predominant normal sleep+non-riser group (HR=4.43;2.09–9.39, P<0.001), independent of covariates. Conclusions Short duration of sleep is associated with incident CVD risk, and the combination of riser pattern and short duration of sleep that is most strongly predictive of future CVD, independent of ambulatory BP levels. Physicians should inquire about sleep duration in the risk assessment of hypertensive patients. PMID:19001199

  14. "Non-dipping" related to cardiovascular events in essential hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Zweiker, R; Eber, B; Schumacher, M; Toplak, H; Klein, W

    1994-01-01

    About 1 third of all patients with essential hypertension reveal an impaired circadian pattern of blood pressure. This phenomenon called "non-dipping" (i.e. a lack of the normal nocturnal fall in blood pressure) is related to a higher incidence of end-organ damage such as left ventricular hypertrophy. It is the purpose of this study to evaluate, whether or not non-dipping of blood pressure may worsen the prognosis of hypertensive subjects. 116 consecutive hypertensives underwent an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) using the Spacelabs 2000 device. 2 groups were established: Group I (n = 87) were "dippers", group II (n = 29) "non-dippers" showing a diminished or even lack of nocturnal fall in blood pressure. No difference was seen concerning sex, mean 24-hour systolic blood pressure, systolic and diastolic causal blood pressure and heart rate. However, a significant difference in age and mean 24-hour diastolic blood pressure could be observed. In a follow-up investigation after approximately 31 months all patients and/or their physicians were contacted concerning cardiovascular events during the time since the ABPM was performed. In Group I only 1 transient ischemic attack occurred, but in group II 4 patients showed major cardiovascular events: 3 deaths occurred (2 of which caused by myocardial infarction, 1 by apoplexy), while 1 suffered from a transient ischemic attack (p < 0.001). Thus, in essential hypertension non-dipping of blood pressure is associated with an increased occurrence of cardiovascular events, and, therefore, the circadian blood pressure profile should be carefully monitored.

  15. Hypertension Control in Adults With Diabetes Mellitus and Recurrent Cardiovascular Events: Global Results From the Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Navar, Ann Marie; Gallup, Dianne S; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Green, Jennifer B; McGuire, Darren K; Armstrong, Paul W; Buse, John B; Engel, Samuel S; Lachin, John M; Standl, Eberhard; Van de Werf, Frans; Holman, Rury R; Peterson, Eric D

    2017-08-28

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) treatment targets for adults with diabetes mellitus remain unclear. SBP levels among 12 275 adults with diabetes mellitus, prior cardiovascular disease, and treated hypertension were evaluated in the TECOS (Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes with Sitagliptin) randomized trial of sitagliptin versus placebo. The association between baseline SBP and recurrent cardiovascular disease was evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling with restricted cubic splines, adjusting for clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier curves by baseline SBP were created to assess time to cardiovascular disease and 2 potential hypotension-related adverse events: worsening kidney function and fractures. The association between time-updated SBP and outcomes was examined using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, 42.2% of adults with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension had an SBP ≥140 mm Hg. The association between SBP and cardiovascular disease risk was U shaped, with a nadir ≈130 mm Hg. When the analysis was restricted to those with baseline SBP of 110 to 150 mm Hg, the adjusted association between SBP and cardiovascular disease risk was flat (hazard ratio per 10-mm Hg increase, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.02). There was no association between SBP and risk of fracture. Above 150 mm Hg, higher SBP was associated with increasing risk of worsening kidney function (hazard ratio per 10-mm Hg increase, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.18). Many patients with diabetes mellitus have uncontrolled hypertension. The U-shaped association between SBP and cardiovascular disease events was largely driven by those with very high or low SBP, with no difference in cardiovascular disease risk between 110 and 150 mm Hg. Lower SBP was not associated with higher risks of fractures or worsening kidney function. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Cardiovascular

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Overview of Cardiovascular research which addresses risks of space flight, including adaptive changes to the cephalad fluid shift (such as reduced circulating blood volume), potential for heart rhy...

  17. [Psychosocial factors as predictors of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events: contribution from animal models].

    PubMed

    Alboni, Paolo; Alboni, Marco

    2006-11-01

    Conventional risk factors (abnormal lipids, hypertension, etc.) are independent predictors of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events; however, these factors are not specific since about half patients with acute myocardial infarction paradoxically result at low cardiovascular risk. Recent prospective studies provide convincing evidence that some psychosocial factors are independent predictors of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, as well. Psychosocial factors that promote atherosclerosis can be divided into two general categories: chronic stressors, including social isolation/low social support and work stress (subordination without job control) and emotional factors, including affective disorders such as depression, severe anxiety and hostility/anger. The emotional factors, such as the chronic stressors, activate the biological mechanisms of chronic stress: increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic system and inflammation processes, which have atherogenic effects, and an increase in blood coagulation. In spite of the amount of published data, psychosocial factors receive little attention in the medical setting. About 30 years ago, Kuller defined the criteria for a causal relation between a risk factor and atherosclerosis and cardiac events. The first of these criteria states that experimental research should demonstrate that any new factor would increase the extent of atherosclerosis or its complications in suitable animal models. We carried out a bibliographic research in order to investigate whether the results of the studies dealing with animal examination and experimentation support the psychosocial factors as predictors of atherosclerosis. Contributions related to some of the psychosocial factors such as social isolation, subordination and hostility/anger have been found. In these studies atherosclerotic extension has been evaluated at necroscopy; however, the incidence of cardiovascular events has not been

  18. [Simulation of a risk for cardiovascular diseases and their events at individual and group levels].

    PubMed

    Boitsov, S A; Shal'nova, S A; Deev, A D; Kalinina, A M

    2013-01-01

    The transition from the identification of individual risk factors to the assessment of an overall or total risk, in other words, to the creation of prognostic models should be now recognized to be one of the most important achievements in the epidemiology of chronic noncommunicable diseases. The paper comparatively analyzes major current prognostic algorithms for assessing the risk of cardiovascular diseases and their events and the advantages and disadvantages of these algorithms. The authors provide evidence that it is necessary to create national risk models, including the most promising new indicators.

  19. Biomarkers of inflammation and risk of cardiovascular events in anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Ziad; Aulin, Julia; Andersson, Ulrika; Alexander, John H; Gersh, Bernard; Granger, Christopher B; Hanna, Michael; Horowitz, John; Hylek, Elaine M; Lopes, Renato D; Siegbahn, Agneta; Wallentin, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for stroke and mortality and the prothrombotic state has been linked to inflammation. In this study we evaluated the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers at baseline and future risk of cardiovascular events in the Apixaban for Reduction In Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial. The ARISTOTLE trial randomised 18,201 patients with AF to apixaban or warfarin. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C reactive protein (CRP) were analysed in plasma obtained at randomisation from 14,954 participants, and median follow-up was 1.9 years. Association between quartile groups of IL-6 and CRP and outcomes were analysed by Cox regression adjusted for clinical risk factors and other cardiovascular biomarkers (NT-proBNP, troponin, GDF-15, cystatin C). The IL-6 median level was 2.3 ng/L (IQR 1.5-3.9), median CRP level was 2.2 mg/L (1.0-4.8). IL-6 and CRP were significantly associated with all-cause mortality independent of clinical risk factors and other biomarkers (HR (95% CI) 1.93 (1.57 to 2.37) and 1.49 (1.24 to 1.79), respectively, Q4 vs Q1). IL-6 was associated with myocardial infarction, cardiovascular mortality, and major bleeding beyond clinical risk factors but not in the presence of cardiovascular biomarkers (NT-proBNP, troponin, GDF-15, cystatin C). Neither inflammatory biomarker was associated with stroke/systemic embolism. Risk prediction for stroke, death and major bleeding was not improved by IL-6 or CRP when added to clinical risk factors and the other cardiovascular biomarkers (NT-proBNP, troponin, GDF-15, cystatin C). In patients with AF on anticoagulation, after accounting for clinical risk factors and other biomarkers, biomarkers of inflammation were significantly associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, there were no associations with the risk of stroke or major bleeding. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00412984 post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  20. [Stratification of thoracic pain with modified HEART score and its relationship to short term cardiovascular events].

    PubMed

    Chacón-Diaz, Manuel; Salinas, Jorge; Doig, Rafael

    2017-07-13

    Chest pain is a major reason for emergency room care worldwide. The relationship between the Modified Heart Score and the presence of major cardiac events at 30 days after emergency admission was evaluated. Retrospective, observational study in a single center. In patients older than 18 years old, who were treated for chest pain, in whom the Modified HEART Score was applied at admission and related to the presence of major cardiac events (myocardial infarction, death, hospitalization due to cardiac causes and percutaneous coronary revascularization Or surgical) at 30 days of follow-up. Of 158 patients analyzed, 17 adverse events (10.8%) were found at follow-up. The modified HEART score could predict adverse events in 4%; 21.4% and 100% of patients with scores 0-3; 4-6 and 7-10 respectively (P=.0001). A modified HEART score greater than or equal to 4 was associated with more adverse events (OR: 4.52; CI 2.76-7.39) with a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 84%. The application of the modified HEART score stratifies patients with chest pain in an adequate manner in low, moderate and high risk of cardiovascular complications, which allows the emergency units to improve their protocols for triage and diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Parametric conditional frailty models for recurrent cardiovascular events in the lipid study.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jisheng; Forbes, Andrew; Kirby, Adrienne; Marschner, Ian; Simes, John; West, Malcolm; Tonkin, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of recurrent event data is frequently needed in clinical and epidemiological studies. An important issue in such analysis is how to account for the dependence of the events in an individual and any unobserved heterogeneity of the event propensity across individuals. We applied a number of conditional frailty and nonfrailty models in an analysis involving recurrent myocardial infarction events in the Long-Term Intervention with Pravastatin in Ischaemic Disease study. A multiple variable risk prediction model was developed for both males and females. A Weibull model with a gamma frailty term fitted the data better than other frailty models for each gender. Among nonfrailty models the stratified survival model fitted the data best for each gender. The relative risk estimated by the elapsed time model was close to that estimated by the gap time model. We found that a cholesterol-lowering drug, pravastatin (the intervention being tested in the trial) had significant protective effect against the occurrence of myocardial infarction in men (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.60-0.83). However, the treatment effect was not significant in women due to smaller sample size (HR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.51-1.10). There were no significant interactions between the treatment effect and each recurrent MI event (p = 0.24 for men and p = 0.55 for women). The risk of developing an MI event for a male who had an MI event during follow-up was about 3.4 (95% CI 2.6-4.4) times the risk compared with those who did not have an MI event. The corresponding relative risk for a female was about 7.8 (95% CI 4.4-13.6). The number of female patients was relatively small compared with their male counterparts, which may result in low statistical power to find real differences in the effect of treatment and other potential risk factors. The conditional frailty model suggested that after accounting for all the risk factors in the model, there was still unmeasured heterogeneity of the risk for myocardial infarction

  2. Efficacy and safety of alirocumab in reducing lipids and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer G; Farnier, Michel; Krempf, Michel; Bergeron, Jean; Luc, Gérald; Averna, Maurizio; Stroes, Erik S; Langslet, Gisle; Raal, Frederick J; El Shahawy, Mahfouz; Koren, Michael J; Lepor, Norman E; Lorenzato, Christelle; Pordy, Robert; Chaudhari, Umesh; Kastelein, John J P

    2015-04-16

    Alirocumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9), has been shown to reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in patients who are receiving statin therapy. Larger and longer-term studies are needed to establish safety and efficacy. We conducted a randomized trial involving 2341 patients at high risk for cardiovascular events who had LDL cholesterol levels of 70 mg per deciliter (1.8 mmol per liter) or more and were receiving treatment with statins at the maximum tolerated dose (the highest dose associated with an acceptable side-effect profile), with or without other lipid-lowering therapy. Patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive alirocumab (150 mg) or placebo as a 1-ml subcutaneous injection every 2 weeks for 78 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was the percentage change in calculated LDL cholesterol level from baseline to week 24. At week 24, the difference between the alirocumab and placebo groups in the mean percentage change from baseline in calculated LDL cholesterol level was -62 percentage points (P<0.001); the treatment effect remained consistent over a period of 78 weeks. The alirocumab group, as compared with the placebo group, had higher rates of injection-site reactions (5.9% vs. 4.2%), myalgia (5.4% vs. 2.9%), neurocognitive events (1.2% vs. 0.5%), and ophthalmologic events (2.9% vs. 1.9%). In a post hoc analysis, the rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (death from coronary heart disease, nonfatal myocardial infarction, fatal or nonfatal ischemic stroke, or unstable angina requiring hospitalization) was lower with alirocumab than with placebo (1.7% vs. 3.3%; hazard ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.31 to 0.90; nominal P=0.02). Over a period of 78 weeks, alirocumab, when added to statin therapy at the maximum tolerated dose, significantly reduced LDL cholesterol levels. In a post hoc analysis, there was evidence of a reduction in the rate of

  3. Common carotid intima-media thickness relates to cardiovascular events in adults aged <45 years.

    PubMed

    Eikendal, Anouk L M; Groenewegen, Karlijn A; Anderson, Todd J; Britton, Annie R; Engström, Gunnar; Evans, Greg W; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hedblad, Bo; Holewijn, Suzanne; Ikeda, Ai; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Kitamura, Akihiko; Lonn, Eva M; Lorenz, Matthias W; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Okazaki, Shuhei; O'Leary, Daniel H; Polak, Joseph F; Price, Jacqueline F; Robertson, Christine; Rembold, Christopher M; Rosvall, Maria; Rundek, Tatjana; Salonen, Jukka T; Sitzer, Matthias; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Hoefer, Imo E; Peters, Sanne A E; Bots, Michiel L; den Ruijter, Hester M

    2015-04-01

    Although atherosclerosis starts in early life, evidence on risk factors and atherosclerosis in individuals aged <45 years is scarce. Therefore, we studied the relationship between risk factors, common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and first-time cardiovascular events in adults aged <45 years. Our study population consisted of 3067 adults aged <45 years free from symptomatic cardiovascular disease at baseline, derived from 6 cohorts that are part of the USE-IMT initiative, an individual participant data meta-analysis of general-population-based cohort studies evaluating CIMT measurements. Information on risk factors, CIMT measurements, and follow-up of the combined end point (first-time myocardial infarction or stroke) was obtained. We assessed the relationship between risk factors and CIMT and the relationship between CIMT and first-time myocardial infarction or stroke using a multivariable linear mixed-effects model and a Cox proportional-hazards model, respectively. During a follow-up of 16.3 years, 55 first-time myocardial infarctions or strokes occurred. Median CIMT was 0.63 mm. Of the risk factors under study, age, sex, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol related to CIMT. Furthermore, CIMT related to first-time myocardial infarction or stroke with a hazard ratio of 1.40 per SD increase in CIMT, independent of risk factors (95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.76). CIMT may be a valuable marker for cardiovascular risk in adults aged <45 years who are not yet eligible for standard cardiovascular risk screening. This is especially relevant in those with an increased, unfavorable risk factor burden.

  4. Plasma Arginine/Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Ratio and Incidence of Cardiovascular Events: A Case-Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Edward; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Hu, Frank B; Clish, Clary B; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Hruby, Adela; Fitó, Montserrat; Liang, Liming; Toledo, Estefanía; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramón; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Lapetra, José; Arós, Fernando; Romaguera, Dora; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Wang, Dong D; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2017-06-01

    Arginine, its methylated metabolites, and other metabolites related to the urea cycle have been independently associated with cardiovascular risk, but the potential causal meaning of these associations (positive for some metabolites and negative for others) remains elusive due to a lack of studies measuring metabolite changes over time. To examine the association between baseline and 1-year concentrations of urea cycle metabolites and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a case-cohort setting. A case-cohort study was nested within the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea trial. We used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to assess metabolite levels at baseline and after 1-year follow-up. The primary CVD outcome was a composite of myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death. We used weighted Cox regression models (Barlow weights) to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multicenter randomized trial in Spain. Participants were 984 participants accruing 231 events over 4.7 years' median follow-up. Incident CVD. Baseline arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio [HR per standard deviation (SD) = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.96] and global arginine availability [arginine / (ornithine + citrulline)] (HR per SD = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.00) were significantly associated with lower risk of CVD. We observed no significant association for 1-year changes in these ratios or any effect modification by the Mediterranean diet (MD) intervention. A higher baseline arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio was associated with lower CVD incidence in a high cardiovascular risk population. The intervention with the MD did not change 1-year levels of these metabolites.

  5. Impact of mitral annular calcification on cardiovascular events in a multiethnic community: the Northern Manhattan Study.

    PubMed

    Kohsaka, Shun; Jin, Zhezhen; Rundek, Tatjana; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2008-09-01

    We sought to determine the magnitude of the association between mitral annular calcification (MAC) and vascular events in a multiethnic cohort. Mitral annular calcification is common in the elderly and is associated with atherosclerotic risk factors. Its impact on the risk of cardiovascular events is controversial. The study cohort consisted of 1,955 subjects, ages >or=40 years, and free of prior myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke (IS). Mitral annular calcification was assessed by transthoracic 2-dimensional echocardiography. The association between MAC and MI, IS, and vascular death (VD) was examined by Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors. The effect of MAC thickness was also analyzed. The mean age of the cohort was 68.0 +/- 9.7 years and the majority of subjects were Hispanics (56.8%). A total of 519 subjects (26.6%) had MAC. Of 498 patients with MAC thickness measurements available, 253 (13.1%) had mild to moderate MAC (1 to 4 mm) and 245 (12.7%) severe MAC (>4 mm). During a mean follow-up of 7.4 +/- 2.5 years, MI occurred in 100 (5.1%) subjects, IS in 104 (5.3%) subjects, and VD in 155 (8.0%) subjects. After adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors, MAC was associated with an increased risk of MI (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13 to 2.69, p = 0.011) and VD (adjusted HR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.09 to 2.15, p = 0.015), but not IS (adjusted HR: 1.34; 95% CI: 0.87 to 2.05, p = 0.18). Further analysis revealed that the impact of MAC was related to its thickness, with MAC >4 mm being a strong and independent predictor of MI (adjusted HR: 1.89; 95% CI: 1.13 to 3.17, p = 0.008) and VD (adjusted HR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.21 to 2.72, p = 0.002), and showing borderline association with IS (adjusted HR: 1.59; 95% CI: 0.95 to 2.67, p = 0.084). In this multiethnic cohort, MAC was a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular events, especially MI and VD. The risk increase

  6. Impact of mitral annular calcification on cardiovascular events in a multiethnic community. The Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Kohsaka, Shun; Jin, Zhezhen; Rundek, Tatjana; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We sought to determine the magnitude of the association between mitral annular calcification (MAC) and vascular events in a multiethnic cohort. BACKGROUND MAC is common in the elderly, and is associated with atherosclerotic risk factors. Its impact on the risk of cardiovascular events is controversial. METHODS The study cohort consisted of 1,955 subjects, aged ≥40 years, and free of prior myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke (IS). MAC was assessed by transthoracic 2D echocardiography. The association between MAC and MI, IS, and vascular death (VD) was examined by Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors. The effect of MAC thickness was also analyzed. RESULTS The mean age of the cohort was 68.0 ± 9.7 years and the majority of subjects were Hispanics (56.8%). 519 subjects (26.6%) had MAC. Of 498 patients with MAC thickness measurement available, 253 (13.1%) had mild to moderate MAC (1–4mm) and 245 (12.7%) severe MAC (≥4mm). During a mean follow-up of 7.4 ± 2.5 years, MI occurred in 100 (5.1%) subjects, IS in 104 (5.3%) subjects, and VD in 155 (8.0%) subjects. After adjustment for other cardiovascular risk factors, MAC was associated with an increased risk of MI (adjusted hazards ratio [HR] 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–2.69: p=0.011) and VD (adjusted HR 1.53; 95%CI 1.09–2.15: p=0.015), but not IS (adjusted HR 1.34; 95%CI 0.87–2.05: p=0.18). Further analysis revealed that the impact of MAC was related to its thickness, with MAC >4mm being a strong and independent predictor of MI (adjusted HR 1.89: 95%CI 1.13–3.17: p=0.008) and VD (adjusted HR 1.81: 95%CI 1.21–2.72: p=0.002), and showing borderline association with IS (adjusted HR 1.59: 95%CI 0.95–2.67: p=0.084). CONCLUSIONS In this multiethnic cohort, MAC was a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular events, especially MI and VD. The risk increase was directly related to MAC severity. PMID:19356491

  7. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Predict Cardiovascular Events after Atherothrombotic Stroke and Acute Myocardial Infarction. A PROCELL Substudy.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Regueiro, Ander; Núñez, Julio; Díaz-Ricard, Maribel; Novella, Susana; Oliveras, Anna; Valverde, Miguel A; Marrugat, Jaume; Ois, Angel; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Sanchís, Juan; Escolar, Ginès; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Heras, Magda; Roquer, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine prognostic factors for the risk of new vascular events during the first 6 months after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or atherothrombotic stroke (AS). We were interested in the prognostic role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and circulating endothelial cells (CEC). Between February 2009 and July 2012, 100 AMI and 50 AS patients were consecutively studied in three Spanish centres. Patients with previously documented coronary artery disease or ischemic strokes were excluded. Samples were collected within 24h of onset of symptoms. EPC and CEC were studied using flow cytometry and categorized by quartiles. Patients were followed for up to 6 months. NVE was defined as new acute coronary syndrome, transient ischemic attack (TIA), stroke, or any hospitalization or death from cardiovascular causes. The variables included in the analysis included: vascular risk factors, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), atherosclerotic burden and basal EPC and CEC count. Multivariate survival analysis was performed using Cox regression analysis. During follow-up, 19 patients (12.66%) had a new vascular event (5 strokes; 3 TIAs; 4 AMI; 6 hospitalizations; 1 death). Vascular events were associated with age (P = 0.039), carotid IMT≥0.9 (P = 0.044), and EPC count (P = 0.041) in the univariate analysis. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed an independent association with EPC in the lowest quartile (HR: 10.33, 95%CI (1.22-87.34), P = 0.032] and IMT≥0.9 [HR: 4.12, 95%CI (1.21-13.95), P = 0.023]. Basal EPC and IMT≥0.9 can predict future vascular events in patients with AMI and AS, but CEC count does not affect cardiovascular risk.

  8. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Predict Cardiovascular Events after Atherothrombotic Stroke and Acute Myocardial Infarction. A PROCELL Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Regueiro, Ander; Núñez, Julio; Díaz-Ricard, Maribel; Novella, Susana; Oliveras, Anna; Valverde, Miguel A.; Marrugat, Jaume; Ois, Angel; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Sanchís, Juan; Escolar, Ginès; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Roquer, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine prognostic factors for the risk of new vascular events during the first 6 months after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or atherothrombotic stroke (AS). We were interested in the prognostic role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and circulating endothelial cells (CEC) Methods Between February 2009 and July 2012, 100 AMI and 50 AS patients were consecutively studied in three Spanish centres. Patients with previously documented coronary artery disease or ischemic strokes were excluded. Samples were collected within 24h of onset of symptoms. EPC and CEC were studied using flow cytometry and categorized by quartiles. Patients were followed for up to 6 months. NVE was defined as new acute coronary syndrome, transient ischemic attack (TIA), stroke, or any hospitalization or death from cardiovascular causes. The variables included in the analysis included: vascular risk factors, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), atherosclerotic burden and basal EPC and CEC count. Multivariate survival analysis was performed using Cox regression analysis. Results During follow-up, 19 patients (12.66%) had a new vascular event (5 strokes; 3 TIAs; 4 AMI; 6 hospitalizations; 1 death). Vascular events were associated with age (P = 0.039), carotid IMT≥0.9 (P = 0.044), and EPC count (P = 0.041) in the univariate analysis. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed an independent association with EPC in the lowest quartile (HR: 10.33, 95%CI (1.22–87.34), P = 0.032] and IMT≥0.9 [HR: 4.12, 95%CI (1.21–13.95), P = 0.023]. Conclusions Basal EPC and IMT≥0.9 can predict future vascular events in patients with AMI and AS, but CEC count does not affect cardiovascular risk. PMID:26332322

  9. Attenuation of Cardiovascular Responses and Upper Airway Events to Tracheal Extubation by Low Dose Propofol

    PubMed Central

    Moein Vaziri, Mohammad Taghy; Jouybar, Reza; Moein Vaziri, Nader; Moein Vaziri, Najmeh; Panah, Ashkan

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic changes and respiratory tract complications are often followed by tracheal extubation. These events may be dangerous in neurosurgical patients and those with cardiovascular disease or at an old age. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the attenuation of cardiovascular responses and upper airway events resulting from tracheal extubation by low dose propofol. Materials and Methods 80 patients with ASA physical status I, undergoing an elective surgery in a double blind manner received 0.5mg/kg propofol or normal saline 2 minutes before extubation. Heart rate and blood pressure and quality of tracheal extubation were recorded. Results Heart rate and blood pressure in patients receiving propofol were less than the control group (P < 0.05) at the time of injection of propofol, but there were no differences between the two groups at the time of extubation. Conclusions We concluded that propofol can reduce SBP, DBP, MAP, HR & cough production at the time of injection but there were no significant changes in these parameters after extubation. PMID:24083001

  10. Prognostic value of computed tomographic coronary angiography and exercise electrocardiography for cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye-Hwan; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Kang, Min Gyu; Ahn, Jong Hwa; Koh, Jin-Sin; Park, Yongwhi; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Jeong, Young-Hoon; Kwak, Choong Hwan; Hwang, Jin-Yong; Park, Jeong Rang

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study is a head-to-head comparison of predictive values for long-term cardiovascular outcomes between exercise electrocardiography (ex-ECG) and computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with chest pain. Methods: Four hundred and forty-two patients (mean age, 56.1 years; men, 61.3%) who underwent both ex-ECG and CTCA for evaluation of chest pain were included. For ex-ECG parameters, the patients were classified according to negative or positive results, and Duke treadmill score (DTS). Coronary artery calcium score (CACS), presence of plaque, and coronary artery stenosis were evaluated as CTCA parameters. Cardiovascular events for prognostic evaluation were defined as unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, revascularization, heart failure, and cardiac death. Results: The mean follow-up duration was 2.8 ± 1.1 years. Fifteen patients experienced cardiovascular events. Based on pretest probability, the low- and intermediate-risks of coronary artery disease were 94.6%. Odds ratio of CACS > 40, presence of plaque, coronary stenosis ≥ 50% and DTS ≤ 4 were significant (3.79, p = 0.012; 9.54, p = 0.030; 6.99, p < 0.001; and 4.58, p = 0.008, respectively). In the Cox regression model, coronary stenosis ≥ 50% (hazard ratio, 7.426; 95% confidence interval, 2.685 to 20.525) was only significant. After adding DTS ≤ 4 to coronary stenosis ≥ 50%, the integrated discrimination improvement and net reclassification improvement analyses did not show significant. Conclusions: CTCA was better than ex-ECG in terms of predicting long-term outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk populations. The predictive value of the combination of CTCA and ex-ECG was not superior to that of CTCA alone. PMID:27017387

  11. Metabolic profiling of murine plasma reveals an unexpected biomarker in rofecoxib-mediated cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Li, Ning; Yang, Jun; Li, Nan; Qiu, Hong; Ai, Ding; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Zhu, Yi; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic administration of high levels of selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs), particularly rofecoxib, valdecoxib, and parecoxib, increases risk for cardiovascular disease. Understanding the possibly multiple mechanisms underlying these adverse cardiovascular events is critical for evaluating the risks and benefits of coxibs and for development of safer coxibs. The current understanding of these mechanisms is likely incomplete. Using a metabolomics approach, we demonstrate that oral administration of rofecoxib for 3 mo results in a greater than 120-fold higher blood level of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which correlates with a significantly shorter tail bleeding time in a murine model. We tested the hypothesis that this dramatic increase in 20-HETE is attributable to inhibition of its metabolism and that the shortened bleeding time following rofecoxib administration is attributable, in part, to this increase. The s.c. infusion of 20-HETE shortened the tail bleeding time dramatically. Neither 20-HETE biosynthesis nor cytochrome P4A-like immune reactivity was increased by rofecoxib administration, but 20-HETE production increased in vitro with the addition of coxib. 20-HETE is significantly more potent than its COX-mediated metabolites in shortening clotting time in vitro. Furthermore, 20-HETE but not rofecoxib significantly increases rat platelet aggregation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest 20-HETE as a marker of rofecoxib exposure and that inhibition of 20-HETE's degradation by rofecoxib is a partial explanation for its dramatic increase, the shortened bleeding time, and, possibly, the adverse cardiovascular events associated with rofecoxib. PMID:20837537

  12. Magnesium and the Risk of Cardiovascular Events: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yongqiang; Li, Huiwu; Tang, Tingting; Wang, Hao; Yan, Weili; Dai, Kerong

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective studies that have examined the association between dietary magnesium intake and serum magnesium concentrations and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events have reported conflicting findings. We undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between dietary magnesium intake and serum magnesium concentrations and the risk of total CVD events. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed systematic searches on MEDLINE, EMBASE, and OVID up to February 1, 2012 without limits. Categorical, linear, and nonlinear, dose-response, heterogeneity, publication bias, subgroup, and meta-regression analysis were performed. The analysis included 532,979 participants from 19 studies (11 studies on dietary magnesium intake, 6 studies on serum magnesium concentrations, and 2 studies on both) with 19,926 CVD events. The pooled relative risks of total CVD events for the highest vs. lowest category of dietary magnesium intake and serum magnesium concentrations were 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 0.92) and 0.77 (0.66 to 0.87), respectively. In linear dose-response analysis, only serum magnesium concentrations ranging from 1.44 to 1.8 mEq/L were significantly associated with total CVD events risk (0.91, 0.85 to 0.97) per 0.1 mEq/L (Pnonlinearity = 0.465). However, significant inverse associations emerged in nonlinear models for dietary magnesium intake (Pnonlinearity = 0.024). The greatest risk reduction occurred when intake increased from 150 to 400 mg/d. There was no evidence of publication bias. Conclusions/Significance There is a statistically significant nonlinear inverse association between dietary magnesium intake and total CVD events risk. Serum magnesium concentrations are linearly and inversely associated with the risk of total CVD events. PMID:23520480

  13. Cinacalcet, Fibroblast Growth Factor-23, and Cardiovascular Disease in Hemodialysis: The Evaluation of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events (EVOLVE) Trial.

    PubMed

    Moe, Sharon M; Chertow, Glenn M; Parfrey, Patrick S; Kubo, Yumi; Block, Geoffrey A; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Drüeke, Tilman B; Herzog, Charles A; London, Gerard M; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Wheeler, David C; Stolina, Maria; Dehmel, Bastian; Goodman, William G; Floege, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    Patients with kidney disease have disordered bone and mineral metabolism, including elevated serum concentrations of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). These elevated concentrations are associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The objective was to determine the effects of the calcimimetic cinacalcet (versus placebo) on reducing serum FGF23 and whether changes in FGF23 are associated with death and cardiovascular events. This was a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial comparing cinacalcet to placebo in addition to conventional therapy (phosphate binders/vitamin D) in patients receiving hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism (intact parathyroid hormone ≥300 pg/mL). The primary study end point was time to death or a first nonfatal cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, hospitalization for angina, heart failure, or a peripheral vascular event). This analysis included 2985 patients (77% of randomized) with serum samples at baseline and 2602 patients (67%) with samples at both baseline and week 20. The results demonstrated that a significantly larger proportion of patients randomized to cinacalcet had ≥30% (68% versus 28%) reductions in FGF23. Among patients randomized to cinacalcet, a ≥30% reduction in FGF23 between baseline and week 20 was associated with a nominally significant reduction in the primary composite end point (relative hazard, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.98), cardiovascular mortality (relative hazard, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.87), sudden cardiac death (relative hazard, 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.86), and heart failure (relative hazard, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.99). Treatment with cinacalcet significantly lowers serum FGF23. Treatment-induced reductions in serum FGF23 are associated with lower rates of cardiovascular death and major cardiovascular events. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00345839. © 2015 American Heart Association

  14. Rationale and design of REDUCE-IT: Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with Icosapent Ethyl-Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Brinton, Eliot A; Jacobson, Terry A; Miller, Michael; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Ketchum, Steven B; Doyle, Ralph T; Murphy, Sabina A; Soni, Paresh N; Braeckman, Rene A; Juliano, Rebecca A; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2017-03-01

    Residual cardiovascular risk persists despite statins, yet outcome studies of lipid-targeted therapies beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) have not demonstrated added benefit. Triglyceride elevation is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. High-dose eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) reduces triglyceride-rich lipoproteins without raising LDL-C. Omega-3s have postulated pleiotropic cardioprotective benefits beyond triglyceride-lowering. To date, no large, multinational, randomized clinical trial has proved that lowering triglycerides on top of statin therapy improves cardiovascular outcomes. The Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with Icosapent Ethyl-Intervention Trial (REDUCE-IT; NCT01492361) is a phase 3b randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of icosapent ethyl, a highly purified ethyl ester of EPA, vs placebo. The main objective is to evaluate whether treatment with icosapent ethyl reduces ischemic events in statin-treated patients with high triglycerides at elevated cardiovascular risk. REDUCE-IT enrolled men or women age ≥45 years with established cardiovascular disease or age ≥50 years with diabetes mellitus and 1 additional risk factor. Randomization required fasting triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL and <500 mg/dL and LDL-C >40 mg/dL and ≤100 mg/dL with stable statin (± ezetimibe) ≥4 weeks prior to qualifying measurements. The primary endpoint is a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, coronary revascularization, or unstable angina. The key secondary endpoint is the composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Several secondary, tertiary, and exploratory endpoints will be assessed. Approximately 8000 patients have been randomized at approximately 470 centers worldwide. Follow-up will continue in this event-driven trial until approximately 1612 adjudicated primary-efficacy endpoint events have occurred. © 2017 The

  15. Do the Effects of Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in PAD Patients Differ from Other Atherosclerotic Disease?

    PubMed

    Poredos, Pavel; Jezovnik, Mateja Kaja

    2015-06-25

    Atherosclerosis is considered a generalized disease. Similar or identical etiopathogenetic mechanisms and risk factors are involved in various atherosclerotic diseases, and the positive effects of preventive measures on atherogenesis in different parts of the arterial system were shown. However, until know, great emphasis has been placed on the aggressive pharmacological management of coronary artery disease (CHD), while less attention has been devoted to the management of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), despite its significant morbidity and mortality. Data on the efficacy of preventive measures in PAD patients have mostly been gained from subgroup analyses from studies devoted primarily to the management of coronary patients. These data have shown that treatment of risk factors for atherosclerosis with drugs can reduce cardiovascular events also in patients with PAD. The effects of some preventive procedures in PAD patients differ from coronary patients. Aspirin as a basic antiplatelet drug has been shown to be less effective in PAD patients than in coronary patients. The latest Antithrombotic Trialists' Collaboration (ATC) meta-analysis demonstrates no benefit of aspirin in reducing cardiovascular events in PAD. Statins reduce cardiovascular events in all three of the most frequently presented cardiovascular diseases, including PAD to a comparable extent. Recent studies indicate that in PAD patients, in addition to a reduction in cardiovascular events, statins may have some hemodynamic effects. They prolong walking distance and improve quality of life. Similarly, angiotensin enzyme inhibitors are also effective in the prevention of cardiovascular events in coronary, cerebrovascular, as well as PAD patients and show positive effects on the walking capacity of patients with intermittent claudication. In PAD patients, the treatment of hypertension and diabetes also effectively prevents cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As PAD patients are at a highest risk

  16. Cardiovascular event risk dynamics over time in older patients on dialysis: a generalized multiple-index varying coefficient model approach.

    PubMed

    Estes, Jason P; Nguyen, Danh V; Dalrymple, Lorien S; Mu, Yi; Şentürk, Damla

    2014-09-01

    Among patients on dialysis, cardiovascular disease and infection are leading causes of hospitalization and death. Although recent studies have found that the risk of cardiovascular events is higher after an infection-related hospitalization, studies have not fully elucidated how the risk of cardiovascular events changes over time for patients on dialysis. In this work, we characterize the dynamics of cardiovascular event risk trajectories for patients on dialysis while conditioning on survival status via multiple time indices: (1) time since the start of dialysis, (2) time since the pivotal initial infection-related hospitalization, and (3) the patient's age at the start of dialysis. This is achieved by using a new class of generalized multiple-index varying coefficient (GM-IVC) models. The proposed GM-IVC models utilize a multiplicative structure and one-dimensional varying coefficient functions along each time and age index to capture the cardiovascular risk dynamics before and after the initial infection-related hospitalization among the dynamic cohort of survivors. We develop a two-step estimation procedure for the GM-IVC models based on local maximum likelihood. We report new insights on the dynamics of cardiovascular events risk using the United States Renal Data System database, which collects data on nearly all patients with end-stage renal disease in the United States. Finally, simulation studies assess the performance of the proposed estimation procedures. © 2014, The International Biometric Society.

  17. Cardiovascular Event Risk Dynamics Over Time in Older Patients on Dialysis: A Generalized Multiple-Index Varying Coefficient Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Estes, Jason P.; Nguyen, Danh V.; Dalrymple, Lorien S.; Mu, Yi; Şentürk, Damla

    2014-01-01

    Among patients on dialysis, cardiovascular disease and infection are leading causes of hospitalization and death. Although recent studies have found that the risk of cardiovascular events is higher after an infection-related hospitalization, studies have not fully elucidated how the risk of cardiovascular events changes over time for patients on dialysis. In this work, we characterize the dynamics of cardiovascular event risk trajectories for patients on dialysis while conditioning on survival status via multiple time indices: (1) time since the start of dialysis, (2) time since the pivotal initial infection-related hospitalization and (3) the patient’s age at the start of dialysis. This is achieved by using a new class of generalized multiple-index varying coefficient (GM-IVC) models. The proposed GM-IVC models utilize a multiplicative structure and one-dimensional varying coefficient functions along each time and age index to capture the cardiovascular risk dynamics before and after the initial infection-related hospitalization among the dynamic cohort of survivors. We develop a two-step estimation procedure for the GM-IVC models based on local maximum likelihood. We report new insights on the dynamics of cardiovascular events risk using the United States Renal Data System database, which collects data on nearly all patients with end-stage renal disease in the U.S. Finally, simulation studies assess the performance of the proposed estimation procedures. PMID:24766178

  18. Density of calcium in the ascending thoracic aorta and risk of incident cardiovascular disease events.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Isac C; McClelland, Robyn L; Michos, Erin D; Allison, Matthew A; Forbang, Nketi I; Longstreth, W T; Post, Wendy S; Wong, Nathan D; Budoff, Matthew J; Criqui, Michael H

    2017-10-01

    The volume and density of coronary artery calcium (CAC) both independently predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) beyond standard risk factors, with CAC density inversely associated with incident CVD after accounting for CAC volume. We tested the hypothesis that ascending thoracic aorta calcium (ATAC) volume and density predict incident CVD events independently of CAC. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a prospective cohort study of participants without clinical CVD at baseline. ATAC and CAC were measured from baseline cardiac computed tomography (CT). Cox regression models were used to estimate the associations of ATAC volume and density with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) events and CVD events, after adjustment for standard CVD risk factors and CAC volume and density. Among 6811 participants, 234 (3.4%) had prevalent ATAC and 3395 (49.8%) had prevalent CAC. Over 10.3 years, 355 CHD and 562 CVD events occurred. One-standard deviation higher ATAC density was associated with a lower risk of CHD (HR 0.48 [95% CI 0.29-0.79], p<0.01) and CVD (HR 0.56 [0.37-0.84], p<0.01) after full adjustment. ATAC volume was not associated with outcomes after full adjustment. ATAC was uncommon in a cohort free of clinical CVD at baseline. However, ATAC density was inversely associated with incident CHD and CVD after adjustment for CVD risk factors and CAC volume and density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Events in the Randomized, Controlled Alzheimer's Disease Anti-Inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT)

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The Alzheimer's Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT) was designed to evaluate the conventional NSAID naproxen sodium and the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for primary prevention of Alzheimer's dementia (AD). On 17 December 2004, after the Adenoma Prevention with Celecoxib (APC) trial reported increased cardiovascular risks with celecoxib, the ADAPT Steering Committee suspended treatment and enrollment. This paper reports on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in ADAPT. Design: ADAPT is a randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel chemoprevention trial with 1–46 mo of follow-up. Setting: The trial was conducted at six field sites in the United States: Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Rochester, New York; Seattle, Washington; Sun City, Arizona; and Tampa, Florida. Participants: The 2,528 participants were aged 70 y and older with a family history of AD. Interventions: Study treatments were celecoxib (200 mg b.i.d.), naproxen sodium (220 mg b.i.d.), and placebo. Outcome measures: Outcome measures were deaths, along with nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, congestive heart failure (CHF), transient ischemic attack (TIA), and antihypertensive treatment recorded from structured interviews at scheduled intervals. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to analyze these events individually and in several composites. Results: Counts (with 3-y incidence) of participants who experienced cardiovascular or cerebrovascular death, MI, stroke, CHF, or TIA in the celecoxib-, naproxen-, and placebo-treated groups were 28/717 (5.54%), 40/713 (8.25%), and 37/1070 (5.68%), respectively. This yielded a hazard ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) for celecoxib of 1.10 (0.67–1.79) and for naproxen of 1.63 (1.04–2.55). Antihypertensive treatment was initiated in 160/440 (47.43%), 147/427 (45.00%), and 164/644 (34.08%). This yielded hazard ratios (CIs) of 1.56 for celecoxib (1.26–1.94) and 1.40 for naproxen (1.12–1

  20. Under-reporting of cardiovascular events in the rofecoxib Alzheimer disease studies.

    PubMed

    Madigan, David; Sigelman, Daniel W; Mayer, James W; Furberg, Curt D; Avorn, Jerry

    2012-08-01

    In September 2004, rofecoxib (Vioxx) was removed from the market after it was found to produce a near doubling of cardiovascular thrombotic (CVT) events in a placebo-controlled study. Its manufacturer stated that this was the first clear evidence of such risk and criticized previous analyses of earlier CVT risk for focusing on investigator-reported events. We studied contemporaneously adjudicated CVT events to assess the information on cardiovascular risk available while the drug was in widespread use. Using an intention-to-treat analysis of adjudicated CVT deaths, we analyzed detailed patient-level data collected during 3 randomized placebo-controlled trials of rofecoxib versus placebo that had been designed to define the drug's possible role in the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer disease. All trials had been completed by April 2003. In the 3 studies combined, the data indicated that rofecoxib more than tripled the risk of confirmed CVT death (risk ratio = 3.57 [1.48-9.72], P = .004). This finding reached the P < .05 level of significance by June 2001. Intention-to-treat analysis of placebo-controlled studies of rofecoxib for Alzheimer disease demonstrated that the drug produced a significant increase in confirmed CVT deaths nearly 40 months before it was removed from the market. By contrast, published analyses of these trials were restricted to on-treatment analyses (ending 14 days after cessation of treatment) that did not reveal this risk. Intention-to-treat analyses of clinical trial data can reveal important information about potential drug risks and should be performed routinely and reported in a timely manner. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The β-Blocker to Lower Cardiovascular Dialysis Events (BLOCADE) Feasibility Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Matthew A; Pilmore, Helen L; Ierino, Francesco L; Badve, Sunil V; Cass, Alan; Garg, Amit X; Isbel, Nicole M; Krum, Henry; Pascoe, Elaine M; Perkovic, Vlado; Scaria, Anish; Tonkin, Andrew M; Vergara, Liza A; Hawley, Carmel M

    2016-06-01

    β-Blocking agents reduce cardiovascular mortality in patients with heart disease, but their potential benefit in dialysis patients is unclear. We aimed to determine the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Pilot RCT. Patients who received dialysis for 3 or more months and were 50 years or older (or ≥18 years with diabetes or cardiovascular disease) were recruited from 11 sites in Australia and New Zealand. We aimed to recruit 150 participants. After a 6-week run-in with the β-blocker carvedilol, we randomly assigned participants to treatment with carvedilol or placebo for 12 months. The prespecified primary outcome was the proportion of participants who tolerated carvedilol, 6.25mg, twice daily during the run-in period. After randomization, we report participant withdrawal and the incidence of intradialytic hypotension (IDH). Of 1,443 patients screened, 354 were eligible, 91 consented, and 72 entered the run-in stage. 49 of 72 run-in participants (68%; 95% CI, 57%-79%) achieved the primary outcome. 5 of the 23 withdrawals from run-in were attributable to bradycardia or hypotension. After randomization, 10 of 26 allocated to carvedilol and 4 of 23 allocated to placebo withdrew. 4 participants randomly assigned to carvedilol withdrew because of bradycardia or hypotension. Overall, there were 4 IDH events per 100 hemodialysis sessions; in participants allocated to carvedilol versus placebo, respectively, there were 7 versus 2 IDH events per 100 hemodialysis sessions (P=0.1) in the 2 weeks immediately following a dose increase and 4 versus 3 IDH events per 100 hemodialysis sessions after no dose increase (P=0.7). Unable to recruit planned sample size. Recruiting patients receiving dialysis to an RCT of β-blocker versus placebo will prove challenging. Possible solutions include international collaboration and exploring novel trial designs such as a registry-based RCT. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  2. Disease activity and lifestyle influence comorbidities and cardiovascular events in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Chiara; Cappellani, Daniele; Urbani, Claudio; Manetti, Luca; Marconcini, Giulia; Tomisti, Luca; Lupi, Isabella; Rossi, Giuseppe; Scattina, Ilaria; Lombardi, Martina; Di Bello, Vitantonio; Marcocci, Claudio; Martino, Enio; Bogazzi, Fausto

    2016-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is to identify the predictors of comorbidities and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) that can develop after diagnosis of acromegaly. The role of therapy for acromegaly in the event of such complications was also evaluated. Retrospective cohort study was conducted on 200 consecutive acromegalic patients in a tertiary referral center. The following outcomes were evaluated: diabetes, hypertension and MACE. Each patient was included in the analysis of a specific outcome, unless they were affected when acromegaly was diagnosed, and further classified as follows: (i) in remission after adenomectomy (Hx), (ii) controlled by somatostatin analogues (SSA) (SSAc) or (iii) not controlled by SSA (SSAnc). Data were evaluated using Cox regression analysis. After diagnosis of acromegaly, diabetes occurred in 40.8% of patients. The SSAnc group had a three-fold higher risk of diabetes (HR: 3.32, P = 0.006), whereas the SSAc group had a 1.4-fold higher risk of diabetes (HR: 1.43, P = 0.38) compared with the Hx group. Hypertension occurred in 35.5% of patients, after diagnosis. The determinants of hypertension were age (HR: 1.06, P = 0.01) and BMI (HR: 1.05, P = 0.01). MACE occurred in 11.8% of patients, after diagnosis. Age (HR: 1.09, P = 0.005) and smoking habit (HR: 5.95, P = 0.01) were predictors of MACE. Conversely, therapy for acromegaly did not influence hypertension or MACE. After diagnosis of acromegaly, control of the disease (irrespective of the type of treatment) and lifestyle are predictors of comorbidities and major adverse cardiovascular events. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  3. The predictive value of different measures of obesity for incident cardiovascular events and mortality.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Harald J; Friedrich, Nele; Klotsche, Jens; Pieper, Lars; Nauck, Matthias; John, Ulrich; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pittrow, David; Silber, Sigmund; Völzke, Henry; Stalla, Günter K; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-04-01

    To date, it is unclear which measure of obesity is the most appropriate for risk stratification. The aim of the study was to compare the associations of various measures of obesity with incident cardiovascular events and mortality. We analyzed two German cohort studies, the DETECT study and SHIP, including primary care and general population. A total of 6355 (mean follow-up, 3.3 yr) and 4297 (mean follow-up, 8.5 yr) individuals participated in DETECT and SHIP, respectively. We measured body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and assessed cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and the composite endpoint of incident stroke, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death. In both studies, we found a positive association of the composite endpoint with WHtR but not with BMI. There was no heterogeneity among studies. The relative risks in the highest versus the lowest sex- and age-specific quartile of WHtR, WC, WHR, and BMI after adjustment for multiple confounders were as follows in the pooled data: cardiovascular mortality, 2.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.31-5.77), 1.74 (0.84-3.6), 1.71 (0.91-3.22), and 0.74 (0.35-1.57), respectively; all-cause mortality, 1.86 (1.25-2.76), 1.62 (1.22-2.38), 1.36 (0.93-1.69), and 0.77 (0.53-1.13), respectively; and composite endpoint, 2.16 (1.39-3.35), 1.59 (1.04-2.44), 1.49 (1.07-2.07), and 0.57 (0.37-0.89), respectively. Separate analyses of sex and age groups yielded comparable results. Receiver operating characteristics analysis yielded the highest areas under the curve for WHtR for predicting these endpoints. WHtR represents the best predictor of cardiovascular risk and mortality, followed by WC and WHR. Our results discourage the use of the BMI.

  4. Weighted Hurdle Regression Method for Joint Modeling of Cardiovascular Events Likelihood and Rate in the U.S. Dialysis Population

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Damla; Dalrymple, Lorien S.; Mu, Yi; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We propose a new weighted hurdle regression method for modeling count data, with particular interest in modeling cardiovascular events in patients on dialysis. Cardiovascular disease remains one of the leading causes of hospitalization and death in this population. Our aim is to jointly model the relationship/association between covariates and (a) the probability of cardiovascular events, a binary process and (b) the rate of events once the realization is positive - when the ‘hurdle’ is crossed - using a zero-truncated Poisson distribution. When the observation period or follow-up time, from the start of dialysis, varies among individuals the estimated probability of positive cardiovascular events during the study period will be biased. Furthermore, when the model contains covariates, then the estimated relationship between the covariates and the probability of cardiovascular events will also be biased. These challenges are addressed with the proposed weighted hurdle regression method. Estimation for the weighted hurdle regression model is a weighted likelihood approach, where standard maximum likelihood estimation can be utilized. The method is illustrated with data from the United States Renal Data System. Simulation studies show the ability of proposed method to successfully adjust for differential follow-up times and incorporate the effects of covariates in the weighting. PMID:24930810

  5. Weighted hurdle regression method for joint modeling of cardiovascular events likelihood and rate in the US dialysis population.

    PubMed

    Sentürk, Damla; Dalrymple, Lorien S; Mu, Yi; Nguyen, Danh V

    2014-11-10

    We propose a new weighted hurdle regression method for modeling count data, with particular interest in modeling cardiovascular events in patients on dialysis. Cardiovascular disease remains one of the leading causes of hospitalization and death in this population. Our aim is to jointly model the relationship/association between covariates and (i) the probability of cardiovascular events, a binary process, and (ii) the rate of events once the realization is positive-when the 'hurdle' is crossed-using a zero-truncated Poisson distribution. When the observation period or follow-up time, from the start of dialysis, varies among individuals, the estimated probability of positive cardiovascular events during the study period will be biased. Furthermore, when the model contains covariates, then the estimated relationship between the covariates and the probability of cardiovascular events will also be biased. These challenges are addressed with the proposed weighted hurdle regression method. Estimation for the weighted hurdle regression model is a weighted likelihood approach, where standard maximum likelihood estimation can be utilized. The method is illustrated with data from the United States Renal Data System. Simulation studies show the ability of proposed method to successfully adjust for differential follow-up times and incorporate the effects of covariates in the weighting.

  6. Statin Trials, Cardiovascular Events, and Coronary Artery Calcification: Implications for a Trial-Based Approach to Statin Therapy in MESA.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Martin Bødtker; Falk, Erling; Li, Dong; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael J; Sandfort, Veit; Rodriguez, Carlos Jose; Ouyang, Pamela; Budoff, Matthew

    2017-06-09

    This study sought to determine whether coronary artery calcium (CAC) could be used to optimize statin allocation among individuals for whom trial-based evidence supports efficacy of statin therapy. Recently, allocation of statins was proposed for primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) based on proven efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of statin therapy, a so-called trial-based approach. The study used data from MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) with 5,600 men and women, 45 to 84 years of age, and free of clinical ASCVD, lipid-lowering therapy, or missing information for risk factors at baseline examination. During 10 years' follow-up, 354 ASCVD and 219 hard coronary heart disease (CHD) events occurred. Based on enrollment criteria for 7 RCTs of statin therapy in primary prevention, 73% of MESA participants (91% of those >55 years of age) were eligible for statin therapy according to a trial-based approach. Among those individuals, CAC = 0 was common (44%) and was associated with low rates of ASCVD and CHD (3.9 and 1.7, respectively, per 1,000 person-years). There was a graded increase in event rates with increasing CAC score, and in individuals with CAC >100 (27% of participants) the rates of ASCVD and CHD were 18.9 and 12.7, respectively. Consequently, the estimated number needed to treat (NNT) in 10 years to prevent 1 event varied greatly according to CAC score. For ASCVD events, the NNT was 87 for CAC = 0 and 19 for CAC >100. For CHD events, the NNT was 197 for CAC = 0 and 28 for CAC >100. Most MESA participants qualified for trial-based primary prevention with statins. Among the individuals for whom trial-based evidence supports efficacy of statin therapy, CAC = 0 and CAC >100 were common and associated with low and high cardiovascular risks, respectively. This information may guide shared decision making aimed at targeting evidence-based statins to those who are likely to benefit the most. Copyright

  7. Dust events as a risk factor for daily hospitalization for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in Minqin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Ziqiang; Lu, Bin

    Dust events are common air pollution events in parts of the world with arid, semi-arid, or desert areas. There is little research on the association between respiratory and cardiovascular health and dust events in places which are close to the deserts. The aim of this study is to evaluate the health effects of dust events in a location where traffic and industry are underdeveloped and dust events are most frequent in China. The setting allows the opportunity to reduce confounding by anthropogenically derived particulate matter and to confirm the health effects of dust events. The present study was done using daily counts of hospitalizations in Minqin (1994-2003) for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth revision) for males and females. Using a semi-parametric generalized additive model and controlling for long-term temporal trends, day of the week, meteorological factors, and seasonal influence, counts of hospitalization were analyzed for dust events in a Poisson regression. Relative risks (RRs) were used to estimate the risk of dust events for respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations. In the year-round model, dust events with a lag of 3 days were significantly associated with total respiratory hospitalization for males and females, with RRs of 1.14 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.29) and 1.18 (95% CI 1.00-1.41); dust events with a lag of 4 days were significantly associated with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in males (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.59), and dust events with a lag of 6 days were significantly associated with pneumonia in males, with an RR of 1.17 (95% CI 1.00-1.38). A significant association between dust events with a lag of 3 days and hypertension in males was also found (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03,1.64). In the seasonal analysis model, the associations between the dust events and respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations were stronger in spring and in winter, respectively. The

  8. Effect of low-dose aspirin on primary prevention of cardiovascular events in Japanese diabetic patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Okada, Sadanori; Morimoto, Takeshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Sakuma, Mio; Soejima, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Masafumi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Waki, Masako; Doi, Naofumi; Horii, Manabu; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Somekawa, Satoshi; Soeda, Tsunenari; Uemura, Shiro; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Benefit of low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in diabetes remains controversial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA), the American Heart Association (AHA), and the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) recommend aspirin for high-risk diabetic patients: older patients with additional cardiovascular risk factors. We evaluated aspirin's benefit in Japanese diabetic patients stratified by cardiovascular risk. In the JPAD trial, we enrolled 2,539 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and no history of cardiovascular disease. We randomly assigned them to aspirin (81-100 mg daily) or no aspirin groups. The median follow-up period was 4.4 years. We stratified the patients into high-risk or low-risk groups, according to the US recommendation: age (older; younger) and coexisting cardiovascular risk factors. The risk factors included smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, family history of coronary artery disease, and proteinuria. Most of the patients were classified into the high-risk group, consisting of older patients with risk factors (n=1,804). The incidence of cardiovascular events was higher in this group, but aspirin did not reduce cardiovascular events (hazard ratio [HR], 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.58-1.17). In the low-risk group, consisting of older patients without risk factors and younger patients (n=728), aspirin did not reduce cardiovascular events (HR, 0.55; 95% CI: 0.23-1.21). These results were unchanged after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Low-dose aspirin is not beneficial in Japanese diabetic patients at high risk.

  9. True fir spacing trials: 10-year results.

    Treesearch

    Robert O. Curtis

    2008-01-01

    Eighteen precommercial thinning trials were established in true fir-hemlock stands in the Olympic Mountains and the west side of the Cascade Range during the period 1987 through 1994. This paper updates a previous report, with results for the first 10 years after establishment. Results are given for (1) all trees, (2) the largest 80 per acre of any species, and (3)...

  10. [10 years of liver transplantation in Peru].

    PubMed

    Chaman Ortiz, José Carlos; Padilla Machaca, P Martín; Rondon Leyva, Carlos; Carrasco Mascaró, Felix

    2010-01-01

    The article reviews the experience in 10 years of hepatic transplants performed by The Transplant Department of the National Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen (HNGAI), describing the history, surgical outcomes in adults and children, retransplantation, combined liver-kidney transplants, complications in 72 transplants performed at the time of submission of the article.

  11. Healthy Lifestyle Factors and Risk of Cardiovascular Events and Mortality in Treatment-Resistant Hypertension: The Regards Study

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Keith M.; Booth, John N.; Calhoun, David A.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M.; Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi

    2014-01-01

    Few data exist regarding whether healthy lifestyle factors are associated with better prognosis among individuals with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension, a high-risk phenotype of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of healthy lifestyle factors with cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular mortality among individuals with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension. We studied participants (n=2,043) from the population-based REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg despite use of 3 antihypertensive medication classes or use of ≥4 classes of antihypertensive medication regardless of blood pressure control). Six healthy lifestyle factors adapted from guidelines for the management of hypertension (normal waist circumference, physical activity ≥4 times/week, non-smoking, moderate alcohol consumption, high Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score, and low sodium-to-potassium intake ratio) were examined. A greater number of healthy lifestyle factors was associated with lower risk for cardiovascular events (n=360) over a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios [HR (95% CI)] for cardiovascular events comparing individuals with 2, 3, and 4-6 versus 0-1 healthy lifestyle factors were 0.91 (0.68-1.21), 0.80 (0.57-1.14), and 0.63 (0.41-0.95), respectively (P-trend=0.020). Physical activity and non-smoking were individual healthy lifestyle factors significantly associated with lower risk for cardiovascular events. Similar associations were observed between healthy lifestyle factors and risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, healthy lifestyle factors, particularly physical activity and non-smoking, are associated with a lower risk for cardiovascular events and mortality among individuals with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension. PMID

  12. Associations between stress disorders and cardiovascular disease events in the Danish population

    PubMed Central

    Gradus, Jaimie L; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Svensson, Elisabeth; Ehrenstein, Vera; Lash, Timothy L; Milstein, Arnold; Adler, Nancy; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a well-documented risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, it is unknown whether another common stress disorder—adjustment disorder—is also associated with an increased risk of CVD and whether gender modifies these associations. The aim of this study was to examine the overall and gender-stratified associations between PTSD and adjustment disorder and 4 CVD events. Design Prospective cohort study utilising Danish national registry data. Setting The general population of Denmark. Participants PTSD (n=4724) and adjustment disorder (n=64 855) cohorts compared with the general population of Denmark from 1995 to 2011. Primary outcome measures CVD events including myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, ischaemic stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Standardised incidence rates and 95% CIs were calculated. Results Associations were found between PTSD and all 4 CVD events ranging from 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.9) for MI to 2.1 (95% CI 1.7 to 2.7) for VTE. Associations that were similar in magnitude were also found for adjustment disorder and all 4 CVD events: 1.5 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.6) for MI to 1.9 (95% CI 1.8 to 2.0) for VTE. No gender differences were noted. Conclusions By expanding beyond PTSD and examining a second stress disorder—adjustment disorder—this study provides evidence that stress-related psychopathology is associated with CVD events. Further, limited evidence of gender differences in associations for either of the stress disorders and CVD was found. PMID:26667014

  13. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiovascular events due to NSAIDs in the diabetic elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungmee; Lee, Joongyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) and cardiovascular (CV) risks such as myocardial infarction or stroke associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use among elderly patients with diabetes. Methods Using a nationwide claims database covering 2008–2012, we conducted a cohort study of patients with diabetes aged ≥65 years. Among the 117 610 patients, NSAID users and non-users were propensity score matched, excluding any who had experienced a potentially confounding event in the year prior to cohort entry. Multivariate Cox regression models treating death as competing risk were used. Results There were 2184 (1.86%) cases of GIB and NSAID users had an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.68 (95% CI 1.54 to 1.83) of GIB risk after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities and recent medications compared to NSAID non-users. There were 9333 (7.94%) cases of myocardial infarction or stroke with an aHR of 1.20 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.25). The risk of GIB was higher in patients with liver disease and renal failure, while that of CV events was higher in patients who received anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, aspirin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The number needed to harm was 111 for GIB and 77 for CV events. Among different NSAIDs, nimesulide increased the risk of GIB and ketorolac increased the risk of CV events compared to celecoxib (aHR 2.60 and 3.13, respectively). Conclusions Elderly patients with diabetes treating NSAIDs had a significantly higher risk of both upper GIB and CV events compared to NSAID non-users, and the risk varied among different NSAIDs regardless of cyclooxygenase-2 activity. PMID:26719806

  14. Hyperuricemia and Incident Cardiovascular Disease and Noncardiac Vascular Events in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Crowson, Cynthia S.; Gabriel, Sherine E.; Matteson, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate whether hyperuricemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A population-based inception cohort of patients diagnosed between 1980 and 2007 with adult-onset RA was assembled. A comparison cohort of age- and sex-matched subjects without RA (non-RA) was also assembled. All clinically obtained uric acid values were collected. CVD and noncardiac vascular events were recorded for each patient. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the impact of hyperuricemia on development of CVD, mortality, and noncardiac vascular disease. Results. In patients without RA, hyperuricemia was associated with heart failure (HR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.13–3.39) and CVD (HR: 1.59; 95% CI: 0.99–2.55). In patients with RA, hyperuricemia was not significantly associated with CVD but was significantly associated with peripheral arterial events (HR: 2.52; 95% CI: 1.17–5.42). Hyperuricemia appeared to be more strongly associated with mortality among RA patients (HR: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.45–2.65) than among the non-RA subjects (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.09–2.24). Conclusion. In patients with RA, hyperuricemia was a significant predictor of peripheral arterial events and mortality but not of CVD. PMID:25197282

  15. Ectopic fat is linked to prior cardiovascular events in men with HIV.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Gabriella; Gabriella, Orlando; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Giovanni, Guaraldi; Zona, Stefano; Stefano, Zona; Carli, Federica; Federica, Carli; Bagni, Pietro; Pietro, Bagni; Menozzi, Marianna; Marianna, Menozzi; Cocchi, Stefania; Stefania, Cocchi; Scaglioni, Riccardo; Riccardo, Scaglioni; Ligabue, Guido; Guido, Ligabue; Raggi, Paolo; Paolo, Raggi

    2012-04-15

    Epicardial Adipose Tissue (EAT) has been associated with adverse cardiovascular events in the general population. We studied the association of general adiposity measures (body mass index, waist circumference) and ectopic adipose tissue [visceral adipose tissue (VAT); liver fat (LF); EAT) with prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) (prior myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, stroke, peripheral vascular disease] in 583 HIV-infected men. VAT, EAT, and LF (liver/spleen attenuation ratio < 1.1) were measured by computed tomography. Patients' mean age was 48.5 ± 8.1 years, prior CVD was present in 33 (5.7%) patients. Factors independently associated with CVD on multivariable analyses were age [incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02 to 1.12], smoking (IRR = 2.70, 95% CI: 1.22 to 6.01), Center for Disease Control group C (IRR = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.41 to 6.76), EAT (IRR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.24, per 10 cm), LF (IRR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.32), and VAT (IRR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.10, per 10 cm). Ectopic fat but not general adiposity measures were associated with prevalent CVD in men with HIV.

  16. Diet drink consumption and the risk of cardiovascular events: a report from the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ankur; Rubenstein, Linda; Robinson, Jennifer; Seguin, Rebecca A; Vitolins, Mara Z; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Shikany, James M; Johnson, Karen C; Snetselaar, Linda; Wallace, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Data are limited regarding the influence of diet drink consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between diet drink intake and cardiovascular events. We conducted a retrospective cohort study, utilizing data from the national, multicenter Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI OS), recruiting subjects from 1993 to 1998. Post-menopausal women with available diet drink intake data, without pre-existing CVD and who survived ≥ 60 days were included in the study. A composite of incident coronary heart disease, heart failure, myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization procedure, ischemic stroke, peripheral arterial disease and CVD death was used as the primary outcome. CVD death and all-cause mortality were secondary outcomes. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare primary and secondary outcomes across diet drink intake strata. In all, 59,614 women, mean age 62.8 years, were included for analysis. In unadjusted analysis over a follow-up of 8.7 ± 2.7 years, the primary outcome occurred in 8.5 % of the women consuming ≥ 2 diet drinks/day, compared to 6.9 %, 6.8 % and 7.2 % in the 5-7/week, 1-4/week and 0-3/month groups, respectively. After controlling for other CVD risk factors, women who consumed ≥ 2 drinks/day had a higher adjusted risk of CVD events (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.1-1.5), CVD mortality (HR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.03-2.3) and overall mortality (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.04-1.5) compared to the reference group (0-3 drinks/month). This analysis demonstrates an association between high diet drink intake and CVD outcomes and mortality in post-menopausal women in the WHI OS.

  17. Apical periodontitis and incident cardiovascular events in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    PubMed

    Gomes, M S; Hugo, F N; Hilgert, J B; Sant'Ana Filho, M; Padilha, D M P; Simonsick, E M; Ferrucci, L; Reynolds, M A

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate whether the presence of apical periodontitis (AP), root canal treatment (RCT) and endodontic burden (EB) - as the sum of AP and RCT sites - were associated with long-term risk of incident cardiovascular events (CVE), including cardiovascular-related mortality, using data on participants in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Ageing (BLSA). This retrospective cohort included 278 dentate participants in the BLSA with complete medical and dental examinations. Periodontal disease (PD) and missing teeth were recorded. The total number of AP and RCT sites was determined from panoramic radiographs. EB was calculated as the sum of AP and RCT sites. Oral inflammatory burden (OIB) was calculated combining PD and EB. The main outcome was incident CVE including angina, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular-related death. Participants were monitored for up to 44 years (mean = 17.4± 11.1 years) following dental examination. Relative risks (RRs) were calculated through Poisson regression models, estimating the relationship between AP, RCT, EB, PD, OIB and incident CVE. Mean age at baseline was 55.0 ±16.8 years and 51.4% were men. Sixty-two participants (22.3%) developed CVE. Bivariate analysis showed that PD, EB, number of teeth and OIB were associated with incident CVE. Multivariate models, adjusted for socio-demographic and medical variables, showed that age ≥60 years (RR = 3.07, 95% CI =1.68-5.62), hypertension (RR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.16-3.46) and EB ≥3 (RR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.04-3.02) were independently associated with incident CVE. The association between OIB and incident CVE was reduced to nonsignificance after adjustments (RR = 1.97, 95% CI = 0.83-4.70). EB in midlife was an independent predictor of CVE amongst community-dwelling participants in the BLSA. Prospective studies are required to evaluate cardiovascular risk reduction with the treatment of AP. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Diabetes Mellitus and Mortality after Acute Coronary Syndrome as a First or Recurrent Cardiovascular Event

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, Richard M.; Abbas, Afroze; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Kilcullen, Niamh; Das, Raj; Morrell, Christine; Barth, Julian H.; Kearney, Mark T.; Hall, Alistair S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is associated with adverse cardiovascular prognosis. However, the risk associated with DM may vary between individuals according to their overall cardiovascular risk burden. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether DM is associated with poor outcome in patients presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) according to the index episode being a first or recurrent cardiovascular event. Methods and Findings We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort study involving 2499 consecutively admitted patients with confirmed ACS in 11 UK hospitals during 2003. Usual care was provided for all participants. Demographic factors, co-morbidity and treatment (during admission and at discharge) factors were recorded. The primary outcome was all cause mortality (median 2 year follow up), compared for cohorts with and without DM according to their prior cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease status. Adjusted analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Within the entire cohort, DM was associated with an unadjusted 45% increase in mortality. However, in patients free of a history of CVD, mortality of those with and without DM was similar (18.8% and 19.7% respectively; p = 0.74). In the group with CVD, mortality of patients with DM was significantly higher than those without DM (46.7% and 33.2% respectively; p<0.001). The age and sex adjusted interaction between DM and CVD in predicting mortality was highly significant (p = 0.002) and persisted after accounting for comorbidities and treatment factors (p = 0.006). Of patients free of CVD, DM was associated with smaller elevation of Troponin I (p<0.001). However in patients with pre-existing CVD Troponin I was similar (p = 0.992). Conclusions DM is only associated with worse outcome after ACS in patients with a pre-existing history of CVD. Differences in the severity of myocyte necrosis may account for this. Further investigation is required

  19. Triglyceride-lowering therapies reduce cardiovascular disease event risk in subjects with hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Guyton, John R; Orringer, Carl E; Hamilton-Craig, Ian; Alexander, Dominik D; Davidson, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular outcomes trials of fibrates, niacin, or omega-3 fatty acids alone, or added to a statin, have not consistently demonstrated reduced risk, but larger, statistically significant clinical benefits have been reported in subgroups with elevated triglycerides (TG) and/or elevated TG plus low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). To perform a meta-analysis of the effects of therapies targeting TG and TG-rich lipoprotein cholesterol on cardiovascular disease event risk in subjects with elevated TG or elevated TG paired with low HDL-C. Publications were identified using PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, clinicaltrials.gov, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and Internet Stroke Center. Random-effects meta-analysis models were used to generate summary relative risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity was assessed by χ(2) and I(2) statistics, and the impact of each trial was assessed in one study-removed sensitivity analyses. Six trials of fibrates, 2 of niacin, 1 of fibrate + niacin, and 1 of omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl esters were identified. For the prespecified primary cardiovascular disease or coronary heart disease end point used in each trial, the summary relative risk estimate (95% confidence interval) for subjects with elevated TG was 0.82 (0.73-0.91), p-heterogeneity = 0.13, I(2) = 36.2, and for subjects with elevated TG and low-HDL-C, it was 0.71 (0.63-0.81), p-heterogeneity = 0.52, I(2) = 0.0. There was no evidence of publication bias, and the results remained statistically significant when each individual trial was removed. Drugs that substantially, but not exclusively, lower TG and TG-rich lipoprotein cholesterol may have cardiovascular benefits in individuals with elevated TG, particularly if accompanied by low HDL-C. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of azithromycin with mortality and cardiovascular events among older patients hospitalized with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Eric M.; Halm, Ethan A.; Pugh, Mary Jo; Copeland, Laurel A.; Metersky, Mark; Fine, Michael J.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Alvarez, Carlos A.; Frei, Christopher R.; Good, Chester; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Downs, John R.; Anzueto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Importance Although clinical practice guidelines recommend combination therapy with macrolides, including azithromycin, as first line therapy for patients hospitalized with pneumonia, recent research suggests that azithromycin may be associated with increased cardiovascular events. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the association of azithromycin use with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for patients hospitalized with pneumonia. Design Retrospective, cohort study comparing older patients hospitalized with pneumonia between fiscal years 2002–2012 prescribed azithromycin therapy and patients receiving other guideline-concordant antibiotic therapy Setting This study was conducted using national Department of Veterans Affairs administrative data of patients hospitalized at any Veterans Administration acute care hospital. Participants Patients were included if they were ≥65 years of age hospitalized with pneumonia and received antibiotic therapy concordant with national clinical practice guidelines. Main Outcome Measures Outcomes included 30 and 90-day all-cause mortality, and 90-day cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and any cardiac event. Propensity score matching was used to control for the possible effects of known confounders with conditional logistic regression. Results Out of the 73,690 patients from 118 hospitals identified, propensity-matched groups were composed of 31,863 azithromycin-exposed and 31,863 matched unexposed. There were no significant differences in potential confounders between groups after matching. 90-day mortality was significantly lower in those who received azithromycin (exposed- 17.4% vs. unexposed- 22.3%, odds ratio [OR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–0.76). However, we found significant increased odds of myocardial infarctions (5.1% vs. 4.4%, OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.08–1.25) but not any cardiac event (43.0% vs. 42.7%, OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.98–1.05), cardiac arrhythmias (25

  1. PCSK9 Plasma Concentrations Are Independent of GFR and Do Not Predict Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Decreased GFR

    PubMed Central

    Rogacev, Kyrill S.; Heine, Gunnar H.; Silbernagel, Günther; Kleber, Marcus E.; Seiler, Sarah; Emrich, Insa; Lennartz, Simone; Werner, Christian; Zawada, Adam M.; Fliser, Danilo; Böhm, Michael; März, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired renal function causes dyslipidemia that contributes to elevated cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a regulator of the LDL receptor and plasma cholesterol concentrations. Its relationship to kidney function and cardiovascular events in patients with reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) has not been explored. Methods Lipid parameters including PCSK9 were measured in two independent cohorts. CARE FOR HOMe (Cardiovascular and Renal Outcome in CKD 2–4 Patients—The Forth Homburg evaluation) enrolled 443 patients with reduced GFR (between 90 and 15 ml/min/1.73 m2) referred for nephrological care that were prospectively followed for the occurrence of a composite cardiovascular endpoint. As a replication cohort, PCSK9 was quantitated in 1450 patients with GFR between 90 and 15 ml/min/1.73 m2 enrolled in the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study (LURIC) that were prospectively followed for cardiovascular deaths. Results PCSK9 concentrations did not correlate with baseline GFR (CARE FOR HOMe: r = -0.034; p = 0.479; LURIC: r = -0.017; p = 0.512). 91 patients in CARE FOR HOMe and 335 patients in LURIC reached an endpoint during a median follow-up of 3.0 [1.8–4.1] years and 10.0 [7.3–10.6] years, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that PCSK9 concentrations did not predict cardiovascular events in either cohort [CARE FOR HOMe (p = 0.622); LURIC (p = 0.729)]. Sensitivity analyses according to statin intake yielded similar results. Conclusion In two well characterized independent cohort studies, PCSK9 plasma levels did not correlate with kidney function. Furthermore, PCSK9 plasma concentrations were not associated with cardiovascular events in patients with reduced renal function. PMID:26799206

  2. Relation of progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis to risk of cardiovascular events (from the Monitored Atherosclerosis Regression Study).

    PubMed

    Vigen, Cheryl; Hodis, Howard N; Selzer, Robert H; Mahrer, Peter R; Mack, Wendy J

    2005-06-01

    We investigated whether change in coronary artery atherosclerosis as measured by quantitative coronary angiography is related to cardiovascular event risk. Although many studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of statins in decreasing atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular event risk, a relation between coronary atherosclerotic progression and event risk has not been documented in clinical trials that have evaluated statin therapy. The Monitored Atherosclerosis Regression Study (MARS) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to test whether lovastatin would decrease coronary atherosclerotic progression as measured by quantitative coronary angiography. We followed 173 subjects in the MARS who had minimum luminal diameter and percent diameter stenosis measured at the beginning and end of a 2-year intervention. Postintervention follow-up events over a mean period of 9.4 years were reported by subjects and verified by medical records. Two-year percent stenosis and minimum luminal diameter changes were tested in relation to clinical event risk in multivariate Cox's regression models. Events ascertained were (1) coronary death and myocardial infarction, (2) coronary death, myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and (3) any cardiovascular event. Increased percent stenosis was associated with significantly increased hazard ratios (HRs) in all event categories (category 1 HR 1.55 per SD percent stenosis, p <0.01; category 2 HR 1.58, p <0.01; category 3 HR 1.47, p = 0.01). Conversely, event risks were decreased for subjects who had increased minimum luminal diameter (category 1 HR 0.79, p = 0.04) and were not associated with category 2 (HR 0.79, p = 0.12) or category 3 (HR 0.81, p = 0.17). These results indicate that quantitative coronary angiographic changes are associated with cardiovascular events and support the long-term benefit of early intervention to decrease

  3. Placental Growth Factor as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with CKD from the NARA-CKD Study.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Masaru; Uemura, Shiro; Takeda, Yukiji; Samejima, Ken-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takaki; Hasegawa, Ayako; Tsushima, Hideo; Hoshino, Ei; Ueda, Tomoya; Morimoto, Katsuhiko; Okamoto, Keisuke; Okada, Sadanori; Onoue, Kenji; Okayama, Satoshi; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Rika; Maruyama, Naoki; Akai, Yasuhiro; Iwano, Masayuki; Shiiki, Hideo; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) contributes to atherogenesis through vascular inflammation and plaque destabilization. High levels of PlGF may be associated with mortality and cardiovascular disease, but the relationship between PlGF level and adverse outcomes in patients with CKD is unclear. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 1351 consecutive participants with CKD enrolled in the Novel Assessment of Risk management for Atherosclerotic diseases in CKD (NARA-CKD) study between April 1, 2004, and December 31, 2011. During a median follow-up of 3 years, 199 participants died and 383 had cardiovascular events, defined as atherosclerotic disease or heart failure requiring hospitalization. In adjusted analyses, mortality and cardiovascular risk increased in each successive quartile of serum PlGF level; hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]) for mortality and cardiovascular risk, respectively, were 1.59 (0.83 to 3.16) and 1.55 (0.92 to 2.66) for the second quartile, 2.97 (1.67 to 5.59) and 3.39 (2.20 to 5.41) for the third quartile, and 3.87 (2.24 to 7.08) and 8.42 (5.54 to 13.3) for the fourth quartile. The composite end point of mortality and cardiovascular events occurred during the study period in 76.4% of patients in both the highest PlGF quartile (≥19.6 pg/ml) and the lowest eGFR tertile (<30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). The association between PlGF and mortality or cardiovascular events was not attenuated when participants were stratified by age, sex, traditional risk factors, and eGFR. These data suggest elevated PlGF is an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with CKD.

  4. Genome-Wide Study of Gene Variants Associated with Differential Cardiovascular Event Reduction by Pravastatin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Judy Z.; Rowland, Charles M.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Iakoubova, Olga A.; Kirchgessner, Todd G.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Buckley, Brendan M.; Stott, David J.; Sattar, Naveed; Devlin, James J.; Packard, Christopher J.; Ford, Ian; Sacks, Frank M.; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Statin therapy reduces the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), however, the person-to-person variability in response to statin therapy is not well understood. We have investigated the effect of genetic variation on the reduction of CHD events by pravastatin. First, we conducted a genome-wide association study of 682 CHD cases from the Cholesterol and Recurrent Events (CARE) trial and 383 CHD cases from the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS), two randomized, placebo-controlled studies of pravastatin. In a combined case-only analysis, 79 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with differential CHD event reduction by pravastatin according to genotype (P<0.0001), and these SNPs were analyzed in a second stage that included cases as well as non-cases from CARE and WOSCOPS and patients from the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk/PHArmacogenomic study of Statins in the Elderly at risk for cardiovascular disease (PROSPER/PHASE), a randomized placebo controlled study of pravastatin in the elderly. We found that one of these SNPs (rs13279522) was associated with differential CHD event reduction by pravastatin therapy in all 3 studies: P = 0.002 in CARE, P = 0.01 in WOSCOPS, P = 0.002 in PROSPER/PHASE. In a combined analysis of CARE, WOSCOPS, and PROSPER/PHASE, the hazard ratio for CHD when comparing pravastatin with placebo decreased by a factor of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.52 to 0.75) for each extra copy of the minor allele (P = 4.8×10−7). This SNP is located in DnaJ homolog subfamily C member 5B (DNAJC5B) and merits investigation in additional randomized studies of pravastatin and other statins. PMID:22666496

  5. Metabolic syndrome and left ventricular hypertrophy in the prediction of cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    de Simone, Giovanni; Devereux, Richard B.; Chinali, Marcello; Roman, Mary J.; Lee, Elisa T.; Resnick, Helaine E.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased prevalence of echocardiographic LV hypertrophy (LVH), a potent predictor of cardiovascular (CV) outcome. Whether MetS increases risk of CV events independently of presence of LVH has never been investigated. It is also unclear whether LVH predicts CV risk both in the presence and absence of MetS. Methods and Results Participants in the 2nd Strong Heart Study examination without prevalent coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure or renal insufficiency (plasma creatinine>2.5 mg/dL) were studied (n=2,758; 1,746 women). MetS was defined by WHO criteria. Echocardiographic LV hypertrophy was defined using population-specific cut-point value for LV mass index (>47.3 g/m2.7). After controlling for age, sex, LDL-cholesterol, smoking, plasma creatinine, diabetes, hypertension and obesity, participants with MetS had greater probability of LVH than those without MetS (OR=1.55 [1.18-2.04], p<0.002). Adjusted hazard of composite fatal and non-fatal CV events was greater when LVH was present, in participants without (HR=2.03 [1.33-3.08]) or with MetS (HR=1.64 [1.31-2.04], both p<0.0001), with similar adjusted population attributable risk (12% and 14%). After adjustment for LVH, risk of incident CV events remained 1.47-fold greater in MetS (p<0.003), an effect, however, that was not confirmed when diabetic participants were excluded. Conclusion LVH is a strong predictor of composite 8-year fatal and non-fatal CV events either in the presence or in the absence of MetS and accounts for a substantial portion of the high CV risk associated with MetS. PMID:18674890

  6. Transfer function-derived central pressure and cardiovascular disease events: the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary F; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Larson, Martin G; Hamburg, Naomi M; Benjamin, Emelia J; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Levy, Daniel; Vita, Joseph A

    2016-08-01

    Relations between central pulse pressure (PP) or pressure amplification and major cardiovascular disease (CVD) events are controversial. Estimates of central aortic pressure derived using radial artery tonometry and a generalized transfer function may better predict CVD risk beyond the predictive value of brachial SBP. Augmentation index, central SBP, central PP, and central-to-peripheral PP amplification were evaluated using radial artery tonometry and a generalized transfer function as implemented in the SphygmoCor device (AtCor Medical, Itasca, Illinois, USA). We used proportional hazards models to examine relations between central hemodynamics and first-onset major CVD events in 2183 participants (mean age 62 years, 58% women) in the Framingham Heart Study. During median follow-up of 7.8 (limits 0.2-8.9) years, 149 participants (6.8%) had an incident event. Augmentation index (P = 0.6), central aortic systolic pressure (P = 0.20), central aortic PP (P = 0.24), and PP amplification (P = 0.15) were not related to CVD events in multivariable models that adjusted for age, sex, brachial cuff systolic pressure, use of antihypertensive therapy, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, smoking, and presence of diabetes. In a model that included standard risk factors, model fit was improved (P = 0.03) when brachial systolic pressure was added after central, whereas model fit was not improved (P = 0.30) when central systolic pressure was added after brachial. After considering standard risk factors, including brachial cuff SBP, augmentation index, central PP and PP amplification derived using radial artery tonometry, and a generalized transfer function were not predictive of CVD risk.

  7. Identification of vascular patients at very high risk for recurrent cardiovascular events: validation of the current ACC/AHA very high risk criteria.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, M Johanneke; Bhatt, Deepak L; Kappelle, L Jaap; de Borst, Gert J; Cramer, Maarten J; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Visseren, Frank L J

    2017-03-28

    To validate and assess performance of the current ACC/AHA very high risk criteria in patients with clinically manifest arterial disease. Data were used from the SMART study (n = 7216) and REACH Registry (n = 48 322), two prospective cohorts of patients with manifest atherosclerotic arterial disease. Prevalence and incidence rates of recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) were calculated, according to the ACC/AHA VHR criteria (cardiovascular disease combined with diabetes, smoking, dyslipidaemia, and/or recent recurrent coronary events). Performance of the ACC/AHA criteria was compared with single very high risk factors in terms of C-statistics and Net Reclassification Index. All patients were at VHR according to the ESC guidelines (incidence of recurrent MACE in SMART was 2.4/100PY, with 95% CI 2.3-2.5/100PY and in REACH 5.1/100PY with 95% CI 5.0-5.3/100PY). In SMART 57% of the patients were at VHR according to the ACC/AHA criteria (incidence of recurrent MACE 2.7/100PY, 95% CI 2.5-2.9/100PY) and in REACH this was 64% (5.9/100PY, 95% CI 5.7-6.1/100PY). The C-statistic for the ACC/AHA VHR criteria was 0.53 in REACH and 0.54 in SMART. Very high risk factors with comparable or slightly better performance were eGFR < 45, polyvascular disease and age >70 years. Around two third of the patients meeting the ACC/AHA VHR criteria had a predicted 10-year risk of recurrent MACE <30%. The ACC/AHA VHR criteria have limited discriminative power. Identifying patients with clinically manifest arterial disease at VHR for recurrent vascular events using eGFR <45, polyvascular disease, or age >70 years performs as well as the ACC/AHA VHR criteria.

  8. AMS at ANTARES - The first 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, E. M.; Elliott, G.; Fallon, J.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Lee, P.; Smith, A. M.; Tuniz, C.; Zoppi, U.

    2000-10-01

    The status and capabilities of the ANTARES AMS facility after 10 years are reviewed. The common AMS radioisotopes, 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl and 129I, are routinely analysed. A capability for the detection of 236U and other actinide isotopes has been developed. The measurement program includes support to Quaternary science projects at Australian universities and to ANSTO projects in global climate change and nuclear safeguards.

  9. Neurology--the next 10 years.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, Donna M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Bettegowda, Chetan; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Kessler, John A; Vezzani, Annamaria; Waxman, Stephen G; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Weller, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in neurology for the next 10 years.

  10. Relationship between Inflammatory Markers and New Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Who Underwent Primary Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Franca, Eluisa La; Caruso, Marco; Sansone, Angela; Iacona, Rosanna; Ajello, Laura; Mancuso, Dario; Castellano, Fabiana; Novo, Salvatore; Assennato, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The determination of inflammation markers in circulation has enabled an important improvement in the study of cardiovascular diseases. It was tested the hypothesis that non-specific markers such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen may provide prognostic information in patients with acute myocardial infarction with persistent ST-segment elevation (STEMI) undergoing primary angioplasty (PCI). Methods: Patients: A cohort of 197 consecutive patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI was enrolled, evaluating during hospitalization, the peak values of the following markers of inflammation: ESR, CRP and fibrinogen. A telephone follow-up has been made in order to investigate any possible new cardiovascular events after hospital discharge and the procedure performed. Results: Higher values of CRP were statistically associated with adverse future events as composite endpoint and with the single endpoint of death. Furthermore, higher age, presence of hypertension, history of previous cardiovascular events, were statistically significantly associated with cardiac events at follow up. In this group were also overrepresented subjects with anterior myocardial infarction in the anterior localization and with an EF ≤ 35% at discharge. Conclusions: CRP appears to be a predictor of future cardiovascular events, confirming that a pro-inflammatory state promotes the progression of atherosclerotic disease and its complications. PMID:23777720

  11. 2002 Robert Ader New Investigator award. Relationship of cardiovascular reactivity, stressful life events, and multiple sclerosis disease activity.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Kurt D; Stover, Angela; Heyman, Rock; Anderson, Barbara P; Houck, Patricia R; Frank, Ellen; Rabin, Bruce S; Baum, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    Previous studies of stress in multiple sclerosis patients have suggested that life events may alter the onset and development of MS. However, results have been inconsistent because of infrequent monitoring and reporting bias. We followed fifty female MS patients for 1 year to determine characteristics of life events associated with MS exacerbations, and examine the influence of cardiovascular activity. Subjects completed weekly life-event checklists. The short- and long-term threat of each event was determined using the Life Events and Difficulties Schedule. Neurologic symptoms were also monitored weekly. MS exacerbations were confirmed by a neurologist blinded to psychosocial events. Cardiovascular reactivity to an acute psychological stressor was determined at study onset, and resting heart rate and blood pressure were monitored monthly. Forty-two percent of life events were associated with exacerbations in the subsequent 6 weeks. Logistic regression confirmed that exacerbations were more likely during at-risk periods following life events and were relatively independent of the threat level and type of stressor. Participants with higher cardiovascular reactivity to acute stress and higher baseline heart rate demonstrated a greater number of exacerbations and proportion of weeks ill. Using multiple regression, we found that disability level, medication usage, cardiovascular reactivity, baseline heart rate, and life event density explained approximately 30% of the variance in the proportion of weeks ill. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that stress is a potential trigger of MS disease activity and suggest that autonomic tone and stress reactivity may play a role in the development of stress-related exacerbations.

  12. NSAIDs Prescription Prevalence after a Cardiovascular Event Related Hospitalization in Medicaid Beneficiaries from Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Suzette M; Hernández, José J; Davis, Sasha M; Almodóvar, María G; Mercado, José R

    2016-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed for pain and inflammation. NSAIDs are associated with serious adverse effects and cardiovascular (CV) risks that include myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure. In the period of time immediately after a CV event, modification to the drug therapy regimen and lifestyle habits should be instituted to decrease morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study is to measure the prevalence of NSAIDs prescribing in the immediate 90 days after a CV-related hospitalization in Medicaid beneficiaries in Puerto Rico. Hospitalization claims were used to identify beneficiaries with a CVrelated hospitalization during the study period, and pharmacy claims were used to evaluate the occurrence of NSAIDs prescribing post-discharge. A total of 4,195 beneficiaries with at least one CV-related hospitalization were identified. Out of these beneficiaries, 774 (18.5%) had at least one pharmacy claim for an NSAID post discharge, and 401 (9.6%) had at least one pharmacy claim for an NSAID within 90 days post-discharge. The average time span between the discharge date and the first NSAID claim was 135 days. Almost 20% of all beneficiaries who were hospitalized for a CV event received an NSAID during the study period, with 10% of patients receiving it during the immediate 90 days post-discharge. It represents a major challenge for our healthcare system, as it may reflect unawareness on the impact of proved evidence in clinical decision making.

  13. Identification of major cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes using primary care data.

    PubMed

    Pouwels, Koen Bernardus; Voorham, Jaco; Hak, Eelko; Denig, Petra

    2016-04-02

    Routine primary care data are increasingly being used for evaluation and research purposes but there are concerns about the completeness and accuracy of diagnoses and events captured in such databases. We evaluated how well patients with major cardiovascular disease (CVD) can be identified using primary care morbidity data and drug prescriptions. The study was conducted using data from 17,230 diabetes patients of the GIANTT database and Dutch Hospital Data register. To estimate the accuracy of the different measures, we analyzed the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) relative to hospitalizations and/or records with a diagnosis indicating major CVD, including ischaemic heart diseases and cerebrovascular events. Using primary care morbidity data, 43% of major CVD hospitalizations could be identified. Adding drug prescriptions to the search increased the sensitivity up to 94%. A proxy of at least one prescription of either a platelet aggregation inhibitor, vitamin k antagonist or nitrate could identify 85% of patients with a history of major CVD recorded in primary care, with an NPV of 97%. Using the same proxy, 57% of incident major CVD recorded in primary or hospital care could be identified, with an NPV of 99%. A substantial proportion of major CVD hospitalizations was not recorded in primary care morbidity data. Drug prescriptions can be used in addition to diagnosis codes to identify more patients with major CVD, and also to identify patients without a history of major CVD.

  14. Scintigraphic calf perfusion symmetry after exercise and prediction of cardiovascular events: One stone to kill two birds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellier, Philippe; Lecouffe, Pascal; Zureik, Mahmoud

    2007-02-01

    BackgroundPeripheral arterial disease (PAD) is commonly associated with a high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity as a marker of plurifocal atherosclerosis. Whether exercise thallium perfusion muscular asymmetry in the legs associated with PAD has prognostic value is unknown. Such a hypothesis was evaluated in a prospective study which remains the gold standard in clinical research. Methods and resultsScintigraphic calf perfusion symmetry after exercise (SCPSE) was measured at the end of a maximal or symptom-limited treadmill exercise test in 358 patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). During the follow-up period (mean 85.3±32.8 months), 93 cardiovascular events and deaths (incident cases) occurred. Among those incident cases, the percentage of subjects with higher SCPSE values (third tertile) was 45.2%, versus 29.1% in controls (lower tertiles) ( p=0.005). In stepwise multivariate analysis performed with the Cox proportional hazards model, previous CAD and SCPSE were the only significant independent predictors of prognosis. The multivariate relative risk of cardiovascular death or event in subjects with higher values of SCPSE was 1.94 (95% CI: 1.15-3.21; p<0.01). ConclusionsScintigraphic calf perfusion asymmetry after exercise was independently associated with incident cardiovascular events in high-risk subjects. This index, which is easily and quickly calculated, could be used for evaluation of cardiovascular risk.

  15. Metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients: prevalence, risk factors, and association with cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Laish, Ido; Braun, Marius; Mor, Eytan; Sulkes, Jaqueline; Harif, Yael; Ben Ari, Ziv

    2011-01-01

    Features of metabolic syndrome are not uncommon in patients after liver transplantation. To examine the prevalence and risk factors of posttransplantation metabolic syndrome (PTMS), the files of 252 transplant recipients (mean age, 54.5 ± 2.8 years, 57.9% male) were reviewed for pretransplant and posttransplant clinical and laboratory parameters (mean follow-up, 6.2 ± 4.4 years). Rates of obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2) ), hypertriglyceridemia (>150 mg/dL), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <40 mg/dL (men) or <50 mg/dL (women), hypertension, and diabetes were significantly higher after transplantation than before. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 5.4% of patients before transplantation and 51.9% after. Besides significantly higher rates of the typical metabolic derangements (P < 0.0001), the patients with PTMS were older and heavier than those without PTMS, and they had a higher rate of pretransplant hepatitis C virus infection (P < 0.03) and more posttransplant major vascular and cardiac events (20 events in 15.2% of patients with PTMS versus 6 events in 4.9% of patients without PTMS; P < 0.007). There was no between-group difference in mortality or causes of death (mainly related to recurrent disease, graft failure, and sepsis). Significant independent predictors of PTMS on logistic regression analysis were age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04), pretransplant nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (OR = 3.4), body mass index (OR = 1.13), diabetes (OR = 5.95), and triglycerides (OR = 1.01). The rate of metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients is more than twice that reported for the general population. PTMS is associated with cardiovascular morbidity but not mortality, and it may be predicted by pretransplantation conditions. Prospective studies are required to determine the significance and management of PTMS.

  16. Association of Serum Erythropoietin with Cardiovascular Events, Kidney Function Decline and Mortality: The Health ABC Study

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Pranav S.; Katz, Ronit; Patel, Kushang V.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Ix, Joachim H.; Fried, Linda F.; Newman, Anne B.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Harris, Tamara B.; Sarnak, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that in patients with heart failure (HF), high serum erythropoietin is associated with risk of recurrent HF and mortality. Trials of erythropoietin stimulating agents in persons with kidney disease have also suggested an increased incidence of adverse clinical events. No studies have evaluated the association of endogenous erythropoietin levels with clinical outcomes in the community living older adults. Methods and Results Erythropoietin concentration was measured in 2,488 participants aged 70–79 years in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Associations of erythropoietin with incident HF, coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, mortality, and ≥30% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were examined using Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression over 10.7 years of follow up. Mean (SD) age was 75 (3) years and median (quartile 1, quartile 3) erythropoietin was 12.3 (9.0, 17.2) mIU/mL. There were 503 incident HF events and each doubling of serum erythropoietin was associated with a 25% increased risk of incident HF 1.25 (95% CI 1.13, 1.48) after adjusting for demographics, prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), CVD risk factors, kidney function and serum hemoglobin. There was no interaction of serum erythropoietin with chronic kidney disease or anemia (p>0.50). There were 330 incident CHD events, 161 strokes, 1,112 deaths and 698 outcomes of ≥ 30% decline in eGFR. Serum erythropoietin was not significantly associated with these outcomes. Conclusions Higher levels of endogenous erythropoietin are associated with incident HF in older adults. Studies need to elucidate the mechanisms through which endogenous erythropoietin levels associate with specific outcomes. PMID:26721912

  17. Coffee consumption and risk of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients. Results from the HARVEST.

    PubMed

    Palatini, Paolo; Fania, Claudio; Mos, Lucio; Garavelli, Guido; Mazzer, Adriano; Cozzio, Susanna; Saladini, Francesca; Casiglia, Edoardo

    2016-06-01

    Controversy still exists about the long-term cardiovascular effects of coffee consumption in hypertension. The predictive capacity of coffee use for cardiovascular events (CVEs) was investigated in 1204 participants from the HARVEST, a prospective cohort study of non-diabetic subjects aged 18-45years, screened for stage 1 hypertension. Subjects were grouped into three categories of coffee drinking, non-drinkers (none), moderate drinkers (1 to 3cups/day) and heavy drinkers (4or more cups/day). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were developed adjusting for possible confounding variables and risk factors. During a median follow-up of 12.6years, CVEs were developed by 60 participants. CVEs were more common among coffee drinkers than abstainers (abstainers, 2.2%; moderate drinkers, 7.0%; heavy drinkers, 14.0%; p for trend=0.0003). In a multivariable Cox regression model, coffee use was a significant predictor of CVE in both coffee categories, with a hazard ratio of 2.8 (95% CI, 1.0-7.9) in moderate coffee drinkers and of 4.5 (1.4-14.2) in heavy drinkers compared to abstainers. After inclusion of change in body weight (p=ns), incident hypertension (p=0.027) and presence of diabetes/prediabetes (p=ns) at follow-up end, the association with CVE was attenuated but remained significant in heavy coffee drinkers (HR, 95% CI, 3.4, 1.04-11.3). These data show that coffee consumption increases the risk of CVE in a linear fashion in hypertension. This association may be explained in part by the association between coffee and development of hypertension. Hypertensive patients should be discouraged from drinking coffee. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact on cardiovascular disease events of the implementation of Argentina’s national tobacco control law

    PubMed Central

    Konfino, Jonatan; Ferrante, Daniel; Mejia, Raul; Coxson, Pamela; Moran, Andrew; Goldman, Lee; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2014-01-01

    Background Argentina’s congress passed a tobacco control law that would enforce 100% smoke-free environments for the entire country, strong and pictorial health warnings on tobacco products and a comprehensive advertising ban. However, the Executive Branch continues to review the law and it has not been fully implemented. Our objective was to project the potential impact of full implementation of this tobacco control legislation on cardiovascular disease. Methods The Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Policy Model was used to project future cardiovascular events. Data sources for the model included vital statistics, morbidity and mortality data, and tobacco use estimates from the National Risk Factor Survey. Estimated effectiveness of interventions was based on a literature review. Results were expressed as life-years, myocardial infarctions and strokes saved in an 8-year-period between 2012 and 2020. In addition we projected the incremental effectiveness on the same outcomes of a tobacco price increase not included in the law. Results In the period 2012–2020, 7500 CHD deaths, 16 900 myocardial infarctions and 4300 strokes could be avoided with the full implementation and enforcement of this law. Annual per cent reduction would be 3% for CHD deaths, 3% for myocardial infarctions and 1% for stroke. If a tobacco price increase is implemented the projected avoided CHD deaths, myocardial infarctions and strokes would be 15 500, 34 600 and 11 900, respectively. Conclusions Implementation of the tobacco control law would produce significant public health benefits in Argentina. Strong advocacy is needed at national and international levels to get this law implemented throughout Argentina. PMID:23092886

  19. Increased Cardiovascular Events and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: 1 Year Prospective Single Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Masedu, Francesco; Romano, Silvio; Berardicurti, Onorina; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Carubbi, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Paola; Alvaro, Saverio; Penco, Maria; Valenti, Marco; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several studies showed the close relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and cerebro-cardiovascular events (CVEs) and subclinical atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis during the course of RA and we evaluated the possible role of both traditional cardiovascular (CV) and disease related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and the onset of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods We designed a single centre, bias-adjusted, prospective, observational study to investigate, in a homogeneous subset of RA patients, the occurrence of new onset of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional CV and disease-related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Results We enrolled 347 RA patients prospectively followed for 12 months. An increased percentage of patients experienced CVEs, developed subclinical atherosclerosis and was affected by systemic arterial hypertension (SAH), type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS), at the end of follow up. Our analysis showed that the insurgence of both SAH and MS, during the follow up, the older age, the CVE familiarity and the lack of clinical response, were associated with a significantly increased risk to experience CVEs and to develop subclinical atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our study quantifies the increased expected risk for CVEs in a cohort of RA patients prospectively followed for 1 year. The occurrence of both new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients may be explained by inflammatory burden as well as traditional CV risk factors. PMID:28103312

  20. Potential cardiovascular adverse events when phenylephrine is combined with paracetamol: simulation and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Hartley C; Potts, Amanda L; Anderson, Brian J

    2015-08-01

    Increased bioavailability of phenylephrine is reported when combined with paracetamol in over-the-counter formulations for the symptomatic treatment of the common cold and influenza. Such formulations could increase phenylephrine-related cardiovascular adverse events particularly in susceptible individuals. Quantification of the effect of phenylephrine concentration on blood pressure allows simulation of potential adverse combination therapy effects. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for papers discussing or describing any adverse effect, hypersensitivity or safety concerns related to phenylephrine alone or in combination with other drugs. The pharmacodynamic relationship between plasma phenylephrine concentration and mean arterial blood pressure was characterized using published observations of blood pressure changes after ophthalmic eye drops. The resulting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters were then used to predict mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) changes in that population if given an oral combination of phenylephrine and paracetamol. There were 1172 papers identified for examination. Forty-seven reports fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Increases in blood pressure and decreases in heart rate have been reported with doses over 15 mg. It has been estimated that a 20-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure would occur with an oral dose of 45 mg phenylephrine in normotensive healthy people. Those taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors report increased systolic blood pressure of greater than 60 mmHg. Blood pressure and heart rate changes are potentiated in patients with underlying hypertension. Simulation showed a modest increase in MAP when phenylephrine 10 mg was co-administered with paracetamol 1 g (4.2 vs 12.3 mmHg). Combination paracetamol phenylephrine oral therapy has potential to increase blood pressure more than phenylephrine alone in those with cardiovascular compromise.

  1. Gender-specific secondary prevention? Differential psychosocial risk factors for major cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Kure, Christina E; Chan, Yih-Kai; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Carrington, Melinda J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the psychosocial determinants and interhospital variability on a major acute cardiovascular event (MACE), during follow-up of a multicenter cohort of patients hospitalised with heart disease, participating in a nurse-led secondary prevention programme. Methods Outcome data were retrospectively analysed from 602 cardiac inpatients randomised to postdischarge standard care (n=296), or home-based intervention (n=306), with prolonged follow-up of individualised multidisciplinary support. Baseline psychosocial profiling comprised depressive status, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), social isolation and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Multivariate analyses examined the independent correlates of a composite 2-year MACE rate of all-cause mortality and unplanned cardiovascular-related hospitalisation, according to gender. Results Participants were aged 70±10 years, 431 (72%) were men and 377 (63%) had coronary artery disease. During 2-year follow-up, 165 (27%) participants (114 men, 51 women; p=0.431) experienced a MACE. Independent correlates of a MACE in men were depressive status (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.06 to 3.58; p=0.032), low physical HRQoL (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.00; p=0.027) and increasing comorbidity (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.25; p=0.004). In women, age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12; p=0.008), MCI (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.09 to 5.18; p=0.029) and hospital site predicted a MACE (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.09 to 4.93; p=0.029). Conclusions Psychological determinants, cognitive impairment and responses to secondary prevention are different for men and women with heart disease and appear to modulate cardiovascular-specific outcomes. Early detection of psychosocial factors through routine screening and gender-specific secondary prevention is encouraged. Trial registration number 12608000014358. PMID:27099759

  2. Rimonabant for prevention of cardiovascular events (CRESCENDO): a randomised, multicentre, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Topol, Eric J; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Fox, Keith A A; Creager, Mark A; Despres, Jean-Pierre; Easton, J Donald; Hamm, Christian W; Montalescot, Gilles; Steg, P Gabriel; Pearson, Thomas A; Cohen, Eric; Gaudin, Christophe; Job, Bernard; Murphy, Judith H; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2010-08-14

    Blockade of the endocannabinoid receptor reduces obesity and improves metabolic abnormalities such as triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose. We assessed whether rimonabant would improve major vascular event-free survival. This double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken in 974 hospitals in 42 countries. 18,695 patients with previously manifest or increased risk of vascular disease were randomly assigned to receive either rimonabant 20 mg (n=9381) or matching placebo (n=9314). Randomisation was stratified by centre, implemented with an independent interactive voice response system, and all study personnel and participants were masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint was the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke, as determined via central adjudication. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00263042. At a mean follow-up of 13.8 months (95% CI 13.6-14.0), the trial was prematurely discontinued because of concerns by health regulatory authorities in three countries about suicide in individuals receiving rimonabant. All randomised participants were analysed. At the close of the trial (Nov 6, 2008), the composite primary endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 364 (3.9%) patients assigned to rimonabant and 375 (4.0%) assigned to placebo (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% CI 0.84-1.12, p=0.68). With rimonabant, gastrointestinal (3038 [33%] vs 2084 [22%]), neuropsychiatric (3028 [32%] vs 1989 [21%]), and serious psychiatric side-effects (232 [2.5%] vs 120 [1.3%]) were significantly increased compared with placebo. Four patients in the rimonabant group and one in the placebo group committed suicide. The premature termination of this trial has important lessons for drug development. A drug that was being marketed for weight loss, but being tested for improving cardiovascular outcomes, induced a level of serious

  3. 10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis. Patients and methods Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint—excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus. Results Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79–0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67–0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons. Interpretation The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements—even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results. PMID:22066551

  4. Photovoltaics - 10 years after Cherry Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, E. L.

    The status of R&D programs connected with photovoltaic (PV) systems 10 years after the Cherry Hill workshop on 'Photovoltaic Conversion of Solar Energy for Terrestrial Applications' is assessed. The five categories of research recommended by the Cherry Hill Workshop are listed in a table together with their recommended research budget allocations. The workshop categories include: single-crystal Si cells; poly-Si cells; systems and diagnostics. Categories for thin film CdS/Cu2S and CuInSe2 cells are also included. The roles of government and private utility companies in providing adequate financial support for PV research programs is emphasized.

  5. Mitochondrial ROS Metabolism: 10 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Kushnareva, Y. E.; Murphy, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    The role of mitochondria in oxidative stress is well recognized, but many questions are still to be answered. This article is intended to update our comprehensive review in 2005 by highlighting the progress in understanding of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism over the past 10 years. We review the recently identified or re-appraised sources of ROS generation in mitochondria, such as p66shc protein, succinate dehydrogenase, and recently discovered properties of the mitochondrial antioxidant system. We also reflect upon some controversies, disputes, and misconceptions that confound the field. PMID:26071769

  6. Mitochondrial ROS Metabolism: 10 Years Later.

    PubMed

    Andreyev, A Y; Kushnareva, Y E; Murphy, A N; Starkov, A A

    2015-05-01

    The role of mitochondria in oxidative stress is well recognized, but many questions are still to be answered. This article is intended to update our comprehensive review in 2005 by highlighting the progress in understanding of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism over the past 10 years. We review the recently identified or re-appraised sources of ROS generation in mitochondria, such as p66(shc) protein, succinate dehydrogenase, and recently discovered properties of the mitochondrial antioxidant system. We also reflect upon some controversies, disputes, and misconceptions that confound the field.

  7. Impact of physical activity on cardiovascular events in patients with chronic heart failure. A multicenter prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yutaka; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Miura, Toshiro; Shimada, Kazunori; Asakura, Masanori; Kadokami, Toshiaki; Ando, Shin-ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Daida, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in chronic heart failure (CHF) is more than double compared with the general population in Japan. However, the impact of physical activity on cardiovascular events in CHF patients remains to be fully elucidated. We performed a prospective, nationwide large-scale multicenter study of 9,178 patients with stage A/B/C/D CHF in Japan. We obtained the baseline physical activity data for 7,292 and yearly changes in physical activity data during a 3-year follow-up period for 4,353 patients. We divided the patients into high- and low-exercise groups by using the median value of physical activity in the stage A/B and C/D groups. In both groups, patients who exercised more were characterized by younger age and less advanced stage of CHF. Importantly, the baseline physical activity levels were significantly associated with all-cause death, heart failure (HF) hospitalization and other cardiovascular events (except acute myocardial infarction, stroke, HF hospitalization). Furthermore, the yearly change in physical activity level was also significantly associated with HF hospitalization and other cardiovascular events in both groups. The baseline level of physical activity and its yearly changes are significantly associated with all-cause death and major cardiovascular events in both stage A/B and C/D patients, suggesting that physical activity could be an important therapeutic target to improve the long-term prognosis of CHF patients.

  8. Effect of Naltrexone-Bupropion on Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Overweight and Obese Patients With Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Steven E; Wolski, Kathy E; Prcela, Lisa; Wadden, Thomas; Buse, John B; Bakris, George; Perez, Alfonso; Smith, Steven R

    2016-03-08

    Few cardiovascular outcomes trials have been conducted for obesity treatments. Withdrawal of 2 marketed drugs has resulted in controversy about the cardiovascular safety of obesity agents. To determine whether the combination of naltrexone and bupropion increases major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, defined as cardiovascular death, nonfatal stroke, or nonfatal myocardial infarction) compared with placebo in overweight and obese patients. Randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind noninferiority trial enrolling 8910 overweight or obese patients at increased cardiovascular risk from June 13, 2012, to January 21, 2013, at 266 US centers. After public release of confidential interim data by the sponsor, the academic leadership of the study recommended termination of the trial and the sponsor agreed. An Internet-based weight management program was provided to all participants. Participants were randomized to receive placebo (n=4454) or naltrexone, 32 mg/d, and bupropion, 360 mg/d (n=4456). Time from randomization to first confirmed occurrence of a MACE. The primary analysis planned to assess a noninferiority hazard ratio (HR) of 1.4 after 378 expected events, with a confidential interim analysis after approximately 87 events (25% interim analysis) to assess a noninferiority HR of 2.0 for consideration of regulatory approval. Among the 8910 participants randomized, mean age was 61.0 years (SD, 7.3 years), 54.5% were female, 32.1% had a history of cardiovascular disease, and 85.2% had diabetes, with a median body mass index of 36.6 (interquartile range, 33.1-40.9). For the 25% interim analysis, MACE occurred in 59 placebo-treated patients (1.3%) and 35 naltrexone-bupropion-treated patients (0.8%; HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.39-0.90). After 50% of planned events, MACE occurred in 102 patients (2.3%) in the placebo group and 90 patients (2.0%) in the naltrexone-bupropion group (HR, 0.88; adjusted 99.7% CI, 0.57-1.34). Adverse effects were more common in the

  9. Increasing aspirin use among persons at risk for cardiovascular events in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Mallonee, Sue; Daniels, Carrie G; Mold, James W; Cline, Terry L

    2010-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heartdisease (CHD)and stroke, is the leading cause of death in the United States and in Oklahoma; Oklahoma ranks 48th worst in CVD deaths.This paper will present Oklahoma-specific data and review current recommendations regarding aspirin use for the prevention of CVD events. Average annual age-adjusted death rates were calculated. Oklahoma Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data were used to determine past history of CHD, risk factors for CHD and stroke, and aspirin use among persons 45 years and older. A literature review of recommendations regarding aspirin use was conducted. Between 2005-2008, 14.8% of Oklahomans 45 years of age and older reported a history of coronary heart disease and 6.4% a history of stroke. Approximately 50% of Oklahomans 45 years and older reported a history of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia; 21.5% were current smokers and 16.0% had diabetes. Nearly 10,000 Oklahomans die annually from CHD or stroke. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends 81mg per day of aspirin for men 45 to 79 and women 55 to 79 years of age unless they are at risk for bleeding complications. Daily aspirin use in Oklahoma was 44-57% among those with risk factors but no history of CHD or stroke. Fewer than 50% of Oklahomans 45-79 years reported being counseled by a health professional to take aspirin. Among those persons without a history of CVD who were counseled by a healthcare professional regarding aspirin, 79% were taking daily aspirin compared to 18% among persons not counseled. Aspirin sales increased significantly in Stephens County following a multifaceted community-based aspirin campaign. Low-dose aspirin is being underutilized as a strategy for reducing the excessive numbers of cardiovascular events and deaths in Oklahoma. Health professionals play an important role in educating patients about appropriate use of low-dose aspirin. Community-based interventions can also be

  10. Automatic signal extraction, prioritizing and filtering approaches in detecting post-marketing cardiovascular events associated with targeted cancer drugs from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Wang, Quanqiu

    2014-02-01

    Targeted drugs dramatically improve the treatment outcomes in cancer patients; however, these innovative drugs are often associated with unexpectedly high cardiovascular toxicity. Currently, cardiovascular safety represents both a challenging issue for drug developers, regulators, researchers, and clinicians and a concern for patients. While FDA drug labels have captured many of these events, spontaneous reporting systems are a main source for post-marketing drug safety surveillance in 'real-world' (outside of clinical trials) cancer patients. In this study, we present approaches to extracting, prioritizing, filtering, and confirming cardiovascular events associated with targeted cancer drugs from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). The dataset includes records of 4,285,097 patients from FAERS. We first extracted drug-cardiovascular event (drug-CV) pairs from FAERS through named entity recognition and mapping processes. We then compared six ranking algorithms in prioritizing true positive signals among extracted pairs using known drug-CV pairs derived from FDA drug labels. We also developed three filtering algorithms to further improve precision. Finally, we manually validated extracted drug-CV pairs using 21 million published MEDLINE records. We extracted a total of 11,173 drug-CV pairs from FAERS. We showed that ranking by frequency is significantly more effective than by the five standard signal detection methods (246% improvement in precision for top-ranked pairs). The filtering algorithm we developed further improved overall precision by 91.3%. By manual curation using literature evidence, we show that about 51.9% of the 617 drug-CV pairs that appeared in both FAERS and MEDLINE sentences are true positives. In addition, 80.6% of these positive pairs have not been captured by FDA drug labeling. The unique drug-CV association dataset that we created based on FAERS could facilitate our understanding and prediction of cardiotoxic events associated with

  11. Blood Pressure and Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis: The CRIC Study (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort).

    PubMed

    Bansal, Nisha; McCulloch, Charles E; Lin, Feng; Alper, Arnold; Anderson, Amanda H; Cuevas, Magda; Go, Alan S; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Kusek, John W; Lora, Claudia M; Lustigova, Eva; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Townsend, Raymond R; Wright, Jackson; Xie, Dawei; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    We recently reported a linear association between higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) and risk of mortality in hemodialysis patients when SBP is measured outside of the dialysis unit (out-of-dialysis-unit-SBP), despite there being a U-shaped association between SBP measured at the dialysis unit (dialysis-unit-SBP) with risk of mortality. Here, we explored the relationship between SBP with cardiovascular events, which has important treatment implications but has not been well elucidated. Among 383 hemodialysis participants enrolled in the prospective CRIC study (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort), multivariable splines and Cox models were used to study the association between SBP and adjudicated cardiovascular events (heart failure, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and peripheral artery disease), controlling for differences in demographics, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and dialysis parameters. Dialysis-unit-SBP and out-of-dialysis-unit-SBP were modestly correlated (r=0.34; P<0.001). We noted a U-shaped association of dialysis-unit-SBP and risk of cardiovascular events, with the nadir risk between 140 and 170 mm Hg. In contrast, there was a linear stepwise association between out-of-dialysis-unit-SBP with risk of cardiovascular events. Participants with out-of-dialysis-unit-SBP ≥128 mm Hg (top 2 quartiles) had >2-fold increased risk of cardiovascular events compared with those with out-of-dialysis-unit-SBP ≤112 mm Hg (3rd SBP quartile: adjusted hazard ratio, 2.08 [95% confidence interval, 1.12-3.87] and fourth SBP quartile: adjusted hazard ratio, 2.76 [95% confidence interval, 1.42-5.33]). In conclusion, among hemodialysis patients, although there is a U-shaped (paradoxical) association of dialysis-unit-SBP and risk of cardiovascular disease, there is a linear association of out-of-dialysis-unit-SBP with risk of cardiovascular disease. Out-of-dialysis-unit blood pressure provides key information and may be an important therapeutic target.

  12. Influence of Cardiovascular Risk in the Prediction and Timing of Cardiac Events After Exercise Echocardiogram Testing Without Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Velasco Del Castillo, Sonia; Antón Ladislao, Ane; Gómez Sánchez, Verónica; Onaindia Gandarias, José Juan; Cacicedo Fernández de Bobadilla, Ángela; Rodríguez Sánchez, Ibon; Laraudogoitia Zaldumbide, Eva

    2017-09-01

    There have been no analyses of the influence of cardiovascular risk as a predictor of events in patients with exercise echocardiography (EE) without ischemia. Our objective was to determine the predictors of cardiac events, paying special attention to cardiovascular risk. This study included 1640 patients with EE without ischemia. Of these, there were 1206 with no previously known coronary artery disease (CAD), whose risk of a fatal cardiovascular disease event was estimated according to the European SCORE (Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation) risk assessment system, and 434 with known CAD. The primary endpoint was cardiac event-free survival (EFS) (cardiac death, nonfatal acute coronary syndrome, and coronary revascularization). After a median follow-up of 35 [23-54] months, no differences were found in cardiac EFS between patients with a SCORE ≥ 10 or diabetes and patients with previous CAD (89.8% vs 87.1%). In the first year, cardiac EFS was high in all groups (99.4% if SCORE < 5; 100% if 5-9; 98% if ≥ 10 or diabetes and 97% in patients with CAD). In the third year, cardiac EFS was similar in the group with SCORE ≥ 10 or diabetes (94.5%) and patients with CAD (91.1%, P = NS). In these patients, the annualized event rate was 2.8% and 2.55%, respectively, and was significantly higher than in groups with SCORE < 5 (0.6%) and SCORE 5-9 (0.12%). The most frequent events were non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome and late revascularization. Predictors of cardiac events were previous CAD, SCORE ≥ 10 or diabetes mellitus, creatinine clearance, left ventricular ejection fraction, and chest pain during EE. Initial outcome after an EE without ischemia is favorable but is subsequently modulated by cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Panic attacks and risk of incident cardiovascular events among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Smoller, Jordan W; Pollack, Mark H; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Jackson, Rebecca D; Oberman, Albert; Wong, Nathan D; Sheps, David

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies have documented an association of depression and phobic anxiety with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but little is known about the cardiovascular sequelae of panic anxiety. To determine whether panic attacks are associated with risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in postmenopausal women. Prospective cohort survey. Ten clinical centers of the 40-center Women's Health Initiative. A total of 3369 community-dwelling, generally healthy postmenopausal women (aged 51-83 years) enrolled between 1997 and 2000 in the Myocardial Ischemia and Migraine Study who completed a questionnaire about occurrence of panic attacks in the previous 6 months. Cardiovascular/cerebrovascular outcomes (fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke) and all-cause mortality were ascertained after a mean of 5.3 years of follow-up. A 6-month history of full-blown panic attacks, endorsed by 10% of postmenopausal women in this cohort, was associated with both coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 4.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-9.99) and the combined end point of coronary heart disease or stroke (hazard ratio, 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.60-5.94) after controlling for multiple potential confounders. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality, excluding those with a history of cardiovascular/cerebrovascular events, was 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.94). Panic attacks are relatively common among postmenopausal women and appear to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in older women.

  14. Cardiovascular events on board commercial maritime vessels: a two-year review.

    PubMed

    Alves, Paulo M; Leigh, Robb; Bartos, Ginger; Mody, Rita; Gholson, Linda; Nerwich, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are an important concern in merchant maritime operations. They are responsible for the majority of deaths at sea that are not related to injury or violence. The objective was to better understand the epidemiology of CVD in merchant maritime operations. Retrospective review of medical events on board merchant maritime vessels over a period of two years, from a US-based telemedicine provider's database. A total of 1,394 cases were initially retrieved from the database. CVD was diagnosed in 29 cases and was the eleventh leading cause for accessing the telemedicine provider. Five deaths occurred in the study period, three of which related to CVDs. CVDs resulted in more diversions and the utilization of more urgent means of communication. CVDs present a challenge in maritime health. The current pre-employment system is not, in a reasonable cost/benefit balance, able to prevent on board events from occurring. The success of telemedicine depends heavily on the onsite resources, both human and material. Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs), along with other devices such as multi-parameter monitors, are tools generally available to address acute presentations of CVDs, but their applicability on board commercial ships is a matter of controversy. CVDs are an important concern in commercial maritime operations due to the need for subsequent evaluation and potential complications including the risk of sudden cardiac arrest. In this study, CVDs were probably responsible for three on board deaths. Additional research is warranted to provide more evidence about the best resources to have on board to handle CVDs more effectively.

  15. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) reduces cardiovascular events: relationship with the EPA/arachidonic acid ratio.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Haruo; Saito, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of fish oil and high-purity eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester (hp-EPA-E) for treating cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been reported. Fish oil contains saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids that have pharmacological effects opposite to those of ω3 fatty acids (ω3). Moreover, ω3, such as EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), do not necessarily have the same metabolic and biological actions. This has obscured the clinical efficacy of ω3. Recently, the Japan EPA Lipid Intervention Study (JELIS) of hp-EPA-E established the clinical efficacy of EPA for CVD, and higher levels of blood EPA, not DHA, were found to be associated with a lower incidence of major coronary events. A significant reduction in the risk of coronary events was observed when the ratio of EPA to arachidonic acid (AA) (EPA/AA) was > 0.75. Furthermore, the ratio of prostaglandin (PG) I3 and PGI2 to thromboxane A2 (TXA2) ([PGI2 + PGI3]/TXA2) was determined to have a linear relationship with the EPA/AA ratio as follows: (PGI2 + PGI3)/TXA2 =λ + π* (EPA/AA). Like PGI2, PGI3 not only inhibits platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction, but also is assumed to reduce cardiac ischemic injury and arteriosclerosis and promote angiogenesis. Thus, the effects of EPA in reducing the risk of CVD could be mediated by biological action of PGI3 in addition to hypotriglyceridemic action of EPA. Compared with DHA, EPA administration increases the EPA/AA ratio and the (PGI2 + PGI3)/TXA2 balance to a state that inhibits the onset and/or progression of CVD.

  16. Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Atherothrombotic Disease: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Su, Ho-Ming; Lee, Chee-Siong; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherothrombotic diseases including cerebrovascular disease (CVD), coronary artery disease (CAD), and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), contribute to the major causes of death in the world. Although several studies showed the association between polyvascular disease and poor cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in Asian population, there was no large-scale study to validate this relationship in this population. Methods and Results This retrospective cohort study included patients with a diagnosis of CVD, CAD, or PAD from the database contained in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Bureau during 2001–2004. A total of 19954 patients were enrolled in this study. The atherothrombotic disease score was defined according to the number of atherothrombotic disease. The study endpoints included acute coronary syndrome (ACS), all strokes, vascular procedures, in hospital mortality, and so on. The event rate of ischemic stroke (18.2%) was higher than that of acute myocardial infarction (5.7%) in our patients (P = 0.0006). In the multivariate Cox regression analyses, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of each increment of atherothrombotic disease score in predicting ACS, all strokes, vascular procedures, and in hospital mortality were 1.41, 1.66, 1.30, and 1.14, respectively (P≦0.0169). Conclusions This large population-based longitudinal study in patients with atherothrombotic disease demonstrated the risk of subsequent ischemic stroke was higher than that of subsequent AMI. In addition, the subsequent adverse CV events including ACS, all stroke, vascular procedures, and in hospital mortality were progressively increased as the increase of atherothrombotic disease score. PMID:24647769

  17. The Effect of Hurricane Sandy on Cardiovascular Events in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Swerdel, Joel N.; Janevic, Teresa M.; Cosgrove, Nora M.; Kostis, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hurricane Sandy made landfall in New Jersey (NJ) on October 29, 2012. We studied the impact of this extreme weather event on the incidence of, and 30‐day mortality from, cardiovascular (CV) events (CVEs), including myocardial infarctions (MI) and strokes, in NJ. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the MI data acquisition system (MIDAS), a database of all inpatient hospital discharges with CV diagnoses in NJ, including death certificates. Patients were grouped by their county of residence, and each county was categorized as either high‐ (41.5% of the NJ population) or low‐impact area based on data from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and other sources. We utilized Poisson regression comparing the 2 weeks following Sandy landfall with the same weeks from the 5 previous years. In addition, we used CVE data from the 2 weeks previous in each year as to adjust for yearly changes. In the high‐impact area, MI incidence increased by 22%, compared to previous years (attributable rate ratio [ARR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16, 1.28), with a 31% increase in 30‐day mortality (ARR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.22, 1.41). The incidence of stroke increased by 7% (ARR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.03, 1.11), with no significant change in 30‐day stroke mortality. There were no changes in incidence or 30‐day mortality of MI or stroke in the low‐impact area. Conclusion In the 2 weeks following Hurricane Sandy, there were increases in the incidence of, and 30‐day mortality from, MI and in the incidence of stroke. PMID:25488295

  18. The Role of Plasma Triglyceride/High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio to Predict New Cardiovascular Events in Essential Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Turak, Osman; Afşar, Barış; Ozcan, Fırat; Öksüz, Fatih; Mendi, Mehmet Ali; Yayla, Çagrı; Covic, Adrian; Bertelsen, Nathan; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    Triglyceride (TG) to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (TG/HDL-C) has been suggested as a simple method to identify unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in the general population. The effect of the TG/HDL-C ratio on essential hypertensive patients is unclear. About 900 consecutive essential hypertensive patients (mean age 52.9±12.6 years, 54.2% male) who visited our outpatient hypertension clinic were analyzed. Participants were divided into quartiles based on baseline TG/HDL-C ratio and medical records were obtained periodically for the occurrence of fatal events and composite major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) including transient ischemic attack, stroke, aortic dissection, acute coronary syndrome, and death. Participants were followed for a median of 40 months (interquartile range, 35-44 months). Overall, a higher quartile of TG/HDL-C ratio at baseline was significantly linked with higher incidence of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. Using multivariate Cox regression analysis, plasma TG/HDL-C ratio was independently associated with increased risk of fatal events (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.37; P≤.001] and MACEs (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.06-1.21; P≤.001). Increased plasma TG/HDL-C ratio was associated with more fatal events and MACEs in essential hypertensive patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Acute myocardial infarction versus other cardiovascular events in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Ramirez, Julio; Cosentini, Roberto; Valenti, Vincenzo; Voza, Antonio; Rossi, Paolo; Stolz, Daiana; Legnani, Delfino; Pesci, Alberto; Richeldi, Luca; Peyrani, Paula; Massari, Fernando Maria; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on clinical outcomes of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus other cardiovascular events (CVEs) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This was an international, multicentre, observational, prospective study of CAP patients hospitalised in eight hospitals in Italy and Switzerland. Three groups were identified: those without CVEs, those with AMI and those with other CVEs. Among 905 patients, 21 (2.3%) patients experienced at least one AMI, while 107 (11.7%) patients experienced at least one other CVE. Patients with CAP and either AMI or other CVEs showed a higher severity of the disease than patients with CAP alone. Female sex, liver disease and the presence of severe sepsis were independent predictors for the occurrence of AMI, while female sex, age >65 years, neurological disease and the presence of pleural effusion predicted other CVEs. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among those who experienced AMI in comparison to those experiencing other CVEs (43% versus 21%, p=0.039). The presence of AMI showed an adjusted odds ratio for in-hospital mortality of 3.57 (p=0.012) and for other CVEs of 2.63 (p=0.002). These findings on AMI versus other CVEs as complications of CAP may be important when planning interventional studies on cardioprotective medications.

  20. Acute myocardial infarction versus other cardiovascular events in community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Julio; Cosentini, Roberto; Valenti, Vincenzo; Voza, Antonio; Rossi, Paolo; Stolz, Daiana; Legnani, Delfino; Pesci, Alberto; Richeldi, Luca; Peyrani, Paula; Massari, Fernando Maria; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on clinical outcomes of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus other cardiovascular events (CVEs) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This was an international, multicentre, observational, prospective study of CAP patients hospitalised in eight hospitals in Italy and Switzerland. Three groups were identified: those without CVEs, those with AMI and those with other CVEs. Among 905 patients, 21 (2.3%) patients experienced at least one AMI, while 107 (11.7%) patients experienced at least one other CVE. Patients with CAP and either AMI or other CVEs showed a higher severity of the disease than patients with CAP alone. Female sex, liver disease and the presence of severe sepsis were independent predictors for the occurrence of AMI, while female sex, age >65 years, neurological disease and the presence of pleural effusion predicted other CVEs. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among those who experienced AMI in comparison to those experiencing other CVEs (43% versus 21%, p=0.039). The presence of AMI showed an adjusted odds ratio for in-hospital mortality of 3.57 (p=0.012) and for other CVEs of 2.63 (p=0.002). These findings on AMI versus other CVEs as complications of CAP may be important when planning interventional studies on cardioprotective medications. PMID:27730139

  1. Aqua's First 10 Years: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Aqua spacecraft was launched at 2:55 a.m. on May 4, 2002, from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, into a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 705 km. Aqua carries six Earth-observing instruments to collect data on water in all its forms (liquid, vapor, and solid) and on a wide variety of additional Earth system variables (Parkinson 2003). The design lifetime for Aqua's prime mission was 6 years, and Aqua is now well into its extended mission, approaching 10 years of successful operations. The Aqua data have been used for hundreds of scientific studies and continue to be used for scientific discovery and numerous practical applications.

  2. [Cardiovascular risk and cardiovascular events in the general population of the sanitary area of Toledo. RICARTO Study].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Roca, G C; Rodríguez-Padial, L; Alonso-Moreno, F J; Segura-Fragoso, A; Villarín-Castro, A; Rodríguez-García, M L; Menchén-Herreros, A; Rojas-Martelo, G A; Fernández-Conde, J A; Artigao-Rodenas, L M; Carbayo-Herencia, J A; Escobar-Cervantes, C; Hernández-Moreno, J; Fernández-Martín, J

    2017-05-26

    The main aim of this study is to ascertain the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF), target organ damage (TOD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as life habits (physical exercise, alcohol consumption, and Mediterranean diet) in the population of a Health Area in Toledo, Spain, to assess cardiovascular risk (CVR). Epidemiological and observational study that will analyse a sample from the general population aged 18 years or older, randomly selected from a database of health cards, and stratified by age and gender. Clinical history, physical examination, and complementary tests will be performed. Aliquots of whole blood and serum samples will be stored at a temperature of-85°C to evaluate future genetic studies. CVR will be estimated by using SCORE project scales calibrated for Spanish population and the Framingham Heart Study scale. When the estimated sample size has been achieved and after a minimum follow-up of 5 years, a final visit will performed in which CVRF, TOD, CVD, CVRF control, and fatal and non-fatal outcomes will be evaluated. The RICARTO study is aimed to assess the prevalence of the main CVRF, TOD and CVD in order to determine the CVR in the general population of a health area of Toledo. An analysis will be repeated on the final sample after at least 5 years of follow-up to ascertain the incidence of CV outcomes and the temporal trends of life style, as well as the prevalence of CVRF, TOD, and CVD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. [Blood-stasis and toxin causing catastrophe hypothesis and acute cardiovascular events: proposal of the hypothesis and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Shi, Da-Zhu; Yin, Hui-Jun

    2008-10-01

    A hypothesis of " blood-stasis and toxin causing catastrophe engender acute cardiovascular event (ACE)" was put forward according to TCM cognition on blood-stasis and toxin, in combining with the up to date concept of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, and together with our clinical practical experiences. The etiology, pathogenesis, evolving law, initial characteristics, clinical manifestation, therapeutic methods, prescriptions and their compatibility, as well as the well-suited time for applying TCM intervention were discussed. The authors stressed that it is of great significance for further reducing the morbidity of ACE and improving the effect of integrative medicine for preventing and treating cardiovascular thrombotic disease.

  4. [The relevance of a decline in renal function for risk of renal failure, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality].

    PubMed

    Bots, Michiel L; Blankestijn, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the presence of impaired renal function is associated with an increased risk of end-stage renal disease, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. Irrespective of the starting level of renal function, a decline in renal function over two years is a relevant and strong risk factor for end-stage renal disease, cardiovascular death and all-cause mortality. Even a decline of 20 to 30 per cent is associated with to a considerable increased risk and requires further attention.

  5. Protocol for Evaluating the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index to Predict Cardiovascular Events in Japan: A Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Ito, Hiroshi; Horinaka, Shigeo; Shirai, Kohji; Higaki, Jitsuo; Orimio, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was developed in Japan and is a blood pressure-independent index of arterial stiffness from the origin of the aorta to the ankle. In recent years, it has been studied by many researchers worldwide, and it is strongly anticipated that it will play a role as a predictive factor for arteriosclerotic diseases. The objective of this study was to examine the benefits of using CAVI as a predictor of cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. Methods and Design This prospective multicenter study to evaluate the usefulness of the CAVI to predict cardiovascular events in Japan (CAVI-J) is a cohort study with central registration. Participants (n = 3,000) will be scheduled to enroll and data will be collected for up to 5 years from entry of participants into the study. To be eligible to participate in the CAVI-J study, individuals have to be aged between 40 and 74 years and have at least one of the following risk factors for arteriosclerosis: (1) type 2 diabetes mellitus; (2) high-risk hypertension; (3) metabolic syndrome; (4) chronic kidney disease (stage 3), or (5) history of coronary artery disease or noncardiogenic cerebral infarction. The primary endpoints of this study are cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke. The secondary endpoints are composite cardiovascular events including all cause death, angina pectoris with revascularization, new incidence of peripheral artery disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection, heart failure requiring hospitalization, and deterioration in renal function. The cutoff for CAVI against the incidence of cardiovascular events will be determined. PMID:28275590

  6. Absolute risk of cardiovascular disease events, and blood pressure- and lipid-lowering therapy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Banks, Emily; Crouch, Simon R; Korda, Rosemary J; Stavreski, Bill; Page, Karen; Thurber, Katherine A; Grenfell, Robert

    2016-05-02

    To quantify absolute cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and treatment in Australian adults. Cross-sectional representative study of 9564 people aged 18 years or more who had participated in the 2011-12 Australian National Health Measures Survey (response rate for those aged 45-74 years: 46.5%). Prior CVD was ascertained and 5-year absolute risk of a primary CVD event calculated (using the Australian National Vascular Disease Prevention Alliance algorithm; categories: low [< 10%], moderate [10-15%], and high [> 15%] risk) on the basis of data on medical history, risk factors and medications, derived from interviews, physical measurements, and blood and urine samples. Absolute CVD risk increased with age and was higher among men than women. Overall, 19.9% (95% CI, 18.5-21.3%) of Australians aged 45-74 years had a high absolute risk of a future CVD event (an estimated 1 445 000 people): 8.7% (95% CI, 7.8-9.6%) had prior CVD (estimated 634 000 people) and 11.2% (95% CI, 10.2-12.2%) had high primary CVD risk (estimated 811 000 people). A further 8.6% (95% CI, 7.4-9.8%, estimated 625 000) were at moderate primary CVD risk. Among those with prior CVD, 44.2% (95% CI, 36.8-51.6%) were receiving blood pressure- and lipid-lowering medications, 35.4% (95% CI, 27.8-43.0%) were receiving only one of these, and 20.4% (95% CI, 13.9-26.9%) were receiving neither. Corresponding figures for high primary CVD risk were 24.3% (95% CI, 18.3-30.3%); 28.7% (95% CI, 22.7-34.7%); and 47.1% (95% CI, 39.9-54.3%). About one-fifth of the Australian population aged 45-74 years (about 1.4 million individuals) were estimated to have a high absolute risk of a future CVD event. Most (estimated 970 000) were not receiving currently recommended combination blood pressure- and lipid-lowering therapy, indicating substantial potential for health gains by increasing routine assessment and treatment according to absolute CVD risk.

  7. High Triglycerides Predicts Arteriogenic Erectile Dysfunction and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Subjects With Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Corona, Giovanni; Cipriani, Sarah; Rastrelli, Giulia; Sforza, Alessandra; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The atherogenic role of triglycerides (TG) remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to analyze the contribution of TG in the pathogenesis of erectile dysfunction (ED) and to verify the value of elevated TG in predicting major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). An unselected series of 3,990 men attending our outpatient clinic for sexual dysfunction was retrospectively studied. A subset of this sample (n = 1,687) was enrolled in a longitudinal study. Several clinical, biochemical, and instrumental (penile color Doppler ultrasound; PCDU) factors were evaluated. Among the patients studied, after adjustment for confounders, higher TG levels were associated with arteriogenic ED and a higher risk of clinical and biochemical hypogonadism. Conversely, no association between TG and other sexual dysfunctions was observed. When pathological PCDU parameters-including flaccid acceleration (<1.17 m/sec(2)) or dynamic peak systolic velocity (PSV <35 cm/sec)-were considered, the negative association between impaired penile flow and higher TG levels was confirmed, even when subjects taking lipid-lowering drugs or those with diabetes were excluded from the analysis (OR = 6.343 [1.243;32.362], P = .026 and 3.576 [1.104;11.578]; P = .34 for impaired acceleration and PSV, respectively). Similarly, when the same adjusted models were applied, TG levels were associated with a higher risk of hypogonadism, independently of the definition criteria (OR = 2.892 [1.643;5.410], P < .0001 and 4.853 [1.965;11.990]; P = .001 for total T <12 and 8 nM, respectively). In the longitudinal study, after adjusting for confounders, elevated TG levels (upper quartile: 162-1686 mg/dL) were independently associated with a higher incidence of MACE (HR = 2.469 [1.019;5.981]; P = .045), when compared to the rest of the sample. Our data suggest an association between elevated TG and arteriogenic ED and its cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification. Whether the use of TG lowering drugs

  8. The predictive value of chronic kidney disease for assessing cardiovascular events under consideration of pretest probability for coronary artery disease in patients who underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Tatsuhiko; Moroi, Masao; Joki, Nobuhiko; Hase, Hiroki; Masai, Hirofumi; Kunimasa, Taeko; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kaoru

    2013-02-01

    Pretest probability of coronary artery disease (CAD) facilitates diagnosis and risk stratification of CAD. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are established major predictors of cardiovascular events. However, the role of CKD to assess pretest probability of CAD has been unclear. This study evaluates the role of CKD to assess the predictive value of cardiovascular events under consideration of pretest probability in patients who underwent stress MPI. Patients with no history of CAD underwent stress MPI (n = 310; male = 166; age = 70; CKD = 111; low/intermediate/high pretest probability = 17/194/99) and were followed for 24 months. Cardiovascular events included cardiac death and nonfatal acute coronary syndrome. Cardiovascular events occurred in 15 of the 310 patients (4.8 %), but not in those with low pretest probability which included 2 CKD patients. In patients with intermediate to high pretest probability (n = 293), multivariate Cox regression analysis identified only CKD [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.88; P = 0.022) and summed stress score of stress MPI (HR = 1.50; P < 0.001) as independent and significant predictors of cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular events were not observed in patients with low pretest probability. In patients with intermediate to high pretest probability, CKD and stress MPI are independent predictors of cardiovascular events considering the pretest probability of CAD in patients with no history of CAD. In assessing pretest probability of CAD, CKD might be an important factor for assessing future cardiovascular prognosis.

  9. [Impact of adherence to statins on cardiovascular adverse events in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, S T; Xu, J Y; Huang, R C

    2016-08-24

    To evaluate the impact of different adherence mode to statins on cardiovascular adverse events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Electronic searches, including PubMed, Scopus, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid EBM Reviews CENTRAL, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Ovid PsycInfo, Wanfang data, CNKI and Science & Technology Magazine Online, were performed and all related literatures of all languages were retrieval till to March 1, 2015. The full text was obtained through manual retrieval, inter-library loan and document delivery service, or by contacting the author directly. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, data was extracted dependently by two raters. The high adherence to statin was use defined by the ratio of statins cover time and the total time (proportion of days covered, PDC≥80%). Data were analyzed quantitatively using RevMan 5.1. Then implement subgroup analysis was made according to different statin adherence and classification of clinical outcomes. The impact of adherence to statin on cardiovascular events (all-cause mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, hospitalization due to unstable angina pectoris, heart insufficiency attack) in CAD patients was evaluated. Present analysis enrolled eight relevant retrospective and observational studies. Because there were only few literatures describing the impact of statin adherence on clinical outcomes, we also included literatures with low adherence group (4 studies in PDC<80%, 2 studies in PDC<40% and 2 studies in PDC<20%). High adherence group includes 189 556 cases; low adherence group includes 11 384 cases. Compare with low adherence group, cardiovascular events rate reduced by 32% in high adherence group (OR=0.68, 95%CI 0.58-0.80, P<0.001). Subgroup analysis with 4 literatures with PDC≥80% or<80% showed that the cardiovascular events prominently decreased in high adherence group compared to low adherence group (OR=0.63, 95%CI 0.53-0.76, P<0.001). According to 5 literatures with

  10. Value of serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A for predicting cardiovascular events among patients presenting with cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    von Haehling, Stephan; Doehner, Wolfram; Jankowska, Ewa A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Stellos, Konstantinos; Puntmann, Valentina O.; Nagel, Eike; Anker, Stefan D.; Gawaz, Meinrad; Bigalke, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) has been suggested as a candidate marker for the identification of unstable plaques in coronary arteries. We assessed the value of PAPP-A for predicting short-term cardiovascular events in a large cohort of patients presenting with cardiac chest pain. Methods: We included consecutive patients who presented to a teaching hospital in Germany with chest pain of cardiac origin confirmed by coronary angiography. We analyzed PAPP-A levels from serum samples drawn within 30 minutes after arrival in the emergency department or in the catheterization laboratory. Patients were followed for 90 days or until death for major adverse cardiovascular events, defined as the combined outcome of stent thrombosis, myocardial (re)infarction, ischemic stroke or cardiovascular-related death. Results: A total of 2568 patients (mean age [± standard deviation (SD)] 68 ± 11 years; 74% male) presented with cardiac chest pain: 55% had stable angina and 45% had acute coronary syndrome. The PAPP-A levels ranged from 4 to 2154 mIU/L (median 14.0 mIU/L, interquartile range 9.3–25.2 mIU/L). Major adverse cardiovascular events occurred in 203 patients (7.9%). The mean PAPP-A level was higher among patients who had an event than among those who did not (62 ± 156 v. 21 ± 23 mIU/L, p < 0.001). In a multivariable analysis, PAPP-A remained a significant independent predictor of the primary outcome within 90 days (hazard ratio per 1 SD increase in PAPP-A level 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.74–2.21). The optimal prognostic cutoff value was a PAPP-A level of 34.6 mIU/L. Interpretation: Higher levels of serum PAPP-A were independently associated with an increased short-term risk of cardiovascular events in patients presenting with cardiac chest pain. Further studies are required to validate the use of PAPP-A in routine clinical practice to predict future cardiovascular events. PMID:23509133

  11. Target Organ Complications and Cardiovascular Events Associated with Masked Hypertension and White Coat Hypertension: Analysis from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Tientcheu, Danielle; Ayers, Colby; Das, Sandeep R.; McGuire, Darren K.; de Lemos, James A.; Khera, Amit; Kaplan, Norman; Victor, Ronald; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple epidemiological studies from Europe and Asia have demonstrated increased cardiovascular risks associated with isolated elevation of home blood pressure (BP) or masked hypertension (MH). Previous studies have not addressed cardiovascular outcomes associated with MH and white coat hypertension (WCH) in the general population in the United States. Objectives The goal of this study was to determine hypertensive target organ damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes associated with WCH (high clinic BP ≥140/90 mm Hg, normal home BP of <135/85 mm Hg), MH (high home BP ≥135/85 mm Hg, normal clinic BP <140/90 mm Hg), and sustained hypertension (SH, high home and clinic BP) in the Dallas Heart Study, a large, multiethnic probability-based population cohort. Methods We evaluated associations between WCH, MH, SH and aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV) by magnetic resonance imaging; urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR); and cystatin C at study baseline. Then, associations between WCH and MH with incident cardiovascular outcomes (coronary heart disease, stroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and cardiovascular death) over a median follow-up period of 9 years were assessed. Results The study cohort comprised 3,027 subjects (50% African Americans). The sample-weighted prevalence of WCH and MH were 3.3% and 17.8%, respectively. Both WCH and MH were independently associated with increased APWV, cystatin C, and UACR. Both WCH and MH were independently associated with higher cardiovascular events compared with the NT group, even after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (adjusted HR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.05 to 4.15 and adjusted HR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.36 to 3.03, respectively). Conclusions In a multiethnic U.S. population, both WCH and MH were independently associated with increased aortic stiffness, renal injury, and incident cardiovascular events. Because MH is common and associated with an adverse cardiovascular profile, home BP

  12. Alcohol and Immediate Risk of Cardiovascular Events: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Chahal, Harpreet S.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Rimm, Eric B.; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although considerable research describes the cardiovascular effects of habitual moderate and heavy alcohol consumption, the immediate risks following alcohol intake have not been well characterized. Based on its physiological effects, alcohol may have markedly different effects on immediate and long-term risk. Methods and Results We searched CINAHL, Embase, and PubMed from inception to March 12 2015, supplemented with manual screening for observational studies assessing the association between alcohol intake and cardiovascular events in the following hours and days. We calculated pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between alcohol intake and myocardial infarction (MI), ischemic stroke (IS) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) using DerSimonian and Laird random-effects models to model any alcohol intake or dose-response relationships of alcohol intake and cardiovascular events. Among 1056 citations and 37 full-text articles reviewed, 23 studies (29457 participants) were included. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with an immediately higher cardiovascular risk that was attenuated after 24 hours, and even protective for MI and HS (≈2–4 drinks: RR=30% lower risk), and protective against IS within one week (≈6 drinks: 19% lower risk). In contrast, heavy alcohol drinking was associated with higher cardiovascular risk in the following day (≈6–9 drinks: RR=1.3–2.3) and week (≈19–30 drinks: RR=2.25–6.2). Conclusions There appears to be a consistent finding of an immediately higher cardiovascular risk following any alcohol consumption but by 24 hours, only heavy alcohol intake conferred continued risk. PMID:26936862

  13. Burden of Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Subclinical Atherosclerosis, and Incident Cardiovascular Events Across Dimensions of Religiosity: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Matthew; Liu, Kiang; Ning, Hongyan; Fitchett, George; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Religious involvement has been associated with improved health practices and outcomes; however, no ethnically-diverse community-based study has examined differences in cardiac risk factors, subclinical cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events across levels of religiosity. Methods and Results We included 5474 White, Black, Hispanic, and Chinese participants who attended Exam 2 of the NHLBI’s MESA study. We compared cross-sectional differences in cardiac risk factors and subclinical CVD, and longitudinal CVD event rates across self-reported levels of religious participation, prayer/meditation, and spirituality. Multivariable-adjusted regression models were fitted to assess associations of measures of religiosity with risk factors, subclinical CVD, and CVD events. MESA participants (52.4% female, mean age 63) with greater levels of religious participation were more likely to be female and black. After adjustment for demographic covariates, participants who attended services daily, compared with never, were significantly more likely to be obese (adjusted odds ratio 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12 – 1.72), but less likely to smoke (adjusted odds ratio 0.39, 95% CI 0.26 – 0.58). Results were similar for those with frequent prayer/meditation or high levels of spirituality. There were no consistent patterns of association observed between measures of religiosity and presence/extent of subclinical CVD at baseline or incident CVD events during longitudinal follow up over 4 years. Conclusions Our results do not confirm those of previous studies associating greater religiosity with overall better health risks and status, at least with regard to CVD. There was no reduction in risk for CVD events associated with greater religiosity. PMID:20100975

  14. The Decline Effect in Cardiovascular Medicine: Is the Effect of Cardiovascular Medicine and Stent on Cardiovascular Events Decline Over the Years?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moo-Sik; Flammer, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    The term decline effect is referred to a diminution of scientifically discovered effects over time. Reasons for the decline effect are multifaceted and include publication bias, selective reporting, outcomes reporting bias, regression to the mean, scientific paradigm shift, overshadowing and habituation, among others. Such effects can be found in cardiovascular medicines through medications (e.g., aspirin, antithrombotics, proton pump inhibitor, beta-blockers, statins, estrogen/progestin, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor etc.), as well as with interventional devices (e.g., angioplasty, percutaneous coronary intervention, stents). The scientific community should understand the various dimensions of the decline effects, and effective steps should be undertaken to prevent or recognize such decline effects in cardiovascular medicines. PMID:23964290

  15. Joint effect of insulin signalling genes on cardiovascular events and on whole body and endothelial insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bacci, Simonetta; Prudente, Sabrina; Copetti, Massimiliano; Spoto, Belinda; Rizza, Stefano; Baratta, Roberto; Di Pietro, Natalia; Morini, Eleonora; Di Paola, Rosa; Testa, Alessandra; Mallamaci, Francesca; Tripepi, Giovanni; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Mercuri, Luana; Di Silvestre, Sara; Lauro, Renato; Malatino, Lorenzo; Consoli, Agostino; Pellegrini, Fabio; Pandolfi, Assunta; Frittitta, Lucia; Zoccali, Carmine; Federici, Massimo; Doria, Alessandro; Trischitta, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) share a common soil. We investigated the combined role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting insulin signaling (ENPP1 K121Q, rs1044498; IRS1 G972R, rs1801278; TRIB3 Q84R, rs2295490) on CVD, age at myocardial infarction (MI), in vivo insulin sensitivity and in vitro insulin-stimulated nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. Design and Setting 1. We first studied, incident cardiovascular events (a composite endpoint comprising myocardial infarction -MI-, stroke and cardiovascular death) in 733 patients (2,186 person-years, 175 events). 2. In a replication attempt, age at MI was tested in 331 individuals. 3. OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was assessed in 829 individuals with fasting glucose < 126 mg/dl. 4. NOS activity was measured in 40 strains of human vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results 1. Risk variants jointly predicted cardiovascular events (HR=1.181; p=0.0009) and, when added to clinical risk factors, significantly improved survival C-statistics; they also allowed a significantly correct reclassification (by net reclassification index) in the whole sample (135/733 individuals) and, even more, in obese patients (116/204 individuals). 2. Risk variants were jointly associated with age at MI (p=0.006). 3. A significant association was also observed with ISI (p=0.02). 4. Finally, risk variants were jointly associated with insulin-stimulated NOS activity in HUVECs (p=0.009). Conclusions Insulin signaling genes variants jointly affect cardiovascular disease, very likely by promoting whole body and endothelium-specific insulin resistance. Further studies are needed to address whether their genotyping help identify very high-risk patients who need specific and/or more aggressive preventive strategies. PMID:23107043

  16. Acute cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in patients with hyperthyroidism: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Olaf M; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Jørgensen, Jens Otto L

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have shown an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in hyperthyroidism, but most studies have been too small to address the effect of hyperthyroidism on individual cardiovascular endpoints. Our main aim was to assess the association among hyperthyroidism, acute cardiovascular events and mortality. It is a nationwide population-based cohort study. Data were obtained from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Patient Registry, which covers all Danish hospitals. We compared the rate of all-cause mortality as well as venous thromboembolism (VTE), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), ischemic and non-ischemic stroke, arterial embolism, atrial fibrillation (AF) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the two cohorts. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated. The study included 85 856 hyperthyroid patients and 847 057 matched population-based controls. Mean follow-up time was 9.2 years. The HR for mortality was highest in the first 3 months after diagnosis of hyperthyroidism: 4.62, 95% CI: 4.40-4.85, and remained elevated during long-term follow-up (>3 years) (HR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.33-1.37). The risk for all examined cardiovascular events was increased, with the highest risk in the first 3 months after hyperthyroidism diagnosis. The 3-month post-diagnosis risk was highest for atrial fibrillation (HR: 7.32, 95% CI: 6.58-8.14) and arterial embolism (HR: 6.08, 95% CI: 4.30-8.61), but the risks of VTE, AMI, ischemic and non-ischemic stroke and PCI were increased also 2- to 3-fold. We found an increased risk for all-cause mortality and acute cardiovascular events in patients with hyperthyroidism. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  17. Coffee consumption and risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality among women with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W.L.; Lopez-Garcia, E.; Li, T. Y.; Hu, F. B.; van Dam, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Coffee has been linked to both beneficial and harmful health effects, but data on its relation with cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes are sparse. Methods This is a prospective cohort study including 7,170 women with diagnosed type 2 diabetes but free of cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline. Coffee consumption was assessed in 1980 and then every 2 to 4 years through validated questionnaires. A total of 658 incident cardiovascular events (434 coronary heart disease and 224 stroke) and 734 deaths from all causes were documented between 1980 and 2004. Results After adjustment for age, smoking, and other cardiovascular risk factors, the relative risks (RRs) were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.50 to 1.14) for cardiovascular diseases (p trend = 0.09) and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.55 to 1.14) for all-cause mortality (p trend = 0.05) for the consumption of ≥ 4 cups/day caffeinated coffee as compared with nondrinkers. Similarly, multivariable RRs were 0.96 (95% CI, 0.66 to 1.38) for cardiovascular diseases (p trend = 0.84) and 0.76 (95% CI, 0.54 to 1.07) for all-cause mortality (p trend = 0.08) for the consumption of ≥ 2 cups/day decaffeinated coffee as compared with nondrinkers. Higher decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated with lower concentrations of glycosylated hemoglobin (6.2% for ≥ 2 cups/d versus 6.7% for < 1 cup/mo; p trend = 0.02). Conclusions These data provides evidence that habitual coffee consumption is not associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases or premature mortality among diabetic women. PMID:19266179

  18. The association between central fat distribution and recurrent cardiovascular disease events in female survivors of nonfatal myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    Visceral fat has been shown to be an important predictor of metabolic alterations that lead to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, morbidity, and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between central fat distribution and the risk of recurrent coronary events among a cohort of female myocardial infarction (MI) survivors. Participants included 356 women (mean ± SD age, 55 ± 8.71 years) discharged alive after an incident MI from hospitals in Erie and Niagara (New York) counties between 1996 and 2004. A recurrent cardiovascular event was any nonfatal or fatal International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision-coded diagnosis between 390 and 450. The mean ± SD follow-up time was 4.01 ± 2.6 years. Interviews and self-administered follow-up surveys were used to collect pertinent information, and a search of the National Death Index Plus database was completed. Eighty-five women experienced a recurrent cardiovascular event. Using Cox proportional hazards analyses, the crude model for body mass index suggested that after incident MI, women had a 39% risk of a recurrent CVD event (hazard ratio [HR], 1.39; confidence interval [CI], 0.76-2.54; P = .293), whereas crude models for waist circumference and sagittal abdominal distention showed the risk to be more than twice as high (HR, 2.12; CI, 1.08-4.16; P = .010; and HR, 2.16; CI, 1.09-4.28; P = .037, respectively). Both measures of central fat distribution appeared to be better predictors of recurrent cardiovascular events when compared with body mass index, whereas sagittal abdominal distention was the better predictor compared with waist circumference, even after multivariate adjustment. After adjusting for secondary prevention interventions-statin, aspirin, β-blocker use, and physical activity-the risk of recurrent event was observed to decrease by about 1%. These results suggest that central fat distribution is positively associated with a recurrence of

  19. High cardiovascular event rates occur within the first weeks of starting hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gillespie, Iain A; Kronenberg, Florian; Richards, Sharon; Stenvinkel, Peter; Anker, Stefan D; Wheeler, David C; de Francisco, Angel L; Marcelli, Daniele; Froissart, Marc; Floege, Jürgen; Aljama, P; Anker, S; Drueke, T B; Eckardt, K -U; Floege, J; de Francisco, A; Kronenberg, F; Macdougall, I C; Malyszko, J; Schernthaner, G; Stenvinkel, P; Wheeler, D C; Molemans, B; Canaud, B

    2015-01-01

    Early mortality is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, but little is known about early cardiovascular event (CVE) rates after HD initiation. To study this we analyzed data in the AROii cohort of incident HD patients from over 300 European Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers. Weekly rates of a composite of CVEs during the first year and monthly rates of the composite and its constituents (coronary artery, cerebrovascular, peripheral arterial, congestive heart failure, and sudden cardiac death) during the first 2 years after HD initiation were assessed. Of 6308 patients that started dialysis within 7 days, 1449 patients experienced 2405 CVEs over the next 2 years. The first-year CVE rate (30.2/100 person-years; 95% CI, 28.7–31.7) greatly exceeded the second-year rate (19.4/100; 95% CI, 18.1–20.8). Composite CVEs were highest during the first week with increased risk compared with the second year, persisting until the fifth month. Except for sudden cardiac death, temporal patterns of rates for all CVE categories were very similar, with highest rates during the first month and a high-risk period extending to 4 months. Higher or lower cumulative weekly dialysis dose, lower blood flow, and lower net ultrafiltration during dialysis were associated with CVE during the high-risk period, but not during the post high-risk period. Thus, the incidence of CVE in the first weeks after HD initiation is much higher than during subsequent periods which raises concerns that HD initiation may trigger CVEs. PMID:25923984

  20. Predictive Value of Cumulative Blood Pressure for All-Cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan Xiu; Song, Lu; Xing, Ai Jun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Hai Yan; Li, Chun Hui; Zhao, Hua Ling; Chen, Shuo Hua; Lu, Cheng Zhi; Wu, Shou Ling

    2017-01-01

    The predictive value of cumulative blood pressure (BP) on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (CCE) has hardly been studied. In this prospective cohort study including 52,385 participants from the Kailuan Group who attended three medical examinations and without CCE, the impact of cumulative systolic BP (cumSBP) and cumulative diastolic BP (cumDBP) on all-cause mortality and CCEs was investigated. For the study population, the mean (standard deviation) age was 48.82 (11.77) years of which 40,141 (76.6%) were male. The follow-up for all-cause mortality and CCEs was 3.96 (0.48) and 2.98 (0.41) years, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that for every 10 mm Hg·year increase in cumSBP and 5 mm Hg·year increase in cumDBP, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality were 1.013 (1.006, 1.021) and 1.012 (1.006, 1.018); for CCEs, 1.018 (1.010, 1.027) and 1.017 (1.010, 1.024); for stroke, 1.021 (1.011, 1.031) and 1.018 (1.010, 1.026); and for MI, 1.013 (0.996, 1.030) and 1.015 (1.000, 1.029). Using natural spline function analysis, cumSBP and cumDBP showed a J-curve relationship with CCEs; and a U-curve relationship with stroke (ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke). Therefore, increases in cumSBP and cumDBP were predictive for all-cause mortality, CCEs, and stroke. PMID:28167816

  1. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  2. Predictive Value of Cumulative Blood Pressure for All-Cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Xiu; Song, Lu; Xing, Ai Jun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Hai Yan; Li, Chun Hui; Zhao, Hua Ling; Chen, Shuo Hua; Lu, Cheng Zhi; Wu, Shou Ling

    2017-02-01

    The predictive value of cumulative blood pressure (BP) on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (CCE) has hardly been studied. In this prospective cohort study including 52,385 participants from the Kailuan Group who attended three medical examinations and without CCE, the impact of cumulative systolic BP (cumSBP) and cumulative diastolic BP (cumDBP) on all-cause mortality and CCEs was investigated. For the study population, the mean (standard deviation) age was 48.82 (11.77) years of which 40,141 (76.6%) were male. The follow-up for all-cause mortality and CCEs was 3.96 (0.48) and 2.98 (0.41) years, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that for every 10 mm Hg·year increase in cumSBP and 5 mm Hg·year increase in cumDBP, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality were 1.013 (1.006, 1.021) and 1.012 (1.006, 1.018); for CCEs, 1.018 (1.010, 1.027) and 1.017 (1.010, 1.024); for stroke, 1.021 (1.011, 1.031) and 1.018 (1.010, 1.026); and for MI, 1.013 (0.996, 1.030) and 1.015 (1.000, 1.029). Using natural spline function analysis, cumSBP and cumDBP showed a J-curve relationship with CCEs; and a U-curve relationship with stroke (ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke). Therefore, increases in cumSBP and cumDBP were predictive for all-cause mortality, CCEs, and stroke.

  3. Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Predict Onset of Cardiovascular Events in Women

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Jennifer A.; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Roberts, Andrea L.; Agnew-Blais, Jessica; Chen, Qixuan; Cerdá, Magdalena; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Spiegelman, Donna; Suglia, Shakira F.; Rimm, Eric B.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychological stress is a proposed risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the sentinel stress-related mental disorder, occurs twice as frequently in women as men. However, whether PTSD contributes to CVD risk in women is not established. Methods and Results We examined trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in relation to incident CVD over a 20-year period in 49,978 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CVD events confirmed by additional information or medical record review [n=548, including myocardial infarction (n=277) and stroke (n=271)]. Trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Brief Trauma Questionnaire and a PTSD screen. Compared to no trauma exposure, endorsing 4 or more PTSD symptoms was associated with increased CVD risk after adjusting for age, family history, and childhood factors (HR=1.60 [95% CI, 1.20–2.13]). Being trauma-exposed and endorsing no PTSD symptoms was associated with elevated CVD risk (HR=1.45 [95% CI, 1.15–1.83]), although being trauma-exposed and endorsing 1–3 PTSD symptoms was not. After adjusting for adult health behaviors and medical risk factors, this pattern of findings was maintained. Health behaviors and medical risk factors accounted for 14% of the trauma/no symptoms-CVD association and 47% of the trauma/4+ symptoms-CVD association. Conclusion Trauma exposure and elevated PTSD symptoms may increase risk of CVD in this population of women. These findings suggest screening for CVD risk and reducing health risk behaviors in trauma-exposed women may be promising avenues for prevention and intervention. PMID:26124186

  4. Automatic machine learning based prediction of cardiovascular events in lung cancer screening data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; de Jong, Pim A.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Wielingen, Geoffrey V. F.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    Calcium burden determined in CT images acquired in lung cancer screening is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (CVEs). This study investigated whether subjects undergoing such screening who are at risk of a CVE can be identified using automatic image analysis and subject characteristics. Moreover, the study examined whether these individuals can be identified using solely image information, or if a combination of image and subject data is needed. A set of 3559 male subjects undergoing Dutch-Belgian lung cancer screening trial was included. Low-dose non-ECG synchronized chest CT images acquired at baseline were analyzed (1834 scanned in the University Medical Center Groningen, 1725 in the University Medical Center Utrecht). Aortic and coronary calcifications were identified using previously developed automatic algorithms. A set of features describing number, volume and size distribution of the detected calcifications was computed. Age of the participants was extracted from image headers. Features describing participants' smoking status, smoking history and past CVEs were obtained. CVEs that occurred within three years after the imaging were used as outcome. Support vector machine classification was performed employing different feature sets using sets of only image features, or a combination of image and subject related characteristics. Classification based solely on the image features resulted in the area under the ROC curve (Az) of 0.69. A combination of image and subject features resulted in an Az of 0.71. The results demonstrate that subjects undergoing lung cancer screening who are at risk of CVE can be identified using automatic image analysis. Adding subject information slightly improved the performance.

  5. Multiple Inflammatory Biomarkers in Relation to Cardiovascular Events and Mortality in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Schnabel, Renate B.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G.; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Fontes, João D.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rong, Jian; Levy, Daniel; Keaney, John F.; Wang, Thomas J.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that chronic low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress are related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Approach and Results We examined 11 established and novel biomarkers representing inflammation and oxidative stress (C-reactive protein [CRP], fibrinogen, interleukin-6, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (mass and activity), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, myeloperoxidase, CD40 ligand, P-selectin, tumor necrosis factor receptor II [TNFRII]) in relation to incident major CVD and mortality in the community. We studied 3035 participants (mean age 61±9 years, 53% women). During follow-up (median 8.9 years), 253 participants experienced a CVD event and 343 died. CRP (hazard ratios [HR] reported per standard deviation ln-transformed biomarker, 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.35; nominal P=0.02) and TNFRII (HR 1.15, 95% CI; 1.01-1.32; nominal P=0.04) were retained in multivariable-adjusted models for major CVD, but were not significant after adjustment for multiple testing. The biomarkers related to mortality were TNFRII (HR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.19-1.49; P<0.0001); ICAM-1 (HR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.12-1.37; P<0.0001), and interleukin-6 (HR 1.25, 95% CI: 1.12-1.39; P<0.0001). The addition of these markers to the model including traditional risk factors increased discrimination and reclassification for risk of death (P<0.0001), but not for CVD. Conclusions Of 11 biomarkers, TNFRII was associated nominally with incident major CVD, and significantly with all-cause mortality, which renders it an interesting target for future research. The combination of TNFRII with CRP in relation to CVD and with interleukin-6 to mortality increased the predictive ability in addition to CVD risk factors for total mortality but not for incident CVD. PMID:23640499

  6. Added value of CAC in risk stratification for cardiovascular events: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sanne A E; Bakker, Marina; den Ruijter, Hester M; Bots, Michiel L

    2012-01-01

    Identification of individuals at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is important to initiate adequate treatment and to prevent future events. Moreover, identification of low-risk individuals is important to refrain from unneeded therapy. Current risk prediction models do not accurately predict the risk of CVD in individuals, and new markers have been sought to improve the risk assessment in individuals. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a marker of atherosclerosis that might improve current risk assessment when added to traditional risk factors. We performed a systematic review on PubMed search (1 February 2011) on studies reporting on the added value of CAC in risk prediction in asymptomatic individuals. Of 39 publications on CAC and CVD, nine studies were carried out in asymptomatic individuals. All studies showed an increase in area under the curve ranging from 0.05 to 0.20 when CAC was added to the risk model. Four studies reported on improvements of individuals in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk categories. Addition of CAC to the risk model resulted in a net reclassification improvement ranging from 14% to 30%, meaning that CAC measurement reclassified a substantial proportion of individuals into correct risk categories. This improvement was most pronounced in those at intermediate Framingham risk. The available studies consistently showed that CAC scoring improves risk stratification in CVD risk categories when added to traditional risk factors only, especially among individuals at intermediate risk for CVD. Cost-effectiveness analyses together with a randomized controlled trial are needed before widespread introduction of CAC in clinical care. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  7. Psychosocial stress and major cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hagström, Emil; Norlund, Fredrika; Stebbins, Amanda; Armstrong, Paul W; Chiswell, Karen; Granger, Christopher B; López-Sendón, José; Pella, Daniel; Soffer, Joseph; Sy, Rody; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey D; Stewart, Ralph A H; Held, Claes

    2017-09-28

    Assess the risk of ischemic events associated with psychosocial stress in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Psychosocial stress was assessed by a questionnaire in 14,577 patients (median age 65.0, IQR 59, 71; 81.6% males) with stable CHD on optimal secondary preventive therapy in the prospective randomised STABILITY clinical trial. Adjusted Cox regression models were used to assess associations between individual stressors, baseline cardiovascular risk factors, and outcomes. After 3.7 years of follow-up, depressive symptoms, loss of interest, and financial stress were associated with increased risk (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) of CV death (1.21, 1.09-1.34; 1.15, 1.05-1.27; and 1.19, 1.08-1.30, respectively) and the primary composite endpoint of CV death, non-fatal MI, or non-fatal stroke (1.21, 1.13-1.30; 1.19, 1.11-1.27; and 1.17, 1.10-1.24, respectively). Living alone was related to higher risk of CV death (1.68, 1.38-2.05) and the primary composite endpoint (1.28, 1.11-1.48), whereas being married as compared with being widowed, was associated with lower risk of CV death (0.64, 0.49-0.82) and the primary composite endpoint (0.81, 0.67-0.97). Psychosocial stress, such as depressive symptoms, loss of interest, living alone, and financial stress, was associated with increased CV mortality in patients with stable CHD despite optimal medical secondary prevention treatment. Secondary prevention of CHD should therefore focus also on psychosocial issues both in clinical management and in future clinical trials. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. High cardiovascular event rates occur within the first weeks of starting hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gillespie, Iain A; Kronenberg, Florian; Richards, Sharon; Stenvinkel, Peter; Anker, Stefan D; Wheeler, David C; de Francisco, Angel L; Marcelli, Daniele; Froissart, Marc; Floege, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    Early mortality is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, but little is known about early cardiovascular event (CVE) rates after HD initiation. To study this we analyzed data in the AROii cohort of incident HD patients from over 300 European Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers. Weekly rates of a composite of CVEs during the first year and monthly rates of the composite and its constituents (coronary artery, cerebrovascular, peripheral arterial, congestive heart failure, and sudden cardiac death) during the first 2 years after HD initiation were assessed. Of 6308 patients that started dialysis within 7 days, 1449 patients experienced 2405 CVEs over the next 2 years. The first-year CVE rate (30.2/100 person-years; 95% CI, 28.7-31.7) greatly exceeded the second-year rate (19.4/100; 95% CI, 18.1-20.8). Composite CVEs were highest during the first week with increased risk compared with the second year, persisting until the fifth month. Except for sudden cardiac death, temporal patterns of rates for all CVE categories were very similar, with highest rates during the first month and a high-risk period extending to 4 months. Higher or lower cumulative weekly dialysis dose, lower blood flow, and lower net ultrafiltration during dialysis were associated with CVE during the high-risk period, but not during the post high-risk period. Thus, the incidence of CVE in the first weeks after HD initiation is much higher than during subsequent periods which raises concerns that HD initiation may trigger CVEs.

  9. Ramadan fasting is not usually associated with the risk of cardiovascular events: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Tanvir C.; Ahmed, Salim; Shommu, Nusrat S.; Afzal, Arfan R.; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Qasqas, Mahdi; Rumana, Nahid; Vaska, Marcus; Berka, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Over one billion Muslims worldwide fast during the month of Ramadan. Ramadan fasting brings about some changes in the daily lives of practicing Muslims, especially in their diet and sleep patterns, which are associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Over the years, many original studies have made the effort to identify the possible impact of the Ramadan fast on cardiovascular diseases. This systematic review and meta-analysis is an attempt to present the summary of key findings from those articles and an appraisal of selected literature. A systematic search using keywords of “;Ramadan fasting” and “;cardiovascular diseases” was conducted in primary research article and gray-literature repositories, in combination with hand searching and snow balling. Fifteen studies were finally selected for data extraction on the outcomes of stroke, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. The analysis revealed that the incidence of cardiovascular events during the Ramadan fast was similar to the nonfasting period. Ramadan fast is not associated with any change in incidence of acute cardiovascular disease. PMID:27186152

  10. Predictors of cardiovascular events in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ballocca, Flavia; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Moretti, Claudio; Omedè, Pierluigi; Cerrato, Enrico; Barbero, Umberto; Abbate, Antonio; Bertero, Maria Tiziana; Zoccai, Giuseppe Biondi; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease represents an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), due to a complex interplay between traditional risk factors and disregulation of autoimmunity but uncertainty is still present about the most important predictors of cardiovascular events. The aim of our work was to perform a collaborative systematic review on the main predictors of cardiovascular events in SLE patients. PubMed and Cochrane were systematically searched for eligible studies on SLE and cardiovascular events between January 2008 and December 2012. Study features, patient characteristics and incidence of stent thrombosis were abstracted and pooled, when appropriate, with random-effect methods (point estimate - 95% confidence intervals) and consistency of predictors was formally appraised. A total of 17,187 patients was included; of those, 93.1% were female and the median age was 39 years. After a median follow-up period of 8 years, cardiovascular events presented in 25.4%, including acute myocardial infarction (4.1%) and stroke (7.3%). The most important predictors may be divided into traditional risk factors, such as male gender (OR 6.2, CI 95% 1.49-25), hyperlipidaemia (OR 3.9, CI 95% 1.57-9.71), familiar history of cardiac disease (OR 3.6, CI 95% 1.15-11.32) and hypertension (OR 3.5, CI 95% 1.65-7.54), and SLE-related features, such as the presence of auto-antibodies (OR 5.8 and 5.0, CI 95% 3.28-7.78) and neurological disorders (OR 5.2, CI 95% 2.0-13.9). A low correlation was shown for the importance of organ damage and SLE activity (respectively OR 1.4, CI 95% 1.09-4.44 and OR 1.2, CI 95% 1.2-1.2), as well as for age at diagnosis (OR 1.1, CI 95% 1.07-1.17). Cardiovascular events in SLE patients are caused by a multifactorial mechanism, including both traditional and disease-specific risk factors. A global valuation with an individual risk stratification based on both these features is important to

  11. The association between ambulatory systolic blood pressure and cardiovascular events in a selected population with intensive control of cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rock, Wasseem; Leshno, Moshe; Shlomai, Gadi; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Grossman, Ehud

    2014-07-01

    Recent guidelines recommend a target clinic systolic blood pressure (BP) of <140 mm Hg. These recommendations are based on the relationship of office BP measurements and cardiovascular (CV) events. We evaluated the association between 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements (24H ABPM) and CV events in a selected population with intensive control of CV risk factors. We retrospectively followed all patients who had undergone 24H ABPM during 2005 at the Institute of Periodic Medical Examinations, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel, to monitor the development of CV events. These patients were followed closely and treated meticulously in order to control CV risk factors. The study population consisted of 317 patients (81% males; mean age, 59.2 ± 9.8 years) followed for a mean period of 6.4 ± 2.1 years (median, 6 years). During follow-up, 22 patients had their first CV event. Patients who experienced CV events were significantly older, more likely diabetic, and had a history of previous CV disease. Twenty-four-hour ABPM systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg was not associated with increased CV events, whereas 24H ABPM systolic BP ≥150 mm Hg was. Logistic regression analysis showed that 24H ABPM systolic BP ≥150 mm Hg, a former smoker, old age, and a history of CV disease were associated with CV events during follow-up. We found that, in a population aggressively managed for CV risk factors, 24H ABPM systolic BP ≥150 mm Hg is associated with increased CV events. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. nutritionDay: 10 years of growth.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Karin; Pichard, Claude; Sulz, Isabella; Volkert, Dorothee; Streicher, Melanie; Singer, Pierre; Ljungqvist, Olle; Van Gossum, Andre; Bauer, Peter; Hiesmayr, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Despite high prevalence at hospital admission, disease related malnutrition (DRM) remains under recognized and undertreated. DRM is associated with increased morbidity, hospital readmission rate, and burden for the healthcare system. The compelling need to increase awareness and knowledge through an international survey has triggered the launch of the nutritionDay (ND) concept. ND is a worldwide annual systematic collection and analysis of data in hospital wards, intensive care units and nursing homes. ND is based on questionnaires to systematically collect and analyze the patient's characteristics, food intake and nutrition support, as well as the determinants of their environment (facility, health care personal, etc …). Questionnaires, outcome documentation sheets and step-by-step guidance are available as download in 30 languages. ND has described the nutritional status and behavior of over 150,000 hospitalized patients and nursing home's patients in over 56 participating countries. These data allowed a local, regional, national and international benchmarking at different levels (i.e. type of medical pathologies, care facilities, etc.) and over time. Sixteen peer-reviewed publications have already been released and picture the international scene of DRM. This review presents the 10-year of the ND project development and shows how ND serves all health care professionals to optimize nutrition care and nutrition related structures. ND keeps progressing and is likely to become a standard tool for determining the nutritional status and behavior of hospitalized patients and nursing home's population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  13. Myocardial infarction in Singapore: a nationwide 10-year study of multiethnic differences in incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Tan, A T H; Emmanuel, S C; Tan, B Y; Teo, W S; Chua, T S J; Tan, B H

    2002-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases have progressively increased in importance as a major contributor of morbidity and mortality in Asia. However, many countries in Asia do not have nationwide systematically-collected and standardised data on myocardial infarction (MI). To accurately document the extent of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease in Singapore, a nationwide myocardial infarct registry was established in the mid-1986. Possible myocardial infarct events were identified through daily national lists of cardiac enzymes, hospital discharge codes, mortuary records and the national death registry. Data obtained from clinical history, cardiac enzymes and 12-lead electrocardiogram Minnesota codes were entered into an algorithm based on the WHO MONICA study. Cases identified as "definite" MI were included in the decade's review for this study. From 1988 to 1997, 13,048 myocardial infarct events were diagnosed with 3367 deaths. There was a 39.1% decline in mortality, with an average decline of 6.5% per year [95% confidence intervals (CI), -3.9% to -9.1%]. However, the decline in incidence was only 20.8% with an average decline of 2.4% per year (95% CI, -6.6% to -1.2%). The highest incidence and mortality rates for both genders were seen in the Indians, followed by the Malays and the Chinese. Over 10 years, from 1988 to 1997, we documented a significant fall in mortality from MI in Singapore. There was a smaller decline in the incidence of infarction. Singapore implemented a National Healthy Lifestyle Programme in 1992 as a 10-year effort. The disparity in the incidence and mortality may suggest that a more dramatic and immediate impact has taken place in mortality through therapeutic programmes; primary preventive programmes would be more difficult to evaluate and have a more gradual impact. Only with continual accurate data collection through the whole country, over a much longer period, can the relative value of preventive and therapeutic programmes in coronary heart

  14. Association Between Diabetic Macular Edema and Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Multicenter Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Leveziel, Nicolas; Ragot, Stéphanie; Gand, Elise; Lichtwitz, Olivier; Halimi, Jean Michel; Gozlan, Julien; Gourdy, Pierre; Robert, Marie-Françoise; Dardari, Dured; Boissonnot, Michèle; Roussel, Ronan; Piguel, Xavier; Dupuy, Olivier; Torremocha, Florence; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Maréchaud, Richard; Hadjadj, Samy

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual loss associated with diabetes but any association between DME and cardiovascular events is unclear.This study aims to describe the possible association between DME and cardiovascular events in a multicenter cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes.Two thousand eight hundred seven patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes and nephrology clinical institutional centers participating in the DIAB 2 NEPHROGENE study focusing on diabetic complications. DME (presence/absence) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) classification were based on ophthalmological report and/or on 30° color retinal photographs. DR was defined as absent, nonproliferative (background, moderate, or severe) or proliferative. Cardiovascular events were stroke, myocardial infarction, and lower limb amputation.Details regarding associations between DME and cardiovascular events were evaluated.The study included 2807 patients with type 2 diabetes, of whom 355 (12.6%) had DME. DME was significantly and independently associated with patient age, known duration of diabetes, HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and DR stage. Only the prior history of lower limb amputation was strongly associated with DME in univariate and multivariate analyses, whereas no association was found with regard to myocardial infarction or stroke. Moreover, both major (n = 32) and minor lower limb (n = 96) amputations were similarly associated with DME, with respective odds ratio of 3.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77-7.74; P = 0.0012) and of 4.29 (95% CI, 2.79-6.61; P < 0.001).DME is strongly and independently associated with lower limb amputation in type 2 diabetic patients.

  15. Work-related life events, psychological well-being and cardiovascular risk factors in male Swedish automotive workers.

    PubMed

    Rose, Gisela; Kumlin, Lars; Dimberg, Lennart; Bengtsson, Calle; Orth-Gomer, Kristina; Cai, Xiaodong

    2006-09-01

    To analyse the relationship between life events, social support, psychological well-being and cardiovascular risk factors in blue- and white-collar Swedish automotive workers. Baseline questionnaire regarding life events, social support, depressed mood and mental strain and smoking habits. Follow-up questionnaire after 5 years included the Psychological General Well-being Inventory to assess various health variables. At baseline and follow-up, anthropometric data were obtained. Blood pressure, blood glucose and serum lipids were measured and smoking habits were surveyed. The blue-collar workers showed a profile indicating increased cardiovascular risk with a higher proportion of smokers, a higher waist to hip ratio and higher triglycerides. They also reported themselves to have worse general health and less emotional self-control, but were less anxious than the white-collar workers. Negative life events, especially those related to work seemed to affect the well-being of the blue-collar workers more adversely than the white-collar workers. Being nervous and depressed at baseline increased the risk of poor psychological well-being at the follow-up. Social support within this 5-year perspective was a factor which predicted psychological well-being in both worker categories. Increase in cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio was the only cardiovascular risk factor associated with the strain of life events but not with work-related events. Over a 5-year period, men who experienced negative, strongly stressful and work-related life events displayed poorer psychological well-being at follow-up regardless of worker category. Social support was protective.

  16. Relation between Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Cardiovascular Events and Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xue, Yangjing; Thapa, Saroj; Wang, Luping; Tang, Jifei

    2016-01-01

    Data on the association between age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease and mortality are conflicting. The purpose of this report is to conduct a systematic review to better understand the role of AMD as a risk factor for CVD events and mortality. We searched Medline (Ovid) and Embase (Ovid) for trials published from 1980 to 2015. We included 20 cohort studies that reported relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for the association of AMD and cardiovascular events and mortality, involving 29,964,334 participants. In a random-effects model, the adjusted RR (95% confidence interval [CI]) associated with AMD was 1.08 (1.00–1.117) for all-cause mortality (8 studies) and 1.18 (0.98–1.43) for cardiovascular disease mortality (5 studies). The pooled RR (95% CI) was 1.17 (0.94–1.45) for coronary heart disease (CHD; 3 studies) and 1.13 (0.93–1.36) for stroke (8 studies). Findings from this systematic review support that AMD is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality. The evidence that AMD predicts incident CVD events or CVD mortality remains inclusive and warrants further study in the future. PMID:28070519

  17. Comparative determinants of 4-year cardiovascular event rates in stable outpatients at risk of or with atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Deepak L; Eagle, Kim A; Ohman, E Magnus; Hirsch, Alan T; Goto, Shinya; Mahoney, Elizabeth M; Wilson, Peter W F; Alberts, Mark J; D'Agostino, Ralph; Liau, Chiau-Suong; Mas, Jean-Louis; Röther, Joachim; Smith, Sidney C; Salette, Geneviève; Contant, Charles F; Massaro, Joseph M; Steg, Ph Gabriel

    2010-09-22

    Clinicians and trialists have difficulty with identifying which patients are highest risk for cardiovascular events. Prior ischemic events, polyvascular disease, and diabetes mellitus have all been identified as predictors of ischemic events, but their comparative contributions to future risk remain unclear. To categorize the risk of cardiovascular events in stable outpatients with various initial manifestations of atherothrombosis using simple clinical descriptors. Outpatients with coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral arterial disease or with multiple risk factors for atherothrombosis were enrolled in the global Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) Registry and were followed up for as long as 4 years. Patients from 3647 centers in 29 countries were enrolled between 2003 and 2004 and followed up until 2008. Final database lock was in April 2009. Rates of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke. A total of 45,227 patients with baseline data were included in this 4-year analysis. During the follow-up period, a total of 5481 patients experienced at least 1 event, including 2315 with cardiovascular death, 1228 with myocardial infarction, 1898 with stroke, and 40 with both a myocardial infarction and stroke on the same day. Among patients with atherothrombosis, those with a prior history of ischemic events at baseline (n = 21,890) had the highest rate of subsequent ischemic events (18.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17.4%-19.1%); patients with stable coronary, cerebrovascular, or peripheral artery disease (n = 15,264) had a lower risk (12.2%; 95% CI, 11.4%-12.9%); and patients without established atherothrombosis but with risk factors only (n = 8073) had the lowest risk (9.1%; 95% CI, 8.3%-9.9%) (P < .001 for all comparisons). In addition, in multivariable modeling, the presence of diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 1.44; 95% CI, 1.36-1.53; P < .001), an ischemic event in the previous year (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1

  18. Oxidized phospholipids on apoB-100-containing lipoproteins: a biomarker predicting cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Taleb, Adam; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known etiologic factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. Oxidation of lipoproteins, and in particular of low density lipoprotein, is a necessary if not obligatory mechanism for the generation of macrophage-derived foam cells, the first major initiating factor in the development of an atherosclerotic plaque. Oxidation of lipoproteins does not result in the generation of a single, defined molecular species, but of a variety of oxidation-specific epitopes, such as oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde-lysine epitopes. Unique monoclonal antibodies have been developed to bind these well-defined epitopes, and have been used in in vitro assays to detect them on circulating lipoproteins present in plasma. This article will summarize the accumulating clinical data of one oxidation-specific biomarker, oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) on apoB-100 lipoproteins. Elevated levels of OxPL/apoB predict the presence and progression of coronary, femoral and carotid artery disease, are increased following acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary intervention, and predict the development of death, myocardial infarction, stroke and need for revascularization in unselected populations. OxPL/apoB levels are independent of traditional risk factors and the metabolic syndrome, and enhance the risk prediction of the Framingham Risk Score. The OxPLs measured in this assay reflect the biological activity of the most atherogenic lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) particles, reflected in patients with high plasma Lp(a) levels with small apo(a) isoforms. The predictive value of OxPL/apoB is amplified by Lp(a) and phospholipases such as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and secretory phospholipase A2, which are targets of therapy in clinical trials. This assay has now been validated in over 10,000 patients and efforts are underway to make it available to the research and clinical communities. PMID:22003918

  19. Advanced chronic kidney disease populations have elevated trimethylamine N-oxide levels associated with increased cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Kim, Richard B; Morse, Bridget L; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Tang, Mila; Muirhead, Norman; Barrett, Brendan; Holmes, Daniel T; Madore, Francois; Clase, Catherine M; Rigatto, Claudio; Levin, Adeera

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is more common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and traditional risk factors do not adequately predict those at risk for cardiovascular (CV) events. Recent evidence suggests elevated trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), created by gut microflora from dietary L-carnitine and choline, is associated with CV events. We investigated the relationship of TMAO levels in patients with stages 3b and 4 CKD to ischemic CV events using the CanPREDDICT cohort, a Canada-wide observational study with prospective 3-year follow-up of adjudicated CV events. Baseline samples were obtained for 2529 CKD patients. TMAO, choline, and L-carnitine levels were measured using tandem mass spectrometry. Baseline median TMAO level was high for the whole cohort (20.41 μM; interquartile range [IQR]: 12.82-32.70 μM). TMAO was independently associated with CV events (hazard ratio 1.23; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.42 / 1 SD lnTMAO) after adjusting for all potential CV risk factors. Those in the highest TMAO quartile had significantly higher risk of CV events (adjusted hazard ratio 1.59; 95% confidence interval: 1.04-2.43; P = 0.0351) in the analysis of recurring ischemic events. Among those with stage 3b CKD (hazard ratio 1.45; 95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.87 / 1 SD lnTMAO), independent of kidney function, TMAO levels identified those at highest risk for events. Our results suggest that TMAO may represent a new potentially modifiable CV risk factor for CKD patients. Further studies are needed to determine sources of variability and if lowering of TMAO reduces CV risk in CKD.

  20. Glycosylated haemoglobin as a predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavero-Redondo, I; Peleteiro, B; Álvarez-Bueno, C; Rodríguez-Artalejo, F; Martínez-Vizcaíno, V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glycosylated haemoglobin level (HbA1c) is an indicator of the average blood glucose concentrations over the preceding 2–3 months and is used as a convenient and well-known biomarker in clinical practice. Currently, epidemiological evidence suggests that HbA1c level is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary heart disease and heart failure. This protocol aim is to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine relationships of HbA1c levels with cardiovascular outcomes and cause of death, and to analyse the range of HbA1c levels that is a predictor of cardiovascular disease and/or mortality based on data from published observational studies. Methods and analysis The search will be conducted using Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Web of Science databases from their inception. Observational studies written in Portuguese, Spanish or English will be included. The Quality In Prognosis Studies tool will be used to assess the risk of bias for the studies included in the systematic review or meta-analysis. HRs for cardiovascular outcomes and causes of death with 95% CIs will be determined as primary outcomes. Subgroup analyses will be performed based on cardiovascular outcomes, cause of death studied, and type of population included in the studies. Ethics and dissemination This systematic review will synthesise evidence on the potential of using HbA1c level as a prognostic marker for cardiovascular disease outcomes and/or mortality. The results will be disseminated by publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Ethics approval will not be needed because the data used for this systematic review will be obtained from published studies and there will be no concerns about privacy. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42015032552. PMID:27401368

  1. The role of conventional and novel mechanisms in explaining increased risk of cardiovascular events in offspring with positive parental history.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Mark; Chida, Yoichi; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2009-10-01

    Parental history is a widely accepted risk factor for offspring cardiovascular events, although the mechanisms remain unclear. We examined the contribution of conventional and novel risk factors in explaining the excess risk of cardiovascular events in offspring with positive parental history (PH+). We collected conventional (blood pressure, cholesterol, adiposity), lifestyle, and novel (C-reactive protein, CRP) risk factors at baseline in participants from the Scottish Health Surveys (n = 5946, 44.5% men, aged 53.6 +/- 12.4 years), who were followed up over an average of 7.1 years for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (a composite of fatal and nonfatal events incorporating acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass surgery, percutaneous coronary angioplasty, stroke, heart failure). Younger PH+ participants (<65 years) were at higher risk of incident CVD events [age-adjusted and sex-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-3.00] compared with PH-. Despite an association of PH+ with blood pressure, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, CRP, and physical activity, less than 15% of the excess risk was explained through conventional and novel risk factors. However, the greatest risk of CVD was observed in PH+ participants with elevated CRP (> or =3 mg/l) (hazard ratio = 2.99, 95% CI 2.15-4.16) or hypertension (hazard ratio = 2.87, 95% CI 2.07-3.99). Only a small amount of the excess CVD risk associated with PH+ is accounted for by conventional and novel mechanisms. However, the combination of elevated CRP or hypertension with PH+ substantially increases the risk of CVD.

  2. Receptor for advanced glycation end products Glycine 82 Serine polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Lisa; Frazer, Ian H; Turner, Malcolm; Marwick, Thomas H; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2007-01-01

    Patients with