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Sample records for 10-year coronary heart

  1. Antipsychotic effects on estimated 10 year coronary heart disease risk in the CATIE Schizophrenia Study

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; Goff, Donald C.; Meyer, Jonathan M.; Davis, Vicki G.; Nasrallah, Henry A.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Rosenheck, Robert; Davis, Sonia M.; Hsiao, John K.; Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Persons with schizophrenia die earlier than the general population, in large part due to cardiovascular disease. The study objective was to examine effects of different antipsychotic treatments on estimates of 10 year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk calculated by the Framingham Heart Study formula. Method Change in ten-year risk for CHD was compared between treatment groups in 1125 patients followed for 18 months or until treatment discontinuation in the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) Schizophrenia Trial. Results The covariate-adjusted mean change in 10-year CHD risk differed significantly between treatments. Olanzapine was associated with a 0.5% (SE 0.3) increase and quetiapine, a 0.3% (SE 0.3) increase; whereas risk decreased in patients treated with perphenazine, −0.5% (SE 0.3), risperidone, −0.6% (SE 0.3), and ziprasidone −0.6% (SE 0.4). The difference in 10-year CHD risk between olanzpaine and risperidone was statistically significant (p=0.004). Differences in estimated 10 year CHD risk between drugs were most marked in the tertile of subjects with a baseline CHD risk of at least 10%. Among individual CHD risk factors used in the Framingham formula, only total and HDL cholesterol levels differed between treatments. Conclusions These results indicate that the impact on 10-year CHD risk differs significantly between antipsychotic agents, with olanzapine producing the largest elevation in CHD risk of the agents studied in CATIE. PMID:18775645

  2. Sheepskin effects of education in the 10-year Framingham risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sze Yan; Buka, Stephen L.; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Gilman, Stephen E.; Loucks, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    While the association between education and adult health is well documented, it is unclear whether quantity (i.e. years of schooling) or credentials (i.e. degrees) drive this association. Individuals with degrees may have better health than their non-credentialed counterparts given similar years of schooling, the so-called “sheepskin” effect. This paper contributes to this line of inquiry by examining associations of educational degree and years of schooling with the Framingham Risk Score, a measure of 10-year risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), using data from a unique birth cohort (the New England Family Study; participants mean age 42 years) with prospective information on childhood health and intelligence quotient (IQ). According to our results, years of schooling were inversely associated with 10-year CHD risk in the unadjusted model but not in the fully adjusted models that included degree attainment. By contrast, associations between degree attainment and 10-year CHD risk remained significant in the fully adjusted models that included years of schooling. College degree holders had 10-year CHD risk 19% (95% CI: −33%, −2%) lower than individuals with HS degrees or less in the fully adjusted models. Subanalyses evaluating sheepskin effects on the individual components of the 10-year CHD risk algorithm showed the expected education gradient was generally noted for each of the individual components, with decreasing prevalence of “high risk” values associated with higher degree credentials. Our results suggest educational credentials provide an additional benefit to risk of coronary heart disease beyond schooling. PMID:23415589

  3. Reducing coronary heart disease in the Australian Coalfields: evaluation of a 10-year community intervention.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, N; Heading, G; McElduff, P; Dobson, A; Heller, R

    1999-03-01

    Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death in Australia with the Coalfields district of New South Wales having one of the country's highest rates. Identification of the Coalfields epidemic in the 1970's led to the formation of a community awareness program in the late 1980's (the healthy heart support group) followed by a more intense community action program in 1990, the Coalfields Healthy Heartbeat (CHHB). CHHB is a coalition of community members, local government officers, health workers and University researchers. We evaluate the CHHB program, examining both the nature and sustainability of heart health activities undertaken, as well as trends in risk factor levels and rates of coronary events in the Coalfields in comparison with nearby local government areas. Process data reveal difficulties mobilising the community as a whole; activities had to be selected for interested subgroups such as families of heart disease patients, school children, retired people and women concerned with family nutrition and body maintenance. Outcome data show a significantly larger reduction in case fatality for Coalfields men (although nonfatal heart attacks did not decline) while changes in risk factors levels were comparable with surrounding areas. We explain positive responses to the CHHB by schools, heart attack survivors and women interested in body maintenance in terms of the meaning these subgroups find in health promotion discourses based on their embodied experiences. When faced with a threat to one's identity, health discourse suddenly becomes meaningful along with the regimens for health improvement. General public disinterest in heart health promotion is examined in the context of historical patterns of outsiders criticising the lifestyle of miners, an orientation toward communal rather than individual responsibility for health (i.e. community 'owned' emergency services and hospitals) and anger about risks from environmental hazards imposed by industrialists

  4. Physical activity assessed with three different methods and the Framingham Risk Score on 10-year coronary heart disease risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity (PA) protects against coronary heart disease (CHD) by favorably altering several CHD risk factors. In order to best understand the true nature of the relationship between PA and CHD, the impact different PA assessment methods have on the relationships must first be clarified. The p...

  5. Change in risk factors for coronary heart disease during 10 years of a community intervention programme (North Karelia project).

    PubMed Central

    Puska, P; Salonen, J T; Nissinen, A; Tuomilehto, J; Vartiainen, E; Korhonen, H; Tanskanen, A; Rönnqvist, P; Koskela, K; Huttunen, J

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive community based programme to control cardiovascular diseases was started in North Karelia, Finland, in 1972. Reductions in smoking, serum cholesterol concentrations, and blood pressure were among the central intermediate objectives. The effect of the programme during the 10 year period 1972-82 was evaluated by examining independent random population samples at the outset (1972) and five (1977) and 10 (1982) years later both in the programme and in a matched reference area. Over 10 000 subjects were studied in 1972 and 1977 (participation rate about 90%) and roughly 8000 subjects in 1982 (participation rate about 80%). Analyses were conducted of the estimated effect of the programme on the risk factor population means by comparing the baseline and five year and 10 year follow up results in the age range 30-59 years. The effect of the programme (net reduction in North Karelia) at 10 years among the middle aged male population was estimated to be a 28% reduction in smoking (p less than 0.001), a 3% reduction in mean serum cholesterol concentration (p less than 0.001), a 3% fall in mean systolic blood pressure (p less than 0.001), and a 1% fall in mean diastolic blood pressure (p less than 0.05). Among the female population the reductions were respectively, 14% (NS), 1% (NS), 5% (p less than 0.001), and 2% (p less than 0.05). During the first five years of the project (1972-7) the programme effectively reduced the population mean values of the major coronary risk factors. At 10 years the effects had persisted for serum cholesterol concentrations and blood pressure and were increased for smoking. PMID:6423038

  6. Assessment of the 10-year risk of coronary heart disease events for Qatar Petroleum's firefighters and non-firefighter staff in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Mochtar, I; Hooper, R W

    2012-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major public health problem worldwide and firefighters may be at particular occupational risk. In a cross-sectional study in Ras Laffan Industrial City, Qatar, we assessed the 10-year risk of coronary heart disease events for 369 Qatar Petroleum staff at their periodic medical examination. The subjects of the study (all males) were divided into firefighters and non-firefighters groups. Based on the Framingham risk score calculations, 69.9% of the subjects were categorized as low risk, 27.1% as intermediate risk and 2.9% as high risk. None of the firefighters was categorized as high risk, 15.5% were intermediate and the rest were low risk. In the whole group, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was the most prevalent risk factor (68.8%), followed by hypertension (32.0%) and smoking (15.4%). The mean risk of developing coronary heart disease in firefighters [6.5% (SD 3.7%)] was significantly lower than in non-firefighters 19.5% (SD 6.5%)]. PMID:22571088

  7. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary heart ...

  8. Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Women Share: Print Page Text Size: A A ... heart-and-circulation, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Women Coronary Heart Disease Sexual Health Women and ...

  9. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  10. Predicting Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The FINRISK Calculator.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Peltonen, Markku; Puska, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    The FINRISK risk calculator predicts 10-year risk for coronary heart disease, stroke incidence, and their combination. The model is based on 10-year cohort follow-up from 3 different cohorts in 1982, 1987, and 1992 from a random population sample in 3 areas in Finland. Coronary heart disease, stroke, and their combination are predicted by smoking, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diabetes, and family history. The Internet-based calculator is commonly used in Finland in health services to assess the need for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia treatment and is used also in patients' counseling. PMID:27242089

  11. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension. Treatment of hypertension ...

  12. Eating With Your Heart In Mind: 7 to 10 Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The purpose of this brightly illustrated guide is to teach 7-10 year old children that all healthy Americans, 2 years of age or older, should eat in a way that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol so as to help reduce the risk of heart disease. The theme reflected throughout the manual is that changes in eating patterns help lower blood…

  13. Coronary heart disease at altitude.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J K

    1994-01-01

    In the past, it has been assumed that some basic physiologic responses to altitude, exposure in coronary patients are comparable to those in normal young subjects. In fact there are similar changes in sympathetic activation, heart rate, and blood pressure early after ascent, with decrements in plasma volume, cardiac output, and stroke volume as acclimatization proceeds. These responses are described, and experience with coronary patients is reviewed. During the 1st 2 to 3 days at altitude, coronary patients are at greatest risk of untoward events. Gradual rather than abrupt ascent, a moderate degree of physical conditioning, early limitation of activity to a level tolerated at low altitude for somewhat less), and attention to blood pressure control all appear to have protective effects. Ascent to moderate altitude appears to entail little risk in coronary patients who are asymptomatic or have moderate exercise tolerance, provided that the above precautions are observed and that activity does not exceed levels at lower altitude. If activity is to be increased, pre-ascent treadmill exercise testing or Holter monitor data secured under conditions comparable to those anticipated at altitude may provide reasonable guidelines. For coronary patients previously evaluated and known to be in a high-risk category, indications for ascent should be examined more critically, and precautionary measures should be more rigorous. Advice for patients with known coronary disease who may desire to trek at very high altitude must involve individual evaluation, and guidelines remain elusive. PMID:7888800

  14. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  15. Distribution of Coronary Artery Calcium Scores by Framingham 10-Year Risk Strata in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA): Potential Implications for Coronary Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Okwuosa, Tochi M.; Greenland, Philip; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Bild, Diane E.; Burke, Gregory L.; Eng, John; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives By examining the distribution of CAC across FRS strata in a large, multi-ethnic, community-based sample of men and women, we sought to determine if lower risk persons could potentially benefit from CAC screening. Background The 10-year Framingham risk scores (FRS) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) are predictors of coronary heart disease (CHD). CAC ≥300 is associated with the highest risk for CHD even in low risk (FRS <10%) persons; however expert groups have suggested CAC screening only in intermediate risk (FRS 10–20%) groups. Methods We included 5660 MESA participants. The number needed to screen [number of people that need to be screened to detect one person with CAC above the specified cut-point (NNS)] was used to assess the yield of screening for CAC. CAC prevalence was compared across FRS strata using chi-square tests. Results CAC >0, ≥100 and ≥300 were present in 46.4%, 20.6% and 10.1% of participants, respectively. Prevalence and amount of CAC increased with higher FRS. CAC ≥300 was observed in 1.7% and 4.4% of those with FRS 0–2.5% and 2.6–5%, respectively (NNS =59.7 and 22.7). Likewise, CAC ≥300 was observed in 24% and 30% of those with FRS 15.1–20% and >20%, respectively (NNS =4.2 and 3.3). Trends were similar when stratified by age, gender and race/ethnicity. Conclusions Our study suggests that in very low risk individuals (FRS ≤5%), the yield of screening and probability of identifying persons with clinically significant levels of CAC is low, but becomes greater in low and intermediate risk persons (FRS 5.1–20%). PMID:21527159

  16. Infections, atherosclerosis, and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Famularo, G; Trinchieri, V; Santini, G; De Simone, C

    2000-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the immune response is involved in atherosclerosis. Studies done over the past several years have shown an association between markers of inflammation and coronary atherosclerosis with an exacerbation of the inflammatory process during acute myocardial ischemia. Overall, these data have greatly renewed interest in the infectious theory of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Search of bibliographic databases (from January 1991 through December 1999) and manual scanning of both peer-reviewed publications and other documents were used to identify pertinent literature. Infections and coronary heart disease were indexed as key words. A large number of studies have reported an association of human coronary heart disease and certain persistent bacterial and viral infections. The association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and coronary heart disease appears quite significant although the sequence of infection and disease is uncertain. The association between Helicobacter pylori and coronary heart disease may be accounted for by residual confounding from classic risk factors. Preliminary findings indicate that this association could be due to a higher prevalence of more virulent Helicobacter strains. Infection with Cytomegalovirus appears to be associated with a greater risk of restenosis after angioplasty rather than primary atherosclerosis. Early trials of appropriate antibiotic therapy in subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction have been encouraging. A causal relationship between infections and coronary heart disease is still elusive. Improved studies involving prospective collection of data are required to demonstrate such an association with potential implications for public health worldwide. PMID:10920505

  17. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  18. Coronary heart disease and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Karamermer, Yusuf; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of coronary artery disease in female patients is increasing due to changing lifestyle patterns including cigarette smoking, diabetes and stress. Since women are delaying childbearing until older age, acute coronary syndrome will more frequently occur during pregnancy. Although rare, acute coronary syndrome during pregnancy often has devastating consequences. It is associated with increased maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity compared with the nonpregnant situation. Furthermore, it constitutes an important problem for the patient and the treating physician, because the selection of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches is greatly influenced not only by maternal, but also by fetal safety. PMID:19804311

  19. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27226153

  20. The Epidemiology of Coronary Heart Disease in Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, Richard F.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death among US blacks whose CHD mortality rates are among the highest in the world. Important to the advance of understanding the etiology, pathogenesis, and prevention of coronary heart disease is an examination of the epidemiology of coronary heart disease in blacks. PMID:3873545

  1. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  2. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  3. Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke More Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack Updated:May 24,2016 Sometimes a heart attack ... Disease Go Red For Women Types of aneurysms Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) • ...

  4. Panic attacks 10 years after heart transplantation successfully treated with low-dose citalopram: a case report

    PubMed Central

    YE, Chenyu; ZHUANG, Yamin; JI, Jianlin; CHEN, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Panic attacks are common among patients who have undergone heart transplantation, but there are no clinical guidelines for the treatment of panic attacks in this group of patients. This report describes a 22-year-old woman who experienced panic attacks 10 years after heart transplant surgery. The attacks started after she discovered that the average post-transplantation survival is 10 years. Treated with citalopram 10 mg/d, her symptoms improved significantly after 2 weeks and had completely resolved after 8 weeks. A positive physician-patient relationship with the doctors who regularly followed her medical condition was crucial to encouraging her to adhere to the treatment with citalopram. She continued taking the citalopram for 7 months without any adverse effects. When followed up 3 months after stopping the citalopram, she had had no recurrence of the panic attacks. PMID:27199531

  5. Panic attacks 10 years after heart transplantation successfully treated with low-dose citalopram: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chenyu; Zhuang, Yamin; Ji, Jianlin; Chen, Hao

    2015-12-25

    Panic attacks are common among patients who have undergone heart transplantation, but there are no clinical guidelines for the treatment of panic attacks in this group of patients. This report describes a 22-year-old woman who experienced panic attacks 10 years after heart transplant surgery. The attacks started after she discovered that the average post-transplantation survival is 10 years. Treated with citalopram 10 mg/d, her symptoms improved significantly after 2 weeks and had completely resolved after 8 weeks. A positive physician-patient relationship with the doctors who regularly followed her medical condition was crucial to encouraging her to adhere to the treatment with citalopram. She continued taking the citalopram for 7 months without any adverse effects. When followed up 3 months after stopping the citalopram, she had had no recurrence of the panic attacks. PMID:27199531

  6. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy P.; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. Findings: The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. Conclusions: The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD. PMID:24171883

  7. Men's and Women's Health Beliefs Differentially Predict Coronary Heart Disease Incidence in a Population-Based Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korin, Maya Rom; Chaplin, William F.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Butler, Mark J.; Ojie, Mary-Jane; Davidson, Karina W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in the association between beliefs in heart disease preventability and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods: A total of 2,688 Noninstitutionalized Nova Scotians without prior CHD enrolled in the Nova Scotia Health Study (NSHS95) and were followed for 10…

  8. Congestive Heart Failure With Apparently Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A 10-Year Observational Study.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Shabana, Adel; Arabi, Abdulrahman; Al-Thani, Hassan; Asaad, Nidal; AlBinALi, Hajar; Singh, Rajvir; Gomaa, Mohammed; Gehani, A

    2015-09-01

    We analyzed the clinical presentation and outcomes (from 2003 to 2013) of heart failure (HF) with apparently normal systolic function (HFPEF). Based on the echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), patients were divided into 2 groups, group 1 (<50%) and group 2 (≥50%). Of 2212 patients with HF, 20% were in group 2. Patients in group 2 were more likely to be older, females, Arabs, hypertensive, and obese (P = .001). Patients in group 1 were mostly Asians and had more troponin-T positivity (P = .001). Inhospital cardiac arrest, shock, and deaths were significantly greater in group 1. On multivariate analysis, age, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, lack of on-admission β-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors use were independent predictors of mortality. HFPEF is associated with less mortality compared to those who presented with reduced LVEF. On admission, use of evidence-based medications could in part predict this difference in the hospital outcome. PMID:25248442

  9. Coronary heart disease mortality and radon exposure in the Newfoundland fluorspar miners' cohort, 1950-2001.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Paul J; Lane, Rachel S D; Morrison, Howard I

    2007-08-01

    Kreuzer and coworkers recently reported no association between cumulative exposure to radiation and death from cardiovascular disease in a cohort of German uranium miners. Here, we report on the relationship between cumulative exposure to radon progeny and coronary heart disease among Newfoundland fluorspar miners. Previous analyses in this cohort found elevated death rates from coronary heart disease among those with higher cumulative radon exposure. However, this finding was based on a relatively small number of deaths and was not statistically significant. Since then, the follow-up of this cohort has been extended by 10 years until the end of 2001. Among the 2,070 miners in our study, 267 died from coronary heart disease. There was no trend evident between cumulative exposure to radon and the relative risk of death from coronary heart disease (P = 0.63). This finding was unchanged after adjusting for the lifetime smoking status that was available for approximately 54% of the cohort. Similarly, the cumulative radon exposure was found to be unrelated to deaths of the circulatory system, acute myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease. These findings are consistent with those recently reported by Kreuzer and colleagues. We share their view that uncontrolled confounding for other coronary heart disease risk factors hinders the interpretation of the risk estimates. PMID:17453229

  10. A coronary heart disease risk score based on patient-reported information.

    PubMed

    Mainous, Arch G; Koopman, Richelle J; Diaz, Vanessa A; Everett, Charles J; Wilson, Peter W F; Tilley, Barbara C

    2007-05-01

    To develop a simple, patient self-report-based coronary heart disease (CHD) risk score for adults without previously diagnosed CHD (Personal Heart Early Assessment Risk Tool [HEART] score), the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC) Study, a prospective cohort of subjects aged 45 to 64 years at baseline, was used to develop a measure for 10-year risk of CHD (n = 14,343). Variables evaluated for inclusion were age, history of diabetes mellitus, history of hypercholesterolemia, history of hypertension, family history of CHD, smoking, physical activity, and body mass index. The 10-year risk of CHD events was defined as myocardial infarction, fatal CHD, or cardiac procedure. The new measure was compared with the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and European Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The Personal HEART score for men included age, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, physical activity, and family history. In men, the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve for predicting 10-year CHD for the Personal HEART score (0.65) was significantly different from that for the FRS (0.69, p = 0.03), but not for the European SCORE (0.62, p = 0.12). The Personal HEART score for women included age, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and body mass index. The area under the curve for the Personal HEART score (0.79) for women was not significantly different from that for the FRS (0.81, p = 0.42) and performed better than the European SCORE (0.69, p = 0.01). In conclusion, the Personal HEART score identifies 10-year risk for CHD based on self-report data, is similar in predictive ability to the FRS and European SCORE, and has the potential for easy self-assessment. PMID:17478150

  11. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  12. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be

  13. Evaluation of coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on risk categories: The Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mahesh J.; de Lemos, James A.; McGuire, Darren K.; See, Raphael; Lindsey, Jason B.; Murphy, Sabina A.; Grundy, Scott M.; Khera, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Background A strategy using coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening to refine coronary heart disease risk assessment in moderately high risk (MHR) subjects (10-year risk 10%–20%) has been suggested. The potential impact of this strategy is unknown. Methods Coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on MHR subjects were modeled in 2,610 subjects aged 30 to 65 years undergoing Framingham risk scoring and CAC assessment in the Dallas Heart Study. The proportions of subjects eligible for imaging and reclassified from MHR to high risk (HR) (10-year risk >20%) based upon CAC scores were determined. Results Only 1.0% of women and 15.4% of men were at MHR by Framingham risk scoring and thus eligible for imaging, and <0.1% and 1.1% respectively, changed from MHR to HR using a CAC threshold ≥400. Coronary artery calcium imaging targeting MHR subjects was also relatively inefficient (>100 women, 14.3 men scanned per subject reclassified). Restricting to an older age range (45–65 years) or expanding the MHR group to 6% to 20% risk had virtually no impact on risk assessment in women. In a secondary analysis, a proposed imaging strategy targeting promotion of subjects from lower risk to MHR was more efficient and had greater yield than current recommendations targeting promotion from MHR to HR. Conclusions Coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on MHR subjects will have a negligible impact on risk assessment in women and a modest impact in men. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of CAC screening as an adjunct to coronary heart disease risk assessment, especially for women and those at seemingly lower risk. PMID:19464410

  14. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-01

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  15. Nickel chloride inhibits metabolic coronary vasodilatation in isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Edoute, Y.; Rubanyi, G.M.; Vanhoutte, P.M.

    1986-03-01

    Nickel is a potent coronary vasoconstrictor and it is released from ischemic myocardium. To determine whether or not nickel ions cause coronary vasoconstriction when local vasodilator mechanisms are stimulated the authors studied the inter-relation between exogenous nickel chloride (NiCl/sub 2/) and metabolic coronary vasodilatation in isolated rat hearts perfused by a modified Langendorff technique. NiCl/sub 2/ induced dose-dependent (10/sup -7/-10/sup -5/M) increases in coronary vascular resistance in spontaneously beating hearts. Pacing of the hearts (380/min) and infusing adenosine (10/sup -6/M) evoked comparable increases in coronary flow but did not affect the coronary vasoconstriction caused by NiCl/sub 2/. At concentrations (> 10/sup -7/M) which evoked vasoconstriction, NiCl/sub 2/ significantly reduced vasodilator responses evoked by pacing, transient coronary occlusion and adenosine. Lower concentrations, which did not cause vasoconstriction, had no effect on these vasodilator responses. Thus, at relative low concentrations NiCl/sub 2/ inhibits metabolic dilatation of the coronary vessels which may contribute to the increased vascular resistance caused by the trace metal under ischemic/hypoxic conditions.

  16. Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease The Coronary Arterial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The coronary circulation in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) includes the extramural coronary arteries, basal coronary blood flow, flow reserve, the coronary microcirculation, and coronary atherogenesis. Methods: Coronary arteriograms were analyzed in 59 adults with CCHD. Dilated extramural coronaries were examined histologically in six patients. Basal coronary blood flow was determined with N-13 positron emission tomography in 14 patients and in 10 controls. Hyperemic flow was induced by intravenous dipyridamole pharmacologic stress. Immunostaining against SM alpha-actin permitted microcirculatory morphometric analysis. Non-fasting total cholesterols were retrieved in 279 patients divided into four groups: Group A---143 cyanotic unoperated, Group B---47 rendered acyanotic by reparative surgery, Group C---41 acyanotic unoperated, Group D---48 acyanotic before and after operation. Results: Extramural coronary arteries were mildly or moderately dilated to ectatic in 49/59 angiograms. Histologic examination disclosed loss of medial smooth muscle, increased medial collagen, and duplication of internal elastic lamina. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased. Hyperemic flow was comparable to controls. Remodeling of the microcirculation was based upon coronary arteriolar length, volume and surface densities. Coronary atherosclerosis was absent in both the arteriograms and the necropsy specimens. Conclusions: Extramural coronary arteries in CCHD dilate in response to endothelial vasodilator substances supplemented by mural attenuation caused by medial abnormalities. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased, but hyperemic flow was normal. Remodeling of the microcirculation was responsible for preservation of flow reserve. The coronaries were atheroma-free because of the salutory effects of hypocholesterolemia, hypoxemia, upregulated nitric oxide, low platelet counts, and hyperbilirubinrmia. PMID:22845810

  17. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  18. Coronary embolism in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Charles, R G; Epstein, E J; Holt, S; Coulshed, N

    1982-01-01

    Coronary embolism is considered to be rare but recent evidence suggests that it may be underdiagnosed, and implicated in acute myocardial infarction associated with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Twenty-six patients were studied. In six, coronary embolism was a primary cause of death confirmed at autopsy. In 20 patients, 23 episodes of coronary embolism were diagnosed clinically. The left coronary system was occluded in 65 per cent, transient electrocardiographic changes occurred in 30 per cent, and either no history or an atypical history of acute myocardial infarction occurred in 29 per cent. Other systemic emboli occurred in 25 per cent. Aortic valve lesions were present in 70 per cent and combined mitral and aortic valve disease in 55 per cent of the patients. The incidence of coronary risk factors was low. Sequelae included increased dyspnoea (35 per cent), ventricular aneurysm (25 per cent) and cardiac failure (12 per cent). Angina rarely followed acute myocardial infarction. PMID:7111677

  19. State of the art coronary heart disease risk estimations based on the Framingham heart study.

    PubMed

    Reissigová, J; Tomecková, M

    2005-12-01

    The aim was to review the most interesting articles dealing with estimations of an individual's absolute coronary heart disease risk based on the Framingham heart study. Besides the Framingham coronary heart disease risk functions, results of validation studies of these Framingham risk functions are discussed. In general, the Framingham risk functions overestimated an individual's absolute risk in external (non-Framingham) populations with a lower occurrence of coronary heart disease compared with the Framingham population, and underestimated it in populations with a higher occurrence of coronary heart disease. Even if the calibration accuracy of the Framingham risk functions were not satisfying, the Framingham risk functions were able to rank individuals according to risk from low-risk to high-risk groups, with the discrimination ability of 60% and more. PMID:16419382

  20. [Prevention of coronary heart disease: smoking].

    PubMed

    Heitzer, T; Meinertz, T

    2005-01-01

    Smoking is the leading preventable cause of illness and premature death in Germany, claiming over 110,000 lives a year because it directly increases the risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, emphysema and a variety of cancers. The overwhelming majority of smokers begin tobacco use before they reach adulthood. Among those young people who smoke, the average age is now 13-14. In Germany, about 39% of male and 31% of female adults (age 18-60 years) continue to smoke, despite information about the unequivocally negative health consequences of smoking. The exact mechanisms of smoking-related vascular disease are not yet known. Smoking causes acute hemodynamic alterations such as increase in heart rate, systematic and coronary vascular resistance, myocardial contractility, and myocardial oxygen demand. These short-term effects could lower the ischemic threshold in smokers with coronary artery disease and contribute to the increased risk for acute cardiovascular events. Endothelial damage is thought to be an initiating event in atherosclerosis and early studies have demonstrated that long-term smoking has direct toxic effects with structural changes of human endothelial cells. Recent research has shown the importance of the functional role of the endothelium in regulating vascular tone, platelet-endothelial interactions, leukocyte adhesion and smooth muscle cell proliferation via synthesis and release of a variety of substances such as nitric oxide. There is strong evidence that smoking leads to endothelial dysfunction mainly by increased inactivation of nitric oxide by oxygen-derived free radicals. Smoking also increases oxidative modification of LDL and is associated with lower HDL plasma levels. Smoking induces a systemic inflammatory response with increased leukocyte count and elevation of the C-reactive protein level. Importantly, the prothrombotic effects of smoking have been repeatedly demonstrated to cause alterations in platelet function, imbalance of

  1. On Two Hearts and Other Coronary Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1998-01-01

    Speculates as to how understanding of heart disease has developed and provides insight into how medical science makes progress. Summarizes the state of knowledge on arteriosclerosis, heart attacks, and exercising the heart. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  2. Antibiotic trials for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey L; Muhlestein, Joseph B

    2004-01-01

    The possibility has been raised in recent years that infection might contribute as an inflammatory stimulus to chronic "noninfectious" degenerative diseases. Within the past decade, serious attention has been given to the possibility of bacterial vectors as causal factors of atherosclerosis. To date, the greatest amount of information has related to the intracellular organism Chlamydia pneumoniae. This interest has been stimulated by the frequent finding of bacterial antigens and, occasionally, recoverable organisms, within human atherosclerotic plaque. Indirect evidence for and against the benefit of anti-Chlamydia antibiotic agents comes from epidemiologic studies. Given the potential for confounding in observational studies, prospective, randomized intervention trials are required. These antibiotic trials have generated enthusiastic expectations for proving (or disproving) the infectious-disease hypothesis of atherosclerosis and establishing new therapies. However, these expectations have been tempered by important limitations and uncertainties. Negative outcomes can be explained not only by an incorrect hypothesis but also by inadequate study size or design or by an ineffective antibiotic regimen. In contrast, if studies are positive, the hypothesis still is not entirely proved, because a nonspecific anti-inflammatory effect or an anti-infective action against other organisms might be operative. The clinical trial data to date have not provided adequate support for the clinical use of antibiotics in primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. New and innovative experimental approaches, in addition to traditionally designed antibiotic trials, should be welcome in our attempts to gain adequate insight into the role of infection in atherosclerosis and its therapy. PMID:15061624

  3. Cereal grains and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Truswell, A S

    2002-01-01

    Cereal grains and their products provide around 30% of total energy intake in British adults, (much more than any of the other major food groups). Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the largest single cause of death in Britain and many other Western countries. This review examines the question whether there is a relation between cereal consumption and CHD. Several of the nutrients in cereals have known potential for reducing risk factors for CHD: the linoleic acid, fibre, vitamin E, selenium and folate. Cereals also contain phytoestrogens of the lignan family and several phenolic acids with antioxidant properties. Processing generally reduces the content of these nutrients and bioprotective substances. Although cereals at the farm gate are very low in salt, processed cereal foods, eg bread and some breakfast cereals, are high-salt foods and thus could contribute to raising blood pressure. Human experiments have clearly shown that oat fibre tends to lower plasma total and LDL cholesterol but wheat fibre does not. Rice bran and barley may also lower cholesterol but most people do not eat enough barley to have an effect. Cereal foods with low glycaemic index such as pasta and oats are beneficial for people with diabetes and might lower plasma lipids. Between 1996 and 2001 an accumulation of five very large cohort studies in the USA, Finland and Norway have all reported that subjects consuming relatively large amounts of whole grain cereals have significantly lower rates of CHD. This confirms an earlier report from a small British cohort. The protective effect does not seem to be due to cholesterol-lowering. While cohort studies have shown this consistent protective effect of whole grain cereals, there has been (only one) randomised controlled secondary prevention trial of advice to eat more cereal fibre. In this there was no reduction of the rate of reinfarction. The trial had some weaknesses, eg there were eight different diets, compliance was not checked objectively

  4. Prognostic significance of transient ST segment changes after coronary artery bypass surgery: a long-term (4-10 year) follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D; Mulcahy, D; Curzen, N; Sullivan, A; Cunningham, D; Sparrow, J; Wright, C; Quyyumi, A; Fox, K

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the long-term (four to 10 years) prognostic significance of transient ST segment changes on ambulatory ST segment monitoring after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). PATIENTS AND METHODS--76 patients (67 men, nine women) underwent CABG between 1982 and 1984 (n = 31) and between 1987 and 1988 (n = 45) and at a mean age of 57. All underwent 48 hours of ambulatory ST segment monitoring at a mean of 19 weeks after surgery. The results were available for assessment. All general practitioners were contacted and patients' notes reviewed. Patients were contacted by telephone. Details were recorded of intervening events (acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, need for further revascularisation, and deaths). Event free survival curves were produced for those with and without transient ST segment changes during routine postoperative ambulatory ST segment monitoring. RESULTS--During 3213 hours of monitoring after CABG, 21 (27.6%) of 76 patients had transient ST segment changes, of which 70% were silent. Over a mean 70 month follow up period, patients with such ischaemic changes were no more likely to have either an objective (myocardial infarction or cardiac death) or subjective (unstable angina or another revascularisation) event than those patients without ischaemic changes. This finding was the same in patients operated on between 1987 and 1988 and between 1982 and 1984. CONCLUSIONS--Although ambulatory ST segment monitoring is becoming increasingly popular in some countries as a routine investigation for ischaemia in various coronary subgroups, the findings of such an investigation, when performed after CABG, do not help to identify a subgroup more likely to have an adverse outcome during up to 10 years of follow up. There seems to be no reason to perform this investigation after surgery, and particularly to refer patients for reinvestigation because of the detection of predominantly silent ST segment changes of uncertain relevance. PMID

  5. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management. PMID:24656111

  6. Plasma homocysteine levels in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chacko, K A

    1998-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is being identified as a risk factor for coronary heart disease but its role among Asian Indians has not been studied. This has practical importance because (1) the data generated in the West may not represent Indian population, and (2) the condition is remediable. To assess the magnitude of this problem, we studied 56 patients with coronary heart disease, and 53 control subjects. Details of diet, smoking, medication, hypertension and diabetes were recorded; lipids and sugar levels were estimated in all. Patients with renal and liver diseases were excluded. Serum homocysteine was estimated using liquid chromatography. Both the groups were comparable by age and sex. Higher, but statistically insignificant homocysteine levels were seen in patients with coronary heart disease: 10.98 +/- 9.04 nmol/ml vs 9.41 +/- 3.60 nmol/ml in control subjects. Among males, higher, but statistically insignificant levels were seen in coronary heart disease patients: 11.96 +/- 9.41 nmol/ml vs 9.87 +/- 3.50 nmol/ ml in control subjects; among females, the levels were lower though not significant: 5.10 +/- 1.64 nmol/ml vs 6.39 +/- 2.99 nmol/ml. Sub-group analysis with age 40 as dividing point did not show significant difference. Six (10.7%) patients with coronary heart disease and three (5.7%) control subjects had homocysteine levels above 95th percentile of control subjects (p = NS). Twenty-three (41.1%) coronary heart disease patients and 19 (35.9%) control subjects had levels above 10 nmol/ml (p = NS). We conclude that homocysteine is not a major risk factor for coronary heart disease in the study population. The lack of statistical significance could be due to inadequate sample size although some past studies reporting statistically significant association between coronary heart disease and homocysteine involved similar or smaller number of subjects. Larger studies are warranted to see if ethnic differences also have any role. PMID:9753851

  7. Hyperhomocysteinaemia, Helicobacter pylori, and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, J J; Sanderson, J E

    1996-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinaemia and Helicobacter pylori infection have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. These two risk factors, though they seem unrelated, could be linked by a deficiency of vitamins and folate caused by chronic gastritis in H pylori infection. This nutritional defect could lead to failure of methylation by 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolic acid and thus exacerbate the accumulation of homocysteine in susceptible patients. Homocysteine is toxic to endothelial cells and results in coronary artery disease. PMID:8983673

  8. The role of coffee consumption on the 10-year (2004-2014) Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) incidence among cardiac patients: the GREECS observational study.

    PubMed

    Notara, Venetia; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Kouvari, Matina; Tzanoglou, Despoina; Kouli, Georgia; Mantas, Yannis; Kogias, Yannis; Stravopodis, Petros; Papanagnou, George; Zombolos, Spyros; Babatsikou, Fotοula; Koutis, Charilaos; Pitsavos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    The association between long-term coffee consumption and 10-year cardiovascular disease incidence among Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) patients was evaluated. From 2003 to 2004, 2172 ACS consecutive patients from six major Greek hospitals were enrolled. During 2013-2014, the 10-year follow-up was performed (88% participation rate) and recurrent fatal or non-fatal ACS was recorded. Baseline coffee consumption (cups/day) was assessed using a semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire. Multi adjusted analysis revealed that 1-2 cups of coffee/day versus no consumption had an adverse effect on the ACS incidence [odds ratio (OR) = 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01, 1.79]. In subgroup analysis, with hypertension as strata, only the normotensive reached significance. Odds ratios for 1-2 and ≥3 cups relative to no consumption were [OR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.07, 2.60] and [OR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.06, 3.27], respectively, after controlling for potential confounders. Thus, avoidance of coffee may be of high importance to ameliorate disease prognosis among cardiac patients. PMID:26307525

  9. Anomalous right coronary artery arising from left coronary cusp with coexisting valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Khetpal, Akash; Khetpal, Neelam; Godil, Ansab; Ali Mallick, Muhammad Saad; Lashari, Muhammad Nawaz

    2016-04-01

    We report an unusual case, a 50 year old female with an abnormal right coronary artery originating from the left coronary cusp. The patient, who had a history of hypertension presented with chest pain and shortness of breath to the emergency department. She was diagnosed with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and had hypertension as one of the coronary risk factor. Echocardiography revealed poor progression of R waves. She was scheduled for echocardiography thereafter which revealed severe aortic stenosis with aortic root dilatation. The patient was discharged due to absence of any complications or other anomalies. This case is unique because of the simultaneously presenting valvular pathology, along with the anomalous origin of the right coronary artery which was detected, as an incidental finding, during coronary angiography. PMID:27122291

  10. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  11. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    PubMed

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins. PMID:7582364

  12. Coronary heart disease in Asian Indians: perspectives of family members.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shantala; Wilkes, Lesley M; Jackson, Debra

    Despite the high prevalence rate and significant mortality and morbidity from coronary heart disease in Asian Indians (irrespective of their religious background), very few studies have reported on family members' experiences of caring for a person with coronary heart disease. This paper reports on family members' experiences of coronary heart disease in Asian Indians residing in Australia, and is part of a larger study that explored the experiences and/or understanding of coronary heart disease in Asian Indians from the perspective of patients, family members and 'healthy' participants. Using a constructivist approach semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with five family members. Findings are represented under the following main categories: 1. A period of complexity for family members; 2. Indian Culture: Its influence on health/health behaviour & illness experience; 3. Impact of migration and societal discrimination; 4. Disappointment with health care services and the health system; and 5. Strategies to prevent cardiac illness and attain optimal health. Cultural factors had both positive and negative influences not only on the illness experience but also on health behaviour and attitude. The impact of Indian culture in relation to coronary heart disease needs to be understood not only at the cultural level by providing culturally sensitive health care, but also by educating Asian Indians to change their health attitude and behaviour and improve their lifestyle. Asian Indians need education and advice to become more resilient and adaptable to a Western society and also to become aware of the acculturative effects of a Western lifestyle. PMID:17343522

  13. Correlation between serum cystatin C level and elderly hypertensive patients combined coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Xianming; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Wei; Wang, Ying; He, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the correlation between serum cystatin C level and elderly hypertension with coronary heart disease patients. Methods: 500 hypertensive patients combined coronary heart disease were selected by coronary angiography. 321 of them were elderly patients with hypertension (male 204, female 117), and 400 of them were elderly patients with coronary heart disease (male 257, female 143), The serum cystatin C level of all patients were detected by immunoturbidimetry, and analyzed the correlation between the serum cystatin C level and different degree of blood pressure and the degree of coronary artery stenosis in elderly patients. Results: The serum cystatin C level was closely related with the blood pressure and the degree of the coronary artery stenosis. The higher the blood pressure level and the more serious the coronary artery stenosis, the higher the serum cystatin C level; The serum cystatin C level of hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease patients (Group D) were markedly higher than the level of the patients without hypertension and coronary heart disease patients (Group A), and the level of the patients with coronary heart disease (Group B) and the hypertension group (Group C) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The serum cystatin C level of elderly patients with hypertension and coronary heart disease were closely related with the degree of blood pressure and coronary arteries stenosis. The serum cystatin C maybe a predictor of disease severity in elderly hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26131241

  14. Vegetarianism, coronary disease risk factors and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Thorogood, M

    1994-02-01

    Recent studies of vegetarians confirm a lower risk of fatal heart disease amongst such subjects. Lipid levels are lower in vegetarians, even when the diet of comparable meat-eaters is low in fat. This may partly explain the lower mortality, but it is not clear whether the absence of meat or some other aspect of the vegetarian diet is causal in this relationship. PMID:15559026

  15. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  16. Seasonality and Coronary Heart Disease Deaths in United States Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Mbanu, Ibeawuchi; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Peeples, Lynne; Stallings, Leonard A.; Kales, Stefanos N.

    2013-01-01

    United States firefighters have a high on-duty fatality rate and coronary heart disease is the leading cause. Seasonality affects the incidence of cardiovascular events in the general population, but its effects on firefighters are unknown. We statistically examined the seasonal and annual variation of all on-duty coronary heart disease deaths among US firefighters between 1994 and 2004 using the chi-square distribution and Poisson regression model of the monthly fatality counts. We also examined the effect of ambient temperature (apparent as well as wind chill temperature) on coronary heart disease fatalities during the study span using a time-stratified, case-crossover study design. When grouped by season, we observed the distribution of the 449 coronary heart disease fatalities to show a relative peak in winter (32%) and relative nadir in spring (21%). This pattern was significantly different (p=0.005) from the expected distribution under the null hypothesis where season has no effect. The pattern persisted in additional analyses, stratifying the deaths by the type of duty in which the firefighters were engaged at the time of their deaths. In the Poisson regression model of the monthly fatality counts, the overall goodness-of-fit between the actual and predicted case counts was excellent ( χ42 = 16.63; p = 0.002). Two distinct peaks were detected, one in January-February and the other in August-September. Overall, temperature was not associated with increased risk of on-duty death. After allowing for different effects of temperature in mild/hot versus cold periods, a 1°C increase was not protective in cold weather, nor did it increase the risk of death in warmer weather. The findings of this study reveal statistical evidence for excess coronary heart disease deaths among firefighters during winter; however, the temporal pattern coronary heart disease deaths was not linked to temperature variation. We also found the seasonal pattern to be independent of duty

  17. Cannabinoids and atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Rajesh; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-06-01

    Marijuana is the most abused recreational drug in the United States. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of marijuana, affect multiple organ systems in the human body. The pharmacologic effects of marijuana, based on stimulation of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, which are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, have been well described. Activation of these receptors modulates the function of various cellular elements of the vessel wall, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Clinically, there are reports linking marijuana smoking to the precipitation of angina and acute coronary syndromes. Recently, large published clinical trials with CB1 antagonist rimonabant did not show any significant benefit of this agent in preventing progression of atherosclerosis. In light of these findings and emerging data on multiple pathways linking cannabinoids to atherosclerosis, we discuss the literature on the role of cannabinoids in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We also propose a marijuana paradox, which implies that inhalation of marijuana may be linked to precipitation of acute coronary syndromes, but modulation of the endocannabinoid system by a noninhalation route may have a salutary effect on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22278660

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND STROKE IN JAPANESE MEN LIVING IN JAPAN, HAWAII AND CALIFORNIA. CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK FACTORS IN JAPAN AND HAWAII

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various risk factors were evaluated to explain a significantly greater incidence of coronary heart disease in men of Japanese ancestry resident in Hawaii compared with men resident in Japan. The independent predictors of incidence of coronary heart disease in both Japan and Hawai...

  19. Management of Hypertension among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Zizi, Ferdinand; Brimah, Perry; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Makaryus, Amgad N; McFarlane, Samy; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common outcome of hypertension. Hypertension accelerates the development of atherosclerosis, and sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) can destabilize vascular lesions and precipitate acute coronary events. Hypertension can cause myocardial ischemia in the absence of CHD. These cardiovascular risks attributed to hypertension can be reduced by optimal BP control. Although several antihypertensive agents exist, the choice of agent and the appropriate target BP for patients with CHD remain controversial. In this succinct paper, we examine the evidence and the mechanisms for the linkage between hypertension and CHD and we discuss the treatment options and the goals of therapy that are consistent with the report of the seventh Joint National Committee on the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) and American Heart Association scientific statement. We anticipate changes in the recommendations of the forthcoming JNC 8. PMID:21785704

  20. Diabetes is a predictor of coronary artery stenosis in patients hospitalized with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kosuga, Tsuneharu; Komukai, Kimiaki; Miyanaga, Satoru; Kubota, Takeyuki; Nakata, Kotaro; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Yamada, Takayuki; Yoshida, Jun; Kimura, Haruka; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2016-05-01

    In patients with heart failure, coronary artery disease is the most common underlying heart disease, and is associated with increased mortality. However, estimating the presence or absence of coronary artery disease in patients with heart failure is sometimes difficult without coronary imaging. We reviewed 155 consecutive patients hospitalized with heart failure who underwent coronary angiography. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with (N = 59) and without (N = 96) coronary artery stenosis. The clinical characteristics and blood sampling data were compared between the two groups. The patients with coronary artery stenosis were older than those without. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia and a history of revascularization was higher in the patients with coronary artery stenosis. Patients with coronary artery stenosis tended to have wall motion asynergy more frequently than those without. On the other hand, the prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) was lower in patients with coronary artery stenosis. The serum hemoglobin level and estimated glomerular filtration rate were lower in patients with coronary artery stenosis than in those without. In the multivariate analysis, DM (odds ratio 3.517, 95 % CI 1.601-7.727) was found to be the only the predictor of the presence of coronary artery stenosis in patients with heart failure. In conclusion, coronary imaging is strongly recommended for heart failure patients with DM to confirm the presence of coronary artery stenosis. PMID:25822806

  1. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in the U.S. It is a likely cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial formula developed by the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population who require medical evaluation for job certification. Those individuals assessed to have a high risk probability will be targeted for intervention.

  2. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart. PMID:23177618

  3. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  4. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  5. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  6. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  7. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  8. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  9. A Novel Risk Score to the Prediction of 10-year Risk for Coronary Artery Disease Among the Elderly in Beijing Based on Competing Risk Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Tang, Zhe; Li, Xia; Luo, Yanxia; Guo, Jin; Li, Haibin; Liu, Xiangtong; Tao, Lixin; Yan, Aoshuang; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study aimed to construct a risk prediction model for coronary artery disease (CAD) based on competing risk model among the elderly in Beijing and develop a user-friendly CAD risk score tool. We used competing risk model to evaluate the risk of developing a first CAD event. On the basis of the risk factors that were included in the competing risk model, we constructed the CAD risk prediction model with Cox proportional hazard model. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and time-dependent area under the ROC curve (AUC) were used to evaluate the discrimination ability of the both methods. Calibration plots were applied to assess the calibration ability and adjusted for the competing risk of non-CAD death. Net reclassification index (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were applied to quantify the improvement contributed by the new risk factors. Internal validation of predictive accuracy was performed using 1000 times of bootstrap re-sampling. Of the 1775 participants without CAD at baseline, 473 incident cases of CAD were documented for a 20-year follow-up. Time-dependent AUCs for men and women at t = 10 years were 0.841 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.806–0.877], 0.804 (95% CI: 0.768–0.839) in Fine and Gray model, 0.784 (95% CI: 0.738–0.830), 0.733 (95% CI: 0.692–0.775) in Cox proportional hazard model. The competing risk model was significantly superior to Cox proportional hazard model on discrimination and calibration. The cut-off values of the risk score that marked the difference between low-risk and high-risk patients were 34 points for men and 30 points for women, which have good sensitivity and specificity. A sex-specific multivariable risk factor algorithm-based competing risk model has been developed on the basis of an elderly Chinese cohort, which could be applied to predict an individual's risk and provide a useful guide to identify the groups at a high risk for CAD among the Chinese

  10. Coronary heart disease. The size and nature of the problem.

    PubMed

    Turner, R W

    1980-08-01

    In the U.K., coronary heart disease has reached epidemic proportions. It is the commonest cause of death after the age of 35 years and the fastest rate of increase is in early middle age. The epidemic is due mainly to our way of life. The most important factors are dietary, with smoking, physical inactivity and stress also contributing. Twenty independent working parties from different countries have reviewed the dietary evidence and reached a strong consensus on dietary recommendations. Little action has been taken in the U.K. The Coronary Prevention Group has been formed to consider the reasons for this inaction and also the implication for research, the government, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Department of Health and Social Security, the food and agriculture industries, caterers, nutrition education and for individuals, of the dietary recommendations. PMID:7465457

  11. Coronary heart disease. The size and nature of the problem.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    In the U.K., coronary heart disease has reached epidemic proportions. It is the commonest cause of death after the age of 35 years and the fastest rate of increase is in early middle age. The epidemic is due mainly to our way of life. The most important factors are dietary, with smoking, physical inactivity and stress also contributing. Twenty independent working parties from different countries have reviewed the dietary evidence and reached a strong consensus on dietary recommendations. Little action has been taken in the U.K. The Coronary Prevention Group has been formed to consider the reasons for this inaction and also the implication for research, the government, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Department of Health and Social Security, the food and agriculture industries, caterers, nutrition education and for individuals, of the dietary recommendations. PMID:7465457

  12. Thyroid Function, Prevalent Coronary Heart Disease, and Severity of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Yan; Jiang, Jingjing; Gui, Minghui; Liu, Lin; Aleteng, Qiqige; Wu, Bingjie; Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaojing; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if free T4 and TSH concentrations or thyroid function categories were associated with prevalent CHD and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a population undergoing coronary angiography. This was a cross-sectional study including 1799 patients who were consecutively admitted and underwent coronary angiography. We evaluated the severity of coronary atherosclerosis using Gensini score. In the entire study population, free T4 level was inversely associated with prevalent CHD (OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.91–0.99, P = 0.01) and the natural log-transformed Gensini score (ln(Gensini score)) (β = −0.03, 95% CI −0.05–−0.01, P = 0.005). The odds of CHD increased gradually across hyperthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, and overt hypothyroidism groups using the euthyroid group as the reference, and the trend is borderline significant (P for trend = 0.051). When comparing to the euthyroid group, ln(Gensini score) of the overt hypothyroidism group was significantly higher (P = 0.009), but the trend was not significant (P for trend = 0.08). A significant association of thyroid function with CHD or ln(Gensini score) in euthyroid patients was not observed. The present study demonstrated an association of thyroid function with prevalent CHD and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a population undergoing coronary angiography. However, this association was not observed in euthyroid individuals. PMID:26770196

  13. Fate of Patients With Coronary Perforation Complicating Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Euro Heart Survey Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Timm; Boeder, Niklas; Nef, Holger M; Möllmann, Helge; Hochadel, Matthias; Marco, Jean; Weidinger, Franz; Zeymer, Uwe; Gitt, Anselm K; Hamm, Christian W

    2015-11-01

    Coronary perforation (CP) is a life-threatening complication that can occur during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Little is known, however, about the incidence and clinical outcome of CP. We sought to investigate the occurrence of CP and its determinants and risk profile in a large-scale, prospective registry. From 2005 to 2008, unselected patients (n = 42,068) from 175 centers in 33 countries who underwent a PCI procedure were prospectively enrolled in the PCI registry of the Euro Heart Survey program. For the present analysis, patients experiencing CP during PCI (n = 124, 0.3%) were compared with those who underwent PCI without CP. Patients with CP were older, more often women, had more severe coronary disease, and underwent more complex types of coronary intervention. Independent factors associated with CP were the use of rotablation, intravascular ultrasound-guided PCI, bypass PCI, a totally occluded vessel, a type C lesion, peripheral arterial disease, and body mass index <25. More than 10% of the patients developed cardiac tamponade. In a small minority (3.3%), emergency bypass surgery had to be performed. The inhospital death rate was markedly elevated in patients with CP (7.3% vs 1.5%, p <0.001). After adjustment for the EuroHeart score, CP remained a strong predictor of hospital mortality (odds ratio 5.21, 95% confidence interval 2.34 to 11.60). In conclusion, in this real world, all-comers registry, the incidence of CP was low, occurred more often in patients who underwent more complex coronary interventions, and was associated with a fivefold higher hospital mortality. PMID:26341189

  14. Antiplatelet Management for Coronary Heart Disease: Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Michael; Morneau, Kathleen; Hoang, Vu; Virani, Salim; Jneid, Hani

    2016-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the leading cause of death in the USA. CHD accounts for 48 % of all cardiovascular mortality or approximately one of every seven deaths. Disruption of atherosclerotic plaques-usually by rupture or erosion-and superimposed thrombosis can result in acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death. Silent plaque disruption may also occur and result in coronary plaque progression and ultimately the symptomatic manifestations of stable CHD. Antiplatelet agents remain the cornerstone therapy for acute thrombotic coronary syndromes and are essential for thromboprophylaxis against these events in patients with stable CHD. Antiplatelet drugs are also important adjunct therapies during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as they mitigate equipment-associated thrombotic complications that are partially induced by iatrogenic plaque rupture by interventionalists during balloon angioplasty in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Since the introduction of clopidogrel, there has been considerable development in this field with at least three novel P2Y12 antagonists approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) over the past decade. Rapidly accumulating evidence is helping to guide the optimal duration of treatment with dual antiplatelet therapy after stenting, especially with the newer drug-eluting stents. More data are also emerging on the hazards and long-term safety of these agents. It is therefore prudent for clinicians to remain current on treatment options and recent advances in this area. We herein review current and emerging antiplatelet therapies and summarize their characteristics and indications of use as well as challenges and areas of ongoing research. PMID:27139709

  15. [Adipokines: adiponectin, leptin, resistin and coronary heart disease risk].

    PubMed

    Kopff, Barbara; Jegier, Anna

    2005-01-01

    lesions. Correlation between resistin concentration and the extent of atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary vessels has also been found. The disturbances in secretion, function and balance of adiponectin, leptin and resistin are to be considered not only a link between visceral adiposity and cardiovascular risk but also independent risk factor of coronary heart disease. PMID:16521924

  16. [Adherence to cardioprotective medications in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino; Mazzone, Carmine; Di Lenarda, Andrea

    2009-04-01

    Treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease relies on evidence-based medications such as beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers, aspirin and statins, which are considered cornerstones to control symptoms, improve quality of life, reduce future events, and prolong survival. In spite of the clear benefits of therapy, previous studies have shown differences between the large randomized populations and the "real world" about long-term treatment in terms of efficacy, tolerability, costs, side effects and drug interactions. Moreover, a different awareness of the patient's compliance has been highlighted in relation to the setting (hospital, family doctor, etc.). The analysis and assessment of the prescription and efficacy of therapy for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease represent one of the most important challenges for the healthcare system, because reliable data are necessary to verify usefulness and results of therapy, prescribed at discharge after an acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary artery bypass graft, but above all the actual application of treatments should be pursued in every clinical setting. The Cardiology School of the Trieste University has constituted a working group of cardiology students that during the year 2009 will enroll and follow for 1 year all patients with coronary artery disease discharged from the Cardiovascular Department and Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of Trieste to assess: (1) if evidence-based medicine for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease is applied in the Trieste area; (2) adherence to prescribed treatment; (3) factors that are associated with non-adherence and consequences of non-adherence. PMID:19475879

  17. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined. PMID:22686063

  18. Tissue Doppler Imaging in Coronary Artery Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Michele; Totaro, Antonio; Ieva, Riccardo; Ferraretti, Armando; Musaico, Francesco; Biase, Matteo Di

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the prognostic role of TDI-derived parameters in major cardiac diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF). In these conditions, myocardial mitral annular systolic (S’) and early diastolic (E’) velocities have been shown to predict mortality or cardiovascular events. In heart failure non invasive assessment of LV diastolic pressure by transmitral to mitral annular early diastolic velocity ratio (E/E’) is a strong prognosticator, especially when E/E’ is > or =15. Moreover, other parameters derived by TDI, as cardiac time intervals and Myocardial Performance Index, might play a role in the prognostic stratification in CAD and HF. Recently, a three-dimensional (3-D) TDI imaging modality, triplane TDI, has become available, and this allows calculation of 3-Dvolumes and LV ejection fraction. We present a brief update of TDI. PMID:22845815

  19. Mortality from coronary heart disease and stroke for six ethnic groups in California, 1985 to 1990.

    PubMed

    Wild, S H; Laws, A; Fortmann, S P; Varady, A N; Byrne, C D

    1995-11-01

    Coronary heart disease and stroke death rates were compared for six ethnic groups (non-Hispanic white, Hispanic, African-American, Chinese, Japanese, and Asian Indian) by sex and age (25 to 44, 45 to 64, 65 to 84, and 25 to 84 years old) using California census and 1985 to 1990 death data. African-American men and women in all age groups had the highest rates of death from coronary heart disease, stroke, and all causes (except for coronary heart disease in the oldest men). Hispanics, Chinese, and Japanese in all age-sex groups had comparatively low death rates for coronary heart disease and stroke, although stroke was proportionally an important cause of death for Chinese and Japanese groups. Coronary heart disease was an important cause of death for Asian Indians although death rates were generally not higher than those for other ethnic groups. Ethnic differences were most marked for women and younger age groups. PMID:8680605

  20. Early right coronary vasospasm presenting with malignant arrhythmias in a heart transplantation recipient without allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Pistono, M; Brentana, L; Gnemmi, M; Imparato, A; Temporelli, P L; Zingarelli, E; Patané, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2009-01-24

    In heart transplant recipients, the aetiology of coronary vasospasm is largely unknown but it has been reported to be related to coronary vasculopathy or allograft rejection. We report a case of acute, reversible coronary vasospasm which caused malignant arrhythmias in a cardiac transplant recipient one month after transplantation without evidence of coronary vasculopathy or allograft rejection. The patient had a normal post-operative course with no other complications; this case supports the hypothesis that coronary vasospasm is not necessarily related to epicardial coronary artery disease or allograft rejection, but rather may be due to an abnormal reversible vasoreactivity. PMID:17950482

  1. [Prevention of coronary heart disease with statins. Which patients profit?].

    PubMed

    Adam, O; Forth, W

    2003-06-19

    Statins are generally considered as safe drugs with a very favorable cost-efficacy-ratio. Calculation of health expenses limits the prescription of statins in primary prevention to persons on high risk (i.e. 20% risk of a coronary infarction within the next 10 years). Prescription of statins in secondary prevention of atherosclerosis is mandatory. Advanced age, impairment of renal function or polypharmacotherapy increase the incidence of severe side-effects, especially myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. These patients should be given statins with lesser risk of these side-effects. Combination of statins with fibrates has attracted public concern, but may be indicated in persons with otherwise not treatable hyperlipidemia. These patients need intensive monitoring, just as patients on other drugs that are metabolized via the enzyme CYP3A4. Patients on statins should get dietary counseling, as an appropriate diet increases the effect of statins. PMID:12891851

  2. Non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart: CT angiography findings.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ersin; Kafadar, Cahit; Tutar, Süleyman; Bozlar, Uğur; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is most commonly performed for the evaluation of the coronary arteries; however, non-coronary cardiac pathologies are frequently detected on these scans. In cases where magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used, cardiac CT can serve as the first-line imaging modality to evaluate many non-coronary cardiac pathologies. In this article, we discuss congenital non-coronary abnormalities of the left heart and their cardiac CT imaging features. PMID:27609435

  3. Predictive Value of Auricular Diagnosis on Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwai-Ping Suen, Lorna; Lau, Yuk-kong; Ma, Hok-cheung; Lai, Kam-wai; Holroyd, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    The ear has a reflexive property; therefore, various physical attributes may appear on the auricle when disorders of the internal organs or other parts of the body exist. Auricular diagnostics is an objective, painless, and noninvasive method that provides rapid access to information. Thus, the association between auricular signals and coronary heart disease (CHD) should be further investigated. A case control study was conducted to determine the predictive value of auricular signals on 100 cases of CHD (CHD+ve = 50; CHD−ve = 50) via visual inspection, electrical skin resistance measurement, and tenderness testing. The results showed that the presence of an ear lobe crease (ELC) was significantly associated with coronary heart disease. The “heart” zone of the CHD+ve group significantly exhibited higher conductivity on both ears than that of the controls. The CHD+ve group experienced significant tenderness in the “heart” region compared with those in the CHD−ve group in both acute and chronic conditions. Further studies that take into consideration the impact of age, race, and earlobe shape on ELC prevalence in a larger sample should be done. PMID:23326290

  4. Neighborhood socioeconomic environment and incidence of coronary heart disease: a follow-up study of 25,319 women and men in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sundquist, Kristina; Winkleby, Marilyn; Ahlén, Helena; Johansson, Sven-Erik

    2004-04-01

    In this study, the authors examined whether neighborhood socioeconomic environment predicted incident coronary heart disease after adjustment for individual-level characteristics. A random sample of the Swedish population (25,319 women and men aged 35-74 years) was interviewed between 1986 and 1993 and was followed through December 1997 for incident coronary heart disease (1,189 events). Neighborhood socioeconomic environment was defined by small-area market statistics (6,145 neighborhoods) and measured by two indicators: neighborhood education (proportion of people with less than 10 years of education in the neighborhood) and neighborhood income (proportion of people with incomes in the lowest national income quartile). Separate multilevel Cox proportional hazards models showed that low neighborhood education and low neighborhood income each predicted incident coronary heart disease after adjustment for age, sex, and individual-level education and income (hazard ratios were 1.25 and 1.23, respectively). The authors conclude that neighborhood socioeconomic environment predicts incident coronary heart disease, having a significant effect on coronary heart disease risk beyond the individual effect. PMID:15033643

  5. Vitamin E supplementation in the prevention of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, S; Allison, T G; Hensrud, D D

    2001-11-01

    Vitamin E consists of a number of compounds, tocopherols and tocotrienols, that function as lipid-soluble antioxidants. A hypothesis is that vitamin E may slow the progression of atherosclerosis by blocking the oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and thus decrease its uptake into the arterial lumen. Basic science and animal studies have generally supported this hypothesis. Observational studies have primarily assessed patients with no established coronary heart disease (CHD), and results have generally supported a protective role of vitamin E in CHD. Early primary and secondary prevention clinical trials (Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Protection study and Cambridge Heart Antioxidant Study) showed mixed results. Despite years of encouraging evidence from basic science and observational studies, 3 large randomized clinical trials (Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto miocardico, Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation, and Primary Prevention Project) with a combined total of more than 25,000 patients failed to show a significant benefit with vitamin E taken as a dietary supplement for the prevention of CHD. Four large randomized primary prevention trials currently under way should add to our knowledge. The American Heart Association has recommended consumption of a balanced diet with emphasis on antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables but has made no recommendations regarding vitamin E supplementation for the general population. Although vitamin E supplementation seems to be safe for most people, recommendations from health care professionals should reflect the uncertainty of established benefit as demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:11702901

  6. Can patients with coronary heart disease go to high altitude?

    PubMed

    Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tourism to high altitude is very popular and includes elderly people with both manifest and subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). Thus, risk assessment regarding high altitude exposure of patients with CHD is of increasing interest, and individual recommendations are expected despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence. The major factor increasing cardiac stress is hypoxia. At rest and for a given external workload, myocardial oxygen demand is increased at altitude, particularly in nonacclimatized individuals, and there is some evidence that blood-flow reserve is reduced in atherosclerotic coronary arteries even in the absence of severe stenosis. Despite a possible imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen delivery, studies on selected patients have shown that exposure and exercise at altitudes of 3000 to 3500 m is generally safe for patients with stable CHD and sufficient work capacity. During the first days at altitude, patients with stable angina may develop symptoms of myocardial ischemia at slightly lower heart rate x  blood-pressure products. Adverse cardiac events, however, such as unstable angina coronary syndromes, do not occur more frequently compared with sea level except for those who are unaccustomed to exercise. Therefore, training should start before going to altitude, and the altitude-related decrease in exercise capacity should be considered. Travel to 3500 m should be avoided unless patients have stable disease, preserved left ventricular function without residual capacity, and above-normal exercise capacity. CHD patients should avoid travel to elevations above 4500 m owing to severe hypoxia at these altitudes. The risk assessment of CHD patients at altitude should always consider a possible absence of medical support and that cardiovascular events may turn into disaster. PMID:20919884

  7. Importance of blood cellular genomic profile in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baba, M Iqbal; Kaul, Deepak; Grover, Anil

    2006-01-01

    Since receptor/transcription factor family especially peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors PPARs (alpha, gamma) and liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha) have been recognized to play crucial role in both lipid metabolism and inflammation, the present study was addressed to explore the interrelationship between blood cellular genomic expression profile, serum lipid levels and severity of coronary heart disease (CHD) in human subjects. Based upon the demographic and laboratory data, the human subjects were divided into 4 groups. Genomic expression profile in the subjects belonging to these groups was determined by measuring the transcriptional expression of genes coding for PPARs (alpha, gamma), CD36, LXRalpha and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in their blood mononuclear cells. This genomic expression profile was correlated with serum lipid profile as well as with the severity of CHD (revealed by coronary angiography coupled with modified Gensini score) using standard statistical analytical methods. Further in vitro and in vivo effect of statins on such genomic profile was also explored. Although genes coding for PPARs (alpha, gamma), CD36, LDLR showed correlation with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis , blood cellular LXRalpha genomic profile showed conspicuous negative correlation with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in subjects with or without hypercholesterolemia. This view was further confirmed in experiments directed to understand the effect of statins on the cellular genomic profile of PPARs (alpha, gamma) and LXRalpha. Based on these reported findings, we propose that blood cellular LXRalpha genomic profile has a protective effect against the development of CHD and hence may be of importance in devising synthetic therapeutic drugs for CHD in future. PMID:16252156

  8. Coronary heart disease: prevalence and dietary sugars in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton-Smith, C; Woodward, M

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to investigate the effects of dietary intakes of different types of sugars (extrinsic, intrinsic, and lactose) and the dietary fat to sugar ratio on prevalent coronary heart disease (CHD). DESIGN--This was a baseline cross sectional survey of CHD risk factors. SETTING--Twenty two Scottish health districts were surveyed between 1984 and 1986. PARTICIPANTS--A total of 10,359 men and women aged 40-59 years were screened as part of the Scottish Heart Health Study, and a further 1267 men and women aged 25-39 and 60-64 years were screened as part of the Scottish MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) Study. The response rates were 74% and 64% respectively. METHODS--Subjects completed a questionnaire which included sociodemographic, health, and food frequency information. Medical history, response to the Rose chest pain questionnaire, and results of a 12 lead ECG recording were used to categorize subjects into CHD diagnosed, previously CHD undiagnosed, or no CHD groups. The chi 2 statistic was used to determine whether the CHD groups differed in their sugar consumption, and multiple logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for other potential coronary risk factors, was used to calculate odds ratios for prevalent CHD by intake fifths of dietary sugars. MAIN RESULTS--Men, but not women, differed in their sugar consumption by CHD group. The odds ratios showed a tendency for a U shaped relationship for extrinsic sugar intake with CHD prevalence, but no significant effect of the fat to sugar ratio (possible marker of obesity) on CHD was seen. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest that neither extrinsic sugar, intrinsic sugar, nor the fat to sugar ratio are significant independent predictors of prevalent CHD in the Scottish population, when the other major risk factors such as cigarette smoking, blood cholesterol concentration, and antioxidant vitamins intake are accounted for. These new data for different sugar types

  9. Economic impact of HIV infection and coronary heart disease in immigrants to Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Zowall, H; Coupal, L; Fraser, R D; Gilmore, N; Deutsch, A; Grover, S A

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the direct health care costs of illnesses associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and of coronary heart disease (CHD) in immigrants to Canada. DESIGN: Comparative cost analysis. PARTICIPANTS: All people who immigrated to Canada in 1988. The numbers with HIV infection and CHD were estimated from country-specific HIV seroprevalence data and national CHD mortality statistics and data from the Framingham study. Health care costs, projected over the 10 years after immigration, were calculated on the basis of data from the Hospital Medical Records Institute and provincial fee schedules. RESULTS: Of the 161,929 immigrants in 1988, 484 were estimated to be HIV positive. The total cost of treatment of HIV-related illnesses from 1989 to 1998 (discounted at 3%) would be $18.5 million: $17.1 million would be spent on the outpatient and inpatient care of the HIV-positive immigrants, $1.0 million on care of the subsequently infected sexual partners and $0.4 million on care of the HIV-positive children born to seropositive immigrant women. In comparison, CHD would develop in 2558 immigrants during the same 10-year period. The total CHD costs would be $21.6 million: $8.4 million would be spent on treating myocardial infarction, $3.2 million on coronary artery bypass grafting, $1.6 million on pacemaker insertion and $8.4 million on treating other CHD events. CONCLUSIONS: The economic impact of HIV infection in immigrants to Canada is similar to that of CHD. This comparison identifies an important shortcoming in current immigration policy: economic considerations can be arbitrarily applied to certain diseases, thereby discriminating against specific groups of immigrants. PMID:1393930

  10. Family coronary heart disease: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Superko, H Robert; Roberts, Robert; Garrett, Brenda; Pendyala, Lakshmana; King, Spencer

    2010-12-01

    A family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) is an accepted risk factor for cardiovascular events and is independent of common CHD risk factors. Advances in the understanding of genetic influences on CHD risk provide the opportunity to apply this knowledge and improve patient care. Utility of inherited cardiovascular risk testing exists by utilizing both phenotypes and genotypes and includes improved CHD risk prediction, selection of the most appropriate treatment, prediction of outcome, and family counseling. The major impediment to widespread clinical adoption of this concept involves un-reimbursed staff time, educational needs, access to a standardized and efficient assessment mechanism, and privacy issues. The link between CHD and inheritance is indisputable and the evidence strong and consistent. For clinicians, the question is how to utilize this information, in an efficient manner, in order to improve patient care and detection of high-risk family members. PMID:21184539

  11. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  12. Guanxin II (II) for the management of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Qin, Feng; Huang, Xi

    2009-12-01

    This article presents an integrated overview of Guanxin II (II) regarding its quality control, pharmacokinetics, pharmacology, clinical studies, adverse events, dosage and administration, and its pharmacoeconomic assessment. It has been demonstrated that Guanxin II has beneficial effects on coronary heart disease (CHD). The underlying mechanism was proved to be its anti-ischemic, anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, antiplatelet and anti-inflammatory effects, and so on. Tanshinol, hydroxysafflor yellow A and ferulic acid might be responsible for the cardioprotective effect of Guanxin II. In terms of acquisition cost, Guanxin II is cheaper than other drugs currently available for CHD. Guanxin II is safe, cheap, and effective in the management of CHD. However, the mechanism of its cardioprotective effects has not been completely understood because of limitations in the research methodologies of Chinese medicine. Further work should be carried out with single components such as tanshinol, hydroxysafflor yellow A and ferulic acid, using modern biochemical and molecular methods. PMID:20082256

  13. Blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Volumetric blood flow velocity was supporting on constant level (1 ml/h). Silicone tube of diameter comparable with coronary arteries diameter was used as vessel model. Cell-cell interactions were studied under glucose and anticoagulants influence. Increased adhesiveness of blood cells to tube walls was revealed in patient with coronary heart disease (CHD) compare to practically healthy persons (PHP). In patients with stable angina pectoris of high functional class and patients with AMI shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were predominating in blood flow structure up to microclots formation. Clotting and erythrocytes aggregation increase as response to glucose solution injection, sharply defined in patients with CHD. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with CHD and PHP. After compare our results with other author's data we can consider that method used in our study is sensible enough to investigate blood flow structure violations in patients with CHD and PHP. Several differences of cell-cell interaction in flow under glucose and anticoagulant influence were found out in patients with CHD and PHP.

  14. [Risk management of coronary heart disease-prevention].

    PubMed

    Dorner, Thomas; Rieder, Anita

    2004-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and is responsible for 45% of deaths in the western world and 24.5% of deaths in the developing countries. In the 21st century these diseases will continue to dominate the disease spectrum and death statistics in both the industrialised and developing worlds. Since 1975 mortality from cardiovascular disease has decreased by about 24 to 28% in most countries. About 45% of this reduction can be attributed to an improvement in treatment of coronary heart disease and around 55% are attributable to a reduction in risk factors, in particular, stopping smoking and control of hypertension. However, especially in the case of ischaemic heart disease, it is not clear whether the reduction in mortality reflects a reduction in incidence of this disease. Due to the aging population and the reduction in age-related mortality, it is expected that the absolute number of people with heart disease will increase. Furthermore, the increase in prevalence of obesity, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes as well as the higher prevalence of female smokers compared with thirty years ago could result in an increase in mortality over the next years and decades. It has been shown that prevention strategies, such as education campaigns aimed at the general public, can potentially greatly contribute to a reduction in incidence of cardiovascular disease at every stage. In order for such campaigns to be effective, it is necessary to understand and reduce the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A large proportion of these risk factors are associated with lifestyle and are therefore modifiable. These modifiable risk factors include smoking, hypertension, poor diet, dyslipidemia, lack of exercise, overweight, adiposity and diabetes mellitus and optimisation of these should be a key aim for all adults. Gender differences also play a role in the incidence and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Incidence of myocardial

  15. Combined Effect of Blood Cadmium and Lead Levels on Coronary Heart Disease Prediction Risk in Korean Men.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye-Min; Cho, Doo-Yeoun; Kim, Min-Young; Yang, Sung-Won; Seo, Young-Seok; Kim, Kyu-Nam

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the combined effects of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) on 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk calculated using the Framingham risk score. The heavy metal data set of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2008-2010) was analyzed. The 10-year CHD risk was significantly associated with the log-transformed blood Cd and Pb levels in Korean men. For the highest quartile of Cd and Pb, the odds ratio (OR) of the intermediate risk and beyond for CHD (10-year risk ≥10%) compared to the lowest quartile was 6.870 (Cd, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.58-10.30) and 3.127 (Pb, 95% CI: 2.09-4.69) after adjusting for confounders, respectively. The adjusted OR of the intermediate risk and beyond for CHD (10-year risk ≥10%) in the fourth quartile of both Cd and Pb was 12.2 (95% CI: 8.0-18.5) compared to the reference group (first and second quartiles of Cd and Pb). However, the association between log-transformed blood Cd and Pb and the 10-year CHD risk was not significant in Korean women. PMID:26586853

  16. Aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease depending on different glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2002-07-01

    The aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease comparing to practically healthy persons and patients with coronary heart disease combined with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus depending on different glucose concentration in unguentums of blood incubates with the help of computer microphotometer - visual analyzer was studied. Two-phase behavior of erythrocytes size changing of practically healthy persons depending on glucose concentration in an incubation medium and instability erythrocyte systems of a whole blood to the influence of high glucose concentration were revealed. Influence of high glucose concentration on aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease and its combination with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was revealed.

  17. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  18. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  19. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  20. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  1. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  2. Association between Six Minute Walk Test and All-Cause Mortality, Coronary Heart Disease-Specific Mortality, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanyar, Ali; Aziz, Michael M; Enright, Paul L; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Boudreau, Robert; Sutton-Tyrell, Kim; Kuller, Lewis; Newman, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between six-minute walk test (6 MWT) performance and all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, and incident coronary heart disease in older adults. Methods We conducted a time-to-event analysis of 1,665 Cardiovascular Health Study participants with a 6 MWT and without prevalent cardiovascular disease. Results During a mean follow-up of 8 years, there were 305 incident coronary heart disease events, 504 deaths of which 100 were coronary heart disease-related deaths. The 6 MWT performance in the shortest two distance quintiles was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (290-338 meters: HR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5; <290 meters: HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0). The adjusted risk of coronary heart disease mortality incident events among those with a 6 MWT <290 meters was not significant. Discussion Performance on the 6 MWT is independently associated with all-cause mortality and is of prognostic utility in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:24695552

  3. Coronary Arteries in Childhood Heart Disease: Implications for Management of Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Baraona, Fernando; Valente, Anne Marie; Porayette, Prashob; Pluchinotta, Francesca Romana; Sanders, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Survival of patients with congenital heart defects has improved dramatically. Many will undergo interventional catheter or surgical procedures later in life. Others will develop atherosclerotic or post-surgical coronary heart disease. The coronary artery anatomy in patients with congenital heart disease differs substantially from that seen in the structurally normal heart. This has implications for diagnostic procedures as well as interventions. The unique epicardial course seen in some defects could impair interpretation of coronary angiograms. Interventional procedures, especially at the base of the heart, risk injuring unusually placed coronary arteries so that coronary artery anatomy must be delineated thoroughly prior to the procedure. In this review, we will describe the variants of coronary artery anatomy and their implications for interventional and surgical treatment and for sudden death during late follow-up in several types of congenital heart defects including: tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries and defects with functionally one ventricle. We will also discuss the coronary abnormalities seen in Kawasaki disease. PMID:24294539

  4. Changes in Heart Rate Variability after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Clinical Importance of These Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lakusic, Nenad; Mahovic, Darija; Cerkez Habek, Jasna; Novak, Miroslav; Cerovec, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability is a physiological feature indicating the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the heart rate. Association of the reduced heart rate variability due to myocardial infarction and the increased postinfarction mortality was first described more than thirty years ago. Many studies have unequivocally demonstrated that coronary artery bypass grafting surgery generally leads to significant reduction in heart rate variability, which is even more pronounced than after myocardial infarction. Pathophysiologically, however, the mechanisms of heart rate variability reduction associated with acute myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass grafting are different. Generally, heart rate variability gradually recovers to the preoperative values within six months of the procedure. Unlike the reduced heart rate variability in patients having sustained myocardial infarction, a finding of reduced heart rate variability after coronary artery bypass surgery is not considered relevant in predicting mortality. Current knowledge about changes in heart rate variability in coronary patients and clinical relevance of such a finding in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are presented. PMID:26078960

  5. Milk and other dietary influences on coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    While dietary links to ischemic heart disease (IHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality have been studied for many years, the correlation has not clearly been resolved, especially for older populations. In this paper, a multi-country statistical approach involving 32 countries is used to find dietary links to IHD and CHD for various age groups aged 35+. For IHD, milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+, while for females aged 35-64, sugar was found to have the highest association. In the case of CHD, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65-74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations, and for females aged 45-64, sugar had the highest association. A number of mechanisms have been proposed in the literature that might explain the milk carbohydrate or non-fat milk association. One of the most prominent theories is that animal proteins contribute to homocysteine (Hcy) production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert Hcy to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with Hcy from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries.

  6. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies. PMID:23834957

  7. Low job control and risk of coronary heart disease in Whitehall II (prospective cohort) study.

    PubMed Central

    Bosma, H.; Marmot, M. G.; Hemingway, H.; Nicholson, A. C.; Brunner, E.; Stansfeld, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between adverse psychosocial characteristics at work and risk of coronary heart disease among male and female civil servants. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study (Whitehall II study). At the baseline examination (1985-8) and twice during follow up a self report questionnaire provided information on psychosocial factors of the work environment and coronary heart disease. Independent assessments of the work environment were obtained from personnel managers at baseline. Mean length of follow up was 5.3 years. SETTING: London based office staff in 20 civil service departments. SUBJECTS: 10,308 civil servants aged 35-55 were examined-6895 men (67%) and 3413 women (33%). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: New cases of angina (Rose questionnaire), severe pain across the chest, diagnosed ischaemic heart disease, and any coronary event. RESULTS: Men and women with low job control, either self reported or independently assessed, had a higher risk of newly reported coronary heart disease during follow up. Job control assessed on two occasions three years apart, although intercorrelated, had cumulative effects on newly reported disease. Subjects with low job control on both occasions had an odds ratio for any subsequent coronary event of 1.93 (95% confidence interval 1.34 to 2.77) compared with subjects with high job control at both occasions. This association could not be explained by employment grade, negative affectivity, or classic coronary risk factors. Job demands and social support at work were not related to the risk of coronary heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: Low control in the work environment is associated with an increased risk of future coronary heart disease among men and women employed in government offices. The cumulative effect of low job control assessed on two occasions indicates that giving employees more variety in tasks and a stronger say in decisions about work may decrease the risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:9055714

  8. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Heran, Balraj S; Chen, Jenny MH; Ebrahim, Shah; Moxham, Tiffany; Oldridge, Neil; Rees, Karen; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) worldwide is one of great concern to patients and healthcare agencies alike. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patients with heart disease to health. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) on mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life of patients with CHD. Search methods RCTs have been identified by searching CENTRAL, HTA, and DARE (using The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009), as well as MEDLINE (1950 to December 2009), EMBASE (1980 to December 2009), CINAHL (1982 to December 2009), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to December 2009). Selection criteria Men and women of all ages who have had myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), or who have angina pectoris or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected and data extracted independently by two reviewers. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results This systematic review has allowed analysis of 47 studies randomising 10,794 patients to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation or usual care. In medium to longer term (i.e. 12 or more months follow-up) exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduced overall and cardiovascular mortality [RR 0.87 (95% CI 0.75, 0.99) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.87), respectively], and hospital admissions [RR 0.69 (95% CI 0.51, 0.93)] in the shorter term (< 12 months follow-up) with no evidence of heterogeneity of effect across trials. Cardiac rehabilitation did not reduce the risk of total MI, CABG or PTCA. Given both the heterogeneity in outcome measures and methods of reporting findings, a meta-analysis was not undertaken for health-related quality of life. In seven out of 10 trials reporting health

  9. Number of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors and Mortality in Patients With First Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Context Few studies have examined the association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors and outcomes of acute myocardial infarction in community practice. Objective To determine the association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors in patients with first myocardial infarction and hospital mortality. Design Observational study from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction, 1994-2006. Patients We examined the presence and absence of 5 major traditional coronary heart disease risk factors (hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and family history of coronary heart disease) and hospital mortality among 542 008 patients with first myocardial infarction and without prior cardiovascular disease. Main Outcome Measure All-cause in-hospital mortality. Results A majority (85.6%) of patients who presented with initial myocardial infarction had at least 1 of the 5 coronary heart disease risk factors, and 14.4% had none of the 5 risk factors. Age varied inversely with the number of coronary heart disease risk factors, from a mean age of 71.5 years with 0 risk factors to 56.7 years with 5 risk factors (P for trend <.001). The total number of in-hospital deaths for all causes was 50 788. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were 14.9%, 10.9%, 7.9%, 5.3%, 4.2%, and 3.6% for patients with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. After adjusting for age and other clinical factors, there was an inverse association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors and hospital mortality adjusted odds ratio (1.54; 95% CI, 1.23-1.94) among individuals with 0 vs 5 risk factors. This association was consistent among several age strata and important patient subgroups. Conclusion Among patients with incident acute myocardial infarction without prior cardiovascular disease, in-hospital mortality was inversely related to the number of coronary heart disease risk factors. PMID:22089719

  10. Effect of Heart Rate and Coronary Calcification on the Diagnostic Accuracy of the Dual-Source CT Coronary Angiography in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingdong; Cheng, Yuntao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Tang, Yuansheng; Wang, Yong; Xu, Fayun

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography, with a particular focus on the effect of heart rate and calcifications. Materials and Methods One hundred and nine patients with suspected coronary disease were divided into 2 groups according to a mean heart rate (< 70 bpm and ≥ 70 bpm) and into 3 groups according to the mean Agatston calcium scores (≤ 100, 101-400, and > 400). Next, the effect of heart rate and calcification on the accuracy of coronary artery stenosis detection was analyzed by using an invasive coronary angiography as a reference standard. Coronary segments of less than 1.5 mm in diameter in an American Heart Association (AHA) 15-segment model were independently assessed. Results The mean heart rate during the scan was 71.8 bpm, whereas the mean Agatston score was 226.5. Of the 1,588 segments examined, 1,533 (97%) were assessable. A total of 17 patients had calcium scores above 400 Agatston U, whereas 50 had heart rates ≥ 70 bpm. Overall the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for significant stenoses were: 95%, 91%, 65%, and 99% (by segment), respectively and 97%, 90%, 81%, and 91% (by artery), respectively (n = 475). Heart rate showed no significant impact on lesion detection; however, vessel calcification did show a significant impact on accuracy of assessment for coronary segments. The specificity, PPV and accuracy were 96%, 80%, and 96% (by segment), respectively for an Agatston score less than 100% and 99%, 96% and 98% (by artery). For an Agatston score of greater to or equal to 400 the specificity, PPV and accuracy were reduced to 79%, 55%, and 83% (by segment), respectively and to 79%, 69%, and 85% (by artery), respectively. Conclusion The DSCT provides a high rate of accuracy for the detection of significant coronary artery disease, even in patients with high heart rates and evidence of coronary calcification

  11. Wine drinking is associated with increased heart rate variability in women with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Janszky, I; Ericson, M; Blom, M; Georgiades, A; Magnusson, J-O; Alinagizadeh, H; Ahnve, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that alcohol consumption is positively related to heart rate variability (HRV) in women with coronary heart disease (CHD) and therefore that cardiac autonomic activity is potentially implicated in the mediation of the favourable effects of moderate drinking. Design, settings, and patients: Cross sectional study of female patients who survived hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction or underwent a revascularisation procedure, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or coronary artery bypass grafting. Main outcome measures: Ambulatory 24 hour ECG was recorded during normal activities. The mean of the standard deviations of all normal to normal intervals for all five minute segments of the entire recording (SDNNI) and the following frequency domain parameters were assessed: total power, high frequency power, low frequency power, and very low frequency power. A standardised questionnaire evaluated self reported consumption of individual alcoholic beverage types: beer, wine, and spirits. Other clinical characteristics, such as age, body mass index, smoking habits, history of diabetes mellitus, menopausal status, educational status, and treatment, were also assessed. Results: Wine intake was associated with increased HRV in both time and frequency domains independently of other clinical covariates (for example, ln SDNNI was 3.89 among wine drinkers v 3.59 among wine non-drinkers in the multivariate model; p  =  0.014). In contrast, consumption of beer and spirits and the total amount of alcohol consumed did not relate significantly to any of the HRV parameters. Conclusion: Intake of wine, but not of spirits or beer, is positively and independently associated with HRV in women with CHD. These results may contribute to the understanding of the complex relation between alcohol consumption and CHD. PMID:15710709

  12. Hearts Too Good to Die: An Evaluation of Coronary Care

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Anthony S.

    1984-01-01

    Intensive coronary care has become the standard treatment for acute myocardial infarction, and no self-respecting hospital would be without its coronary care unit. However, literature review to evaluate the contribution of coronary care shows that its promise may have been overstated and its benefits overestimated. PMID:21279061

  13. [Mechanisms of coronary flow recovery in the isolated heart during reperfusion with cardioprotective liposomal emoxipin form].

    PubMed

    Toropova, Ia G; Antonova, L V; Mukhamadiiarov, R A; Bogdanov, M V; Golovkin, A S

    2013-06-01

    In the experiments on the isolated perfused rat heart the effects of liposomes, containing different concentrations (0.25 and 0.1 mg/mL) of emoxipine, on coronary flow restoration after total normothermic ischemia and reperfusion were studied. The coronary flow, levels of nitrates and nitrites in the outflowing perfusate from heart and level of free radical processes were assessed, The obtained results showed that 0.1 mg/mL liposomal emoxipine provide with stronger increase coronary flow during reperfusion mostly due to the increase concentration of endothelial nitric oxide compare with treatments at 0.25 mg/mL. PMID:24459885

  14. Triple coronary artery revascularization on the stabilized beating heart: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Cartier, Raymond; Hébert, Yves; Blain, Robert; Tremblay, Normand; Desjardins, Jacques; Leclerc, Yves

    1998-01-01

    Objective To decrease health costs and morbidity related to extracorporeal circulation, surgeons have modified the coronary artery bypass (CAB) technique so that it can be completed without the use of extra-corporeal circulation. This study summarizes initial experience with direct coronary artery revascularization on the beating heart using a coronary stabilizer. Design A case series. Setting The Montreal Heart Institute, a university-affiliated centre, specializing in the treatment of cardiac illnesses. Patients Ten patients underwent CAB by this technique. They presented with double or triple coronary artery disease with no intramyocardial, heavily calcified, diffused atheromatous coronary vessels, or left main coronary disease. Intervention CAB grafting in the beating heart. The anterior wall was grafted in all patients, the inferior wall in 7 and the posterior wall in 7. Main outcome measures Patient survival and graft patency. Results One patient died of multiple organ failure not related to the grafting technique itself, and 1 patient suffered a non-Q myocardial infarction. Early coronary angiography performed on 8 patients showed 100% graft patency, most with excellent distal runoff (21/22 grafts). Conclusion In patients with adequate anatomy, performance of CAB without extracorporeal circulation can achieve excellent early results provided there is appropriate mechanical stabilization of the beating heart. PMID:9711161

  15. [Induction of myocardial neoangiogenesis by human growth factors. A new therapeutic approach in coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Stegmann, T J; Hoppert, T; Schneider, A; Gemeinhardt, S; Köcher, M; Ibing, R; Strupp, G

    2000-09-01

    Currently available approaches for treating human coronary heart disease aim to relieve symptoms and the risk of myocardial infarction either by reducing myocardial oxygen demand, preventing further disease progression, restoring coronary blood flow pharmacologically or mechanically, or bypassing the stenotic lesions and obstructed coronary artery segments. Gene therapy, especially using angiogenic growth factors, has emerged recently as a potential new treatment for cardiovascular disease. Following extensive experimental research on angiogenic growth factors, the first clinical studies on patients with coronary heart disease and peripheral vascular lesions have been performed. The polypeptides fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) appear to be particularly effective in initiating neovascularization (neoangiogenesis) in hypoxic or ischemic tissues. The first clinical study on patients with coronary heart disease treated by local intramyocardial injection of FGF-1 showed a 3-fold increase of capillary density mediated by the growth factor. Also, angiogenic growth factor injection intramyocardially as sole therapy for end-stage coronary disease showed an improvement of myocardial perfusion in the target areas as well as a reduction of symptoms and an increase in working capacity. Angiogenic therapy of the human myocardium introduces a new modality of treatment for coronary heart disease in terms of regulation of blood vessel growth. Beyond drug therapy, angioplasty and bypass surgery, this new approach may evolve into a fourth principle of treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:11076317

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of coronary arteries for open-heart surgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Roderick S.; Gladysz, D.; Brown, Derek W.; Higginson, Lyall A. J.

    1991-07-01

    A technique utilizing laser induced fluorescence has been developed to obtain direct real-time imaging of the coronary artery network for open heart surgery applications. Both excimer pumped dye and cw argon-ion laser radiation transmitted through a fused silica fiber were used as laser sources to irradiate swine, bovine, and human cadaver hearts whose coronary arteries had been injected with strongly fluorescent dyes. The laser induces fluorescence originating from within the coronary arteries and detected by the surgeon's eye, allows the entire coronary network to be directly viewed. A comparison between laser induced fluorescence and the use of direct visual inspection of arteries following injection of the dye Cardio-Green(R) as well as conventional thermal imaging is presented. The limitations imposed on each technique by layers of fat on top of the coronary arteries are also described. The possibility of using these techniques to detect mechanical or laser beam perforations during laser endarterectomy procedures is discussed.

  17. The potential protective effects of taurine on coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Oktawia P; Koenig, Karen L; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2010-01-01

    In humans, taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is mainly obtained from diet. Despite the fact that the health effects of taurine are largely unknown, taurine has become a popular supplement and ingredient in energy drinks in recent years. Evidence from mechanistic and animal studies has shown that the main biological actions of taurine include its ability to conjugate bile acids, regulate blood pressure (BP), and act as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. These actions suggest that high levels of taurine may be protective against coronary heart disease (CHD). However, data from epidemiologic and intervention studies in humans are limited. We review what is known about taurine's metabolism, its transportation in the body, its food sources, and evidence of its effect on cardiovascular health from in vitro, animal, and epidemiologic studies. We also discuss shortcomings of the human studies that need to be addressed in the future. The identification of taurine as a preventive factor for CHD may be of great public health importance. PMID:19592001

  18. Trends in Coronary Heart Disease Epidemiology in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajeev; Mohan, Indu; Narula, Jagat

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary heart disease (CHD), are epidemic in India. The Registrar General of India reported that CHD led to 17% of total deaths and 26% of adult deaths in 2001-2003, which increased to 23% of total and 32% of adult deaths in 2010-2013. The World Health Organization (WHO) and Global Burden of Disease Study also have highlighted increasing trends in years of life lost (YLLs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from CHD in India. In India, studies have reported increasing CHD prevalence over the last 60 years, from 1% to 9%-10% in urban populations and <1% to 4%-6% in rural populations. Using more stringent criteria (clinical ± Q waves), the prevalence varies from 1%-2% in rural populations and 2%-4% in urban populations. This may be a more realistic prevalence of CHD in India. Case-control studies have reported that important risk factors for CHD in India are dyslipidemias, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, abdominal obesity, psychosocial stress, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity. Suitable preventive strategies are required to combat this epidemic. PMID:27372534

  19. Study on cholesteryl ester transfer activity in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fujinuma, Y; Tanaka, A; Maezawa, H

    1991-09-01

    The net cholesterol transfer activity from high density lipoprotein (HDL) to low density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in the patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) to examine its effect on the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Furthermore, in the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia (more than 60 mg/dl), the HDL particle size was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. A significant cholesteryl ester transfer activity (P less than 0.02) was noted in the CHD patients with low HDL cholesterolemia (less than 60 mg/dl). The rate of cholesteryl ester transfer activity (cholesteryl ester transfer activity/hour) inversely correlated with the serum HDL cholesterol value (r = -0.483, P = 0.096) in the patients with CHD. These results suggest that an increase of CETA caused a low HDL cholesterol value in the CHD patients with low HDL cholesterolemia and it may have the risk of causing CHD. However, an increase of the CETA was not found in the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia compared to the normal subjects, the HDL particle size being significantly greater than that in the normal subjects. In the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia, the large size of HDL may have the risk of causing CHD. PMID:1934199

  20. Epidemiological basis for the prevention of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Marmot, M. G.

    1979-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have laid the basis for a preventive approach to coronary heart disease (CHD). On balance, present evidence indicates that the following should form the basis of a preventive programme: low-fat diet, cessation of smoking, and control of blood pressure. Other factors likely to produce a beneficial effect on CHD occurrence include reduction of obesity and increased physical activity. Although psychosocial factors are most likely to be causally related to CHD, it is not possible at present to provide clear guidelines as to their role in a preventive programme. Trials are being conducted to investigate the possibility of preventing CHD by a variety of approaches: a doctor-centred approach or health education in certain sectors of a community or in whole communities. These trials have shown that it is possible to achieve behavioural changes and a reduction in the levels of risk factors in a proportion of the participants. It is not yet clear to what extent these changes in levels of risk factors in middle-aged people will lead to a reduction in the incidence of CHD. It can be calculated, however, that the greatest benefit is likely to come from approaches to prevention that involve the whole community, rather than only high-risk groups. PMID:314348

  1. Spirituality and Negative Emotions in Individuals With Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ginting, Henndy; Näring, Gérard; Kwakkenbos, Linda; Becker, Eni S

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) experience disease-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anger. Spirituality may be helpful to cope with these negative emotions. Research findings on the role of spirituality in dealing with negative emotions are inconsistent. In this study, we examined the associations between 7 dimensions of spirituality (ie, meaningfulness, trust, acceptance, caring for others, connectedness with nature, transcendent experiences, and spiritual activities) and negative emotions among individuals with CHD in Indonesia, controlling for perceived social support as well as demographic and clinical characteristics. In total, 293 individuals with CHD were recruited from the 3 largest hospitals in Bandung, Indonesia. They completed the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Trait Anxiety Scale of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Multidimensional Anger Inventory, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated that a higher overall level of spirituality was associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms, less anxiety, and less anger. Specifically, a higher level of trust was significantly associated with both less depressive symptoms and less anxiety. Higher levels of caring for others and spiritual activities were associated with less anxiety, and a higher level of connectedness with nature was associated with less anger. These findings underscore the importance of specific dimensions of spirituality as a potentially independent buffer against negative emotions in individuals with CHD. PMID:25350528

  2. Aspirin as Primary Prevention of Acute Coronary Heart Disease Events

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Stephen P.; Hovater, Martha; Brown, Todd M.; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Aspirin for primary prophylaxis is controversial. This study evaluated associations between prophylactic aspirin use and incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods and Results The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study was accessed for aspirin use examining black and white hazards for incident CHD, for men and women, each adjusting incrementally for sampling, sociodemographics, and CHD risk factors. Stratified models examined risks across strata of the Framingham risk score, and all-cause mortality. 23,949 participants (mean 64 yo), had 503 incident events over a 3.5 year follow-up. Prophylactic aspirin use was not associated with incident acute CHD, HR 1.05 (95% CI 0.86, 1.29). Modeling had little impact on the HR (1.09 {95% CI 0.89, 1.33) nor did the addition of risk factors (HR 1.00 {95% CI 0.81, 1.23). Aspirin use was not associated with incident CHD for any Framingham risk level. Findings were similar when including all aspirin users (not just those taking aspirin prophylactically), and when examining associations with all-cause mortality. There was no excess hospitalized bleeding in the aspirin users. Conclusion Aspirin was not associated with lower risk for incident acute CHD overall, or within race, gender, or Framingham Risk Score. PMID:26413491

  3. Helicobacter pylori vs coronary heart disease - searching for connections

    PubMed Central

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Gajewski, Adrian; Rudnicka, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discussed the findings and concepts underlying the potential role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections in the initiation, development or persistence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). This Gram-negative bacterium was described by Marshall and Warren in 1984. The majority of infected subjects carries and transmits H. pylori with no symptoms; however, in some individuals these bacteria may cause peptic ulcers, and even gastric cancers. The widespread prevalence of H. pylori infections and the fact that frequently they remain asymptomatic may suggest that, similarly to intestinal microflora, H. pylori may deliver antigens that stimulate not only local, but also systemic inflammatory response. Recently, possible association between H. pylori infection and extragastric disorders has been suggested. Knowledge on the etiology of atherosclerosis together with current findings in the area of H. pylori infections constitute the background for the newly proposed hypothesis that those two processes may be related. Many research studies confirm the indirect association between the prevalence of H. pylori and the occurrence of CHD. According to majority of findings the involvement of H. pylori in this process is based on the chronic inflammation which might facilitate the CHD-related pathologies. It needs to be elucidated, if the infection initiate or just accelerate the formation of atheromatous plaque. PMID:25914788

  4. Catch-up growth in childhood and death from coronary heart disease: longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, J G; Forsén, T; Tuomilehto, J; Winter, P D; Osmond, C; Barker, D J P

    1999-01-01

    Objective To examine whether catch-up growth during childhood modifies the increased risk of death from coronary heart disease that is associated with reduced intrauterine growth. Design Follow up study of men whose body size at birth was recorded and who had an average of 10 measurements taken of their height and weight through childhood. Setting Helsinki, Finland. Subjects 3641 men who were born in Helsinki University Central Hospital during 1924-33 and who went to school in Helsinki. Main outcome measures Hazard ratios for death from coronary heart disease. Results Death from coronary heart disease was associated with low birth weight and, more strongly, with a low ponderal index at birth. Men who died from coronary heart disease had an above average body mass index at all ages from 7 to 15 years. In a simultaneous regression the hazard ratio for death from the disease increased by 14% (95% confidence interval 8% to 19%; P<0.0001) for each unit (kg/m3) decrease in ponderal index at birth and by 22% (10% to 36%; P=0.0001) for each unit (kg/m2) increase in body mass index at 11 years of age. Body mass index in childhood was strongly related to maternal body mass index, which in turn was related to coronary heart disease. The extent of crowding in the home during childhood, although related to body mass index in childhood, was not related to later coronary heart disease. Conclusion The highest death rates from coronary heart disease occurred in boys who were thin at birth but whose weight caught up so that they had an average or above average body mass from the age of 7 years. Death from coronary heart disease may be a consequence of poor prenatal nutrition followed by improved postnatal nutrition. Key messagesMen who had low birth weight or were thin at birth have high death rates from coronary heart diseaseDeath rates are even higher if weight “catches up” in early childhoodDeath from coronary heart disease may be a consequence of prenatal undernutrition

  5. Abnormalities of capillary microarchitecture in a rat model of coronary ischemic congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiqiu; Yaniz-Galende, Elisa; Kagan, Heather J.; Liang, Lifan; Hekmaty, Saboor; Giannarelli, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the role of capillary disorder in coronary ischemic congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF was induced in rats by aortic banding plus ischemia-reperfusion followed by aortic debanding. Coronary arteries were perfused with plastic polymer containing fluorescent dye. Multiple fluorescent images of casted heart sections and scanning electric microscope of coronary vessels were obtained to characterize changes in the heart. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. Stenosis was found in all levels of the coronary arteries in CHF. Coronary vasculature volume and capillary density in remote myocardium were significantly increased in CHF compared with control. This occurred largely in microvessels with a diameter of ≤3 μm. Capillaries in CHF had a tortuous structure, while normal capillaries were linear. Capillaries in CHF had inconsistent diameters, with assortments of narrowed and bulged segments. Their surfaces appeared rough, potentially indicating endothelial dysfunction in CHF. Segments of main capillaries between bifurcations were significantly shorter in length in CHF than in control. Transiently increasing preload by injecting 50 μl of 30% NaCl demonstrated that the CHF heart had lower functional reserve; this may be associated with congestion in coronary microcirculation. Ischemic coronary vascular disorder is not limited to the main coronary arteries, as it occurs in arterioles and capillaries. Capillary disorder in CHF included stenosis, deformed structure, proliferation, and roughened surfaces. This disorder in the coronary artery architecture may contribute to the reduction in myocyte contractility in the setting of heart failure. PMID:25659485

  6. Self-management of coronary heart disease in older patients after elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dawkes, Susan; Smith, Graeme D; Elliott, Lawrie; Raeside, Robert; Donaldson, Jayne H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore how older patients self-manage their coronary heart disease (CHD) after undergoing elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Methods This mixed methods study used a sequential, explanatory design and recruited a convenience sample of patients (n = 93) approximately three months after elective PTCA. The study was conducted in two phases. Quantitative data collected in Phase 1 by means of a self-administered survey were subject to univariate and bivariate analysis. Phase 1 findings informed the purposive sampling for Phase 2 where ten participants were selected from the original sample for an in-depth interview. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. This paper will primarily report the findings from a sub-group of older participants (n = 47) classified as 65 years of age or older. Results 78.7% (n = 37) of participants indicated that they would manage recurring angina symptoms by taking glyceryl trinitrate and 34% (n = 16) thought that resting would help. Regardless of the duration or severity of the symptoms 40.5% (n = 19) would call their general practitioner or an emergency ambulance for assistance during any recurrence of angina symptoms. Older participants weighed less (P = 0.02) and smoked less (P = 0.01) than their younger counterparts in the study. Age did not seem to affect PTCA patients' likelihood of altering dietary factors such as fruit, vegetable and saturated fat consumption (P = 0.237). Conclusions The findings suggest that older people in the study were less likely to know how to correctly manage any recurring angina symptoms than their younger counterparts but they had fewer risk factors for CHD. Age was not a factor that influenced participants' likelihood to alter lifestyle factors. PMID:27594866

  7. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  8. A Group Therapy Approach to the Treatment of Coronary Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Grace S.

    This study investigates the coronary heart patient's "here and now" feelings and attitudes toward his illness prior to and following group treatment. This study also attempts to investigate the change in a patient's acceptance of his heart condition. To measure the change in general health level, a questionnaire was administered to eight patients…

  9. Depression and Heart Rate Variability in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gehi, Anil; Mangano, Dennis; Pipkin, Sharon; Browner, Warren S.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Depression is associated with low heart rate variability (HRV) in patients following myocardial infarction, suggesting that alterations in the autonomic nervous system may contribute to the adverse cardiac outcomes associated with depression. Whether depression is associated with low HRV in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) is not known. Objective To examine the association between major depression and 24-hour HRV in patients with stable CHD. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study of 873 outpatients with stable CHD recruited from outpatient clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. Main Outcome Measures Major depression was assessed using the Computerized National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Heart rate variability was measured by 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography. Results A total of 195 participants (22%) had major depression. Overall, we observed no association between depression and HRV as measured by time domain or frequency domain variables. Mean HRV was similar in participants with and without depression (all P values >.10), and participants with depression were no more likely than those without depression to have low HRV (all P values >.10). Conclusions We found no evidence of an association between depression and HRV in 873 outpatients with stable CHD. These findings raise questions about the potential role of HRV in the association between depression and cardiovascular disease. PMID:15939843

  10. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  11. The significance of coronary reserve in clinical heart disease.

    PubMed

    Strauer, B E

    1990-03-15

    The clinical syndrome "coronary insufficiency with normal coronary arteriogram" is found in approximately 10% to 20% of patients with exercise-induced coronary insufficiency. In most of these cases, disturbances of the coronary microcirculation are present. They can appear in vascular diseases (arterial hypertension, systemic immunopathies, immune complex vasculitis), in rheologic diseases (paraproteinemia, hyperlipoproteinemia, polyglobulia) and in disturbances of transport and diffusion of oxygen (carbon monoxide intoxication, methemoglobinemia). The clinical diagnosis is based on the usual diagnostic procedures (electrocardiogram, exercise electrocardiogram, responsiveness to nitroglycerin), as well as on newer functionally oriented diagnostic procedures (determinations of coronary blood flow and coronary vascular reserve, production of lactate, serologic findings, histology and immune histology of peripheral arteries, measurements of viscosities in both plasma and blood). Many clinically relevant disturbances in the coronary microcirculation can thus be detected and treated on a rational basis by management of the underlying main disease, that is, by treatment of the vascular, rheologic and metabolic disorders. Persistent angina pectoris in the presence of a normal coronary arteriogram does not represent an end to coronary diagnostic procedures, but introduces the clinical task of using all diagnostic possibilities to enable functional and therapeutic assessment of the coronary microcirculation. PMID:2307786

  12. Dual Prosthetic Heart Valve Presented with Chest Pain: A Case Report of Coronary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Sarawut

    2015-01-01

    Coronary embolism from a prosthetic heart valve is a rare but remarkable cause of acute coronary syndrome. There is no definite management of an entity like this. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male with a history of rheumatic heart disease with dual prosthetic heart valve and atrial fibrillation who developed chest pain from acute myocardial infarction. The laboratory values showed inadequate anticoagulation. Cardiac catheterization and thrombectomy with the aspiration catheter were chosen to be the treatment for this patient, and it showed satisfactory outcome. PMID:25785203

  13. Psychological risk factors related to coronary heart disease. Prospective studies among policemen in Helsinki.

    PubMed

    Nirkko, O; Lauroma, M; Siltanen, P; Tuominen, H; Vanhala, K

    1982-01-01

    Psychological investigations carried out on 1326 Helsinki policemen showed that individuals with electrocardiogram (ECG) signs of coronary heart disease (CHD), and those showing symptoms, were more anxious, aggressive, defensive and inhibited than those free from signs or symptoms. It is suggested that the poor prognosis associated with angina pectoris may be related to the psychological characteristics of the patients who suffer from it. Studies of 5- and 10-year prospective data showed that subjects dying from myocardial infarction differed from survivors on six significant psychological characteristics, including optimism, inhibition and superego strength. Multiple logistic analysis showed an association of lowered self-esteem and high somatization with myocardial infarction. A particular statistical analysis ("ridit analysis") revealed the existence of 4 variables (inhibition, neuroticism, differentiation and certainty) which distinguished to some degree with different manifestations of CHD. The nature of these variables and the correlations involved are discussed. It is concluded that psychological variables have some predictive power not only for the risk of CHD, but also for the risk of clinically different CHD events. PMID:6958183

  14. Networks in Coronary Heart Disease Genetics As a Step towards Systems Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Drenos, Fotios; Grossi, Enzo; Buscema, Massimo; Humphries, Steve E.

    2015-01-01

    We present the use of innovative machine learning techniques in the understanding of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) through intermediate traits, as an example of the use of this class of methods as a first step towards a systems epidemiology approach of complex diseases genetics. Using a sample of 252 middle-aged men, of which 102 had a CHD event in 10 years follow-up, we applied machine learning algorithms for the selection of CHD intermediate phenotypes, established markers, risk factors, and their previously associated genetic polymorphisms, and constructed a map of relationships between the selected variables. Of the 52 variables considered, 42 were retained after selection of the most informative variables for CHD. The constructed map suggests that most selected variables were related to CHD in a context dependent manner while only a small number of variables were related to a specific outcome. We also observed that loss of complexity in the network was linked to a future CHD event. We propose that novel, non-linear, and integrative epidemiological approaches are required to combine all available information, in order to truly translate the new advances in medical sciences to gains in preventive measures and patients care. PMID:25951190

  15. Disclosing genetic risk for coronary heart disease: effects on perceived personal control and genetic counseling satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C L; Jouni, H; Kruisselbrink, T M; Austin, E E; Christensen, K D; Green, R C; Kullo, I J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether disclosure of coronary heart disease (CHD) genetic risk influences perceived personal control (PPC) and genetic counseling satisfaction (GCS). Participants (n = 207, age: 45-65 years) were randomized to receive estimated 10-year risk of CHD based on a conventional risk score (CRS) with or without a genetic risk score (GRS). Risk estimates were disclosed by a genetic counselor who also reviewed how GRS altered risk in those randomized to CRS+GRS. Each participant subsequently met with a physician and then completed surveys to assess PPC and GCS. Participants who received CRS+GRS had higher PPC than those who received CRS alone although the absolute difference was small (25.2 ± 2.7 vs 24.1 ± 3.8, p = 0.04). A greater proportion of CRS+GRS participants had higher GCS scores (17.3 ± 5.3 vs 15.9 ± 6.3, p = 0.06). In the CRS+GRS group, PPC and GCS scores were not correlated with GRS. Within both groups, PPC and GCS scores were similar in patients with or without family history (p = NS). In conclusion, patients who received their genetic risk of CHD had higher PPC and tended to have higher GCS. Our findings suggest that disclosure of genetic risk of CHD together with conventional risk estimates is appreciated by patients. Whether this results in improved outcomes needs additional investigation. PMID:25708169

  16. Anomalies of left coronary artery origin affecting surgical repair of hypoplastic left heart syndrome and Shone complex.

    PubMed

    Saroli, Tania; Gelehrter, Sarah; Gomez-Fifer, Carlen A; van der Velde, Mary E; Bove, Edward L; Ensing, Gregory J

    2008-08-01

    There has traditionally been less concern regarding coronary anomalies with left-sided congenital heart lesions such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS)or Shone complex than with other lesions. However, coronary anomalies in this setting can profoundly affect surgical intervention, particularly when surgical repair involves the ascending aorta. We describe four patients with congenital left-sided heart lesions in which left coronary artery (LCA) anomalies substantially affected intervention and outcome. In the first two cases, the coronary anomalies were not identified prospectively and resulted in surgical injury directly to the coronary or to its surrounding region. In the latter two cases, successful identification of the coronary anomaly preoperatively allowed for modification of surgical technique and/or intervention. We conclude that detailed coronary artery assessment should be part of the routine echocardiographic evaluation of congenital left-sided heart lesions that require surgery. PMID:18445061

  17. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  18. Effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolong; Lu, Yan; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective is to explore the effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. Methods: 45 healthy male Wistar rats of clean grade were selected and divided into treatment group, model control group and blank control group. The rats in the treatment group and model control group received high-fat diet for 12 weeks and intraperitoneal injection of VD3 to establish rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. After modeling, the rats in the treatment group received gavage of 100 mg/(kg·d) curcimin, and the rats in the model control group and blank control group received gavage of 5 ml/(kg·d) distilled water, the intervention time was 4 weeks. After intervention, the rats were killed, and the hearts were dissected to obtain the samples of coronary artery. After embedding and frozen section, immunofluorescence method was used to detect the change of endarterium permeability in 3 groups, Western blot was used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and CD40L in coronary artery tissue, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and C reaction protein (CRP). Results: After modeling, compared with the blank control group, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterin (LDL-c) in the treatment group and model control group were significantly higher (P<0.05), however, high density lipoprotein cholesterin (HDL-c) was significantly lower. The pathological sections showed that there was lipidosis in rat coronary artery in treatment group and model control group, indicating that the modeling was successful. Immunofluorescence showed that there was only a little fluorochrome permeability in artery in blank control group, there was some fluorochrome permeability in artery in the treatment group and there was a lot of fluorochrome permeability in artery in the model

  19. Role of Adiponectin in Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Debbie A.; de Oliveira, Cesar; White, Jon; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Barros, Aluísio J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Hypoadiponectinemia correlates with several coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. However, it is unknown whether adiponectin is causally implicated in CHD pathogenesis. Objective: We aimed to investigate the causal effect of adiponectin on CHD risk. Methods and Results: We undertook a Mendelian randomization study using data from genome-wide association studies consortia. We used the ADIPOGen consortium to identify genetic variants that could be used as instrumental variables for the effect of adiponectin. Data on the association of these genetic variants with CHD risk were obtained from CARDIoGRAM (22 233 CHD cases and 64 762 controls of European ancestry) and from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Metabochip (63 746 cases and 130 681 controls; ≈ 91% of European ancestry) consortia. Data on the association of genetic variants with adiponectin levels and with CHD were combined to estimate the influence of blood adiponectin on CHD risk. In the conservative approach (restricted to using variants within the adiponectin gene as instrumental variables), each 1 U increase in log blood adiponectin concentration was associated with an odds ratio for CHD of 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.68–1.01) in CARDIoGRAM and 0.97 (95% confidence interval, 0.84–1.12) in CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Metabochip. Findings from the liberal approach (including variants in any locus across the genome) indicated a protective effect of adiponectin that was attenuated to the null after adjustment for known CHD predictors. Conclusions: Overall, our findings do not support a causal role of adiponectin levels in CHD pathogenesis. PMID:27252388

  20. Population Assessment of Future Trajectories in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Thorolfsdottir, Rosa Björk; Aspelund, Thor; Capewell, Simon; Critchley, Julia; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Andersen, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have been decreasing in Iceland since the 1980s, largely reflecting improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to predict future CHD mortality in Iceland based on potential risk factor trends. Methods and findings The previously validated IMPACT model was used to predict changes in CHD mortality between 2010 and 2040 among the projected population of Iceland aged 25–74. Calculations were based on combining: i) data on population numbers and projections (Statistics Iceland), ii) population risk factor levels and projections (Refine Reykjavik study), and iii) effectiveness of specific risk factor reductions (published meta-analyses). Projections for three contrasting scenarios were compared: 1) If the historical risk factor trends of past 30 years were to continue, the declining death rates of past decades would level off, reflecting population ageing. 2) If recent trends in risk factors (past 5 years) continue, this would result in a death rate increasing from 49 to 70 per 100,000. This would reflect a recent plateau in previously falling cholesterol levels and recent rapid increases in obesity and diabetes prevalence. 3) Assuming that in 2040 the entire population enjoys optimal risk factor levels observed in low risk cohorts, this would prevent almost all premature CHD deaths before 2040. Conclusions The potential increase in CHD deaths with recent trends in risk factor levels is alarming both for Iceland and probably for comparable Western populations. However, our results show considerable room for reducing CHD mortality. Achieving the best case scenario could eradicate premature CHD deaths by 2040. Public health policy interventions based on these predictions may provide a cost effective means of reducing CHD mortality in the future. PMID:24465713

  1. Is the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease relationship modified by activity level in older persons?

    PubMed

    Harris, T B; Makuc, D M; Kleinman, J C; Gillum, R F; Curb, J D; Schatzkin, A; Feldman, J J

    1991-08-01

    Although coronary heart disease remains a leading cause of death and disability in old age, the relationship of serum cholesterol level to risk of coronary heart disease in old age is controversial. Data for 2,388 white persons aged 65-74 who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (NHEFS) were examined to determine the relationship of serum cholesterol level to coronary heart disease incidence and whether activity level would modify this relationship. While there was no overall relationship between serum cholesterol level and coronary heart disease risk in either men or women, the relationship between serum cholesterol level and coronary heart disease differed within activity groups. For persons who were more active, serum cholesterol level was associated with a graded increase in risk of coronary heart disease, from 1.3 (95% CI 0.7, 2.3) in those with serum cholesterol level of 4.7-5.1 to 1.7 in those with serum cholesterol level of 6.2 mmol/L or more (95% CI 1.0, 2.7), when compared with those with serum cholesterol level below 4.7. For the least active persons, all levels of cholesterol were associated with a significant inverse relative risk, including cholesterol of 6.2 mmol/L or more (Relative risk = 0.4 (95% CI 0.2, 0.7]. These data suggest that factors such as activity level may modify the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association in old age. The serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association in more active older persons resembles that seen in younger populations, whereas the association in less active persons is that of serum cholesterol level and risk of cancer or death. The modification of the serum cholesterol-coronary heart disease association by activity level may have implications for appropriate clinical management as well as appropriate design of research studies of this association. PMID:2071804

  2. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rehabilitation Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Surgery Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... include lifestyle changes, medicines, and a procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as coronary angioplasty. PCI is ...

  3. Quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease after myocardial infarction and with ischemic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Bellwon, Jerzy; Höfer, Stefan; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Gruchała, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Quality of life measures are useful when interventions or treatments are indicated for several reasons such as improvement of physical functioning, pain relief, to estimate the effectiveness of therapies or to predict mortality. The aim of the current study was to describe quality of life in patients with stable coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and heart failure and to evaluate the relationship between depression and health-related quality of life. Material and methods Patients after STEMI, with stable coronary artery disease, and heart failure (n = 332) completed the MacNew Heart Disease Health-related Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results Patients with myocardial infarction had significantly higher scores than patients with stable coronary artery disease or heart failure on the MacNew global scale (p < 0.001) and the physical (p < 0.001), emotional (p < 0.001) and social (p < 0.001) subscales. The anxiety scores were significantly higher in the group of patients with stable coronary artery disease than in patients with myocardial infarction (p < 0.05). The depression scores were significantly higher in patients with heart failure (p < 0.01). Conclusions In patients with stable CAD, anxiety correlated mainly with symptoms, i.e. angina, than with the history of MI. Patients with symptoms of angina react to the illness with anxiety more than depression, whereas patients with heart failure with dyspnea react to the illness with depressive symptoms more than anxiety. In patients after MI and with stable CAD, cognitive-behavioral techniques could be useful to quickly reduce the level of anxiety, while patients with heart failure require long-term support therapy to reduce the risk of depressive symptoms. PMID:27186176

  4. Association of serum SPARC level with severity of coronary artery lesion in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Song, Hai-Yan; An, Meng-Meng; Zhu, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association of serum SPARC level with the severity of coronary artery lesion in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: 120 patients with type 2 diabetic patients were the subjects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect levels of serum SPARC and Gensini score was used to assess extent of coronary artery lesions. The patients were divided into 4 groups: A group was the healthy control group with 40 patients. According to angiography and the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria for diabetes the rest were divided into B, C, D group: there were 40 cases in group B (simple type 2 diabetes mellitus group), 40 cases were in group C (simple CHD group), and 40 cases were in D group (type 2 diabetes combined with coronary heart disease group). Results: Compared with that in group A, the serum SPARC level in group B, C and D increased significantly (4.22±1.19) μg/L, (3.71±1.05) μg/L and (5.96±1.40) μg/L vs (3.60±0.40) μg/L (P<0.05 ). Moreover, the serum SPARC level in group D was the highest (P<0.05). Serum SPARC level, insulin resistance (IR), and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were the vital factors contributing to coronary heart disease. Serum SPARC level was positively correlated with the Gensini scores in group D (r=0.770, P<0.05), whereas it was not related to the Gensini scores in group C (r=0.520, P>0.05). Pearson correlation analysis showed that serum SPARC level was positively correlated with triglyceride, fasting insulin, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance Index (r=0.780, 0.762 and 0.891, respectively; P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum SPARC level elevated in T2DM patients with coronary heart disease, which was correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease significantly. PMID:26770566

  5. A Striking Coronary Artery Pattern in a Grown-Up Congenital Heart Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Iacovelli, Fortunato; Pepe, Martino; Contegiacomo, Gaetano; Alberotanza, Vito; Masi, Filippo; Bortone, Alessandro Santo; Favale, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a myocardial disorder probably due to the arrest of normal embryogenesis of the left ventricle. It could be isolated or associated with other extracardiac and cardiac abnormalities, including coronary artery anomalies. Despite the continuous improvement of imaging resolution quality, this cardiomyopathy still remains frequently misdiagnosed, especially if associated with other heart diseases. We report a case of LVNC association with both malposition of the great arteries and a very original coronary artery pattern. PMID:26881144

  6. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease: a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    PubMed Central

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom R; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Whittaker, John C; Smith, George Davey; Dudbridge, Frank; Casas, Juan P; Holmes, Michael V; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease. We then used a conventional Mendelian randomisation approach to investigate the causal relevance using a genetic instrument based on 31 urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To account for potential pleiotropic associations of certain SNPs with risk factors other than urate, we additionally did both a multivariable Mendelian randomisation analysis, in which the genetic associations of SNPs with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were included as covariates, and an Egger Mendelian randomisation (MR-Egger) analysis to estimate a causal effect accounting for unmeasured pleiotropy. Findings In the meta-analysis of 17 prospective observational studies (166 486 individuals; 9784 coronary heart disease events) a 1 SD higher urate concentration was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for coronary heart disease of 1·07 (95% CI 1·04–1·10). The corresponding OR estimates from the conventional, multivariable adjusted, and Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis (58 studies; 198 598 individuals; 65 877 events) were 1·18 (95% CI 1·08–1·29), 1·10 (1·00–1·22), and 1·05 (0·92–1·20), respectively, per 1 SD increment in plasma urate. Interpretation Conventional and multivariate Mendelian randomisation analysis implicates a causal role for urate in the development of coronary heart disease, but these estimates might be inflated by hidden pleiotropy. Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis, which accounts for

  7. Influence of nutrition in childhood on the origins of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Brook, C G

    1978-03-01

    Both the quality and the quantity of food ingested are relevant to the genesis of risk factors for coronary heart disease and the two are inseparable. Nevertheless they have a major common pathway through hypertension, which may well be the most important consequence of a high-protein, high-carbohydrate, high-fat, high-energy and high-sodium diet. Because body fatness is a strongly genetically determined characteristic and because it evolves over the whole period of childhood a vigorous and sustained programme of health education is required at all levels. The aim of such a programme is to effect a small shift in the fatness of the whole population; such a shift would dramatically and disproportionately reduce the incidence of obesity. Since the morbidity and mortality which is found in obese subjects arises primarily from cardiovascular disease in general, and coronary heart disease in particular, nutritional influences have obvious relevance to the prevention of coronary heart disease. PMID:652680

  8. The Decline and Rise of Coronary Heart Disease: Understanding Public Health Catastrophism

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Jeremy A.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of coronary heart disease mortality in the United States and Western Europe is one of the great accomplishments of modern public health and medicine. Cardiologists and cardiovascular epidemiologists have devoted significant effort to disease surveillance and epidemiological modeling to understand its causes. One unanticipated outcome of these efforts has been the detection of early warnings that the decline had slowed, plateaued, or even reversed. These subtle signs have been interpreted as evidence of an impending public health catastrophe. This article traces the history of research on coronary heart disease decline and resurgence and situates it in broader narratives of public health catastrophism. Juxtaposing the coronary heart disease literature alongside the narratives of emerging and reemerging infectious disease helps to identify patterns in how public health researchers create data and craft them into powerful narratives of progress or pessimism. These narratives, in turn, shape public health policy. PMID:23678895

  9. The decline and rise of coronary heart disease: understanding public health catastrophism.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S; Greene, Jeremy A

    2013-07-01

    The decline of coronary heart disease mortality in the United States and Western Europe is one of the great accomplishments of modern public health and medicine. Cardiologists and cardiovascular epidemiologists have devoted significant effort to disease surveillance and epidemiological modeling to understand its causes. One unanticipated outcome of these efforts has been the detection of early warnings that the decline had slowed, plateaued, or even reversed. These subtle signs have been interpreted as evidence of an impending public health catastrophe. This article traces the history of research on coronary heart disease decline and resurgence and situates it in broader narratives of public health catastrophism. Juxtaposing the coronary heart disease literature alongside the narratives of emerging and reemerging infectious disease helps to identify patterns in how public health researchers create data and craft them into powerful narratives of progress or pessimism. These narratives, in turn, shape public health policy. PMID:23678895

  10. Assessing the relationship between dental disease and coronary heart disease in elderly U.S. veterans.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Dominguez, B L; Grossman, N

    1998-03-01

    Several recent studies have shown a link between dental disease and coronary heart disease. The authors studied 320 U.S. veterans in a convenience sample to assess the relationship between oral health and systemic diseases among older people. They present cross-sectional data confirming that a statistically significant association exists between a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and certain oral health parameters, such as the number of missing teeth, plaque benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide test scores, salivary levels of Streptococcus sanguis and complaints of xerostomia. The oral parameters in these subjects were independent of and more strongly associated with coronary heart disease than were recognized risk factors, such as serum cholesterol levels, body mass index, diabetes and smoking status. However, because of the convenience sample studied, these findings cannot be generalized to other populations. PMID:9529805

  11. Serum cholesterol concentration and coronary heart disease in population with low cholesterol concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Peto, R; Collins, R; MacMahon, S; Lu, J; Li, W

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between serum cholesterol concentration and mortality (from coronary heart disease and from other causes) below the range of cholesterol values generally seen in Western populations. DESIGN--Prospective observational study based on 8-13 years of follow up of subjects in a population with low cholesterol concentrations. SETTING--Urban Shanghai, China. SUBJECTS--9021 Chinese men and women aged 35-64 at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death from coronary heart disease and other causes. RESULTS--The average serum cholesterol concentration was 4.2 mmol/l at baseline examination, and only 43 (7%) of the deaths that occurred during 8-13 years of follow up were attributed to coronary heart disease. There was a strongly positive, and apparently independent, relation between serum cholesterol concentration and death from coronary heart disease (z = 3.47, p less than 0.001), and within the range of usual serum cholesterol concentration studied (3.8-4.7 mmol/l) there was no evidence of any threshold. After appropriate adjustment for the regression dilution bias, a 4 (SD 1)% difference in usual cholesterol concentration was associated with a 21 (SD 6)% (95% confidence interval 9% to 35%) difference in mortality from coronary heart disease. There was no significant relation between serum cholesterol concentration and death from stroke or all types of cancer. The 79 deaths due to liver cancer or other chronic liver disease were inversely related to cholesterol concentration at baseline. CONCLUSION--Blood cholesterol concentration was directly related to mortality from coronary heart disease even in those with what was, by Western standards, a "low" cholesterol concentration. There was no good evidence of an adverse effect of cholesterol on other causes of death. PMID:1888927

  12. Whole-Heart Contrast-Enhanced Coronary Magnetic Resonance Angiography using Gradient Echo Interleaved EPI

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Himanshu; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Bi, Xiaoming; Li, Debiao

    2009-01-01

    Whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a promising method for detecting coronary artery disease. However, the imaging time is relatively long (on the order of 10–15 minutes). Such a long imaging time may result in patient discomfort and compromise the robustness of whole-heart coronary MRA due to increased respiratory and cardiac motion artifacts. The goal of this study was to optimize a gradient echo interleaved EPI (GRE-EPI) acquisition scheme for reducing the imaging time of contrast-enhanced whole-heart coronary MRA. Numerical simulations and phantom studies were used to optimize the GRE-EPI sequence parameters. Healthy volunteers were scanned with both the proposed GRE-EPI sequence and a 3D TrueFISP sequence for comparison purposes. Slow infusion (0.5 cc/sec) of Gd-DTPA was used to enhance the SNR of the GRE-EPI acquisition. Whole-heart images with the GRE-EPI technique were acquired with a true resolution of 1.0 × 1.1 × 2.0 mm3 in an average scan time of 4.7 ± 0.7 minutes with an average navigator efficiency of 44 ± 6%. The GRE-EPI acquisition showed excellent delineation of all the major coronary arteries with scan time reduced by a factor of 2 compared with the TrueFISP acquisition. PMID:19319898

  13. A Health Education Program for Parents and Children Who Exhibit High Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopp, Joyce W.; And Others

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of joint parent-child education to change the behaviors known to be associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Earlier studies have shown that parents who are at increased risk of coronary heart disease can be identified by studying certain factors in the children. Utilizing a combined risk…

  14. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Davey Smith, George; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimäki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. Methods and results We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with established associations with HDL-C, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). For each trait, we constructed two scores. The first was unrestricted, including all independent SNPs associated with the lipid trait identified from a prior meta-analysis (threshold P < 2 × 10−6); and the second a restricted score, filtered to remove any SNPs also associated with either of the other two lipid traits at P ≤ 0.01. Mendelian randomization meta-analyses were conducted in 17 studies including 62,199 participants and 12,099 CHD events. Both the unrestricted and restricted allele scores for LDL-C (42 and 19 SNPs, respectively) associated with CHD. For HDL-C, the unrestricted allele score (48 SNPs) was associated with CHD (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.70), per 1 mmol/L higher HDL-C, but neither the restricted allele score (19 SNPs; OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.42, 1.98) nor the unrestricted HDL-C allele score adjusted for triglycerides, LDL-C, or statin use (OR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.44, 1.46) showed a robust association. For triglycerides, the unrestricted allele score (67 SNPs) and the restricted allele score (27 SNPs) were both associated with CHD (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.11 and 1.61; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.59, respectively) per 1-log unit increment. However, the unrestricted triglyceride score adjusted for HDL-C, LDL-C, and statin use gave an OR for CHD of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.75). Conclusion The genetic findings support a causal effect of triglycerides on CHD risk, but a causal role for HDL-C, though possible, remains less certain. PMID:24474739

  15. Optimization of Coronary Whole-Heart MRA Free Breathing Technique at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Ahmed M.; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.; Herzka, Daniel A.; Ho, Vincent B.; Locklin, Julie; Tzatha, Efstathia; Stuber, Matthias; Pettigrew, Roderic I

    2011-01-01

    Four different techniques for 3T whole-heart coronary MRA using free-breathing 3D segmented parallel imaging and adiabatic T2-Prep were assessed. Coronary MRA at 3T is improved by shortening the acquisition window more than employing the highest spatial resolution. Double oblique whole-heart acquisitions result in better overall image quality and allow for better delineation of the LAD. It is possible to attain shorter acquisition windows and a smaller voxel size at 3T than previously reported at 1.5T. PMID:21871751

  16. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease in the Caerphilly cohort: a 10 year follow up

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, U; Ben-Shlomo, Y; Elwood, P; Ubbink, J; Smith, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Prospective assessment of the risk of coronary heart disease associated with total serum homocyst(e)ine (homocysteine) concentration.
DESIGN—Nested case-control study.
SETTING—Caerphilly and surrounding villages in south Wales, UK.
PARTICIPANTS—2290 men who participated in phase II of the study in 1984. After a mean follow up of 10 years, 312 men developed coronary heart disease and were compared with 1248 randomly selected, age frequency matched controls.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE—Acute myocardial infarction or death from coronary heart disease.
RESULTS—The geometric mean serum homocysteine concentration was higher in cases (12.2 µmol/l, 95% confidence interval (CI) 11.8 to 12.6 µmol/l) than in controls (11.8 µmol/l, 95% CI 11.3 to 12.5 µmol/l) (p = 0.09). There was a graded increase in the odds ratio of coronary heart disease across quintiles of the homocysteine concentration distribution compared with the first (p = 0.04), which was attenuated when adjusted for confounding variables (p = 0.4). There was a small but non-significant increase in the adjusted odds ratio of coronary heart disease per standard deviation change in the log distribution of homocysteine concentration (OR = 1.07 (95% CI .93 to 1.24), p = 0.34). Comparing the top quintile of the homocysteine concentration with the remaining 80%, the adjusted odds ratio of coronary heart disease was 1.03 (95% CI 0.73 to 1.45) (p = 0.8) and comparing the top 5% with the remaining 95% it was 1.05 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.95) (p = 0.9).
CONCLUSIONS—These findings do not support the hypothesis that a raised homocysteine concentration is a strong independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Randomised controlled trials of homocysteine lowering treatment such as folic acid are needed before generalising the early positive results of observational studies.


Keywords: homocysteine; coronary heart disease; cohort PMID:11156664

  17. The atopic heart: a curious case of coronary hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Arora, S; Patel, R; Fadila, M; Wool, K

    2016-03-01

    Kounis syndrome is a coronary hypersensitivity disorder involving coronary vasospasm secondary to inflammatory mediators released primarily from mast cells. We report a case of the type I variant of Kounis syndrome manifesting as angioedema with significant inferolateral ST elevation (2 mm) and raised cardiac biomarkers. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and treatment is tactical. Caution should be exercised before using beta-blockers, morphine and epinephrine, which are empiric in cases of acute coronary syndrome and anaphylaxis, respectively. Our patient was treated with intravenous steroids and histamine blockers given the angioedema at presentation. The purpose of our case is to emphasise the importance of including Kounis syndrome in the differential diagnosis for acute coronary syndrome, and formulation of standard treatment guidelines for this under-recognised condition. PMID:27020993

  18. Severe obstruction of the left main coronary artery by mycotic aortic psuedoaneurysm following orthotopic heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kamineni, Raghunandan; Lui, Charles Y; Copeland, Jack G

    2004-04-01

    Mycotic aneurysm of the ascending aorta is a rare complication following orthotopic heart transplantation. This article describes a case of mycotic pseudoaneurysm caused by Candida albicans that developed shortly after orthotopic heart transplantation. The pseudoaneurysm compressed the left main coronary artery, which led to the development of congestive heart failure symptoms mimicking sub-acute transplant rejection. The heart failure signs and symptoms resolved completely with resection of the aneurysm. This case reiterates that early diagnosis and complete resection of the aneurysm is associated with good prognosis. PMID:15063413

  19. Heart rate in the pathophysiology of coronary blood flow and myocardial ischaemia: benefit from selective bradycardic agents

    PubMed Central

    Heusch, G

    2008-01-01

    Starting out from a brief description of the determinants of coronary blood flow (perfusion, pressure, extravascular compression, autoregulation, metabolic regulation, endothelium-mediated regulation and neurohumoral regulation) the present review highlights the overwhelming importance of metabolic regulation such that coronary blood flow is increased at increased heart rate under physiological circumstances and the overwhelming importance of extravascular compression such that coronary blood flow is decreased at increased heart rate through reduction of diastolic duration in the presence of severe coronary stenoses. The review goes on to characterize the role of heart rate in the redistribution of regional myocardial blood flow between a normal coronary vascular tree with preserved autoregulation and a poststenotic vasculature with exhausted coronary reserve. When flow is normalized by heart rate, there is a consistent close relationship of regional myocardial blood flow and contractile function for each single cardiac cycle no matter whether or not there is a coronary stenosis and what the actual blood flow is. β-Blockade improves both flow and function along this relationship. When the heart rate reduction associated with β-blockade is prevented by pacing, α-adrenergic coronary vasoconstriction is unmasked and both flow and function are deteriorated. Selective heart rate reduction, however, improves both flow and function without any residual negative effect such as unmasked α-adrenergic coronary vasoconstriction or negative inotropic action. PMID:18223669

  20. Carperitide induces coronary vasodilation and limits infarct size in canine ischemic hearts: role of NO.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Sanada, Shoji; Asakura, Masanori; Asano, Yoshihiro; Kim, Jiyoong; Shinozaki, Yoshiro; Mori, Hidezo; Minamino, Tetsuo; Takashima, Seiji; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2014-08-01

    Carperitide is effective for heart failure (HF) owing to its diuretic and vasodilatory effects. This recombinant peptide may also have direct cardioprotective effects because carperitide reduces the severity of heart failure and limits infarct size. Because coronary vasodilation is an important cardioprotective treatment modality, we investigated whether carperitide increased coronary blood flow (CBF) and improved myocardial metabolic and contractile dysfunction during ischemia in canine hearts. We also tested whether carperitide is directly responsible for limiting the infarct size. We infused carperitide at 0.025-0.2 μg kg(-1) min(-1) into the canine coronary artery. A minimum dose of 0.1 μg kg(-1) min(-1) was required to obtain maximal vasodilation. To test the effects of carperitide on ischemic hearts, we reduced perfusion pressure in the left anterior descending coronary artery such that CBF decreased to one-third of the baseline value. At 10 min after carperitide was infused at a dose of 0.1 μg kg(-1) min(-1), we observed increases in CBF, fractional shortening (FS) and pH levels in coronary venous blood without concomitant increases in cardiac nitric oxide (NO) levels; these changes were attenuated using either the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor antagonist HS-142-1 or the NO synthase inhibitor L(ω)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP) levels in the coronary artery were elevated in response to carperitide that also limited the infarct size after 90 min of ischemia and subsequent reperfusion. Again, these effects were blunted by L-NAME. Carperitide increases CBF, reduces myocardial contractile and metabolic dysfunction and limits infarct size. In addition, NO is necessary for carperitide-induced vasodilation and cardioprotection in ischemic hearts. PMID:24694647

  1. Coronary hemodynamic responses during local hemodilution in canine hearts.

    PubMed

    Crystal, G J

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemodilution per se on coronary hemodynamics, experiments were performed in 36 anesthetized, open-chest dogs whose left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was perfused selectively with either normal arterial blood or arterial blood diluted with lactated Ringer solution. LAD blood flow (CBF) was measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter and its transmural distribution assessed with 15-microns radioactive microspheres. LAD perfusion pressure was set at the normal level (approximately 100 mmHg) or at 50% of that level to simulate coronary insufficiency. Dilator reserve capacity was calculated from ratio of reactive hyperemic peak flow following release of 90-s occlusion to control (preocclusion) flow. Systemic hemodynamic parameters were maintained near control values during coronary hemodilution. With perfusion pressure normal, graded hemodilution caused progressive, transmurally uniform increases in CBF that showed a nonlinear relationship to inflow hematocrit. Increased peak reactive hyperemic flow and decreased dilator reserve ratio indicated that both reduced viscosity and vasodilation contributed to increased CBF during hemodilution. Hypotension alone reduced CBF, with greater effect in the subendocardium. Additional hemodilution returned CBF to normotensive value, but relative subendocardial hypoperfusion persisted. The present study provides fundamental information on effects of hemodilution on coronary hemodynamics without the systemic responses that complicated previous studies utilizing whole body exchange transfusions. PMID:3348430

  2. Contrast-Kinetics-Resolved Whole-Heart Coronary MRA Using 3DPR

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peng; Huang, Feng; Li, Yu; Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia; Bi, Xiaoming; Jerecic, Renate; Li, Debiao

    2009-01-01

    Slow contrast infusion was recently proposed for contrast-enhanced whole-heart coronary MR angiography (MRA). Current protocols use Cartesian k-space sampling with empirical acquisition delays, potentially resulting in suboptimal coronary artery delineation and image artifacts if there is a timing error. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using time-resolved three-dimensional projection reconstruction (3DPR) for whole-heart coronary MRA. With this method, data acquisition was started simultaneously with contrast injection. Sequential time frames were reconstructed by employing a sliding window scheme with temporal tornado filtering. Additionally, a self-timing method was developed to monitor contrast enhancement during a scan and automatically determine the peak enhancement time around which optimal temporal frames were reconstructed. Our preliminary results on 6 healthy volunteers showed that by using time-resolved 3DPR, the contrast kinetics of the coronary artery system throughout a scan could be retrospectively resolved and assessed. In addition, the blood signal dynamics predicted using self-timing was closely correlated to the true dynamics in time-resolved reconstruction. This approach is useful for optimizing delineation of each coronary artery and minimizing image artifacts for contrast-enhanced whole-heart MRA. PMID:20373398

  3. Role of coronary endothelium in cyclic AMP formation by the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, K.; Schrader, J.

    1986-03-01

    In order to quantify the activation of adenylate cyclase of the coronary endothelium in vivo, endothelial adenine nucleotides of isolated guinea pig hearts were selectively pre-labeled by intracoronary infusion of tritiated (H3)-adenosine, and the coronary efflux of H3-cAMP was measured. The adenosine receptor agonist, NECA (12 ..mu..M), increased total cAMP release 4 fold, and raised H3-cAMP release 22 fold. Several classes of coronary vasodilators (adenosine, L-PIA, D-PIA, the beta 2-adrenergic agonist procaterol, and PGE1) caused dose-dependent increases in endothelial-derived H3-cAMP release. These increases were accompanied by decreases in vascular resistance, at agonist doses without positive intropic effects. Hypoxic perfusion also raised H3-cAMP release, and this was antagonized by theophylline. It is concluded: (1) cyclic AMP formation by coronary endothelium can dominate total cAMP production by the heart; (2) coronary endothelial adenylate cyclase-coupled receptors for adenosine (A2), catecholamines (beta2) and prostaglandins are activated in parallel with coronary vasodilation; (3) endothelial adenylate cyclase can be activated by endogenous adenosine.

  4. Coronary hemodynamic responses during local hemodilution in canine hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, G.J. )

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemodilution per se on coronary hemodynamics, experiments were performed in 36 anesthetized, open-chest dogs whose left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was perfused selectively with either normal arterial blood or arterial blood diluted with lactated Ringer solution. LAD blood flow (CBF) was measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter and its transmural distribution assessed with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. With perfusion pressure normal, graded hemodilution caused progressive, transmurally uniform increases in CBF that showed an nonlinear relationship to inflow hematocrit. Increased peak reactive hyperemic flow and decreased dilator reserve ratio indicated that both reduced viscosity and vasodilation contributed to increased CBF during hemodilution. Hypotension alone reduced CBF, with greater effect in the subendocardium. Additional hemodilution returned CBF to normotensive value, but relative subendocardial hypoperfusion persisted. The present study provides fundamental information on effects of hemodilution on coronary hemodynamics without the systemic responses that complicated previous studies utilizing whole body exchange transfusions.

  5. EDUCATION AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK: POTENTIAL MECHANISMS SUCH AS LITERACY, PERCEIVED CONSTRAINT AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in the education-CHD literature explain the associations between education and CHD risk. METHOD The study sample included 346 participants, aged 38–47 years (59.5% women), of the New England Family Study birth cohort. Ten-year CHD risk was calculated using the validated Framingham risk algorithm that utilizes diabetes, smoking, blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, age and gender. Multivariable regression and mediation analyses were performed. RESULTS Regression analyses adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and childhood confounders (e.g. parental socioeconomic status, intelligence) demonstrated that relative to those with ≥college education, men and women with 10-year CHD risk, respectively. Mediation analyses demonstrated significant indirect effects for reading comprehension in women (7.2%; 95% CI: 0.7, 19.4) and men (7.2%; 95% CI: 0.8, 19.1), and depressive symptoms (11.8%; 95% CI: 2.5, 26.6) and perceived constraint (6.7%, 95% CI: 0.7, 19.1) in women. CONCLUSIONS Evidence suggested that reading comprehension in women and men, and depressive symptoms and perceived constraint in women, may mediate some of the association between education and CHD risk. If these mediated effects are interpreted causally, interventions targeting reading, depressive symptoms, and perceived constraint could reduce educational inequalities in CHD. PMID:25431228

  6. Differences in coronary heart disease risk markers among apparently healthy individuals of African ancestry.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Errol E.; Huffman, Fatma G.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study identified and compared coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors among foreign-born Afro Caribbeans (FBAC), U.S.-born Afro-Caribbean Americans (USBAC) and African Americans. METHODS: Sixty-six FBAC living in the United States for <10 years, 62 USBAC and 61 African-American adults (18-40 years) were recruited. Sociodemographic, behavioral and biochemical data were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: More USBAC (26.2%) and African-American (23.7%) participants compared to the FBAC (10.8%) participants had significantly (p < 0.05) poorer diet scores and were significantly (p < 0.05) more obese (17.7% and 23.0% vs. 7.6%). These differences remained significant between the male ethnic groups but not the females. Also, more USBAC and African-American participants compared to FBAC participants watched television often/very often (54.8% and 49.2% vs. 45.5%), played less sports (56.5% and 55.7% vs. 40.9%) and smoked cigarettes (4.8% and 6.6% vs. 0.0%). In general, USBAC and African-American participants were more likely to have elevated blood glucose (BG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels compared to FBAC participants. More FBAC than USBAC and African-American participants had elevated blood pressure (BP) and low levels of high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). However, the differences were not significant. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that there are differences in risk factors for CHD among ethnic groups (FBAC, USBAC and African-American participants) of persons with African ancestory. PMID:17595935

  7. Coronary heart disease prevention: nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Tucker, Katherine L

    2011-08-17

    Diet is a key modifiable risk factor in the prevention and risk reduction of coronary heart disease (CHD). Results from the Seven Countries Study in the early 1970s spurred an interest in the role of single nutrients such as total fat in CHD risk. With accumulating evidence, we have moved away from a focus on total fat to the importance of considering the quality of fat. Recent meta-analyses of intervention studies confirm the beneficial effects of replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids on CHD risk. Scientific evidence for a detrimental role of trans fat intake from industrial sources on CHD risk has led to important policy changes including listing trans fatty acid content on the "Nutrition Facts" panel and banning the use of trans fatty acids in food service establishments in some cities. The effects of such policy changes on changes in CHD incidence are yet to be evaluated. There has been a surging interest in the protective effects of vitamin D in primary prevention. Yet, its associations with secondary events have been mixed and intervention studies are needed to clarify its role in CHD prevention. Epidemiological and clinical trial evidence surrounding the benefit of B vitamins and antioxidants such as carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C, have been contradictory. While pharmacological supplementation of these vitamins in populations with existing CHD has been ineffective and, in some cases, even detrimental, data repeatedly show that consumption of a healthy dietary pattern has considerable cardioprotective effects for primary prevention. Results from these studies and the general ineffectiveness of nutrient-based interventions have shifted interest to the role of foods in CHD risk reduction. The strongest and most consistent protective associations are seen with fruit and vegetables, fish, and whole grains. Epidemiological and clinical trial data also show risk reduction with moderate alcohol consumption. In the past decade, there has

  8. Genetic APOC3 mutation, serum triglyceride concentrations, and coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent decades have witnessed an increased awareness of the importance of lowering triglyceride concentrations in conjunction with lowering LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) to achieve optimal reduction of the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Historically, LDL-C was the only target of pharmacologic ther...

  9. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Young People of Differing Socio-Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon P.; Baker, Julien S.; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socio-economic status (SES). A cohort of 100 boys and 108 girls, aged 12.9, SD 0.3 years drawn of differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included indices of obesity, blood pressure, aerobic fitness, diet, blood…

  10. Small dense low density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease: results from the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sought to establish reference values for a new direct assay for small dense LDL cholesterol (sdLDL-C) and to measure sdLDL-C concentrations in patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) vs controls. Direct LDL-C and sdLDL-C were measured in samples from 3188 male and female participan...

  11. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non–hig...

  12. Addressing Health Inequities: Coronary Heart Disease Training within Learning Disabilities Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holly, Deirdre; Sharp, John

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Research suggests this may be due to inequalities in health status and inequities in the way health services respond to need. Little is known about the most effective way to improve health outcomes for people with learning disabilities. A previously developed…

  13. Cognition and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Late Midlife: The Whitehall II Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Severine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition…

  14. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  15. The Effect of a Physiological Evaluation Program on Coronary Heart Disease Risk Scores for Sedentary Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkenberg, Mel; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to compare the coronary heart disease (CHD) probability estimates of a group of sedentary males involved in an exercise stress test program from 1968 through 1974 with those of a comparison group of sedentary males not involved in the program. The program was designed to evaluate cardiopulmonary function and improve…

  16. Elders' Knowledge about Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease, Their Perceived Risk, and Adopted Preventive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khayyal, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; El Shazly, Somaya Abdel Moneim

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most frequent single cause of death among persons over 65 years of age and it seems to continue to be a significant threat to the health and wellbeing of the elderly population all over the world, yet the condition is largely preventable. The aims of this study to assess and determine the relations among elder's…

  17. Hospitalization Cost Offset of a Hostility Intervention for Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Karina W.; Gidron, Yori; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors evaluated hospitalization cost offset of hostility management group therapy for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) from a previously published randomized controlled trial (Y. Gidron, K. Davidson, & I. Bata, 1999). Twenty-six male patients with myocardial infarction or unstable angina were randomized to either 2 months of…

  18. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  19. Overweight Status, Obesity, and Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, C. Michael; Robinson, Laura M.; Davidson, Philip W.; Haveman, Meindert; Janicki, Matthew P.; Albertini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have high rates of overweight status/obesity (OSO). OSO is associated with several important risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). This study focused on assessing whether such risk factors are being identified in adults with ID who are receiving their healthcare in…

  20. Adiponectin: an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in men in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our aim was to determine whether plasma adiponectin levels were an independent predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 3,188 male and female participants from cycle 6 of the Framingham Offspring Study (mean age: 57 years in both men and women; BMI:...

  1. Mitochondrial tRNA Variants in Chinese Subjects With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yanwen; Xue, Ling; Jiang, Pingping; Xu, Meifen; He, Yiqun; Shi, Suxue; Huang, Yangyiyi; He, Jiqiang; Mo, Jun Qin; Guan, Min‐Xin

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Mitochondrial genetic determinants for the development of this disorder remain less explored. Methods and Results We performed a clinical and genetic evaluation and mutational screening of 22 mitochondrial tRNA genes in a cohort of 80 genetically unrelated Han Chinese subjects and 125 members of 4 families with coronary heart disease and 512 Chinese control subjects. This analysis identified 16 nucleotide changes among 9 tRNA genes. Of these, the T5592C mutation creates a highly conservative base pairing (5G‐68C) on the acceptor stem of tRNAGln, whereas the G15927A mutation destabilizes a highly conserved base pairing (28C‐42G) in the anticodon stem of tRNAThr. However, the other tRNA variants were polymorphisms. The pedigrees of BJH24 carrying the T5592C mutation, BJH15, and BJH45 harboring the G15927A mutation exhibited maternal transmission of coronary heart disease. Sequence analysis of their mitochondrial genomes revealed the presence of T5592C or G15927A mutation but the absence of other functionally significant mutations in all matrilineal relatives of these families. Conclusions Our previous observations showed that altered structures of tRNAs by these mtDNA mutations caused mitochondrial dysfunction. These may be the first evidence that mtDNA mutations increase the risk of coronary heart disease. Our findings may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of this disorder. PMID:24470521

  2. Coronary Heart Disease Knowledge and Risk Factors among Tri-Ethnic College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutoubi, Samer; Huffman, Fatma G.; Ciccazzo, Michele W.; Himburg, Susan P.; Johnson, Paulette

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and Europe. This study identified and compared nutritional knowledge associated with CHD risk factors among tri-ethnic college students. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, observational study using questionnaires. Setting: University laboratory.…

  3. Dietary carbohydrates, physical inactivity, obesity, and the 'metabolic syndrome' as predictors of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Manson, J E

    2001-08-01

    Several decades of epidemiological and clinical research have identified physical inactivity, excessive calorie consumption, and excess weight as common risk factors for both type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease. This trio forms the environmental substrate for a now well-recognized metabolic phenotype called the insulin resistance syndrome. Recent data suggest that a high intake of rapidly absorbed carbohydrates, which is characterized by a high glycemic load (a measure of carbohydrate quality and quantity), may increase the risk of coronary heart disease by aggravating glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. These data also suggest that individuals who are obese and insulin resistant are particularly prone to the adverse effects of a high dietary glycemic load. In addition, data continue to accumulate suggesting the important beneficial effects of physical activity, even at moderate levels, and weight reduction on improving insulin sensitivity and reducing the risk of coronary heart disease. Future metabolic studies should continue to quantify the physiological impact of different foods on serum glucose and insulin, and such information should routinely be incorporated into large-scale and long-term prospective studies, in which the possible interaction effects between diet and other metabolic determinants such as physical activity and obesity can be examined. Until more definitive data are available, replacing refined grain products and potatoes with minimally processed plant-based foods such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, and reducing the intake of high glycemic load beverages may offer a simple strategy for reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease. PMID:11507324

  4. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, Nabila; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction) is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21), non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93), patients with unstable angina (n = 16), stable coronary artery disease (n = 14) and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207). We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6) and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7). In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classification method (k = 3). The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms. PMID:26930047

  5. Established and emerging cardiovascular magnetic resonance techniques for the assessment of stable coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ripley, David P.; Motwani, Manish; Plein, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. International guidelines recommend cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative option in those presenting with chest pain to inform diagnosis, risk stratify and determine the need for revascularization. CMR offers a unique method to assess global and regional cardiac function, myocardial perfusion, myocardial viability, tissue characterisation and proximal coronary anatomy all within a single study. This results in high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of significant coronary stenoses and an established role in the management of both stable CHD and acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The growing evidence base for the prognostic value of CMR, emerging advances in acquisition techniques, improvements in hardware and the completion of current major multi-centre clinical CMR trials will further raise its prominence in international guidelines and routine cardiological practice. This article will focus on the rapidly evolving role of the multi-parametric CMR examination in the assessment of patients with stable and unstable CHD. PMID:25392820

  6. Optimal image reconstruction phase at low and high heart rates in dual-source CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Araoz, Philip A; Kirsch, Jacobo; Primak, Andrew N; Braun, Natalie N; Saba, Osama; Williamson, Eric E; Harmsen, W Scott; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cardiac phase having the highest coronary sharpness for low and high heart rate patients scanned with dual source CT (DSCT) and to compare coronary image sharpness over different cardiac phases. DSCT coronary CT scans for 30 low heart rate (< or =70 beats per minute- bpm) and 30 high heart rate (>70 bpm) patients were reconstructed into different cardiac phases, starting at 30% and increasing at 5% increments until 70%. A blinded observer graded image sharpness per coronary segment, from which sharpness scores were produced for the right (RCA), left main (LM), left anterior descending (LAD), and circumflex (Cx) coronary arteries. For each coronary artery, the phase with maximal image sharpness was identified with repeated measures analysis of variance. Comparison of coronary sharpness between low and high heart rate patients was made using generalized estimating equations. For low heart rates the highest sharpness scores for all four vessels (RCA, LM, LAD, and Cx) were at the 65 or 70% phase, which are end-diastolic cardiac phases. For high heart rates the highest sharpness scores were between the 35 and 45% phases, which are end-systolic phases. Low heart rate patients had higher coronary sharpness at most cardiac phases; however, patients with high heart rates had higher coronary sharpness in the 45% phase for all four vessels (P < 0.0001). Using DSCT scanning, optimal image sharpness is obtained in end-diastole at low heart rates and in end-systole in high heart rates. PMID:19669664

  7. Optimal image reconstruction phase at low and high heart rates in dual-source CT coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Jacobo; Primak, Andrew N.; Braun, Natalie N.; Saba, Osama; Williamson, Eric E.; Harmsen, W. Scott; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cardiac phase having the highest coronary sharpness for low and high heart rate patients scanned with dual source CT (DSCT) and to compare coronary image sharpness over different cardiac phases. DSCT coronary CT scans for 30 low heart rate (≤ 70 beats per minute- bpm) and 30 high heart rate (>70 bpm) patients were reconstructed into different cardiac phases, starting at 30% and increasing at 5% increments until 70%. A blinded observer graded image sharpness per coronary segment, from which sharpness scores were produced for the right (RCA), left main (LM), left anterior descending (LAD), and circumflex (Cx) coronary arteries. For each coronary artery, the phase with maximal image sharpness was identified with repeated measures analysis of variance. Comparison of coronary sharpness between low and high heart rate patients was made using generalized estimating equations. For low heart rates the highest sharpness scores for all four vessels (RCA, LM, LAD, and Cx) were at the 65 or 70% phase, which are end-diastolic cardiac phases. For high heart rates the highest sharpness scores were between the 35 and 45% phases, which are end-systolic phases. Low heart rate patients had higher coronary sharpness at most cardiac phases; however, patients with high heart rates had higher coronary sharpness in the 45% phase for all four vessels (P < 0.0001). Using DSCT scanning, optimal image sharpness is obtained in end-diastole at low heart rates and in end-systole in high heart rates. PMID:19669664

  8. Primary prevention and risk factor reduction in coronary heart disease mortality among working aged men and women in eastern Finland over 40 years: population based observational study

    PubMed Central

    Laatikainen, Tiina; Peltonen, Markku; Borodulin, Katja; Männistö, Satu; Jula, Antti; Salomaa, Veikko; Harald, Kennet; Puska, Pekka; Vartiainen, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate how much changes in the main risk factors of cardiovascular disease (smoking prevalence, serum cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure) can explain the reduction in coronary heart disease mortality observed among working aged men and women in eastern Finland. Design Population based observational study. Setting Eastern Finland. Participants 34 525 men and women aged 30-59 years who participated in the national FINRISK studies between 1972 and 2012. Interventions Change in main cardiovascular risk factors through population based primary prevention. Main outcome measures Predicted and observed age standardised mortality due to coronary heart disease. Predicted change was estimated with a logistic regression model using risk factor data collected in nine consecutive, population based, risk factor surveys conducted every five years since 1972. Data on observed mortality were obtained from the National Causes of Death Register. Results During the 40 year study period, levels of the three major cardiovascular risk factors decreased except for a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From years 1969-1972 to 2012, coronary heart disease mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 deaths per 100 000 people) and 84% (114 to 17) among men and women aged 35-64 years, respectively. During the first 10 years of the study, changes in these three target risk factors contributed to nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than predicted. In the last 10 years of the study, about two thirds (69% in men and 66% in women) of the reduction could be explained by changes in the three main risk factors, and the remaining third by other factors. Conclusion Reductions in disease burden and mortality due to coronary heart disease can be achieved through the use of population based primary prevention programmes. Secondary prevention among high risk

  9. Reconsidering the back door approach by targeting the coronary sinus in ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Kassimis, George; Raina, Tushar; Banning, Adrian P

    2016-08-15

    Coronary sinus interventions (CSI) are a class of invasive techniques (surgical and percutaneous) originally proposed in the first half of the 20th century, aiming to treat ischaemic heart disease by acting on the venous coronary system. Three main classes of CSI have been proposed and tested: (1) retroperfusion technique, (2) retroinfusion technique and (3) coronary sinus occlusion techniques. They all share the principle that a controlled increased pressure within the coronary sinus may promote a retrograde perfusion of the ischaemic myocardium with consequent cardioprotection. Development of arterial treatments including coronary aortic bypass grafting and then percutaneous coronary intervention deflected interest from interventions on the coronary venous system. However, CSI may still have a possible niche role today in specific and selected clinical contexts in which existing therapies are insufficient. In this review paper, we aim to revise the rationale for CSI, describing the details and the evidence collected so far about these techniques and to provide insights about the main clinical scenarios in which these strategies may find a contemporary application in combination or as an alternative to existing approaches. PMID:27288281

  10. Travel to School and Physical Activity Levels in 9–10 Year-Old UK Children of Different Ethnic Origin; Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE)

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Christopher G.; Nightingale, Claire M.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; van Sluijs, Esther M. F.; Ekelund, Ulf; Cook, Derek G.; Whincup, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Travel to school may offer a convenient way to increase physical activity levels in childhood. We examined the association between method of travel to school and physical activity levels in urban multi-ethnic children. Methods and Findings 2035 children (aged 9–10 years in 2006–7) provided data on their usual method of travel to school and wore an Actigraph-GT1M activity monitor during waking hours. Associations between method of travel and mean level of physical activity (counts per minute [CPM], steps, time spent in light, moderate or vigorous activity per day) were examined in models adjusted for confounding variables. 1393 children (69%) walked or cycled to school; 161 (8%) used public transport and 481 (24%) travelled by car. White European children were more likely to walk/cycle, black African Caribbeans to travel by public transport and South Asian children to travel by car. Children travelling by car spent less time in moderate to vigorous physical activity (−7 mins, 95%CI-9,-5), and had lower CPM (−32 CPM, 95%CI-44,-19) and steps per day (−813 steps, 95%CI,-1043,-582) than walkers/cyclists. Pupils travelling by public transport had similar activity levels to walkers/cyclists. Lower physical activity levels amongst car travellers' were especially marked at travelling times (school days between 8–9 am, 3–5 pm), but were also evident on weekdays at other times and at weekends; they did not differ by gender or ethnic group. Conclusion Active travel to school is associated with higher levels of objectively measured physical activity, particularly during periods of travel but also at other times. If children travelling by car were to achieve physical activity levels (steps) similar to children using active travel, they would increase their physical activity levels by 9%. However, the population increase would be a modest 2%, because of the low proportion of car travellers in this urban population. PMID:22319596

  11. Effects of Psychoeducation on Mental Health in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Zahra; Aghajani, Mohammad; Masoudi Alavi, Negin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with coronary heart disease are at high risk for mental health disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Psychoeducation is a well-known intervention for psychiatric patients, but its use has been limited in other health conditions, such as coronary heart disease. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychoeducation on mental health in coronary heart disease patients. Patients and Methods This randomized clinical trial included 70 patients with coronary heart disease at Shahid Beheshti hospital, in Kashan, Iran, in 2014. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the experimental group, which received eight sessions of psychoeducation, and the control group, which received routine care. Data were collected with the Goldberg mental health questionnaire (GHQ) and were analyzed using independent and paired t-tests performed with SPSS version 16. Results The means of overall GHQ scores were significantly decreased post-test in the intervention group, and the differences between the two groups were statistically significant in the overall GHQ scores (P = 0.0001). A significant difference was observed between the mean GHQ scores of the intervention group prior to and after the psychoeducational program (PEP) intervention (30 ± 4.66 vs. 20.50 ± 3.30) (P = 0.0001). No significant changes were observed in the control group pre- and post-test (P = 0.07). Conclusions Psychoeducation resulted in improved mental health in patients with coronary heart disease. Therefore, it is recommended that this approach be performed as a complementary, effective, non-invasive, low-cost nursing intervention to reduce psychological problems in these patients. PMID:27437125

  12. Copeptin in acute coronary syndromes and heart failure management: State of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schurtz, Guillaume; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe; Goldstein, Patrick; Lemesle, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of multiple biomarkers has changed cardiovascular disease management. Recently, several trials have assessed the diagnostic and prognostic performances of copeptin, especially in patients with heart failure or acute coronary syndromes. Primary results are interesting, with copeptin looking promising for: the management of patients who present at emergency departments early after chest pain onset and the risk stratification of patients with heart failure. The purpose of this article is to review the data on the place of copeptin in the management of patients with chest pain or heart failure. PMID:26071835

  13. BMP Signals Promote Proepicardial Protrusion Necessary for Recruitment of Coronary Vessel and Epicardial Progenitors to the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yasuo; Garriock, Robert J.; Navetta, Alicia M.; Coughlin, Laura E.; Mikawa, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The coronary vessels and epicardium arise from an extracardiac rudiment called the proepicardium. Failed fusion of the proepicardium to the heart results in severe coronary and heart defects. However, it is unknown how the proepicardium protrudes toward and attaches to the looping heart tube. Here we show that ectopic expression of BMP ligands in the embryonic myocardium can cause proepicardial cells to target aberrant regions of the heart. Additionally, misexpression of a BMP antagonist, Noggin, suppresses proepicardium protrusion and contact with the heart. Finally, proepicardium explant preferentially expands toward a co-cultured heart segment. This preference can be mimicked by BMP2/4 and suppressed by Noggin. These results support a model in which myocardium-derived BMP signals regulate the entry of coronary progenitors to the specific site of the heart by directing their morphogenetic movement. PMID:20708592

  14. Congenital coronary artery-left heart fistulas: Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Pezzella, A. Thomas; Falaschi, Giorgio; Ott, David A.; Cooley, Denton A.

    1981-01-01

    Of 59 patients who underwent operative correction of congenital coronary artery fistulas from May 1956 through May 1980 at our institution, three had fistulas that arose from the coronary artery and terminated in the left heart. The chief indication for surgical correction in such patients is the presence of symptoms or the development of complications, which include rupture, endocarditis, and congestive heart failure. The principal objective of repair is closure or obliteration of the fistulous communication and preservation of distal myocardial perfusion. Because symptoms and complications tend to occur with age, elective ligation is warranted during childhood, even in asymptomatic patients. The three cases described here, as well as the reviewed series of left heart fistulas, substantiate this fact. All three patients were symptomatic before operation and asymptomatic afterward. PMID:15216192

  15. Association between risk factors for coronary heart disease in schoolboys and adult mortality rates in the same localities.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, W; Weir, D C; Whitehead, J E; Rogers, D I; Sapiano, S B; Floyd, C A; Kirk, P M; Stalker, C R; Field, N J; Cayton, R M

    1990-01-01

    Risk factors for coronary heart disease were compared in fifth year boys (15-16 years old) from two schools that were chosen from localities with a fourfold difference in adult mortality from coronary heart disease. One school was in an underprivileged urban locality in the area of increased incidence of heart disease ('high risk') and the other in a semi-rural affluent locality with an incidence of heart disease similar to the national average ('low risk'). Smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, obesity, physical fitness, and inactivity were evaluated as risk factors for coronary heart disease. Smoking, increased body fat, poor diet, and physical inactivity were found increased among pupils from the school in the high risk area compared with those in the low risk area. Lipids, maximum oxygen uptake, and hypertension were similar in both schools. The risk of coronary heart disease seems to reflect the adult mortality rates in the area. To reduce the overall incidence of coronary heart disease, health education should be directed towards prevention of smoking, improving diets, and increasing amounts of activity among school children, with special attention directed toward children in regions where there is a high mortality from coronary heart disease among adults. PMID:2301987

  16. How does the ‘Heart Team’ decision get enacted for patients with coronary artery disease?

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Luckraz, Heyman; Aktuerk, Dincer; Thekkudan, Joyce; Mahboob, Sophia; Norell, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A heart team approach has been recommended for managing patients with coronary artery disease. Although this seems to be a new concept, we have been developing such a practice for over 8 years. In this report, the enactment of the heart team decision is reviewed and possible improvement is discussed. Design Review of 1000 heart team decisions over a 1-year period for patients with coronary artery disease. These decisions were recorded contemporaneously at the time of the team discussion. Thereafter, patient's notes were reviewed 6 months following the heart team meeting to assess whether the decision was enacted and, if not, what were the reasons for aberration. Results The heart team decision was enacted in 95.5% of patients. The reasons for aberration in the remaining 45 patients included patient's choice (refusal), unrecognised comorbidities at the time of the heart team discussion, change in patient's clinical condition requiring urgent intervention and death while awaiting procedure, among others. Conclusions The decision of a well set-up heartteam meeting is carried out for most patients. Aberration is uncommon and usually due to unknown factors at the time of the discussion. The heart team approach ensures that patients receive best available care (most likely evidence-based), and demonstrates transparency. PMID:27326160

  17. [Current value of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, F; Taylor, A M; Neubauer, S; Pennell, D J

    1997-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging technique with increasing importance in clinical medicine. It has become a valuable and reliable imaging tool in the diagnosis and management of many medical and surgical conditions. Important advantages of MRI are its flexibility in orientation of imaging plane and the possibility of both anatomical and functional imaging. MRI is based on the application and detection of radio signals and works without any exposure to ionizing radiation, and therefore it is regarded as a safe imaging technique. In the heart there are well established imaging indications such as in acquired and congenital heart disease, pericardial and aortic disease and visualisation of cardiac masses and hypertrophy. Its applications in coronary artery disease (CAD) have been relatively limited, but recent developments in ultrafast imaging sequences and computer hardware have led to a considerable improvement in spatial and temporal image resolution. This has made applications in CAD a possibility, particularly coronary imaging and myocardial perfusion imaging. Recent clinical studies report good correlation between Magnetic Resonance Coronary Angiography (MRCA) and conventional x-ray contrast angiography in the detection of coronary lesions. In the assessment of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patency and the definition of anomalous coronary arteries, MRI showed good sensitivity and specificity. The first results of coronary artery flow measurements have now been reported. Myocardial perfusion imaging and stress-ventriculography for detection of wall motion abnormalities are reported as indirect imaging methods with high reliability and clinical value in the diagnosis of CAD. This overview describes recent developments in cardiac MRI and assesses the current and future value of MRI for clinical cardiology. PMID:9441526

  18. A Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Salt Reduction Policies to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease in Four Eastern Mediterranean Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Helen; Shoaibi, Azza; Ghandour, Rula; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon; Khatib, Rana; Jabr, Samer; Unal, Belgin; Sözmen, Kaan; Arfa, Chokri; Aissi, Wafa; Romdhane, Habiba Ben; Fouad, Fouad; Al-Ali, Radwan; Husseini, Abdullatif

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is rising in middle income countries. Population based strategies to reduce specific CHD risk factors have an important role to play in reducing overall CHD mortality. Reducing dietary salt consumption is a potentially cost-effective way to reduce CHD events. This paper presents an economic evaluation of population based salt reduction policies in Tunisia, Syria, Palestine and Turkey. Methods and Findings Three policies to reduce dietary salt intake were evaluated: a health promotion campaign, labelling of food packaging and mandatory reformulation of salt content in processed food. These were evaluated separately and in combination. Estimates of the effectiveness of salt reduction on blood pressure were based on a literature review. The reduction in mortality was estimated using the IMPACT CHD model specific to that country. Cumulative population health effects were quantified as life years gained (LYG) over a 10 year time frame. The costs of each policy were estimated using evidence from comparable policies and expert opinion including public sector costs and costs to the food industry. Health care costs associated with CHDs were estimated using standardized unit costs. The total cost of implementing each policy was compared against the current baseline (no policy). All costs were calculated using 2010 PPP exchange rates. In all four countries most policies were cost saving compared with the baseline. The combination of all three policies (reducing salt consumption by 30%) resulted in estimated cost savings of $235,000,000 and 6455 LYG in Tunisia; $39,000,000 and 31674 LYG in Syria; $6,000,000 and 2682 LYG in Palestine and $1,3000,000,000 and 378439 LYG in Turkey. Conclusion Decreasing dietary salt intake will reduce coronary heart disease deaths in the four countries. A comprehensive strategy of health education and food industry actions to label and reduce salt content would save both money and lives. PMID:24409297

  19. Certain progress in the treatment of coronary heart disease with traditional medicinal plants in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, K J

    1981-01-01

    A case of coronary heart disease in China was confirmed by the necropsy of a female body unearthed from the tomb at Changsha. It proved that such a case existed about 2,100 years ago. Research in reducing the frequency of myocardial infarction by traditional medicinal plants showed the effect of several herbs. The traditional aromatic and warm herbal medicines may have the possibility of relieving coronary arterial spasm. The clinical and experimental observations proved that the Huoxue-huayu plants' action against blood platelet aggregation and against attack was effective. PMID:6307037

  20. Dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography: image quality and stenosis diagnosis in patients with high heart rates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minwen; Li, Jiayi; Xu, Jian; Chen, Kang; Zhao, Hongliang; Huan, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate prospectively the effects of heart rate and heart-rate variability on dual-source computed tomographic coronary image quality in patients whose heart rates were high, and to determine retrospectively the accuracy of dual-source computed tomographic diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis in the same patients.We compared image quality and diagnostic accuracy in 40 patients whose heart rates exceeded 70 beats/min with the same data in 40 patients whose heart rates were 70 beats/min or slower. In both groups, we analyzed 1,133 coronary arterial segments. Five hundred forty-five segments (97.7%) in low-heart-rate patients and 539 segments (93.7%) in high-heart-rate patients were of diagnostic image quality. We considered P < 0.05 to be statistically significant. No statistically significant differences between the groups were found in diagnostic-image quality scores of total segments or of any coronary artery, nor were any significant differences found between the groups in the accurate diagnosis of angiographically significant stenosis.Calcification was the chief factor that affected diagnostic accuracy. In high-heart-rate patients, heart-rate variability was significantly related to the diagnostic image quality of all segments (P = 0.001) and of the left circumflex coronary artery (P = 0.016). Heart-rate variability of more than 5 beats/min most strongly contributed to an inability to evaluate segments in both groups. When heart rates rose, the optimal reconstruction window shifted from diastole to systole.The image quality of dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography at high heart rates enables sufficient diagnosis of stenosis, although variability of heart rates significantly deteriorates image quality. PMID:19436804

  1. Computed tomographic coronary angiography: experience at Baylor University Medical Center/Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Noninvasive cardiac computed tomographic imaging using multislice or electron beam technology has been shown to be highly specific and sensitive in diagnosing coronary heart disease. It is about a fifth of the cost of coronary angiography and is particularly well suited for evaluating patients with a low or low to moderate probability of having obstructive coronary atherosclerosis. In addition, it offers more information than calcium scoring: because of the intravenous contrast used, it temporarily increases the density of the lumen and allows differentiation of soft plaque from calcified plaque. The Baylor Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital now uses this modality to define coronary atherosclerosis in patients who would otherwise have needed invasive coronary angiography; several research protocols with the technique are also under way. Baylor has recently upgraded to the 64-slice scanner. It is expected that computed tomographic coronary angiography will replace a significant percentage of invasive cardiac catheterizations. PMID:16200178

  2. Quality of Life and Coping Strategies in Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Seyedeh-Monavar; Hosseinian, Simin; Eslami, Mansoure; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali

    This study aims to find the relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in coronary heart disease patients. Two hundred coronary heart disease patients at Tehran Heart Center, who had been diagnosed with the disease 3 months before, were selected and filled out The Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and Quality of Life-SF36. Results showed a discrepancy between quality of life indices and coping strategies. Task-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with total quality of life and PF indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with MH, RE and RP indices. Emotional-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with RP and RE indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with PF, GH, PH, total psychological health and total quality of life indices. Avoidance-oriented strategy had a negative and significant relationship only with MH index. Furthermore, quality of life aspects (physical and psychological) had a positive and significant relationship with emotional-oriented strategy, but it did not have a significant relationship with task-oriented and avoidance-oriented strategies. Also, the social aspect of quality of life did not have a significant relationship with any of the strategies. Considering the effect of stress on decreasing the quality of life, we recommend a psychologist train coping strategies to coronary heart disease patients along with medical treatments in order to improve recovery, maintain health and reduce recurrence.

  3. Who Needs Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rehabilitation Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Surgery Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... coronary arteries that can't be treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as coronary angioplasty. Your doctor ...

  4. Socioeconomic inequalities in coronary heart disease risk in older age: contribution of established and novel coronary risk factors

    PubMed Central

    RAMSAY, S E; MORRIS, R W; WHINCUP, P H; PAPACOSTA, O; RUMLEY, A; LENNON, L; LOWE, G; WANNAMETHEE, S G

    2009-01-01

    Background:Evidence on socioeconomic inequalities in coronary heart disease (CHD) and their pathways in the elderly is limited. Little is also known about the contributions that novel coronary risk factors (particularly inflammatory/hemostatic markers) make to socioeconomic inequalities in CHD. Objectives:To examine the extent of socioeconomic inequalities in CHD in older age, and the contributions (relative and absolute) of established and novel coronary risk factors. Methods:A population-based cohort of 3761 British men aged 60–79 years was followed up for 6.5 years for CHD mortality and incidence (fatal and non-fatal). Social class was based on longest-held occupation recorded at 40–59 years. Results:There was a graded relationship between social class and CHD incidence. The hazard ratio for CHD incidence comparing social class V (unskilled workers) with social class I (professionals) was 2.70 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37–5.35; P-value for trend = 0.008]. This was reduced to 2.14 (95% CI 1.06–4.33; P-value for trend = 0.11) after adjustment for behavioral factors (cigarette smoking, physical activity, body mass index, and alcohol consumption), which explained 38% of the relative risk gradient (41% of absolute risk). Additional adjustment for inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and von Willebrand factor) explained 55% of the relative risk gradient (59% of absolute risk). Blood pressure and lipids made little difference to these estimates; results were similar for CHD mortality. Conclusions:Socioeconomic inequalities in CHD persist in the elderly and are at least partly explained by behavioral risk factors; novel (inflammatory) coronary risk markers made some further contribution. Reducing inequalities in behavioral factors (especially cigarette smoking) could reduce these social inequalities by at least one-third. PMID:20015318

  5. Reduced cerebral embolic signals in beating heart coronary surgery detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Watters, M P; Cohen, A M; Monk, C R; Angelini, G D; Ryder, I G

    2000-05-01

    Cerebral emboli detected by transcranial Doppler imaging were recorded in 20 patients undergoing multiple-vessel coronary artery bypass surgery, either with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, in a prospective unblinded comparative study. Emboli were recorded continuously from the time of pericardial incision until 10 min after the last aortic instrumentation. The numbers of coronary grafts and of aortic clampings were also documented. Patients undergoing revascularization with cardiopulmonary bypass had more emboli (median 79, range 38-876) per case compared with patients having off-pump surgery (median 3, range 0-18). No clinically detectable neurological deficits were seen in either group. Beating heart surgery is associated with fewer emboli than coronary surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Further research is necessary to determine whether a smaller number of emboli alters the incidence of neurological deficit after cardiac surgery. PMID:10844840

  6. Diagnostic value of plasma morphology in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Sergeeva, Yuliya V.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Denisova, Tatiana P.

    2006-08-01

    Blood plasma can be considered as a special water system with self-organization possibilities. Plasma slides as the results of wedge dehydration reflect its stereochemical interaction and their study can be used in diagnostic processes. 46 patients with coronary heart disease were studied. The main group was formed of men in age ranged from 54 to 72 years old with stable angina pectoris of II and III functional class (by Canadian classification) (n=25). The group of compare was of those who was hospitalized with diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, men in age range 40-82. Clinical examination, basic biochemical tests and functional plasma morphology characteristics were studied. A number of qualitative and quantitative differences of blood plasma morphology of patients with chronic and acute coronary disease forms was revealed.

  7. [Diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Clodi, Martin; Säly, Christoph; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Resl, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens; Eber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and heart failure are interacting dynamically. Patients being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease should be screened for diabetes mellitus. Enhanced cardiovascular risk stratification based on biomarkers, symptoms and classical risk factors should be performed in patients with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. PMID:27052249

  8. The role of Homocysteine as a predictor for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Lühmann, Dagmar; Schramm, Susanne; Raspe, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective There is an ongoing debate on the role of the cytotoxic aminoacid homocysteine as a causal risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. Results from multiple case control-studies demonstrate, that there is a strong association between high plasma levels of homoysteine and prevalent coronary heart disease, independent of other classic risk factors. Furthermore, results from interventional studies point out that elevated plasma levels of homocysteine may effectively be lowered by the intake of folic acid and B vitamins. In order to use this information for the construction of a new preventive strategy against coronary heart disease, more information is needed: first, whether homocysteine actually is a causal risk factor with relevant predictive properties and, second, whether by lowering elevated homocysteine plasma concentrations cardiac morbidity can be reduced. Currently in Germany the determination of homocysteine plasma levels is reimbursed for by statutory health insurance in patients with manifest coronary heart disease and in patients at high risk for coronary heart disease but not for screening purposes in asymptomatic low risk populations. Against this background the following assessment sets out to answer four questions: Is an elevated homocysteine plasma concentration a strong, consistent and independent (of other classic risk factors) predictor for coronary heart disease? Does a therapeutic lowering of elevated homoysteine plasma levels reduce the risk of developing coronary events? What is the cost-effectiveness relationship of homocysteine testing for preventive purposes? Are there morally, socially or legally relevant aspects that should be considered when implementing a preventive strategy as outlined above? Methods In order to answer the first question, a systematic overview of prospective studies and metaanalyses of prospective studies is undertaken. Studies are included that analyse the association of

  9. Coronary Heart Disease in Women: A Challenge for the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Solimene, Maria Cecília

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the first killer of women in the modern era, regardless of age, race and of ethnicity, although its prevalence rises after menopause. Modern women have professional and housewife responsibilities, consume excess of fat and carbohydrates, smoke, do not exercise regularly and do not have enough time to rest. This situation leads to overweight, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Women do not often participate in preventive studies and still undergo less intensive and invasive evaluation and treatment for chest pain when compared to men. However, the rate of coronary death is twice higher in women than in men after myocardial infarction and revascularization procedures. The objective of this review is to analyze the main gender differences regarding symptoms, diagnosis, management and prognosis of coronary heart disease and to discuss the influence of hormonal replacement therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. PMID:20126352

  10. Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease: A Risk Factor for the Global Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Chiha, Maguy; Njeim, Mario; Chedrawy, Edgar G.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in the United States and the world. In this we will paper focus on type 2 diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for coronary heart disease, review the mechanisms of atherogenesis in diabetics, the impact of hypertension and the treatment goals in diabetics, the guidelines for screening, and review the epidemiologic consequences of diabetes and heart disease on a global scale. The underlying premise to consider diabetes a cardiovascular disease equivalent will be explored as well as the recommendations for screening and cardiac testing for asymptomatic diabetic patients. PMID:23119148

  11. Study on TCM Syndrome Identification Modes of Coronary Heart Disease Based on Data Mining

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Zhao, Huihui; Chen, Jianxin; Ma, Xueling; Yang, Yi; Zheng, Chenglong; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the most important types of heart disease because of its high incidence and high mortality. TCM has played an important role in the treatment of CHD. Syndrome differentiation based on information from traditional four diagnostic methods has met challenges and questions with the rapid development and wide application of system biology. In this paper, methods of complex network and CHAID decision tree were applied to identify the TCM core syndromes of patients with CHD, and to establish TCM syndrome identification modes of CHD based on biological parameters. At the same time, external validation modes were also constructed to confirm the identification modes. PMID:22675388

  12. Mechanisms by which stress can lead to coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Henry, J P

    1986-07-01

    Much stress is of psychological origin and due to emotional arousal. The mechanisms by which anger, helplessness, or a sense of control and serenity exert their various neuroendocrine effects are discussed. Primacy is given to three systems; to the catecholamines, to testosterone and to cortisol. Evidence that they interact to accelerate the arteriosclerotic process is cited. The protective aspects of intimacy are discussed together with evidence that certain personality types promote it in the marital situation while others do not. It is suggested that the post-traumatic stress syndrome may relate to the coronary-prone personality for it involves an alexithymic disturbance of the emotional competence required for successful intimacy. PMID:3748938

  13. Coronary bifurcations as you have never seen them: the Visible Heart® Laboratory bifurcation programme.

    PubMed

    Burzotta, Francesco; Cook, Brian; Iaizzo, Paul A; Singh, Jasvindar; Louvard, Yves; Latib, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    The Visible Heart® Laboratory is an original experimental laboratory in which harvested animal hearts are resuscitated and connected to a support machine in order to beat outside the animal body. Resuscitated animal hearts may be exposed to various types of endovascular intervention under full, multimodality inspection. This unique experimental setting allows the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in a setting which resembles a standard catheterisation laboratory set-up, and contemporaneously allows unique multimodality imaging. For these reasons, the performance of PCI on bifurcations in the Visible Heart® Laboratory may improve the knowledge of the dynamic stent deformations and stent-vessel wall interactions associated with the different steps of the various techniques for bifurcation stenting. Furthermore, the collected images may also serve as a novel educative resource for physicians. The performance of bifurcation stenting in the Visible Heart® Laboratory is a promising experimental setting to gain novel information regarding any existing or future PCI technique to treat coronary bifurcations. PMID:25983169

  14. Quantitative Determination of Fibrinogen of Patients with Coronary Heart Diseases through Piezoelectric Agglutination Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qinghai; Hua, Xing; Fu, Weiling; Liu, Dongbo; Chen, Ming; Cai, Guoru

    2010-01-01

    Fibrinogen can transform fibrin through an agglutination reaction, finally forming fibrin polymer with grid structure. The density and viscosity of the reaction system changes drastically during the course of agglutination. In this research, we apply an independently-developed piezoelectric agglutination sensor to detect the fibrinogen agglutination reaction in patients with coronary heart diseases. The terminal judgment method of determining plasma agglutination reaction through piezoelectric agglutination sensor was established. In addition, the standard curve between plasma agglutination time and fibrinogen concentration was established to determinate fibrinogen content quantitatively. The results indicate the close correlation between the STAGO paramagnetic particle method and the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor for the detection of Fibrinogen. The correlation coefficient was 0.91 (γ = 0.91). The determination can be completed within 10 minutes. The fibrinogen concentration in the coronary heart disease group was significantly higher than that of the healthy control group (P < 0.05). The results reveal that high fibrinogen concentration is closely correlated to the incurrence, development and prognosis of coronary heart diseases. Compared with other traditional methods, the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor has some merits such as operation convenience, small size, low cost, quick detecting, good precision and the common reacting agents with paramagnetic particle method. PMID:22294917

  15. The association of pericardial fat with incident coronary heart disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)123

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fang-Chi; Harris, Tamara B; Liu, Yongmei; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Szklo, Moyses; Ouyang, Pamela; Espeland, Mark A; Lohman, Kurt K; Criqui, Michael H; Allison, Matthew; Bluemke, David A; Carr, J Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pericardial fat (ie, fat around the heart) may have a direct role in the atherosclerotic process in coronary arteries through local release of inflammation-related cytokines. Cross-sectional studies suggest that pericardial fat is positively associated with coronary artery disease independent of total body fat. Objective: We investigated whether pericardial fat predicts future coronary heart disease events. Design: We conducted a case-cohort study in 998 individuals, who were randomly selected from 6814 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants and 147 MESA participants (26 from those 998 individuals) who developed incident coronary heart disease from 2000 to 2005. The volume of pericardial fat was determined from cardiac computed tomography at baseline. Results: The age range of the subjects was 45–84 y (42% men, 45% white, 10% Asian American, 22% African American, and 23% Hispanic). Pericardial fat was positively correlated with both body mass index (correlation coefficient = 0.45, P < 0.0001) and waist circumference (correlation coefficient = 0.57, P < 0.0001). In unadjusted analyses, pericardial fat (relative hazard per 1-SD increment: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.54), but not body mass index (1.00; 0.84, 1.18), was associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. Waist circumference (1.14; 0.97, 1.34; P = 0.1) was marginally associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The relation between pericardial fat and coronary heart disease remained significant after further adjustment for body mass index and other cardiovascular disease risk factors (1.26; 1.01, 1.59). The relation did not differ by sex. Conclusion: Pericardial fat predicts incident coronary heart disease independent of conventional risk factors, including body mass index. PMID:19571212

  16. [Percutaneous coronary Excimer laser angioplasty in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Karsch, K R; Haase, K K; Mauser, M; Ickrath, O; Voelker, W; Baumbach, A; Seipel, L

    1990-07-01

    To verify the efficacy and safety of percutaneous coronary excimer laser angioplasty in patients with coronary artery disease a prospective study was conducted in 60 patients. The application of laser light was possible in 55 of the 60 patients. A novel 1.4-mm diameter catheter with 20 quartz fibers of 100-microns diameter, each arranged concentrically around a central lumen suitable for an 0.014-inch flexible guide wire was used. The light source was a commercial excimer laser emitting energy at a wavelength of 308 nm, with a pulse duration of 60 ns. The laser was operated at 20 Hz; mean energy transmission was 30 +/- 5 mJ/mm2. In 23 of the 55 patients treated with excimer laser energy the qualitative angiographic results were sufficient. In 32 patients additional balloon angioplasty was necessary, either because of an insufficient result or due to vessel closure after laser ablation. In 47 of the 55 patients control angiography was performed within the 6-month follow-up period. Rate of restenosis was higher in patients treated with laser ablation and subsequent balloon angioplasty (16 of 28) than in patients treated with laser ablation alone (6 of 19). Results of the 6-month observation period suggest that 1) coronary excimer laser angioplasty in combination with subsequent balloon angioplasty results in a considerable increase of the restenosis rate; 2) the exclusive use of laser ablation also results in a restenosis rate comparable to balloon angioplasty alone; and 3) the impact of this new method using improved application systems and higher energy transmission has to be determined in further studies. PMID:2399764

  17. Coronary Microvascular Rarefaction and Myocardial Fibrosis in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Selma F.; Hussain, Saad; Mirzoyev, Sultan A.; Edwards, William D.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Characterization of myocardial structural changes in heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has been hindered by limited availability of human cardiac tissue. Cardiac hypertrophy, coronary artery disease (CAD), coronary microvascular rarefaction and myocardial fibrosis may contribute to HFpEF pathophysiology. Methods and Results We identified HFpEF patients (n=124) and age-appropriate control patients (non-cardiac death, no HF diagnosis; n=104) who underwent autopsy. Heart weight and CAD severity were obtained from the autopsy reports. Using whole field digital microscopy and automated analysis algorithms in full thickness left ventricular (LV) sections, microvascular density (MVD), myocardial fibrosis and their relationship were quantified. Subjects with HFpEF had heavier hearts (median 538 g; 169% of age/sex/body size expected heart weight vs. 335 g; 112% in controls), more severe CAD (65% with ≥ one vessel with >50% diameter stenosis in HFpEF vs 13% in controls), more LV fibrosis (median % area fibrosis, 9.6 vs. 7.1) and lower MVD (median 961 vs. 1316 vessels per mm2) than control (p <0.0001 for all). Myocardial fibrosis increased with decreasing MVD in controls (r = − 0.28, p=0.004) and HFpEF (r = − 0.26, p=0.004). Adjusting for MVD attenuated the group differences in fibrosis. Heart weight, fibrosis and MVD were similar in HFpEF patients with vs without CAD. Conclusions In this study, patients with HFpEF had more cardiac hypertrophy, epicardial CAD, coronary microvascular rarefaction and myocardial fibrosis than controls. Each of these findings may contribute to the LV diastolic dysfunction and cardiac reserve function impairment characteristic of HFpEF. PMID:25552356

  18. Psychological risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease: Findings from the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Beth E.; Panguluri, Praveen; Na, Beeya; Whooley, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    Psychological factors, such as depression and anxiety, are independently associated with an increased risk of both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, but the reasons for these associations are unknown. We sought to determine whether psychological factors were associated with a greater prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease, and the extent to which such an association may be explained by socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and biological mediators. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1024 outpatients with stable coronary heart disease. Psychological factors, including depressive and anxiety symptoms, hostility, anger, and optimism–pessimism, were assessed using validated standardized questionnaires. The presence or absence of the metabolic syndrome was determined using the criteria outlined by the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. Higher levels of depression, anger expression, hostility, and pessimism were significantly associated with increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. These associations were explained by differences in socioeconomic status and health behaviors. Additional adjustment for potential biological mediators had little impact. Further research is needed to determine whether addressing socioeconomic and behavioral factors in people with depression or high levels of anger or hostility could reduce the burden of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:19969373

  19. Prevalence and prediction of obstructive coronary artery disease in patients referred for valvular heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Lappé, Jason M; Grodin, Justin L; Wu, Yuping; Bott-Silverman, Corinne; Cho, Leslie

    2015-07-15

    Current guidelines recommend a coronary evaluation before valvular heart surgery (VHS). Diagnostic coronary angiography is recommended in patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and those with high pretest probability of CAD. In patients with low or intermediate pretest probability of CAD, the guidelines recommend coronary computed tomographic angiography. However, there are no tools available to objectively assess a patient's risk for obstructive CAD before VHS. To address this deficit, 5,360 patients without histories of CAD who underwent diagnostic coronary angiography as part of preoperative evaluation for VHS were identified. Obstructive CAD was defined as ≥50% stenosis in ≥1 artery. Of the patients assessed, 1,035 (19.3%) were found to have obstructive CAD. Through multivariate analysis, age, gender, diabetes, renal dysfunction, hyperlipidemia, and a family history of premature CAD were found to be associated with the presence of obstructive CAD (p <0.001 for all). After adjustment, the specific dysfunctional valve was not associated with the presence of obstructive CAD. Patients were then randomly split into derivation and validation cohorts. Within the derivation cohort, using only age, gender, and the presence or absence of risk factors, a model was constructed to predict the risk for obstructive CAD (C statistic 0.766, 95% confidence interval 0.750 to 0.783). The risk prediction model performed well within the validation cohort (C statistic 0.767, 95% confidence interval 0.751 to 0.784, optimism 0.004). The bias-corrected C statistic for the model was 0.765 (95% confidence interval 0.748 to 0.782). In conclusion, this novel risk prediction tool can be used to objectively risk-stratify patients who undergo preoperative evaluation before VHS and to facilitate appropriate triage to computed tomographic angiography or diagnostic coronary angiography. PMID:25972053

  20. Cohort study of effect of being overweight and change in weight on risk of coronary heart disease in old age.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T. B.; Launer, L. J.; Madans, J.; Feldman, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk of late life coronary heart disease associated with being overweight in late middle or old age and to assess whether weight change modifies this risk. DESIGN: Longitudinal study of subjects in the epidemiological follow up study of the national health and nutrition examination survey I. SETTING: United States. SUBJECTS: 621 men and 960 women free of coronary heart disease in 1982-84 (mean age 77 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incidence of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Body mass index of 27 or more in late middle age was associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease in late life (relative risk = 1.7 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 2.1)) while body mass index of 27 or more in old age was not (1.1 (0.8 to 1.5)). This difference in risk was due largely to weight loss between middle and old age. Exclusion of those with weight loss of 10% or more increased risk associated with heavier weight in old age (1.4 (1.0 to 1.9)). Thinner older people who lost weight and heavier people who had gained weight showed increased risk of coronary heart disease compared with thinner people with stable weight. CONCLUSIONS: Heavier weight in late middle age was a risk factor for coronary heart disease in late life. Heavier weight in old age was associated with an increased risk once those with substantial weight loss were excluded. The contribution of weight to risk of coronary heart disease in older people may be underestimated if weight history is neglected. PMID:9224080

  1. Construction of an odds model of coronary heart disease using published information: the Cardiovascular Health Improvement Model (CHIME)

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher J; Taylor, Paul; Potts, Henry WW

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a need for a new cardiovascular disease model that includes a wider range of relevant risk factors, in particular lifestyle factors, to aid targeting of interventions and improve population models of the impact of cardiovascular disease and preventive strategies. The model needs to be applicable to a wider population including different ethnic groups, different countries and to those with and without cardiovascular disease. This paper describes the construction of the Cardiovascular Health Improvement Model that aims to meet these requirements. Method An odds model is used. Information was taken from 2003 mortality statistics for England and Wales, the Health Survey for England 2003 and published data on relative risk in those with and without CVD and mean blood pressure values in hypertensives. The odds ratios used were taken from the INTERHEART study. Results A worked example is given calculating the 10-year coronary heart disease risk for a 57 year-old non-diabetic male with no personal or family history of cardiovascular disease, who smokes 30 cigarettes a day and has a systolic blood pressure of 137 mmHg, a total cholesterol (TC) of 6.2 mmol/l, a high density lipoprotein (HDL) of 1.3 mol/l, and a body mass index of 21. He neither drinks regularly nor exercises. He can give no reliable information about his mental health or fruit and vegetable intake. His 10-year risk of CHD death is 2.47%. Conclusion This paper demonstrates a method for developing a CHD risk model. Further improvements could be made to the model with additional information. The method is applicable to other causes of death. PMID:18976488

  2. Ethnic Minorities and Coronary Heart Disease: an Update and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, J. Adam; Alvarez, Manrique

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Overall, heart disease accounts for about 1 in 4 deaths with coronary heart disease (CHD) being responsible for over 370,000 deaths per year. It has frequently and repeatedly been shown that some minority groups in the USA have higher rates of traditional CHD risk factors, different rates of treatment with revascularization procedures, and excess morbidity and mortality from CHD when compared to the non-Hispanic white population. Numerous investigations have been made into the causes of these disparities. This review aims to highlight the recent literature which examines CHD in ethnic minorities and future directions in research and care. PMID:26792015

  3. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  4. Explaining the decline in coronary heart disease mortality in Turkey between 1995 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have been decreasing in Turkey since the early 1990s. Our study aimed to determine how much of the CHD mortality decrease in Turkey between 1995 and 2008 could be attributed to temporal trends in major risk factors and how much to advances in medical and surgical treatments. Methods The validated IMPACT CHD mortality model was used to combine and analyse data on uptake and effectiveness of CHD treatments and risk factor trends in Turkey in adults aged 35–84 years between 1995 and 2008. Data sources were identified, searched and appraised on population, mortality and major CHD risk factors for adults those aged 35–84 years. Official statistics, electronic databases, national registers, surveys and published trials were screened from 1995 onwards. Results Between 1995 and 2008, coronary heart disease mortality rates in Turkey decreased by 34% in men and 28% in women 35 years and over. This resulted in 35,720 fewer deaths in 2008. Approximately 47% of this mortality decrease was attributed to treatments in individuals (including approximately 16% to secondary prevention, 3% angina treatments, 9% to heart failure treatments, 5% to initial treatments of acute myocardial infarction, and 5% to hypertension treatments) and approximately 42% was attributable to population risk factor reductions (notably blood pressure 29%; smoking 27%; and cholesterol 1%). Adverse trends were seen for obesity and diabetes (potentially increasing mortality by approximately 11% and 14% respectively). The model explained almost 90% of the mortality fall. Conclusion Reduction in major cardiovascular risk factors explained approximately 42% and improvements in medical and surgical treatments explained some 47% of the CHD mortality fall. These findings emphasize the complimentary value of primary prevention and evidence-based medical treatments in controlling coronary heart disease. PMID:24308515

  5. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  6. Cost effectiveness of lowering cholesterol concentration with statins in patients with and without pre-existing coronary heart disease: life table method applied to health authority population.

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, P. D.; Hollingworth, W.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To estimate the cost effectiveness of statins in lowering serum cholesterol concentration in people at varying risk of fatal cardiovascular disease and to explore the implications of changing the criteria for intervention on cost and cost effectiveness for a purchasing authority. DESIGN--A life table method was used to model the effect of treatment with a statin on survival over 10 years in men and women aged 45-64. The costs of intervention were estimated from the direct costs of treatment, offset by savings associated with a reduction in coronary angiographies, non-fatal myocardial infarctions, and revascularisation procedures. The robustness of the model to various assumptions was tested in a sensitivity analysis. SETTING--Population of a typical district health authority. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Cost per life year saved. RESULTS--The average cost effectiveness of treating men aged 45-64 with no history of coronary heart disease and a cholesterol concentration > 6.5 mmol/l for 10 years with a statin was 136,000 pounds per life year saved. The average cost effectiveness for patients with pre-existing coronary heart disease and a cholesterol concentration > 5.4 mmol/l was 32,000 pounds. These averages hide enormous differences in cost effectiveness between groups at different risk, ranging from 6000 pounds per life year in men aged 55-64 who have had a myocardial infarction and whose cholesterol concentration is above 7.2 mmol/l to 361,000 pounds per life year saved in women aged 45-54 with angina and a cholesterol concentration of 5.5-6.0 mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS--Lowering serum cholesterol concentration in patients with and without preexisting coronary heart disease is effective and safe, but treatment for all those in whom treatment is likely to be effective is not sustainable within current NHS resources. Data on cost effectiveness data should be taken into account when assessing who should be eligible for treatment. PMID:8664620

  7. Dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Dynamics of glucose concentration in human organism is an important diagnostic characteristic for it's parameters correlate significantly with the severity of metabolic, vessel and perfusion disorders. 36 patients with stable angina pectoris of II and III functional classes were involved in this study. All of them were men in age range of 45-59 years old. 7 patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (aged from 49 to 59 years old) form the group of compare. Control group (n = 5) was of practically healthy men in comparable age. To all patients intravenous glucose solution (40%) in standard loading dose was injected. Capillary and vein blood samples were withdrawn before, and 5, 60, 120, 180 and 240 minutes after glucose load. At these time points blood pressure and glucose concentration were measured. In prepared blood smears shape, deformability and sizes of erythrocytes, quantity and degree of shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were studied. Received data were approximated by polynomial of high degree to receive concentration function of studied parameters, which first derivative elucidate velocity characteristics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease and practically healthy persons. Received data show principle differences in dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease as a possible mechanism of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  8. Cell-sheet therapy with omentopexy promotes arteriogenesis and improves coronary circulation physiology in failing heart.

    PubMed

    Kainuma, Satoshi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Pearson, James; Chen, Yi Ching; Saito, Atsuhiro; Harada, Akima; Shiozaki, Motoko; Iseoka, Hiroko; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Horitsugi, Genki; Ishibashi, Mana; Ikeda, Hayato; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sonobe, Takashi; Fujii, Yutaka; Naito, Hisamichi; Umetani, Keiji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo; Kobayashi, Eiji; Daimon, Takashi; Ueno, Takayoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Toda, Koichi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hatazawa, Jun; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-02-01

    Cell-sheet transplantation induces angiogenesis for chronic myocardial infarction (MI), though insufficient capillary maturation and paucity of arteriogenesis may limit its therapeutic effects. Omentum has been used clinically to promote revascularization and healing of ischemic tissues. We hypothesized that cell-sheet transplantation covered with an omentum-flap would effectively establish mature blood vessels and improve coronary microcirculation physiology, enhancing the therapeutic effects of cell-sheet therapy. Rats were divided into four groups after coronary ligation; skeletal myoblast cell-sheet plus omentum-flap (combined), cell-sheet only, omentum-flap only, and sham operation. At 4 weeks after the treatment, the combined group showed attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and a greater amount of functionally (CD31(+)/lectin(+)) and structurally (CD31(+)/α-SMA(+)) mature blood vessels, along with myocardial upregulation of relevant genes. Synchrotron-based microangiography revealed that the combined procedure increased vascularization in resistance arterial vessels with better dilatory responses to endothelium-dependent agents. Serial (13)N-ammonia PET showed better global coronary flow reserve in the combined group, mainly attributed to improvement in the basal left ventricle. Consequently, the combined group had sustained improvements in cardiac function parameters and better functional capacity. Cell-sheet transplantation with an omentum-flap better promoted arteriogenesis and improved coronary microcirculation physiology in ischemic myocardium, leading to potent functional recovery in the failing heart. PMID:25421595

  9. Direct effects of smoking on the heart: silent ischemic disturbances of coronary flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deanfield, J.E.; Shea, M.J.; Wilson, R.A.; Horlock, P.; de Landsheere, C.M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1986-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is strongly associated with ischemic heart disease and acute coronary events. The effect of smoking a single cigarette on regional myocardial perfusion was studied in 13 chronic smokers with typical stable angina pectoris using positron emission tomography and rubidium-82 (/sup 82/Rb). Findings were compared with the effects of physical exercise. After exercise, 8 patients (61%) had angina, ST depression and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion. Uptake of /sup 82/Rb increased from 49 +/- 8 to 60 +/- 7 in remote myocardium, but decreased from 46 +/- 3 to 37 +/- 5 in an ischemic area. The remaining 5 patients (39%) had homogeneous increases in /sup 82/Rb uptake without angina or ST depression. After smoking, 6 of the 8 patients with positive exercise test responses had a decrease in /sup 82/Rb uptake, from 47 +/- 3 to 35 +/- 6 in the same segment of myocardium affected during exercise. However, in contrast to exercise, the events during smoking were largely silent. The absolute decreases in regional /sup 82/Rb uptake after smoking occurred at significantly lower levels of myocardial oxygen demand than after exercise. This suggests that an impairment of coronary blood supply is responsible. Thus, in smokers with coronary artery disease, each cigarette can cause profound silent disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion that are likely to occur frequently during daily life. Such repeated insults may represent an important mechanism linking smoking with coronary events.

  10. Socioeconomic inequalities in access to treatment for coronary heart disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sara L; Richter, Matthias; Schröder, Jochen; Frantz, Stefan; Fink, Astrid

    2016-09-15

    Strong socioeconomic inequalities exist in cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The current review aims to synthesize the current evidence on the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and access to treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined quantitative studies analyzing the relationship between SES and access to CHD treatment that were published between 1996 and 2015. Our data sources included Medline and Web of Science. Our search yielded a total of 2066 records, 57 of which met our inclusion criteria. Low SES was found to be associated with low access to coronary procedures and secondary prevention. Access to coronary procedures, especially coronary angiography, was mainly related to SES to the disadvantage of patients with low SES. However, access to drug treatment and cardiac rehabilitation was only associated with SES in about half of the studies. The association between SES and access to treatment for CHD was stronger when SES was measured based on individual-level compared to area level, and stronger for individuals living in countries without universal health coverage. Socioeconomic inequalities exist in access to CHD treatment, and universal health coverage shows only a minor effect on this relationship. Inequalities diminish along the treatment pathway for CHD from diagnostic procedures to secondary prevention. We therefore conclude that CHD might be underdiagnosed in patients with low SES. Our results indicate that there is an urgent need to improve access to CHD treatment, especially by increasing the supply of diagnostic angiographies, to reduce inequalities across different healthcare systems. PMID:27288969

  11. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Whittle, Jeff; Lynch, Amy I.; Colantonio, Lisandro D.; Simpson, Lara M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Levitan, Emily B.; Whelton, Paul K; Cushman, William C.; Louis, Gail T.; Davis, Barry R.; Oparil, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Variability of blood pressure (BP) across outpatient visits is frequently dismissed as random fluctuation around a patient’s underlying BP. Objective: Examine the association between visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Design Prospective cohort study Setting Post-hoc analysis of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Participants 25,814 ALLHAT participants. Measurements VVV of SBP was defined as the standard deviation (SD) across BP measurements obtained at 7 visits conducted from 6 to 28 months following ALLHAT enrollment. Participants free of cardiovascular disease events during the first 28 months of follow-up were followed from the month 28 study visit through the end of active ALLHAT follow-up. Outcomes included fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure. Results There were 1194 cases of fatal CHD or non-fatal MI, 1948 deaths, 606 cases of stroke and 921 cases of heart failure during follow-up. After multivariable adjustment including mean SBP, the hazard ratio comparing participants in the highest versus lowest quintile of SD of SBP (≥14.4 mmHg versus <6.5 mmHg) was 1.30 (1.06–1.59) for fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, 1.58 (1.32–1.90) for all-cause mortality, 1.46 (1.06–2.01) for stroke, and 1.25 (0.97–1.61) for heart failure. Higher VVV of DBP was also associated with cardiovascular disease events and mortality. Limitations Long-term outcomes were not available. Conclusions Higher VVV of SBP is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Future studies should examine whether reducing VVV of BP lowers this risk. Primary funding source National Institutes of Health PMID:26215765

  12. Association of HDL cholesterol efflux capacity with incident coronary heart disease events: a prospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Saleheen, Danish; Scott, Robert; Javad, Sundas; Zhao, Wei; Rodrigues, Amrith; Picataggi, Antonino; Lukmanova, Daniya; Mucksavage, Megan L; Luben, Robert; Billheimer, Jeffery; Kastelein, John J P; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Rader, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Although HDL cholesterol concentrations are strongly and inversely associated with risk of coronary heart disease, interventions that raise HDL cholesterol do not reduce risk of coronary heart disease. HDL cholesterol efflux capacity—a prototypical measure of HDL function—has been associated with coronary heart disease after adjusting for HDL cholesterol, but its effect on incident coronary heart disease risk is uncertain. Methods We measured cholesterol efflux capacity and assessed its relation with vascular risk factors and incident coronary heart disease events in a nested case-control sample from the prospective EPIC-Norfolk study of 25 639 individuals aged 40–79 years, assessed in 1993–97 and followed up to 2009. We quantified cholesterol efflux capacity in 1745 patients with incident coronary heart disease and 1749 control participants free of any cardiovascular disorders by use of a validated ex-vivo radiotracer assay that involved incubation of cholesterol-labelled J774 macrophages with apoB-depleted serum from study participants. Findings Cholesterol efflux capacity was positively correlated with HDL cholesterol concentration (r=0·40; p<0·0001) and apoA-I concentration (r=0·22; p<0·0001). It was also inversely correlated with type 2 diabetes (r=–0·18; p<0·0001) and positively correlated with alcohol consumption (r=0·12; p<0·0001). In analyses comparing the top and bottom tertiles, cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly and inversely associated with incident coronary heart disease events, independent of age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and alcohol use, waist:hip ratio, BMI, LDL cholesterol concentration, log-triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol or apoA-I concentrations (odds ratio 0·64, 95% CI 0·51–0·80). After a similar multivariable adjustment the risk of incident coronary heart disease was 0·80 (95% CI 0·70–0·90) for a per-SD change in cholesterol efflux capacity. Interpretation HDL

  13. Socioeconomic Status and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: The Role of Social Cognitive Factors

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Jennifer E.; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine existing research on social cognitive factors that may, in part, mediate the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and coronary heart disease (CHD). We focus on how social status is ‘carried’ in the mental systems of individuals, and how these systems differentially affect CHD risk and associated behaviors. To this end, literatures documenting the association of various social cognitive factors (e.g., social comparison, perceived discrimination, and self-efficacy) with cardiovascular disease are reviewed as are literatures regarding the relationship of these factors to SES. Possible mechanisms through which social cognitions may affect health are addressed. In addition, directions for future research are discussed, and a model identifying the possible associations between social cognitive factors, SES, and coronary disease is provided. PMID:21785652

  14. Amaranth oil application for coronary heart disease and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Danik M; Miroshnichenko, Lidia A; Kulakova, Svetlana N; Pogojeva, Ala V; Zoloedov, Vladimir I

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the Nation's leading killer for both men and women among all racial and ethnic groups. Development and progression of CVD is linked to the presence of risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. It is known that cholesterol is an indicator of increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Low-density cholesterol (LDL) above 130 mg/dl high-density cholesterol (HDL) cholesterol below 35 mg/dl and total blood cholesterol above 200 mg/dl are indicators of problematic cholesterol. Proper ranges of cholesterol are important in the prevention of CVD. It has been suggested that a reduction in the consumption of saturated and an increase in unsaturated fatty acids is beneficial and prevents CVD. Amaranth grain contains tocotrienols and squalene compounds, which are known to affect cholesterol biosynthesis. The cholesterol precursors squalene, lanosterol and other methyl sterols, reflect cholesterol synthesis 123, whereas plant sterols and cholestanol, a metabolite of cholesterol, reflect the efficiency of cholesterol absorption in normal and hyperlipidemic populations 456. Qureshi with co-authors 7 showed that feeding of chickens with amaranth oil decreases blood cholesterol levels, which are supported by the work of others 8. Previously, we have shown that Amaranth oil modulates the cell membrane fluidity 9 and stabilized membranes that could be one reason as to why it is beneficial to those who consume it. It is known that in hypertension, the cell membrane is defective and hence, the movement of the Na and K ions across the cell membranes could defective that could contribute to the development of increase in blood pressure. Based on these properties of amaranth oil we hypothesize that it could be of significant benefit for patients with CVD. PMID:17207282

  15. Amaranth oil application for coronary heart disease and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Danik M; Miroshnichenko, Lidia A; Kulakova, Svetlana N; Pogojeva, Ala V; Zoloedov, Vladimir I

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the Nation's leading killer for both men and women among all racial and ethnic groups. Development and progression of CVD is linked to the presence of risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. It is known that cholesterol is an indicator of increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Low-density cholesterol (LDL) above 130 mg/dl high-density cholesterol (HDL) cholesterol below 35 mg/dl and total blood cholesterol above 200 mg/dl are indicators of problematic cholesterol. Proper ranges of cholesterol are important in the prevention of CVD. It has been suggested that a reduction in the consumption of saturated and an increase in unsaturated fatty acids is beneficial and prevents CVD. Amaranth grain contains tocotrienols and squalene compounds, which are known to affect cholesterol biosynthesis. The cholesterol precursors squalene, lanosterol and other methyl sterols, reflect cholesterol synthesis [1-3], whereas plant sterols and cholestanol, a metabolite of cholesterol, reflect the efficiency of cholesterol absorption in normal and hyperlipidemic populations [4-6]. Qureshi with co-authors [7] showed that feeding of chickens with amaranth oil decreases blood cholesterol levels, which are supported by the work of others [8]. Previously, we have shown that Amaranth oil modulates the cell membrane fluidity [9] and stabilized membranes that could be one reason as to why it is beneficial to those who consume it. It is known that in hypertension, the cell membrane is defective and hence, the movement of the Na and K ions across the cell membranes could defective that could contribute to the development of increase in blood pressure. Based on these properties of amaranth oil we hypothesize that it could be of significant benefit for patients with CVD. PMID:17207282

  16. Open heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft - CABG) Heart transplant Heart valve surgery Hypoplastic left heart repair Minimally ... Heart bypass surgery Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart transplant Heart valve surgery Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Patent ...

  17. A new apex-ejecting perfused rat heart preparation: relation between coronary flow and loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wikman-Coffelt, J; Coffelt, R J; Rapcsak, M; Sievers, R; Rouleau, J L; Parmley, W W

    1983-12-01

    The isolated perfused rat heart is an important experimental preparation for both mechanical and biochemical studies. In order to define better the relationship between coronary flow and loading conditions, a new preparation was developed in which the left ventricle ejected through the apex, while the aortic perfusion pressure could be separately controlled at a higher level than the apex afterload. Results were compared with a standard aortic perfused and ejecting preparation. All analyses were made at low calcium concentration (1.6 mmol X litre-1) for reducing cardiac performance. Coronary flow was related to perfusion pressure in the aortic ejecting preparation when the aortic afterload chamber was between 6.0 and 9.3 kPa (45 and 70 mmHg). Coronary autoregulation was demonstrable in the apex ejecting preparation irrespective of the height of the apex afterload chamber and the aortic ejecting preparation when the aortic chamber was between 11.0 and 16.0 kPa (83 and 120 mmHg). Following the addition of 10(-6) mol X litre-1 adenosine, there was significant coronary vasodilatation, and flow became pressure dependent in all cases. In the apex-ejecting preparation, with a high aortic pressure, coronary flow remained at relatively fixed level, and increases in oxygen demand were met by increasing oxygen extraction. Thus, in this preparation oxygen extraction was directly related to workload. With abrupt increases in afterload, going from 6.0 to 9.3 kPa (45 to 70 mmHg) to a higher level, there was evidence of transient hypoxia with the aortic ejecting but not the apex ejecting preparation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6661747

  18. Reducing Personal Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution Improves Cardiovascular Health in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Wang, Shengfeng; Lee, Matthew M.Y.; Barnes, Gareth D.; Miller, Mark R.; Cassee, Flemming R.; Boon, Nicholas A.; Donaldson, Ken; Li, Jing; Li, Liming; Mills, Nicholas L.; Newby, David E.; Jiang, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Air pollution exposure increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and is a major global public health concern. Objectives: We investigated the benefits of reducing personal exposure to urban air pollution in patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: In an open randomized crossover trial, 98 patients with coronary heart disease walked on a predefined route in central Beijing, China, under different conditions: once while using a highly efficient face mask, and once while not using the mask. Symptoms, exercise, personal air pollution exposure, blood pressure, heart rate, and 12-lead electrocardiography were monitored throughout the 24-hr study period. Results: Ambient air pollutants were dominated by fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) that was present at high levels [74 μg/m3 for PM2.5 (PM with aerodynamic diamater <2.5 µm)]. Consistent with traffic-derived sources, this PM contained organic carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and was highly oxidizing, generating large amounts of free radicals. The face mask was well tolerated, and its use was associated with decreased self-reported symptoms and reduced maximal ST segment depression (–142 vs. –156 μV, p = 0.046) over the 24-hr period. When the face mask was used during the prescribed walk, mean arterial pressure was lower (93 ± 10 vs. 96 ± 10 mmHg, p = 0.025) and heart rate variability increased (high-frequency power: 54 vs. 40 msec2, p = 0.005; high-frequency normalized power: 23.5 vs. 20.5 msec, p = 0.001; root mean square successive differences: 16.7 vs. 14.8 msec, p = 0.007). However, mask use did not appear to influence heart rate or energy expenditure. Conclusions: Reducing personal exposure to air pollution using a highly efficient face mask appeared to reduce symptoms and improve a range of cardiovascular health measures in patients with coronary heart disease. Such interventions to reduce personal exposure to PM air pollution have the potential to reduce the

  19. Intelligence System for Diagnosis Level of Coronary Heart Disease with K-Star Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kusnanto, Hari; Herianto, Herianto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, and it is important to diagnose the level of the disease. Intelligence systems for diagnosis proved can be used to support diagnosis of the disease. Unfortunately, most of the data available between the level/type of coronary heart disease is unbalanced. As a result system performance is low. Methods This paper proposes an intelligence systems for the diagnosis of the level of coronary heart disease taking into account the problem of data imbalance. The first stage of this research was preprocessing, which included resampled non-stratified random sampling (R), the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE), clean data out of range attribute (COR), and remove duplicate (RD). The second step was the sharing of data for training and testing using a k-fold cross-validation model and training multiclass classification by the K-star algorithm. The third step was performance evaluation. The proposed system was evaluated using the performance parameters of sensitivity, specificity, positive prediction value (PPV), negative prediction value (NPV), area under the curve (AUC) and F-measure. Results The results showed that the proposed system provides an average performance with sensitivity of 80.1%, specificity of 95%, PPV of 80.1%, NPV of 95%, AUC of 87.5%, and F-measure of 80.1%. Performance of the system without consideration of data imbalance provide showed sensitivity of 53.1%, specificity of 88,3%, PPV of 53.1%, NPV of 88.3%, AUC of 70.7%, and F-measure of 53.1%. Conclusions Based on these results it can be concluded that the proposed system is able to deliver good performance in the category of classification. PMID:26893948

  20. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease: a collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data

    PubMed Central

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David; Fransson, Eleonor I; Heikkilä, Katriina; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; De Bacquer, Dirk; Dragano, Nico; Ferrie, Jane E; Geuskens, Goedele A; Goldberg, Marcel; Hamer, Mark; Hooftman, Wendela E; Houtman, Irene L; Joensuu, Matti; Jokela, Markus; Kittel, France; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Koskinen, Aki; Kouvonen, Anne; Kumari, Meena; Madsen, Ida EH; Marmot, Michael G; Nielsen, Martin L; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Siegrist, Johannes; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Suominen, Sakari B; Väänänen, Ari; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna; Westerholm, Peter JM; Westerlund, Hugo; Zins, Marie; Steptoe, Andrew; Theorell, Töres

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies. Methods We used individual records from 13 European cohort studies (1985–2006) of men and women without coronary heart disease who were employed at time of baseline assessment. We measured job strain with questions from validated job-content and demand-control questionnaires. We extracted data in two stages such that acquisition and harmonisation of job strain measure and covariables occurred before linkage to records for coronary heart disease. We defined incident coronary heart disease as the first non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary death. Findings 30 214 (15%) of 197 473 participants reported job strain. In 1·49 million person-years at risk (mean follow-up 7·5 years [SD 1·7]), we recorded 2358 events of incident coronary heart disease. After adjustment for sex and age, the hazard ratio for job strain versus no job strain was 1·23 (95% CI 1·10–1·37). This effect estimate was higher in published (1·43, 1·15–1·77) than unpublished (1·16, 1·02–1·32) studies. Hazard ratios were likewise raised in analyses addressing reverse causality by exclusion of events of coronary heart disease that occurred in the first 3 years (1·31, 1·15–1·48) and 5 years (1·30, 1·13–1·50) of follow-up. We noted an association between job strain and coronary heart disease for sex, age groups, socioeconomic strata, and region, and after adjustments for socioeconomic status, and lifestyle and conventional risk factors. The population attributable risk for job strain was 3·4%. Interpretation Our findings suggest that prevention of workplace stress might decrease disease incidence; however, this strategy would have a much smaller

  1. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  2. Characteristics of reactive electropermeable points on the auricles of coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Saku, K; Mukaino, Y; Ying, H; Arakawa, K

    1993-05-01

    In oriental medicine there is a hypothesis related to acupuncture that the auricle is a projection of the functional anatomy of the whole human body. In this study reactive electropermeable points (REPP), that is, points on the skin with low electrical resistance, on the auricle were measured on patients with coronary heart disease using a neurometer LC-M. Our findings correlated positively with the particular points--heart I (shin) and heart II (shinzo)*--named by the Chinese group as being related to the functional anatomy of the heart. The incidence of positive REPP test results at the shin and shinzo points for subjects with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were extremely high, and positive test results for patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI) and angina pectoris (AP) were also significant. There was no significant difference in the incidence rates of REPP at the shin and shinzo points between the OMI and AP groups. High incidence of positive REPP test results at the lung and heart III (shinyu) points occurred only in the AMI group, and this was significantly high when compared with the control group. PMID:8504576

  3. Dietary patterns and their association with acute coronary heart disease: Lessons from the REGARDS Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2015-01-01

    Shikany et al used data from 17,418 participants in the REGARDS study, a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥ 45 years, enrolled between 2003–2007. They examined 536 acute coronary heart disease events at follow-up (median 5.8 years) in relation to five dietary patterns (Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad). After adjustment for baseline variables, the highest consumers of the Southern pattern experienced a 56% higher hazard for acute CHD. PMID:26779528

  4. Dietary recommendations for the community towards the postponement of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shaper, A G; Marr, J W

    1977-01-01

    The public has recently been confronted with many, often conflicting, recommendations about diet and reducing the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Dietary recommendations to the community designed to lower the risk of CHD should be specific, clear, and brief. People should be advised to reduce their intake of foods that are high in saturated fats and replace these partially with foods that are relatively high in polyunsaturated fats. This will lower both total fat and dietary cholesterol intakes and will also change the ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fats. PMID:322802

  5. [Unsolved problems of cytoprotective therapy in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Statsenko, M E; Turkina, S V; Ermolenko, A A

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives data on the proven efficiency of myocardial cytoprotection with the pFOX inhibitors trimetazidine and meldonium for coronary heart disease. However, no algorithm has been defined for their differentiated use at different ischemic remodeling stages in these patients in terms of the mechanism of metabolic effects. Sequential use of meldonium and trimetazidine in different periods of acute and chronic myocardial ischemia may become one of the possible ways to increase the efficacy of the pFOX inhibitors. PMID:27022658

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Often Unrecognized among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: The REGARDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Newsome, Britt B.; McClure, Leslie A.; Cushman, Mary; Howard, George; Audhya, Paul; Abramson, Jerome L.; Warnock, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with kidney disease are at increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and CHD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Awareness of CKD may potentially influence diagnostic decisions, life-style changes and pharmacologic interventions targeted at modifiable CHD risk factors. We describe here the degree to which persons with CHD are aware of their CKD. Methods The Reasons for Geographical and Racial Difference in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study, a population-based sample of US residents aged 45 and older. We included in our analyses 28,112 REGARDS participants recruited as of June 2007. We estimated GFR (eGFR) using the MDRD equation, defined CKD as a GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and ascertained awareness of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease through self-report. We used the odds ratio to compare the association between awareness of kidney disease, as measured by GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, among individuals with and without self-reported CHD by both the presence of CKD and the severity of impaired kidney function. Results Coronary heart disease was reported by 3,803 (14.1%) of subjects, and 11.3% of subjects had CKD by eGFR. Among all individuals with a GFR <60 ml/min/ 1.73 m2, 9.6% reported having been told by a physician that they had kidney disease. Among those with CHD and CKD, 5.0% were aware of their CKD compared to 2.0% in those without CHD [OR (95% CI) = 2.57 (2.08, 3.28)]. This difference persisted after controlling for the level of kidney function [aOR (95% CI) = 1.87 (1.43, 2.41)]. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of CKD and a low prevalence of awareness of kidney disease among older adults in the US population with or without coronary heart disease. These findings support recent recommendations that patients with cardiovascular disease be systematically screened for and educated about CKD. PMID:18663284

  7. Burden of coronary heart disease on the Iranian oil industry (1999-2000).

    PubMed

    Larijani, B; Fakhrzadeh, H; Mohaghegh, M; Pourebrahim, R; Akhlaghi, M R

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the direct cost of coronary heart disease (CHD) to the Iranian oil industry, we calculated the cost of essential services for 1253 CHD patients admitted to the National Iranian Oil Corporation (NIOC) Central Hospital. The direct cost of CHD at the Hospital was 10940 million rials (US$ 1 = 8000 rials), or 8.7 million rials per patient. The direct cost of CHD to the Iranian oil industry was estimated at 22 770 million rials. Working days lost to workers hospitalized for CHD amounted to 62 832. The heavy burden of CHD on the Iranian oil industry necessitates the introduction of an industry-wide prevention programme. PMID:16450520

  8. Dietary patterns and their association with acute coronary heart disease: Lessons from the REGARDS Study.

    PubMed

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2015-01-01

    Shikany et al used data from 17,418 participants in the REGARDS study, a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥ 45 years, enrolled between 2003-2007. They examined 536 acute coronary heart disease events at follow-up (median 5.8 years) in relation to five dietary patterns (Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad). After adjustment for baseline variables, the highest consumers of the Southern pattern experienced a 56% higher hazard for acute CHD. PMID:26779528

  9. Biomarkers in Cardiology - Part 2: In Coronary Heart Disease, Valve Disease and Special Situations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality and morbidity in Brazil. Their primary and secondary preventions are a priority for the health system and require multiple approaches for increased effectiveness. Biomarkers are tools used to identify with greater accuracy high-risk individuals, establish a faster diagnosis, guide treatment, and determine prognosis. This review aims to highlight the importance of biomarkers in clinical cardiology practice and raise relevant points regarding their application and perspectives for the next few years. This document was divided into two parts. This second part addresses the application of biomarkers in coronary heart disease, valvular diseases, cardio-oncology, pulmonary embolism, and cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:26083777

  10. Plasma levels of IL-8 predict early complications in patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoyong; Li, Junyong; Gu, Jian; Li, Shuren; Dang, Yi; Wang, Tianhong

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of plasma interleukin-8 (IL-8) for early complications after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The pre- and postprocedural plasma levels of IL-8 and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) were examined by immunoassay, and the expression of CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils was assessed by flow cytometry. Early complications (abrupt occlusion, threatened abrupt occlusion, early recurrence of ischemia, myocardial infarction, cardiac sudden death, and target vessel revascularization) occurred intra-procedure and 30 days after PCI and were observed in 121 consecutive patients with coronary heart disease. Sixteen patients with early complications had high preprocedural levels and high postprocedural differentials of IL-8, CRP, and CD11b/CD18 compared to those without complications (all P < 0.05). The occurrence of complications showed a significant increase in the patients according to the tertiles of IL-8, CRP, and CD11b/CD18. Preprocedural levels of IL-8 (RR = 5.864, CI = 1.658-20.734, P = 0.006) and diabetes (RR = 1.587, CI = 1.246-2.132, P = 0.038) were independent predictors of early complications. There were significant correlations in the postprocedural differential between IL-8 and CD11b/CD18 (r = 0.776, P = 0.002) in patients with complications. The results reveal that the early complications after PCI contribute to preprocedural inflammatory responses. Normal levels of IL-8 may be powerful negative predictors of early complications in patients with CHD following PCI. PMID:12906027

  11. Coronary Artery Calcium Score and Risk Classification for Coronary Heart Disease Prediction: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Polonsky, Tamar S.; McClelland, Robyn L.; Jorgensen, Neal W.; Bild, Diane E.; Burke, Gregory L.; Guerci, Alan D.; Greenland, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Context Coronary artery calcium score (CACS) has been shown to predict future coronary heart disease (CHD) events. However, the extent to which adding CACS to traditional CHD risk factors improves classification of risk is unclear. Objective To determine whether adding CACS to a prediction model based on traditional risk factors improves classification of risk. Design, Setting and Participants CACS was measured by computed tomography on 6,814 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population-based cohort without known cardiovascular disease. Recruitment spanned July 2000 to September 2002; follow-up extended through May 2008. Participants with diabetes were excluded for the primary analysis. Five-year risk estimates for incident CHD were categorized as 0-<3%, 3-<10%, and ≥10% using Cox proportional hazards models. Model 1 used age, gender, tobacco use, systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive medication use, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and race/ethnicity. Model 2 used these risk factors plus CACS. We calculated the net reclassification improvement (NRI) and compared the distribution of risk using Model 2 versus Model 1. Main Outcome Measures Incident CHD events Results Over 5.8 years median follow-up, 209 CHD events occurred, of which 122 were myocardial infarction, death from CHD, or resuscitated cardiac arrest. Model 2 resulted in significant improvements in risk prediction compared to Model 1 (NRI=0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.34, P<0.001). With Model 1, 69% of the cohort was classified in the highest or lowest risk categories, compared to 77% with Model 2. An additional 23% of those who experienced events were reclassified to high risk, and an additional 13% without events were reclassified to low risk using Model 2. Conclusions In the MESA cohort, addition of CACS to a prediction model based on traditional risk factors significantly improved the classification of risk and placed more individuals in

  12. Triple versus dual antiplatelet therapy for coronary heart disease patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Feng, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Xu, Fei-Fei; Zhu, Jie

    2013-10-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Previous studies have suggested that cilostazol-based triple antiplatelet therapy (TAT) may be more effective than conventional dual antiplatelet therapy (DAT) at improving the clinical outcomes of patients with CHD undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, individually published results are inconclusive. The present meta-analysis evaluated controlled clinical studies to compare the clinical outcomes between TAT and DAT in patients with CHD undergoing PCI. Ten controlled clinical studies were included, with a total of 7,670 patients with CHD undergoing PCI. The total number included 3,925 patients treated with DAT (aspirin and clopidogrel) and 3745 patients treated with TAT (addition of cilostazol to DAT). The crude odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated with either the fixed or random effects model. The meta-analysis results indicated that patients in the TAT group had a significantly lower rate of restenosis compared with that of the DAT group (OR=0.59, 95% CI: 0.45-0.77; P<0.001). The rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and target lesion revascularization (TLR) in the TAT group were significantly lower compared with those in the DAT group (MACE: OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.56-0.85, P<0.001; TLR: OR=0.61, 95% CI: 0.43-0.88, P=0.008). However, no significant differences between the TAT and DAT groups in terms of mortality rate, myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization and stent thrombosis were observed. In conclusion, the results of the present meta-analysis indicated that the efficacy and safety of cilostazol-based TAT therapy is greater than that of conventional DAT therapy for patients with CHD undergoing PCI. PMID:24137311

  13. Applications of Data Mining Methods in the Integrative Medical Studies of Coronary Heart Disease: Progress and Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixin; Guo, Fang

    2014-01-01

    A large amount of studies show that real-world study has strong external validity than the traditional randomized controlled trials and can evaluate the effect of interventions in a real clinical setting, which open up a new path for researches of integrative medicine in coronary heart disease. However, clinical data of integrative medicine in coronary heart disease are large in amount and complex in data types, making exploring the appropriate methodology a hot topic. Data mining techniques are to analyze and dig out useful information and knowledge from the mass data to guide people's practices. The present review provides insights for the main features of data mining and their applications of integrative medical studies in coronary heart disease, aiming to analyze the progress and prospect in this field. PMID:25544853

  14. Coronary heart disease risk prediction in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

    PubMed

    Chambless, Lloyd E; Folsom, Aaron R; Sharrett, A Richey; Sorlie, Paul; Couper, David; Szklo, Moyses; Nieto, F Javier

    2003-09-01

    Risk prediction functions for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) were estimated using data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, a prospective study of CHD in 15,792 persons recruited in 1987-1989 from four U.S. communities, with follow-up through 1998. Predictivity of which individuals had incident CHD was assessed by increase in area under ROC curves resulting from adding nontraditional risk factors and markers of subclinical disease to a basic model containing only traditional risk factors. We also assessed the increase in population attributable risk. The additional factors were body mass index; waist-hip ratio; sport activity index; forced expiratory volume; plasma fibrinogen, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and Lp(a); heart rate; Keys score; pack-years smoking; and subclinical disease marker carotid intima-media thickness. These factors substantially improved prediction of future CHD for men, less for women, and also increased attributable risks. PMID:14505774

  15. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10 years. Alternative Names Cardiac transplant; Transplant - heart; Transplantation - heart Images Heart, section through the middle Heart, ... 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  16. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  17. Mendelian Randomisation study of the influence of eGFR on coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Charoen, Pimphen; Nitsch, Dorothea; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; White, Jonathan; Zabaneh, Delilah; Jefferis, Barbara; Wannamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Mulick Cassidy, Amy; Gaunt, Tom; Day, Ian; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Brunner, Eric; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hingorani, Aroon; Whittaker, John; Pablo Casas, Juan; Dudbridge, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Impaired kidney function, as measured by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), has been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in observational studies, but it is unclear whether this association is causal or the result of confounding or reverse causation. In this study we applied Mendelian randomisation analysis using 17 genetic variants previously associated with eGFR to investigate the causal role of kidney function on CHD. We used 13,145 participants from the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium and 194,427 participants from the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis plus Coronary Artery Disease (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D) consortium. We observed significant association of an unweighted gene score with CHD risk (odds ratio = 0.983 per additional eGFR-increasing allele, 95% CI = 0.970-0.996, p = 0.008). However, using weights calculated from UCLEB, the gene score was not associated with disease risk (p = 0.11). These conflicting results could be explained by a single SNP, rs653178, which was not associated with eGFR in the UCLEB sample, but has known pleiotropic effects that prevent us from drawing a causal conclusion. The observational association between low eGFR and increased CHD risk was not explained by potential confounders, and there was no evidence of reverse causation, therefore leaving the remaining unexplained association as an open question. PMID:27338949

  18. Mendelian Randomisation study of the influence of eGFR on coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Charoen, Pimphen; Nitsch, Dorothea; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; White, Jonathan; Zabaneh, Delilah; Jefferis, Barbara; Wannamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Mulick Cassidy, Amy; Gaunt, Tom; Day, Ian; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Brunner, Eric; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hingorani, Aroon; Whittaker, John; Pablo Casas, Juan; Dudbridge, Frank; Dale, Caroline; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Ong, Ken; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Sofat, Reecha; Schmidt, Floriaan; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Morris, Richard; Plagno, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Impaired kidney function, as measured by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), has been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in observational studies, but it is unclear whether this association is causal or the result of confounding or reverse causation. In this study we applied Mendelian randomisation analysis using 17 genetic variants previously associated with eGFR to investigate the causal role of kidney function on CHD. We used 13,145 participants from the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium and 194,427 participants from the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis plus Coronary Artery Disease (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D) consortium. We observed significant association of an unweighted gene score with CHD risk (odds ratio = 0.983 per additional eGFR-increasing allele, 95% CI = 0.970–0.996, p = 0.008). However, using weights calculated from UCLEB, the gene score was not associated with disease risk (p = 0.11). These conflicting results could be explained by a single SNP, rs653178, which was not associated with eGFR in the UCLEB sample, but has known pleiotropic effects that prevent us from drawing a causal conclusion. The observational association between low eGFR and increased CHD risk was not explained by potential confounders, and there was no evidence of reverse causation, therefore leaving the remaining unexplained association as an open question. PMID:27338949

  19. Type D personality is associated with health behaviors and perceived social support in individuals with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ginting, Henndy; van de Ven, Monique; Becker, Eni S; Näring, Gérard

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the role of Type D personality in health behaviors and perceived social support in individuals with coronary heart disease. Different from other related studies, this study assessed a broader range of health behaviors in an eastern population while controlling for anxiety and depression. In all, 386 Indonesian individuals with coronary heart disease completed the measures assessing Type D, perceived social support, depression, anxiety, and health behaviors. Compared with non-Type D, Type D individuals reported more unhealthy behaviors, less healthy behaviors, and perceived less social support. For those identified as Type D, tailored interventions might be considered. PMID:24934433

  20. Robotic totally endoscopic triple coronary artery bypass grafting on the arrested heart: report of the first successful clinical case.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Johannes; Rehman, Atiq; Schwartz, Kimberly; Deshpande, Seema; Kon, Zachary; Lehr, Eric; Zimrin, David; Griffith, Bartley

    2010-12-01

    Robotic technology enables "port only" totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting (TECAB). During early procedure development only single bypass grafts were feasible. Because current referral practice for coronary bypass surgery mostly includes multivessel disease, performance of multiple endoscopic bypass grafts is desirable. We report a case in which a patient received a right internal mammary artery bypass graft to the left anterior descending artery and a left internal mammary artery jump graft to 2 obtuse marginal branches. The procedure was performed through 5 ports on the arrested heart using the daVinci S robotic surgical system. This is the first reported triple bypass grafting procedure using an arrested heart approach. PMID:21169151

  1. Parity and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Middle-aged and Older Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lijun; Wu, Jing; Xu, Guiqiang; Song, Lulu; Yang, Siyi; Yuan, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Youjie

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy leads to physiological changes in lipid, glucose levels, and weight, which may increase the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in later life. The purpose of this study was to examine whether parity is associated with CHD in middle-aged and older Chinese women. A total of 20,207 women aged 37 to 94 years from Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort who completed the questionnaire, were medically examined and provided blood samples, were included in our analysis. CHD cases were determined by self-report of physician diagnosis through face-to-face interviews. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between parity and CHD. The rate of CHD was 15.8%. Parity had a positive association with CHD without adjustment of covariates. After controlling for the potential confounders, increasing risk of coronary heart disease was observed in women who had two (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.41–1.93), three (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.44–2.16), and four or more live births (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.33–2.20) compared with women with just one live birth. High parity was significantly associated with increasing risk of CHD in Chinese women. This suggests that multiparity may be a risk factor for CHD among Chinese women. PMID:26607032

  2. Perceptions of coronary heart disease: the development and psychometric testing of a measurement scale.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W

    2014-01-01

    Individuals' perceptions of coronary heart disease (CHD) have implications for the ways in which they respond to the disease, process risks, make decisions, and take action to reduce CHD risks. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the perceptions of coronary heart disease scale (PCS) among a Hong Kong Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenient sample (n = 232) of participants recruited from a variety of catchments including public domains, a cardiac unit, and a cardiac rehabilitation and prevention center. Exploratory factor analysis identified a nine-item, two-factor model that accounted for 52.5% of the total explained variance. The two factors were the perceived risk (five items) and perceived seriousness (four items) of CHD. The PCS demonstrated good content validity; acceptable total, and subscale internal consistency (.73, .61 - .81); and significant contrast-group differences with higher levels of CHD perceptions among males (p = .002), younger participants (p < .001), and those with higher educational levels (p < .001), suggesting excellent construct validity. The newly developed PCS demonstrates acceptable psychometric properties as a short measurement scale, which supports its use in future research. Future validation of this scale is warranted. PMID:23731251

  3. Risk factors for coronary heart disease among Asian Indians living in Australia.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ritin; Rolley, John X; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Sundar, Subbaram; Patel, Navin C; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the coronary heart disease risk factors in the Asian Indian community living in a large city in Australia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the Australia India Friendship Fair in 2010. All people of Asian Indian descent who attended the Fair and visited the health promotion stall were eligible to participate in the study if they self-identified as of Asian Indian origin, were aged between 18 and 80 years, and were able to speak English. Blood pressure, blood glucose, waist circumference, height, and weight were measured by a health professional. Smoking, cholesterol levels, and physical activity status were obtained through self-reports. Data were analyzed for 169 participants. More than a third of the participants under the age of 65 years had high blood pressure. Prevalence of diabetes (16%) and obesity (61%) was significantly higher compared with the national average. Ten women identified themselves as smokers. Physical activity patterns were similar to that of the wider Australian population. The study has provided a platform for raising awareness among nurses and promoting advocacy on the cardiovascular risk among Asian Indians. Strategies involving Asian Indian nurses and other Asian Indian health professionals as well as support from the private and public sectors can assist in the reduction of the coronary heart disease risk factors among this extremely susceptible population. PMID:24692337

  4. Coronary heart disease and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the elderly diabetic.

    PubMed

    Chanudet, X; Bonnevie, L; Bauduceau, B

    2007-04-01

    Diabetes and old age come together to increase the frequency and severity of coronary heart disease. Often clinically nearly silent, symptoms frequently manifest dramatically, to such an extent that the question of screening should be raised, as in younger subjects. Preventing these manifestations relies on better management of the cardiovascular risk factors and obtaining good blood glucose control, but here progress remains necessary, which also requires adapting to the older patient's clinical and psychological condition. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a frequent degenerative complication in diabetics, particularly in the oldest subjects. The most severe types have serious clinical consequences, thus a higher mortality factor, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. As for coronary heart disease, the therapeutic tools have expanded these last few years and should be thought out in relation to the geriatric evaluation, with the objective of improving these patients' quality of life. Therefore, a necessary distinction should be made between subjects who have aged successfully, whose management, ultimately, differs little from younger subjects, and frail elderly individuals for whom exploratory techniques and treatment should be adapted. PMID:17702096

  5. A haemodynamic and radionuclide assessment of diltiazem in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Silke, B; Sharma, S K; Verma, S P; Midtbo, K A; Reynolds, G; Taylor, S H

    1987-01-01

    To obtain multiple dose-response haemodynamic and radionuclide data on i.v. diltiazem, 12 ischaemic patients were studied during routine catheterization. At rest, following a 20 min stable control period, the effects of four doses (0.0625, 0.0625, 0.125 and 0.25 mg kg-1 diltiazem at 5 min intervals) were measured in the 3-5 min following i.v. injection. The exercise effects of the cumulative 0.5 mg kg-1 dosage were assessed by comparing a control and post drug period of supine bicycle exercise. The increase in plasma diltiazem levels correlated linearly with the administered dose and achieved therapeutic levels. There were significant dose-related reductions in systemic arterial blood pressure and vascular resistance index; the heart rate fell and cardiac stroke index increased. The calculated double-product (heart rate X systolic blood pressure) was significantly reduced. The left ventricular filling pressures, ejection fraction and cardiac volumes were unaltered. During supine bicycle exercise, the systemic diastolic blood pressure, heart rate and calculated double-product were reduced without change in other parameters. Over the dose range 0.0625-0.5 mg kg-1, diltiazem acutely increased cardiac stroke index and reduced resting heart rate. These haemodynamic data, taken together with its described coronary vasodilator activity suggest that its role in acute vasospastic angina and during angiographic procedures ought to be explored further. PMID:3828193

  6. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  7. Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Calcification Scoring: Mammogram for the Heart.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Abdul H; Zallaghi, Forough; Torres-Acosta, Noel; Thompson, Randall C; O'Keefe, James H

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC), identified via low-radiation, non-contrast computed tomography of the heart, quantifies the burden of calcified coronary atherosclerosis. This modality is highly useful for cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification among individuals without known coronary heart disease (CHD), especially for those at intermediate risk. The presence of CAC is associated with up to a 10-fold higher risk of adverse CV events, even after fully adjusting for the standard CV risk factors. In fact, the CAC score is among the strongest clinically available predictors of future risk of adverse CV events among primary prevention patients. Additionally, the absence of CAC in asymptomatic individuals confers a very low risk of CV events. Even in the presence of a benign CV risk factor profile and normal cardiac stress test, a very high CAC score portends a high risk of adverse CV events. On the other hand, a CAC score of zero is associated with a low CHD risk despite significant CV risk factor profiles. CAC scoring is a quick, low-cost screening tool to help risk-stratify patients and identify those likely to benefit from aggressive preventive treatments (such as high-intensity statin therapy, ezetimibe, PCSK9 inhibitors, and aspirin) and to identify those likely who warrant close monitoring. Moreover, individuals with a zero CAC score may be at low enough risk to avoid or defer daily aspirin therapy and pharmacological therapy for cholesterol management, and instead work on therapeutic lifestyle changes. An abnormal CAC score may also lead to better adherence to pharmacological regimens and suggested lifestyle changes. PMID:26892393

  8. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, P<0.001). In conclusion, the decrease in HR with ivabradine was associated with an increase in central systolic pressure, which may have antagonized possible benefits of HR lowering in coronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. PMID:27091900

  9. Usefulness of Serum Cathepsin L as an Independent Biomarker in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingxian; Li, Xiangping; Peng, Daoquan; Tan, Zheng; Liu, Hongmin; Qing, Yingnan; Xue, Yanqiong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Higher levels of cysteinyl cathepsin L were detected in human atherosclerotic lesions than in healthy aortas. However, a link between human coronary heart disease (CHD) and systemic cathepsin L levels remains unknown. A total of 137 volunteers with diagnosed acute and previous myocardial infarction (MI) and stable and unstable angina pectoris in addition to 48 controls were asked to undergo coronary angiography. Serum cathepsin L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fasting glucose, and lipid protein profiles were measured. Serum cathepsin L levels were significantly higher in patients with CHD than in those without CHD (p <0.001). The significance persisted after adjusting for most major confounders. Patients with unstable angina pectoris had higher serum cathepsin L levels than those with stable angina pectoris (p = 0.02). Of patients with acute coronary syndrome, those with acute MI had higher serum cathepsin L levels than those with unstable angina pectoris (p <0.05) and patients with previous MI had the highest levels. Importantly, serum cathepsin L associated positively with number of coronary branch luminal narrowings (R = 0.38, p <0.001), Gensini scores (R = 0.44, p <0.001), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (R = 0.32, p <0.001), fasting glucose (R = 0.16, p <0.03), and cigarette smokers (R = 0.27, p <0.001), but inversely with high-density lipoprotein (R = -0.23, p = 0.002) and apolipoprotein A1 (R = -0.19, p = 0.01) in all subjects. In conclusion, after adjusting for these confounders, we found that serum cathepsin L correlated positively and independently with Gensini score, suggesting that serum cathepsin L serves as a novel and independent biomarker for CHD. PMID:19195505

  10. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Yu, Yanan; Li, Bing; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yijun; Shen, Chunti; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  11. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, YE; ZHANG, YINGYING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; YU, YANAN; LI, BING; WANG, PENGQIAN; LI, HAIXIA; ZHAO, YIJUN; SHEN, CHUNTI; WANG, ZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets. PMID:27221156

  12. [Approaches potentiating cardioprotective effect of ambulatory physical training in patients with ischemic heart disease and multivessel coronary artery involvement after coronary stenting].

    PubMed

    Liamina, N P; Kotel'nikova, E V; Biziaeva, E A; Karpova, É S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorehabilitation of patients with multivessel coronary lesions is an obligatory component of ambulatory stage of care. With the aim of potentiating cardioprotective and antiischemic impact of rehabilitative preventive measures in 36 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and multivessel coronary artery involvement who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention we studied cardioprotective and antiischemic effect of long-term (24 weeks) administration of 70 mg/day trimetazidine in combination with moderate intensity physical training with the use of distance surveillance by a physician. The chosen therapeutic approach in patients with residual ischemia after incomplete anatomical revascularization provided early persistent formation of cardioprotective and antiischemic effect proven by increase of tolerance to physical exercise, improvement of diastolic function, and positive dynamics of both ECG parameters and biochemical markers of myocardial ischemia. PMID:25675716

  13. Relationship Between Exercise Workload During Cardiac Rehabilitation and Outcomes in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Brawner, Clinton A; Abdul-Nour, Khaled; Lewis, Barry; Schairer, John R; Modi, Shalini S; Kerrigan, Dennis J; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Keteyian, Steven J

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of this retrospective, observational study was to describe the relation between exercise workload during cardiac rehabilitation (CR), expressed as metabolic equivalents of task (METs), and prognosis among patients with coronary heart disease. We included patients with coronary heart disease who participated in CR between January 1998 and June 2007. METs were calculated from treadmill workload. Cox regression analysis was used to describe the relationship between METs and time to a composite outcome of all-cause mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or heart failure hospitalization. Among 1,726 patients (36% women; median age 59 years [interquartile range, 52 to 66]), there were 467 events (27%) during a median follow-up of 5.8 years (interquartile range, 2.6 to 8.7). In analyses adjusted for age, sex, Charlson co-morbidity index, hypertension, diabetes, and CR referral diagnosis, METs were independently related to the composite outcome at CR start (Wald chi-square 43, hazard ratio 0.59 [95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.70]) and CR end (Wald chi-square 47, hazard ratio 0.68 [95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.76]). Patients exercising below 3.5 METs on exit from CR represent a high-risk group with 1- and 3-year event rates ≥7% and ≥18%, respectively. In conclusion, METs during CR is available at no additional cost and can be used to identify patients at increased risk for an event who may benefit from closer follow-up, extended length of stay in CR, and/or participation in other strategies aimed at maximizing adherence to secondary preventive behaviors and improving exercise capacity. PMID:26897640

  14. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width is Independently Correlated With Diurnal QTc Variation in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanmin; Xiao, Qiang; Zeng, Wei; Guo, Huimei; Jiang, Ke; Zhong, Ming; Zhong, Jingquan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the relationship between red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and diurnal corrected QT (QTc) variation in patients with coronary heart disease. This retrospective study included 203 patients who underwent coronary angiography between February 2013 and June 2014. RDW values and dynamic electrocardiography (Holter) results were collected to investigate the relationship between RDW and diurnal QTc variation. Patients were separated into three groups (A, B, and C) by binning their RDW values in an ascending order. RDW values, coronary artery scores and diurnal QTc variations were significantly different among these groups (P < 0.05). While coronary artery scores gradually rose with increased RDW, diurnal QTc variation decreased. Pearson's correlation analysis was applied to control for confounding factors, and multiple correlation analysis showed that coronary artery score was positively correlated with RDW (r = 0.130, P = 0.020), while it was not correlated with the diurnal QTc variation (r = −0.226, P = 0.681). RDW was negatively correlated with diurnal QTc variation (r = −0.197, P = 0.035). RDW is independently associated with diurnal QTc variation in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26061304

  15. Progression of Coronary Calcium and Incident Coronary Heart Disease Events: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Budoff, Matthew J.; Young, Rebekah; Lopez, Victor A.; Kronmal, Richard A.; Nasir, Khurram; Blumenthal, Roger S.; Detrano, Robert C.; Bild, Diane E.; Guerci, Alan D.; Liu, Kiang; Shea, Steven; Szklo, Moyses; Post, Wendy; Lima, Joao; Bertoni, Alain; Wong, Nathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery calcium (CAC) predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) events and serial measurement of CAC has been proposed to evaluate atherosclerosis progression. We examined whether progression of CAC is a predictor of future CHD events. Methods and Results We studied 6,778 persons (52.8% female) aged 45–84 years from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. 5,682 persons had baseline and follow-up CAC scans approximately 2.5 ± 0.8 years apart; multiple imputation was used to account for the remainder (n=1,096) missing follow-up scans. Median follow-up duration from the baseline was 7.6 (max=9.0) years. CAC change was assessed by absolute change between baseline and follow-up CAC. Cox proportional hazards regression providing hazard ratios (HR) examined the relation of change in CAC with CHD events, adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, baseline calcium score, and other risk factors. 343 total and 206 hard CHD events occurred. The annual change in CAC averaged 24.9 ± 65.3 units. Among persons without CAC at baseline (n=3,396), a 5 unit annual change in CAC was associated with an adjusted HR of 1.4 (1.0–1.9) for total and 1.5 (1.1–2.1) for hard CHD. Among those with CAC>0 at baseline HR’s (per 100 unit annual change) were 1.2 (1.1–1.4) and 1.3 (1.1–1.5), respectively. Among participants with baseline CAC, those with annual progression of ≥300 units had adjusted HR’s of 3.8 (1.5–9.6) for total and 6.3 (1.9–21.5) for hard CHD compared to those without progression. Conclusions Progression of CAC is associated with an increased risk for future hard and total CHD events. PMID:23500326

  16. Framingham Risk Scores for coronary heart disease in a cohort of Saudi Arabian men and women with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amjad; Qureshi, Ahmed Zaheer; Ayaz, Saeed Bin; Rathore, Farooq Azam

    2016-06-01

    People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD). This study aimed at predicting CHD risk in a cohort of Saudi patients with SCI in comparison with patients without SCI and to correlate different demographic and clinical factors with Framingham Risk Score (FRS) in SCI patients. The study was conducted at the rehabilitation and the main hospitals of King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; on sixty patients with SCI and sixty controls of age ≥20 years. FRS was calculated on a web-based calculator. For the SCI group, sub-groups were made for statistical analysis based on gender, cigarette smoking, neurological level and completeness of injury. The mean FRS for the SCI group (2 ± 7.9) was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than the control group (-2.24 ± 3.4). The 10-year risk of developing CHD was low in 90 % of the SCI group and 100 % of the controls. The age, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and serum total cholesterol had a positive correlation to FRS in SCI patients and females had a significantly higher mean FRS than males (P = 0.03). There was no significant relation of resultant FRS with time since SCI, smoking history and neurological level or completeness of injury. Our sample of Saudi patients with SCI had a higher FRS as compared to controls, however, majority had a low risk of developing CHD in next 10 years. The age, SBP and total cholesterol surfaced as positive predictors of CHD in SCI patients. Time since SCI, smoking, and neurological level or completeness of injury did not influence the resultant FRS and thus the development of CHD. PMID:26292928

  17. Unequal Trends in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality by Socioeconomic Circumstances, England 1982–2006: An Analytical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bajekal, Madhavi; Scholes, Shaun; O’Flaherty, Martin; Raine, Rosalind; Norman, Paul; Capewell, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains a major public health burden, causing 80,000 deaths annually in England and Wales, with major inequalities. However, there are no recent analyses of age-specific socioeconomic trends in mortality. We analysed annual trends in inequalities in age-specific CHD mortality rates in small areas in England, grouped into deprivation quintiles. Methods We calculated CHD mortality rates for 10-year age groups (from 35 to ≥85 years) using three year moving averages between 1982 and 2006. We used Joinpoint regression to identify significant turning points in age- sex- and deprivation-specific time trends. We also analysed trends in absolute and relative inequalities in age-standardised rates between the least and most deprived areas. Results Between 1982 and 2006, CHD mortality fell by 62.2% in men and 59.7% in women. Falls were largest for the most deprived areas with the highest initial level of CHD mortality. However, a social gradient in the pace of fall was apparent, being steepest in the least deprived quintile. Thus, while absolute inequalities narrowed over the period, relative inequalities increased. From 2000, declines in mortality rates slowed or levelled off in the youngest groups, notably in women aged 45–54 in the least deprived groups. In contrast, from age 55 years and older, rates of fall in CHD mortality accelerated in the 2000s, likewise falling fastest in the least deprived quintile. Conclusions Age-standardised CHD mortality rates have declined substantially in England, with the steepest falls in the most affluent quintiles. However, this concealed contrasting patterns in underlying age-specific rates. From 2000, mortality rates levelled off in the youngest groups but accelerated in middle aged and older groups. Mortality analyses by small areas could provide potentially valuable insights into possible drivers of inequalities, and thus inform future strategies to reduce CHD mortality across all social

  18. Prevalence and 1-year prognosis of transient heart failure following coronary revascularization.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Marco; Griffo, Raffaele; Tramarin, Roberto; Fattirolli, Francesco; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Faggiano, Pompilio; De Feo, Stefania; Vestri, Anna Rita; Giallauria, Francesco; Greco, Cesare

    2014-09-01

    The occurrence of heart failure during the whole pre-discharge course of coronary revascularization, as far as its influence on subsequent prognosis, is poorly understood. The present study examined the effect of transient heart failure (THF) developing in the acute and rehabilitative phase on survival after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients in the Italian survey on cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention after cardiac revascularization (ICAROS) were analyzed for THF, the latter being defined either as signs and symptoms consistent with decompensation or cardiogenic shock. ICAROS was a prospective, multicenter registry of 1,262 consecutive patients discharged from 62 cardiac rehabilitation (CR) facilities, providing data on risk factors, lifestyle habits, drug treatments, and major cardiovascular events (MACE) during a 1-year follow-up. Records were linked to the official website of the Italian Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (GICR-IACPR). The overall prevalence of pre-discharge THF was 7.6%, with 69.8% of cases in acute wards, 22.9% during CR, and 7.3% in both settings. THF affected more frequently patients with chronic cardiac condition (42.7 vs. 30.6%; p < 0.05), age ≥75 years (33.3 vs. 23.1%; p < 0.005), COPD (19.8 vs. 12.3%; p < 0.05), and chronic kidney disease (17.7 vs. 7%; p < 0.001). After discharge, THF patients showed good maintenance rates of RAAS modulators (90.6%) and beta-blockers (83.3%), while statin therapy significantly decreased from 81.3 to 64.6% (p < 0.05). The pursuit of secondary prevention targets, as far as self-reported drug adherence, was not different among groups. Patients with THF had increased 1-year mortality (8.3 vs. 1.6%, p < 0.001). Moreover, THF independently predicted adverse outcome with OR for recurrent events (mainly further episodes of decompensation) of 2.4 (CI 1.4-4.3). Patients who experienced THF after coronary

  19. Genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus, low density lipoproteins, response to pravastatin and coronary heart disease: results from PROSPER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caucasian carriers of the T allele at R46L in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) locus have been reported to have 15% lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (C) levels and 47% lower coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Our objective was to examine two PCSK9 single nucle...

  20. Red blood cell membrane concentration of cis-palmitoleic and cis-vaccenic acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although previous studies have suggested associations between plasma palmitoleic acid and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including blood pressure, inflammation, and insulin resistance, little is known about the relation of palmitoleic acid and CHD. This ancillary study of the Physicians'...

  1. Dietary Patterns Predict Subsequent Coronary Heart Disease Risk In Postmenopausal Women : The Women’s Health Initiative Observational Cohort Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Evidence suggests that dietary patterns predispose to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship between dietary patterns and CHD risk was assessed in postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS). Methods: Case-co...

  2. EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND STROKE IN JAPANESE MEN LIVING IN JAPAN, HAWAII AND CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The incidence of myocardial infarction and death from coronary heart disease was studied in defined samples of 45 to 68 year old Japanese men in Japan, Hawaii and California. The incidence rate was lowest in Japan where it was half that observed in Hawaii (P<0.01). The youngest m...

  3. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  4. Lipoprotein(a) levels, apo(a) isoform size, and coronary heart disease risk in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], Lp(a) cholesterol, and of apo(a) isoform size to prospective coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma Lp(a) and Lp(a) cholesterol levels, and apo(a) isoform size were measured at examinati...

  5. 76 FR 49707 - Food Labeling; Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reopening the comment period for the proposed rule published in the Federal Register of December 8, 2010, proposing to amend regulations on plant sterol/ stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). FDA is reopening the comment period because the Agency received a request for additional time to comment on the proposed...

  6. Genetic variation in CYP2J2 and risk of coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CYP2J2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) which regulate endothelial function and serve as a reserve system to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3). We sought to determine if genetic variation in CYP2J2 was associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events...

  7. Regular Exercise and Plasma Lipid Levels Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A 20-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teramoto, Masaru; Golding, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of regular exercise on the plasma lipid levels that contribute to coronary heart disease (CHD), of 20 sedentary men who participated in an exercise program over 20 consecutive years. The men, whose initial ages ranged from 30-51 years, participated in the University of Nevada-based exercise program for an average of 45…

  8. Gendered Uncertainty and Variation in Physicians' Decisions for Coronary Heart Disease: The Double-Edged Sword of "Atypical Symptoms"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lisa C.; Lutfey, Karen E.; Gerstenberger, Eric; Grace, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Nonmedical factors and diagnostic certainty contribute to variation in clinical decision making, but the process by which this occurs remains unclear. We examine how physicians' interpretations of patient sex-gender affect diagnostic certainty and, in turn, decision making for coronary heart disease. Data are from a factorial experiment of 256…

  9. Evidence of the Role of Physical Activity and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Arthur S.; Norstrom, Jane

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents epidemiologic evidence on the contributions of physical inactivity and reduced cardiorespiratory fitness to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The types and dose of physical activity to reduce risk of CHD and plausible biologic mechanisms for the partial protective effect are reviewed. (Author/SM)

  10. Relationship between QT/QS2 ratio and angiographic severity of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, S; Acanfora, D; Papa, M; Covelluzzi, F; Tedeschi, C; Furgi, G; Rengo, F; De Caprio, L

    1988-08-01

    The relationship between QT/QS2 ratio and angiographic severity of coronary heart disease (CHD) was determined in 99 patients who underwent coronary arteriography because of chest pain. Sixteen control patients with normal coronary arteriograms and normal left ventricular function and 83 patients with angiographic evidence of CHD were studied. QT/QS2 ratio and systolic time intervals were calculated from poligraphic recordings taken at rest. In control subjects QT/QS2 ratio was significantly shorter (0.91 +/- 0.04) than in patients with double (0.95 +/- 0.07; p less than 0.05 versus control subjects) and triple vessel coronary artery disease (0.95 +/- 0.05; p less than 0.05 versus control subjects). QT/QS2 ratio was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) in patients with 3 areas or more of left ventricular abnormal wall motion (LV AWM) (0.98 +/- 0.05) than in patients with none (0.92 +/- 0.06) or just 1-2 areas (0.93 +/- 0.06) of LV AWM. Multiple regression analysis revealed no relation between the number of coronary stenoses and QT/QS2 (t = 0.86; p = NS), while a relation was identified between the number of asynergic segments and QT/QS2 (t = 1.99; p less than 0.05). A significant correlation was found between QT/QS2 and PEP/LVET (r = 0.39; p less than 0.001). Setting the upper normal limit at 2 standard deviations from the mean of control subjects (QT/QS2 = 0.99), QT/QS2 criterion yielded a 30% sensitivity, a 94% specificity and a 96% predictive accuracy in diagnosing CHD. We conclude that in CHD patients QT/QS2 ratio is influenced by the extension of LV AWM. Although a low sensitivity may limit its use, a QT/QS2 value higher than 0.99 in a patient with chest pain strongly suggests CHD and thus this criterion may be diagnostically useful. PMID:3243415

  11. Spatial analysis of MODIS aerosol optical depth, PM2.5, and chronic coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiyong

    2009-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have found adverse health effects of acute and chronic exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Air pollution epidemiological studies relying on ground measurements provided by monitoring networks are often limited by sparse and unbalanced spatial distribution of the monitors. Studies have found correlations between satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM2.5 in some land regions. Satellite aerosol data may be used to extend the spatial coverage of PM2.5 exposure assessment. This study was to investigate correlation between PM2.5 and AOD in the conterminous USA, to derive a spatially complete PM2.5 surface by merging satellite AOD data and ground measurements based on the potential correlation, and to examine if there is an association of coronary heart disease with PM2.5. Results Years 2003 and 2004 daily MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) Level 2 AOD images were collated with US EPA PM2.5 data covering the conterminous USA. Pearson's correlation analysis and geographically weighted regression (GWR) found that the relationship between PM2.5 and AOD is not spatially consistent across the conterminous states. The average correlation is 0.67 in the east and 0.22 in the west. GWR predicts well in the east and poorly in the west. The GWR model was used to derive a PM2.5 grid surface using the mean AOD raster calculated using the daily AOD data (RMSE = 1.67 μg/m3). Fitting of a Bayesian hierarchical model linking PM2.5 with age-race standardized mortality rates (SMRs) of chronic coronary heart disease found that areas with higher values of PM2.5 also show high rates of CCHD mortality: = 0.802, posterior 95% Bayesian credible interval (CI) = (0.386, 1.225). Conclusion There is a spatial variation of the relationship between PM2.5 and AOD in the conterminous USA. In the eastern USA where AOD correlates well with PM2.5, AOD can be merged with ground PM2.5 data to derive a PM2.5 surface for epidemiological study. The study

  12. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of multiple risk factor interventions for preventing coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, S.; Smith, G. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of multiple risk factor intervention in reducing cardiovascular risk factors, total mortality, and mortality from coronary heart disease among adults. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials in workforces and in primary care in which subjects were randomly allocated to more than one of six interventions (stopping smoking, exercise, dietary advice, weight control, antihypertensive drugs, and cholesterol lowering drugs) and followed up for at least six months. SUBJECTS: Adults aged 17-73 years, 903000 person years of observation were included in nine trials with clinical event outcomes and 303000 person years in five trials with risk factor outcomes alone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking rates, blood cholesterol concentrations, total mortality, and mortality from coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Net decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking prevalence, and blood cholesterol were 4.2 mm Hg (SE 0.19 mm Hg), 2.7 mm Hg (0.09 mm Hg), 4.2% (0.3%), and 0.14 mmol/l (0.01 mmol/l) respectively. In the nine trials with clinical event end points the pooled odds ratios for total and coronary heart disease mortality were 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.92 to 1.02) and 0.96 (0.88 to 1.04) respectively. Statistical heterogeneity between the studies with respect to changes in mortality and risk factors was due to trials focusing on hypertensive participants and those using considerable amounts of drug treatment, with only these trials showing significant reductions in mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The pooled effects of multiple risk factor intervention on mortality were insignificant and a small, but potentially important, benefit of treatment (about a 10% reduction in mortality) may have been missed. Changes in risk factors were modest, were related to the amount of pharmacological treatment used, and in some cases may have been overestimated

  13. Usefulness of Beta blockade in contemporary management of patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Winchester, David E; Pepine, Carl J

    2014-11-15

    Considerable progress has been made over the last few decades in the management of clinically stable coronary heart disease (SCHD), including improvements in interventions (e.g., percutaneous revascularization), pharmacological management, and risk factor control (e.g., smoking, diet, activity level, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension). Although β blockers have long been used for the treatment of SCHD, their efficacy was established in the era before widespread use of reperfusion interventions, modern medical therapy (e.g., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers), or preventive treatments (e.g., aspirin, statins). On the basis of these older data, β blockers are assumed beneficial, and their use has been extrapolated beyond patients with heart failure and previous myocardial infarction, which provided the best evidence for efficacy. However, there are no randomized clinical trials demonstrating that β blockers decrease clinical events in patients with SCHD in the modern era. Furthermore, these agents are associated with weight gain, problems with glycemic control, fatigue, and bronchospasm, underscoring the fact that their use is not without risk. In conclusion, data are currently lacking to support the widespread use of β blockers for all SCHD patients, but contemporary data suggest that they be reserved for a well-defined high-risk group of patients with evidence of ongoing ischemia, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, and perhaps some arrhythmias. PMID:25260949

  14. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  15. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Chainani, Vinod; Hanno, Ram; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case report also emphasizes the interventional approach for patients with aortic valve stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27418982

  16. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Vinod; Perez, Osman; Hanno, Ram; Hourani, Patrick; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case report also emphasizes the interventional approach for patients with aortic valve stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27418982

  17. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease: A Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaccarino, Viola; Goldberg, Jack; Rooks, Cherie; Shah, Amit J.; Veledar, Emir; Faber, Tracy L.; Votaw, John R.; Forsberg, Christopher W.; Bremner, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) using a prospective twin study design and objective measures of CHD. Background It has long been hypothesized that PTSD increases the risk of CHD but empirical evidence using objective measures is limited. Methods We conducted a prospective study of middle-aged male twins from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. Among twin pairs without self-reported CHD at baseline, we selected pairs discordant for a lifetime history of PTSD, pairs discordant for a lifetime history of major depression, and pairs without either condition. All underwent a clinic visit after a median follow-up of 13 years. Outcomes included clinical events (myocardial infarction, other hospitalizations for CHD and coronary revascularization) and quantitative measures of myocardial perfusion by [N13] positron emission tomography, including a stress total severity score (STSS) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). Results A total of 562 twins (281 pairs) were included with mean age of 42.6 yrs at baseline. The incidence of CHD was more than double in twins with PTSD (22.6%) than those without PTSD (8.9%; p<0.001). The association remained robust after adjusting for lifestyle factors, other CHD risk factors and major depression (OR=2.2, 95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.1). STSS was significantly higher (+ 95%, p=0.001) and CFR lower (−0.21, p=0.02) in twins with PTSD than those without, denoting worse myocardial perfusion. Associations were only mildly attenuated within 117 twin pairs discordant for PTSD. Conclusions Among Vietnam era veterans, PTSD is a risk factor for CHD. PMID:23810885

  18. Serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease--Causal association or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, Setor K

    2015-12-01

    Observational epidemiological evidence supports a linear inverse and independent association between serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but whether this association is causal remains to be ascertained. A Mendelian randomization approach was employed to test whether serum total bilirubin is causally linked to CHD. The genetic variant rs6742078--well known to specifically modify levels of serum total bilirubin and accounting for up to 20% of the variance in circulating serum total bilirubin levels--was used as an instrumental variable. In pooled analysis of estimates reported from published genome-wide association studies, every copy of the T allele of rs6742078 was associated with 0.42 standard deviation (SD) higher levels of serum total bilirubin (95% confidence interval, 0.40 to 0.43). Based on combined data from the Coronary Artery Disease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analyses and the Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics Consortium involving a total of 36,763 CHD cases and 76,997 controls, the odds ratio for CHD per copy of the T allele was 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.04). The odds ratio of CHD for a 1 SD genetically elevated serum total bilirubin level was 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.98 to 1.09). The current findings casts doubt on a strong causal association of serum total bilirubin levels with CHD. The inverse associations demonstrated in observational studies may be driven by biases such as unmeasured confounding and/or reverse causation. However, further research in large-scale consortia is needed. PMID:26408227

  19. Association of lipoprotein lipase gene with coronary heart disease in Sudanese population.

    PubMed

    Abdel Hamid, Muzamil M; Ahmed, Safa; Salah, Awatif; Tyrab, Etayeb M A; Yahia, Lemya M; Elbashir, Elbagire A; Musa, Hassan H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is stabilizing in high-income countries and has continued to rise in low-to-middle-income countries. Association of lipid profile with lipoprotein lipase gene was studied in case and control subject. The family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most risk factors for early-onset of coronary heart disease (CHD). Sudanese patients had significantly (P<0.05) lower TC and LDL-C levels compared to controls. Allele frequency of LPL D9N, N291S and S447X carrier genotype was 4.2%, 30.7% and 7.1%, respectively. We conclude that lipoprotein lipase polymorphism was not associated with the incidence of CHD in Sudan. PMID:26025183

  20. Data-Mining-Based Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Model Using Fuzzy Logic and Decision Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekwon; Lee, Jongsik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The importance of the prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been recognized in Korea; however, few studies have been conducted in this area. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for the prediction and classification of CHD in Koreans. Methods A model for CHD prediction must be designed according to rule-based guidelines. In this study, a fuzzy logic and decision tree (classification and regression tree [CART])-driven CHD prediction model was developed for Koreans. Datasets derived from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey VI (KNHANES-VI) were utilized to generate the proposed model. Results The rules were generated using a decision tree technique, and fuzzy logic was applied to overcome problems associated with uncertainty in CHD prediction. Conclusions The accuracy and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve values of the propose systems were 69.51% and 0.594, proving that the proposed methods were more efficient than other models. PMID:26279953

  1. Awareness, knowledge and healthy lifestyle behaviors related to coronary heart disease among women: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Hadassah Joann; Wu, Vivien Xi; Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Wang, Wenru

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine recent literature on the awareness, knowledge, and healthy lifestyle behaviors related to Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) among women. Literature published in the English language from 2004 to 2015 was reviewed. Of the 684 articles retrieved, 21 were deemed relevant. Being aware that CHD is the leading cause of death in women and knowledge of the risk factors of CHD were found to be generally suboptimal in the women studied. Awareness was seen to be positively associated with healthy lifestyle behaviors, though findings on the predictive relationship of knowledge of risk factors on healthy lifestyle behaviors in women seem to be divided. Diabetes was the prominent risk factor that most women did not associate with CHD. Translating these findings into clinical practice can help health care providers be more attuned when discussing CHD with their female patients so as to provide targeted education on CHD prevention. PMID:26961078

  2. Relationship of lipoprotein(a) levels to physical activity and family history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, S; Elosua, R; Covas, M I; Pavesi, M; Vila, J; Marrugat, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association of physical activity with serum lipoprotein(a) [La(a)] levels in individuals according to whether they had a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: Lp(a) levels in 332 healthy Spanish men aged 20 to 60 years were measured. Physical activity and family history of CHD were assessed. RESULTS: For men with a family history of CHD, the odds ratio for Lp(a) levels above the median value was 0.13 (95% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.50) in very active men (energy expended in physical activity > 300 kcal/day) compared with active men (energy expended in physical activity < 300 kcal/day). CONCLUSIONS: Regular daily physical activity in individuals with a family history of CHD could be useful for controlling Lp(a) levels. PMID:10076490

  3. Risk factors of coronary heart disease: attitude and behaviour in family practice in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Khattab, M S; Abolfotouh, M A; Alakija, W; al-Humaidi, M A; al-Wahat, S

    1999-01-01

    To study risk factors of attitudes and behaviour towards coronary heart disease (CHD), 280 Saudis > or = 20 years attending a family practice answered a structured health and lifestyle questionnaire and had their weight, height, blood pressure and random total cholesterol measured. Significant difference was found between males and females in the mean number of cardiovascular risk factors (t = -3.03, P < 0.01). Few people with high dietary fat intake, obesity or physical inactivity perceived their behaviour as harmful. The number of people who perceived an associated risk to their health increased with incidence of smoking and obesity but not with high fat intake. Physically inactive people were least likely to perceive their behaviour as harmful. PMID:10793779

  4. Growing Epidemic of Coronary Heart Disease in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Gaziano, Thomas A.; Bitton, Asaf; Anand, Shuchi; Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika; Murphy, Adrianna

    2010-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single largest cause of death in the developed countries and is one of the leading causes of disease burden in developing countries. In 2001, there were 7.3 million deaths due to CHD worldwide. Three-fourths of global deaths due to CHD occurred in the low and middle-income countries. The rapid rise in CHD burden in most of the low and middle and income countries is due to socio-economic changes, increase in life span and acquisition of lifestyle related risk factors. The CHD death rate, however, varies dramatically across the developing countries. The varying incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates reflect the different levels of risk factors, other competing causes of death, availability of resources to combat CVD, and the stage of epidemiologic transition that each country or region finds itself. The economic burden of CHD is equally large but solutions exist to manage this growing burden. PMID:20109979

  5. Barriers to physical activity in people at risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, J

    Scotland has a high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a literature search identified the risk factors and the importance that physical activity plays in reducing the risk. The search also revealed that patients at risk of CHD find it difficult to increase their exercise levels. In an attempt to understand this, barriers to exercise were explored from a psychological perspective. The study uses the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLCS) (Wallston and Wallston, 1978) in conjunction with a specifically designed exercise questionnaire. The results show that differences in exercise levels exist between different age groups and between males and females. Differences in MHLCS scores and in barriers to exercise are also shown between the different age groups and sexes, as well as between those working and those not working. The main barriers to exercises were time, ill health, preference to do other things, money, having nobody to go with and lack of confidence. PMID:10426012

  6. Rose Angina Questionnaire: Validation with cardiologists' diagnoses to detect coronary heart disease in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Muhammad Aziz; Spurrier, Nicola; Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal; Rahman, Mahmudur; Choudhury, Sohel Reza; Leeder, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Aim/objectives The study aimed to validate the Rose Angina Questionnaire (RAQ) to detect coronary heart disease (CHD) by comparing with cardiologists' diagnoses in Bangladesh. Methods Patients aged 40–75 years attending to two cardiac hospitals were diagnosed as either CHD positive or CHD negative by cardiologists. The RAQ was used to reclassify them into CHD positive [RAQ] and CHD negative [RAQ]. Findings There were 302 CHD positive [cardiologists] and 302 CHD negative [cardiologists] individuals. The RAQ reclassified 194 individuals as CHD positive [RAQ] and 409 individuals as CHD negative [RAQ]. Therefore, the RAQ had 53% sensitivity and 89% specificity. There was no difference in sensitivity and specificity during subgroup analyzes by age and gender; the sensitivity was higher among people from lower socio-economic status. Conclusion The RAQ, having moderate sensitivity but high specificity to detect CHD, can be used to screen individuals at risk of CHD in large-scale epidemiological surveys. PMID:23438610

  7. The relationship between urban sprawl and coronary heart disease in women.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Beth Ann; Eibner, Christine; Bird, Chloe E; Jewell, Adria; Margolis, Karen; Shih, Regina; Ellen Slaughter, Mary; Whitsel, Eric A; Allison, Matthew; Escarce, Jose J

    2013-03-01

    Studies have reported relationships between urban sprawl, physical activity, and obesity, but - to date - no studies have considered the relationship between sprawl and coronary heart disease (CHD) endpoints. In this analysis, we use longitudinal data on post-menopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Clinical Trial to analyze the relationship between metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level urban compactness (the opposite of sprawl) and CHD endpoints including death, any CHD event, and myocardial infarction. Models control for individual and neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics. Women who lived in more compact communities at baseline had a lower probability of experiencing a CHD event and CHD death or MI during the study follow-up period. One component of compactness, high residential density, had a particularly noteworthy effect on outcomes. Finally, exploratory analyses showed evidence that the effects of compactness were moderated by race and region. PMID:23376728

  8. Type A Behavior Pattern and Coronary Heart Disease: Philip Morris’s “Crown Jewel”

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley; McKee, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The type A behavior pattern (TABP) was described in the 1950s by cardiologists Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman, who argued that TABP was an important risk factor for coronary heart disease. This theory was supported by positive findings from the Western Collaborative Group Study and the Framingham Study. We analyzed tobacco industry documents to show that the tobacco industry was a major funder of TABP research, with selected results used to counter concerns regarding tobacco and health. Our findings also help explain inconsistencies in the findings of epidemiological studies of TABP, in particular the phenomenon of initially promising results followed by negative findings. Our analysis suggests that these “decline effects” are partly explained by tobacco industry involvement in TABP research. PMID:22994187

  9. Exercise Training and Cardiac Rehabilitation in Primary and Secondary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Carl J.; Thomas, Randal J.; Squires, Ray W.; Allison, Thomas G.; Milani, Richard V.

    2009-01-01

    Substantial data have established a sedentary lifestyle as a major modifiable risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Increased levels of physical activity, exercise training, and overall cardiorespiratory fitness have provided protection in the primary and secondary prevention of CHD. This review surveys data from observational studies supporting the benefits of physical activity, exercise training, and overall cardiorespiratory fitness in primary prevention. Clearly, cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention (CRSP) programs have been greatly underused by patients with CHD. We review the benefits of CRSP programs on CHD risk factors, psychological factors, and overall CHD morbidity and mortality. These data support the routine referral of patients with CHD to CRSP programs. Patients should be vigorously encouraged to attend these programs. PMID:19339657

  10. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time. PMID:21625092

  11. Coronary heart disease risk factors in men with light and dark skin in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed Central

    Costas, R; Garcia-Palmieri, M R; Sorlie, P; Hertzmark, E

    1981-01-01

    The association of skin color with coronary heart disease risk factors was studied in 4,000 urban Puerto Rican men. Skin color on the inner upper arm was classified according to the von Luschan color tiles. Using this grading, men were separated into two groups of light or dark skin color. The dark group had a lower socioeconomic status (SES) based on income, education, and occupation. Dark men had slightly higher mean systolic blood pressures (SBP) and lower mean serum cholesterol levels than the light, but the relative weights and cigarette smoking habits of both groups were similar. After controlling for the differences in SES, skin color showed a small but statistically significant association with SBP. Whether this association with skin color represents genetic or environmental influences on SBP could not be determined from this study. PMID:7235099

  12. Role of cis-Monounsaturated Fatty Acids in the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Joris, Peter J; Mensink, Ronald P

    2016-07-01

    The effects of cis-monounsaturated fatty acids (cis-MUFAs) on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and on CHD mortality are not clear. Also, dietary recommendations for cis-MUFA as derived by various organizations are not in agreement. Earlier studies have mainly focused on the effects of cis-MUFA on serum lipids and lipoproteins. More recent studies, however, have also addressed effects of cis-MUFA on other non-traditional CHD risk markers such as vascular function markers, postprandial vascular function, and energy intake and metabolism. Although well-designed randomized controlled trials with CHD events as endpoints are missing, several large prospective cohort studies have recently been published on the relationship between cis-MUFA and CHD risk. The aim of this paper is to review these new studies that have been published in the last 3 years on the effects of cis-MUFA on cardiovascular risk markers and CHD. PMID:27221500

  13. Overtime work and incident coronary heart disease: the Whitehall II prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, Marianna; Ferrie, Jane E.; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Shipley, Martin J.; Vahtera, Jussi; Marmot, Michael G.; Kivimäki, Mika

    2010-01-01

    Aims To examine the association between overtime work and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) among middle-aged employees. Methods and results Six thousand and fourteen British civil servants (4262 men and 1752 women), aged 39–61 years who were free from CHD and worked full time at baseline (1991–1994), were followed until 2002–2004, an average of 11 years. The outcome measure was incident fatal CHD, clinically verified incident non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), or definite angina (a total of 369 events). Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics showed that 3–4 h overtime work per day was associated with 1.60-fold (95% CI 1.15–2.23) increased risk of incident CHD compared with employees with no overtime work. Adjustment for all 21 cardiovascular risk factors measured made little difference to these estimates (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11–2.19). This association was replicated in multivariate analysis with only fatal cardiovascular disease and incident non-fatal MI as the outcome (HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.02–2.76). Conclusion Overtime work is related to increased risk of incident CHD independently of conventional risk factors. These findings suggest that overtime work adversely affects coronary health. PMID:20460389

  14. The european multifactorial preventive trial of coronary heart disease: four-year experience.

    PubMed

    Menotti, A

    1983-01-01

    The European Multifactorial Preventive Trial of Coronary Heart Disease operates in five centers in Belgium, Italy, Poland, Spain, and Great Britain with a total of 44 pairs of factories employing over 63,000 men aged 40-59. Pairs of factories were randomly allocated to either treatment or control. An entry screening for risk factors was offered to all men in treatment factories and to random samples of men in control factories. Those identified as relatively high-risk in treatment factories (upper 15-20%) were individually treated with advice for cholesterol lowering diet, smoking cessation, regular exercise, weight reduction, and drug control of hypertension, whereas mass education on the same subjects was given to non-high-risk individuals. Random samples of men were reexamined after 2 and 4 years in order to assess risk factor changes, with control groups serving as reference for naturally occurring trends. Changes of main risk factors recorded in different centers varied considerably. Pooled data showed a net reduction of 2.5% random sample (RS) and 5.8% high-risk (HR) for serum cholesterol; of 1.3% (RS) and 2.6% (HR) for systolic blood pressure; of 0.5% (RS) and 0.9% (HR) for body weight; and 8.8% (RS) and 15.2% (HR) for cigarette consumption. The net reduction of coronary risk estimated by the multiple logistic equation was 12% in RS and 17% in HR. PMID:6844301

  15. Genetics of coronary heart disease with reference to ApoAI-CIII-AIV gene region

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Suraksha; Mastana, Sarabjit

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are affected by multiple factors like genetic as well as environmental hence they reveal factorial nature. The evidences that genetic factors are susceptible for developing cardiovascular diseases come from twin studies and familial aggregation. Different ethnic populations reveal differences in the prevalence coronary artery disease (CAD) pointing towards the genetic susceptibility. With progression in molecular techniques different developments have been made to comprehend the disease physiology. Molecular markers have also assisted to recognize genes that may provide evidences to evaluate the role of genetic factors in causation of susceptibility towards CAD. Numerous studies suggest the contribution of specific “candidate genes”, which correlate with various roles/pathways that are involved in the coronary heart disease. Different studies have revealed that there are large numbers of genes which are involved towards the predisposition of CAD. However, these reports are not consistent. One of the reasons could be weak contribution of genetic susceptibility of these genes. Genome wide associations show different chromosomal locations which dock, earlier unknown, genes which may attribute to CAD. In the present review different ApoAI-CIII-AIV gene clusters have been discussed. PMID:25228954

  16. Anger Expression and Sleep Quality in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease: Findings From the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Caska, Catherine M.; Hendrickson, Bethany E.; Wong, Michelle H.; Ali, Sadia; Neylan, Thomas; Whooley, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if anger expression affects sleep quality in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Research has indicated that poor sleep quality independently predicts adverse outcomes in patients with CHD. Risk factors for poor sleep quality include older age, socioeconomic factors, medical comorbidities, lack of exercise, and depression. Methods We sought to examine the association of anger expression with sleep quality in 1020 outpatients with CHD from the Heart and Soul Study. We assessed anger-in, anger-out, and anger temperament, using the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2, and measured sleep quality, using items from the Cardiovascular Health Study and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. We used multivariate analysis of variance to examine the association between anger expression and sleep quality, adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results Each standard deviation (SD) increase in anger-in was associated with an 80% greater odds of poor sleep quality (odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.6–2.1; p < .0001). This association remained strong after adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, lifestyle factors, medications, cardiac function, depressive symptoms, anger-out, and anger temperament (adjusted OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.5–1.7; p = .001). In the same model, each SD increase in anger-out was associated with a 21% decreased odds of poor sleep quality (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.64–0.98; p = .03). Anger temperament was not independently associated with sleep quality. Conclusions Anger suppression is associated with poor sleep quality in patients with CHD. Whether modifying anger expression can improve sleep quality or reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality deserves further study. PMID:19251866

  17. Associations of high HDL cholesterol level with all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure complicating coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Anping; Li, Xida; Zhong, Qi; Li, Minming; Wang, Rui; Liang, Yingcong; Chen, Wenzhong; Huang, Tehui; Li, Xiaohong; Zhou, Yingling; Li, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in patients with ejection fraction reduced heart failure (EFrHF) complicating coronary heart disease (CHD). A total of 323 patients were retrospectively recruited. Patients were divided into low and high HDL cholesterol groups. Between-group differences and associations between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality were assessed. Patients in the high HDL cholesterol group had higher HDL cholesterol level and other lipid components (P <0.05 for all comparison). Lower levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and higher albumin (ALB) level were observed in the high HDL cholesterol group (P <0.05 for all comparison). Although left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were comparable (28.8 ± 4.5% vs 28.4 ± 4.6%, P = 0.358), mean mortality rate in the high HDL cholesterol group was significantly lower (43.5% vs 59.1%, P = 0.007). HDL cholesterol level was positively correlated with ALB level, while inversely correlated with ALT, Hs-CRP, and NYHA classification. Logistic regression analysis revealed that after extensively adjusted for confounding variates, HDL cholesterol level remained significantly associated with all-cause mortality although the magnitude of association was gradually attenuated with odds ratio of 0.007 (95% confidence interval 0.001–0.327, P = 0.012). Higher HDL cholesterol level is associated with better survival in patients with EFrHF complicating CHD, and future studies are necessary to demonstrate whether increasing HDL cholesterol level will confer survival benefit in these populations of patients. PMID:27428188

  18. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of radix stephaniae tetrandrae. II. Myocardial infarct, arrhythmias, coronary arterial flow and heart rate in the isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Yu, X C; Wu, S; Wang, G Y; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The primary purpose of the present study was to compare the cardioprotective effects of the extract from radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST) and its individual compounds, tetrandrine (Tet) and fanchinoline (Fan). Secondly, we also compared the cardiac effects of the individual compounds and the RST extract with those of verapamil, a classical Ca2+ channel blocker. The Langendorff isolated perfused rat heart preparation was used. Regional ischaemia and reperfusion was employed to induce myocardial infarct and arrhythmia. Infarct, arrhythmia, heart rate and coronary artery flow were determined in hearts treated with vehicle, RST extract, Tet, Fan, or verapamil. It was found that RST extract, of which only 9% was Tet, and Tet alone produced equally potent ameliorating effects on arrhythmia and infarct induced by ischaemia and reperfusion without further inhibiting ischaemia-reduced heart rate and coronary artery flow. Fan had no effects on arrhythmia and infarct induced by ischaemia and reperfusion; but it induced S-T segment elevation and further reduced heart rate and coronary artery flow during ischaemia. Verapamil also ameliorated the effects of ischaemia and reperfusion on arrhythmia and infarct. It should be noted that 1 microM verapamil, that produced comparable effects on infarct and arrhythmia to the RST extract and Tet, further inhibited heart rate during ischaemia. The results indicate that the RST extract produces equally potent cardioprotective and anti-arrhythmic effects as Tet alone. Both RST extract and Tet may be better choices for the treatment of arrhythmia and infarct induced by myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion than the classical Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil as they do not further reduce heart rate during ischaemia. PMID:11432452

  19. Optimal Cutoff Points of Anthropometric Parameters to Identify High Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several published studies have reported the need to change the cutoff points of anthropometric indices for obesity. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate anthropometric cutoff points predicting high coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in Korean adults. We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2007 to 2010. A total of 21,399 subjects aged 20 to 79 yr were included in this study (9,204 men and 12,195 women). We calculated the 10-yr Framingham coronary heart disease risk score for all individuals. We then estimated receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio to predict a 10-yr CHD risk of 20% or more. For sensitivity analysis, we conducted the same analysis for a 10-yr CHD risk of 10% or more. For a CHD risk of 20% or more, the area under the curve of waist-to-height ratio was the highest, followed by waist circumference and BMI. The optimal cutoff points in men and women were 22.7 kg/m2 and 23.3 kg/m2 for BMI, 83.2 cm and 79.7 cm for waist circumference, and 0.50 and 0.52 for waist-to-height ratio, respectively. In sensitivity analysis, the results were the same as those reported above except for BMI in women. Our results support the re-classification of anthropometric indices and suggest the clinical use of waist-to-height ratio as a marker for obesity in Korean adults. PMID:26770039

  20. Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women1234

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Teresa T; Malik, Vasanti; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Manson, JoAnn E; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have linked full-calorie sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) with greater weight gain and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective: We prospectively examined the association between consumption of SSBs and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. Design: Women (n = 88,520) from the Nurses' Health Study aged 34–59 y, without previously diagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, or diabetes in 1980, were followed from 1980 to 2004. Consumption of SSBs was derived from 7 repeated food-frequency questionnaires administered between 1980 and 2002. Relative risks (RRs) for CHD were calculated by using Cox proportional hazards models and adjusted for known cardiovascular disease risk factors. Results: During 24 y of follow-up, we ascertained 3105 incident cases of CHD (nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD). After standard and dietary risk factors were adjusted for, the RRs (and 95% CIs) of CHD according to categories of cumulative average of SSB consumption (<1/mo, 1–4/mo, 2–6/wk, 1/d, and ≥2 servings/d) were 1.0, 0.96 (0.87, 1.06), 1.04 (0.95, 1.14), 1.23 (1.06, 1.43), and 1.35 (1.07, 1.69) (P for trend < 0.001). Additional adjustment for body mass index, energy intake, and incident diabetes attenuated the associations, but they remained significant. Artificially sweetened beverages were not associated with CHD. Conclusion: Regular consumption of SSBs is associated with a higher risk of CHD in women, even after other unhealthful lifestyle or dietary factors are accounted for. PMID:19211821

  1. Degenerative lesions of a coronary chemoreceptor and nearby neural elements in the hearts of victims of sudden death.

    PubMed Central

    James, T. N.

    1986-01-01

    A coronary chemoreceptor and its neighboring nerves and ganglia were studied by serial sections of tissue taken from the hearts of sixteen victims of sudden unexpected death. Either focal or extensive inflammatory destruction was present in the chemoreceptors of 13 of the 16 hearts, and similar abnormalities of local nerves and ganglia were present in all 16 hearts. Since an identical coronary chemoreceptor in the dog has previously been shown to be the site of origin of a powerful reflex with major influence upon the electrical activity heart, the functional significance of the neural abnormalities found in these 16 human hearts may include important distortion of cardiac rhythm, conduction or repolarization. Future studies are needed to determine the prevalence of such lesions in the hearts of other victims of sudden death and among control subjects, as well as to determine the etiology of this special neuropathology of the heart. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3837961

  2. Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Attributable to Major Risk Factors is Similar in Argentina and the United States: the Coronary Heart Disease Policy Model

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Andrew; DeGennaro, Vincent; Ferrante, Daniel; Coxson, Pamela G.; Palmas, Walter; Mejia, Raul; Perez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Goldman, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in Argentina and the U.S. Argentina is 92% urban, with cardiovascular disease risk factor levels approximating the U.S. Methods The Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Policy Model is a national-scale computer model of CHD and stroke. Risk factor data were obtained from the Cardiovascular Risk Factor Multiple Evaluation in Latin America Study (2003–04), Argentina National Risk Factor Survey (2005) and U.S. national surveys. Proportions of cardiovascular events over 2005–2015 attributable to risk factors were simulated by setting risk factors to optimal exposure levels [systolic blood pressure (SBP) 115 mm Hg, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) 2.00 mmol/l (78 mg/dl), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) 1.03 mmol/l (60 mg/dl), absence of diabetes, and smoking]. Cardiovascular disease attributable to body mass index (BMI) > 21 kg/m2 was assumed mediated through SBP, LDL, HDL, and diabetes. Results Cardiovascular disease attributable to major risk factors was similar between Argentina and the U.S., except for elevated SBP in men (CHD 8 % points higher in Argentine men, 6% higher for stroke). CHD attributable to BMI > 21 kg/m2 was substantially higher in the U.S. (men 10–11 % points higher; women CHD 13–14% higher). Conclusions Projected cardiovascular disease attributable to major risk factors appeared similar in Argentina and the U.S., though elevated BMI may be responsible for more of U.S. cardiovascular disease. A highly urbanized middle-income nation can have cardiovascular disease rates and risk factor levels comparable to a high income nation, but fewer resources for fighting the epidemic. PMID:21550675

  3. Aspirate from human stented saphenous vein grafts induces epicardial coronary vasoconstriction and impairs perfusion and left ventricular function in rat bioassay hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Helmut R; Baars, Theodor; Kahlert, Philipp; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Stent implantation into aortocoronary saphenous vein grafts (SVG) releases particulate debris and soluble vasoactive mediators, for example, serotonin. We now analyzed effects of the soluble mediators released into the coronary arterial blood during stent implantation on vasomotion of isolated rat epicardial coronary artery segments and on coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary blood was retrieved during percutaneous SVG intervention using a distal occlusion/aspiration protection device in nine symptomatic patients with stable angina pectoris and a flow-limiting SVG stenosis. The blood was separated into particulate debris and plasma. Responses to coronary plasma were determined in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and in isolated, constant pressure-perfused rat hearts (±nitric oxide synthase [NOS] inhibition and ±serotonin receptor blockade, respectively). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induced a stronger vasoconstriction of rat epicardial coronary arteries (52 ± 8% of maximal potassium chloride induced vasoconstriction [% KClmax = 100%]) than plasma taken before stent implantation (12 ± 8% of KClmax); NOS inhibition augmented this vasoconstrictor response (to 110 ± 15% and 24 ± 9% of KClmax). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation reduced in isolated perfused rat hearts only under NOS inhibition coronary flow by 17 ± 3% and left ventricular developed pressure by 25 ± 4%. Blockade of serotonin receptors abrogated these effects. Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induces vasoconstriction in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and reduces coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27482071

  4. The interleukin-6 receptor as a target for prevention of coronary heart disease: a mendelian randomisation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background A high circulating concentration of interleukin 6 is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Blockade of the interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) with a monoclonal antibody (tocilizumab) licensed for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis reduces systemic and articular inflammation. However, whether IL6R blockade also reduces risk of coronary heart disease is unknown. Methods Applying the mendelian randomisation principle, we used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene IL6R to evaluate the likely efficacy and safety of IL6R inhibition for primary prevention of coronary heart disease. We compared genetic findings with the effects of tocilizumab reported in randomised trials in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Findings In 40 studies including up to 133 449 individuals, an IL6R SNP (rs7529229) marking a non-synonymous IL6R variant (rs8192284; p.Asp358Ala) was associated with increased circulating log interleukin-6 concentration (increase per allele 9·45%, 95% CI 8·34–10·57) as well as reduced C-reactive protein (decrease per allele 8·35%, 95% CI 7·31–9·38) and fibrinogen concentrations (decrease per allele 0·85%, 95% CI 0·60–1·10). This pattern of effects was consistent with IL6R blockade from infusions of tocilizumab (4–8 mg/kg every 4 weeks) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis studied in randomised trials. In 25 458 coronary heart disease cases and 100 740 controls, the IL6R rs7529229 SNP was associated with a decreased odds of coronary heart disease events (per allele odds ratio 0·95, 95% CI 0·93–0·97, p=1·53×10−5). Interpretation On the basis of genetic evidence in human beings, IL6R signalling seems to have a causal role in development of coronary heart disease. IL6R blockade could provide a novel therapeutic approach to prevention of coronary heart disease that warrants testing in suitably powered randomised trials. Genetic studies in populations could be used more widely to help to

  5. Maternal melatonin administration mitigates coronary stiffness and endothelial dysfunction, and improves heart resilience to insult in growth restricted lambs

    PubMed Central

    Tare, Marianne; Parkington, Helena C; Wallace, Euan M; Sutherland, Amy E; Lim, Rebecca; Yawno, Tamara; Coleman, Harold A; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with impaired cardiac function in childhood and is linked to short- and long-term morbidities. Placental dysfunction underlies most IUGR, and causes fetal oxidative stress which may impact on cardiac development. Accordingly, we investigated whether antenatal melatonin treatment, which possesses antioxidant properties, may afford cardiovascular protection in these vulnerable fetuses. IUGR was induced in sheep fetuses using single umbilical artery ligation on day 105–110 of pregnancy (term 147). Study 1: melatonin (2 mg h−1) was administered i.v. to ewes on days 5 and 6 after surgery. On day 7 fetal heart function was assessed using a Langendorff apparatus. Study 2: a lower dose of melatonin (0.25 mg h−1) was administered continuously following IUGR induction and the ewes gave birth normally at term. Lambs were killed when 24 h old and coronary vessels studied. Melatonin significantly improved fetal oxygenation in vivo. Contractile function in the right ventricle and coronary flow were enhanced by melatonin. Ischaemia–reperfusion-induced infarct area was 3-fold greater in IUGR hearts than in controls and this increase was prevented by melatonin. In isolated neonatal coronary arteries, endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability was reduced in IUGR, and was rescued by modest melatonin treatment. Melatonin exposure also induced the emergence of an indomethacin-sensitive vasodilation. IUGR caused marked stiffening of the coronary artery and this was prevented by melatonin. Maternal melatonin treatment reduces fetal hypoxaemia, improves heart function and coronary blood flow and rescues cardio-coronary deficit induced by IUGR. PMID:24710061

  6. The Recovery of Hibernating Hearts Lies on a Spectrum: from Bears in Nature to Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Robert W; Holley, Christopher T; Stone, Laura Hocum; Crampton, Melanie; Adabag, Selcuk; Garcia, Santiago; Iaizzo, Paul A; Ward, Herbert B; Kelly, Rosemary F; McFalls, Edward O

    2015-06-01

    Clinicians often use the term "hibernating myocardium" in reference to patients with ischemic heart disease and decreased function within viable myocardial regions. Because the term is a descriptor of nature's process of torpor, we provide a comparison of the adaptations observed in both conditions. In nature, hearts from hibernating animals undergo a shift in substrate preference in favor of fatty acids, while preserving glucose uptake and glycogen. Expression of electron transport chain proteins in mitochondria is decreased while antioxidant proteins including uncoupling protein-2 are increased. Similarly, hibernating hearts from patients have a comparable metabolic signature, with increased glucose uptake and glycogen accumulation and decreased oxygen consumption. In contrast to nature however, patients with hibernating hearts are at increased risk for arrhythmias, and contractility does not fully recover following revascularization. Clearly, additional interventions need to be advanced in patients with coronary artery disease and hibernating myocardium to prevent refractory heart failure. PMID:25946989

  7. Thermographic imaging in the beating heart: a method for coronary flow estimation based on a heat transfer model.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N; Rispler, S; Sideman, S; Shofty, R; Beyar, R

    1998-09-01

    Intraoperative thermographic imaging in open-chest conditions can provide the surgeon with important qualitative information regarding coronary flow by utilizing heat transfer analysis following injection of cold saline into the aortic root. The heat transfer model is based on the assumption that the epicardial temperature changes are mainly due to convection of heat by the blood flow, which may, therefore, be estimated by measuring the temperature variations. Hearts of eight dogs were exposed and imaged by a thermographic camera. Flow in the left arterial descending (LAD) coronary branch was measured by a transit-time flowmeter. 20 ml of cold saline were injected into the aortic root (just after the aortic valve) and the epicardial temperature images were recorded at end-diastole, for 20-30 s. Different flow rates were achieved by 1 min occlusion of the LAD, which affected a reactive hyperemic response. The dynamics of the temperature in the arterial coronary tree was obtained by averaging the temperature over an edge-detected arterial segment for each frame. The heat transfer equation was curve-fitted, and the flow-dependent heat transfer index was correlated with the experimentally determined coronary flow (r = 0.69, p < 0.001). In summary: a method for quantitative estimation of coronary blood flow by thermography and heat transfer analysis was developed and tested in animal experiments. This method can provide important information regarding coronary blood flow during open-chest surgical procedures. PMID:9796950

  8. Going High with Heart Disease: The Effect of High Altitude Exposure in Older Individuals and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, Benjamin D

    2015-06-01

    Levine, Benjamin D. Going high with heart disease: The effect of high altitude exposure in older individuals and patients with coronary artery disease. High Alt Med Biol 16:89-96, 2015.--Ischemic heart disease is the largest cause of death in older men and women in the western world (Lozano et al., 2012 ; Roth et al., 2015). Atherosclerosis progresses with age, and thus age is the dominant risk factor for coronary heart disease in any algorithm used to assess risk for cardiovascular events. Subclinical atherosclerosis also increases with age, providing the substrate for precipitation of acute coronary syndromes. Thus the risk of high altitude exposure in older individuals is linked closely with both subclinical and manifest coronary heart disease (CHD). There are several considerations associated with taking patients with CHD to high altitude: a) The reduced oxygen availability may cause or exacerbate symptoms; b) The hypoxia and other associated environmental conditions (exercise, dehydration, change in diet, thermal stress, emotional stress from personal danger or conflict) may precipitate acute coronary events; c) If an event occurs and the patient is far from advanced medical care, then the outcome of an acute coronary event may be poor; and d) Sudden death may occur. Physicians caring for older patients who want to sojourn to high altitude should keep in mind the following four key points: 1). Altitude may exacerbate ischemic heart disease because of both reduced O2 delivery and paradoxical vasoconstriction; 2). Adverse events, including acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death, are most common in older unfit men, within the first few days of altitude exposure; 3). Ensuring optimal fitness, allowing for sufficient acclimatization (at least 5 days), and optimizing medical therapy (especially statins and aspirin) are prudent recommendations that may reduce the risk of adverse events; 4). A graded exercise test at sea level is probably sufficient for

  9. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the heart is smaller because it pumps blood only to the lungs. The left coronary artery, ... heart is larger and more muscular because it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Updated August ...

  10. Left ventricular volume during supine exercise: importance of myocardial scar in patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, D.L.; Scharf, J.; Ahnve, S.; Gilpin, E.

    1987-01-01

    Existing studies suggest that exercise-induced ischemia produces an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume; however, all of these studies have included patients with previous myocardial infarction. To test whether the end-diastolic volume response to exercise is related to the extent of myocardial scar, the results of gated radionuclide supine exercise tests performed on 130 subjects were reviewed. The patient group comprised 130 subjects were reviewed. The patient group comprised 130 men aged 35 to 65 years (mean +/- SD 52 +/- 5) with documented coronary heart disease. The extent of myocardial ischemia and scar formation was assessed by stress electrocardiography and thallium-201 scintigraphy. Patients were classified into three groups on the basis of left ventricular end-diastolic volume response at peak exercise: group 1 (n = 72) had an increase of end-diastolic volume greater than 10%, group 2 (n = 41) had a change in end-diastolic volume less than 10% and group 3 (n = 17) had a decrease in end-diastolic volume greater than 10% (n = 17). At rest there was no significant difference among groups in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, end-diastolic (EDVrest) or end-systolic volumes or ejection fraction (p greater than 0.05); however, at peak exercise the end-systolic volume response was significantly greater for group 1 (p less than 0.002).

  11. Diagonal earlobe crease: a coronary risk factor, a genetic marker of coronary heart disease, or a mere wrinkle. Ancient Greco-Roman evidence.

    PubMed

    Guţiu, I A; Galeţescu, E; Guţiu, L I; Răducu, L

    1996-01-01

    In a new study on the relationship between the diagonal earlobe crease (DELC), first described by Frank in 1973, and the presence of chronic ischemic heart disease, four main hypotheses are presented. Hypothesis 1: DELC is a coronary risk factor or a marker of coronary risk factor. Hypothesis 2: DELC is a genetic marker of atherosclerotic coronary disease. Hypothesis 3: DELC is, in fact, the result of aging and the relationship with atherosclerotic coronary disease is mere coincidence. Hypothesis 4: DELC is an anatomic peculiarity of the ear lobe, perhaps the result of a particular way of sleeping. These hypotheses are discussed in the light of the most important results obtained so far, in the literature and in the author's personal studies. Moreover, the data reported by Petrakis, who was the first to mention in 1980 the presence of this sign in some of the Greco-Roman sculptures in the museums of Rome, are corroborated by the observations of one of the authors, made in the Louvre Museum in Paris. PMID:9167228

  12. Trends in the incidence and mortality of coronary heart disease in asian pacific region: the Singapore experience.

    PubMed

    Meng Khoo, Chin; Tai, E Shyong

    2014-01-01

    The rates of coronary heart disease are lower in Asia than in developed countries. Singapore has undergone rapid urbanization over the past several decades. In the several decades between the 1960s and 1980s, a rapid increase in the rates of ischemic heart disease was observed, to the extent that Singapore exhibits one of the highest rates of mortality from cardiovascular disease in the Asia-Pacific region, higher even than the rates in North America. Rates of cardiovascular disease have now stabilized, and are declining. This is, a pattern that has been observed in many developed countries. Increased life expectancy has resulted in an epidemiologic transition that has seen chronic non-communicable diseases replace malnutrition and infections as the major causes of mortality. At the same time, there have been changes in nutrient intake and physical activity as well as rapid increases in the levels of several cardiovascular risk factors including obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, when present, there is a lack of awareness and sub-optimal treatment of these risk factors. In addition to the changes in environmental exposures related to socio-economic development, it does appear that specific populations are particularly prone to the development of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors. In particular, Asian Indians experience a high rate of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus. Emerging data suggests that Chinese may be particularly prone to the adverse effects of obesity in relation to insulin resistance and inflammation. A concerted effort to change lifestyles to prevent the development of coronary heart disease risk factors, and to improve awareness and treatment of risk factors when then develop, is required to halt the epidemic of coronary heart disease that is occurring in Asia. PMID:24452111

  13. Prospective Coronary Heart Disease Screening in Asymptomatic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Using Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Results and Risk Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, Theodore; M’Kacher, Radhia; Koscielny, Serge; Elfassy, Eric; Raoux, François; Carde, Patrice; Santos, Marcos Dos; Margainaud, Jean-Pierre; Sabatier, Laure; Paul, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the coronary artery status using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma treated with combined modalities and mediastinal irradiation. Methods and Materials: All consecutive asymptomatic patients with Hodgkin lymphoma entered the study during follow-up, from August 2007 to May 2012. Coronary CT angiography was performed, and risk factors were recorded along with leukocyte telomere length (LTL) measurements. Results: One hundred seventy-nine patients entered the 5-year study. The median follow-up was 11.6 years (range, 2.1-40.2 years), and the median interval between treatment and the CCTA was 9.5 years (range, 0.5-40 years). Coronary artery abnormalities were demonstrated in 46 patients (26%). Coronary CT angiography abnormalities were detected in nearly 15% of the patients within the first 5 years after treatment. A significant increase (34%) occurred 10 years after treatment (P=.05). Stenoses were mostly nonostial. Severe stenoses were observed in 12 (6.7%) of the patients, entailing surgery with either angioplasty with stent placement or bypass grafting in 10 of them (5.5%). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that age at treatment, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, as well as radiation dose to the coronary artery origins, were prognostic factors. In the group of patients with LTL measurements, hypertension and LTL were the only independent risk factors. Conclusions: The findings suggest that CCTA can identify asymptomatic individuals at risk of acute coronary artery disease who might require either preventive or curative measures. Conventional risk factors and the radiation dose to coronary artery origins were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic value of LTL needs further investigation.

  14. Reexamining the Efficacy and Value of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, William S; Boden, William E

    2016-08-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) continues to be performed frequently for patients with stable ischemic heart disease, despite uncertain efficacy. Individual randomized trial data and meta-analyses have not demonstrated that PCI in addition to optimal medical therapy reduces the incidence of death or myocardial infarction in patients with stable disease. The Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation (COURAGE) Trial did not show benefit for cardiovascular outcomes or mortality but did find a modest improvement in quality of life that did not persist at 3 years. Long-term follow-up from COURAGE (up to 15 years) found no differences in mortality, consistent with other published literature. How PCI could reduce long-term mortality or prevent myocardial infarction is not clear because sites of future plaque rupture leading to myocardial infarction are unpredictable and PCI can only treat localized anatomic segments of obstructive atherosclerosis. In addition, PCI is expensive, and the value to society of PCI for stable disease has not been demonstrated. The ISCHEMIA trial will assess the role of PCI for stable ischemic heart disease using newer technology and in patients with greater ischemic burden than in COURAGE. After nearly a decade, the COURAGE trial and other studies have given us pause to critically reexamine the role of PCI for patients with stable ischemic heart disease. Until further research can show that PCI can reduce cardiovascular events in these patients, a first-line strategy of optimal medical therapy is known to be safe, effective, and noninferior to PCI, and our practice should more closely follow this strategy. PMID:27380178

  15. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Mok, Greta S. P.; Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu; Yang, Ching-Ching; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm.MaterialsAll reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique.ResultsNo statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients.ConclusionThis study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  16. What Causes Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors ... Microvascular Disease? The same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis may cause coronary microvascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a ...

  17. Combining salicylate and enalapril in patients with coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Baur, L. H.; Schipperheyn, J. J.; van der Laarse, A.; Souverijn, J. H.; Frölich, M.; de Groot, A.; Voogd, P. J.; Vroom, T. F.; Cats, V. M.; Keirse, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the effects of adding a salicylate to the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril in patients with heart failure due to coronary artery disease. DESIGN--Double blind, crossover study for three days in hospital followed by an extended similar study outside hospital over two months of once daily enalapril plus salicylate and enalapril plus placebo. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--20 patients with heart failure due to myocardial infarction (New York Heart Association class II or III) and an ejection fraction less than 0.40. Twelve patients completed the two parts of the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Blood pressure, plasma converting enzyme activity; plasma angiotensin II and noradrenaline concentrations; excretion of metabolites of renal and systemic prostanoids. RESULTS--The unloading effect of first and second dose of enalapril in the morning lasted only during the day; in the extended study it lasted 24 hours because of the drug's accumulation. Converting enzyme inhibitors attenuate the breakdown of bradykinin and therefore enhance prostaglandin E2 synthesis mediated by bradykinin. Evidence was found of such a prostaglandin E2 mediated contribution to ventricular unloading by enalapril, which was blocked by salicylate. The contribution, however, was small and variable, and salicylate addition had on average no significant de-unloading effect during the day. Unloading was abolished in only three of the 20 patients in the short term study and in one of the 12 in the extended study. At night, when other effects of enalapril on blood pressure had waned and the bradykinin induced effect persisted, salicylate significantly reduced the remaining small unloading effect. No effect was seen of salicylate addition on reversal of remodelling. Enalapril reduced angiotensin II induced synthesis of systemic and renal prostaglandin I2 and thromboxane A2, initially only during the day, but later also at night. It thereby masked suppression

  18. GENETIC VARIATION IN SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE (EPHX2) AND RISK OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE: THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN COMMUNITIES (ARIC) STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). Soluble epoxide hydrolase metabolizes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in the vasculature and regulates endothelial function. We sought to determine whether genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) was ass...

  19. Genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) and risk of coronary heart disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). Soluble epoxide hydrolase metabolizes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in the vasculature and regulates endothelial function. We sought to determine whether genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) was ass...

  20. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries to determine your risk for heart disease Congenital heart disease (heart problems that are present at birth) Problems ... Abnormal results may be due to: Aneurysm Congenital heart disease ... Narrowing of one or more coronary arteries (coronary artery ...

  1. [Extended hypothermic heart-lung preservation system for cardiopulmonary preservation with retrograde coronary sinus perfusion and lung immersion].

    PubMed

    Senoo, Y; Bando, K; Tago, M; Seno, S; Teraoka, H; Teramoto, S

    1990-09-01

    One major restriction of clinical heart-lung transplantation has been the inability to provide extended hypothermic organ preservation. We examined whether core-cooling, retrograde heart perfusion and lung immersion could provide adequate cardiopulmonary preservation. Hence, donor dogs were placed on cardiopulmonary bypass, and rapidly cooled to 15 degrees C. Then heterotopic heart unilateral left lung transplantations were performed. In control group I (n = 5), hearts and lungs were harvested following core-cooling and cardioplegic arrest, and transplanted immediately. In experimental group II (n = 5), heart-lung blocks were similarly excised but stored at 4 degrees C for 12 hours and then transplanted. During preservation, the lungs were immersed in the extracellular solution. For the heart, non-recirculating retrograde coronary sinus perfusion was performed with oxygenated intracellular solution containing perfluorochemicals. Myocardial function determined by the ratio of end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension in the experimental group was similar to that in controls. Although pulmonary vascular resistance and extravascular lung water of the experimental group was higher than those in control group, arterial oxygenation was similar in both groups. Thus, extended heart-lung preservation with core-cooling, retrograde heart perfusion and lung immersion technique could be achieved for heart-lung transplantation. PMID:2246529

  2. Modelling Future Coronary Heart Disease Mortality to 2030 in the British Isles

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, John; Kabir, Zubair; Bennett, Kathleen; Hotchkiss, Joel W.; Kee, Frank; Leyland, Alastair H.; Davies, Carolyn; Bandosz, Piotr; Guzman-Castillo, Maria; O’Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon; Critchley, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite rapid declines over the last two decades, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates in the British Isles are still amongst the highest in Europe. This study uses a modelling approach to compare the potential impact of future risk factor scenarios relating to smoking and physical activity levels, dietary salt and saturated fat intakes on future CHD mortality in three countries: Northern Ireland (NI), Republic of Ireland (RoI) and Scotland. Methods CHD mortality models previously developed and validated in each country were extended to predict potential reductions in CHD mortality from 2010 (baseline year) to 2030. Risk factor trends data from recent surveys at baseline were used to model alternative future risk factor scenarios: Absolute decreases in (i) smoking prevalence and (ii) physical inactivity rates of up to 15% by 2030; relative decreases in (iii) dietary salt intake of up to 30% by 2030 and (iv) dietary saturated fat of up to 6% by 2030. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were then conducted. Results Projected populations in 2030 were 1.3, 3.4 and 3.9 million in NI, RoI and Scotland respectively (adults aged 25–84). In 2030: assuming recent declining mortality trends continue: 15% absolute reductions in smoking could decrease CHD deaths by 5.8–7.2%. 15% absolute reductions in physical inactivity levels could decrease CHD deaths by 3.1–3.6%. Relative reductions in salt intake of 30% could decrease CHD deaths by 5.2–5.6% and a 6% reduction in saturated fat intake might decrease CHD deaths by some 7.8–9.0%. These projections remained stable under a wide range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Feasible reductions in four cardiovascular risk factors (already achieved elsewhere) could substantially reduce future coronary deaths. More aggressive polices are therefore needed in the British Isles to control tobacco, promote healthy food and increase physical activity. PMID:26422012

  3. Predicting Coronary Heart Disease Events in Women: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, Jean; Cleves, Mario A.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Moser, Debra K.; Wei, Jeanne; Pettey, Christina; Rojo, Martha O.; Armbya, Narain

    2013-01-01

    Background Over 240,000 women die in the U.S. from coronary heart disease (CHD) annually. Identifying women’s symptoms that predict a CHD event such as myocardial infarction (MI) could decrease mortality. Objective For this longitudinal observational study, we recruited 1097 women, who were either clinician or self-referred to a cardiologist and undergoing initial evaluation by a cardiologist, to assess the utility of the prodromal symptoms (PS) section of the McSweeney Acute and Prodromal Myocardial Infarction Symptom Survey (MAPMISS) in predicting the occurrence of cardiac events in women. Methods and Results Seventy-seven women experienced events (angioplasty, stent placement, coronary artery bypass, MI, death) during the two-year follow up. The most common events were stents alone (38.9%) or in combination with angioplasty (18.2%). Ten women had MIs; 4 experienced cardiac death. Cox proportional hazards was used to model time to event. The prodromal score was significantly associated with risk of an event (HR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06–1.13), as was the number of PS endorsed by each woman per visit. After covariate adjustment, five symptoms were significantly associated with increased risk: discomfort in jaws/teeth, unusual fatigue, arm discomfort, shortness of breath and general chest discomfort (HR = 3.97, 95% CI = 2.32–6.78). Women reporting >1of these symptoms were 4 times as likely to suffer a cardiac event as women with none. Conclusions Both the MAPMISS PS scores and number of PS were significantly associated with cardiac events, independent of risk factors, suggesting there are specific PS that can be easily assessed using the MAPMISS. This instrument could be an important component of a predictive screen to assist clinicians in deciding the course of management for women. PMID:24231895

  4. Long-term, regular remote ischemic preconditioning improves endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; Li, Y P; He, F; Liu, X Q; Zhang, J Y

    2015-06-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPre) can prevent myocardial injury. The purpose of this study was to assess the beneficial effects of long-term regular RIPre on human arteries. Forty patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were assigned randomly to a RIPre group (n=20) or coronary heart disease (CHD) group (n=20). Twenty patients scheduled for mastectomy were enrolled as a control group. RIPre was achieved by occluding arterial blood flow 5 min with a mercury sphygmomanometer followed by a 5-min reperfusion period, and this was repeated 4 times. The RIPre procedure was repeated 3 times a day for 20 days. In all patients, arterial fragments discarded during surgery were collected to evaluate endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), CD34(+) monocyte count, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression). Phosphorylation levels of STAT-3 and Akt were also assayed to explore the underlying mechanisms. Compared with the CHD group, long-term regular RIPre significantly improved FMD after 20 days (8.5±2.4 vs 4.9±4.2%, P<0.05) and significantly reduced troponin after CABG surgery (0.72±0.31 and 1.64±0.19, P<0.05). RIPre activated STAT-3 and increased CD34(+) endothelial progenitor cell counts found in arteries. Long-term, regular RIPre improved endothelial function in patients with CHD, possibly due to STAT-3 activation, and this may have led to an increase in endothelial progenitor cells. PMID:25923462

  5. Multivariate Meta-Analysis of Preference-Based Quality of Life Values in Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stevanović, Jelena; Pechlivanoglou, Petros; Kampinga, Marthe A.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are numerous health-related quality of life (HRQol) measurements used in coronary heart disease (CHD) in the literature. However, only values assessed with preference-based instruments can be directly applied in a cost-utility analysis (CUA). Objective To summarize and synthesize instrument-specific preference-based values in CHD and the underlying disease-subgroups, stable angina and post-acute coronary syndrome (post-ACS), for developed countries, while accounting for study-level characteristics, and within- and between-study correlation. Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify studies reporting preference-based values in CHD. A multivariate meta-analysis was applied to synthesize the HRQoL values. Meta-regression analyses examined the effect of study level covariates age, publication year, prevalence of diabetes and gender. Results A total of 40 studies providing preference-based values were detected. Synthesized estimates of HRQoL in post-ACS ranged from 0.64 (Quality of Well-Being) to 0.92 (EuroQol European”tariff”), while in stable angina they ranged from 0.64 (Short form 6D) to 0.89 (Standard Gamble). Similar findings were observed in estimates applying to general CHD. No significant improvement in model fit was found after adjusting for study-level covariates. Large between-study heterogeneity was observed in all the models investigated. Conclusions The main finding of our study is the presence of large heterogeneity both within and between instrument-specific HRQoL values. Current economic models in CHD ignore this between-study heterogeneity. Multivariate meta-analysis can quantify this heterogeneity and offers the means for uncertainty around HRQoL values to be translated to uncertainty in CUAs. PMID:27011260

  6. Predictors and Outcomes of Routine Versus Optimal Medical Therapy in Stable Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Chun, Soohun; Qiu, Feng; Austin, Peter C; Ko, Dennis T; Mamdani, Muhammad; Wijeysundera, Duminda N; Czarnecki, Andrew; Bennell, Maria C; Wijeysundera, Harindra C

    2015-09-01

    Although randomized studies have shown optimal medical therapy (OMT) to be as efficacious as revascularization in stable coronary heart disease (CHD), the application of OMT in routine practice is suboptimal. We sought to understand the predictors of receiving OMT in stable CHD and its impact on clinical outcomes. All patients with stable CHD based on coronary angiography from October 2008 to September 2011 were identified in Ontario, Canada. OMT was defined as concurrent use of β blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, and statin. Aspirin use was not part of the OMT definition because of database limitations. Multivariable hierarchical logistic models identified predictors of OMT in the 12 months after angiography. Cox proportional hazard models with time-varying covariates for OMT and revascularization status examined differences in death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI). In these models, patients transitioned among 4 mutually exclusive treatment groups: no OMT and no revascularization, no OMT and revascularization, OMT and no revascularization, OMT and revascularization. Our cohort had 20,663 patients. Over a mean period of 2.5 years, 8.7% had died. Only 61% received OMT within 12 months. The strongest predictor of receiving OMT at 12 months was OMT before the angiogram (odds ratio 14.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 13.17 to 15.75, p <0.001). Relative to no OMT and nonrevascularized patients, patients on OMT and revascularized had the greatest reduction in mortality (hazard ratio 0.52, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.60, p <0.001) and nonfatal MI (hazard ratio 0.74, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.84, p <0.001). In conclusion, our study highlights the low rate of OMT in stable CHD. Patients who received both OMT and revascularization achieved the greatest reduction in mortality and nonfatal MI. PMID:26119653

  7. Effect of trimetazidine on heart rate variability in elderly patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; He, Shenghu; Wang, Xuefei; Wang, Daxin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Trimetazidine has mainly been used in coronary insufficiency, angina and elderly myocardial infarction. However, the effect of trimetazidine on the efficacy, heart rate variability (HRV) and protection of myocardial ischemia in elderly patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of trimetazidine on the efficacy HRV and protection of myocardial ischemia in patients with ACS. Methods: One hundred twenty two elderly ACS patients who were above 70 years were chosen and randomly divided into two groups. One group was given conventional therapy, such as aspirin, isosorbide mononitrate and fluvastatin, and the other group was administered trimetazidine in addition to conventional therapy. The treatment period was eight weeks. A PI-2.22B three-channel AECG system was used on every patient for 24 hour dynamic electrocardiogram monitoring and HRV analyses on the first day after admission and eight weeks after treatment. HRV, 24 hour RR intermediate stage standard deviation (SDNN), five minutes average normal cardiac cycle standard deviation in 24 hour (SDANN), 24 hour close together normal cardiac cycle difference value mean square root (rMSSD), the percentage of difference of close together RR intermediate > 50 ms account total RR intermediate (PNN50), high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) parameters of patients were observed before and after treatment. Results: The SDNN, SDANN, rMSSD, PNN50 and HF parameters significantly increased compared with the conventional treatment group (all P < 0.05). LF and LF/HF were significantly decreased in the trimetazidine treatment group compared with those in the conventional treatment group (all P < 0.05). Conclusion: Trimetazidine improves HRV of elderly ACS patients and reduces cardiovascular events. PMID:27022349

  8. Rationale and Design of the Leipzig (LIFE) Heart Study: Phenotyping and Cardiovascular Characteristics of Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Frank; Teupser, Daniel; Gielen, Stephan; Holdt, Lesca Miriam; Scholz, Markus; Boudriot, Enno; Schuler, Gerhard; Thiery, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Objective We established the Leipzig (LIFE) Heart Study, a biobank and database of patients with different stages of coronary artery disease (CAD) for studies of clinical, metabolic, cellular and genetic factors of cardiovascular diseases. Design The Leipzig (LIFE) Heart Study (NCT00497887) is an ongoing observational angiographic study including subjects with different entities of CAD. Cohort 1, patients undergoing first-time diagnostic coronary angiography due to suspected stable CAD with previously untreated coronary arteries. Cohort 2, patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) requiring percutaneous revascularization. Cohort 3, patients with known left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD). Results We present preliminary results of demographics and phenotyping based on a 4-years analysis of a total of 3,165 subjects. Cohort 1 (n = 2,274) shows the typical distribution of elective coronary angiography cohorts with 43% cases with obstructive CAD and 37% normal angiograms. Cohorts 2 and 3 consist of 590 and 301 subjects, respectively, adding patients with severe forms of CAD. The suitability of the database and biobank to perform association studies was confirmed by replication of the CAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 9p21 (OR per allele: 1.55 (any CAD), 1.54 (MI), 1.74 (LMCAD), p<10−6, respectively). A novel finding was that patients with LMCAD had a stronger association with 9p21 than patients with obstructive CAD without LMCAD (OR 1.22, p = 0.042). In contrast, 9p21 did not associate with myocardial infarction in excess of stable CAD. Conclusion The Leipzig (LIFE) Heart Study provides a basis to identify molecular targets related to atherogenesis and associated metabolic disorders. The study may contribute to an improvement of individual prediction, prevention, and treatment of CAD. PMID:22216169

  9. Deciphering the Causal Role of sPLA2s and Lp-PLA2 in Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Talmud, Philippa J; Holmes, Michael V

    2015-11-01

    Over the last 10 to 15 years, animal and human observational studies have identified elevated levels of both proinflammatory secretory phospholipase A2-IIA and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 as potential risk factors for coronary heart disease. However, Mendelian randomization, a genetic tool to test causality of a biomarker, and phase III randomized controlled trials of inhibitors of theses enzymes (varespladib and darapladib) converged to indicate that elevated levels are unlikely to be themselves causal of coronary heart disease and that inhibition had little or no clinical utility. The concordance of findings from Mendelian randomization and clinical trials suggests that for these 2 drugs, and for other novel biomarkers in future, validation of potential therapeutic targets by genetic studies (such as Mendelian randomization) before embarking on costly phase III randomized controlled trials could increase efficiency and offset the high risk of drug development, thereby facilitating discovery of new therapeutics and mitigating against the exuberant costs of drug development. PMID:26338298

  10. Monitoring changes in heart tissue temperature and evaluation of graft function after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    PubMed

    Lekas, Raimundas; Jakuska, Povilas; Krisciukaitis, Algimantas; Veikutis, Vincentas; Dzemyda, Gintautas; Mickevicius, Tomas; Morkūnaite, Kristina; Vilke, Alina; Treigys, Povilas; Civinskiene, Genuvaite; Andriuskevicius, Jonas; Vanagas, Tomas; Skauminas, Kestutis; Bernatoniene, Jurga

    2009-01-01

    Thermography is a relatively new contact-free method used in experimental and clinical studies and in cardiovascular surgery to investigate the myocardium and coronary artery function. Objects of complex study included mongrel dogs and patients with coronary artery disease who underwent cardiac surgery. For active dynamic thermography, we used a thermovision camera "A20V" (FLIR Systems, USA). Our data indicate that both experimental and clinical study performed on beating hearts could be an important approach to interoperation inspection of autovenous graft function. An infrared camera also can be successfully used to determine the extent of ischemic damage to the myocardium, heart, and blood vessels during surgery as a significant prognostic tool for evaluating outcome after cardiac operation. PMID:19357452

  11. Prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation on clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Aashay; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Pau, Dhaval; Patel, Samir; Thakkar, Badal; Nalluri, Nikhil; Asti, Deepak; Kanotra, Ritesh; Kadavath, Sabeeda; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Achint; Sheikh, Azfar; Patel, Neil; Badheka, Apurva O; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Paydak, Hakan; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of sustained arrhythmia, which is now on course to reach epidemic proportions in the elderly population. AF is a commonly encountered comorbidity in patients with cardiac and major non-cardiac diseases. Morbidity and mortality associated with AF makes it a major healthcare burden. The objective of our article is to determine the prognostic impact of AF on acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Multiple studies have been conducted to determine if AF has an independent role in the overall mortality of such patients. Our review suggests that AF has an independent adverse prognostic impact on the clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26225200

  12. MedlinePlus: Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Blood Institute Start Here Coronary Artery Bypass (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Coronary Artery Bypass ... and Blood Institute) Specifics Limited-Access Heart Surgery (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Types of Coronary ...

  13. Effects of reduced coronary flow on thallium-201 accumulation and release in an in vitro rat heart preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, S.Z.; Newell, J.B.; Ingwall, J.S.; Pohost, G.M.; Alpert, N.M.; Fossel, E.T.

    1983-03-01

    To study the relation between myocardial thallium-201 (TI-201) uptake, TI-201 release, and reduced coronary flow, isolated Langendorff rat hearts (n . 8) were perfused for 3 hours at constant flows ranging from physiologic (12 ml/min) to severely ischemic (1.5 ml/min); thallium activity was monitored with a scintillation probe. Each heart was perfused for 1 hour with thallium buffer, followed by 2 hours with thallium-free buffer at the same flow rate. Accumulation curves for all 4 flows were monoexponential. However, release curves during the 2 hours of washout with thallium-free buffer demonstrated a biexponential configuration. The early fast release component decreased with reductions in coronary flow, and the later slow release component did not vary significantly with flow. These data show that thallium clearance has at least 2 components: a rapid (possibly extracellular) component related to coronary flow and a slow (possibly intracellular) component independent of coronary flow. These findings should be useful in providing a better understanding of thallium redistribution observed clinically.

  14. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., 2000. The method, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the Center for Food Safety and... of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.83 Section 101.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  15. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., 2000. The method, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the Center for Food Safety and... of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.83 Section 101.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  16. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., 2000. The method, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the Center for Food Safety and... of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.83 Section 101.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  17. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., 2000. The method, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the Center for Food Safety and... of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.83 Section 101.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  18. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., 2000. The method, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the Center for Food Safety and... of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.83 Section 101.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  19. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome: A review and expert consensus opinion.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, Michael; Cohen-Solál, Alain; Costa, Susana; Édes, István; Erlikh, Alexey; Franco, Fatima; Gibson, Charles; Gorjup, Vojka; Guarracino, Fabio; Gustafsson, Finn; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Husebye, Trygve; Karason, Kristjan; Katsytadze, Igor; Kaul, Sundeep; Kivikko, Matti; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Masip, Josep; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Møller, Jacob E; Nessler, Jadwiga; Nessler, Bohdan; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Oliva, Fabrizio; Pichler-Cetin, Emel; Põder, Pentti; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Rex, Steffen; Rokyta, Richard; Strasser, Ruth H; Zima, Endre; Pollesello, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure, and especially in cardiogenic shock related to ischemic conditions, vasopressors and inotropes are used. However, both pathophysiological considerations and available clinical data suggest that these treatments may have disadvantageous effects. The inodilator levosimendan offers potential benefits due to a range of distinct effects including positive inotropy, restoration of ventriculo-arterial coupling, increases in tissue perfusion, and anti-stunning and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials levosimendan improves symptoms, cardiac function, hemodynamics, and end-organ function. Adverse effects are generally less common than with other inotropic and vasoactive therapies, with the notable exception of hypotension. The decision to use levosimendan, in terms of timing and dosing, is influenced by the presence of pulmonary congestion, and blood pressure measurements. Levosimendan should be preferred over adrenergic inotropes as a first line therapy for all ACS-AHF patients who are under beta-blockade and/or when urinary output is insufficient after diuretics. Levosimendan can be used alone or in combination with other inotropic or vasopressor agents, but requires monitoring due to the risk of hypotension. PMID:27232927

  20. ECG and Navigator-Free 4D Whole-Heart Coronary MRA for Simultaneous Visualization of Cardiac Anatomy and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jianing; Sharif, Behzad; Fan, Zhaoyang; Bi, Xiaoming; Arsanjani, Reza; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a cardiac and respiratory self-gated 4D coronary MRA technique for simultaneous cardiac anatomy and function visualization. Methods A contrast-enhanced, ungated spoiled gradient echo sequence with self-gating (SG) and 3DPR trajectory was used for image acquisition. Data was retrospectively binned into different cardiac and respiratory phases based on information extracted from SG projections using principal component analysis. Each cardiac phase was reconstructed using a respiratory motion-corrected self-calibrating SENSE framework, and those belong to the quiescent period were retrospectively combined for coronary visualization. Healthy volunteer studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the SG method, the accuracy of the left ventricle (LV) function parameters and the quality of coronary artery visualization. Results SG performed reliably for all subjects including one with poor ECG. The LV function parameters showed excellent agreement with those from a conventional cine protocol. For coronary imaging, the proposed method yielded comparable apparent SNR and coronary sharpness and lower apparent CNR on three subjects compared with an ECG and navigator-gated Cartesian protocol and an ECG-gated, respiratory motion-corrected 3DPR protocol. Conclusion A fully self-gated 4D whole-heart imaging technique was developed, potentially allowing cardiac anatomy and function assessment from a single measurement. PMID:25216287

  1. Interpretation of Clinical Data Based on C4.5 Algorithm for the Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kusnanto, Hari; Herianto, Herianto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The interpretation of clinical data for the diagnosis of coronary heart disease can be done using algorithms in data mining. Most clinical data interpretation systems for diagnosis developed using data mining algorithms with a black-box approach cannot recognize examination attribute relationships with the incidence of coronary heart disease. Methods This study proposes a system to interpretation clinical examination results for the diagnosis of coronary heart disease based the decision tree algorithm. This system comprises several stages. First, oversampling is carried out by a combination of the synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE), feature selection, and the C4.5 classification algorithm. System testing is done using k-fold cross-validation. The performance parameters are sensitivity, specificity, positive prediction value (PPV), negative prediction value (NPV) and the area under the curve (AUC). Results The results showed that the performance of the system has a sensitivity of 74.7%, a specificity of 93.7%, a PPV of 74.2%, an NPV of 93.7%, and an AUC of 84.2%. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, by using C4.5 algorithms, data can be interpreted in the form of a decision tree, to aid the understanding of the clinician. In addition, the proposed system can provide better performance by category. PMID:27525160

  2. Interethnic differences in the accuracy of anthropometric indicators of obesity in screening for high risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, VM; Casas, JP; Miranda, JJ; Perel, P; Pichardo, R; González, A; Sanchez, JR; Ferreccio, C; Aguilera, X; Silva, E; Oróstegui, M; Gómez, LF; Chirinos, JA; Medina-Lezama, J; Pérez, CM; Suárez, E; Ortiz, AP; Rosero, L; Schapochnik, N; Ortiz, Z; Ferrante, D; Diaz, M; Bautista, LE

    2009-01-01

    Background Cut points for defining obesity have been derived from mortality data among Whites from Europe and the United States and their accuracy to screen for high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in other ethnic groups has been questioned. Objective To compare the accuracy and to define ethnic and gender-specific optimal cut points for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) when they are used in screening for high risk of CHD in the Latin-American and the US populations. Methods We estimated the accuracy and optimal cut points for BMI, WC and WHR to screen for CHD risk in Latin Americans (n=18 976), non-Hispanic Whites (Whites; n=8956), non-Hispanic Blacks (Blacks; n=5205) and Hispanics (n=5803). High risk of CHD was defined as a 10-year risk ≥20% (Framingham equation). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) and the misclassification-cost term were used to assess accuracy and to identify optimal cut points. Results WHR had the highest AUC in all ethnic groups (from 0.75 to 0.82) and BMI had the lowest (from 0.50 to 0.59). Optimal cut point for BMI was similar across ethnic/gender groups (27 kg/m2). In women, cut points for WC (94 cm) and WHR (0.91) were consistent by ethnicity. In men, cut points for WC and WHR varied significantly with ethnicity: from 91 cm in Latin Americans to 102 cm in Whites, and from 0.94 in Latin Americans to 0.99 in Hispanics, respectively. Conclusion WHR is the most accurate anthropometric indicator to screen for high risk of CHD, whereas BMI is almost uninformative. The same BMI cut point should be used in all men and women. Unique cut points for WC and WHR should be used in all women, but ethnic-specific cut points seem warranted among men. PMID:19238159

  3. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  4. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  5. Coronary artery disease affects cortical circuitry associated with brain-heart integration during volitional exercise

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Katelyn N.; Badrov, Mark B.; Barron, Carly C.; Suskin, Neville; Heinecke, Armin

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that coronary artery disease (CAD) alters the cortical circuitry associated with exercise. Observations of changes in heart rate (HR) and in cortical blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were made in 23 control subjects [control; 8 women; 63 ± 11 yr; mean arterial pressure (MAP): 90 ± 9 mmHg] (mean ± SD) and 17 similarly aged CAD patients (4 women; 59 ± 9 yr; MAP: 87 ± 10 mmHg). Four repeated bouts each of 30%, 40%, and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force (LAB session), and seven repeated bouts of isometric handgrip (IHG) at 40% MVC force (fMRI session), were performed, with each contraction lasting 20 s and separated by 40 s of rest. There was a main effect of group (P = 0.03) on HR responses across all IHG intensities. Compared with control, CAD demonstrated less task-dependent deactivation in the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, and reduced activation in the right anterior insula, bilateral precentral cortex, and occipital lobe (P < 0.05). When correlated with HR, CAD demonstrated reduced activation in the bilateral insula and posterior cingulate cortex, and reduced deactivation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral precentral cortex (P < 0.05). The increased variability in expected autonomic regions and decrease in total cortical activation in response to the IHG task are associated with a diminished HR response to volitional effort in CAD. Therefore, relative to similarly aged and healthy individuals, CAD impairs the heart rate response and modifies the cortical patterns associated with cardiovascular control during IHG. PMID:25972576

  6. Social participation and coronary heart disease risk in a large prospective study of UK women

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, Angela; Canoy, Dexter; Reeves, Gillian K; Green, Jane; Beral, Valerie; Cairns, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    Background Participation in social activities is thought to prevent heart disease, but evidence is inconclusive. Design We assessed whether participating in social activities reduces the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a large prospective study of 735,159 middle-aged UK women. Methods Women reported their participation in eight social activities (religious group, voluntary work, adult education, art/craft/music, dancing, sports club, yoga, bingo) and were followed for first CHD event (hospital admission or death) over the next 8.6 years. Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risks for CHD incidence by participation in each and in any of the social activities. Results After adjustment for age and region only, every activity except bingo was associated with a reduced risk of CHD (n = 30,756 cases in total). However, after additional adjustment for 11 factors (deprivation, education, smoking, physical activity, body mass index, alcohol, marital status, self-rated health, happiness, hypertension, diabetes), every relative risk estimate moved close to 1.0. For example, for participation in any of the activities compared with none, the relative risk adjusted for age and region only was 0.83 (99% confidence interval 0.81–0.86), but changed to 1.06 (99% confidence interval 1.02–1.09) after additional adjustment. Adjustment for education, self-rated health, smoking and physical activity attenuated the associations most strongly. Residual confounding and other unmeasured factors may well account for any small remaining associations. Conclusions Associations between participation in various social activities and CHD risk appear to be largely or wholly due to confounding by personal characteristics of the participants. PMID:26416995

  7. Heart rate variability derived from exercise ECG in the detection of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Matti; Kähönen, Mika; Nieminen, Tuomo; Karjalainen, Pasi; Tarvainen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lehtinen, Rami; Nikus, Kjell; Kööbi, Tiit; Niemi, Mari; Niemelä, Kari; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Viik, Jari

    2007-10-01

    The diagnostic performance of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis from exercise ECG in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) is unknown. Bicycle exercise ECG recordings from The Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS) of angiography-proofed CAD patients (n = 112) and a patient group with a low likelihood of CAD (n = 114) were analyzed. HRV parameters (SDNN, RMSSD, Poincaré SD1 and SD2) were calculated from 1 min segments before exercise, during exercise and after exercise. All the parameters were in addition calculated from heart rate (HR)-corrected RR-interval segments. The ST-segment depressions in each stage were also determined. The diagnostic performance of the parameters was evaluated with the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve method. The uncorrected HRV parameters showed the best diagnostic performance in the recovery segments but the correlation with HR was also high (SDNN: 0.758/-0.64, RMSSD: 0.747/-0.60; area under the ROC/correlation coefficient). The HR correction decreased the correlation and the diagnostic performance in recovery segments (SDNN: 0.515/-0.12, RMSSD: 0.609/0.20). The diagnostic performance of ST-level at its best was higher than any of HRV parameters (ST-level: 0.795/0.36). According to the results, the HR correction decreased the diagnostic performance of the recovery phase. The HRV parameters calculated from 1 min segments of exercise test ECG were not as capable as traditional ST-segment analysis. In conclusion, the HRV analysis from exercise or recovery phase seems to be inadequate in the detection of CAD. PMID:17906387

  8. Knowledge of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors among a Community Sample in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Ammouri, Ali A.; Tailakh, Ayman; Isac, Chandrani; Kamanyire, Joy K.; Muliira, Joshua; Balachandran, Shreedevi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of Omani adults regarding conventional coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and to identify demographic variables associated with these knowledge levels. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional pilot study was carried out among a convenience sample of 130 adults attending a health awareness fair held in a local shopping mall in Muscat, Oman, in November 2012. A modified version of the Heart Disease Facts Questionnaire in both English and Arabic was used to assess knowledge of CHD risk factors. Scores were calculated by summing the correct answers for each item (range: 0–21). Inadequate knowledge was indicated by a mean score of <70%. Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to establish the participants’ knowledge levels and identify associated demographic variables. Results: A total of 114 subjects participated in the study (response rate: 87.7%). Of these, 69 participants (60.5%) had inadequate mean CHD knowledge scores. Knowledge of CHD risk factors was significantly associated with body mass index (odds ratio [OR] = 0.739; P = 0.023), marital status (OR = 0.057; P = 0.036) and education level (OR = 9.243; P = 0.006). Conclusion: Low knowledge levels of CHD risk factors were observed among the studied community sample in Oman; this is likely to limit the participants’ ability to engage in preventative practices. These findings support the need for education programmes to enhance awareness of risk factors and prevention of CHD in Oman. PMID:27226910

  9. The triad of shift work, occupational noise, and physical workload and risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Virkkunen, H; Härmä, M; Kauppinen, T; Tenkanen, L

    2006-01-01

    Background Shift work, noise, and physical workload are very common occupational exposures and they tend to cluster in the same groups of workers. Objectives To study the short and long term effects of these exposures on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and to estimate the joint effects of these factors. Methods The study population in this prospective 13 year follow up study of 1804 middle aged industrially employed men was collected at the first screening for the Helsinki Heart Study. The CHD end points (ICD‐9 codes 410–414 and ICD‐10 codes I20–I25) were obtained from official Finnish registers. The Finnish job‐exposure matrix FINJEM provided information on occupational exposures. Relative risks (RR) of CHD for the exposures were estimated using Cox's proportional hazard models adjusting for classical risk factors of CHD. Results The RR in the five year follow up for continuous noise combined with impulse noise was 1.28; for shift work it was 1.59, and for physical workload 1.18, while in the 13 year follow up the RRs were 1.58, 1.34, and 1.31, respectively. When adjusted for white‐collar/blue‐collar status the RRs decreased markedly. The RR in the 13 year follow up for those exposed to two risk factors was close to 1.7 and for those exposed to all three, 1.87. Conclusion Shift work and continuous noise entailed an excess risk for CHD in the shortest follow up with only a few retired workers but a decreasing risk during the longer follow up. For physical workload and impulse noise the trend was opposite: the CHD risk was increasing with increasing follow up time despite increasing numbers of retired workers. PMID:16709702

  10. [Nutrient intake with low-fat diets in rehabilitation of patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Müller, M J; Wiechmann, M; Helms, C; Wulff, C; Kolenda, K D

    2000-05-01

    We investigated the nutritional value of a very low fat diet (diet I) adapted to nutritional habits in Germany. Data were compared to a low fat diet (diet II) according to the American Heart Association. The study was performed in 37 patients with coronary heart disease (30 males and 7 females, age 45-83 yrs) stratified to the 2 dietary treatments. Daily fat intake was 38 g (24% of energy intake of 6.5 MJ/d) in diet I and 60 g (31% of 7.3 MJ/d) in diet II (p < 0.01), respectively. When compared with diet II, in diet I the intake of cholesterol, saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids, Vit. A, Vit. D and Vit. B12 were all reduced (p < 0.01), whereas the uptake of Vit. C was increased p < 0.01. The intake of folic acid was low in both groups. Both diets resulted in a decrease in BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels. Concomitantly plasma triglycerides only decreased in response to diet I but HDL cholesterol levels remained unchanged. Reduction of BMI and cholesterol levels were dependent on baseline BMI and cholesterol concentrations, respectively. The cholesterol lowering effect of diet I is in part attributed to the weight lowering effect of the diet. Taking into account the nutritional habits in Germany, very low fat diets seem to be adequate with respect to their nutritional value. Both diets are effective in lowering body weight, plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels without affecting HDL cholesterol. These effects are most pronounced in overweight and hypercholesterolemic patients. PMID:10900676

  11. Contribution of Climate and Air Pollution to Variation in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality Rates in England

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, Peter; Allender, Steven; Rayner, Mike; Goldacre, Michael

    2012-01-01

    There are substantial geographic variations in coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates in England that may in part be due to differences in climate and air pollution. An ecological cross-sectional multi-level analysis of male and female CHD mortality rates in all wards in England (1999–2004) was conducted to estimate the relative strength of the association between CHD mortality rates and three aspects of the physical environment - temperature, hours of sunshine and air quality. Models were adjusted for deprivation, an index measuring the healthiness of the lifestyle of populations, and urbanicity. In the fully adjusted model, air quality was not significantly associated with CHD mortality rates, but temperature and sunshine were both significantly negatively associated (p<0.05), suggesting that CHD mortality rates were higher in areas with lower average temperature and hours of sunshine. After adjustment for the unhealthy lifestyle of populations and deprivation, the climate variables explained at least 15% of large scale variation in CHD mortality rates. The results suggest that the climate has a small but significant independent association with CHD mortality rates in England. PMID:22427884

  12. Prevalence and correlates of coronary heart disease: first population-based study in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Rouba Karen; Farah, Rita; Chahine, Mirna N; Asmar, Roland; Hosseini, Hassan; Salameh, Pascale; Pathak, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background Lebanon is experiencing a growing epidemic of coronary heart diseases (CHDs), as most low- and middle-income countries currently are. However, this growth can be attenuated if effective preventive strategies are adopted. Purpose To provide the first national population-based prevalence of CHD and to describe the profile of Lebanese adults with prevalent CHD. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study using a multistage cluster sample across Lebanon. We interviewed residents aged 40 years and older using a questionnaire that captured the presence of CHDs and their risk factors (RFs). Results Our study showed that 13.4% of the Lebanese population aged ≥40 years suffer from a prevalent CHD. CHD seemed to appear more prematurely than in developed countries, and males seemed to be more subject to CHD than females until a certain age. CHD was associated with older age, male sex, a lower economic situation, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, having a family history of premature cardiovascular diseases, and suffering from diabetes. However, smoking and waist circumference did not seem to have an independent effect on CHD, but rather an effect mediated by biological RFs. Conclusion This is the first nationwide endeavor conducted in Lebanon to assess the prevalence of CHD. This study also confirms the relevance of the classic RFs of CHD and their applicability to the Lebanese population, thus allowing for prevention strategies. PMID:27051290

  13. Subgroup differences in psychosocial factors relating to coronary heart disease in the UK South Asian population☆

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Emily D.; Nazroo, James Y.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To explore the differences in psychosocial risk factors related to coronary heart disease (CHD) between South Asian subgroups in the UK. South Asian people suffer significantly higher rates of CHD than other ethnic groups, but vulnerability varies between South Asian subgroups, in terms of both CHD rates and risk profiles. Psychosocial factors may contribute to the excess CHD propensity that is observed; however, subgroup heterogeneity in psychosocial disadvantage has not previously been systematically explored. Methods With a cross-sectional design, 1065 healthy South Asian and 818 white men and women from West London, UK, completed psychosocial questionnaires. Psychosocial profiles were compared between South Asian religious groups and the white sample, using analyses of covariance and post hoc tests. Results Of the South Asian sample, 50.5% was Sikh, 28.0% was Hindu, and 15.8% was Muslim. Muslim participants were more socioeconomically deprived and experienced higher levels of chronic stress, including financial strain, low social cohesion, and racial discrimination, compared with other South Asian religious groups. In terms of health behaviors, Muslim men smoked more than Sikhs and Hindus, and Muslims also reported lower alcohol consumption and were less physically active than other groups. Conclusion This study found that Muslims were exposed to more psychosocial and behavioral adversity than Sikhs and Hindus, and highlights the importance of investigating subgroup heterogeneity in South Asian CHD risk. PMID:20846539

  14. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FLAVONOIDS INTAKE IN SAUDI PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Alsaif, Mohammed A.; Khan, Latifa A.; Alhamdan, Adel A.H.; Alorf, Saada; Al-Othman, Abdulaziz M.; Alawami, Shatha

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the dietary intake of flavonoids and their effect on serum lipid levels in Saudi patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methodology: A cross-sectional study with a sample of 50 CHD patients and 50 controls. A 24-hour recall method was used to collect data on the dietary intake of macronutrients, flavonoids, and antioxidant vitamins. A food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to collect data on habitual consumption during the year preceding the interview. Baseline data collection included medical history, anthropometric measurements, physical activity, and smoking status. Results: CHD patients showed significantly less intake of fruits and vegetables compared to the controls. Serum lipids including total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low density lipoproteins (LDL) were found to be significantly higher in CHD patients than in the controls. The main sources of flavonoids in a typical Saudi diet are tea, fruits (apples), vegetables (onions), and chocolate. The intake of flavonoids and antioxidant vitamins was significantly lower in CHD patients compared to the controls. A negative correlation between the dietary intake of different flavonoids and serum LDL was observed in CHD patients. Significant correlation was found between the intake of flavonol and waist to hip ratio Conclusions: The findings of the study support a potential protective effect of dietary flavonoids in relation to CHD. The study showed that consuming more Flavonoids may have positive effect on lowering blood lipids. PMID:23012157

  15. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B; Hancock-Cerutti, William F; Millar, John S; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Peloso, Gina M; Stitziel, Nathan O; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-03-11

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  16. Meditation and Coronary Heart Disease: A Review of the Current Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Indranill Basu; Menezes, Arthur R.; Malur, Pavan; Hiltbold, Aimee E.; Reilly, John P.; Lavie, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chest pain from coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for more than 8 million emergency department visits every year in the United States, emphasizing the need for cardiovascular (CV) interventions to help reduce this high number. Meditation––a state of contemplation, concentration, and reflection––has the potential to help decrease CV disease. Methods This article reviews the available data regarding the effects of meditation on various aspects of CV health. Results During the past few decades, multiple studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of meditation on various CV risk factors. In addition to decreasing CV mortality, meditation has also been shown to improve conditions such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and high cortisol levels. Still unclear is how current medical therapies impact overall CHD in comparison to meditation techniques. Conclusion Prospective trials are needed to study the effects of meditation on CV risk factors, to provide guidelines for daily meditation practice, and to determine the efficacy of meditation compared to current pharmacologic therapies. PMID:25598736

  17. Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) Compounds Improve the Biochemical Indices of the Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boyan; Du, Yanhui; Cong, Lixin; Jia, Xiaoying; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Danshen was able to reduce the risk of the patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), but the mechanism is still widely unknown. Biochemical indices (lipid profile, markers of renal and liver function, and homocysteine (Hcy)) are closely associated with CHD risk. We aimed to investigate whether the medicine reduces CHD risk by improving these biochemical indices. The patients received 10 Danshen pills (27 mg/pill) in Dashen group, while the control patients received placebo pills, three times daily. The duration of follow-up was three months. The serum biochemical indices were measured, including lipid profiles (LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-C, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), apolipoprotein (Apo) A, ApoB, ApoE, and lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a))); markers of liver function (gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total bilirubin (TBil), indirect bilirubin (IBil), and direct bilirubin (DBil)); marker of renal function (uric acid (UA)) and Hcy. After three-month follow-up, Danshen treatment reduced the levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, Lp(a), GGT, DBil, UA, and Hcy (P < 0.05). In contrast, the treatment increased the levels of HDL-C, ApoA, ApoB, ApoE, TBil, and IBil (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Danshen can reduce the CHD risk by improving the biochemical indices of CHD patients. PMID:27366196

  18. Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

    1987-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

  19. Correlation between high density lipoprotein and monocyte subpopulations among stable coronary atherosclerotic heart disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong-Hai; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wang, Xue-Jun; Liang, Jian-Guang; Liu, Jia-Chao

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is a structurally and functionally heterogeneous molecular particle whose function is unclear in atherosclerosis at present. Studies show that small HDL functional imbalance may exist in Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CAD) patients. Monocyte is considered to play an important role in atherosclerosis, in accordance with the expression of superficial CD14 and CD16, it can be divided into three subpopulations. The purpose of this study was to explore the relation between HDL and monocyte subpopulations among CAD patients. We report 90 cases of stable CAD patients and define the monocyte subpopulations as classical monocyte (CD14++CD16-; CM), intermediate monocyte (CD14+CD16+; IM), and non-classical monocyte (CD14+CD16++; NCM); HDL group is measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results indicated that the small HDL in blood serum has a correlation with proinflammatory NCM in circulation but a negative correction with CM and no relationship with diabetes, saccharify hemoglobin, hypertension, smoking history and taking dose of statins drugs and severity of disease. In conclusion, this study primarily confirms that micromolecule HDL level correlates with the increase of non-classical monocyte subpopulations and decrease of classical monocyte quantity. Thus demonstrates the proinflammatory correlation between micromolecule HDL and internal immunity in the development of stable atherosclerosis. PMID:26629252

  20. Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denova-Gutiérrez, Edgar; Huitrón-Bravo, Gerardo; Talavera, Juan O.; Castañón, Susana; Gallegos-Carrillo, Katia; Flores, Yvonne; Salmerón, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD) in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS). Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-administered questionnaires. Dietary GI and dietary GL were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric and clinical measurements were assessed with standardized procedures. CHD risk was estimated according to the sex-specific Framingham prediction algorithms. Results. IIn the 5,830 individuals aged 20 to 70 who were evaluated, dietary GI and GL were significantly associated with HDL-C, LDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and triglycerides serum levels. Subjects with high dietary GI have a relative risk of 1.56 (CI 95%; 1.13–2.14), and those with high dietary GL have a relative risk of 2.64 (CI 95%; 1.15–6.58) of having an elevated CHD risk than those who had low dietary GI and GL. Conclusions. Our results suggest that high dietary GI and dietary GL could have an unfavorable effect on serum lipid levels, which are in turn associated with a higher CHD risk. PMID:20700407

  1. Physical activity in the prevention of coronary heart disease: implications for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Tina; Schultz, William M; McCue, Andrew A; Lambert, Cameron T; Sandesara, Pratik B; Eapen, Danny J; Gordon, Neil F; Franklin, Barry A; Sperling, Laurence S

    2016-06-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to be a leading cause of death worldwide. Because regular physical activity (PA) independently decreases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) while also having a positive, dose-related impact on other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, it has increasingly become a focus of CHD prevention. Current guidelines recommend 30 min of moderate-intensity PA 5 days a week, but exercise regimens remain underused. PA adherence can be fostered with a multilevel approach that involves active individual participation, physician counselling and health coaching, community involvement, and policy change, with incorporation of cardiac rehabilitation for patients requiring secondary prevention. Viewing exercise quantity as a vital sign, prescribing PA like a medication, and using technology, such as smartphone applications, encourage a global shift in focus from CVD treatment to prevention. Community-wide, home-based and internet-based prevention initiatives may also offer a developing pool of resources that can be tapped into to promote education and PA compliance. This review summarises the underlying rationale, current guidelines for and recommendations to cultivate a comprehensive focus in the endorsement of PA in the primary and secondary prevention of CHD. PMID:26941396

  2. Plasma lipids profile and erythrocytes system in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.

    2006-08-01

    Erythrocytes system study can provide a framework for detailed exploration of blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions, one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. Our objective was to explore erythrocytes system in patients with stable angina pectoris II f.c. (Canadian classification). The participants (N = 56, age 40 - 55 years) without obesity, glucose tolerance violations, lipid lowering drugs treating, heart failure of II and more functional classes (NYHA), coronary episode at least 6 months before study were involved in the study. Blood samples were incubated with glucose solutions of increasing concentrations (from 2.5% to 20% with 2.5% step) during 60 mm (36° C). In prepared blood smears erythrocyte's sizes were studied. Plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose levels were also measured. Received data were approximated by polynomials of high degree, with after going first and second derivations. Erythrocytes system "behavior" was studied by means of phase pattern constructing. By lipids levels all the patient were divided into five groups: 1) patients with normal lipids levels, 2) patients with borderline total cholesterol level, 3) patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia, 4) patients with isolated hypertriglyceridemia and 5) patients with combined hyperlipidemia. Erythrocytes size lowering process was of set of "stages", which characteristics differ significantly (p > 0.05) in all five groups. Their rate and acceleration characteristics allow us to detect type of lipid profile in patients. Erythrocyte system disturbing by glucose concentration increase show to be most resistant in group of patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia.

  3. Periodontal disease as a risk marker in coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Borgnakke, Wenche S.; Taylor, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Over half a million Americans die each year from coronary heart disease (CHD), 26 million suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), and a large proportion have periodontal disease (PD), a chronic infection of the tissues surrounding teeth. Chronic inflammation contributes to CHD and CKD occurrence and progression, and PD contributes to the cumulated chronic systemic inflammatory burden. This review examines recent evidence regarding the role of PD in CHD and CKD. Recent findings Periodontal pathogens cause both local infection and bacteremia, eliciting local and systemic inflammatory responses. PD is associated with the systemic inflammatory reactant CRP, a major risk factor for both CHD and CKD. Non-surgical PD treatment is shown to improve periodontal health, endothelial function and levels of CRP and other inflammatory markers. Evidence for the association of PD with CKD consists of a small body of literature represented mainly by cross-sectional studies. No definitive randomized-controlled trials exist with either CHD or CKD as primary endpoints. Summary Recent evidence links PD with CHD and CKD. Adding oral health self-care and referral for professional periodontal assessment and therapy to the repertoire of medical care recommendations is prudent to improve patients’ oral health and possibly reduce CHD and CKD risk. PMID:20948377

  4. Gender differences and disparities in all-cause and coronary heart disease mortality: epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    This overview is primarily concerned with large recent prospective cohort studies of adult populations, not patients, because the latter studies are confounded by differences in medical and surgical management for men vs. women. When early papers are uniquely informative they are also included. Because the focus is on epidemiology, details of age, sex, sample size, and source as well as study methods are provided. Usually the primary outcomes were all-cause or coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality using baseline data from midlife or older adults. Fifty years ago few prospective cohort studies of all-cause or CHD mortality included women. Most epidemiologic studies that included community-dwelling adults did not include both sexes and still do not report men and women separately. Few studies consider both sex (biology) and gender (behavior and environment) differences. Lifespan studies describing survival after live birth are not considered here. The important effects of prenatal and early childhood biologic and behavioral factors on adult mortality are beyond the scope of this review. Clinical trials are not discussed. Overall, presumptive evidence for causality was equivalent for psychosocial and biological exposures, and these attributes were often associated with each other. Inconsistencies or gaps were particularly obvious for studies of sex or gender differences in age and optimal measures of body size for CHD outcomes, and in the striking interface of diabetes and people with the metabolic syndrome, most of whom have unrecognized diabetes. PMID:24054926

  5. Dietary Patterns, Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Shu, Long; Si, Cai-Juan; Yu, Xiao-Long; Liao, Dan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Zheng, Pei-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies reported the potential associations between dietary patterns and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adulthood, however a consistent perspective has not been established to date. Herein, we carried out this meta-analysis to evaluate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of CHD. MEDLINE and EBSCO were searched for relevant articles published up to April 2015. A total of 35 articles (reporting 37 original studies) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the present meta-analysis. The decreased risk of CHD was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy/prudent dietary patterns (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60, 0.75; p < 0.00001) and alcohol consumption (OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.78; p < 0.00001). There was evidence of an increased risk of CHD in the highest compared with the lowest categories of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02). The results of this meta-analysis indicate that different dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of CHD. PMID:26262641

  6. A Mendelian randomization study of the effect of type-2 diabetes on coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Omar S.; Morris, John A.; Mujammami, Muhammad; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Leong, Aaron; Li, Rui; Turgeon, Maxime; Greenwood, Celia M.T.; Thanassoulis, George; Meigs, James B.; Sladek, Robert; Richards, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    In observational studies, type-2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), yet interventional trials have shown no clear effect of glucose-lowering on CHD. Confounding may have therefore influenced these observational estimates. Here we use Mendelian randomization to obtain unconfounded estimates of the influence of T2D and fasting glucose (FG) on CHD risk. Using multiple genetic variants associated with T2D and FG, we find that risk of T2D increases CHD risk (odds ratio (OR)=1.11 (1.05–1.17), per unit increase in odds of T2D, P=8.8 × 10−5; using data from 34,840/114,981 T2D cases/controls and 63,746/130,681 CHD cases/controls). FG in non-diabetic individuals tends to increase CHD risk (OR=1.15 (1.00–1.32), per mmol·per l, P=0.05; 133,010 non-diabetic individuals and 63,746/130,681 CHD cases/controls). These findings provide evidence supporting a causal relationship between T2D and CHD and suggest that long-term trials may be required to discern the effects of T2D therapies on CHD risk. PMID:26017687

  7. Metabolic syndrome and incident coronary heart disease in Australian indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; McCulloch, Brad; McDermott, Robyn

    2012-06-01

    This report aims to compare the prediction of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components for morbidity and mortality of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a cohort of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults (TSIs). A total of 2,100 adults (1,283 Aborigines and 817 TSIs) was followed up for 6 years from 2000. Outcome measures were all CHD events (deaths and hospitalizations). Baseline anthropometric measurements, blood pressure (BP), fasting blood lipids and glucose were collected. Smoking and alcohol intake was self-reported. We found MetS was more prevalent in TSI (50.3%) compared to Aborigines (33.0%). Baseline MetS doubled the risk of a CHD event in Aborigines. Increased fasting triglycerides was stronger in predicting CHD (hazard ratio (HR): 2.8) compared with MetS after adjusted for age, sex, tobacco and alcohol consumption, and baseline diabetes and albuminuria for Aborigines but not among TSIs. MetS was not more powerful than its components in predicting CHD event. In Australian Aborigines, the "triglyceridemic waist" phenotype strongly predicts CHD event, whereas among TSI, baseline diabetes mediated the prediction of increased fasting glucose for CHD event. PMID:21660075

  8. Coronary heart disease prevalence and occupational structure in U.S. metropolitan areas: a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Michimi, Akihiko; Ellis-Griffith, Gregory; Nagy, Christine; Peterson, Tina

    2013-05-01

    This research explored the link between coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence and metropolitan-area level occupational structure among 137 metropolitan/micropolitan statistical areas (MMSA) in the United States. Using data from the 2006-2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 2007 County Business Patterns, logistic mixed models were developed to estimate CHD prevalence between MMSAs controlling for individual-level socioeconomic characteristics and various types of occupational structure. Results showed that CHD prevalence was lower in MMSAs where their economy was dominated by 'tourism and resort' and 'the quaternary sector' and higher in MMSAs dominated by 'manufacturing', 'transportation and warehousing', and 'mining'. MMSA-level effects on CHD were found in 'tourism and resort' and 'the quaternary sector' having lower risk and 'mining' having higher risk of CHD. Although these effects prevailed in many MMSAs, some MMSAs did not fit into these effects. Additional analysis indicated a possible link between metropolitan population loss and higher CHD prevalence especially in the coal mining region of the Appalachian Mountains. PMID:23511976

  9. Systematic review of zinc biochemical indicators and risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Maryam; Poustchi, Hossein; Mohammadi-Nasrabadi, Fatemeh; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Poor zinc nutritional status is suspected as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Since zinc absorption may be influenced by some nutritional and physiologic factors, it would be better to investigate zinc status through biochemical measurements. The objective of the present study was to review recent studies investigating the association of zinc biomarkers with CHD, systematically. METHODS The MEDLINE database was used for relevant studies published from January 2009 to December 2013 with appropriate keywords. Articles were included in this study if they were human studies, original articles, and published in English. RESULTS Six case-control studies and two prospective cohort studies that measured zinc biomarkers were included in the study. Almost all case-control studies suggest that decreased plasma zinc was associated with increased CHD risk. Cohort studies did not support this relationship. CONCLUSION The majority of the evidence for this theory is extracted from case-control studies, which might have bias. Prospective studies and randomized clinical trials are needed to investigate whether poor zinc status is associated with increased CHD risk. Consequently, a protective role of zinc in CHD could not be still established. PMID:26862344

  10. Long Working Hours and Coronary Heart Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, Marianna; Heikkilä, Katriina; Jokela, Markus; Ferrie, Jane E.; Batty, G. David; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimäki, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The authors aggregated the results of observational studies examining the association between long working hours and coronary heart disease (CHD). Data sources used were MEDLINE (through January 19, 2011) and Web of Science (through March 14, 2011). Two investigators independently extracted results from eligible studies. Heterogeneity between the studies was assessed using the I2 statistic, and the possibility of publication bias was assessed using the funnel plot and Egger's test for small-study effects. Twelve studies were identified (7 case-control, 4 prospective, and 1 cross-sectional). For a total of 22,518 participants (2,313 CHD cases), the minimally adjusted relative risk of CHD for long working hours was 1.80 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42, 2.29), and in the maximally (multivariate-) adjusted analysis the relative risk was 1.59 (95% CI: 1.23, 2.07). The 4 prospective studies produced a relative risk of 1.39 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.72), while the corresponding relative risk in the 7 case-control studies was 2.43 (95% CI: 1.81, 3.26). Little evidence of publication bias but relatively large heterogeneity was observed. Studies varied in size, design, measurement of exposure and outcome, and adjustments. In conclusion, results from prospective observational studies suggest an approximately 40% excess risk of CHD in employees working long hours. PMID:22952309

  11. Side effects of using nitrates to treat heart failure and the acute coronary syndromes, unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho; Ripley, Toni L

    2007-07-01

    Nitrates are potent venous dilators and anti-ischemic agents. They are widely used for the relief of chest pain and pulmonary congestion in patients with acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. Nitrates, however, do not reduce mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Combination of nitrates and hydralazine when given in addition to beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction who are of African-American origin. Side effects during nitrate therapy are common but are less well described in the literature compared with the reported side effects in patients with stable angina pectoris. The reported incidence of side effects varies highly among different studies and among various disease states. Headache is the most commonly reported side effect with an incidence of 12% in acute heart failure, 41-73% in chronic heart failure, 3-19% in unstable angina and 2-26% in acute myocardial infarction. The reported incidence of hypotension also differs: 5-10% in acute heart failure, 20% in chronic heart failure, 9% in unstable angina and < 1-48% in acute myocardial infarction, with the incidence being much higher with concomitant nitrate therapy plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Reported incidence of dizziness is as low as 1% in patients with acute myocardial infarction to as high as 29% in patients with heart failure. Severe headaches and/or symptomatic hypotension may necessitate discontinuation of nitrate therapy. Severe life threatening hypotension or even death may occur when nitrates are used in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction associated with right ventricular dysfunction or infarction, or with concomitant use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine. Despite the disturbing observational reports in the literature that continuous and prolonged use of nitrates may lead to

  12. Coronary flow and oxidative stress during local anaphylactic reaction in isolated mice heart: the role of nitric oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Milicic, Vesna; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Jeremic, Nevena; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Djuric, Dragan; Jakovljevic, Vladimir Lj

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) in cardiac anaphylaxis regarding changes in coronary reactivity and oxidative status of the mice heart. The animals were divided into two groups: experimental group (CBA, iNOS(-/-) mice) and control group: wild-type mice (CBA/H). The hearts of male mice (n = 24; 6-8 weeks old, body mass 20-25 g, 12 in each experimental group) were excised and retrogradely perfused according to the Langendorff technique at a constant perfusion pressure (70 cm H2O). Cardiac anaphylaxis was elicited by injection of solution (1 mg/1 ml) of ovalbumin into the aortic cannula. For the next 10 min, in intervals of 2 min (0-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, 8-10 min) coronary flow (CF) rates were measured and samples of coronary effluent were collected. Markers of oxidative stress including index of lipid peroxidation measured as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), NO measured in the form of nitrites (NO2(-)), superoxide anion radical (O2(-)), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the coronary venous effluent were assessed spectrophotometrically. After the ovalbumin challenge, CF was significantly lower in the wild mice group. NO and H2O2 release were significantly higher in iNOS(-/-) mice group. TBARS and O2(-) values did not vary significantly between wild and iNOS(-/-) mice groups. Our results indicate that coronary vasoconstriction during cardiac anaphylaxis does not necessarily depend on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/NO activity and that iNOS/NO pathway may not be an only influential mediator of redox changes in this model of cardiac anaphylaxis. PMID:26708221

  13. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  14. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2011-01-01

    cardiovascular risk burden is actually being eliminated, and the full potential of risk reduction remains unrealized. Worldwide the situation is similar, with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome approaching 50%. Primordial prevention, resulting from healthful lifestyle habits that do not permit the appearance of risk factors, is the preferred method to lower cardiovascular risk. Lowering the prevalence of obesity is the most urgent matter, and is pleiotropic since it affects blood pressure, lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherothrombotic disease progression. Physical activity also improves several risk factors, with the additional potential to lower heart rate. Given the current obstacles, success of primordial prevention remains uncertain. At the same time, the consequences of delay and inaction will inevitably be disastrous, and the sense of urgency mounts. Since most CHD events arise in a large subpopulation of low- to moderate-risk individuals, identifying a high proportion of those who will go on to develop events with accuracy remains unlikely. Without a refinement in risk prediction, the current model of targeting high-risk individuals for aggressive therapy may not succeed alone, especially given the rising burden of risk. Estimating cardiovascular risk over a period of 10 years, using scoring systems such as Framingham or SCORE, continues to enjoy widespread use and is recommended for all adults. Limitations in the former have been of concern, including the under- or over-estimation of risk in specific populations, a relatively short 10-year risk horizon, focus on myocardial infarction and CHD death, and exclusion of family history. Classification errors may occur in up to 37% of individuals, particularly women and the young. Several different scoring systems are discussed in this review. The use of lifetime risk is an important conceptual advance, since ≥90% of young adults with a low 10-year risk have a lifetime risk of ≥39%; over half of

  15. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard

    2011-01-01

    cardiovascular risk burden is actually being eliminated, and the full potential of risk reduction remains unrealized. Worldwide the situation is similar, with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome approaching 50%. Primordial prevention, resulting from healthful lifestyle habits that do not permit the appearance of risk factors, is the preferred method to lower cardiovascular risk. Lowering the prevalence of obesity is the most urgent matter, and is pleiotropic since it affects blood pressure, lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherothrombotic disease progression. Physical activity also improves several risk factors, with the additional potential to lower heart rate. Given the current obstacles, success of primordial prevention remains uncertain. At the same time, the consequences of delay and inaction will inevitably be disastrous, and the sense of urgency mounts. Since most CHD events arise in a large subpopulation of low- to moderate-risk individuals, identifying a high proportion of those who will go on to develop events with accuracy remains unlikely. Without a refinement in risk prediction, the current model of targeting high-risk individuals for aggressive therapy may not succeed alone, especially given the rising burden of risk. Estimating cardiovascular risk over a period of 10 years, using scoring systems such as Framingham or SCORE, continues to enjoy widespread use and is recommended for all adults. Limitations in the former have been of concern, including the under- or over-estimation of risk in specific populations, a relatively short 10-year risk horizon, focus on myocardial infarction and CHD death, and exclusion of family history. Classification errors may occur in up to 37% of individuals, particularly women and the young. Several different scoring systems are discussed in this review. The use of lifetime risk is an important conceptual advance, since ≥90% of young adults with a low 10-year risk have a lifetime risk of ≥39%; over half of

  16. Statin under-use and low prevalence of LDL-C control among U.S. adults at high risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa, Christopher M.; Safford, Monika M.; Levitan, Emily B.; Mann, Devin M.; Yun, Huifeng; Glasser, Steve; Woolley, J. Michael; Rosenson, Robert; Farkouh, Michael; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Statins reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in individuals with a history of CHD or risk equivalents. A 10-year CHD risk >20% is considered a risk equivalent but is frequently not detected. Statin use and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) control were examined among participants with CHD or risk equivalents in the nationwide Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study (n=8,812). Methods Participants were categorized into 4 mutually exclusive groups: (1) history of CHD (n=4,025), (2) no history of CHD but with a history of stroke and/or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (n=946), (3) no history of CHD or stroke/AAA but with diabetes mellitus (n=3,134), or (4) no history of the conditions in (1) through (3) but with 10-year Framingham CHD risk score (FRS) >20% calculated using the ATP-III point scoring system (n=707). Results Statins were used by 58.4% of those in the CHD group and 41.7%, 40.4%, and 20.1% of those in the stroke/AAA, diabetes, and FRS>20% groups, respectively. Among those taking statins, 65.1% had LDL-C <100mg/dL, with no difference between the CHD, stroke/AAA, or diabetes groups. However, compared to those in the CHD group, LDL-C <100mg/dL was less common among participants in the FRS>20% group (multivariable adjusted prevalence ratio: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.62 – 0.85). Results were similar using the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol treatment guideline. Conclusions These data suggest many people with high CHD risk, especially those with a FRS>20%, do not receive guideline-concordant lipid-lowering therapy and do not achieve an LDL-C <100mg/dL. PMID:24892511

  17. [Impact of sleep deprivation on coronary heart disease and progress in prevention and treatment with traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jie; Guo, Li-li

    2015-05-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has been taken as an independent predictor for cardiovascular risks, which was closely related to the increased morbidity and mortality in coronary heart disease (CHD). In this article, after reviewing the impact of modern medical method sleep deprivation on CHD and studies on principle method recipe medicines for preventing and treating CHD, the authors observed the autonomic nerve dysfunction, hormonal metabolism dysfunction, endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory responses after sleep deprivation, which can cause or aggravate CHD. On the basis of the traditional Chinese medicine theories of "heart dominating the blood and vessels and the mind", the authors considered that traditional Chinese medicines can tonify heart and soothe the nerves, reducing all of the risk factors through multi-target and multi-pathway, and improve sleep and decrease the risk factors caused by sleep deprivation, which provides a new idea for the prevention and treatment of CHD. PMID:26323126

  18. Prediction of coronary heart disease mortality in Busselton, Western Australia: an evaluation of the Framingham, national health epidemiologic follow up study, and WHO ERICA risk scores.

    PubMed Central

    Knuiman, M W; Vu, H T

    1997-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of the Framingham, national health epidemiologic follow up study, and the WHO ERICA risk scores in predicting death from coronary heart disease (CHD) in an Australian population. DESIGN: Cohort follow up study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The cohort consisted of 1923 men and 1968 women who participated in health surveys in the town of Busselton in Western Australia over the period 1966-81. Baseline assessment included cardiovascular risk factor measurement. Mortality follow up to 31 December 1994 was used. MAIN RESULTS: Risk scores for death from CHD within 10 years based on age, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, smoking, and BMI were derived from the Busselton study data using logistic regression analysis. Similar risk scores developed from the Framingham, the national health epidemiologic follow up study, and the WHO ERICA cohorts were found to perform just as well in Busselton as the Busselton-derived scores, both before and after controlling the effect of age. There was considerable overlap across the different risk scores in the identification of individuals in the highest quintile of risk. Those in the top 20% of scores included about 41% of deaths from CHD among men and about 63% of deaths from CHD among women. CONCLUSION: Although there is variation in risk score coefficients across the studies, the relative risk predictive performance of the scores is similar. The use of Framingham and other similar risk scores will not be misleading in white Australian populations. PMID:9425461

  19. Angioplasty and stent placement - heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... angioplasty; Coronary artery angioplasty; Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; Heart artery dilatation ... to carefully guide the catheter up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ...

  20. Detection of coronary artery disease by vasodilator thallium imaging of the heart with amyl nitrite inhalation: a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Rifkin, R.D.; Sharma, S.C.; Spraragen, S.; Claunch, B.; Shackford, H.; Patton, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Thallium imaging of the heart using dipyridamole-induced coronary arteriolar vasodilation has proven to be an effective means of detecting significant coronary stenosis. However, intravenous dipyridamole has not yet been made available for general use. We therefore examined the feasibility of substituting amyl nitrite inhalation as an arteriolar vasodilator prior to thallium imaging. Seventeen patients, all of whom had catheterization-proven coronary stenosis, inhaled amyl nitrite for 2-5 min. Thallium was injected after 45-60 s of inhalation. Completion of inhalation was followed immediately by planar imaging. Of 6 patients who inhaled amyl nitrite for at least 4 min, 5 had moderate or severe image defects on immediate scans which completely resolved on delayed scans. Only 3 of 11 who inhaled amyl nitrite for 2 min or less prior to scanning had similarly positive tests. Overall sensitivity for significant stenosis was 8 of 17 (47%). Inhalation was well tolerated with only one episode of angina and hypotension. We conclude that amyl nitrite inhalation for at least 4 min may offer an effective and readily available alternative to intravenous dipyridamole for vasodilator imaging of the heart.

  1. Accelerated Whole-Heart Coronary MRA Using Motion-Corrected Sensitivity Encoding with Three-Dimensional Projection Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jianing; Sharif, Behzad; Arsanjani, Reza; Bi, Xiaoming; Fan, Zhaoyang; Yang, Qi; Li, Kuncheng; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To achieve whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with (1.0 mm)3 spatial resolution and 5 min of free-breathing scan time. Methods We used an electrocardiograph-gated, T2-prepared and fat-saturated balanced steady state free precession sequence with 3DPR trajectory for free-breathing data acquisition with 100% gating efficiency. For image reconstruction, we used a self-calibrating iterative SENSE scheme with integrated retrospective motion correction. We performed healthy volunteer study to compare the proposed method with motion-corrected gridding at different retrospective undersampling levels on apparent signal-to-noise ratio (aSNR) and subjective coronary artery (CA) visualization scores. Results Compared with gridding, the proposed method significantly improved both image quality metrics for undersampled datasets with 6000, 8000, and 10,000 projections. With as few as 10,000 projections, the proposed method yielded good CA visualization scores (3.02 of 4) and aSNR values comparable to those with 20,000 projections. Conclusion Using the proposed method, good image quality was observed for free breathing whole-heart coronary MRA at (1.0 mm)3 resolution with an achievable scan time of 5 min. PMID:24435956

  2. Synergistic effect of hypertension with diabetes mellitus and gender on severity of coronary atherosclerosis: Findings from Tehran Heart Center registry

    PubMed Central

    Masoudkabir, Farzad; Poorhosseini, Hamidreza; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ali; Hakki, Elham; Roayaei, Pegah; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We performed this study to evaluate the possible synergism between hypertension and other conventional risk factors of coronary artery disease (CAD) on an angiographic severity of coronary atherosclerosis. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on 10502 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography in the cardiac catheterization laboratory of Tehran Heart Center Hospital (Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran), and their conventional risk factors including male gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia, smoking, and family history of premature CAD were recorded. The severity of coronary atherosclerosis evaluated by calculation of Gensini’s score. RESULTS All aforementioned conventional risk factors of CAD were independently associated with severity of CAD. Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that hypertension had synergistic effect with male gender [Excess Gensini’s score: 5.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.72-9.15, P < 0.001] and also with DM (Excess Gensini’s score: 3.99, 95% CI: 0.30-7.69, P = 0.034) on severity of CAD. No interaction was observed between hypertension and smoking, dyslipidemia and also with a family history of CAD. CONCLUSION Hypertension has a synergistic effect with DM and male gender on the severity of CAD. These findings imply that more effective screening and treatment strategies should be considered for early diagnosis and tight control of hypertension in male and diabetic people for prevention of advanced CAD. PMID:26862339

  3. [Immediate and remote results of stenting of left coronary artery trunk in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Bokeriia, L A; Alekian, B G; Buziashvili, Iu I; Golukhova, E Z; Staferov, A V; Zakarian, N V; Al-Sharjabi, R M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was assessment of efficacy of stenting in patients with ischemic heart disease with lesions of left coronary artery (LCA) trunk. In the A.N. Bakulev Scientific Center of Cardiovascular Surgery between June 1997 and March 2005 stenting of LCA trunk was carried out in 50 patients (33 with stable effort angina and 17 with acute coronary syndrome). Immediate success rate was 100% in patients with stable angina. In a group of patients with acute coronary syndrome angiographic success rate was 100%. Total lethality in this group was (3 cases) 17.7%. In remote period (6 to 60 months) 33 of 39 patients were examined and recurrence of angina was noted in 7 of them (21.1%). Control angiography was carried out in 16 patients and restenosis of LCA was revealed in 18.75% of cases. The authors believe that stenting of LCA trunk is an effective and safe method of treatment of patients with stable angina and sufficiently safe method in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Roentgenoendovascular treatment may serve as an alternative to aortocoronary bypass surgery especially in isolated lesions of LCA trunk. Application of stents with drug coating allows to cardinally improve long term results of stenting. PMID:16710248

  4. Pulmonary Instillation of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Promotes Coronary Vasoconstriction and Exacerbates Injury in Isolated Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Leslie C.; Frasier, Chad R.; Sloan, Ruben C.; Mann, Erin E.; Harrison, Benjamin S.; Brown, Jared M.; Brown, David A.; Wingard, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) across industry has increased human exposures. We tested the hypothesis that pulmonary instillation of MWCNT would exacerbate cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. One day following intratracheal instillation of 1, 10, or 100 μg MWCNT in Sprague-Dawley rats, we used a Langendorff isolated heart model to examine cardiac I/R injury. In the 100 μg MWCNT group we report increased premature ventricular contractions at baseline and increased myocardial infarction. This was associated with increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) release and depression of coronary flow during early reperfusion. We also tested if isolated coronary vascular responses were affected by MWCNT instillation and found trends for enhanced coronary tone, which were dependent on ET-1, cyclooxygenase, thromboxane, and Rho-kinase. We conclude that instillation of MWCNT promoted cardiac injury by depressing coronary flow, invoking vasoconstrictive mechanisms involving ET-1, cyclooxygenase, thromboxane, and Rho-kinase. PMID:23102262

  5. Chlamydia pneumoniae antibody levels before coronary events in the Helsinki Heart Study as measured by different methods.

    PubMed

    Paldanius, Mika; Leinonen, Maija; Virkkunen, Hanna; Tenkanen, Leena; Sävykoski, Tiina; Mänttäri, Matti; Saikku, Pekka

    2006-11-01

    The lack of specific tests for the diagnosis of chronic Chlamydia pneumoniae infection has led to the use of enzyme immunoassay (EIA) instead of the gold standard, that is, microimmunofluorescence (MIF), in the measurement of C. pneumoniae antibodies. We assessed the predictive values of C. pneumoniae antibody levels and seroconversions measured by MIF and EIA for coronary events in the prospective Helsinki Heart Study. Sera from 239 cases with coronary events and 239 controls were available at the baseline and data from 210 cases and 211 controls before and after the event. The agreement between MIF and EIA antibody levels was best in high antibody titers. In conditional logistic regression analysis, only high IgA MIF titers (>/=40) at the baseline predicted future coronary events, and the participants with MIF seroconversion between consecutive sera had a higher (nonsignificant) risk for coronary events than the controls. The difference in the kinetics of EIA and MIF antibodies demonstrated that MIF should remain the gold standard. PMID:16757141

  6. Modification of the association between smoking status and severity of coronary stenosis by vitamin D in patients suspected of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuibao; Yang, Xiyan; Wang, Lefeng; Chen, Mulei; Zhao, Wenshu; Xu, Li; Yang, Xinchun

    2016-09-01

    Given both smoking and vitamin D are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) via inflammation and smoking may interfere with the local antiinflammatory effects of vitamin D. We hypothesized that the relationship between smoking and severity of CHD may be modified by vitamin D.A cross-sectional study was conducted. 25-OH vitamin D values were determined in 348 consecutive patients (mean age 62.4 ± 10.5 years; 56.3% male) undergoing coronary angiography at the Heart Center of Chaoyang Hospital affiliated to Capital Medical University between the period of September 2014 and May 2015. We categorized the patients into 2 groups based on 25-OH vitamin D levels, that is, severe hypovitaminosis D (25-OH vitamin D < 10 ng/mL) and higher vitamin D (25-OH vitamin D > =  10 ng/mL). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of severe coronary stenosis or higher Gensini score across three smoking status, that is, never smokers, former smokers, and current smokers in severe hypovitaminosis D and higher vitamin D groups, respectively.Of these patients, we identified 212 (60.9%) cases of severe CHD and 161 (46.3%) cases of severe hypovitaminosis D. Multivariable logistic regression model showed the ORs of severe CHD were 1.94 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.47, 7.98) for former smokers and 2.62 (95% CI: 0.83, 8.24) for current smokers, compared with never smokers in group with severe hypovitaminosis D (P-trend = 0.005). In contrast, smoking was not found to be significantly associated with severe CHD in group with higher 25-OH vitamin D (P-trend = 0.115). We found a significant interaction between smoking status and vitamin D on presence of severe CHD (P-interaction = 0.015). In terms of Gensini score as a dependent variable, similar results were identified.Our finding indicated the association between smoking and severity of CHD appeared to be substantially stronger among patients with severe hypovitaminosis D as

  7. The Evidence for Saturated Fat and for Sugar Related to Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Lucan, Sean C; O'Keefe, James H

    2016-01-01

    Dietary guidelines continue to recommend restricting intake of saturated fats. This recommendation follows largely from the observation that saturated fats can raise levels of total serum cholesterol (TC), thereby putatively increasing the risk of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD). However, TC is only modestly associated with CHD, and more important than the total level of cholesterol in the blood may be the number and size of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that contain it. As for saturated fats, these fats are a diverse class of compounds; different fats may have different effects on LDL and on broader CHD risk based on the specific saturated fatty acids (SFAs) they contain. Importantly, though, people eat foods, not isolated fatty acids. Some food sources of SFAs may pose no risk for CHD or possibly even be protective. Advice to reduce saturated fat in the diet without regard to nuances about LDL, SFAs, or dietary sources could actually increase people's risk of CHD. When saturated fats are replaced with refined carbohydrates, and specifically with added sugars (like sucrose or high fructose corn syrup), the end result is not favorable for heart health. Such replacement leads to changes in LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides that may increase the risk of CHD. Additionally, diets high in sugar may induce many other abnormalities associated with elevated CHD risk, including elevated levels of glucose, insulin, and uric acid, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin and leptin resistance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and altered platelet function. A diet high in added sugars has been found to cause a 3-fold increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, but sugars, like saturated fats, are a diverse class of compounds. The monosaccharide, fructose, and fructose-containing sweeteners (e.g., sucrose) produce greater degrees of metabolic abnormalities than does glucose (either isolated as a monomer, or in chains as starch

  8. Prediagnostic plasma antibody levels to periodontopathic bacteria and risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masayuki; Izumi, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Yoko; Ikeda, Ai; Iso, Hiroyasu; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have indicated that periodontitis is an important risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined whether plasma antibody levels to 3 major periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia predicted the risk of CHD events. A nested case-control research design (case: n = 191, control: n = 382), by matching gender, age, study area, date of blood collection, and time since last meal at blood collection, was employed in a large cohort of Japanese community residents.Antibody levels of periodontopathic bacteria were associated with risk of CHD after adjusting for BMI, smoking status, alcohol intake, history of hypertension, history of diabetes mellitus, exercise during leisure time, and perceived mental stress. The association was different by age subgroup. For subjects aged 40-55 years, the medium (31.7-184.9 U/mL) or high tertile plasma antibody level (> 184.9 U/mL) of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed higher risk of CHD (medium: OR = 3.72; 95% CI = 1.20-11.56, high: OR = 4.64; 95% CI = 1.52-14.18) than the low tertile level (< 31.7 U/mL). The ORs of CHD incidence became higher with an increase in IgG level of A. actinomycetemcomitans (P for trend = 0.007). For subjects aged 56-69 years, the high tertile level (> 414.1 U/mL) of P. intermedia was associated with higher risk of CHD (OR = 2.65; 95% CI = 1.18-5.94) in a dose-response fashion (P for trend = 0.007). The possible role of periodontopathic bacteria as a risk factor for CHD incidence was suggested by the results of this study by the elevated antibody level to these bacteria with the increased risk of CHD. PMID:22878796

  9. LINE-1 Hypomethylation is Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Liu, Shuchuan; Su, Zhendong; Cheng, Rongchao; Bai, Xiuping; Li, Xueqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Global methylation level in blood leukocyte DNA has been associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), with inconsistent results in various populations. Similar data are lacking in Chinese population where different genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors may affect DNA methylation and its risk relationship with CHD. Objectives To examine whether global methylation is associated with the risk of CHD in Chinese population. Methods A total of 334 cases with CHD and 788 healthy controls were included. Global methylation in blood leukocyte DNA was estimated by analyzing LINE-1 repeats using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Results In an initial analysis restricted to control subjects, LINE-1 level reduced significantly with aging, elevated total cholesterol, and diagnosis of diabetes. In the case-control analysis, reduced LINE-1 methylation was associated with increased risk of CHD; analysis by quartile revealed odds ratios (95%CI) of 0.9 (0.6-1.4), 1.9 (1.3-2.9) and 2.3 (1.6-3.5) for the third, second and first (lowest) quartile (Ptrend < 0.001), respectively, compared to the fourth (highest) quartile. Lower (

  10. Coronary heart disease: interplay between changing concepts of aetiology, risk distribution, and social strategies for prevention.

    PubMed

    McMichael, A J

    1989-01-01

    Epidemic diseases move in grand cycles, accompanying changes in culture, social organization, and environment. Coronary heart disease (CHD), a mass disease of twentieth century industrialized society, has a predominantly environmental aetiology. Although the major biomedical risk factors appear to have been identified over the past 40 years of epidemiological research, we are not certain why CHD is now on the wane in most Western nations. In Australia, CHD death rates have, since 1968, declined much more in professional and white-collar men than in blue-collar men. Any substantial reduction in CHD rates will require a generalized population shift towards a lower CHD risk profile. Numerically, the greatest gains should come from reducing the CHD risk of the bulk of the population, who are currently at medium risk of CHD. Notions of risk need, in the first instance, to be based on up-to-date knowledge of biomedical risk factors and mechanisms in order to develop optimal intervention strategies. A population-based strategy can be achieved via community education and structural modification of the social environment. The latter approach will require public health research into broader questions of the social-environmental influences on population cardiovascular health: for example, research into the social, political, and economic determinants of national food and nutrition policies; and into the various environmental (including workplace) changes that will facilitate risk-lowering behaviour. Hopefully, intervention strategies in such areas, set within a community development context, will be developed within the incipient National Program for Better Health.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2661131

  11. Dietary carbohydrates, refined grains, glycemic load, and risk of coronary heart disease in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Yu, Danxia; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Li, Honglan; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yang, Gong; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Xianglan

    2013-11-15

    The potential long-term association between carbohydrate intake and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains unclear, especially among populations who habitually have high-carbohydrate diets. We prospectively examined intakes of carbohydrates and staple grains as well as glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to CHD among 117,366 Chinese women and men (40-74 years of age) without history of diabetes, CHD, stroke, or cancer at baseline in Shanghai, China. Diet was assessed using validated food frequency questionnaires. Incident CHD cases were ascertained during follow-ups (in women, the mean was 9.8 years and in men, the mean was 5.4 years) and confirmed by medical records. Carbohydrate intake accounted for 67.5% of the total energy intake in women and 68.5% in men. Seventy percent of total carbohydrates came from white rice and 17% were from refined wheat products. Positive associations between carbohydrate intakess and CHD were found in both sexes (all P for heterogeneity > 0.35). The combined multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for the lowest to highest quartiles of carbohydrate intake, respectively, were 1.00, 1.38, 2.03, and 2.88 (95% confidence interval: 1.44, 5.78; P for trend = 0.001). The combined hazard ratios comparing the highest quartile with the lowest were 1.80 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 3.17) for refined grains and 1.87 (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 3.53) for glycemic load (both P for trend = 0.03). High carbohydrate intake, mainly from refined grains, is associated with increased CHD risk in Chinese adults. PMID:24008907

  12. Physical activity in patients with stable coronary heart disease: an international perspective

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ralph; Held, Claes; Brown, Rebekkah; Vedin, Ola; Hagstrom, Emil; Lonn, Eva; Armstrong, Paul; Granger, Christopher B.; Hochman, Judith; Davies, Richard; Soffer, Joseph; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Aims Despite the known benefits of regular exercise, the reasons why many coronary heart disease (CHD) patients engage in little physical activity are not well understood. This study identifies factors associated with low activity levels in individuals with chronic CHD participating in the STABILITY study, a global clinical outcomes trial evaluating the lipoprotein phospholipaseA2 inhibitor darapladib. Methods and results Prior to randomization, 15 486 (97.8%) participants from 39 countries completed a lifestyle questionnaire. Total physical activity was estimated from individual subject self-reports of hours spend each week on mild, moderate, and vigorous exercise, corresponding approximately to 2, 4, and 8 METS, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression evaluated clinical and demographic variables for the lowest compared with higher overall exercise levels, and for individuals who decreased rather than maintained or increased activity since diagnosis of CHD. The least active 5280 subjects (34%) reported exercise of ≤24MET.h/week. A total of 7191 subjects (46%) reported less exercise compared with before diagnosis of CHD. The majority of participants were either ‘not limited’ or ‘limited a little’ walking 100 m (84%), climbing one flight of stairs (82%), or walking 1 km/½ mile (68%), and <10% were limited ‘a lot’ by dyspnoea or angina. Variables independently associated with both low physical activity and decreasing exercise after diagnosis of CHD included more co-morbid conditions, poorer general health, fewer years of education, race, and country (P < 0.001 for all). Conclusion In this international study, low physical activity was only partly explained by cardiovascular symptoms. Potentially modifiable societal and health system factors are important determinants of physical inactivity in patients with chronic CHD. PMID:24014220

  13. Association between Psoriasis Vulgaris and Coronary Heart Disease in a Hospital-Based Population in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Masayuki; Kato, Takao; Funasako, Moritoshi; Nakane, Eisaku; Miyamoto, Shoichi; Izumi, Toshiaki; Haruna, Tetsuya; Inoko, Moriaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with an immune-genetic background. It has been reported as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States and Europe. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psoriasis and CHD in a hospital-based population in Japan. Methods For 113,065 in-hospital and clinic patients at our institution between January 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013, the diagnostic International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 codes for CHD, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and psoriasis vulgaris were extracted using the medical accounting system and electronic medical record, and were analyzed. Results The prevalence of CHD (n = 5,167, 4.5%), hypertension (n = 16,476, 14.5%), dyslipidemia (n = 9,236, 8.1%), diabetes mellitus (n = 11,555, 10.2%), and psoriasis vulgaris (n = 1,197, 1.1%) were identified. The prevalence of CHD in patients with hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and psoriasis vulgaris were 21.3%, 22.2%, 21.1%, and 9.0%, respectively. In 1,197 psoriasis patients, those with CHD were older, more likely to be male, and had more number of the diseases surveyed by ICD-10 codes. Multivariate analysis showed that psoriasis vulgaris was an independent associated factor for CHD (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–1.58; p = 0.0404) along with hypertension (adjusted OR: 7.78; 95% CI: 7.25–8.36; p < 0.0001), dyslipidemia (adjusted OR: 2.35; 95% CI: 2.19–2.52; p < 0.0001), and diabetes (adjusted OR: 2.86; 95% CI: 2.67–3.06; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Psoriasis vulgaris was independently associated with CHD in a hospital-based population in Japan. PMID:26910469

  14. Genetics of coronary heart disease: towards causal mechanisms, novel drug targets and more personalized prevention.

    PubMed

    Orho-Melander, M

    2015-11-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an archetypical multifactorial disorder that is influenced by genetic susceptibility as well as both modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors, and their interactions. Advances during recent years in the field of multifactorial genetics, in particular genomewide association studies (GWASs) and their meta-analyses, have provided the statistical power to identify and replicate genetic variants in more than 50 risk loci for CHD and in several hundreds of loci for cardiometabolic risk factors for CHD such as blood lipids and lipoproteins. Although for a great majority of these loci both the causal variants and mechanisms remain unknown, progress in identifying the causal variants and underlying mechanisms has already been made for several genetic loci. Furthermore, identification of rare loss-of-function variants in genes such as PCSK9, NPC1L1, APOC3 and APOA5, which cause a markedly decreased risk of CHD and no adverse side effects, illustrates the power of translating genetic findings into novel mechanistic information and provides some optimism for the future of developing novel drugs, given the many genes associated with CHD in GWASs. Finally, Mendelian randomization can be used to reveal or exclude causal relationships between heritable biomarkers and CHD, and such approaches have already provided evidence of causal relationships between CHD and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides/remnant particles and lipoprotein(a), and indicated a lack of causality for HDL cholesterol, C-reactive protein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. Together, these genetic findings are beginning to lead to promising new drug targets and novel interventional strategies and thus have great potential to improve prevention, prediction and therapy of CHD. PMID:26477595

  15. Quantifying Policy Options for Reducing Future Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in England: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Shaun; Bajekal, Madhavi; Norman, Paul; O’Flaherty, Martin; Hawkins, Nathaniel; Kivimäki, Mika; Capewell, Simon; Raine, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    Aims To estimate the number of coronary heart disease (CHD) deaths potentially preventable in England in 2020 comparing four risk factor change scenarios. Methods and Results Using 2007 as baseline, the IMPACTSEC model was extended to estimate the potential number of CHD deaths preventable in England in 2020 by age, gender and Index of Multiple Deprivation 2007 quintiles given four risk factor change scenarios: (a) assuming recent trends will continue; (b) assuming optimal but feasible levels already achieved elsewhere; (c) an intermediate point, halfway between current and optimal levels; and (d) assuming plateauing or worsening levels, the worst case scenario. These four scenarios were compared to the baseline scenario with both risk factors and CHD mortality rates remaining at 2007 levels. This would result in approximately 97,000 CHD deaths in 2020. Assuming recent trends will continue would avert approximately 22,640 deaths (95% uncertainty interval: 20,390-24,980). There would be some 39,720 (37,120-41,900) fewer deaths in 2020 with optimal risk factor levels and 22,330 fewer (19,850-24,300) in the intermediate scenario. In the worst case scenario, 16,170 additional deaths (13,880-18,420) would occur. If optimal risk factor levels were achieved, the gap in CHD rates between the most and least deprived areas would halve with falls in systolic blood pressure, physical inactivity and total cholesterol providing the largest contributions to mortality gains. Conclusions CHD mortality reductions of up to 45%, accompanied by significant reductions in area deprivation mortality disparities, would be possible by implementing optimal preventive policies. PMID:23936122

  16. Sweetened Beverage Consumption, Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Biomarkers of Risk in Men

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Lawrence; Malik, Vasanti S.; Kellogg, Mark D.; Rimm, Eric B.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is associated with weight gain and risk of type 2 diabetes. Few studies have tested for a relationship with coronary heart disease (CHD), or intermediate biomarkers. The role of artificially sweetened beverages is also unclear. Methods and Results We performed an analysis of the Health Professionals Follow-up study, a prospective cohort study including 42 883 men. Associations of cumulatively averaged sugar-sweetened (e.g. sodas) and artificially sweetened (e.g. diet sodas) beverage intake with incident fatal and non-fatal CHD (myocardial infarction) were examined using proportional hazard models. There were 3683 CHD cases over 22 years of follow-up. Participants in the top quartile of sugar-sweetened beverage intake had a 20% higher relative risk of CHD than those in the bottom quartile (RR=1.20, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.33, p for trend < 0.01) after adjusting for age, smoking, physical activity, alcohol, multivitamins, family history, diet quality, energy intake, BMI, pre-enrollment weight change and dieting. Artificially sweetened beverage consumption was not significantly associated with CHD (multivariate RR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.93, 1.12, p for trend = 0.28). Adjustment for self-reported high cholesterol, high triglycerides, high blood pressure and diagnosed type 2 diabetes slightly attenuated these associations. Intake of sugar-sweetened but not artificially sweetened beverages was significantly associated with increased triglycerides, CRP, IL6, TNFr1, TNFr2, decreased HDL, Lp(a), and leptin (p values < 0.02). Conclusions Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with increased risk of CHD and some adverse changes in lipids, inflammatory factors, and leptin. Artificially sweetened beverage intake was not associated with CHD risk or biomarkers. PMID:22412070

  17. [Risk factors in hyperlipidemic patients with coronary heart disease one year after PTCA].

    PubMed

    Kimmerle, R; Wimmer, T; Markus, M; Heinemann, L; Vester, E; Berger, M

    1994-01-01

    The reduction of modifiable risk factors in hyperlipidemic patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) receiving standard medical care in Germany has not been evaluated before. We identified all patients < 65 yrs of age with marked hyperlipidemia (Cholesterol (Chol) > 250 mg/dl, HDL < 20% Chol) among all patients who underwent PTCA during defined periods 1991/92 in the Cardiology department of the Heinrich-Heine-University. The study patients (n = 93, age 54 +/- 8 yrs, 75 men, 18 women) were evaluated 13 +/- 2 months after PTCA for modification of their risk factors, treatments, knowledge, medications and dietary habits with a structured questionnaire and a 5-day dietary protocol. At follow-up Chol and LDL were significantly reduced from 299 +/- 47 to 253 +/- 43, and from 228 +/- 47 to 189 +/- 42 mg/dl, respectively (p < 0.001). 10% of patients had an LDL < 135 mg/dl. In contrast, HDL (43 +/- 9 mg/dl) and triglycerides (242 +/- 138 mg/dl), the percentage of smokers (40%), of overweight patients (38%) and of patients with elevated blood pressure (43%) remained unchanged. During the observation period the number of contacts with physicians was high (12 (1-40)). 32% of patients participated in dietary counselling by a dietician and 42% in an in-patient rehabilitation programme. In 2/3 of patients the knowledge related to hyperlipidemia and a lipid-lowering diet was good. However, according to the dietary protocols the fat intake was high (37 +/- 7% of total calories). Lipid lowering drugs had been prescribed in 68% of patients, predominantly as monotherapy and in low dosage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8147073

  18. Association between coronary heart disease and cancers of the breast, prostate, and colon.

    PubMed

    Neugut, A I; Rosenberg, D J; Ahsan, H; Jacobson, J S; Wahid, N; Hagan, M; Rahman, M I; Khan, Z R; Chen, L; Pablos-Mendez, A; Shea, S

    1998-10-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) and cancers of the breast, prostate, and colon are more common in industrialized countries than in the developing world, and to some degree, these conditions appear to share risk factors. To investigate whether there is an association between these cancers and a prior history of CHD, a hospital-based case-control study was conducted at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. The study was based on 252 breast cancer cases, 256 colorectal cancer cases, and 322 benign surgical controls, all of whom underwent biopsy or surgery between January 1989 and December 1992, and on 319 prostate cancer cases and 189 benign prostatic hypertrophy controls diagnosed between January 1984 and December 1986 (prior to widespread use of prostate-specific antigen screening). Medical records were reviewed on each, focusing on the preoperative anesthesia and surgical clearances. No association was found between a history of CHD and breast or colorectal cancer, but an elevated risk was found for prostate cancer (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-3.39), using unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for appropriate confounders. No association was found between cigarette smoking and any of the three cancers. Aspirin use was protective for colorectal cancer (odds ratio, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.73) but had no association with breast or prostate cancer. The study suggests that individuals with CHD are at elevated risk for prostate cancer but not breast or colorectal cancer. Etiological risk factors associated with CHD should be investigated with regard to prostate cancer. Patients with CHD may represent a high-risk group for prostate cancer and potential future targets for prostate cancer screening interventions. PMID:9796631

  19. Do practitioners and friends support patients with coronary heart disease in lifestyle change? a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthy lifestyles help to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD) but outcomes from secondary prevention interventions which support lifestyle change have been disappointing. This study is a novel, in-depth exploration of patient factors affecting lifestyle behaviour change within an intervention designed to improve secondary prevention for patients with CHD in primary care using personalised tailored support. We aimed to explore patients’ perceptions of factors affecting lifestyle change within a trial of this intervention (the SPHERE Study), using semi-structured, one-to-one interviews, with patients in general practice. Methods Interviews (45) were conducted in purposively selected general practices (15) which had participated in the SPHERE Study. Individuals, with CHD, were selected to include those who succeeded in improving physical activity levels and dietary fibre intake and those who did not. We explored motivations, barriers to lifestyle change and information utilised by patients. Data collection and analysis, using a thematic framework and the constant comparative method, were iterative, continuing until data saturation was achieved. Results We identified novel barriers to lifestyle change: such disincentives included strong negative influences of social networks, linked to cultural norms which encouraged consumption of ‘delicious’ but unhealthy food and discouraged engagement in physical activity. Findings illustrated how personalised support within an ongoing trusted patient-professional relationship was valued. Previously known barriers and facilitators relating to support, beliefs and information were confirmed. Conclusions Intervention development in supporting lifestyle change in secondary prevention needs to more effectively address patients’ difficulties in overcoming negative social influences and maintaining interest in living healthily. PMID:23984815

  20. Association between chronic kidney disease and coronary artery calcification: the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Holly; Toto, Robert; Peshock, Ronald; Cooper, Richard; Victor, Ronald

    2005-02-01

    The hypothesis that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased coronary artery calcification (CAC) was tested using data from the Dallas Heart Study, a representative sample of Dallas County residents aged 30 to 65 yr. CKD was defined as presence of microalbuminuria and GFR > or =60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (stage 1 to 2), or GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (stage 3 to 5), excluding end-stage kidney disease. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between stages of CKD and CAC scores >10, >100, and >400 versus scores < or =10 compared with no CKD while adjusting for covariates. Analyses were repeated after stratifying by presence of diabetes. The mean age was 43.9 yr, and hypertension and diabetes were noted in 31.0 and 9.8%, respectively. No association was noted between stage 1 to 2 CKD and increased CAC scores. Compared with no CKD, stage 3 to 5 CKD was associated with CAC scores >100 (odds ratio, 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.92 to 8.80) and >400 (odds ratio, 8.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.94 to 35.95) in the total population after adjustment for covariates, but these associations were substantially reduced after exclusion of participants with diabetes. Participants with diabetes and stage 3 to 5 CKD had a ninefold increased odds of CAC scores >10 versus scores < or =10 compared with participants with diabetes and without CKD, whereas no association was noted between stage 3 to 5 CKD and CAC scores >10 in the nondiabetic population. In conclusion, stage 3 to 5 CKD is associated with increased CAC scores, but this association may be substantially stronger among adults with diabetes. These findings need to be confirmed in study populations that include adults >65 yr of age and a larger number of CKD cases. PMID:15601745

  1. Association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and coronary heart disease: A nationwide population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) development, if any, and to evaluate whether longer use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increases the risk of CHD.Patients diagnosed with GERD between 2000 and 2011 were identified as the study cohort (n = 12,960). Patients without GERD were randomly selected from the general population, frequency-matched with the study group according to age, sex, and index year, and evaluated as the comparison cohort (n = 51,840). Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to determine the incidence of CHD. The risk of CHD was evaluated in both groups by using Cox proportional hazards regression models.The GERD patients had a greater probability of CHD than the cohort without GERD did (log-rank test, P < 0.001 and 11.8 vs 6.5 per 1000 person-years). The GERD cohort had a higher risk of CHD than the comparison cohort did after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, alcohol-related illness, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, biliary stone, anxiety, depression, chronic kidney disease, and cirrhosis (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34-1.66). The risk of CHD was greater for the patients treated with PPIs for more than 1 year (aHR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.34-2.08) than for those treated with PPIs for <1 year (aHR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.39-1.74).Our population-based cohort study results indicate that GERD was associated with an increased risk of developing CHD, and that PPI use for more than 1 year might increase the risk of CHD. PMID:27399102

  2. Neutrophil proteolytic activation cascades: a possible mechanistic link between chronic periodontitis and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alfakry, Hatem; Malle, Ernst; Koyani, Chintan N; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Sorsa, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that affect a large segment of society. Coronary heart disease (CHD), the most common cardiovascular disease, progresses over several years and affects millions of people worldwide. Chronic infections may contribute to the systemic inflammation and enhance the risk for CHD. Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic infections that affects up to 50% of the adult population. Under inflammatory conditions the activation of endogenous degradation pathways mediated by immune responses leads to the release of destructive cellular molecules from both resident and immigrant cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their regulators can activate each other and play an important role in immune response via degrading extracellular matrix components and modulating cytokines and chemokines. The action of MMPs is required for immigrant cell recruitment at the site of inflammation. Stimulated neutrophils represent the major pathogen-fighting immune cells that upregulate expression of several proteinases and oxidative enzymes, which can degrade extracellular matrix components (e.g. MMP-8, MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase). The activity of MMPs is regulated by endogenous inhibitors and/or candidate MMPs (e.g. MMP-7). The balance between MMPs and their inhibitors is thought to mirror the proteolytic burden. Thus, neutrophil-derived biomarkers, including myeloperoxidase, may activate proteolytic destructive cascades that are involved in subsequent immune-pathological events associated with both periodontitis and CHD. Here, we review the existing studies on the contribution of MMPs and their regulators to the infection-related pathology. Also, we discuss the possible proteolytic involvement and role of neutrophil-derived enzymes as an etiological link between chronic periodontitis and CHD. PMID:26608308

  3. Association of vitamin d receptor-a gene polymorphisms with coronary heart disease in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    He, Lina; Wang, Menghong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms in Han Chinese adults. Methods: A total of 215 CHD patients and 67 controls were recruited. In both groups, the VDR gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of Tru9I (rs757343), ApaI (rs7975232), TaqI (rs731236) and FokI (rs2228570) were detected, and the frequencies of VDR genotypes were compared between patients and controls. The relationship between VDR FokI genotype and risk for CHD was assessed by logistic regression analysis after adjusting for age and sex. In addition, the clinical parameters and biochemical characteristics of CHD subgroups were compared according to the VDR FokI polymorphism. Results: The frequencies of FokI genotypes in CHD patients were 23.7% for AA, 47.9% for AG, and 28.4% for GG. The frequency of FokI-GG genotype significantly decreased in CHD patients as compared to control group (P = 0.039). No significant differences were observed in other VDR SNPs (rs7975232, rs731236 and rs757343) (P > 0.05) between groups. FokI-A allele carriers had a 2.61-fold increase in the odds (95% CI: 1.116-6.102, P = 0.027) as compare to CHD subjects with FokI mutation. In CHD subgroup, patients with GG genotype had a significantly higher concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than those with AG genotype or A* genotype (P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: VDR FokI polymorphisms appear to be associated with CHD. GG genotype predicts a higher HDL-cholesterol in CHD adults. PMID:26131229

  4. Impact of hypertension on the lifetime risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Okamura, Tomonori; Raheen Afzal, Arfan; Rumana, Nahid; Watanabe, Makoto; Higashiyama, Aya; Nakao, Yoko M; Nakai, Michikazu; Takegami, Misa; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Okayama, Akira; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    The lifetime risk estimate conveys the probability of disease in the remaining lifetime for an index age. These estimates may be useful for general audience-targeted knowledge translation activities against hypertension. There are only a few reports on the impact of hypertension on the lifetime risk of cardiovascular events. The Suita Study, a cohort study of urban residents, was established in 1989. We included all participants who were coronary heart disease (CHD) free at baseline. Age (in years) was used as the timescale. Age-specific incidence rates were calculated with the person-year method within 5-year bands. We estimated the sex- and index-age-specific lifetime risk of first-ever CHD, taking the competing risk of death into account. We followed 5834 participants from 1989 to 2007 for a total of 75 387.5 person-years. At age 45 years, the competing risk of death-adjusted lifetime risk for all CHD for men was 14.12% for normotensive men and 26.95% for hypertensive men. The competing risk of death-adjusted lifetime risk for all CHD at 45 years of age for women was 6.21% for normotensive women and 14.85% for hypertensive women. This increased lifetime risk of CHD for hypertensive patients was observed among both men and women across all index ages. Although the overall lifetime risk of CHD was lower than in the Western population, hypertension showed a significant effect on the residual lifetime risk of CHD among Japanese middle-aged men and women. This easy-to-understand knowledge may be used as an important index to assist public health education and planning. PMID:26960917

  5. Association of I-FABP gene polymorphism and the risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Dong; Yu, Changqing; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to investigate the association between polymorphism of I-FABP gene and coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: 225 patients with CHD were randomly recruited into the case group, and 196 healthy elderly volunteers were recruited from Medical Examination Center of our hospital as control. General clinical data were collected and plasma TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C levels were measured. Besides, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) technology were used to detect the polymorphism of Hha-I enzyme cleavage sites in I-FABP gene in the study population. Results: Hha-I cleavage sites occurred at codon 54 in exon in the coding sequencing of I-FABP gene in all participants. After cleavage with Hha-I enzyme, the genotypes were identified as wild-type A/A, heterozygous mutant A/T and homozygous mutant T/T. In case group, A/T and T/T genetic carriers had significantly higher levels of TC, TG and LDL-C than A/A carriers (P<0.05). However, in control group, similar differences were not observed (P>0.05). BMI, dietary habits and I-FABP alleles were independent risk factors of CHD. Conclusion: The polymorphism of I-FABP gene existed in the study population. And this genetic variation had influence on lipid metabolism, which was associated with the risk of developing CHD. I-FABP gene polymorphism may contribute to the increased genetic susceptibility to CHD. PMID:26629163

  6. Mental stress as a provocative test in patients with various clinical syndromes of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Specchia, G; Falcone, C; Traversi, E; La Rovere, M T; Guasti, L; De Micheli, G; Ardissino, D; De Servi, S

    1991-04-01

    To assess the prevalence of mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia and investigate the pathogenetic mechanisms by which emotional stress may induce myocardial ischemia, we studied 372 patients with angina pectoris who underwent mental arithmetic and exercise stress testings. Hyperventilation tests were also performed in 176 patients, and 340 patients underwent coronary arteriography. Sixty-one patients showed significant ST segment abnormalities during mental arithmetic and exercise stress testings (group 1). Two hundred eleven patients had negative responses to mental stress but positive exercise tests (group 2), whereas both tests were negative in 100 patients (group 3). Mental stress induced significant increases in heart rate and systolic blood pressure in the three groups of patients; however, group 1 patients had higher increases in rate-pressure product (mm Hg x beats/min) than group 2 and group 3 patients (14,909 +/- 3,894 versus 12,985 +/- 2,900 versus 12,724 +/- 4,400 mm Hg x beats/min, p less than 0.01). Group 1 patients had shorter exercise durations than group 2 or group 3 (4.06 +/- 1.55 versus 7.65 +/- 3.07 versus 13.9 +/- 5.31 minutes, p less than 0.01), although rate-pressure products at peak exercise were similar in groups 1 and 2 (20,277 +/- 6,058 versus 20,768 +/- 3,864, p = NS) and significantly higher in group 3 (26,221 +/- 7,100/mm Hg x beats/min, p less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2009619

  7. Blood gas analysis of the coronary sinus in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANGHUA; SHAN, CHUNFANG; ZHANG, YU; ZHOU, XIANHUI; LI, JINXIN; LI, YAODONG; XING, QIANG; TANG, BAOPENG

    2015-01-01

    The difference in cardiac oxygen consumption between individuals with normal cardiac function and those with heart failure (HF), and the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac ejection fraction (EF) are poorly understood. By establishing a control group composed of individuals with normal cardiac function, the present study aimed to determine the difference in cardiac oxygen consumption between individuals with normal and abnormal cardiac function, as well as the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac EF. A total of 34 patients with normal cardiac function were enrolled in the control group and 44 patients with HF were enrolled in the experimental group. Blood samples from the aortic root, femoral vein and coronary sinus (CS) were collected from each patient. All the blood samples were subjected to blood gas analysis. The partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen saturation obtained from the peripheral vein and CS of patients with HF were lower than those in patients with normal cardiac function. In each patient with HF, the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac EF was analyzed using multi-linear correlation and regression analyses. Cardiac oxygen consumption negatively correlated with cardiac EF (R=-0.336, P=0.026). Furthermore, linear regression analysis suggested that cardiac EF had a significant effect on cardiac oxygen consumption (y = 82.906–0.483×, P=0.026). In conclusion, myocardial oxygen consumption is greater in individuals with HF compared to those with normal cardiac function. The cardiac EF affects myocardial oxygen consumption in patients with HF. PMID:26137240

  8. Sexual activity and concerns in people with coronary heart disease from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Steptoe, Andrew; Jackson, Sarah E; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sexual activity is a central component of intimate relationships, but sexual function may be impaired by coronary heart disease (CHD). There have been few representative population-based comparisons of sexual behaviour and concerns in people with and without CHD. We therefore investigated these issues in a large nationally representative sample of older people. Methods We analysed cross-sectional data from 2979 men and 3711 women aged 50 and older from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Sexual behaviour and concerns were assessed by validated self-completion questionnaire and analyses were weighted for non-response. Covariates included age, partnerships status and comorbidities. Results There were 376 men and 279 women with CHD. Men with CHD were less likely to be sexually active (68.7% vs 80.0%, adjusted OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.81), thought less about sex (74.7% vs 81.9%, OR 0.72, CI 0.54 to 0.95), and reported more erectile difficulties (47.4% vs 38.1%, OR 1.46, CI 1.10 to 1.93) than men without CHD. Effects were more pronounced among those diagnosed within the past 4 years. Women diagnosed <4 years ago were also less likely to be sexually active (35.4% vs 55.6%, OR 0.44, CI 0.23 to 0.84). There were few differences in concerns about sexual activity. Cardiovascular medication showed weak associations with erectile dysfunction. Conclusions There is an association between CHD and sexual activity, particularly among men, but the impact of CHD is limited. More effective advice after diagnosis might reverse the reduction in sexual activity, leading to improved quality of life. PMID:27126394

  9. Chronic Fine and Coarse Particulate Exposure, Mortality, and Coronary Heart Disease in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Puett, Robin C.; Hart, Jaime E.; Yanosky, Jeff D; Paciorek, Christopher; Schwartz, Joel; Suh, Helen; Speizer, Frank E; Laden, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Background The relationship of fine particulate matter < 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) air pollution with mortality and cardiovascular disease is well established, with more recent long-term studies reporting larger effect sizes than earlier long-term studies. Some studies have suggested the coarse fraction, particles between 2.5 and 10 μm (PM10–2.5), may also be important. With respect to mortality and cardiovascular events, questions remain regarding the relative strength of effect sizes for chronic exposure to fine and coarse particles. Objectives We examined the relationship of chronic PM2.5 and PM10–2.5 exposures with all-cause mortality and fatal and nonfatal incident coronary heart disease (CHD), adjusting for time-varying covariates. Methods The current study included women from the Nurses’ Health Study living in metropolitan areas of the northeastern and midwestern United States. Follow-up was from 1992 to 2002. We used geographic information systems–based spatial smoothing models to estimate monthly exposures at each participant’s residence. Results We found increased risk of all-cause mortality [hazard ratio (HR), 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02–1.54] and fatal CHD (HR = 2.02; 95% CI, 1.07–3.78) associated with each 10-μg/m3 increase in annual PM2.5 exposure. The association between fatal CHD and PM10–2.5 was weaker. Conclusions Our findings contribute to growing evidence that chronic PM2.5 exposure is associated with risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:20049120

  10. Body composition assessment and coronary heart disease risk factors among college students of three ethnic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Koutoubi, Samer; Huffman, Fatma G.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study identified and compared anthropometric measurements, body composition and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors among college students of three ethnic groups. METHODS: Subjects were assessed for cardiovascular risk. Body composition analysis was performed using the Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA). RESULTS: Black non-Hispanic females (30%) were significantly (p < 0.017) more in the "overweight" category compared to white non-Hispanic females (6.7%). Black non-Hispanic females had significantly (p < 0.044) higher percentages of body fat and lower percentages of body lean, and significantly (p < 0.040) lower percentages of body water than white non-Hispanic females. Significant positive correlations were found between CHD Risk Point Standard (CHDRPS) and percentages of body fat in white non-Hispanic males (p < 0.005), Hispanic males (p < 0.016) and Hispanic females (p < 0.001). Significant inverse correlations were found between CHDRPS and percentages of body water in white non-Hispanic males (p < 0.004), Hispanic males (p < 0.013) and Hispanic females (p < 0.001): body lean in white non-Hispanic males (p < 0.005), Hispanic males (p < 0.016) and Hispanic females (p < 0.001); and lean/fat ratio in white non-Hispanic males (p < 0.008), Hispanic males (p < 0.030), black non-Hispanic males (p < 0.020) and Hispanic females (p < 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of overweight justifies a high priority for weight control in young adults in an effort to prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) later in life. PMID:16035576

  11. Neighbourhood socioeconomic status and coronary heart disease in individuals between 40 and 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Axel C; Li, Xinjun; Holzmann, Martin J; Wändell, Per; Gasevic, Danijela; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective The incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) has decreased in general but not among younger middle-aged adults. We performed a cohort study of the association between neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES) at the age of 40 and risk of MI before the age of 50 years. Methods All individuals in Sweden were included in the year of their 40th birthday, if it occurred between 1998 and 2010. National registers were used to categorise neighbourhood SES into high, middle and low, and to retrieve information on incident MI and coronary heart disease (CHD). Cox regression models, adjusted for marital status, education level, immigrant status and region of residence, provided an estimate of the HRs and 95% CIs for MI or CHD. Results Out of 587 933 men and 563 719 women, incident MI occurred in 2877 (0.48%) men and 932 (0.17%) women; and CHD occurred in 4400 (0.74%) men and 1756 (0.31%) women during a mean follow-up of 5.5 years. Using individuals living in middle-SES neighbourhoods as referents, living in high-SES neighbourhoods was associated with lower risk of MI in both sexes (HR (95% CI): men: 0.72 (0.64 to 0.82), women: 0.66 (0.53 to 0.81)); living in low-SES neighbourhoods was associated with a higher risk of MI (HR (95% CI): men: 1.31 (1.20 to 1.44), women: 1.28 (1.08 to 1.50)). Similar risk estimates for CHD were found. Conclusions The results of our study suggest an increased risk of MI and CHD among residents from low-SES neighbourhoods and a lower risk in those from high-SES neighbourhoods compared with residents in middle-SES neighbourhoods. PMID:26864672

  12. UK research spend in 2008 and 2012: comparing stroke, cancer, coronary heart disease and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Leal, Jose; Gray, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess UK governmental and charity research funding in 2012 for cancer, coronary heart disease (CHD), dementia and stroke, and to make comparisons with 2008 levels. Design Analysis of research expenditure. Setting United Kingdom. Main outcome measures We identified UK governmental agencies and charities providing health research funding to determine the 2012 levels of funding for cancer, CHD, dementia and stroke. Levels of research funding were compared to burden of disease measures, including prevalence, disability adjusted life years and economic burden. Results The combined research funding into cancer, CHD, dementia and stroke by governmental and charity organisations in 2012 was £856 million, of which £544 million (64%) was devoted to cancer, £166 million (19%) to CHD, £90 million (11%) to dementia and £56 million (7%) to stroke. For every £10 of health and social care costs attributable to each disease, cancer received £1.08 in research funding, CHD £0.65, stroke £0.19 and dementia £0.08. A considerable shift in the distribution of government research funding was observed between 2008 and 2012. In 2008, 66% of governmental research funding into the four conditions under study was devoted to cancer, 21% to CHD, 9% to dementia and 4% to stroke. In 2012, the proportions devoted to dementia and stroke had increased to 21% and 12%, respectively, with cancer accounting for 45% of total research spend. Conclusions Although there has been much progress by government to increase levels of research funding for dementia and stroke, these areas remain underfunded when compared with the burden of disease. PMID:25869683

  13. Effective homocysteine metabolism may protect South African blacks against coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ubbink, J B; Vermaak, W J; Delport, R; van der Merwe, A; Becker, P J; Potgieter, H

    1995-10-01

    L-Methionine (0.1 g/kg body wt) was administered to young white [n = 18; mean (+/- SD) age 20.0 +/- 1.0 y] and black [n = 12; mean (+/- SD) age 22.0 +/- 1.3 y] volunteers who had a similar lifestyle and who did not differ significantly from each other with respect to plasma folate or vitamin B-12 concentrations. Blacks, however, had significantly lower plasma pyridoxal-5'-phosphate concentrations compared with whites (P < 0.001). Fasting plasma homocysteine concentrations in blacks and whites were not significantly different. The mean (+/- SD) maximum increase in plasma homocysteine concentration measured after methionine loading was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in blacks (11.0 +/- 3.6 mumol/L) than in whites (18.0 +/- 6.2 mumol/L). Six weeks of vitamin supplementation (1.0 mg folic acid, 400 micrograms vitamin B-12, and 10 mg pyridoxine/d) reduced the mean (+/- SD) fasting plasma homocysteine concentration from 9.6 +/- 3.5 to 7.2 +/- 1.6 mumol/L in whites (P < 0.05) and from 8.4 +/- 2.4 to 5.6 +/- 1.4 mumol/L in blacks (P < 0.01). The mean (+/- SD) maximum increase in plasma homocysteine concentration after methionine loading declined from 18.0 +/- 6.2 to 11.1 +/- 2.3 mumol/L (P < 0.01) in whites, but vitamin supplementation did not have a significant effect on the methionine-load test in black volunteers. A significant race-by-time interaction shows that blacks metabolized homocysteine more effectively than did whites, which may partly explain their relative resistance against coronary heart disease despite a high prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and smoking. PMID:7572713

  14. Should We Screen for Coronary Heart Disease in Asymptomatic Persons?: Grand Rounds Discussion From Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Gerald W; Cutlip, Donald E; Pinto, Duane S

    2016-04-01

    In March 2015, the American College of Physicians (ACP) released a clinical guideline on the value of screening for coronary heart disease (CHD) in asymptomatic persons. The guideline authors found that results of screening studies are unlikely to change patient management or the intensity of risk factor reduction strategies. Most events occur in patients who are at low to intermediate risk for CHD; and in low-risk asymptomatic patients, percutaneous coronary intervention in "screen-positive" patients does not improve outcomes and creates unnecessary risks. As a result, the ACP recommended against screening for asymptomatic patients who are at low risk for CHD. Instead, it recommended a focus on proven strategies, such as treatment of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, to reduce risk in appropriately selected asymptomatic persons. Two discussants weigh the evidence for and against screening for CHD in asymptomatic patients with varying degrees of risk and provide recommendations for a specific patient who is uncertain whether to proceed to screening. PMID:27043981

  15. Beating heart mitral valve repair for a patient with previous coronary bypass: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitral valve reoperation, through a median sternotomy, for a patient with patent coronary bypass grafts is technically challenging and carries higher postoperative morbidity and mortality than a primary operation. We present a case of mitral valve repair using a beating heart technique under normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass that was performed 3 years after a coronary artery bypass operation. A limited (10 cm) right thoracotomy was made and cardiopulmonary bypass was conducted using the ascending aortic and femoral venous cannulation. The left atrium was opened while beating was maintained. Triangular resection of the prolapsed portion of the posterior leaflet and ring annuloplasty were performed. Completeness of the repair was verified by direct visualization under beating condition and transesophageal echocardiogram. This technique is a safe and feasible option for a mitral valve reoperation that excludes re-sternotomy, extensive pericardial dissection and aortic clamping, thereby minimizes risks of bleeding, graft injury and myocardial damage. PMID:24128131

  16. Magnesium and trace metals: risk factors for coronary heart disease - associations between blood levels and angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Manthey, J.; Stoeppler, M.; Morgenstern, W.; Nussel, E.; Opherk, D.; Weintraut, A.; Wesch, H.; Kubler, W.

    1981-10-01

    A deficiency or an excessive intake of metals with cardiovascular effects is suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and sudden death. Therefore, in 106 patients undergoing coronary arteriography, serum levels of six essential metals (magnesium, chromium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc) and whole blood concentrations of two elements without known essential function (cadmium and lead) were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, including the flameless technique, or neutron activation analysis. Our results suggest that a deficiency of magnesium but not of the other metals studied may be present in patients with severe CHD; elevated serum copper and manganese levels do not play a role in the development of CHD in the sample of patients studied; and cigarette smoking may be associated with increased serum cadmium levels, which may explain in part the contribution of smoking to the risk of sudden death in patients with CHD.

  17. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is a minimally invasive procedure to open up blocked coronary arteries, allowing blood to circulate unobstructed to the heart muscle. The procedure ...

  18. Comparison of effectiveness of carvedilol versus bisoprolol for prevention of postdischarge atrial fibrillation after coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Marazzi, Giuseppe; Iellamo, Ferdinando; Volterrani, Maurizio; Caminiti, Giuseppe; Madonna, Mariapina; Arisi, Giovanna; Massaro, Rosalba; Righi, Daniela; Rosano, Giuseppe M C

    2011-01-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs frequently soon after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and often results in increased mortality and morbidity, particularly in patients with heart failure. New-onset AF is also a common event in the early period after discharge from a cardiac surgery clinic. Current guidelines recommend β blockers as first-line medication for the prevention of AF after CABG. In this prospective study, we investigated the effectiveness of the highly selective β1 receptor antagonist bisoprolol compared to the less selective β blocker carvedilol in preventing postdischarge AF after CABG in patients with decreased left ventricular function. Three hundred twenty patients (231 men, 89 women, mean age 66 ± 10 years) with ejection fraction <40% who underwent CABG and were then referred to an in-hospital cardiac rehabilitation program were randomized to receive bisoprolol (n = 160) or carvedilol (n = 160) starting 4 to 5 days after surgery. Bisoprolol was started at 1.25 mg 1 time/day and carvedilol was started 3.125 mg 2 times/day. All patients underwent continuous telemetric electrocardiographic monitoring for 5 days after entry in the study and thereafter 2 times/day routinely up to hospital discharge. During follow-up, 23 patients (14.6%) in the bisoprolol group and 37 patients (23%) in the carvedilol group developed AF (relative risk 0.6, confidence interval 0.4 to 0.9, p = 0.032). Twenty-six percent of all AF episodes were asymptomatic. At the 4-week outpatient visit, those in the bisoprolol group showed a significantly greater decrease in heart rate, being in sinus rhythm or AF (-15.6 ± 3 vs -9.4 ± 3 beats/min, p = 0.021), whereas changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressures did not differ significantly. In conclusion, bisoprolol is more effective than carvedilol in decreasing the incidence of postdischarge AF after CABG in patients with decreased left ventricular function. PMID:21129714

  19. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD-heart attack; Coronary artery disease-heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  20. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso Heart anatomy illustrations and animations for grades K-6. Heart ...

  1. Energy loss and coronary flow simulation following hybrid stage I palliation: a hypoplastic left heart computational fluid dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H.; Niehaus, Justin; Gottliebson, William; Abdallah, Shaaban

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The theoretical differences in energy losses as well as coronary flow with different band sizes for branch pulmonary arteries (PA) in hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) remain unknown. Our objective was to develop a computational fluid dynamic model (CFD) to determine the energy losses and pulmonary-to-systemic flow rates. This study was done for three different PA band sizes. METHODS Three-dimensional computer models of the hybrid procedure were constructed using the standard commercial CFD softwares Fluent and Gambit. The computer models were controlled for bilateral PA reduction to 25% (restrictive), 50% (intermediate) and 75% (loose) of the native branch pulmonary artery diameter. Velocity and pressure data were calculated throughout the heart geometry using the finite volume numerical method. Coronary flow was measured simultaneously with each model. Wall shear stress and the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic volume flow rates were calculated. Computer simulations were compared at fixed points utilizing echocardiographic and catheter-based metric dimensions. RESULTS Restricting the PA band to a 25% diameter demonstrated the greatest energy loss. The 25% banding model produced an energy loss of 16.76% systolic and 24.91% diastolic vs loose banding at 7.36% systolic and 17.90% diastolic. Also, restrictive PA bands had greater coronary flow compared with loose PA bands (50.2 vs 41.9 ml/min). Shear stress ranged from 3.75 Pascals with restrictive PA banding to 2.84 Pascals with loose banding. Intermediate PA banding at 50% diameter achieved a Qp/Qs (closest to 1) at 1.46 systolic and 0.66 diastolic compared with loose or restrictive banding without excess energy loss. CONCLUSIONS CFD provides a unique platform to simulate pressure, shear stress as well as energy losses of the hybrid procedure. PA banding at 50% provided a balanced pulmonary and systemic circulation with adequate coronary flow but without extra energy losses incurred. PMID:23660734

  2. Cardiac contractile dysfunction during mild coronary flow reductions is due to an altered calcium-pressure relationship in rat hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Figueredo, V M; Brandes, R; Weiner, M W; Massie, B M; Camacho, S A

    1992-01-01

    Coronary artery stenosis or occlusion results in reduced coronary flow and myocardial contractile depression. At severe flow reductions, increased inorganic phosphate (Pi) and intracellular acidosis clearly play a role in contractile depression. However, during milder flow reductions the mechanism(s) underlying contractile depression are less clear. Previous perfused heart studies demonstrated no change of Pi or pH during mild flow reductions, suggesting that changes of intravascular pressure (garden hose effect) may be the mediator of this contractile depression. Others have reported conflicting results regarding another possible mediator of contractility, the cytosolic free calcium (Cai). To examine the respective roles of Cai, Pi, pH, and vascular pressure in regulating contractility during mild flow reductions, Indo-1 calcium fluorescence and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements were performed on Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Cai and diastolic calcium levels did not change during flow reductions to 50% of control. Pi demonstrated a close relationship with developed pressure and significantly increased from 2.5 +/- 0.3 to 4.2 +/- 0.4 mumol/g dry weight during a 25% flow reduction. pH was unchanged until a 50% flow reduction. Increasing vascular pressure to superphysiological levels resulted in further increases of developed pressure, with no change in Cai. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that during mild coronary flow reductions, contractile depression is mediated by an altered relationship between Cai and pressure, rather than by decreased Cai. Furthermore, increased Pi and decreased intravascular pressure may be responsible for this altered calcium-pressure relationship during mild coronary flow reductions. PMID:1430205

  3. Effect of heart rate on the diagnostic accuracy of 256-slice computed tomography angiography in the detection of coronary artery stenosis: ROC curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GANG; WU, YIFEN; ZHANG, ZHENTAO; ZHENG, XIAOLIN; ZHANG, YULAN; LIANG, MANQIU; YUAN, HUANCHU; SHEN, HAIPING; LI, DEWEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of heart rate (HR) on the diagnostic accuracy of 256-slice computed tomography angiography (CTA) in the detection of coronary artery stenosis. Coronary imaging was performed using a Philips 256-slice spiral CT, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic value of 256-slice CTA in coronary artery stenosis. The HR of the research subjects in the study was within a certain range (39–107 bpm). One hundred patients suspected of coronary heart disease underwent 256-slice CTA examination. The cases were divided into three groups: Low HR (HR <75 bpm), moderate HR (75≤ HR <90 bpm) and high HR (HR ≥90 bpm). For the three groups, two observers independently assessed the image quality for all coronary segments on a four-point ordinal scale. An image quality of grades 1–3 was considered diagnostic, while grade 4 was non-diagnostic. A total of 97.76% of the images were diagnostic in the low-HR group, 96.86% in the moderate-HR group and 95.80% in the high-HR group. According to the ROC curve analysis, the specificity of CTA in diagnosing coronary artery stenosis was 98.40, 96.00 and 97.60% in the low-, moderate- and high-HR groups, respectively. In conclusion, 256-slice coronary CTA can be used to clearly show the main segments of the coronary artery and to effectively diagnose coronary artery stenosis. Within the range of HRs investigated, HR was found to have no significant effect on the diagnostic accuracy of 256-slice coronary CTA for coronary artery stenosis. PMID:27168831

  4. Role of genetic polymorphisms of ion channels in the pathophysiology of coronary microvascular dysfunction and ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Francesco; Mancone, Massimo; Chilian, William M; Severino, Paolo; Canali, Emanuele; Logan, Suzanna; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Volterrani, Maurizio; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2013-11-01

    Conventionally, ischemic heart disease (IHD) is equated with large vessel coronary disease. However, recent evidence has suggested a role of compromised microvascular regulation in the etiology of IHD. Because regulation of coronary blood flow likely involves activity of specific ion channels, and key factors involved in endothelium-dependent dilation, we proposed that genetic anomalies of ion channels or specific endothelial regulators may underlie coronary microvascular disease. We aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding for ion channels expressed in the coronary vasculature and the possible correlation with IHD resulting from microvascular dysfunction. 242 consecutive patients who were candidates for coronary angiography were enrolled. A prospective, observational, single-center study was conducted, analyzing genetic polymorphisms relative to (1) NOS3 encoding for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS); (2) ATP2A2 encoding for the Ca²⁺/H⁺-ATPase pump (SERCA); (3) SCN5A encoding for the voltage-dependent Na⁺ channel (Nav1.5); (4) KCNJ8 and KCNJ11 encoding for the Kir6.1 and Kir6.2 subunits of K-ATP channels, respectively; and (5) KCN5A encoding for the voltage-gated K⁺ channel (Kv1.5). No significant associations between clinical IHD manifestations and polymorphisms for SERCA, Kir6.1, and Kv1.5 were observed (p > 0.05), whereas specific polymorphisms detected in eNOS, as well as in Kir6.2 and Nav1.5 were found to be correlated with IHD and microvascular dysfunction. Interestingly, genetic polymorphisms for ion channels seem to have an important clinical impact influencing the susceptibility for microvascular dysfunction and IHD, independent of the presence of classic cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:24068186

  5. An automated multi-modal object analysis approach to coronary calcium scoring of adaptive heart isolated MSCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. This can be challenging for a human observer as it is difficult to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. The inclusion or exclusion of false positive or true positive calcified plaques respectively will alter the patient calcium score incorrectly, thus leading to the possibility of incorrect treatment prescription. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the Volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the requirement and

  6. Association of structural variants of the gene of apolipoprotein B with coronary heart disease and serum lipid level

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, V.A.; Puzyrev, V.P.; Lemza, S.V.; Karpov, R.S.; Fedorov, A.Yu.

    1995-07-01

    Xba I and EcoR I polymorphism of the apolipoprotein B (APOB) gene was studied by PCR. A significant increase in the frequency of allele X{sup +} and haplotype X{sup +}E{sup +} was demonstrated in patients with coronarographically documented coronary heart disease (CHD) over that of the general population. Association of allele E{sup {minus}} with increased levels of serum triglycerides was found. The results provide evidence about the contribution of structural variants of the APOB gene to determining CHD. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. [On the importance of a comprehensive study for diagnostics of death from acute ethanol poisoning and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Porodenko, V A; Korkhmazov, V T

    2011-01-01

    Over 30 000 cases of acute poisoning with ethyl alcohol and its surrogates are recorded annually in this country. Differential diagnostics between fatal poisoning and death from coronary heart disease encounters serious difficulties. The authors report a comprehensive forensic chemical, morphometric, and pathomorphological study of the activity of ethanol-oxidizing enzyme systems in the internal organs. The results of histochemical examination provide a basis for the extension of diagnostic potential of the available methods and the enhancement of the objective value of expert reports. PMID:21866846

  8. What are the evidences of solar activity influence on coronary heart disease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Yury; Breus, Tamara

    Researches of last two decades have shown that the cardiovascular system represents the most probable target for influence of helio - and geomagnetic activity. Both cardiovascular system and blood connect very closely: one system cannot exist without another. For the same reason the effects perceived by one system, are easily transferred to another. Laboratory tests as blood coagulation, platelet aggregation, and capillary blood velocity performed in our hospital in patients suffering from coronary heart disease (CHD) revealed a high their dependence on a level of geomagnetic activity (Gurfinkel et al., 1995, 1998). Later Gmitrov and Ohkubo (2002) in experiments on animals also found a significant negative correlation between geomagnetic field disturbances and capillary blood velocity. The analyzing data collected by the Moscow ambulance services covering more then one million observations over three years, cleaned up by seasonal effects of meteorological and social causes, showed that the number of cases of myocardial infarction increased during geomagnetic storms (Breus et al., 1995). During 14 years we collected more than 25000 cases of acute myocardial infarction and brain stroke at seven medical hospitals located in Russia, China and some other countries. We used only cases with established date of acute attack of diseases. Undated cases were excluded from the analysis. Average numbers of patients on geomagnetic active days and days with quiet geomagnetic condition were compared. It was shown statistically that during geomagnetic disturbances the frequency of myocardial infarction and brain stroke cases increased on the average by a factor of two in comparison with quiet geomagnetic conditions. These results are close to results obtained by (Stoupel, 1999), for patients suffering with acute cardiological pathology. Our recent study (with L.Parfeonova) revealed the relation between heart ventricular ectopic activity (VEA) and geomagnetic conditions in patients

  9. Is There an Association Between Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Katsiki, Niki; Kollari, Erietta; Dardas, Sotirios; Dardas, Petros; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Athyros, Vasilios G.; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been shown to predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded the gold standard marker of arterial stiffness. In previous studies, cfPWV was associated with the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, with regard to CHD severity as assessed by the Syntax Score, only brachial-ankle PWV was reported to correlate with Syntax Score; no data exist for cfPWV. In this pilot study, we evaluated the possible associations between cfPWV, CHD and Syntax Score in 62 consecutive pa-tients (49 males; mean age: 64±12years) with chest pain undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. cfPWV was signifi-cantly higher in CHD patients than in non-CHD individuals (10 vs. 8.4 m/s; p = 0.003). No significant association was found between cfPWV and CHD severity as assessed by Syntax Score. A cut-off point of 12.3 m/s was considered as diagnostic for abnormally increased cfPWV (specificity: 97%; sensitivity: 12%; positive likelihood ratio: 3.558). Further research is needed to establish the relationship between cfPWV and Syntax Score. PMID:27347222

  10. The Relationship of Metabolic Syndrome with Stress, Coronary Heart Disease and Pulmonary Function - An Occupational Cohort-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Nowobilski, Roman; Dropinski, Jerzy; Kotula-Horowitz, Katarzyna; Laskowicz, Bartosz; Stanisz, Andrzej; Lelakowski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Higher levels of stress impact the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease. The association between MetS, impaired pulmonary function and low level of physical activity is still pending assessment in the subjects exposed to stress. The study aimed to examine whether higher levels of stress might be related to MetS and the plaque presence, as well as whether MetS might affect pulmonary function. Design and Methods The study embraced 235 police officers (mean age 40.97 years) from the south of Poland. The anthropometrics and biochemical variables were measured; MetS was diagnosed using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Computed tomography coronary angiography of coronary arteries, exercise ECG, measurements of brachial flow-mediated dilation, and carotid artery intima-media thickness were completed. In order to measure the self-perception of stress, 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was applied. Pulmonary function and physical activity levels were also addressed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to determine the relationships between: 1/ incidence of coronary plaque and MetS per se, MetS components and the number of classical cardiovascular risk factors, 2/ perceived stress and MetS, 3/ MetS and pulmonary function parameters. Results Coronary artery atherosclerosis was less associated with MetS (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.24–5.52; p = 0.011) than with a co-existence of classical cardiovascular risk factors (OR = 5.67, 95% CI 1.07–29.85, p = 0.03; for 3 risk factors and OR = 9.05; 95% CI 1.24–66.23, p = 0.02; for 6 risk factors, respectively). Perceived stress increased MetS prevalence (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03–1.13; p = 0.03), and impacted coronary plaque prevalence (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.001–1.10; p = 0.04). Leisure-time physical activity reduced the chances of developing MetS (OR = 0.98 95% CI 0.96–0.99; p = 0.02). MetS subjects had significantly lower values of certain

  11. The ASSURE ROT Registry: Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold Following Rotablation for Complex Coronary Lesions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Coronary Restenosis; Heart Diseases; Coronary Stenosis; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  12. Difficulties in beating-heart totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting: how to handle the problem endoscopically.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Bonatti, Johannes; Schachner, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    We describe 2 cases of successful conversion from beating-heart (BH) to arrested-heart (AH) totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery (TECAB). The preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scan of the first patient showed significant artherosclerosis of the femoral vessels in both groins. Therefore we tried to avoid inguinal cannulation by performing an off-pump BH-TECAB. But the target vessel was strongly fissured, and bleedings from the surrounding tissue made anastomotic suturing impossible. Therefore we cannulated the groin cautiously and endoclamped the aorta. The preoperative CT scan of the second patient showed a soft plaque in the ascending aorta. Therefore we tried to perform an on-pump BH-TECAB to avoid clamping of the aorta. Even though we snared the target vessel, significant backbbleeding occurred. Therefore we performed endoclamping of the aorta distal to the aortic plaque. In both cases the following AH-TECAB procedure was performed successfully without any problems. PMID:19546063

  13. The effects of N-acetylcysteine on cisplatin-induced changes of cardiodynamic parameters within coronary autoregulation range in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Rosic, Gvozden; Selakovic, Dragica; Joksimovic, Jovana; Srejovic, Ivan; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Tatalović, Nikola; Orescanin-Dusic, Zorana; Mitrovic, Slobodanka; Ilic, Milena; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic NAC administration along with cisplatin on cisplatin-induced cardiotoxicity by means of coronary flow (CF), cardiodynamic parameters, oxidative stress markers and morphological changes in isolated rat heart. Isolated hearts of Wistar albino rats (divided into four groups: control, cisplatin, NAC and cisplatin+NAC group) were perfused according to Langendorff technique at constant coronary perfusion pressure starting at 50 and gradually increased to 65, 80, 95 and 110 cm H2O to evaluate cardiodynamic parameters within autoregulation range. Samples of coronary venous effluent (CVE) were collected for determination of CF and biochemical assays, and heart tissue samples for biochemical assays and histopathological examination. Cisplatin treatment decreased CF and heart rate, and increased left ventricular systolic pressure and maximum left ventricular pressure development rate. Cisplatin increased H2O2 and TBARS, but decreased NO2(-) levels in CVE. In tissue samples, cisplatin reduced pathological alterations in myocardium and coronary vessels, with no changes in the amount of total glutathione, as well as in activity of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. NAC coadministration, by reducing oxidative damage, attenuated cisplatin-induced changes of cardiodynamic and oxidative stress parameters, as well as morphological changes in myocardium and coronary vasculature. PMID:26656795

  14. Prevalence of coronary heart disease or stroke among workers aged <55 years--United States, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Luckhaupt, Sara E; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2014-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease accounts for one in three deaths in the United States each year, and coronary heart disease and stroke account for most of those deaths. To try to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched the Million Hearts initiative, promoting proven and effective interventions in communities and clinical settings. In workplace settings, cardiovascular disease can be addressed through a Total Worker Health program, which integrates occupational safety and health protection with health promotion. To identify workers likely to benefit from such a program, CDC analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the period 2008-2012 to estimate the prevalence of a history of coronary heart disease or stroke (CHD/stroke) among adults aged <55 years by selected characteristics, employment status, occupation category, and industry of employment. The results of that analysis showed that 1.9% of employed adults aged <55 years reported a history of CHD/stroke, compared with 2.5% of unemployed adults looking for work, and 6.3% of adults not in the labor force (e.g., unemployed adults who stopped looking for work, homemakers, students, retired persons, and disabled persons). Workers employed in service and blue collar occupations were more likely than those in white collar occupations to report a history of CHD/stroke. Two industry groups also had significantly higher adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) for CHD/stroke: Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services* and Accommodation and Food Service.† Workers in these occupation and industry groups might especially benefit from a Total Worker Health approach to reducing the risk for CHD/stroke. PMID:25078653

  15. Coronary angiography

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary angiography is often done along with cardiac catheterization . This is a procedure which measures pressures in ... Cardiac catheterization carries a slightly increased risk when compared with other heart tests. However, the test is very safe ...

  16. Association of Genetic Polymorphisms on VEGFA and VEGFR2 With Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Doxing; Song, Jiantao; Ji, Xianfei; Liu, Zunqi; Cong, Mulin; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a cardiovascular disease which is contributed by abnormal neovascularization. VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A) and VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) have been revealed to be involved in the pathological angiogenesis. This study was intended to confirm whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VEGFA and VEGFR2 were associated with CHD in a Chinese population, considering pathological features and living habits of CHD patients. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 810 CHD patients and 805 healthy individuals. Six tag SNPs within VEGFA and VEGFR2 were obtained from HapMap Database. Genotyping of SNPs was performed using SNapShot method (Applied Biosystems, Foster, CA). Odd ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association between SNPs and CHD risk. Under the allelic model, 6 SNPs of VEGFA and VEGFR2 were remarkably associated with the susceptibility to CHD. Genotype CT of rs3025039, TT of rs2305948, and AA of rs1873077 were associated with a reduced risk of CHD when smoking, alcohol intake and diabetes were considered, while homozygote GG of rs1570360 might elevate the susceptibility to CHD (all P < 0.05) for patients who were addicted to smoking or those with hypertension. All of the combined effects of rs699947 (CC/CA) and rs2305948 (TT), rs3025039 (TT) and rs2305948 (TT), rs3025039 (CT) and rs1870377 (AA) had positive effects on the risk of CHD, respectively (all P < 0.05). By contrast, the synthetic effects of rs69947 (CA/AA) and rs1870377 (TA), rs699947 (CA) and rs7667298 (GG), rs699947 (AA) and rs7667298 (GG), rs1570360 (GG) and rs2305948 (TT), as well as rs1570360 (GG) and rs1870377 (AA) all exhibited adverse effects on the risk of CHD, respectively (all P < 0.05). Six polymorphisms in VEGFA and VEGFR2 may have substantial influence on the susceptibility to CHD in a Han Chinese population. Prospective cohort

  17. Base Rates of Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: An Individual Symptom Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmann, Sebastian; Gierk, Benjamin; Murray, Alexandra M.; Scholl, Arne; Lehmann, Marco; Löwe, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depression is common in coronary heart disease (CHD) but challenging to diagnose. Instead of focusing on the overall diagnosis of depression, base rates of depressive symptoms could facilitate screening and management of psychopathology in CHD. The present study investigates the frequency of individual depressive symptoms in CHD and their impact on cardiac and subjective health. Methods In total, 1337 in- and outpatients with CHD were screened for depressive symptoms with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) at three different cardiac treatment sites. Tables stratified by age and gender were designed to illustrate base rates of depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical data were conducted to test associations between individual depressive symptoms and quality of life as well impairment caused angina pectoris and dyspnea. Results During the last 14 days, more than half of patients reported a loss of energy (74.9%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 70.6–79.2), sleeping problems (69.4%, 95% CI: 64.9–74.0), loss of interest (55.7%, 95% CI: 50.8–60.7). In contrast, psychomotor change (25.6%, 95%CI: 21.3–30.0), feelings of failure (21.9%, 95%CI: 17.7–26.0), suicidal ideations (14.1%, 95%CI: 10.7–17.6) were less frequently reported. Depending on the outcome, only particular depressive symptoms were highly associated with low quality of life and impairment caused by angina pectoris and dyspnea. Loss of energy was the only depressive symptom that reliably predicted all three outcomes. Conclusions Depressive symptoms in CHD are frequent but vary widely in terms of frequency. Findings underline the differential effects of individual depressive symptoms on cardiac health. Presented base rates of depressive symptoms offer clinicians a new way to judge the severity of individual depressive symptoms and to communicate individual PHQ-9 profiles with patients with respect to gender, age, cardiac

  18. Association between Apolipoprotein C-III Gene Polymorphisms and Coronary Heart Disease: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Zhan; Xie, Xiang; Ma, Yi-Tong; Zheng, Ying-Ying; Yang, Yi-Ning; Li, Xiao-Mei; Fu, Zhen-Yan; Dai, Chuan-Fang; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Yin, Guo-Ting; Liu, Fen; Chen, Bang-Dang; Gai, Min-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the apolipoprotein C-III (APOC3) gene have been reported to be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD), but the data so far have been conflicting. To derive a more precise estimation of these associations, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the three main polymorphisms (SstI, T-455C, C-482T) of APOC3 in all published studies. Databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Wanfang, SinoMed and CNKI were systematically searched. The association was assessed using odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3.3 and Stata 12.0. A total of 31 studies have been identified. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the association between the APOC3 gene polymorphisms and CHD and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were evaluated by random or fixed effect models. A statistical association between APOC3 SstI polymorphism and CHD susceptibility was observed under an allelic contrast model (P= 0.003, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.05-1.24), dominant genetic model (P= 0.01, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03-1.26), and recessive genetic model (P= 0.02, OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.06-1.71), respectively. A significant association between the APOC3 T-455C polymorphism and CHD was also detected under an allelic contrast (P < 0.0001, OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.10-1.29), dominant genetic model (P= 0.0003, OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.11-1.39) and recessive genetic model (P= 0.04, OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.01-1.67). No significant association between the APOC3 C-482T polymorphism and CHD was found under an allelic model (P= 0.94, OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.93-1.08), dominant genetic model (P= 0.20, OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 0.97-1.18) or recessive genetic model (P= 0.13, OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.79-1.03). This meta-analysis revealed that the APOC3 SstI and T-455C polymorphisms significantly increase CHD susceptibility. No significant association was observed between the APOC3 C-482T polymorphism and CHD susceptibility. PMID:26816662

  19. Use of complementary and alternative medicine and self-tests by coronary heart disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Sheila; Pattison, Helen; Jolly, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease patients have to learn to manage their condition to maximise quality of life and prevent recurrence or deterioration. They may develop their own informal methods of self-management in addition to the advice they receive as part of formal cardiac rehabilitation programmes. This study aimed to explore the use of complementary and alternative medicines and therapies (CAM), self-test kits and attitudes towards health of UK patients one year after referral to cardiac rehabilitation. Method Questionnaire given to 463 patients attending an assessment clinic for 12 month follow up in four West Midlands hospitals. Results 91.1% completed a questionnaire. 29.1% of patients used CAM and/or self-test kits for self-management but few (8.9%) used both methods. CAM was more often used for treating other illnesses than for CHD management. Self-test kit use (77.2%,) was more common than CAM (31.7%,) with BP monitors being the most prevalent (80.0%). Patients obtained self-test kits from a wide range of sources, for the most part (89.5%) purchased entirely on their own initiative. Predictors of self-management were post revascularisation status and higher scores on 'holism', 'rejection of authority' and 'individual responsibility'. Predictors of self-test kit use were higher 'holism' and 'individual responsibility' scores. Conclusion Patients are independently using new technologies to monitor their cardiovascular health, a role formerly carried out only by healthcare practitioners. Post-rehabilitation patients reported using CAM for self-management less frequently than they reported using self-test kits. Reports of CAM use were less frequent than in previous surveys of similar patient groups. Automatic assumptions cannot be made by clinicians about which CHD patients are most likely to self-manage. In order to increase trust and compliance it is important for doctors to encourage all CHD patients to disclose their self-management practices and to

  20. Association of Genetic Polymorphisms on VEGFA and VEGFR2 With Risk of Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Doxing; Song, Jiantao; Ji, Xianfei; Liu, Zunqi; Cong, Mulin; Hu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a cardiovascular disease which is contributed by abnormal neovascularization. VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A) and VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) have been revealed to be involved in the pathological angiogenesis. This study was intended to confirm whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VEGFA and VEGFR2 were associated with CHD in a Chinese population, considering pathological features and living habits of CHD patients.Peripheral blood samples were collected from 810 CHD patients and 805 healthy individuals. Six tag SNPs within VEGFA and VEGFR2 were obtained from HapMap Database. Genotyping of SNPs was performed using SNapShot method (Applied Biosystems, Foster, CA). Odd ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association between SNPs and CHD risk.Under the allelic model, 6 SNPs of VEGFA and VEGFR2 were remarkably associated with the susceptibility to CHD. Genotype CT of rs3025039, TT of rs2305948, and AA of rs1873077 were associated with a reduced risk of CHD when smoking, alcohol intake and diabetes were considered, while homozygote GG of rs1570360 might elevate the susceptibility to CHD (all P < 0.05) for patients who were addicted to smoking or those with hypertension. All of the combined effects of rs699947 (CC/CA) and rs2305948 (TT), rs3025039 (TT) and rs2305948 (TT), rs3025039 (CT) and rs1870377 (AA) had positive effects on the risk of CHD, respectively (all P < 0.05). By contrast, the synthetic effects of rs69947 (CA/AA) and rs1870377 (TA), rs699947 (CA) and rs7667298 (GG), rs699947 (AA) and rs7667298 (GG), rs1570360 (GG) and rs2305948 (TT), as well as rs1570360 (GG) and rs1870377 (AA) all exhibited adverse effects on the risk of CHD, respectively (all P < 0.05).Six polymorphisms in VEGFA and VEGFR2 may have substantial influence on the susceptibility to CHD in a Han Chinese population. Prospective cohort studies

  1. Lipoprotein(a) Concentration and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Nonvascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Context Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein–like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. Objective To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular and nonvascular outcomes. Study Selection Long-term prospective studies that recorded Lp(a) concentration and subsequent major vascular morbidity and/or cause-specific mortality published between January 1970 and March 2009 were identified through electronic searches of MEDLINE and other databases, manual searches of reference lists, and discussion with collaborators. Data Extraction Individual records were provided for each of 126 634 participants in 36 prospective studies. During 1.3 million person-years of follow-up, 22 076 first-ever fatal or nonfatal vascular disease outcomes or nonvascular deaths were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta-analysis. Analyses excluded participants with known preexisting CHD or stroke at baseline. Data Synthesis Lipoprotein(a) concentration was weakly correlated with several conventional vascular risk factors and it was highly consistent within individuals over several years. Associations of Lp(a) with CHD risk were broadly continuous in shape. In the 24 cohort studies, the rates of CHD in the top and bottom thirds of baseline Lp(a) distributions, respectively, were 5.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4-5.9) per 1000 person-years and 4.4 (95% CI, 4.2-4.6) per 1000 person-years. The risk ratio for CHD, adjusted for age and sex only, was 1.16 (95% CI, 1.11-1.22) per 3.5-fold higher usual Lp(a) concentration (ie, per 1 SD), and it was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.09-1.18) following further

  2. Insufficient glucocorticoid signaling and elevated inflammation in coronary heart disease patients with comorbid depression.

    PubMed

    Nikkheslat, Naghmeh; Zunszain, Patricia A; Horowitz, Mark A; Barbosa, Izabela G; Parker, Jennie A; Myint, Aye-Mu; Schwarz, Markus J; Tylee, Andre T; Carvalho, Livia A; Pariante, Carmine M

    2015-08-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) and depression are very common and often co-existing disorders. In addition to psychological and social morbidity, depression exacerbates adverse cardiac outcomes in CHD patients. Inflammation has been proposed as one of the mechanisms involved in the association between these two debilitating diseases. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate inflammatory responses as well as to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the putative inflammatory activation in CHD patients with and without depression, by assessing the function of two important biological factors regulating inflammation, the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Eighty-three CHD patients with (n=28) and without (n=55) comorbid depression were recruited from primary care services in South London. Depression status was assessed by means of Clinical Interview Schedule Revised for diagnosis of depression, and Beck Depression Inventory for the presence of depressive symptoms. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and plasma and salivary cortisol were measured using commercially available ELISA kits. Gene expression of GR and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were conducted via qPCR. GR sensitivity was evaluated in vitro in isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells using the dexamethasone inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-6 levels. Serum levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Our results show that CHD patients with depression had higher levels of CRP, IL-6 gene expression, and VEGF compared with CHD non-depressed, as well as lower plasma and saliva cortisol levels. The CHD depressed group also exhibited a reduction in GR expression and sensitivity. Finally, tryptophan levels were significantly lower in patients with depression, who also showed an increased kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. In conclusion, CHD

  3. Large-scale Metabolomic Profiling Identifies Novel Biomarkers for Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ganna, Andrea; Salihovic, Samira; Sundström, Johan; Broeckling, Corey D.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Larsson, Anders; Siegbahn, Agneta; Zilmer, Mihkel; Prenni, Jessica; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Fall, Tove; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of circulating metabolites in large prospective epidemiological studies could lead to improved prediction and better biological understanding of coronary heart disease (CHD). We performed a mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics study for association with incident CHD events in 1,028 individuals (131 events; 10 y. median follow-up) with validation in 1,670 individuals (282 events; 3.9 y. median follow-up). Four metabolites were replicated and independent of main cardiovascular risk factors [lysophosphatidylcholine 18∶1 (hazard ratio [HR] per standard deviation [SD] increment = 0.77, P-value<0.001), lysophosphatidylcholine 18∶2 (HR = 0.81, P-value<0.001), monoglyceride 18∶2 (MG 18∶2; HR = 1.18, P-value = 0.011) and sphingomyelin 28∶1 (HR = 0.85, P-value = 0.015)]. Together they contributed to moderate improvements in discrimination and re-classification in addition to traditional risk factors (C-statistic: 0.76 vs. 0.75; NRI: 9.2%). MG 18∶2 was associated with CHD independently of triglycerides. Lysophosphatidylcholines were negatively associated with body mass index, C-reactive protein and with less evidence of subclinical cardiovascular disease in additional 970 participants; a reverse pattern was observed for MG 18∶2. MG 18∶2 showed an enrichment (P-value = 0.002) of significant associations with CHD-associated SNPs (P-value = 1.2×10−7 for association with rs964184 in the ZNF259/APOA5 region) and a weak, but positive causal effect (odds ratio = 1.05 per SD increment in MG 18∶2, P-value = 0.05) on CHD, as suggested by Mendelian randomization analysis. In conclusion, we identified four lipid-related metabolites with evidence for clinical utility, as well as a causal role in CHD development. PMID:25502724

  4. Acute Effects of Particulate Air Pollution on the Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaofang; Peng, Li; Kan, Haidong; Wang, Weibing; Geng, Fuhai; Mu, Zhe; Zhou, Ji; Yang, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Evidence based on ecological studies in China suggests that short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiovascular mortality. However, there is less evidence of PM-related morbidity for coronary heart disease (CHD) in China. This study aims to investigate the relationship between acute PM exposure and CHD incidence in people aged above 40 in Shanghai. Methods Daily CHD events during 2005–2012 were identified from outpatient and emergency department visits. Daily average concentrations for particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns (PM10) were collected over the 8-year period. Particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) were measured from 2009 to 2012. Analyses were performed using quasi-poisson regression models adjusting for confounders, including long-term trend, seasonality, day of the week, public holiday and meteorological factors. The effects were also examined by gender and age group (41–65 years, and >65 years). Results There were 619928 CHD outpatient and emergency department visits. The average concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 81.7μg/m3 and 38.6μg/m3, respectively. Elevated exposure to PM10 and PM2.5 was related with increased risk of CHD outpatients and emergency department visits in a short time course. A 10 μg/m3 increase in the 2-day PM10 and PM2.5 was associated with increase of 0.23% (95% CI: 0.12%, 0.34%) and 0.74% (95% CI: 0.44%, 1.04%) in CHD morbidity, respectively. The associations appeared to be more evident in the male and the elderly. Conclusion Short-term exposure to high levels of PM10 and PM2.5 was associated with increased risk of CHD outpatient and emergency department visits. Season, gender and age were effect modifiers of their association. PMID:26942767

  5. Large-scale metabolomic profiling identifies novel biomarkers for incident coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ganna, Andrea; Salihovic, Samira; Sundström, Johan; Broeckling, Corey D; Hedman, Asa K; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Larsson, Anders; Siegbahn, Agneta; Zilmer, Mihkel; Prenni, Jessica; Arnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Fall, Tove; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-12-01

    Analyses of circulating metabolites in large prospective epidemiological studies could lead to improved prediction and better biological understanding of coronary heart disease (CHD). We performed a mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics study for association with incident CHD events in 1,028 individuals (131 events; 10 y. median follow-up) with validation in 1,670 individuals (282 events; 3.9 y. median follow-up). Four metabolites were replicated and independent of main cardiovascular risk factors [lysophosphatidylcholine 18∶1 (hazard ratio [HR] per standard deviation [SD] increment = 0.77, P-value<0.001), lysophosphatidylcholine 18∶2 (HR = 0.81, P-value<0.001), monoglyceride 18∶2 (MG 18∶2; HR = 1.18, P-value = 0.011) and sphingomyelin 28∶1 (HR = 0.85, P-value = 0.015)]. Together they contributed to moderate improvements in discrimination and re-classification in addition to traditional risk factors (C-statistic: 0.76 vs. 0.75; NRI: 9.2%). MG 18∶2 was associated with CHD independently of triglycerides. Lysophosphatidylcholines were negatively associated with body mass index, C-reactive protein and with less evidence of subclinical cardiovascular disease in additional 970 participants; a reverse pattern was observed for MG 18∶2. MG 18∶2 showed an enrichment (P-value = 0.002) of significant associations with CHD-associated SNPs (P-value = 1.2×10-7 for association with rs964184 in the ZNF259/APOA5 region) and a weak, but positive causal effect (odds ratio = 1.05 per SD increment in MG 18∶2, P-value = 0.05) on CHD, as suggested by Mendelian randomization analysis. In conclusion, we identified four lipid-related metabolites with evidence for clinical utility, as well as a causal role in CHD development. PMID:25502724

  6. Key role of dietary fats in coronary heart disease under progressive urbanization and nutritional transitionh.

    PubMed

    Bulliyya, G

    2000-12-01

    The increased vulnerability to non-communicable diseases (NCD) of developing populations experiencing a demographic and epidemiological transitions to increased risk of NCD at a time when the battle against infectious diseases, is ongoing. Apart from population growth, the major attributes of developmental transition are confined to changes in occupational pattern in family structure, lifestyle, dietary practices and progressive ageing of population. The emergence of the NCD is significantly associated with changes in dietary pattern, in most of the countries. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in developed countries and the incidence is increasing in developing countries, including India. The disease needs awareness of the risk factors responsible for prevention. The purpose of this review is to present an overview of the role of dietary fats in growth and development and in health and disease. Although the causation of CHD is multifaceted and the risk factors associated in general are several, there are specific and important elements, such as dietary fats and lifestyle. Dietary fats are an important component as they serve a number of functions in the body. The minimum desirable and upper limits of fat intake have been given, based on recommendations of expert groups. Sources of different fats are made available worldwide and the production, consumption, storage, oxidation and nomenclature are being discussed in the light of health and disease. The relative essentiality of the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids is recognized in terms of pharmacologically active eicosanoid metabolism. Nevertheless, epidemiological, physiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that long-chain omega-3 fatty acids present in fish oils have quite diverse health benefits. Appropriate guidelines need to be recommended at a national level consistent with dietary habits. The ratios of balanced fatty acids, namely omega-11, omega-9, omega-6 and omega-3, should

  7. Epidemiology of cardioprotective pharmacological agent use in stable coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Mathur, Mukul; Gupta, Rakesh; Guptha, Soneil; Roy, Sanjeeb; Khedar, R.S.; Gupta, Nishant; Gupta, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine use of class and type of cardioprotective pharmacological agents in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) we performed a prescription audit. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted in major districts of Rajasthan in years 2008–09. We evaluated prescription for classes (anti-platelets, β-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), calcium channel blockers (CCB) and statins) and specific pharmacological agents at clinics of physicians in tertiary (n = 18), secondary (n = 69) and primary care (n = 43). Descriptive statistics are reported. Results Prescriptions of 2290 stable CHD patients were audited. Anti-platelet use was in 2031 (88.7%), β-blockers 1494 (65.2%), ACE inhibitors 1196 (52.2%), ARBs 712 (31.1%), ACE inhibitors – ARB combinations 19 (0.8%), either ACE inhibitors or ARBs 1908 (83.3%), CCBs 1023 (44.7%), statins 1457 (63.6%) and other lipid lowering agents in 170 (7.4%). Among anti-platelets aspirin–clopidogrel combination was used in 88.5%. Top three molecules in β-blockers were atenolol (37.8%), metoprolol (26.4%) and carvedilol (11.9%); ACE inhibitors ramipril (42.1%), lisinopril (20.3%) and perindopril (10.9%); ARB's losartan (47.7%), valsartan (22.3%) and telmisartan (14.9%); CCBs amlodipine (46.7%), diltiazem (29.1%) and verapamil (9.5%) and statins were atorvastatin (49.8%), simvastatin (28.9%) and rosuvastatin (18.3%). Use of metoprolol, ramipril, valsartan, diltiazem and atorvastatin was more at tertiary care, and atenolol, lisinopril, losartan, amlodipine and simvasatin in primary care (p < 0.01). Conclusions There is low use of β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs and statins in stable CHD patients among physicians in Rajasthan. Significant differences in use of specific molecules at primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare are observed. PMID:23809376

  8. Hypovitaminosis D: a novel risk factor for coronary heart disease in type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Nuzzo, Vincenzo; Gatti, Adriano; Zuccoli, Alfonso; Savastano, Silvia; Di Somma, Carolina; Pivonello, Rosario; Orio, Francesco; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the association of 25(OH)D levels with coronary heart disease (CHD) in 698 consecutive type 2 diabetic outpatients. 698 consecutive type 2 diabetic outpatients (25.2 % men, age 66 ± 9 years) and 100 (90 % men, age 65 ± 13 years) age-matched non-diabetic volunteers were enrolled. 25(OH)D assay and the main cardiovascular risk factors were explored. 25(OH)D concentration was 22 ± 10 ng/ml in control subjects and 18.23 ± 10 ng/ml in diabetic patients (p < 0.01). The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D was higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (90 vs. 83 %, p < 0.01). Diabetic subjects with hypovitaminosis D had higher prevalence of high values of A1C (p < 0.01), BMI (p < 0.01), LDL cholesterol (p < 0.01), triglycerides (p < 0.01), and glycemia (p < 0.01) than their vitamin D-sufficient counterparts. 25(OH)D and HDL cholesterol were lower (p < 0.01), while BMI (p < 0.01), age (p < 0.01), systolic (p < 0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.01), diabetes duration (p < 0.01), A1C (p < 0.01), glycemia (p < 0.01), fibrinogen (p < 0.01), triglycerides (p < 0.01), and total (p < 0.01) and LDL cholesterol (p < 0.01) were higher in diabetic subjects with CHD than diabetic subjects without CHD. At the logistic regression analysis, the association of vitamin D with CHD was lost, while sex (p = 0.026), diabetes duration (p = 0.023), and age (p = 0.024) were the most powerful predictors of CHD. The current study demonstrates that 25(OH)D does not have a direct effect on CHD but may have an indirect effect mediated by cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes duration, age, and sex. PMID:25931413

  9. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate and Mortality among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Xia, Min; Li, Dan; Yang, Yunou; Li, Qing; Liu, Jiaxing; Chen, Xuechen; Hu, Gang; Ling, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    Objective The association between estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the risk of mortality among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) is complex and still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of eGFR on the risk prediction of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality with a long follow-up period among patients with CHD in China. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 3276 Chinese patients with CHD. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the association of different levels of eGFR with the risks of mortality. Results During a mean follow-up period of 4.9 years, 293 deaths were identified. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios associated with different levels of eGFR (≥90 [reference group], 60–89, 30–59, 15–29 ml/min per 1.73m2) at baseline were 1.00, 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87–1.88), 1.96 (95% CI, 1.31–2.94), and 3.91 (95% CI, 2.15–7.13) (P <0.001) for all-cause mortality, and 1.00, 1.26 (95% CI, 0.78–2.04), 1.94 (95% CI, 1.17–3.20), and 3.77 (95% CI, 1.80–7.89) (P <0.001) for CVD mortality, respectively. After excluding subjects who died during the first 2 years of follow-up (n = 113), the graded associations of eGFR with the risks of all-cause and CVD morality were still present. The addition of eGFR to a model including traditional cardiovascular risk factors resulted in significant improvement in the prediction of all-cause and CVD mortality. Conclusions Reduced eGFR (< 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) at baseline is associated with increased risks of all-cause and CVD mortality among Chinese patients with CHD. PMID:27537335

  10. Thyroid Function Within the Normal Range and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Vatten, Lars J.; Bjøro, Trine; Bauer, Douglas C.; Bremner, Alexandra; Cappola, Anne R.; Ceresini, Graziano; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H.; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Iervasi, Giorgio; Imaizumi, Misa; Kearney, Patricia M.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Newman, Anne. B.; Peeters, Robin P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Razvi, Salman; Sgarbi, José A.; Stott, David J.; Trompet, Stella; Vanderpump, Mark P. J.; Völzke, Henry; Walsh, John P.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Importance Some experts suggest that serum thyrotropin levels in the upper part of the current reference range should be considered abnormal, an approach that would reclassify many individuals as having mild hypothyroidism. Health hazards associated with such thyrotropin levels are poorly documented, but conflicting evidence suggests that thyrotropin levels in the upper part of the reference range may be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Objective To assess the association between differences in thyroid function within the reference range and CHD risk. Design, Setting, and Participants Individual participant data analysis of 14 cohorts with baseline examinations between July 1972 and April 2002 and with median follow-up ranging from 3.3 to 20.0 years. Participants included 55 412 individuals with serum thyrotropin levels of 0.45 to 4.49 mIU/L and no previously known thyroid or cardiovascular disease at baseline. Exposures Thyroid function as expressed by serum thyrotropin levels at baseline. Mainoutcomes and Measures Hazard ratios (HRs) of CHD mortality and CHD events according to thyrotropin levels after adjustment for age, sex, and smoking status. Results Among 55 412 individuals, 1813 people (3.3%) died of CHD during 643 183 person-years of follow-up. In 10 cohorts with information on both nonfatal and fatal CHD events, 4666 of 48 875 individuals (9.5%) experienced a first-time CHD event during 533 408 person-years of follow-up. For each 1-mIU/L higher thyrotropin level, the HR was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.90-1.04) for CHD mortality and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.97-1.03) for a first-time CHD event. Similarly, in analyses by categories of thyrotropin, the HRs of CHD mortality (0.94 [95% CI, 0.74-1.20]) and CHD events (0.97 [95% CI, 0.83-1.13]) were similar among participants with the highest (3.50-4.49 mIU/L) compared with the lowest (0.45-1.49 mIU/L) thyrotropin levels. Subgroup analyses by sex and age group yielded similar results. Conclusions and

  11. Association Between Metabolic Syndrome and Coronary Heart Disease in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Jalalzadeh, Mojgan; Mousavinasab, Nouraddin; Soloki, Mehrdad; Miri, Reza; Ghadiani, Mohammad Hassan; Hadizadeh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome (MeS) is a common risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) in the general population. Objectives: We examined the association between MeS and its risk in terms of CHD in patients on hemodialysis (HD). Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on 300 patients on HD in six HD centers during March 2012. Patients were divided in two groups regarding presence of MeS. The rate of CHD were evaluated in each group and compared with each other. Results: A total of 300 patients on HD, 173 males and 127 females with mean age of 61.7 ± 14.2, were enrolled in the study. Prevalence of MeS was 50.3%; hypertension, 83.7%; diabetes mellitus, 52%; high triglyceride level, 34%, low HDL cholesterol, 48.3%; and abdominal obesity, 41.3%. During the study, the CHD was more frequent in patients with MeS (27.8%) than was in those without MeS (14.1%) (P = 0.004). In addition, stroke happened more frequently in the MeS group than in those without MeS (30.5% vs. 17.4%; P = 0.008). The mean number of criteria for MeS was not significantly associated with mortality causes (CHD, 2.7 ± 1.3; stroke, 2.8 ± 0.9; other causes, 2.9 ± 1.3 P = 0.78). However, hypertension (89.3%) and diabetes mellitus (53.8%) were associated with increased risk for mortality. In the group of MeS, CHD were not significantly associated with serum albumin, calcium, phosphate, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, ferritin, C-reactive protein, and KT/V; but there was significant association with white blood cells count (P < 0.0002). Conclusions: These findings suggested MeS might be an important risk factor for CHD, but not for mortality due to CHD in patients on HD. PMID:25738129

  12. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  13. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium intake is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). BACKGROUND: Animal and cell studies suggest that magnesium may prevent calcification within atherosclerotic plaques underlying c...

  14. Association Between a Genetic Variant Related to Glutamic Acid Metabolism and Coronary Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qibin; Prudente, Sabrina; Mendonca, Christine; Andreozzi, Francesco; di Pietro, Natalia; Sturma, Mariella; Novelli, Valeria; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Formoso, Gloria; Gervino, Ernest V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.; Niewczas, Monika A.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Biolo, Gianni; Pandolfi, Assunta; Rimm, Eric; Sesti, Giorgio; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Hu, Frank

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Diabetes is associated with an elevated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Previous studies have suggested that the genetic factors predisposing to excess cardiovascular risk may be different in diabetic and non-diabetic participants. OBJECTIVE To identify genetic determinants of CHD that are specific to diabetic patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied five independent sets of CHD cases and CHD-negative controls from the Nurses Health Study (NHS; enrolled in 1976 and followed through 2008), Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS; enrolled in 1986 and followed through 2008), Joslin Heart Study (enrolled in 2001-2008), Gargano Heart Study (enrolled in 2001-2008), and Catanzaro Study (enrolled in 2004-2010). Included were a total of 1,517 CHD cases and 2,671 CHD-negative controls, all with type 2 diabetes. Results in diabetic patients were compared with those in 737 non-diabetic CHD cases and 1,637 non-diabetic CHD-negative controls from the NHS and HPFS cohorts. EXPOSURE 2,543,016 common genetic variants occurring throughout the genome. MAIN OUTCOME CHD defined as fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or angiographic evidence of significant stenosis of the coronary arteries. RESULTS We identified a variant on chromosome 1q25 (rs10911021) consistently associated with CHD risk among diabetic participants with an odds ratio of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.51, P=2×10−8). No association between this variant and CHD was detected among non-diabetic participants (OR=0.99, P=0.89), consistent with a significant gene-by-diabetes interaction on CHD risk (P=2×10−4). As compared to protective allele homozygotes, rs10911021 risk allele homozygotes were characterized by a 32% decrease in the expression of the neighboring glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) gene in human endothelial cells (P=0.0048). They also showed a decreased ratio between plasma

  15. Identification of metabolic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetic coronary heart diseases based on metabolomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Gao, Jian; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Qi; Man, Hongxue; Guo, Shuzhen; Wang, Yingfeng; Li, Zhongfeng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic coronary heart disease (T2DM-CHD) is a kind of serious and complex disease. Great attention has been paid to exploring its mechanism; however, the detailed understanding of T2DM-CHD is still limited. Plasma samples from 15 healthy controls, 13 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, 15 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 T2DM-CHD patients were analyzed in this research. The potential biomarkers of CHD and T2DM were detected and screened out by 1H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling and multivariate data analysis. About 11 and 12 representative metabolites of CHD and T2DM were identified respectively, mainly including alanine, arginine, proline, glutamine, creatinine and acetate. Then the diagnostic model was further constructed based on the previous metabolites of CHD and T2DM to detect T2DM-CHD with satisfying sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 93.3% and accuracy of 93.2%, validating the robustness of 1H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling to diagnostic strategy. The results demonstrated that the NMR-based metabolomics approach processed good performance to identify diagnostic plasma biomarkers and most identified metabolites related to T2DM and CHD could be considered as predictors of T2DM-CHD as well as the therapeutic targets for prevention, which provided new insight into diagnosing and forecasting of complex diseases. PMID:27470195

  16. Identification of metabolic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetic coronary heart diseases based on metabolomic approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Gao, Jian; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Qi; Man, Hongxue; Guo, Shuzhen; Wang, Yingfeng; Li, Zhongfeng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic coronary heart disease (T2DM-CHD) is a kind of serious and complex disease. Great attention has been paid to exploring its mechanism; however, the detailed understanding of T2DM-CHD is still limited. Plasma samples from 15 healthy controls, 13 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, 15 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 T2DM-CHD patients were analyzed in this research. The potential biomarkers of CHD and T2DM were detected and screened out by (1)H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling and multivariate data analysis. About 11 and 12 representative metabolites of CHD and T2DM were identified respectively, mainly including alanine, arginine, proline, glutamine, creatinine and acetate. Then the diagnostic model was further constructed based on the previous metabolites of CHD and T2DM to detect T2DM-CHD with satisfying sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 93.3% and accuracy of 93.2%, validating the robustness of (1)H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling to diagnostic strategy. The results demonstrated that the NMR-based metabolomics approach processed good performance to identify diagnostic plasma biomarkers and most identified metabolites related to T2DM and CHD could be considered as predictors of T2DM-CHD as well as the therapeutic targets for prevention, which provided new insight into diagnosing and forecasting of complex diseases. PMID:27470195

  17. Usefulness of Nutraceuticals (Armolipid Plus) Versus Ezetimibe and Combination in Statin-Intolerant Patients With Dyslipidemia With Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Marazzi, Giuseppe; Pelliccia, Francesco; Campolongo, Giuseppe; Quattrino, Silvia; Cacciotti, Luca; Volterrani, Maurizio; Gaudio, Carlo; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2015-12-15

    Statins are extensively used to treat dyslipidemia, but, because of their low tolerability profile, they are discontinued in a significant proportion of patients. Ezetimibe and nutraceuticals have been introduced as alternative therapies and have proved to be effective and well tolerated. A single-blind, single-center, randomized, prospective, and parallel group trial comparing a combination of nutraceuticals (red yeast rice, policosanol, berberine, folic acid, coenzyme Q10 and astaxanthin), called Armolipid Plus, and ezetimibe for 3 months in terms of efficacy and tolerability. Patients who did not achieve their therapeutic target (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <100 mg/dl) could add the alternative treatment on top of randomized treatment for another 12 months: 100 patients who are dyslipidemic with ischemic heart disease treated with percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled (ezetimibe n = 50, nutraceutical n = 50). Efficacy (lipid profile) and tolerability (adverse events, transaminases, and creatine kinase) were assessed after 3 and 12 months. After 3 months, 14 patients in the nutraceutical group achieved their therapeutic target, whereas none of the patients in the ezetimibe group did. At 1-year follow-up, 58 patients (72.5%) of the combined therapy group (n = 86) and 14 (100%) of the nutraceutical group reached the therapeutic goal. No patients experienced important undesirable effects. In conclusion, nutraceuticals alone or in combination with ezetimibe are well tolerated and improve the lipid profile in statin-intolerant patients with coronary heart disease. Further studies are needed to assess long-term effects of nutraceuticals on mortality. PMID:26611120

  18. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, and pathogenic social hierarchy: a biological limit to possible reductions in morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Rodrick; Wallace, Deborah; Wallace, Robert G

    2004-05-01

    We suggest that a particular form of social hierarchy, which we characterize as "pathogenic", can, from the earliest stages of life, exert a formal analog to evolutionary selection pressure, literally writing a permanent developmental image of itself upon immune function as chronic vascular inflammation and its consequences. The staged nature of resulting disease emerges "naturally" as a rough analog to punctuated equilibrium in evolutionary theory, although selection pressure is a passive filter rather than an active agent, like structured psychosocial stress. Exposure differs according to the social constructs of race, class, and ethnicity, accounting in large measure for observed population-level differences in rates of coronary heart disease across industrialized societies. American Apartheid, which enmeshes both majority and minority communities in a social construct of pathogenic hierarchy, appears to present a severe biological limit to continuing declines in coronary heart disease for powerful as well as subordinate subgroups: "Culture"--to use the words of the evolutionary anthropologist Robert Boyd--"is as much a part of human biology as the enamel on our teeth". PMID:15160975

  19. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, and pathogenic social hierarchy: a biological limit to possible reductions in morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Rodrick; Wallace, Deborah; Wallace, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    We suggest that a particular form of social hierarchy, which we characterize as "pathogenic", can, from the earliest stages of life, exert a formal analog to evolutionary selection pressure, literally writing a permanent developmental image of itself upon immune function as chronic vascular inflammation and its consequences. The staged nature of resulting disease emerges "naturally" as a rough analog to punctuated equilibrium in evolutionary theory, although selection pressure is a passive filter rather than an active agent, like structured psychosocial stress. Exposure differs according to the social constructs of race, class, and ethnicity, accounting in large measure for observed population-level differences in rates of coronary heart disease across industrialized societies. American Apartheid, which enmeshes both majority and minority communities in a social construct of pathogenic hierarchy, appears to present a severe biological limit to continuing declines in coronary heart disease for powerful as well as subordinate subgroups: "Culture"--to use the words of the evolutionary anthropologist Robert Boyd--"is as much a part of human biology as the enamel on our teeth". PMID:15160975

  20. [Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging during adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Y; Chiba, J; Abe, S; Ikeda, K; Tonooka, I; Komatani, A; Takahashi, K; Nakagawa, Y; Shiraishi, T; Tomoike, H

    1992-09-01

    201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging during adenosine infusion was performed in consecutive 55 patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Adenosine was infused intravenously at a rate of 0.14 mg/kg/min for 6 minutes and a dose of 111 MBq of 201Tl was administered in a separate vein at the end of third minute of infusion. Myocardial SPECT imaging was begun 5 minutes and 3 hours after the end of adenosine infusion. For evaluating the presence of perfusion defects, 2 short axis images at the basal and apical levels and a vertical long axis image at the mid left ventricle were used. The regions with decreased 201Tl uptake were assessed semi-quantitatively. Adenosine infusion caused a slight reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in heart rate. The rate pressure products increased slightly (9314 +/- 2377 vs. 10360 +/- 2148, p < 0.001). Chest pain (24%) and headache (13%) were the frequent side effects. The second-degree atrioventricular block was developed in 11 of 55 (20%) patients. All symptoms and hemodynamic changes were well tolerated and disappeared within 1 or 2 minutes after discontinuing adenosine infusion. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of patients with coronary artery disease were 100% (31/31) and 88% (7/8), respectively. 201Tl myocardial imaging during adenosine infusion was considered to be safe and useful for evaluating the patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:1453559

  1. Morphology characterization and biocompatibility study of PLLA (Poly-L-Llactid-Acid) coating chitosan as stent for coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyanti, Prihartini; Paramadini, Adanti W.; Jabbar, Hajria; Fatimah, Inas; Nisak, Fadila N. K.; Puspitasari, Rahma A.

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a global disease with high urgency. In the severe case of coronary heart disease while a blockage in the coronary arteries reach 75% or more, the patient required stent implantation. Stents are made of metal which has many limitations that can lead to blood clots and stent incompatibility toward the size of the blood vessels. There is a metal stent replacement solution that made from polymer material which is biocompatible. PLLA also has biocompatibility and good mechanical strength. PLLA stent will be coated with chitosan as a candidate for drug-coated stents which is able to work as a drug carrier. The aim of this study is to know the morphology information and biocompability status of PLLA coating chitosan as candidate of heart stent. Morphological results using SEM showed a smooth surface structure which reinforced clinical standard of stent material. Results of cytotoxicity test by MTT Assay method showed that the result of four samples in this experiment living cells is reached 90% which is non toxic and safe to use in the human body. %). The conclusion of this study is PLLA is polymer has potency to be used as stent material.

  2. Pharmacogenetics of apolipoprotein E gene during lipid-lowering therapy: lipid levels and prevention of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Tuomo; Kähönen, Mika; Viiri, Leena E; Grönroos, Paula; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2008-10-01

    A non-optimal plasma concentration of lipids is among the major modifiable risk factors of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the prevention of cardiovascular disease by means of lipid-lowering therapy with statins and other agents is of great importance for patient groups where a lifestyle change, for example, diet modification, does not lead to adequately reduced lipid levels. The response of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to statin therapy is highly variable. This is partly attributed to hereditary variation in genes involved in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and lipid metabolism. The pharmacogenetics of lipid-lowering therapy have been investigated for more than 40 different genes. The gene for apolipoprotein E (APOE) has been the most frequently studied, particularly regarding the epsilon2/epsilon3/epsilon4 polymorphism. Those with the epsilon4 allele seem to have the poorest and those with the epsilon2 allele the strongest response to statins with regards to LDL-C levels. In addition, the epsilon2 carriers may reach the LDL-C treatment goals more frequently than epsilon4 carriers. Few studies have investigated the interaction of the APOE epsilon2/epsilon3/epsilon4 polymorphism and lipid-lowering therapy in relation to the course of coronary heart disease; the results are contradictory and so far inconclusive. This review summarizes the pharmacogenetic findings related to the influence of APOE gene variation on lipid responses and the prevention of coronary heart disease during lipid-lowering therapy. PMID:18855536

  3. Local Increases in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality Among Blacks and Whites in the United States, 1985–1995

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Elizabeth; Halverson, Joel

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. This study analyzed coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality trends from 1985 to 1995, by race and sex, among Black and White adults 35 years and older to determine whether adverse trends were evident in any US localities. Methods. Log-linear regression models of annual age-adjusted death rates provided a quantitative measure of local mortality trends. Results. Increasing trends in CHD mortality were observed in 11 of 174 labor market areas for Black women, 23 of 175 areas for Black men, 10 of 394 areas for White women, and 4 of 394 areas for White men. Nationwide, adverse trends affected 1.7% of Black women, 8.0% of Black men, 1.1% of White women, and 0.3% of White men. Conclusions. From 1985 to 1995, moderate to strong local increases in CHD mortality were observed, predominantly in the southern United States. Black men evidenced the most unfavorable trends and were 25 times as likely as White men to be part of a local population experiencing increases in coronary heart disease mortality. PMID:11527788

  4. Regular Breakfast Consumption and Type 2 Diabetes Risk Markers in 9- to 10-Year-Old Children in the Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE): A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Donin, Angela S.; Nightingale, Claire M.; Owen, Chris G.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Perkin, Michael R.; Jebb, Susan A.; Stephen, Alison M.; Sattar, Naveed; Cook, Derek G.; Whincup, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular breakfast consumption may protect against type 2 diabetes risk in adults but little is known about its influence on type 2 diabetes risk markers in children. We investigated the associations between breakfast consumption (frequency and content) and risk markers for type 2 diabetes (particularly insulin resistance and glycaemia) and cardiovascular disease in children. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study of 4,116 UK primary school children aged 9–10 years. Participants provided information on breakfast frequency, had measurements of body composition, and gave fasting blood samples for measureme