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Sample records for 10-year coronary heart

  1. Sheepskin effects of education in the 10-year Framingham risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sze Yan; Buka, Stephen L; Kubzansky, Laura D; Kawachi, Ichiro; Gilman, Stephen E; Loucks, Eric B

    2013-03-01

    While the association between education and adult health is well documented, it is unclear whether quantity (i.e. years of schooling) or credentials (i.e. degrees) drive this association. Individuals with degrees may have better health than their non-credentialed counterparts given similar years of schooling, the so-called "sheepskin" effect. This paper contributes to this line of inquiry by examining associations of educational degree and years of schooling with the Framingham Risk Score, a measure of 10-year risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), using data from a unique birth cohort (the New England Family Study; participants mean age 42 years) with prospective information on childhood health and intelligence quotient (IQ). According to our results, years of schooling were inversely associated with 10-year CHD risk in the unadjusted model but not in the fully adjusted models that included degree attainment. By contrast, associations between degree attainment and 10-year CHD risk remained significant in the fully adjusted models that included years of schooling. College degree holders had 10-year CHD risk 19% (95% CI: -33%, -2%) lower than individuals with HS degrees or less in the fully adjusted models. Subanalyses evaluating sheepskin effects on the individual components of the 10-year CHD risk algorithm showed the expected education gradient was generally noted for each of the individual components, with decreasing prevalence of "high risk" values associated with higher degree credentials. Our results suggest educational credentials provide an additional benefit to risk of coronary heart disease beyond schooling.

  2. Physical activity assessed with three different methods and the Framingham Risk Score on 10-year coronary heart disease risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity (PA) protects against coronary heart disease (CHD) by favorably altering several CHD risk factors. In order to best understand the true nature of the relationship between PA and CHD, the impact different PA assessment methods have on the relationships must first be clarified. The p...

  3. Effects of switching from olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone to aripiprazole on 10-year coronary heart disease risk and metabolic syndrome status: Results from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stroup, T. Scott; Byerly, Matthew J.; Nasrallah, Henry A.; Ray, Neepa; Khan, Ahsan Y.; Lamberti, J. Steven; Glick, Ira D.; Steinbook, Richard M.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Hamer, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the clinical significance of switching from olanzapine, quetiapine, or risperidone to aripiprazole by examining changes in predicted risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) according to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and metabolic syndrome status. FRS estimates 10-year risk of “hard” coronary heart disease (CHD) outcomes (myocardial infarction and coronary death) while metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of CVD, stroke, and diabetes mellitus. Method Changes in FRS and metabolic syndrome status were compared between patients with BMI ≥ 27 and non-HDL-C ≥ 130 mg/dL randomly assigned to stay on stable current treatment (olanzapine, quetiapine, or risperidone) or switch to treatment with aripiprazole with 24 weeks of follow-up. All study participants were enrolled in a behavioral program that promoted healthy diet and exercise. Results The pre-specified analyses included 89 switchers and 98 stayers who had post-baseline measurements needed to assess changes. Least squares mean estimates of 10-year CHD risk decreased more for the switch (from 7.0% to 5.2%) than the stay group (from 7.4% to 6.4%) (p=0.0429). The odds ratio for having metabolic syndrome (stay vs. switch) at the last observation was 1.748 (95% CI 0.919, 3.324, p=0.0885). Conclusion Switching from olanzapine, quetiapine, or risperidone to aripiprazole was associated with larger reductions in predicted 10-year risk of CHD than the behavioral program alone. The advantage of switching on metabolic syndrome was not statistically significant. The benefits of switching must be balanced against its risks, which in this study included more discontinuations of the study treatment but no significant increase in symptoms or hospitalizations. PMID:23434503

  4. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  5. [Cardiac factors predictive of 10-year survival after coronary surgery].

    PubMed

    Fournial, G; Fourcade, J; Roux, D; Garcia, O; Sauer, M; Glock, Y

    1999-07-01

    Although the predictive factors of postoperative mortality after coronary artery surgery are well known, those predictive of long-term survival have received less attention. This study reviews the outcome of a group of 480 patients between 50 and 65 years of age, operated between 1984 and 1986. The patients were classified in two groups according to the presence or absence of internal mammary artery bypass grafts: Group I (304 patients with saphenous vein bypass grafts alone) and group II (176 patients with an internal mammary artery +/- saphenous vein bypass grafts). The long-term results were assessed according to 3 criteria: isolated cardiac mortality: cardiac mortality associated with a repeat revascularisation procedure and cardiac mortality associated with reoperation or recurrence of angina. Cardiac survival at 10 years was significantly better after internal mammary-LAD bypass: 91.4% (CI 87.1-95.1) than after saphenous vein bypass grafting alone: 79.6% (CI 74.8-84.4) (p = 0.012). Univariate analysis identified the following poor predictive factors: three vessel disease (p = 0.03), preoperative left ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction inferior to 45% (p = 0.0001), incomplete revascularisation (p = 0.0003), use of venous bypass graft alone (p < 0.014) and perioperative infarction (p = 0.0254). For each criterion of survival (cardiac isolated or associated with a new revascularisation and/or recurrence of angina), multivariate analysis identified three independent predictive factors of long-term extramortality: not using internal mammary artery-LAD bypass graft, incomplete revascularisation and preoperative hypertension. This study confirms the beneficial effects of internal mammary-LAD artery grafting on long-term survival after coronary artery surgery, and also demonstrates the prejudicial effects of hypertension.

  6. Emergency coronary artery bypass surgery for failed percutaneous coronary angioplasty. A 10-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Craver, J M; Weintraub, W S; Jones, E L; Guyton, R A; Hatcher, C R

    1992-01-01

    Six hundred ninety-nine patients have required emergency coronary artery bypass after failed elective percutaneous coronary angioplasty during the decade September 1980 through December 1990. This represents 4% of 9860 patients having 12,146 elective percutaneous coronary angioplasty procedures during this interval. Emergency coronary artery bypass was required for acute refractory myocardial ischemia in 82%. Hospital mortality rate for all patients was 3.1%; 3.7% in patients with refractory myocardial ischemia but 0.8% in patients without refractory myocardial ischemia, p = 0.08. Postprocedural Q-wave myocardial infarctions were observed in 21% versus 2.4%, p less than 0.0001, and intra-aortic balloon pumping was required in 19% with versus 0.8% without refractory myocardial ischemia, p less than 0.0001. Multivessel disease, p = 0.004, age older than 65 years, p = 0.005, and refractory myocardial ischemia, p = 0.08, interacted to produce the highest risk of in-hospital death. Follow-up shows that there have been 28 additional late deaths, including 23 of cardiac causes for a 91% survival at 5 years. Freedom from both late death and Q-wave myocardial infarction at 5 years was 61%. In the group going to emergency coronary artery bypass with refractory myocardial ischemia, the late cardiac survival was 90%, and in those without ischemia, 92% at 5 years, p = not significant. The MI--free survival in the group with refractory ischemia, however, was 56% versus 83% in the group without ischemia, p less than 0.0001. Multivariate analysis showed the highest late event rates for patients with Q-wave myocardial infarction at the initial emergency coronary artery bypass, age older than 65 years, angina class III or IV, and prior coronary bypass surgery. In spite of a continuing high incidence of early acute myocardial infarction and an increasing operative mortality rate (7%) in the latest 3 years cohort of patients, excellent late survival and low subsequent cardiac event

  7. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  8. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH STRESS AND COPING AT 5 AND 10 YEARS AFTER HEART TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Kathleen L.; Wang, Edward; White-Williams, Connie; Naftel, David C.; Myers, Susan; Kirklin, James K.; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Young, James B.; Pelegrin, Dave; Kobashigawa, Jon; Higgins, Robert; Heroux, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart transplant-related stressors and coping are related to poor outcomes early after transplant. The purposes of our study were to (1) identify the most frequent and bothersome stressors and most used and effective coping strategies, and (2) compare the most frequent and bothersome stresses and most used and effective coping styles between patients at 5 and 10 years after heart transplantation. We also examined differences in coping styles by patient characteristics, and factors associated with frequency and intensity of stress at both 5 and 10 years after heart transplantation. Methods This report is a secondary analysis of data from a prospective, multi-site study of quality of life outcomes. Data are from 199 and 98 patients at 5 and 10 years after transplant, respectively. Patients completed the Heart Transplant Stressor Scale and Jalowiec Coping Scale. Statistical analyses included frequencies, measures of central tendency, t-tests, Chi-square and generalized linear models. Results At 5 and 10 years after heart transplantation, the most bothersome stressors were regarding work, school, and financial issues. Patients who were 10 years post transplant reported less stress, similar stress intensity, and less use and perceived effectiveness of negative coping than patients who were 5 years post transplant. Long-term after transplant, demographic characteristics, psychological problems, negative coping, and clinical factors were related to stress frequency and/or intensity. Conclusions Heart transplant-related stress occurs long-term after surgery. Types of transplant-related stress and factors related to stress confirm the importance of ongoing psychological and clinical support after heart transplantation. PMID:23498164

  9. Eating With Your Heart In Mind: 7 to 10 Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The purpose of this brightly illustrated guide is to teach 7-10 year old children that all healthy Americans, 2 years of age or older, should eat in a way that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol so as to help reduce the risk of heart disease. The theme reflected throughout the manual is that changes in eating patterns help lower blood…

  10. Animal models of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiawei; Huang, Wei; Liu, George

    2015-08-20

    Cardiovascular disease, predominantly coronary heart disease and stroke, leads to high morbidity and mortality not only in developed worlds but also in underdeveloped regions. The dominant pathologic foundation for cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis and as to coronary heart disease, coronary atherosclerosis and resulting lumen stenosis, even total occlusions. In translational research, several animals, such as mice, rabbits and pigs, have been used as disease models of human atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular disorders. However, coronary lesions are either naturally rare or hard to be fast induced in these models, hence, coronary heart disease induction mostly relies on surgical or pharmaceutical interventions with no or limited primary coronary lesions, thus unrepresentative of human coronary heart disease progression and pathology. In this review, we will describe the progress of animal models of coronary heart disease following either spontaneous or diet-accelerated coronary lesions.

  11. Percutaneous coronary intervention for coronary bifurcation disease: consensus from the first 10 years of the European Bifurcation Club meetings.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Jens Flensted; Holm, Niels Ramsing; Stankovic, Goran; Lefèvre, Thierry; Chieffo, Alaide; Hildick-Smith, David; Pan, Manuel; Darremont, Olivier; Albiero, Remo; Ferenc, Miroslaw; Louvard, Yves

    2014-09-01

    The European Bifurcation Club (EBC) is an independent, non-political and informal "think tank" of scientists with a particular interest in clinical, technical and fundamental aspects of the management of coronary artery bifurcation disease. Bifurcations account for 15-20% of all percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and remain one of the most challenging lesions in interventional cardiology in terms of procedural success rate as well as long-term cardiac events. The optimal management is, despite a fast growing scientific literature, still the subject of considerable debate, one of the main concerns being the potential increased risk of late stent thrombosis associated with treatment complexity. The EBC was initiated in 2004 and aims to facilitate an exchange of ideas on management of bifurcation disease. The EBC hosts an annual, compact meeting dedicated to bifurcations which brings together physicians, engineers, biologists, physicists, epidemiologists and statisticians for detailed discussions. Every meeting is finalised with a consensus statement which reflects the unique opportunity of combining the opinion of interventional cardiologists with the opinion of a large variety of other scientists on bifurcation management. This year the EBC celebrates its 10-year anniversary. This consensus document represents the summary of the consensus from the last ten years of the annual EBC meetings.

  12. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  13. Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack Updated:Oct 4,2016 Sometimes a heart attack ... Disease Go Red For Women Types of aneurysms Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ...

  14. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... total cholesterol score is calculated using the following equation: HDL + LDL + 20 percent of your triglyceride level. ... keeping your heart healthy. Sign up today! Email:* State: Zip Code: By clicking submit below you agree ...

  15. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  16. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  17. Genomic prediction of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Gad; Havulinna, Aki S.; Bhalala, Oneil G.; Byars, Sean G.; De Livera, Alysha M.; Yetukuri, Laxman; Tikkanen, Emmi; Perola, Markus; Schunkert, Heribert; Sijbrands, Eric J.; Palotie, Aarno; Samani, Nilesh J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Inouye, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aims Genetics plays an important role in coronary heart disease (CHD) but the clinical utility of genomic risk scores (GRSs) relative to clinical risk scores, such as the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), is unclear. Our aim was to construct and externally validate a CHD GRS, in terms of lifetime CHD risk and relative to traditional clinical risk scores. Methods and results We generated a GRS of 49 310 SNPs based on a CARDIoGRAMplusC4D Consortium meta-analysis of CHD, then independently tested it using five prospective population cohorts (three FINRISK cohorts, combined n = 12 676, 757 incident CHD events; two Framingham Heart Study cohorts (FHS), combined n = 3406, 587 incident CHD events). The GRS was associated with incident CHD (FINRISK HR = 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61–1.86 per S.D. of GRS; Framingham HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.38), and was largely unchanged by adjustment for known risk factors, including family history. Integration of the GRS with the FRS or ACC/AHA13 scores improved the 10 years risk prediction (meta-analysis C-index: +1.5–1.6%, P < 0.001), particularly for individuals ≥60 years old (meta-analysis C-index: +4.6–5.1%, P < 0.001). Importantly, the GRS captured substantially different trajectories of absolute risk, with men in the top 20% of attaining 10% cumulative CHD risk 12–18 y earlier than those in the bottom 20%. High genomic risk was partially compensated for by low systolic blood pressure, low cholesterol level, and non-smoking. Conclusions A GRS based on a large number of SNPs improves CHD risk prediction and encodes different trajectories of lifetime risk not captured by traditional clinical risk scores. PMID:27655226

  18. Usefulness of Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Balloon Angioplasty for the Left Coronary Artery Stenosis 10 Years More Than After Arterial Switch Operation.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Nobuyuki; Tsuda, Etsuko; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Yamada, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Proximal stenosis adjacent to the orifice of one or both coronary arteries may occur after the arterial switch operation (ASO) for d-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA). Coronary artery stenosis (CAS) often progresses within the first 6 months postoperatively and may result in myocardial ischemia and infarction. Although percutaneous transluminal coronary balloon angioplasty (PCBA) for CAS within 15 months after ASO for d-TGA has been reported, there is no report of PCBA for CAS in the late period after ASO. We present the results of PCBA for CAS of the left coronary artery performed more than 10 years after ASO in an 11-year-old boy and a 14-year-old boy without complication. The stenosis degree improved in both patients from 81 to 45 and 80 to 54 %, respectively. Restenosis did not occur, and the stenosis degree improved to about 25 % late after PCBA. Although the initial effect of PCBA may not be dramatic, it can improve late after PCBA. It was considered that the optimal balloon-reference vessel ratio was about 1.0, to obtain the minimal effective lumen diameter. PCBA for CAS even if performed many years after ASO is feasible without complication. PCBA can also provide delayed improvement late after the procedure.

  19. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  20. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  1. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  2. The natural cure of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Withnell, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Following the development of coronary heart disease in 1989 I was introduced to an alumnus of the Pritikin Longevity Center in California and I adopted the regimen of diet and exercise. Within five months I was able to abandon all medication and was symptom free. My medical colleagues maintained that, because I had recovered, the Consultant's diagnosis must have been wrong--there can be no cure of coronary heart disease by lifestyle changes alone. As a result of my experience I decided to review the literature to study the natural history of coronary heart disease. My findings strongly suggest that the increase in incidence in the last hundred years from virtually nil to epidemic proportions is due to lifestyle changes and that the disease can be reversed. I list a number of doctors who have influenced large numbers of people to change their lifestyles with great success. They have utilised mainly plant-based diets whose composition is the same or similar to that which Pritikin originally used and which is still extant at the Longevity Center. I conclude by suggesting that the possibility of reversal of coronary heart disease has profound implications for its treatment with enormous potential savings for the National Health Service.

  3. Age, dental infections, and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K J; Asikainen, S; Wolf, J; Jousimies-Somer, H; Valtonen, V; Nieminen, M

    2000-02-01

    Epidemiological and intervention studies have suggested that infections are risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). Dental infections have appeared as cardiovascular risk factors in cross-sectional and in follow-up studies, and the association has been independent of the "classic" coronary risk factors. This case-control study aimed at detailed assessment of the dental pathology found in various CHD categories (including elderly patients). Altogether, 85 patients with proven coronary heart disease and 53 random controls, matched for sex, age, geographic area, and socio-economic status, were compared with regard to dental status, assessed blindly with four separate scores, and to the "classic" coronary risk factors (seven of the controls had CHD, and they were not included in the analyses). The dental indices were higher among CHD patients than in the controls, but, contrary to previous studies, the differences were not significant (between the CHD patients and their matched controls or among the different CHD categories). This result could not be explained by potential confounding factors. The participants in the present study were older and had more often undergone recent dental treatment in comparison with subjects in our earlier studies. Age correlated with the severity of dental infections only in the random controls but not in the coronary patients who, although young, already had high dental scores. We believe that the higher age of the participants in the present study is the most likely reason for the results. Other possible explanations include an age-related selection bias among older CHD patients, and the fact that those participating in studies like this may have better general health and thus also less severe dental infections. Thus, the role of dental infections as a coronary risk factor varies according to the characteristics of the population studied.

  4. Congestive Heart Failure With Apparently Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A 10-Year Observational Study.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Shabana, Adel; Arabi, Abdulrahman; Al-Thani, Hassan; Asaad, Nidal; AlBinALi, Hajar; Singh, Rajvir; Gomaa, Mohammed; Gehani, A

    2015-09-01

    We analyzed the clinical presentation and outcomes (from 2003 to 2013) of heart failure (HF) with apparently normal systolic function (HFPEF). Based on the echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), patients were divided into 2 groups, group 1 (<50%) and group 2 (≥50%). Of 2212 patients with HF, 20% were in group 2. Patients in group 2 were more likely to be older, females, Arabs, hypertensive, and obese (P = .001). Patients in group 1 were mostly Asians and had more troponin-T positivity (P = .001). Inhospital cardiac arrest, shock, and deaths were significantly greater in group 1. On multivariate analysis, age, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, lack of on-admission β-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors use were independent predictors of mortality. HFPEF is associated with less mortality compared to those who presented with reduced LVEF. On admission, use of evidence-based medications could in part predict this difference in the hospital outcome.

  5. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy P.; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. Findings: The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. Conclusions: The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD. PMID:24171883

  6. Periodontal and coronary heart disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Berent, Robert; Auer, Johann; Schmid, Peter; Krennmair, Gerald; Crouse, Stephen F; Green, John S; Sinzinger, Helmut; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal inflammation has been implicated in atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Coronary angiography (CA) is used in the assessment of CHD; only a few studies have evaluated periodontal disease (PD) and angiographic measures of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CHD and PD. In this prospective epidemiologic study, 466 patients underwent CA and were assessed for PD. All patients underwent physical, laboratory, cardiac, and dental examination including dental x-rays. Periodontal disease and coronary angiograms were evaluated blindly by a dentist and 2 cardiologists, respectively. A coronary stenosis greater than 50% was ruled as CHD. Periodontal disease was defined and measured with the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN); and if at least 2 sextants (segments dividing mandible and maxilla into 6) were recorded as having CPITN of at least 3 (signifying that sextant had periodontal pocket depth ≥ 3.5 mm), the patient was coded as having PD. Three-hundred forty-nine patients (74.9%) had CHD assessed by CA The CHD patients had PD in 55.6% vs 41.9% in the non-CHD patients (P < .01). The CPITN scores were significantly higher in patients with vs without CHD, 2.43 vs 2.16, respectively (P = .023). After adjusting for age, sex, and risk factors for atherosclerosis with additional inclusion of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, PD remained significantly related to CHD (odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.1). Other predictors for CHD were male sex, age, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and diabetes. Our results demonstrate an increased odds ratio for angiographically determined CHD in patients with PD and that CHD and PD may cluster in particular groups of a population. Our data indicate that PD represents a potentially modifiable risk factor that is both preventable and treatable with predictable treatments that pose negligible risk.

  7. Men's and Women's Health Beliefs Differentially Predict Coronary Heart Disease Incidence in a Population-Based Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korin, Maya Rom; Chaplin, William F.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Butler, Mark J.; Ojie, Mary-Jane; Davidson, Karina W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in the association between beliefs in heart disease preventability and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods: A total of 2,688 Noninstitutionalized Nova Scotians without prior CHD enrolled in the Nova Scotia Health Study (NSHS95) and were followed for 10…

  8. Prognostic significance of cardiopulmonary exercise testing for 10-year survival in patients with mild to moderate heart failure.

    PubMed

    Koike, A; Koyama, Y; Itoh, H; Adachi, H; Marumo, F; Hiroe, M

    2000-12-01

    Although a number of studies have investigated the prognostic significance of exercise variables, they have focused only on short-term prognosis in relatively severe heart failure. This study was carried out to determine whether the indices obtained during cardiopulmonary exercise testing have prognostic significance during a 10-year follow-up in mild to moderate heart failure. Three hundred and sixty-four consecutive patients with cardiac disease performed 4 min of 20-W warm-up, followed by a symptom-limited incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer. In addition to the measurements of peak oxygen uptake (VO2) and gas exchange (anaerobic) threshold, the time constant of VO2 kinetics during the onset of warm-up exercise was calculated using a single exponential equation. Data on mortality were available for follow-up in 260 patients. After 3,331+/-610 days of follow-up, 29 cardiovascular-related deaths occurred. The time constant of VO2 in the nonsurvivors was 76.7+/-43.3 s and was significantly prolonged compared with that of survivors (55.3+/-30.6 s, p=0.001). Peak VO2 and gas exchange threshold were both significantly lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors. Kaplan-Meier survival curves for 10 years of follow-up demonstrated a survival rate of 89.0% for patients with a normal VO2 time constant (< 80 s) and 71.7% for those with a longer time constant (> or = 80 s), showing a significant difference in survival (p=0.0028). Respiratory gas parameters obtained during exercise testing, particularly the time constant of VO2 kinetics, were found to be useful for predicting long-term prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure. These results suggest that cardiopulmonary exercise testing could be more applicable in ambulatory patients with minimal symptoms or minimal functional impairment.

  9. [Stress, mental disorders and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Lederbogen, F; Ströhle, A

    2012-11-01

    There are numerous associations between stress, mental disorders and coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to an acute stressor leads to activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal and sympathoadrenal systems and chronic stressors are associated with sustained functional changes of these systems. Experiencing acute and chronic stress is paralleled by an increased incidence of mental disorders with the most consistent evidence on the triggering of major depressive episodes. Various mental disorders, including depression, anxiety and schizophrenia, are associated with an increased risk of CHD. Furthermore, acute and chronic stressors have been identified as risk factors or triggers of acute coronary syndromes. Thus therapeutic strategies aim at reducing subjective stress experience, therapy of mental disorders and treatment of cardiac risk factors known to be more prevalent in increased stress states and mental disorders.

  10. Poor oral health and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Joshipura, K J; Rimm, E B; Douglass, C W; Trichopoulos, D; Ascherio, A; Willett, W C

    1996-09-01

    A few recent studies have shown associations between poor oral health and coronary heart disease (CHD). The objective of this study was to examine the incidence of CHD in relation to number of teeth present and periodontal disease, and to explore potential mediators of this association, in a prospective cohort study. This study is a part of the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). Participants included a US national sample of 44,119 male health professionals (58% of whom were dentists), from 40 to 75 years of age, who reported no diagnosed CHD, cancer, or diabetes at baseline. We recorded 757 incident cases of CHD, including fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and sudden death, in six years of follow-up. Among men who reported pre-existing periodontal disease, those with 10 or fewer teeth were at increased risk of CHD compared with men with 25 or more teeth (relative risk = 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 2.71), after adjustment for standard CHD risk factors. Among men without pre-existing periodontal disease, no relationship was found (relative risk = 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 1.68). The associations were only slightly attenuated after we controlled for dietary factors. No overall associations were found between periodontal disease and coronary heart disease. Tooth loss may be associated with increased risk of CHD, primarily among those with a positive periodontal disease history; diet was only a small mediator of this association.

  11. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease in women.

    PubMed

    Bello, Natalie; Mosca, Lori

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in women and a major cause of morbidity. Coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for nearly half of all CVD deaths. Gender differences in CHD include a later age of onset for women, a greater prevalence of comorbid diseases, and differences in the initial manifestations of the disease. Traditional risk factors for CHD include tobacco use, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and atherogenic diet. More recently identified risk factors in women include high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), homocysteine, and lipoprotein (a). Appropriate management of risk factors is associated with a reduced incidence of CHD, yet poor implementation in women is widely documented. Barriers to optimal risk factor management in women should be identified and overcome in an effort to maximize the cardiovascular health of women.

  12. Stop inhaling smoke: prevent coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Kaye H

    2003-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was rare a century ago and was diagnosed in few living patients prior to 1925. By 1950, it was the most common heart problem seen by clinicians. Thought at first to have been overlooked, there were many explanations offered for its neglect. Smoking, hypertension, and elevated cholesterol are associated with AMI, but of these only smoking should be considered a cause. Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia may be co-effects, perhaps of inflammation stimulated in the lung and blood vessels by smoking and air pollution, thus affecting vessels and arteries subjected to systemic blood pressure. Air pollution--the 20th century's other "big smoke"--deserves consideration as a 2nd cause. Auto exhaust blankets the world's cities. It consists of smoke and other effluents of petroleum vaporization and combustion that emanate from the crankcases and exhaust pipes of trucks and automobiles. The major living spaces (conurbations) of the world now imitate and exceed Los Angeles in their levels of air pollution. Auto exhaust gases fit the timeline, and their increasing amounts parallel the worldwide rise in coronary heart disease. Increasing doses of these chemicals imitate cigarette smoke and stimulate inflammation in the lungs. They appear to be absorbed into the blood, where they cause inflammation in blood vessels, increased blood pressure, and clogged coronary arteries. Avoidance is the obvious solution. Quit inhaling cigarette smoke and motor vehicle exhaust. The benefits have been shown and can be proved by intervention. The quest for clean air is hygienic-like avoiding water contaminated with feces was 150 yr ago. Clear air must be made a moral right. Its attainment requires a major revolution in priorities for energy use and lifestyle. Two types of smoke must be avoided. The world's most lethal disease.

  13. Manifestation of severe coronary heart disease after anabolic drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Mewis, C; Spyridopoulos, I; Kühlkamp, V; Seipel, L

    1996-02-01

    Anabolic steroids are frequently abused, thus increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease, despite the known unfavorable influence on lipid profiles. We report on a young bodybuilder who presented with ventricular tachycardia as the first manifestation of severe underlying coronary heart disease. Coronary angiogram revealed severe stenotic lesions in the right coronary artery and the left descending coronary artery, and hypokinetic regions corresponded to posterolateral and anterior myocardial infarctions. This young patient had a history without any coronary risk factors, but with a 2-year abuse of the anabolic steroid stanazolol. No report published so far has shown possible atherogenic consequences of long-term abuse of stanazolol.

  14. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  15. The epidemic of the 20(th) century: coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S; Goldberg, Robert J; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease was an uncommon cause of death in the US at the beginning of the 20th century. By mid-century it had become the commonest cause. After peaking in the mid-1960s, the number of heart disease deaths began a marked decline that has persisted to the present. The increase in heart disease deaths from the early 20th century until the 1960s was due to an increase in the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis with resultant coronary heart disease, as documented by autopsy studies. This increase was associated with an increase in smoking and dietary changes leading to an increase in serum cholesterol levels. In addition, the ability to diagnose acute myocardial infarction with the aid of the electrocardiogram increased the recognition of coronary heart disease before death. The substantial decrease in coronary heart disease deaths after the mid-1960s is best explained by the decreased incidence, and case fatality rate, of acute myocardial infarction and a decrease in out-of-hospital sudden coronary heart disease deaths. These decreases are very likely explained by a decrease in coronary atherosclerosis due to primary prevention, and a decrease in the progression of nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis to obstructive coronary heart disease due to efforts of primary and secondary prevention. In addition, more effective treatment of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction has led to a substantial decrease in deaths due to acute myocardial infarction. It is very likely that the 20th century was the only century in which heart disease was the most common cause of death in America.

  16. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be

  17. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-05

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  18. Coronary heart disease among Pacific Island people in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tukuitonga, C F; Stewart, A; Beaglehole, R

    1990-09-26

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in New Zealand. Death rates are higher among the Maori than the European population but rates have been declining in both groups over recent years. The occurrence of coronary heart disease among the Pacific Island population in New Zealand is unknown. Data from the National Health Statistics Centre (NHSC) and the Auckland coronary or stroke (ARCOS) study were used to describe the occurrence of coronary heart diseases among Pacific Island people. Age standardised mortality rates show that coronary heart disease is an important cause of death among Pacific Island men. Death rates have declined between 1973-77 and 1978-82 but this trend did not continue among men in the 1983-86 period. Age standardised mortality rates from coronary heart disease from the ARCOS data are 175/100,000 and 52/100,000 for Pacific Island men and women compared with 325/100,000 and 141/100,000 for Maori men and women. Age standardised rates for European men and women are 154/100,000 and 36/100,000 respectively.

  19. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  20. Women, Loneliness, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between loneliness and risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) over a 19-year follow-up period in a community sample of men and women. Loneliness, the perceived discrepancy between actual and desired social relationships, has been linked to several adverse health outcomes. However, no previous research has prospectively examined the association between loneliness and incident CHD in a community sample of men and women. Methods Hypotheses were examined using data from the First National Health and Nutrition Survey and its follow-up studies (n = 3003). Loneliness, assessed by one item from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression scale, and covariates were derived from baseline interviews. Incident CHD was derived from hospital records/death certificates over 19 years of follow-up. Hypotheses were evaluated, using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Among women, high loneliness was associated with increased risk of incident CHD (high: hazard ratio = 1.76, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.17â2.63; medium: hazard ratio = 0.98, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.64â1.49; reference: low), controlling for age, race, education, income, marital status, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and body mass index. Findings persisted additionally controlling for depressive symptoms. No significant associations were observed among men. Conclusions Loneliness was prospectively associated with increased risk of incident CHD, controlling for multiple confounding factors. Loneliness among women may merit clinical attention, not only due to its impact on quality of life but also its potential implications for cardiovascular health. PMID:19661189

  1. Endodontic variables and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Frisk, Fredrik; Hakeberg, Magnus; Ahlqwist, Margareta; Bengtsson, Calle

    2003-10-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to explore a possible association between endodontic disease variables and coronary heart disease (CHD). Dental infections are hypothesized to be linked to atherosclerosis and could be a cause of vascular changes crucial for the development of CHD. Most studies have focused on periodontal disease. To our knowledge, no one has specifically studied endodontic variables as risk factors for the development of CHD. In 1992-93, a representative sample (n = 1056) of women in Göteborg, Sweden, aged between 38 and 84 years, took part in a combined dental and medical survey. The dependent variable was CHD, i.e. subjects with angina pectoris and/or a history of myocardial infarction (n = 106). The independent variables were number of root-filled teeth (RF), number of teeth with periapical radiolucencies (PA), tooth loss (TL), age, life situation, marital status, smoking, alcohol habits, body mass index, waist-hip ratio, serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, hypertension and diabetes. The multivariate logistic regression analysis did not prove the endodontic variables to be predictive of CHD. Only age and tooth loss were significantly associated with CHD, with OR = 1.07 (CI = 1.03-1.12) and OR = 2.70 (CI = 1.49-4.87), respectively. The bivariate logistic regression analysis showed a positive significant association between subjects with RF = 2 and CHD, but for PA the bivariate analysis did not support an association with CHD. This cross-sectional study did not reveal a significant association between endodontically treated teeth and CHD nor between teeth with periapical disease and CHD.

  2. On Two Hearts and Other Coronary Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1998-01-01

    Speculates as to how understanding of heart disease has developed and provides insight into how medical science makes progress. Summarizes the state of knowledge on arteriosclerosis, heart attacks, and exercising the heart. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  3. Risk of heart failure after community acquired pneumonia: prospective controlled study with 10 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Eurich, Dean T; Marrie, Thomas J; Minhas-Sandhu, Jasjeet K; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2017-02-13

    Objective To determine the attributable risk of community acquired pneumonia on incidence of heart failure throughout the age range of affected patients and severity of the infection.Design Cohort study.Setting Six hospitals and seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 2000-02.Participants 4988 adults with community acquired pneumonia and no history of heart failure were prospectively recruited and matched on age, sex, and setting of treatment (inpatient or outpatient) with up to five adults without pneumonia (controls) or prevalent heart failure (n=23 060).Main outcome measures Risk of hospital admission for incident heart failure or a combined endpoint of heart failure or death up to 2012, evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses.Results The average age of participants was 55 years, 2649 (53.1%) were men, and 63.4% were managed as outpatients. Over a median of 9.9 years (interquartile range 5.9-10.6), 11.9% (n=592) of patients with pneumonia had incident heart failure compared with 7.4% (n=1712) of controls (adjusted hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 1.81). Patients with pneumonia aged 65 or less had the lowest absolute increase (but greatest relative risk) of heart failure compared with controls (4.8% v 2.2%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 2.53), whereas patients with pneumonia aged more than 65 years had the highest absolute increase (but lowest relative risk) of heart failure (24.8% v 18.9%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.55, 1.36 to 1.77). Results were consistent in the short term (90 days) and intermediate term (one year) and whether patients were treated in hospital or as outpatients.Conclusion Our results show that community acquired pneumonia substantially increases the risk of heart failure across the age and severity range of cases. This should be considered when formulating post-discharge care plans and preventive strategies, and assessing downstream episodes of

  4. How Is Coronary Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... structures inside your chest, such as your heart, lungs, and blood vessels. A chest x ray can reveal signs ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  5. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  6. Trends of Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in German First Graders Throughout 10 Years: The PEP Family Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Haas, Gerda-Maria; Bertsch, Thomas; Schwandt, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Although childhood overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide, some countries report trends for stabilization. However, the trend for the potentially atherogenic components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in children and adolescents is not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trend of the five components of over 10 years in 2228 first graders aged 6 years. Waist circumference (WC) remained mainly unchanged between 1994 and 2003 whereas the other four components continuously decreased. In boys and girls mean values of triglycerides (-25.9% and -28.6%, resp.), HDL cholesterol (-19.8% and -23.4%, resp.), fasting glucose (-7.3% and -9%, resp.), systolic (-3.8% and -4.1%, resp.), and diastolic (-10.2% and -9.7%, resp.) blood pressure significantly decreased. Whereas the prevalence of abdominal adiposity was stable at baseline and after 10 years (-1% in boys and +2% in girls), the prevalence of hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-C, and glucose was very low without any trend.

  7. Coronary heart disease mortality after irradiation for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Boivin, J.F.; Hutchison, G.B.

    1982-01-01

    The authors conducted a study designed to evaluate the hypothesis that irradiation to the heart in the treatment for Hodgkin's disease (HD) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. This report describes 957 patients diagnosed with HD in 1942-75 and analyzes follow-up findings through December 1977. Twenty-five coronary heart disease deaths have been observed, and 4258.2 person-years of experience at risk have been accrued. The relative death rate (RDR), defined as the CHD mortality for heart-irradiated subjects divided by the mortality for nonirradiated subjects, was estimated. After adjustment for the effect of interval of observation, age, stage, and class, the RDR estimate is 1.5 but does not differ significantly from unit (95% confidence limits: 0.59, 3.7).

  8. Atypical Double Right Coronary Artery Presenting With Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiogenic Shock and Complete Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Shravan; Chaturvedi, Vikash; Agrawal, Puneet; Razi, Mahmadula; Mahrotra, Anupam; Mishra, Vikas; Kumar, Mukesh; Abdali, Nasar; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Umeshwar

    2017-01-01

    Double right coronary artery (RCA) is an extremely rare coronary artery anomaly. We here report an atherosclerotic double RCA which appeared after primary percutaneous intervention performed to treat a 34-year-old male presenting with acute inferior myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock and complete heart block. This is an unusual case as double RCA had been hidden by total atherosclerotic occlusion of the proximal part of the RCA and complete restoration of patency led complete heart block back to normal sinus rhythm. PMID:28179971

  9. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    PubMed

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  10. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  11. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  12. Analysis of Coronary Vessels in Cleared Embryonic Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Ivins, Sarah; Roberts, Catherine; Vernay, Bertrand; Scambler, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Whole mount visualization of the embryonic coronary plexus from which the capillary and arterial networks will form is rendered problematic using standard microscopy techniques, due to the scattering of imaging light by the thick heart tissue, as these vessels are localized deep within the walls of the developing heart. As optical clearing of tissues using organic solvents such as BABB (1 part benzyl alcohol to 2 parts benzyl benzoate) has been shown to greatly improve the optical penetration depth that can be achieved, we combined clearance of whole, PECAM1-immunostained hearts, with laser-scanning confocal microscopy, in order to obtain high-resolution images of vessels throughout the entire heart. BABB clearance of embryonic hearts takes place rapidly and also acts to preserve the fluorescent signal for several weeks; in addition, samples can be imaged multiple times without loss of signal. This straightforward method is also applicable to imaging other types of blood vessels in whole embryos. PMID:28060348

  13. Analysis of Coronary Vessels in Cleared Embryonic Hearts.

    PubMed

    Ivins, Sarah; Roberts, Catherine; Vernay, Bertrand; Scambler, Peter J

    2016-12-07

    Whole mount visualization of the embryonic coronary plexus from which the capillary and arterial networks will form is rendered problematic using standard microscopy techniques, due to the scattering of imaging light by the thick heart tissue, as these vessels are localized deep within the walls of the developing heart. As optical clearing of tissues using organic solvents such as BABB (1 part benzyl alcohol to 2 parts benzyl benzoate) has been shown to greatly improve the optical penetration depth that can be achieved, we combined clearance of whole, PECAM1-immunostained hearts, with laser-scanning confocal microscopy, in order to obtain high-resolution images of vessels throughout the entire heart. BABB clearance of embryonic hearts takes place rapidly and also acts to preserve the fluorescent signal for several weeks; in addition, samples can be imaged multiple times without loss of signal. This straightforward method is also applicable to imaging other types of blood vessels in whole embryos.

  14. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and...

  15. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and...

  16. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and...

  17. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and...

  18. The Counselor and Coronary Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottens, Allen J.

    1977-01-01

    It is clear that steps can be taken for heart disease prevention and that counselors must give thought to adapting existing ideas and techniques and to developing and experimenting with new and innovative preventive tactics. Of utmost importance is the belief that behavioral intervention is both warranted and worthwhile. (Author)

  19. Coronary heart disease in women: triglycerides and lipoprotein biology.

    PubMed

    Dayspring, Thomas D

    2002-01-01

    An examination of coronary heart disease in women over the past two decades in the United States reveals a disturbing gender difference that points to more treatment success in men than in women, which raises the question as to whether women have been as aggressively evaluated and treated. It is only over the last several years that evidence from randomized clinical trials on coronary heart disease etiology and treatment in women has become available. In addition, the previous widely held viewpoint that estrogen is cardioprotective and should be an integral part of pharmacologic therapy has been abandoned. Triglycerides and their very important influence on lipoproteins have emerged as a critical part of the pathobiological forces related to atherothrombosis in women.

  20. Physical activity and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Froelicher, V; Battler, A; McKirnan, M D

    1980-01-01

    This review deals with more recent investigations of the health benefit of regular aerobic exercise including studies in: epidemiology, echocardiography, animal research, and cardiac rehabilitation. Recent epidemiological studies support the preventative aspects of exercise in apparently healthy individuals. Echocardiographic studies suggest morphologic changes in young individuals. Recent animal research confirms previous results as well as documenting improvment in cardiac function even under hypoxic and ischemic conditions. Studies of cardiac rehabilitation suggest that medically supervised programs do not improve or worsen morbidity and mortality. The question of whether exercise training can cause cardiac effects in patients with coronary disease rather than just improve the response of the peripheral circulation to exercise may be answered using newer radionuclide techniques.

  1. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one cause of death in the U.S. It is a likely cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial formula developed by the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population who require medical evaluation for job certification. Those individuals assessed to have a high risk probability will be targeted for intervention.

  2. A Novel Risk Score to the Prediction of 10-year Risk for Coronary Artery Disease Among the Elderly in Beijing Based on Competing Risk Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Tang, Zhe; Li, Xia; Luo, Yanxia; Guo, Jin; Li, Haibin; Liu, Xiangtong; Tao, Lixin; Yan, Aoshuang; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study aimed to construct a risk prediction model for coronary artery disease (CAD) based on competing risk model among the elderly in Beijing and develop a user-friendly CAD risk score tool. We used competing risk model to evaluate the risk of developing a first CAD event. On the basis of the risk factors that were included in the competing risk model, we constructed the CAD risk prediction model with Cox proportional hazard model. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and time-dependent area under the ROC curve (AUC) were used to evaluate the discrimination ability of the both methods. Calibration plots were applied to assess the calibration ability and adjusted for the competing risk of non-CAD death. Net reclassification index (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were applied to quantify the improvement contributed by the new risk factors. Internal validation of predictive accuracy was performed using 1000 times of bootstrap re-sampling. Of the 1775 participants without CAD at baseline, 473 incident cases of CAD were documented for a 20-year follow-up. Time-dependent AUCs for men and women at t = 10 years were 0.841 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.806–0.877], 0.804 (95% CI: 0.768–0.839) in Fine and Gray model, 0.784 (95% CI: 0.738–0.830), 0.733 (95% CI: 0.692–0.775) in Cox proportional hazard model. The competing risk model was significantly superior to Cox proportional hazard model on discrimination and calibration. The cut-off values of the risk score that marked the difference between low-risk and high-risk patients were 34 points for men and 30 points for women, which have good sensitivity and specificity. A sex-specific multivariable risk factor algorithm-based competing risk model has been developed on the basis of an elderly Chinese cohort, which could be applied to predict an individual's risk and provide a useful guide to identify the groups at a high risk for CAD among the Chinese

  3. A Novel Risk Score to the Prediction of 10-year Risk for Coronary Artery Disease Among the Elderly in Beijing Based on Competing Risk Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Tang, Zhe; Li, Xia; Luo, Yanxia; Guo, Jin; Li, Haibin; Liu, Xiangtong; Tao, Lixin; Yan, Aoshuang; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-03-01

    The study aimed to construct a risk prediction model for coronary artery disease (CAD) based on competing risk model among the elderly in Beijing and develop a user-friendly CAD risk score tool. We used competing risk model to evaluate the risk of developing a first CAD event. On the basis of the risk factors that were included in the competing risk model, we constructed the CAD risk prediction model with Cox proportional hazard model. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and time-dependent area under the ROC curve (AUC) were used to evaluate the discrimination ability of the both methods. Calibration plots were applied to assess the calibration ability and adjusted for the competing risk of non-CAD death. Net reclassification index (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were applied to quantify the improvement contributed by the new risk factors. Internal validation of predictive accuracy was performed using 1000 times of bootstrap re-sampling. Of the 1775 participants without CAD at baseline, 473 incident cases of CAD were documented for a 20-year follow-up. Time-dependent AUCs for men and women at t = 10 years were 0.841 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.806-0.877], 0.804 (95% CI: 0.768-0.839) in Fine and Gray model, 0.784 (95% CI: 0.738-0.830), 0.733 (95% CI: 0.692-0.775) in Cox proportional hazard model. The competing risk model was significantly superior to Cox proportional hazard model on discrimination and calibration. The cut-off values of the risk score that marked the difference between low-risk and high-risk patients were 34 points for men and 30 points for women, which have good sensitivity and specificity. A sex-specific multivariable risk factor algorithm-based competing risk model has been developed on the basis of an elderly Chinese cohort, which could be applied to predict an individual's risk and provide a useful guide to identify the groups at a high risk for CAD among the Chinese adults over 55

  4. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Renaud, S

    1984-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that several environmental factors are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). Most of them are predisposing factors known also as risk factors. Other factors appear to have preventive effects. Blood lipids have been considered the main blood mediator between most of these factors and CHD. In recent years, this concept has been challenged since many of these factors did not affect serum lipids. By contrast blood platelets, involved in both thrombosis and atherosclerosis, appear to have their functions markedly changed by most of the factors associated with CHD. To determine whether saturated fats would affect platelet functions as shown in animals and in pilot studies in man, groups of male farmers (40-45 years) from 2 regions of France (Var and Moselle) in which the mortality rate from CHD differed markedly were studied, particularly regarding their platelet functions in relation to the intake of saturated fats. No difference could be observed in blood between the 2 regions concerning total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides, the coagulation was markedly accelerated, as well as the platelet clotting activity in farmers from Moselle. The response of platelets mostly to thrombin but also to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), epinephrine, and collagen was more elevated in Moselle farmers. In Moselle farmers, there was significantly higher intake of saturated fats (16% of the calories) as compared to Var (12%). To determine whether the abnormal platelet response in Moselle farmers was really due to the diet or whether a genetic factor might be involved, a group of 50 Moselle farmers were persuaded to change their dietary habits in order to lower their intake of saturated fats to 10% of the calories and that of polyunsaturated to approximately 12%. 1 year after diet modification, the clotting time (PCT) and clotting activity of platelets were considerably prolonged and the response to thrombin drastically reduced. These

  5. The Impact of Educational Status on 10-Year (2004-2014) Cardiovascular Disease Prognosis and All-cause Mortality Among Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients in the Greek Acute Coronary Syndrome (GREECS) Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Notara, Venetia; Kogias, Yannis; Stravopodis, Petros; Antonoulas, Antonis; Zombolos, Spyros; Mantas, Yannis; Pitsavos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The association between educational status and 10-year risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and all-cause mortality was evaluated. Methods: From October 2003 to September 2004, 2172 consecutive ACS patients from six Greek hospitals were enrolled. In 2013 to 2014, a 10-year follow-up (2004-2014) assessment was performed for 1918 participants (participation rate, 88%). Each patient’s educational status was classified as low (<9 years of school), intermediate (9 to 14 years), or high (>14 years). Results: Overall all-cause mortality was almost twofold higher in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (40% vs. 22% and 19%, respectively, p<0.001). Additionally, 10-year recurrent ACS events (fatal and non-fatal) were more common in the low-education group than in the intermediate-education and high-education groups (42% vs. 30% and 35%, p<0.001), and no interactions between sex and education on the investigated outcomes were observed. Moreover, patients in the high-education group were more physically active, had a better financial status, and were less likely to have hypertension, diabetes, or ACS than the participants with the least education (p<0.001); however, when those characteristics and lifestyle habits were accounted for, no moderating effects regarding the relationship of educational status with all-cause mortality and ACS events were observed. Conclusions: A U-shaped association may be proposed for the relationship between ACS prognosis and educational status, with participants in the low-education and high-education groups being negatively affected by other factors (e.g., job stress, depression, or loneliness). Public health policies should be aimed at specific social groups to reduce the overall burden of cardiovascular disease morbidity. PMID:27499164

  6. Fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pu-Ping; Qu, Yong-Qiang; Shuai, Qun; Tao, Si-Ming; Bao, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yu; Wang, Shang-Wen; Wang, Dian-Hua

    2013-01-15

    Fibrocytes contribute significantly to fibrosis in many cardiac diseases. However, it is not clear whether fibrocytes are associated with the fibrosis in coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes are involved in cardiac fibrosis in CHD. We identified the presence of fibrocytes in CHD heart by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, examined the collagen volume fraction by Masson's Trichrome staining, and evaluated the correlation between fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis. In conjunction, we examined the location of CXCL12, a homing factor and specific ligand for CXCR4, by immunohistochemistry. Fibrocytes were identified in 26 out of 27 CHD hearts and in 10 out of 11 normal hearts. Combinations, including CD34/αSMA, CD34/procollagen-I, CD45/αSMA, CXCR4/procollagen-I and CXCR4/αSMA, stained significantly more fibrocytes in CHD hearts as compared with those in normal hearts (p<0.05). There were positive correlations between the collagen volume fraction and the amount of fibrocytes (r=0.558; p=0.003<0.01) and between the number of CXCR4(+) fibrocytes and the CXCL12(+) cells (r=0.741; p=0.000<0.01) in CHD hearts. Based upon these findings, we conclude that fibrocytes, likely recruited through the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, may contribute to the increase in the fibroblast population in CHD heart.

  7. Heart pump system in "heart-mural coronary artery-myocardial bridge" simulative device.

    PubMed

    Ding, H; Chen, Z; Shen, L; Xu, M; Zhou, Y; Xu, S; Zeng, Y

    2009-06-01

    The myocardial tissue covering the artery is termed a myocardial bridge. But so far many researches on the myocardial bridge have been involved with clinical patients or animals, which have some limitations (e.g. lack of systematicness, difficulties in measuring the flow in the mural coronary artery and so on). Designing a "Heart-Mural coronary artery-Myocardial Bridge" Simulative Device provides a good approach to solve above problems; however, documents on this subject have seldom been reported until now. The heart pump as the key part of the whole simulative device should be able to simulate the waveform of blood pressure, adjust blood flow and regulate heart rate. Our experimental results basically met above requirements. The heart pump proposed in the paper presented an alternative experimental method to go further into other issues about the cardiovascular circulation system.

  8. Dietary factors and coronary heart disease*

    PubMed Central

    Masironi, R.

    1970-01-01

    Mortality data from arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart disease (AHD) and per capita consumption of total fat, saturated fat, sucrose, simple sugars, complex carbohydrates, and protein, and calorie intake for 37 countries were statistically evaluated to investigate possible relationships between dietary factors and incidence of AHD. On a geographical basis, consumption of total and saturated fats is strongly and positively correlated with the death rates, while consumption of complex carbohydrates is negatively correlated. No correlations were found with temporal changes in death rates or with differences within one country. These findings are discussed in the light of the works of many other investigators. It is concluded that the relation of diet to AHD is still controversial, and that the development and severity of the disease cannot be confidently attributed to any single dietary factor nor to blood cholesterol. The contributing effects of other factors, such as physical activity, mental stress, and affluence, are also discussed. PMID:5309508

  9. Prevention of coronary heart disease: a nonhormonal approach.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Vivian; Hoeger, Kathleen

    2005-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a common and serious health problem facing women as they move beyond the reproductive years. Until recently, many postmenopausal women and their physicians relied heavily on hormone therapy to prevent cardiovascular disease, neglecting the well-recognized nonhormonal aspects of cardiovascular health. Simple lifestyle changes--exercise, diet, weight control, and avoidance of tobacco--can significantly reduce the chance of heart disease and its major risk factors, which are essentially the same for men and women. As with men, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are the major risk factors for heart disease in women. This review discusses the epidemiologic studies linking these risk factors to CHD in women, the guidelines for screening, and a brief overview of treatment recommendations.

  10. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  11. Coronary heart disease. The size and nature of the problem.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    In the U.K., coronary heart disease has reached epidemic proportions. It is the commonest cause of death after the age of 35 years and the fastest rate of increase is in early middle age. The epidemic is due mainly to our way of life. The most important factors are dietary, with smoking, physical inactivity and stress also contributing. Twenty independent working parties from different countries have reviewed the dietary evidence and reached a strong consensus on dietary recommendations. Little action has been taken in the U.K. The Coronary Prevention Group has been formed to consider the reasons for this inaction and also the implication for research, the government, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Department of Health and Social Security, the food and agriculture industries, caterers, nutrition education and for individuals, of the dietary recommendations. PMID:7465457

  12. Fate of Patients With Coronary Perforation Complicating Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Euro Heart Survey Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Timm; Boeder, Niklas; Nef, Holger M; Möllmann, Helge; Hochadel, Matthias; Marco, Jean; Weidinger, Franz; Zeymer, Uwe; Gitt, Anselm K; Hamm, Christian W

    2015-11-01

    Coronary perforation (CP) is a life-threatening complication that can occur during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Little is known, however, about the incidence and clinical outcome of CP. We sought to investigate the occurrence of CP and its determinants and risk profile in a large-scale, prospective registry. From 2005 to 2008, unselected patients (n = 42,068) from 175 centers in 33 countries who underwent a PCI procedure were prospectively enrolled in the PCI registry of the Euro Heart Survey program. For the present analysis, patients experiencing CP during PCI (n = 124, 0.3%) were compared with those who underwent PCI without CP. Patients with CP were older, more often women, had more severe coronary disease, and underwent more complex types of coronary intervention. Independent factors associated with CP were the use of rotablation, intravascular ultrasound-guided PCI, bypass PCI, a totally occluded vessel, a type C lesion, peripheral arterial disease, and body mass index <25. More than 10% of the patients developed cardiac tamponade. In a small minority (3.3%), emergency bypass surgery had to be performed. The inhospital death rate was markedly elevated in patients with CP (7.3% vs 1.5%, p <0.001). After adjustment for the EuroHeart score, CP remained a strong predictor of hospital mortality (odds ratio 5.21, 95% confidence interval 2.34 to 11.60). In conclusion, in this real world, all-comers registry, the incidence of CP was low, occurred more often in patients who underwent more complex coronary interventions, and was associated with a fivefold higher hospital mortality.

  13. Shaving, coronary heart disease, and stroke: the Caerphilly Study.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Shah; Smith, George Davey; May, Margaret; Yarnell, John

    2003-02-01

    The relation between frequency of shaving and all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality, coronary heart disease, and stroke events was investigated in a cohort of 2,438 men aged 45-59 years. The one fifth (n = 521, 21.4%) of men who shaved less frequently than daily were shorter, were less likely to be married, had a lower frequency of orgasm, and were more likely to smoke, to have angina, and to work in manual occupations than other men. Over the 20-year follow-up period from 1979-1983 to December 31, 2000, 835 men (34.3%) died. Of those who shaved less frequently than daily, 45.1% died, as compared with 31.3% among those who shaved at least daily. Men who shaved less frequently had fully adjusted hazard ratios (adjusted for testosterone, markers of insulin resistance, social factors, lifestyle, and baseline coronary heart disease) of 1.24 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.50) for all-cause mortality, 1.30 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.71) for cardiovascular disease mortality, 1.08 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.92) for lung cancer mortality, 1.16 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.48) for coronary heart disease events, and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.16, 2.44) for stroke events. The association between infrequent shaving and all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality is probably due to confounding by smoking and social factors, but a small hormonal effect may exist. The relation with stroke events remains unexplained by smoking or social factors.

  14. Association of Cardiorespiratory Fitness With Coronary Heart Disease in Asymptomatic Men

    PubMed Central

    Gander, Jennifer C.; Sui, Xuemei; Hébert, James R.; Hazlett, Linda J.; Cai, Bo; Lavie, Carl J.; Blair, Steven N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) while controlling for an individual’s Framingham Risk Score (FRS)–predicted CHD risk. Patients and Methods The study included 29,854 men from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study, who received a baseline examination from January 1, 1979, to December 31, 2002. Coronary heart disease events included self-reported myocardial infarction or revascularization or CHD death. Multivariable survival analysis investigated the association between CRF, FRS, and CHD. Cardiorespiratory fitness was analyzed as both a continuous and a categorical variable. The population was stratified by “low” and “moderate or high” risk of CHD to test for differences in the FRS stratified by CRF. Results Compared with men without incident CHD, men with incident CHD were older (mean age, 51.6 years vs 44.6 years), had lower average maximally achieved fitness (10.9 metabolic equivalent of tasks vs 12.0 metabolic equivalent of tasks [METs]), and were more likely to have moderate or high 10-year CHD risk (P<.001). Cardiorespiratory fitness, defined as maximal METs, exhibited a 20% lower risk of CHD (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.77–0.83) for each 1-unit MET increase. Among men in the low CRF strata, individuals with moderate or high 10-year CHD risk, according to the FRS, had a higher CHD risk (hazard ratio, 6.55; 95% CI, 3.64–11.82) than men with low CHD risk according to the FRS. Conclusion Clinicians should promote physical activity to improve CRF so as to reduce CHD risk, even to patients with otherwise low CHD risk. PMID:26434963

  15. The Myers-Briggs type indicator and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Thorne, B M; Fyfe, J H; Carskadon, T G

    1987-01-01

    Researchers have for many years attempted to establish a relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and personality type. In our study, 103 subjects completed Form G of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Comparisons were made between 93 CHD patients and an age-appropriate control group (Group C) on each of the four MBTI dimensions: Extraversion-Introversion, Sensing-Intuition, Thinking-Feeling, and Judging-Perceiving. The comparison between CHD patients and Group C showed that CHD patients were significantly more likely to prefer sensing and feeling.

  16. Tissue Doppler Imaging in Coronary Artery Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Michele; Totaro, Antonio; Ieva, Riccardo; Ferraretti, Armando; Musaico, Francesco; Biase, Matteo Di

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the prognostic role of TDI-derived parameters in major cardiac diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF). In these conditions, myocardial mitral annular systolic (S’) and early diastolic (E’) velocities have been shown to predict mortality or cardiovascular events. In heart failure non invasive assessment of LV diastolic pressure by transmitral to mitral annular early diastolic velocity ratio (E/E’) is a strong prognosticator, especially when E/E’ is > or =15. Moreover, other parameters derived by TDI, as cardiac time intervals and Myocardial Performance Index, might play a role in the prognostic stratification in CAD and HF. Recently, a three-dimensional (3-D) TDI imaging modality, triplane TDI, has become available, and this allows calculation of 3-Dvolumes and LV ejection fraction. We present a brief update of TDI. PMID:22845815

  17. Employment grade and coronary heart disease in British civil servants.

    PubMed Central

    Marmot, M G; Rose, G; Shipley, M; Hamilton, P J

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between grade of employment, coronary risk factors, and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality has been investigated in a longitudinal study of 17 530 civil servants working in London. After seven and a half years of follow-up there was a clear inverse relationship between grade of employment and CHD mortality. Men in the lowest grade (messengers) had 3.6 times the CHD mortality of men in the highest employment grade (administrators). Men in the lower employment grades were shorter, heavier for their height, had higher blood pressure, higher plasma glucose, smoked more, and reported less leisure-time physical activity than men in the higher grades. Yet when allowance was made for the influence on mortality of all of these factors plus plasma cholesterol, the inverse association between grade of employment and CHD mortality was still strong. It is concluded that the higher CHD mortality experienced by working class men, which is present also in national statistics, can be only partly explained by the established coronary risk factors. PMID:744814

  18. A Critique of the Evidence Relating Diet and Coronary Heart Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1963-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014624 TITLE: A Critique of the Evidence Relating Diet and Coronary...comprise the compilation report: ADP014598 thru ADP014630 UNCLASSIFIED A CRITIQUE OF THE EVIDENCE RELATING DIET AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE George V...association of diet with CHD and the widespread lay interest in the pro- * blem. Coronary heart disease may seem to have risen like an epidemic among us. It

  19. [The EMEA CHMP guidelines in coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Chauvenet, Marina

    2004-01-01

    The official regulatory recommendations for drug development and the granting of marketing authorisations are intended for use by pharmaceutical companies and the regulatory agencies. These recommendations are particularly useful in Europe, and allow harmonisation of the regulatory requirements between the different member states, thus facilitating further evaluation of the submission file and the registration process. The European guidelines are issued by the Committee for Human Medicinal Products (CHMP) of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Pharmaceutical Products (EMEA). The key points of the current guidelines regarding applications for phase III trials in coronary heart disease (stable angina, acute coronary syndromes) and chronic heart failure are presented. They are as follows: the definition of selected populations, the choice of criteria for evaluating efficacy and safety, the choice of comparators, and study duration etc.

  20. Introducing the Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort: THC-PAC Study

    PubMed Central

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Sadeghian, Saeed; Karimi, Abbasali; Saadat, Soheil; Peyvandi, Flora; Jalali, Arash; Davarpasand, Tahereh; Shahmansouri, Nazila; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Abchouyeh, Maryam Amiri; Isfahani, Farah Ayatollahzade; Rosendaal, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Data on premature coronary artery disease (CAD) are scarce. The Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort Study (THC-PAC) is the first study of its kind in the Middle East to assess major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in young CAD patients. Methods: The cohort consists of CAD patients, males ≤ 45 years old and females ≤ 55 years old. The participants are residents of Tehran or its suburbs and underwent coronary angiography between June 2004 and July 2011. A 10-year follow-up, via either clinical visits or telephone calls at least once a year, was commenced in August 2012. The end point is considered MACE, encompassing death, myocardial infarction, stroke, new coronary involvement, percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: The cohort comprises 1232 eligible patients (613 [49.8%] males) at a mean age of 45.1 years (SD = 5.8). High frequencies of conventional risk factors, including hyperlipidemia (884 [71.8%]), hypertension (575 [46.7%]), positive family history (539 [43.8%]), cigarette smoking (479 [38.8%]), and diabetes mellitus (390 [31.7%]), were seen in the participants. The mean body mass index (BMI) of the enrolled patients was high (29.2 ± 4.8 kg/m2), and 532 (43.3%) and 440 (35.8%) of them were overweight and obese, respectively. The females’ BMI was higher (30.4 ± 5.3 vs. 28.0 ± 3.9 kg/m2; P < 0.001) and they had a greater mean abdominal circumference (99.9 ± 13.5 vs. 98.1 ± 9.3 cm; P = 0.035). Between August 2012 and August 2013, follow-up was successful in 1173 (95.2%) patients (median follow-up duration = 55.3 months, 95%CI: 53.5–57.0 months). Conclusion: Our younger patients with CAD had a high frequency of risk factors compared to the same-age general population and all-age CAD patients, which may predispose them to higher incidence of recurrent MACE. PMID:26157461

  1. Neighborhood socioeconomic status and coronary heart disease risk prediction in a nationally representative sample

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Craig E.; Slaughter, Mary E.; Griffin, Beth A.; Dubowitz, Tamara; Bird, Chloe E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Test the association between coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores and neighborhood socioeconomic status (NSES) in a US nationally-representative sample and describe whether any association varies by gender and race/ethnicity. Study Design Cross-sectional study Methods We use Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 1999 to 2004 linked with Census tract data. Multivariable regression models and propensity score adjusted models are employed to test the association between NSES and 10-year risk of CHD based on the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), adjusting for individual-level characteristics. Results An individual living in a neighborhood at the 75th percentile of NSES (high NSES) has, on average, a 10-year CHD risk that is 0.16 percentage points lower (95% Confidence Interval 0.16, 0.17) than a similar person residing in a neighborhood at the 25th percentile of NSES (low NSES). Race/ethnicity and gender were found to significantly modify the association between NSES on CHD risk: the association is larger in men than women and in whites than minorities. Propensity score models showed findings on the main effects of NSES were robust to self-selection into neighborhoods. Similar results were observed between NSES and risk of cardiovascular disease events. Conclusions NSES is significantly associated with CHD risk, and the relationship varies by gender and race/ethnicity. PMID:23083844

  2. Yield of Screening for Coronary Artery Calcium in Early Middle-Age Adults Based on the 10-Year Framingham Risk Score

    PubMed Central

    Okwuosa, Tochi M.; Greenland, Philip; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and distribution of coronary artery calcium (CAC) across Framingham Risk Score (FRS) strata and therefore determine FRS levels at which asymptomatic, young to early middle-age individuals could potentially benefit from CAC screening. BACKGROUND High CAC burden is associated with increased risk of coronary events beyond the FRS. Expert panel recommendations for CAC screening are based on data obtained in middle-age and older individuals. METHODS We included 2,831 CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study participants with an age range of 33 to 45 years. The number needed to screen ([NNS] number of people in each FRS stratum who need to be screened to detect 1 person with a CAC score above the specified cut point) was used to assess the yield of screening for CAC. CAC prevalence was compared across FRS strata using a chi-square test. RESULTS CAC scores >0 and ≥100 were present in 9.9% and 1.8% of participants, respectively. CAC prevalence and amount increased across higher FRS strata. A CAC score >0 was observed in 7.3%, 20.2%, 19.1%, and 44.8% of individuals with FRSs of 0 to 2.5%, 2.6% to 5%, 5.1% to 10%, and >10%, respectively (NNS = 14, 5, 5, and 2, respectively). A CAC score of ≥100 was observed in 1.3%, 2.4%, and 3.5% of those with FRSs of 0 to 2.5%, 2.6% to 5%, and 5.1% to 10%, respectively (NNS = 79, 41, and 29, respectively), but in 17.2% of those with an FRS >10% (NNS = 6). Similar trends were observed when findings were stratified by sex and race. CONCLUSIONS In this young to early middle-age cohort, we observed concordance between CAC prevalence/amount and FRS strata. Within this group, the yield of screening and possibility of identifying those with a high CAC burden (CAC score of ≥100) is low in those with an FRS of ≤10%, but considerable in those with an FRS >10%. PMID:22974805

  3. Dissecting the causal genetic mechanisms of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint L.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 46 loci that are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). Additionally, 104 independent candidate variants (false discovery rate of 5%) have been identified.1–3 A majority of the causal genes in these loci function independently of conventional risk factors, and it is postulated that a number of the CHD associated genes regulate basic processes in the vascular cells involved in atherosclerosis, and that study of the signaling pathways that are modulated in this cell type by causal regulatory variation will provide critical new insights for targeting the initiation and progression of disease. In this review we will discuss the types of experimental approaches and data that are critical for understanding of molecular processes that underlie the disease risk at 9p21.3, TCF21, SORT1, and other CHD associated loci. PMID:24623178

  4. Reductionism and holism in coronary heart disease and cardiac nursing.

    PubMed

    Chummun, Harry

    Reductionism and holism are two contrasting philosophies which provide scientific knowledge of disease processes, health dynamics and care interventions. While reductionism focuses on specific and perhaps narrow concepts, it enhances our in-depth knowledge of key health issues. Holism focuses on understanding how all the significant factors affecting the particular health issue are involved, so a more informed decision can be made about health intervention. This article explores the contribution each makes to our understanding of coronary heart disease (CHD) and to the preparation of nurses working in cardiac nursing. It proposes that pre- and post-registration nursing curricula reflect both reductionist and holistic approaches and therefore cardiac nurses are suitably trained to manage reductionist as well as holistic care for clients with CHD.

  5. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  6. Pulpal inflammation and incidence of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Joshipura, Kaumudi J; Pitiphat, Waranuch; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Willett, Walter C; Colditz, Graham A; Douglass, Chester W

    2006-02-01

    Pulpal inflammation is primarily caused by coronal caries, and leads to root canal therapy (RCT). Chronic inflammation has been associated with various cardiovascular diseases. This study evaluates the association between pulpal inflammation (using RCT as a surrogate) and incident coronary heart disease (CHD). We report results among males from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS), excluding participants with prior cardiovascular disease or diabetes. We obtained RCT data from the HPFS cohort (n = 34,683). Compared to men without RCT, those with >/=1 RCT had a multivariate RR of 1.21 (95% CI 1.05-1.40) for CHD. The association was limited to dentists (RR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.14-1.67). There was no association among nondentists (RR = 1.03). Dental caries was not associated with CHD. The results suggest a possible modest association between pulpal inflammation and CHD.

  7. Oral health indicators poorly predict coronary heart disease deaths.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, R; Reunanen, A; Paunio, M; Paunio, I; Aromaa, A

    2003-09-01

    Several earlier studies have suggested that development of coronary heart disease (CHD) is causally related to oral infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between oral health indicators and CHD deaths. Out of a nationally representative sample, 6527 men and women aged 30-69 years participated in the health examination with a dental check. Detailed oral health data included caries, periodontal and dental plaque status, presence of remaining teeth, and various types of dentures. Over a mean 12-year follow-up, persons dying of CHD were older and more often smoked, had hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and only a basic education compared with other persons. In univariate analyses, several oral health indicators were associated with CHD deaths. Adjustment for the established CHD risk factors reduced all these associations to statistical non-significance. The associations between oral health indicators and CHD are mostly explained by confounding factors, particularly those relating to health behavior.

  8. Lesions of endodontic origin and risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Caplan, D J; Chasen, J B; Krall, E A; Cai, J; Kang, S; Garcia, R I; Offenbacher, S; Beck, J D

    2006-11-01

    A paucity of epidemiologic research exists regarding systemic health consequences of endodontic disease. This study evaluated whether incident radiographically evident lesions of endodontic origin were related to development of coronary heart disease (CHD) among 708 male participants in the VA Dental Longitudinal Study. At baseline and every three years for up to 32 years, participants (who were not VA patients) received complete medical and dental examinations, including full-mouth radiographs. Cox regression models estimated the relationship between incident lesions of endodontic origin and time to CHD diagnosis. Among those < or = 40 years old, incident lesions of endodontic origin were significantly associated with time to CHD diagnosis (p < 0.05), after adjustment for covariates of interest, with hazard ratios decreasing as age increased. Among those > 40 years old, no statistically significant association was observed. These findings are consistent with research that suggests relationships between chronic periodontal inflammation and the development of CHD, especially among younger men.

  9. Blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Volumetric blood flow velocity was supporting on constant level (1 ml/h). Silicone tube of diameter comparable with coronary arteries diameter was used as vessel model. Cell-cell interactions were studied under glucose and anticoagulants influence. Increased adhesiveness of blood cells to tube walls was revealed in patient with coronary heart disease (CHD) compare to practically healthy persons (PHP). In patients with stable angina pectoris of high functional class and patients with AMI shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were predominating in blood flow structure up to microclots formation. Clotting and erythrocytes aggregation increase as response to glucose solution injection, sharply defined in patients with CHD. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with CHD and PHP. After compare our results with other author's data we can consider that method used in our study is sensible enough to investigate blood flow structure violations in patients with CHD and PHP. Several differences of cell-cell interaction in flow under glucose and anticoagulant influence were found out in patients with CHD and PHP.

  10. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Electrocardiogram Heart Attack Send a link to NHLBI ... calcium, or calcifications, are a sign of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, or coronary microvascular disease. A coronary calcium scan ...

  11. Aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease depending on different glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2002-07-01

    The aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease comparing to practically healthy persons and patients with coronary heart disease combined with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus depending on different glucose concentration in unguentums of blood incubates with the help of computer microphotometer - visual analyzer was studied. Two-phase behavior of erythrocytes size changing of practically healthy persons depending on glucose concentration in an incubation medium and instability erythrocyte systems of a whole blood to the influence of high glucose concentration were revealed. Influence of high glucose concentration on aggregation ability of erythrocytes of patients with coronary heart disease and its combination with non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was revealed.

  12. Heart failure with silent coronary artery spasm exhibiting microscopic focal myocardial necrosis and amyloid-deposition.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoru; Sugiyama, Seigo; Usuku, Hiroki; Hirai, Nobutaka; Kaikita, Koichi; Sakashita, Naomi; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Ogawa, Hisao

    2004-03-01

    We report a 67-year-old Japanese man who presented with worsening heart failure with asymptomatically transient ischemic ST-segment depression. Left ventriculography showed diffuse hypokinesis; asymptomatic coronary artery spasm was evoked by the acetylcholine provocation test. Endomyocardial biopsy exhibited hypertrophic cardiomyocytes and scattered microscopic focal myocardial necrosis with amyloid-deposition. Transient ST-segment depression improved after treatment with a calcium antagonist, but cardiac contraction was still impaired. We hypothesize that asymptomatic coronary spasm may cause irreversible cardiac damage and heart failure with amyloid-deposition; the presence or absence of coronary spasm in heart failure patients should be clarified in order to determine therapeutic strategy.

  13. Main tributaries of the coronary sinus in the adult human heart.

    PubMed

    Duda, B; Grzybiak, M

    1998-01-01

    The coronary sinus collects blood from the heart walls. It is a structure which presently plays a very important clinical role in invasive cardology. In this study, the occurrence of the main tributaries of the coronary sinus was examined as wall as the topography of their outlet portions. Material consistied of 150 adult human hearts of both sexes from aged 18 to 85 years. In the examined material, the graet and middle cardiac veins as well as the posterior vein of the left ventricle were always obserwed. The remaining tributaries of the coronary sinus were less stable. The outlet portions of the main veins of the heart were characterized by significant variability.

  14. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  15. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  16. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  17. Association between Six Minute Walk Test and All-Cause Mortality, Coronary Heart Disease-Specific Mortality, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanyar, Ali; Aziz, Michael M; Enright, Paul L; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Boudreau, Robert; Sutton-Tyrell, Kim; Kuller, Lewis; Newman, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between six-minute walk test (6 MWT) performance and all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, and incident coronary heart disease in older adults. Methods We conducted a time-to-event analysis of 1,665 Cardiovascular Health Study participants with a 6 MWT and without prevalent cardiovascular disease. Results During a mean follow-up of 8 years, there were 305 incident coronary heart disease events, 504 deaths of which 100 were coronary heart disease-related deaths. The 6 MWT performance in the shortest two distance quintiles was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (290-338 meters: HR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5; <290 meters: HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0). The adjusted risk of coronary heart disease mortality incident events among those with a 6 MWT <290 meters was not significant. Discussion Performance on the 6 MWT is independently associated with all-cause mortality and is of prognostic utility in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:24695552

  18. Heart transplant for anomalous origin of left coronary artery from pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Nair, Kiron K S; Zisman, Lawrence S; Lader, Ellis; Dimova, Aneta; Canver, Charles C

    2003-01-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery is a congenital coronary artery malformation most commonly present in infancy. A variety of surgical procedures have been described to achieve physiological correction of the coronary flow abnormalities. These techniques are effective as long as there is potential for myocardial recovery. However the sequelae of chronic myocardial ischemia that characterize this entity often irreversibly damage the heart and preclude correction and palliation of the native anomaly. In this type of setting, heart transplantation is a realistic option. Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) occasionally presents in adulthood. Anatomic repair with a two coronary artery system may not be optimal in patients presenting with ischemic cardiomyopathy. We report an adult patient with platelet factor 4 (PF4) antibodies who underwent orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) for ALCAPA.

  19. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies.

  20. Milk and other dietary influences on coronary heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    While dietary links to ischemic heart disease (IHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality have been studied for many years, the correlation has not clearly been resolved, especially for older populations. In this paper, a multi-country statistical approach involving 32 countries is used to find dietary links to IHD and CHD for various age groups aged 35+. For IHD, milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+, while for females aged 35-64, sugar was found to have the highest association. In the case of CHD, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65-74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations, and for females aged 45-64, sugar had the highest association. A number of mechanisms have been proposed in the literature that might explain the milk carbohydrate or non-fat milk association. One of the most prominent theories is that animal proteins contribute to homocysteine (Hcy) production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert Hcy to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with Hcy from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries.

  1. Procedure for decellularization of porcine heart by retrograde coronary perfusion.

    PubMed

    Remlinger, Nathaniel T; Wearden, Peter D; Gilbert, Thomas W

    2012-12-06

    Perfusion-based whole organ decellularization has recently gained interest in the field of tissue engineering as a means to create site-specific extracellular matrix scaffolds, while largely preserving the native architecture of the scaffold. To date, this approach has been utilized in a variety of organ systems, including the heart, lung, and liver (1-5). Previous decellularization methods for tissues without an easily accessible vascular network have relied upon prolonged exposure of tissue to solutions of detergents, acids, or enzymatic treatments as a means to remove the cellular and nuclear components from the surrounding extracellular environment(6-8). However, the effectiveness of these methods hinged upon the ability of the solutions to permeate the tissue via diffusion. In contrast, perfusion of organs through the natural vascular system effectively reduced the diffusion distance and facilitated transport of decellularization agents into the tissue and cellular components out of the tissue. Herein, we describe a method to fully decellularize an intact porcine heart through coronary retrograde perfusion. The protocol yielded a fully decellularized cardiac extracellular matrix (c-ECM) scaffold with the three-dimensional structure of the heart intact. Our method used a series of enzymes, detergents, and acids coupled with hypertonic and hypotonic rinses to aid in the lysis and removal of cells. The protocol used a Trypsin solution to detach cells from the matrix followed by Triton X-100 and sodium deoxycholate solutions to aid in removal of cellular material. The described protocol also uses perfusion speeds of greater than 2 L/min for extended periods of time. The high flow rate, coupled with solution changes allowed transport of agents to the tissue without contamination of cellular debris and ensured effective rinsing of the tissue. The described method removed all nuclear material from native porcine cardiac tissue, creating a site-specific cardiac ECM

  2. Low job control and risk of coronary heart disease in Whitehall II (prospective cohort) study.

    PubMed Central

    Bosma, H.; Marmot, M. G.; Hemingway, H.; Nicholson, A. C.; Brunner, E.; Stansfeld, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between adverse psychosocial characteristics at work and risk of coronary heart disease among male and female civil servants. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study (Whitehall II study). At the baseline examination (1985-8) and twice during follow up a self report questionnaire provided information on psychosocial factors of the work environment and coronary heart disease. Independent assessments of the work environment were obtained from personnel managers at baseline. Mean length of follow up was 5.3 years. SETTING: London based office staff in 20 civil service departments. SUBJECTS: 10,308 civil servants aged 35-55 were examined-6895 men (67%) and 3413 women (33%). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: New cases of angina (Rose questionnaire), severe pain across the chest, diagnosed ischaemic heart disease, and any coronary event. RESULTS: Men and women with low job control, either self reported or independently assessed, had a higher risk of newly reported coronary heart disease during follow up. Job control assessed on two occasions three years apart, although intercorrelated, had cumulative effects on newly reported disease. Subjects with low job control on both occasions had an odds ratio for any subsequent coronary event of 1.93 (95% confidence interval 1.34 to 2.77) compared with subjects with high job control at both occasions. This association could not be explained by employment grade, negative affectivity, or classic coronary risk factors. Job demands and social support at work were not related to the risk of coronary heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: Low control in the work environment is associated with an increased risk of future coronary heart disease among men and women employed in government offices. The cumulative effect of low job control assessed on two occasions indicates that giving employees more variety in tasks and a stronger say in decisions about work may decrease the risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:9055714

  3. Social Support, Heart Failure, and Acute Coronary Syndromes: The Role of Inflammatory Markers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-03

    diabetes mellitus) Aortic stenosis Chronic hypertension Infiltrative cardiomyopathies Abnormal heart valves Genetic conditions Infection...result from hypertension, obesity, diabetes, valve disease, or coronary disease. Valve disease, especially aortic stenosis , increases risk of HF 7

  4. Nonspecific electrocardiographic abnormality as a predictor of coronary heart disease: the Framingham Study.

    PubMed

    Kannel, W B; Anderson, K; McGee, D L; Degatano, L S; Stampfer, M J

    1987-02-01

    The risk of developing overt coronary heart disease is examined in relation to occurrence of non-specific electrocardiographic S-T and T-wave abnormalities (NSA-ECG) in the Framingham Study. In the course of follow-up, 14% of the 5127 men and women had or developed NSA-ECG without clinically apparent intervening coronary heart disease. During 30 years of surveillance, 760 men and 578 women developed a first overt clinical manifestation of coronary heart disease. NSA-ECG appears to be a hallmark of a compromised coronary circulation which predicted the occurrence of every clinical manifestation of coronary heart disease independently of known risk factors including hypertension, its chief determinant. Coronary morbidity and mortality was increased twofold in each sex. The more common T-wave abnormality alone carried a significant increased risk, although the combination of S-T and T-wave seemed most hazardous. Persons who develop NSA-ECG without other explanation warrant vigorous preventive management against coronary heart disease.

  5. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Heran, Balraj S; Chen, Jenny MH; Ebrahim, Shah; Moxham, Tiffany; Oldridge, Neil; Rees, Karen; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) worldwide is one of great concern to patients and healthcare agencies alike. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patients with heart disease to health. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) on mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life of patients with CHD. Search methods RCTs have been identified by searching CENTRAL, HTA, and DARE (using The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009), as well as MEDLINE (1950 to December 2009), EMBASE (1980 to December 2009), CINAHL (1982 to December 2009), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to December 2009). Selection criteria Men and women of all ages who have had myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), or who have angina pectoris or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected and data extracted independently by two reviewers. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results This systematic review has allowed analysis of 47 studies randomising 10,794 patients to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation or usual care. In medium to longer term (i.e. 12 or more months follow-up) exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduced overall and cardiovascular mortality [RR 0.87 (95% CI 0.75, 0.99) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.87), respectively], and hospital admissions [RR 0.69 (95% CI 0.51, 0.93)] in the shorter term (< 12 months follow-up) with no evidence of heterogeneity of effect across trials. Cardiac rehabilitation did not reduce the risk of total MI, CABG or PTCA. Given both the heterogeneity in outcome measures and methods of reporting findings, a meta-analysis was not undertaken for health-related quality of life. In seven out of 10 trials reporting health

  6. Current Role of Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Without Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Muñoz, Oscar C; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-02-01

    Increase in heart rate represents a significant contribution in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, by promoting atherosclerotic process and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, it negatively influences cardiovascular risk in the general population. The aim of this review is to analyze the current, controversial, and future role of ivabradine as an anti-anginal agent in the setting of coronary artery disease without heart failure. Ivabradine represents a selective heart rate-lowering agent that increased diastolic perfusion time and improving energetics in the ischemic myocardium.

  7. Resting Heart Rate and Coronary Artery Calcium in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Manson, JoAnn E.; Aragaki, Aaron; Eaton, Charles B.; Hsai, Judith; Phillips, Lawrence; Kuller, Lewis; Trevisan, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To test the hypothesis of a significant association between resting heart rate (RHR) and coronary artery calcium (CAC). Methods This is a cross-sectional study of a subset of women enrolled in the estrogen-alone clinical trial of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). We used a longitudinal study that enrolled 998 postmenopausal women with a history of hysterectomy between the ages of 50 and 59 at enrollment at 40 different clinical centers. RHR was measured at enrollment and throughout the study, and CAC was determined approximately 7 years after the baseline clinic visit. Results The mean (standard deviation [SD]) age was 55 (2.8) years. With adjustment for age and ethnicity, a 10-unit increment in RHR was significantly associated with CAC (SD 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.38), but this was no longer significant after adjustment for body mass index (BMI), income, education, dyslipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and hypertension (SD 1.06, 95% CI 0.90-1.25). In a fully adjusted multivariable model, however, there was a significant interaction (p=0.03) between baseline RHR and systolic blood pressure (SBP) for the presence of any CAC. Compared to women with an RHR < 80 beats per minute (BPM) and an SBP < 140 mm Hg, those who had an RHR ≥ 80 BPM and an SBP ≥ 140 mm Hg had 2.66-fold higher odds (1.08-6.57) for the presence of any CAC. Conclusions Compared to those with normal BP and RHR, postmenopausal, hysterectomized women with an elevated SBP and RHR have a significantly higher odds for the presence of calcified coronary artery disease. PMID:21438696

  8. Significance of a positive family history for coronary heart disease in patients with a zero coronary artery calcium score (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Randy; Budoff, Matthew; McClelland, Robyn L; Sillau, Stefan; Burke, Gregory; Blaha, Michael; Szklo, Moyses; Uretsky, Seth; Rozanski, Alan; Shea, Steven

    2014-10-15

    Although a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score of 0 is associated with a very low 10-year risk for cardiac events, this risk is nonzero. Subjects with a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been associated with more subclinical atherosclerosis than subjects without a family history of CHD. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of a family history for CHD in subjects with a CAC score of 0. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis cohort includes 6,814 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline. Positive family history was defined as reporting a parent, sibling, or child who had a heart attack. Time to incident CHD or CVD event was modeled using the multivariable Cox regression; 3,185 subjects were identified from the original Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis cohort as having a baseline CAC score of 0 (mean age 58 years, 37% men). Over a median follow-up of 10 years, 101 participants (3.2%) had CVD events and 56 (1.8%) had CHD events. In age- and gender-adjusted analyses, a family history of CHD was associated with an ∼70% increase in CVD (hazard ratio 1.73, 95% confidence interval 1.17 to 2.56) and CHD (hazard ratio 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 2.91) events. CVD events remained significant after further adjustment for ethnicity, risk factors, and baseline medication use. In conclusion, asymptomatic subjects with a 0 CAC score and a positive family history of CHD are at increased risk for CVD and CHD events compared with those without a family history of CHD, although absolute event rates remain low.

  9. Acute myocardial infarction in a patient with anomalous origin of the right coronary artery: depiction at whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography and delayed-enhanced imaging.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuichi; Matsumoto, Naoya; Kunimasa, Taeko; Tani, Shigemasa; Tachibana, Eizo; Kikushima, Kimio; Nagao, Ken; Saito, Satoshi; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2008-12-17

    A 71-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of anterior chest pain. His electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and cardiac enzymes were normal. Non-ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction was suspected and whole-heart magnetic resonance imaging was performed. Whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left sinus of Valsalva and delayed-enhanced imaging showed transmural hyperenhancement of the inferior wall. Coronary angiography revealed the anomalous origin of the right coronary artery (RCA) from the left sinus of Valsalva and occlusion in the proximal portion of the RCA. Coronary revascularization was achieved by intracoronary thrombolysis followed by stent implantation. Whole-heart coronary MRA and delayed-enhanced imaging allows simultaneous assessment of coronary artery anomaly and extent of myocardial infarction.

  10. [Mechanisms of coronary flow recovery in the isolated heart during reperfusion with cardioprotective liposomal emoxipin form].

    PubMed

    Toropova, Ia G; Antonova, L V; Mukhamadiiarov, R A; Bogdanov, M V; Golovkin, A S

    2013-06-01

    In the experiments on the isolated perfused rat heart the effects of liposomes, containing different concentrations (0.25 and 0.1 mg/mL) of emoxipine, on coronary flow restoration after total normothermic ischemia and reperfusion were studied. The coronary flow, levels of nitrates and nitrites in the outflowing perfusate from heart and level of free radical processes were assessed, The obtained results showed that 0.1 mg/mL liposomal emoxipine provide with stronger increase coronary flow during reperfusion mostly due to the increase concentration of endothelial nitric oxide compare with treatments at 0.25 mg/mL.

  11. Study on cholesteryl ester transfer activity in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fujinuma, Y; Tanaka, A; Maezawa, H

    1991-09-01

    The net cholesterol transfer activity from high density lipoprotein (HDL) to low density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in the patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) to examine its effect on the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Furthermore, in the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia (more than 60 mg/dl), the HDL particle size was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. A significant cholesteryl ester transfer activity (P less than 0.02) was noted in the CHD patients with low HDL cholesterolemia (less than 60 mg/dl). The rate of cholesteryl ester transfer activity (cholesteryl ester transfer activity/hour) inversely correlated with the serum HDL cholesterol value (r = -0.483, P = 0.096) in the patients with CHD. These results suggest that an increase of CETA caused a low HDL cholesterol value in the CHD patients with low HDL cholesterolemia and it may have the risk of causing CHD. However, an increase of the CETA was not found in the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia compared to the normal subjects, the HDL particle size being significantly greater than that in the normal subjects. In the CHD patients with high HDL cholesterolemia, the large size of HDL may have the risk of causing CHD.

  12. Spirituality and Negative Emotions in Individuals With Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ginting, Henndy; Näring, Gérard; Kwakkenbos, Linda; Becker, Eni S

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) experience disease-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anger. Spirituality may be helpful to cope with these negative emotions. Research findings on the role of spirituality in dealing with negative emotions are inconsistent. In this study, we examined the associations between 7 dimensions of spirituality (ie, meaningfulness, trust, acceptance, caring for others, connectedness with nature, transcendent experiences, and spiritual activities) and negative emotions among individuals with CHD in Indonesia, controlling for perceived social support as well as demographic and clinical characteristics. In total, 293 individuals with CHD were recruited from the 3 largest hospitals in Bandung, Indonesia. They completed the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Trait Anxiety Scale of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Multidimensional Anger Inventory, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated that a higher overall level of spirituality was associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms, less anxiety, and less anger. Specifically, a higher level of trust was significantly associated with both less depressive symptoms and less anxiety. Higher levels of caring for others and spiritual activities were associated with less anxiety, and a higher level of connectedness with nature was associated with less anger. These findings underscore the importance of specific dimensions of spirituality as a potentially independent buffer against negative emotions in individuals with CHD.

  13. Epidemiological basis for the prevention of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Marmot, M. G.

    1979-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have laid the basis for a preventive approach to coronary heart disease (CHD). On balance, present evidence indicates that the following should form the basis of a preventive programme: low-fat diet, cessation of smoking, and control of blood pressure. Other factors likely to produce a beneficial effect on CHD occurrence include reduction of obesity and increased physical activity. Although psychosocial factors are most likely to be causally related to CHD, it is not possible at present to provide clear guidelines as to their role in a preventive programme. Trials are being conducted to investigate the possibility of preventing CHD by a variety of approaches: a doctor-centred approach or health education in certain sectors of a community or in whole communities. These trials have shown that it is possible to achieve behavioural changes and a reduction in the levels of risk factors in a proportion of the participants. It is not yet clear to what extent these changes in levels of risk factors in middle-aged people will lead to a reduction in the incidence of CHD. It can be calculated, however, that the greatest benefit is likely to come from approaches to prevention that involve the whole community, rather than only high-risk groups. PMID:314348

  14. Effects of whole grains on coronary heart disease risk.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kristina A; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2010-11-01

    Characterizing which types of carbohydrates, including whole grains, reduce the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) is challenging. Whole grains are characterized as being high in resistant carbohydrates as compared with refined grains, meaning they typically are high in fiber, nutrients, and bound antioxidants. Whole grain intake consistently has been associated with improved cardiovascular disease outcomes, but also with healthy lifestyles, in large observational studies. Intervention studies that assess the effects of whole grains on biomarkers for CHD have mixed results. Due to the varying nutrient compositions of different whole grains, each could potentially affect CHD risk via different mechanisms. Whole grains high in viscous fiber (oats, barley) decrease serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure and improve glucose and insulin responses. Grains high in insoluble fiber (wheat) moderately lower glucose and blood pressure but also have a prebiotic effect. Obesity is inversely related to whole grain intake, but intervention studies with whole grains have not produced weight loss. Visceral fat, however, may be affected favorably. Grain processing improves palatability and can have varying effects on nutrition (e.g., the process of milling and grinding flour increases glucose availability and decreases phytochemical content whereas thermal processing increases available antioxidants). Understanding how individual grains, in both natural and processed states, affect CHD risk can inform nutrition recommendations and policies and ultimately benefit public health.

  15. [Is hypertriglyceridaemia a risk factor for coronary heart disease?].

    PubMed

    Reiner, Zeljko; Muacević-Katanec, Diana; Katanec, Davor; Tedeschi-Reiner, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Although it is still not clear whether elevated serum triglycerides are directly atherogenic or not, the results of many studies indicate that they are undoubtedly an important risk factor/biomarker for coronary heart disease (CHD). Therefore, targeting hypertriglyceridaemia should be beneficial for subjects at high risk for CHD. Elevated triglycerides are often accompanied with low HDL cholesterol, particularly in high risk patients with diabetes type 2 and/or metabolic syndrome. Such a disturbance is called atherogenic dyslipidaemia and has an increasing prevalence. The treatment of hypertriglyceridaemia has to be focused primarily on intensive lifestyle changes (weight reduction in obesity, reduction of alcohol consumption as well as reduction of added sugars, fructose and trans-fatty acids, regular aerobic physical activity) by which reduction of up to 50% in triglycerides can be achieved. Subjects with high CHD risk who cannot lower hypertriglyceridaemia by lifestyle measures should be treated with pharmacological therapy. The available medications include fibrates, niacin and prescription omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. If LDL cholesterol is elevated too, combination therapy is needed. Based upon recent studies in such patients a combination of a statin with fenofibrate and/or omega-3 fatty acids can be recommended.

  16. Coronary heart disease in women: why the disproportionate risk?

    PubMed

    Colhoun, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Women with diabetes experience much greater relative risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) compared with the nondiabetic population than do men with diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, much of the greater elevation in risk in women is explained by a more adverse pattern of known CHD risk factors. In type 1 diabetes the picture is less clear, but current evidence suggests that a cardioprotective lipid profile is found in type 1 diabetic men, thus reducing the effect of diabetes on CHD, but that in women this is not the case. Also, in type 1 diabetic women there is some evidence of altered body fat distribution and a greater elevation in blood pressure. Whether these reflect a greater degree of insulin resistance in type 1 women, and what the origin of this might be, remains controversial. The practical consequence is that clinicians need to be aware that the usual cardioprotective effect of sex does not apply in diabetic women and that risk factor intervention is needed at an early age.

  17. Hypercholesterolemia increases coronary endothelial dysfunction, lipid content, and accelerated atherosclerosis after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Perrault, L P; Mahlberg, F; Breugnot, C; Bidouard, J P; Villeneuve, N; Vilaine, J P; Vanhoutte, P M

    2000-03-01

    Hyperlipidemia may increase endothelial damage and promote accelerated atherogenesis in graft coronary vasculopathy. To study the effects of hypercholesterolemia on coronary endothelial dysfunction, intimal hyperplasia, and lipid content, a porcine model of heterotopic heart transplantation, allowing nonacute rejection without immunosuppressive drugs, was used. A high cholesterol diet was fed to donor and recipient swine 1 month before and after transplantation. The endothelial function of coronary arteries of native and transplanted hearts from cholesterol-fed animals was studied in organ chambers 30 days after implantation and compared with endothelial function in arteries from animals fed a normal diet. The total serum cholesterol increased 3-fold in donors and recipients. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to serotonin, to the alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist UK14,304, and to the direct G-protein activator sodium fluoride were decreased significantly in allografted hearts compared with native hearts from both groups. Relaxations to the calcium ionophore A23187 and bradykinin were decreased significantly in allografts from animals fed the high cholesterol diet. The prevalence of intimal hyperplasia was significantly increased in coronary arteries from hypercholesterolemic swine. There was a significant increase in the lipid content of allograft arteries of hypercholesterolemic recipients. Hypercholesterolemia causes a general coronary endothelial dysfunction, increases the prevalence of intimal hyperplasia, and augments the incorporation of lipids in the vascular wall after heart transplantation. Hyperlipidemia accelerates graft coronary atherosclerosis through its effects on the endothelium.

  18. Abnormalities of capillary microarchitecture in a rat model of coronary ischemic congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiqiu; Yaniz-Galende, Elisa; Kagan, Heather J; Liang, Lifan; Hekmaty, Saboor; Giannarelli, Chiara; Hajjar, Roger

    2015-04-15

    The aim of the present study is to explore the role of capillary disorder in coronary ischemic congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF was induced in rats by aortic banding plus ischemia-reperfusion followed by aortic debanding. Coronary arteries were perfused with plastic polymer containing fluorescent dye. Multiple fluorescent images of casted heart sections and scanning electric microscope of coronary vessels were obtained to characterize changes in the heart. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. Stenosis was found in all levels of the coronary arteries in CHF. Coronary vasculature volume and capillary density in remote myocardium were significantly increased in CHF compared with control. This occurred largely in microvessels with a diameter of ≤3 μm. Capillaries in CHF had a tortuous structure, while normal capillaries were linear. Capillaries in CHF had inconsistent diameters, with assortments of narrowed and bulged segments. Their surfaces appeared rough, potentially indicating endothelial dysfunction in CHF. Segments of main capillaries between bifurcations were significantly shorter in length in CHF than in control. Transiently increasing preload by injecting 50 μl of 30% NaCl demonstrated that the CHF heart had lower functional reserve; this may be associated with congestion in coronary microcirculation. Ischemic coronary vascular disorder is not limited to the main coronary arteries, as it occurs in arterioles and capillaries. Capillary disorder in CHF included stenosis, deformed structure, proliferation, and roughened surfaces. This disorder in the coronary artery architecture may contribute to the reduction in myocyte contractility in the setting of heart failure.

  19. Abnormalities of capillary microarchitecture in a rat model of coronary ischemic congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiqiu; Yaniz-Galende, Elisa; Kagan, Heather J.; Liang, Lifan; Hekmaty, Saboor; Giannarelli, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the role of capillary disorder in coronary ischemic congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF was induced in rats by aortic banding plus ischemia-reperfusion followed by aortic debanding. Coronary arteries were perfused with plastic polymer containing fluorescent dye. Multiple fluorescent images of casted heart sections and scanning electric microscope of coronary vessels were obtained to characterize changes in the heart. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. Stenosis was found in all levels of the coronary arteries in CHF. Coronary vasculature volume and capillary density in remote myocardium were significantly increased in CHF compared with control. This occurred largely in microvessels with a diameter of ≤3 μm. Capillaries in CHF had a tortuous structure, while normal capillaries were linear. Capillaries in CHF had inconsistent diameters, with assortments of narrowed and bulged segments. Their surfaces appeared rough, potentially indicating endothelial dysfunction in CHF. Segments of main capillaries between bifurcations were significantly shorter in length in CHF than in control. Transiently increasing preload by injecting 50 μl of 30% NaCl demonstrated that the CHF heart had lower functional reserve; this may be associated with congestion in coronary microcirculation. Ischemic coronary vascular disorder is not limited to the main coronary arteries, as it occurs in arterioles and capillaries. Capillary disorder in CHF included stenosis, deformed structure, proliferation, and roughened surfaces. This disorder in the coronary artery architecture may contribute to the reduction in myocyte contractility in the setting of heart failure. PMID:25659485

  20. Self-management of coronary heart disease in older patients after elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dawkes, Susan; Smith, Graeme D; Elliott, Lawrie; Raeside, Robert; Donaldson, Jayne H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore how older patients self-manage their coronary heart disease (CHD) after undergoing elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Methods This mixed methods study used a sequential, explanatory design and recruited a convenience sample of patients (n = 93) approximately three months after elective PTCA. The study was conducted in two phases. Quantitative data collected in Phase 1 by means of a self-administered survey were subject to univariate and bivariate analysis. Phase 1 findings informed the purposive sampling for Phase 2 where ten participants were selected from the original sample for an in-depth interview. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. This paper will primarily report the findings from a sub-group of older participants (n = 47) classified as 65 years of age or older. Results 78.7% (n = 37) of participants indicated that they would manage recurring angina symptoms by taking glyceryl trinitrate and 34% (n = 16) thought that resting would help. Regardless of the duration or severity of the symptoms 40.5% (n = 19) would call their general practitioner or an emergency ambulance for assistance during any recurrence of angina symptoms. Older participants weighed less (P = 0.02) and smoked less (P = 0.01) than their younger counterparts in the study. Age did not seem to affect PTCA patients' likelihood of altering dietary factors such as fruit, vegetable and saturated fat consumption (P = 0.237). Conclusions The findings suggest that older people in the study were less likely to know how to correctly manage any recurring angina symptoms than their younger counterparts but they had fewer risk factors for CHD. Age was not a factor that influenced participants' likelihood to alter lifestyle factors. PMID:27594866

  1. Whole Heart Coronary Imaging with Flexible Acquisition Window and Trigger Delay

    PubMed Central

    Kawaji, Keigo; Foppa, Murilo; Roujol, Sébastien; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires a correctly timed trigger delay derived from a scout cine scan to synchronize k-space acquisition with the quiescent period of the cardiac cycle. However, heart rate changes between breath-held cine and free-breathing coronary imaging may result in inaccurate timing errors. Additionally, the determined trigger delay may not reflect the period of minimal motion for both left and right coronary arteries or different segments. In this work, we present a whole-heart coronary imaging approach that allows flexible selection of the trigger delay timings by performing k-space sampling over an enlarged acquisition window. Our approach addresses coronary motion in an interactive manner by allowing the operator to determine the temporal window with minimal cardiac motion for each artery region. An electrocardiogram-gated, k-space segmented 3D radial stack-of-stars sequence that employs a custom rotation angle is developed. An interactive reconstruction and visualization platform is then employed to determine the subset of the enlarged acquisition window for minimal coronary motion. Coronary MRI was acquired on eight healthy subjects (5 male, mean age = 37 ± 18 years), where an enlarged acquisition window of 166–220 ms was set 50 ms prior to the scout-derived trigger delay. Coronary visualization and sharpness scores were compared between the standard 120 ms window set at the trigger delay, and those reconstructed using a manually adjusted window. The proposed method using manual adjustment was able to recover delineation of five mid and distal right coronary artery regions that were otherwise not visible from the standard window, and the sharpness scores improved in all coronary regions using the proposed method. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a whole-heart coronary imaging approach that allows interactive selection of any subset of the enlarged acquisition window for a tailored reconstruction for each branch

  2. Whole heart coronary imaging with flexible acquisition window and trigger delay.

    PubMed

    Kawaji, Keigo; Foppa, Murilo; Roujol, Sébastien; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires a correctly timed trigger delay derived from a scout cine scan to synchronize k-space acquisition with the quiescent period of the cardiac cycle. However, heart rate changes between breath-held cine and free-breathing coronary imaging may result in inaccurate timing errors. Additionally, the determined trigger delay may not reflect the period of minimal motion for both left and right coronary arteries or different segments. In this work, we present a whole-heart coronary imaging approach that allows flexible selection of the trigger delay timings by performing k-space sampling over an enlarged acquisition window. Our approach addresses coronary motion in an interactive manner by allowing the operator to determine the temporal window with minimal cardiac motion for each artery region. An electrocardiogram-gated, k-space segmented 3D radial stack-of-stars sequence that employs a custom rotation angle is developed. An interactive reconstruction and visualization platform is then employed to determine the subset of the enlarged acquisition window for minimal coronary motion. Coronary MRI was acquired on eight healthy subjects (5 male, mean age = 37 ± 18 years), where an enlarged acquisition window of 166-220 ms was set 50 ms prior to the scout-derived trigger delay. Coronary visualization and sharpness scores were compared between the standard 120 ms window set at the trigger delay, and those reconstructed using a manually adjusted window. The proposed method using manual adjustment was able to recover delineation of five mid and distal right coronary artery regions that were otherwise not visible from the standard window, and the sharpness scores improved in all coronary regions using the proposed method. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a whole-heart coronary imaging approach that allows interactive selection of any subset of the enlarged acquisition window for a tailored reconstruction for each branch

  3. A Group Therapy Approach to the Treatment of Coronary Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Grace S.

    This study investigates the coronary heart patient's "here and now" feelings and attitudes toward his illness prior to and following group treatment. This study also attempts to investigate the change in a patient's acceptance of his heart condition. To measure the change in general health level, a questionnaire was administered to eight patients…

  4. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  5. Phytosterol plasma concentrations and coronary heart disease in the prospective Spanish EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Escurriol, Verónica; Cofán, Montserrat; Moreno-Iribas, Concepción; Larrañaga, Nerea; Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Rodríguez, Laudina; González, Carlos A.; Corella, Dolores; Ros, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Phytosterol intake with natural foods, a measure of healthy dietary choices, increases plasma levels, but increased plasma phytosterols are believed to be a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor. To address this paradox, we evaluated baseline risk factors, phytosterol intake, and plasma noncholesterol sterol levels in participants of a case control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Spanish cohort who developed CHD (n = 299) and matched controls (n = 584) who remained free of CHD after a 10 year follow-up. Sitosterol-to-cholesterol ratios increased across tertiles of phytosterol intake (P = 0.026). HDL-cholesterol level increased, and adiposity measures, cholesterol/HDL ratios, and levels of glucose, triglycerides, and lathosterol, a cholesterol synthesis marker, decreased across plasma sitosterol tertiles (P < 0.02; all). Compared with controls, cases had nonsignificantly lower median levels of phytosterol intake and plasma sitosterol. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio for CHD across the lowest to highest plasma sitosterol tertile was 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.36–0.97). Associations were weaker for plasma campesterol. The apolipoprotein E genotype was unrelated to CHD risk or plasma phytosterols. The data suggest that plasma sitosterol levels are associated with a lower CHD risk while being markers of a lower cardiometabolic risk in the EPIC-Spain cohort, a population with a high phytosterol intake. PMID:19786566

  6. Disclosing genetic risk for coronary heart disease: effects on perceived personal control and genetic counseling satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C L; Jouni, H; Kruisselbrink, T M; Austin, E E; Christensen, K D; Green, R C; Kullo, I J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether disclosure of coronary heart disease (CHD) genetic risk influences perceived personal control (PPC) and genetic counseling satisfaction (GCS). Participants (n = 207, age: 45-65 years) were randomized to receive estimated 10-year risk of CHD based on a conventional risk score (CRS) with or without a genetic risk score (GRS). Risk estimates were disclosed by a genetic counselor who also reviewed how GRS altered risk in those randomized to CRS+GRS. Each participant subsequently met with a physician and then completed surveys to assess PPC and GCS. Participants who received CRS+GRS had higher PPC than those who received CRS alone although the absolute difference was small (25.2 ± 2.7 vs 24.1 ± 3.8, p = 0.04). A greater proportion of CRS+GRS participants had higher GCS scores (17.3 ± 5.3 vs 15.9 ± 6.3, p = 0.06). In the CRS+GRS group, PPC and GCS scores were not correlated with GRS. Within both groups, PPC and GCS scores were similar in patients with or without family history (p = NS). In conclusion, patients who received their genetic risk of CHD had higher PPC and tended to have higher GCS. Our findings suggest that disclosure of genetic risk of CHD together with conventional risk estimates is appreciated by patients. Whether this results in improved outcomes needs additional investigation.

  7. Assessment of coronary heart diseases in diabetics in al-Madinah al-Munawarah

    PubMed Central

    al-Nozha, Omar; Mojadadi, Moaz; Mosaad, Mohamed; El-Bab, Mohamed F

    2012-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease is highly prevalent and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to assess the major risk factors and their predictor score for coronary heart diseases in diabetic patients. Methods The present study was conducted in al-Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Using a cross-sectional case control study, 262 outpatient diabetics and 264 matched control subjects were examined for the risk factors and risk predictor scores for ischemic heart disease. The mean age of the patient and control groups was 49.61 ± 12.93 years and 48.39 ± 11.60 years, respectively. Results Diabetic patients had significantly higher positive family history of diabetes, but no significant difference regarding their family history of hypertension. There was a significantly higher body mass index (33.67 kg/m2), glycosylated hemoglobin (7.26%), significantly higher cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride in diabetics compared to control. Diabetic patients had higher risk for developing coronary heart disease with a mean risk score of 6.07 while the control subject risk score was −6.81. However, females showed significantly higher risk for coronary heart diseases than did males. Conclusion Our study replicates the known fact of higher risk in diabetes, but higher risk of coronary heart disease in female diabetics compared with male diabetics. PMID:22393300

  8. Association of dietary fat and carbohydrate consumption and predicted ten-year risk for developing coronary heart disease in a general Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Minoura, Akira; Wang, Da-Hong; Sato, Yoshie; Zou, Yu; Sakano, Noriko; Kubo, Masayuki; Takemoto, Kei; Masatomi, Chie; Ogino, Keiki

    2014-01-01

    We examined the relationships between dietary carbohydrate, protein, fat, and the ratio of n6/n3 fatty acid intakes with the predicted 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in a general Japanese population. We used the Framingham risk score to determine the 10-year CHD risk of the subjects, who were employees of 6 companies in a single prefecture in Japan. After excluding the subjects who reported any history of angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, diabetes, or cancer, and those with missing data resulting in the inability of estimation of 10-year CHD risk and food intakes, the final data analysis was carried out for 809 subjects. The logistic regression models revealed a significantly increased odds ratio of 10-year CHD risk in the subjects with the highest tertile of carbohydrate intake (% energy) (odds ratio 3.64, 95% CI, 2.07-6.40); after adjustment for other variables, the odds ratio for the 10-year CHD risk was also higher in the subjects with the highest tertile of carbohydrate intake (odds ratio 1.72, 95% CI, 0.70-4.25). We also found that fat intake and the ratio of n6/n3 fatty acids were inversely associated with the predicted 10-year CHD risk (p for trend<0.01). The present findings added evidence of a positive association of dietary carbohydrate and inverse associations of total fat and n6/n3 fatty acid ratio with the predicted 10-year CHD risk in a general Japanese population.

  9. Chlamydia pneumoniae IgG titres and coronary heart disease: prospective study and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, John; Whincup, Peter; Walker, Mary; Lennon, Lucy; Thomson, Andrew; Appleby, Paul; Wong, Yuk-ki; Bernardes-Silva, Martine; Ward, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between coronary heart disease and serum markers of chronic Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. Design “Nested” case-control analysis in a prospective cohort study and an updated meta-analysis of previous relevant studies. Setting General practices in 18 towns in Britain. Participants Of the 5661 men aged 40-59 who provided blood samples during 1978-80, 496 men who died from coronary heart disease or had non-fatal myocardial infarction and 989 men who had not developed coronary heart disease by 1996 were included. Main outcome measures IgG serum antibodies to C pneumoniae in baseline samples; details of fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease from medical records and death certificates. Results 200 (40%) of the 496 men with coronary heart disease were in the top third of C pneumoniae titres compared with 329 (33%) of the 989 controls. The corresponding odds ratio for coronary heart disease was 1.66 (95% confidence interval 1.25 to 2.21), which fell to 1.22 (0.82 to 1.82) after adjustment for smoking and indicators of socioeconomic status. No strong associations were observed between C pneumoniae IgG titres and blood lipid concentrations, blood pressure, or plasma homocysteine concentration. In aggregate, the present study and 14 other prospective studies of C pneumoniae IgG titres included 3169 cases, yielding a combined odds ratio of 1.15 (0.97 to 1.36), with no significant heterogeneity among the separate studies (χ2=10.5, df=14; P>0.1). Conclusion This study, together with a meta-analysis of previous prospective studies, reliably excludes the existence of any strong association between C pneumoniae IgG titres and incident coronary heart disease. Further studies are required, however, to confirm or refute any modest association that may exist, particularly at younger ages. PMID:10903653

  10. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J.

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  11. Dual Prosthetic Heart Valve Presented with Chest Pain: A Case Report of Coronary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Sarawut

    2015-01-01

    Coronary embolism from a prosthetic heart valve is a rare but remarkable cause of acute coronary syndrome. There is no definite management of an entity like this. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male with a history of rheumatic heart disease with dual prosthetic heart valve and atrial fibrillation who developed chest pain from acute myocardial infarction. The laboratory values showed inadequate anticoagulation. Cardiac catheterization and thrombectomy with the aspiration catheter were chosen to be the treatment for this patient, and it showed satisfactory outcome. PMID:25785203

  12. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and animations for grades K-6. The Coronary Arteries Coronary Circulation The heart muscle, like every other ... into two main coronary blood vessels (also called arteries). These coronary arteries branch off into smaller arteries, ...

  13. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  14. [DIAGNOSIS OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE CAUSED BY TORTUOSITY OF CORONARY ARTERIES].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, E O; Lazoryshynets, V V; Beshliaga, V M; Grusha, M M

    2015-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problems of diagnostics of coronary artery tortuosity phenomenon. Given the lack of literature about the role of phenomenon tortuosity of coronary arteries in the genesis of ischemic myocardial damage, the purpose of study was to determine the clinical relevance as well as necessity for prevention and treatment of this vascular anomaly. Therefore were analyzed medical history, laboratory and clinical database as well as data functional studies of the heart and cardiovascular system in 1404 patients which were divided into four groups on the results of coronary angiography. The results of the study indicate tortuosity of coronary arteries may be independent and additional burdening factor in the development of ischemic heart disease.

  15. Vascular and cardiac contractile reserve in the dog heart with chronic multiple coronary occlusions.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, F; Flameng, W; Mack, B; Türschmann, W; Schaper, W

    1976-11-01

    areas that were supplied by a normal coronary artery, whereas areas supplied by collaterals became ischemic. Opening of an aortocoronary bypass restored normal flow to previously ischemic areas, and reduced the flow to areas supplied by a normal artery. With the bypass open no differences existed between normal dogs and those with two occluded coronary arteries. We conclude that the norepinephrine-stimulated contractile reserve of hearts with chronic coronary occlusion was comparable to that of normal hearts; however, norepinephrine forced these hearts to spend the entire flow reserve of the remaining normal artery while producing ischemia in collateral-dependent areas. The same dose of norepinephrine did not require the entire flow reserve of normal dogs.

  16. [Heart rhythm disturbances in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in aggregate with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Shoĭkhet, Ia N; Klester, E B; Golovin, V A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study kinds, frequencies and features of heart rhythm disturbances (HRD) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subject to degree of severity, including presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). 1189 of patients with registered HRD were examined. 315 of them had COPD (group 1), 531--combination of COPD and CHD (group 2), 343 were CHD patients (group 3). The extent of examinations included electrocardiogram (ECG), Halter monitoring (HM), bicycle ergometry (BEM), external respiration function estimation. Supraventricular HRD were registered statistically more frequently in group 1: according to ECG data in rest - in 37.2% patients, by BEM results--in 18.8%, by HM--in 50%. Combined (supraventricular and ventricular) HRD were registered most frequently in group 2: 41.2 24.4, and 45.5% respectively. Ventricular HRD dominated in group 3: 47.6, 29.3 and 48.6% respectively. The results of the study indicate that supraventricular HRDprevaile in patients with COPD, combined HRD - in patients with COPD and CHD. Ventricular HRD, which most informatively reflect changes in intracardiac geometry and left ventricle hemodynamics, dominate in CHD patients. The optimization of therapy correction consists in early diagnostics of HRD subject to features of cardiorespiratory system functional state.

  17. Reconstitution of coronary vasculature by an active fraction of Geum japonicum in ischemic hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiaping; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Ming

    2014-02-01

    Chronic coronary heart disease (cCHD) is characterized by atherosclerosis, which progressively narrows the coronary artery lumen and impairs myocardial blood flow. Restoration of occluded coronary vessels with newly formed collaterals remains an ideal therapeutic approach due to the need for redirecting blood flow into the ischemic heart. In this study, we investigated the effect of an active fraction isolated from Geum joponicum (AFGJ) on angiogenesis in cCHD hearts. Our results demonstrated that AFGJ not only enhanced capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, but also promoted the growth of new coronary collaterals (at the diameter 0.021-0.21 mm) in the ischemic region of hearts in rat cCHD model. Our study also indicated that the growth of new collaterals in ischemic hearts resulted in improved functional recovery of the cCHD hearts as demonstrated by ECG and echocardiography analyses. These data suggest that AFGJ may provide a novel therapeutic method for effective treatment of cCHD.

  18. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease: a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    PubMed Central

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom R; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Whittaker, John C; Smith, George Davey; Dudbridge, Frank; Casas, Juan P; Holmes, Michael V; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease. We then used a conventional Mendelian randomisation approach to investigate the causal relevance using a genetic instrument based on 31 urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To account for potential pleiotropic associations of certain SNPs with risk factors other than urate, we additionally did both a multivariable Mendelian randomisation analysis, in which the genetic associations of SNPs with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were included as covariates, and an Egger Mendelian randomisation (MR-Egger) analysis to estimate a causal effect accounting for unmeasured pleiotropy. Findings In the meta-analysis of 17 prospective observational studies (166 486 individuals; 9784 coronary heart disease events) a 1 SD higher urate concentration was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for coronary heart disease of 1·07 (95% CI 1·04–1·10). The corresponding OR estimates from the conventional, multivariable adjusted, and Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis (58 studies; 198 598 individuals; 65 877 events) were 1·18 (95% CI 1·08–1·29), 1·10 (1·00–1·22), and 1·05 (0·92–1·20), respectively, per 1 SD increment in plasma urate. Interpretation Conventional and multivariate Mendelian randomisation analysis implicates a causal role for urate in the development of coronary heart disease, but these estimates might be inflated by hidden pleiotropy. Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis, which accounts for

  19. The Decline and Rise of Coronary Heart Disease: Understanding Public Health Catastrophism

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Jeremy A.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of coronary heart disease mortality in the United States and Western Europe is one of the great accomplishments of modern public health and medicine. Cardiologists and cardiovascular epidemiologists have devoted significant effort to disease surveillance and epidemiological modeling to understand its causes. One unanticipated outcome of these efforts has been the detection of early warnings that the decline had slowed, plateaued, or even reversed. These subtle signs have been interpreted as evidence of an impending public health catastrophe. This article traces the history of research on coronary heart disease decline and resurgence and situates it in broader narratives of public health catastrophism. Juxtaposing the coronary heart disease literature alongside the narratives of emerging and reemerging infectious disease helps to identify patterns in how public health researchers create data and craft them into powerful narratives of progress or pessimism. These narratives, in turn, shape public health policy. PMID:23678895

  20. Assessing the relationship between dental disease and coronary heart disease in elderly U.S. veterans.

    PubMed

    Loesche, W J; Schork, A; Terpenning, M S; Chen, Y M; Dominguez, B L; Grossman, N

    1998-03-01

    Several recent studies have shown a link between dental disease and coronary heart disease. The authors studied 320 U.S. veterans in a convenience sample to assess the relationship between oral health and systemic diseases among older people. They present cross-sectional data confirming that a statistically significant association exists between a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and certain oral health parameters, such as the number of missing teeth, plaque benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide test scores, salivary levels of Streptococcus sanguis and complaints of xerostomia. The oral parameters in these subjects were independent of and more strongly associated with coronary heart disease than were recognized risk factors, such as serum cholesterol levels, body mass index, diabetes and smoking status. However, because of the convenience sample studied, these findings cannot be generalized to other populations.

  1. THE POSSIBLE RELATIONSHIP OF OCCUPATIONAL STRESS TO CLINICAL CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, Ray H.; Friedman, Meyer

    1958-01-01

    Perhaps because of difficulties inherent in quantitation and evaluation, the possible influence of differences in personality factors and of socio-economic stresses has largely been ignored in epidemiological studies of coronary artery disease. This relationship is explored and it is shown that the major factors contributing to the development of coronary disease, including intimal damage, elevated plasma lipid content, altered hemodynamics and accelerated blood clotting, are each affected by certain types of such stresses. On the basis of the considerable clinical and experimental evidence cited, it is suggested that the increasing occupational stress unique to industrialized society plays a dominant role in the high incidence of clinical coronary heart disease. PMID:13573181

  2. Periodontitis: a risk factor for coronary heart disease?

    PubMed

    Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S; Williams, R; Gibbs, P; Garcia, R

    1998-07-01

    This paper evaluates the current information on the relationship between oral disease (specifically periodontitis) and atherosclerosis/coronary heart disease (CHD) to determine whether the information is sufficient to conclude that periodontitis is a risk factor for atherosclerosis/CHD. As background for this evaluation, the term "risk factor" is defined, and the 3 criteria used to establish exposures as risk factors are reviewed. In addition, epidemiologic criteria for defining an exposure as causal are presented. The available evidence then is evaluated according to the criteria for causality, which are extensions of the criteria for establishing a risk factor. This review is done in the context of the relationship between atherosclerosis/CHD and inflammation. A number of findings are briefly reviewed that link inflammation and atherosclerosis/CHD, such as: 1) prior flu-like symptoms were more common in cases of myocardial infarction than in concurrently sampled controls; 2) high levels of cytomegalovirus antibody titers were associated with elevated carotid intimal-medial wall thickness 18 years later; 3) prior infection with cytomegalovirus was a strong independent risk factor for restenosis after coronary atherectomy; 4) dental infections were more common in cases of cerebral infarction compared to community controls matched on age and sex; and 5) the gingival index was significantly correlated with fibrinogen and white cell counts in periodontal patients and controls, adjusted for age, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Three case-control studies and 5 longitudinal studies investigating the relationship between dental conditions and atherosclerosis/CHD are reviewed in terms of strength of associations, consistency of associations, specificity. of associations, time sequence between exposure and outcome, and degree of exposure and outcome. Related to the last criterion, new findings are presented which indicate that the extent of the periodontal infection, a

  3. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Specific Requirements for Health Claims § 101.75 Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and...

  4. A Health Education Program for Parents and Children Who Exhibit High Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopp, Joyce W.; And Others

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of joint parent-child education to change the behaviors known to be associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Earlier studies have shown that parents who are at increased risk of coronary heart disease can be identified by studying certain factors in the children. Utilizing a combined risk…

  5. 10 years of intracoronary and intramyocardial bone marrow stem cell therapy of the heart: from the methodological origin to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Strauer, Bodo-Eckehard; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2011-09-06

    Intracoronary and intramyocardial stem cell therapy aim at the repair of compromised myocardium thereby--as a causal treatment--preventing ventricular remodeling and improving overall performance. Since the first-in-human use of bone marrow stem cells (BMCs) after acute myocardial infarction in 2001, a large number of clinical studies have demonstrated their clinical benefit: BMC therapy can be performed with usual cardiac catheterization techniques in the conscious patient as well as also easily during cardiosurgical interventions. New York Heart Association severity degree of patients as well as physical activity improve in addition to ("on top" of) all other therapeutic regimens. Stem cell therapy also represents an ultimate approach in advanced cardiac failure. For acute myocardial infarction and chronic ischemia, long-term mortality after 1 and 5 years, respectively, is significantly reduced. A few studies also indicate beneficial effects for chronic dilated cardiomyopathy. The clinical use of autologous BMC therapy implies no ethical problems, when unmodified primary cells are used. With the use of primary BMCs, there are no major stem cell-related side effects, especially no cardiac arrhythmias and inflammation. Various mechanisms of the stem cell action in the human heart are discussed, for example, cell transdifferentiation, cell fusion, activation of intrinsic cardiac stem cells, and cytokine-mediated effects. New techniques allow point-of-care cell preparations, for example, within the cardiac intervention or operation theater, thereby providing short preparation time, facilitated logistics of cell transport, and reasonable cost effectiveness of the whole procedure. The 3 main indications are acute infarction, chronic ischemic heart failure, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Future studies are desirable to further elucidate the mechanisms of stem cell action and to extend the current use of intracoronary and/or intramyocardial stem cell therapy by larger and

  6. Cadmium in the blood and heart tissue of patients (smokers/non-smokers) with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Spieker, C.; Bertram, H.P.; Stratmann, T.; Achatzy, R.; Kisters, K.; Zumkley, H.

    1986-01-01

    Cadmium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human hypertension and arteriosclerotic heart disease. Various experiments showed that cadmium could influence the vasopressor-induced reactivity and the stress-strain characteristics of the blood vessel wall. Smoking is considered to be one of the risk factors in accumulating high amounts of cadmium in human organic tissue. Therefore, in the present study the cadmium content of the blood and the heart tissue was evaluated in smoking and non-smoking patients who suffered from coronary heart diseases and various vascular defects. Blood and heart tissue samples of 49 patients undergoing a heart operation were examined. The measurements were carried out with atomic absorption spectometry. Cadmium concentration in the blood was elevated significantly in smoking patients versus non-smokers. In the heart tissue samples of smoking patients cadmium was increased as well towards non-smoking patients. These data show that smoking influences the cadmium intake and it may support the opinion of different research groups that cadmium might have a toxic effect on the myocardium and that cadmium accumulation is another risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. 10 references, 1 figure.

  7. Remodeling of left circumflex coronary arterial tree in pacing-induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a very serious heart disease that manifests an imbalance between left ventricle supply and demand. Although the mechanical demand of the failing heart has been well characterized, the systematic remodeling of the entire coronary arterial tree that constitutes the supply of the myocardium is lacking. We hypothesize that the well-known increase in ventricle wall stress during CHF causes coronary vascular rarefaction to increase the vascular flow resistance, which in turn compromises the perfusion of the heart. Morphometric (diameters, length, and numbers) data of the swine left circumflex (LCx) arterial tree were measured in both CHF (n = 6) and control (n = 6) groups, from which a computer reconstruction of the entire LCx tree was implemented down to the capillary level to enable a hemodynamic analysis of coronary circulation. The vascular flow resistance was increased by ∼75% due to a significant decrease of vessel numbers (∼45%) and diameters in the first capillary segments (∼10%) of the LCx arterial tree after 3-4 wk of pacing. The structural remodeling significantly changed the wall shear stress in vessel segments of the entire LCx arterial tree of CHF animals. This study enhances our knowledge of coronary arterial tree remodeling in heart failure, which provides a deeper understanding of the deterioration of supply-demand relation in left ventricle. PMID:26159756

  8. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... go to the Health Topics Heart Failure article. Arrhythmia An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. When you have an arrhythmia, you may notice that your heart is skipping ...

  9. How Can Coronary Heart Disease Be Prevented or Delayed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  10. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  11. Travel to School and Physical Activity Levels in 9–10 Year-Old UK Children of Different Ethnic Origin; Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE)

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Christopher G.; Nightingale, Claire M.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; van Sluijs, Esther M. F.; Ekelund, Ulf; Cook, Derek G.; Whincup, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Travel to school may offer a convenient way to increase physical activity levels in childhood. We examined the association between method of travel to school and physical activity levels in urban multi-ethnic children. Methods and Findings 2035 children (aged 9–10 years in 2006–7) provided data on their usual method of travel to school and wore an Actigraph-GT1M activity monitor during waking hours. Associations between method of travel and mean level of physical activity (counts per minute [CPM], steps, time spent in light, moderate or vigorous activity per day) were examined in models adjusted for confounding variables. 1393 children (69%) walked or cycled to school; 161 (8%) used public transport and 481 (24%) travelled by car. White European children were more likely to walk/cycle, black African Caribbeans to travel by public transport and South Asian children to travel by car. Children travelling by car spent less time in moderate to vigorous physical activity (−7 mins, 95%CI-9,-5), and had lower CPM (−32 CPM, 95%CI-44,-19) and steps per day (−813 steps, 95%CI,-1043,-582) than walkers/cyclists. Pupils travelling by public transport had similar activity levels to walkers/cyclists. Lower physical activity levels amongst car travellers' were especially marked at travelling times (school days between 8–9 am, 3–5 pm), but were also evident on weekdays at other times and at weekends; they did not differ by gender or ethnic group. Conclusion Active travel to school is associated with higher levels of objectively measured physical activity, particularly during periods of travel but also at other times. If children travelling by car were to achieve physical activity levels (steps) similar to children using active travel, they would increase their physical activity levels by 9%. However, the population increase would be a modest 2%, because of the low proportion of car travellers in this urban population. PMID:22319596

  12. An apparent case of undiagnosed donor Kawasaki disease manifesting as coronary artery aneurysm in a pediatric heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Friedland-Little, Joshua; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Gajarski, Robert J; Schumacher, Kurt R

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of coronary ectasia and LAD coronary artery aneurysm with angiographic characteristics of Kawasaki disease in a three-yr-old girl two-yr status post-orthotopic heart transplant. Coronary anomalies were noted during initial screening coronary angiography two yr after transplant. Subsequent review of the donor echocardiogram revealed that the LMCA had been mildly dilated prior to transplant. In the absence of any symptoms consistent with Kawasaki disease in the transplant recipient, this appears to be a case of Kawasaki disease in the organ donor manifesting with coronary anomalies in the transplant recipient. The patient has done well clinically, and repeat coronary angiography has revealed partial regression of coronary anomalies. Given multiple reports in the literature of persistent abnormalities of coronary artery morphology and function after Kawasaki disease, close monitoring is warranted, with consideration of potential coronary protective medical therapies.

  13. Racial Differences in Hypertension and Coronary Heart Disease in the U.S. Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    pressure are numerous and include changes in the kidneys, brain, heart and other major organs. At least three major types of vascular pathology are known...et al (29) which suggested that hypertension and coronary heart disease were different in their etiology and pathology . It was hypothesized that...blacks may be victimized more by infections and other pathologic processes in the genitourinary tract, processes which may lead to hypertensive disease

  14. Intake of trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease among women.

    PubMed

    Willett, W C; Stampfer, M J; Manson, J E; Colditz, G A; Speizer, F E; Rosner, B A; Sampson, L A; Hennekens, C H

    1993-03-06

    Trans isomers of fatty acids, formed by the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils to produce margarine and vegetable shortening, increase the ratio of plasma low-density-lipoprotein to high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, so it is possible that they adversely influence risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). To investigate this possibility, we studied dietary data from participants in the Nurses' Health Study. We calculated intake of trans fatty acids from dietary questionnaires completed by 85,095 women without diagnosed CHD, stroke, diabetes, or hypercholesterolaemia in 1980. During 8 years of follow-up, there were 431 cases of new CHD (non-fatal myocardial infarction or death from CHD). After adjustment for age and total energy intake, intake of trans isomers was directly related to risk of CHD (relative risk for highest vs lowest quintile 1.50 [95% Cl 1.12-2.00], p for trend = 0.001). Additional control for established CHD risk factors, multivitamin use, and intakes of saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and linoleic acid, dietary cholesterol, vitamins E or C, carotene, or fibre did not change the relative risk substantially. The association was stronger for the 69,181 women whose margarine consumption over the previous 10 years had been stable (1.67 [1.05-2.66], p for trend = 0.002). Intakes of foods that are major sources of trans isomers (margarine, cookies [biscuits], cake, and white bread) were each significantly associated with higher risks of CHD. These findings support the hypothesis that consumption of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils may contribute to occurrence of CHD.

  15. EDUCATION AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK: POTENTIAL MECHANISMS SUCH AS LITERACY, PERCEIVED CONSTRAINT AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in the education-CHD literature explain the associations between education and CHD risk. METHOD The study sample included 346 participants, aged 38–47 years (59.5% women), of the New England Family Study birth cohort. Ten-year CHD risk was calculated using the validated Framingham risk algorithm that utilizes diabetes, smoking, blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, age and gender. Multivariable regression and mediation analyses were performed. RESULTS Regression analyses adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and childhood confounders (e.g. parental socioeconomic status, intelligence) demonstrated that relative to those with ≥college education, men and women with 10-year CHD risk, respectively. Mediation analyses demonstrated significant indirect effects for reading comprehension in women (7.2%; 95% CI: 0.7, 19.4) and men (7.2%; 95% CI: 0.8, 19.1), and depressive symptoms (11.8%; 95% CI: 2.5, 26.6) and perceived constraint (6.7%, 95% CI: 0.7, 19.1) in women. CONCLUSIONS Evidence suggested that reading comprehension in women and men, and depressive symptoms and perceived constraint in women, may mediate some of the association between education and CHD risk. If these mediated effects are interpreted causally, interventions targeting reading, depressive symptoms, and perceived constraint could reduce educational inequalities in CHD. PMID:25431228

  16. Nonrigid retrospective respiratory motion correction in whole-heart coronary MRA.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Johannes F M; Buehrer, Martin; Boesiger, Peter; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    A nonrigid retrospective respiratory motion correction scheme is presented for whole-heart coronary imaging with interleaved acquisition of motion information. The quasi-periodic nature of breathing is exploited to populate a 3D nonrigid motion model from low-resolution 2D imaging slices acquired interleaved with a segmented 3D whole-heart coronary scan without imposing scan time penalty. Reconstruction and motion correction are based on inversion of a generalized encoding equation. Therein, a forward model describes the transformation from the motion free image to the motion distorted k-space data, which includes nonrigid spatial transformations. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated on 10 healthy volunteers using free-breathing coronary whole-heart scans. Although conventional respiratory-gated acquisitions with 5-mm gating window resulted in an average gating efficiency of 51% ± 11%, nonrigid motion correction allowed for gate-free acquisitions, and hence scan time reduction by a factor of two without significant penalty in image quality. Image scores and quantitative image quality measures for the left coronary arteries showed no significant differences between 5-mm gated and gate-free acquisitions with motion correction. For the right coronary artery, slightly reduced image quality in the motion corrected gate-free scan was observed as a result of the close vicinity of anatomical structures with different motion characteristics. Magn Reson Med, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Coronary hemodynamic responses during local hemodilution in canine hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, G.J. )

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemodilution per se on coronary hemodynamics, experiments were performed in 36 anesthetized, open-chest dogs whose left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was perfused selectively with either normal arterial blood or arterial blood diluted with lactated Ringer solution. LAD blood flow (CBF) was measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter and its transmural distribution assessed with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. With perfusion pressure normal, graded hemodilution caused progressive, transmurally uniform increases in CBF that showed an nonlinear relationship to inflow hematocrit. Increased peak reactive hyperemic flow and decreased dilator reserve ratio indicated that both reduced viscosity and vasodilation contributed to increased CBF during hemodilution. Hypotension alone reduced CBF, with greater effect in the subendocardium. Additional hemodilution returned CBF to normotensive value, but relative subendocardial hypoperfusion persisted. The present study provides fundamental information on effects of hemodilution on coronary hemodynamics without the systemic responses that complicated previous studies utilizing whole body exchange transfusions.

  18. Chocolate Consumption is Inversely Associated with Prevalent Coronary Heart Disease: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Hopkins, Paul N.; North, Kari E.; Pankow, James S.; Arnett, Donna K.; Ellison, R. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Epidemiologic studies have suggested beneficial effects of flavonoids on cardiovascular disease. Cocoa and particularly dark chocolate are rich in flavonoids and recent studies have demonstrated blood pressure lowering effects of dark chocolate. However, limited data are available on the association of chocolate consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and prevalent CHD. Methods We studied in a cross-sectional design 4,970 participants aged 25 to 93 years who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study. Chocolate intake was assessed through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Results Compared to subjects who did not report any chocolate intake, odds ratios (95% CI) for CHD were 1.01 (0.76-1.37), 0.74 (0.56-0.98), and 0.43 (0.28-0.67) for subjects consuming 1-3 times/month, 1-4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively (p for trend <0.0001) adjusting for age, sex, family CHD risk group, energy intake, education, non-chocolate candy intake, linolenic acid intake, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, and fruit and vegetables. Consumption of non-chocolate candy was associated with a 49% higher prevalence of CHD comparing 5+/week vs. 0/week [OR=1.49 (0.96-2.32)]. Conclusions These data suggest that consumption of chocolate is inversely related with prevalent CHD in a general population. PMID:20858571

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of non-hemodynamically significant coronary heart disease: where to start?

    PubMed

    Runge, Marschall S; Subramanian, Natrajan; Stouffer, George A

    2005-01-01

    In the U.S. and all industrialized countries, more deaths result from heart attack and stroke than from any other cause. Increasingly it is proposed that many cardiac events occur following the rupture of minor, non-hemodynamically significant atherosclerotic plaque. Indeed many policy makers and some physicians have questioned the importance of traditional screening and treatment strategies for hemodynamically significant coronary artery lesions. As an alternative, it has been suggested that screening and treatment approaches should be guided by emerging data that support the predictive value of measures of inflammation, such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein, or of genetic markers. Our goal is review the biology of acute coronary events and the results of population-based studies and, in this light, consider the usefulness of the current "state-of-the-art" methods for diagnosing coronary heart disease.

  20. Coronary heart disease prevention: nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Tucker, Katherine L

    2011-08-17

    Diet is a key modifiable risk factor in the prevention and risk reduction of coronary heart disease (CHD). Results from the Seven Countries Study in the early 1970s spurred an interest in the role of single nutrients such as total fat in CHD risk. With accumulating evidence, we have moved away from a focus on total fat to the importance of considering the quality of fat. Recent meta-analyses of intervention studies confirm the beneficial effects of replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids on CHD risk. Scientific evidence for a detrimental role of trans fat intake from industrial sources on CHD risk has led to important policy changes including listing trans fatty acid content on the "Nutrition Facts" panel and banning the use of trans fatty acids in food service establishments in some cities. The effects of such policy changes on changes in CHD incidence are yet to be evaluated. There has been a surging interest in the protective effects of vitamin D in primary prevention. Yet, its associations with secondary events have been mixed and intervention studies are needed to clarify its role in CHD prevention. Epidemiological and clinical trial evidence surrounding the benefit of B vitamins and antioxidants such as carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C, have been contradictory. While pharmacological supplementation of these vitamins in populations with existing CHD has been ineffective and, in some cases, even detrimental, data repeatedly show that consumption of a healthy dietary pattern has considerable cardioprotective effects for primary prevention. Results from these studies and the general ineffectiveness of nutrient-based interventions have shifted interest to the role of foods in CHD risk reduction. The strongest and most consistent protective associations are seen with fruit and vegetables, fish, and whole grains. Epidemiological and clinical trial data also show risk reduction with moderate alcohol consumption. In the past decade, there has

  1. Addressing Health Inequities: Coronary Heart Disease Training within Learning Disabilities Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holly, Deirdre; Sharp, John

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Research suggests this may be due to inequalities in health status and inequities in the way health services respond to need. Little is known about the most effective way to improve health outcomes for people with learning disabilities. A previously developed…

  2. Dietary carbohydrates, physical inactivity, obesity, and the 'metabolic syndrome' as predictors of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Manson, J E

    2001-08-01

    Several decades of epidemiological and clinical research have identified physical inactivity, excessive calorie consumption, and excess weight as common risk factors for both type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease. This trio forms the environmental substrate for a now well-recognized metabolic phenotype called the insulin resistance syndrome. Recent data suggest that a high intake of rapidly absorbed carbohydrates, which is characterized by a high glycemic load (a measure of carbohydrate quality and quantity), may increase the risk of coronary heart disease by aggravating glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. These data also suggest that individuals who are obese and insulin resistant are particularly prone to the adverse effects of a high dietary glycemic load. In addition, data continue to accumulate suggesting the important beneficial effects of physical activity, even at moderate levels, and weight reduction on improving insulin sensitivity and reducing the risk of coronary heart disease. Future metabolic studies should continue to quantify the physiological impact of different foods on serum glucose and insulin, and such information should routinely be incorporated into large-scale and long-term prospective studies, in which the possible interaction effects between diet and other metabolic determinants such as physical activity and obesity can be examined. Until more definitive data are available, replacing refined grain products and potatoes with minimally processed plant-based foods such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, and reducing the intake of high glycemic load beverages may offer a simple strategy for reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease.

  3. Elders' Knowledge about Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease, Their Perceived Risk, and Adopted Preventive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khayyal, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; El Shazly, Somaya Abdel Moneim

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most frequent single cause of death among persons over 65 years of age and it seems to continue to be a significant threat to the health and wellbeing of the elderly population all over the world, yet the condition is largely preventable. The aims of this study to assess and determine the relations among elder's…

  4. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  5. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Young People of Differing Socio-Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon P.; Baker, Julien S.; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socio-economic status (SES). A cohort of 100 boys and 108 girls, aged 12.9, SD 0.3 years drawn of differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included indices of obesity, blood pressure, aerobic fitness, diet, blood…

  6. Coronary Heart Disease Knowledge and Risk Factors among Tri-Ethnic College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutoubi, Samer; Huffman, Fatma G.; Ciccazzo, Michele W.; Himburg, Susan P.; Johnson, Paulette

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and Europe. This study identified and compared nutritional knowledge associated with CHD risk factors among tri-ethnic college students. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, observational study using questionnaires. Setting: University laboratory.…

  7. Overweight Status, Obesity, and Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, C. Michael; Robinson, Laura M.; Davidson, Philip W.; Haveman, Meindert; Janicki, Matthew P.; Albertini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have high rates of overweight status/obesity (OSO). OSO is associated with several important risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). This study focused on assessing whether such risk factors are being identified in adults with ID who are receiving their healthcare in…

  8. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  9. Effect of caffeine on the risk of coronary heart disease- A re-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, J O; Akinyinka, A O; Odewole, G A; Okwusidi, J I

    2007-03-01

    The effect of caffeine intake on the risk of coronary heart disease was studied. Twenty-one rats used were randomly divided into three experimental groups, the first group served as the control while the second and third groups were administered caffeine orally at doses of 10mg/kg body weight and 20mg/kg body weight respectively for fourteen days. Caffeine, at 10mg/kg body weight, significantly increased (P<0.05) serum LDL- cholesterol concentration and coronary heart disease risk ratio while it significantly reduced (P<0.05) serum triacylglycerol concentration when compared with controls. At 20mg/kg body weight, caffeine significantly increased (P<0.05) coronary heart disease risk ratio while it significantly reduced (P<0.05) serum HDL-cholesterol concentration and serum triacylgycerol concentration when compared with controls. No dose response effect was observed possibly suggestive of a threshold effect. These results suggest that caffeine predisposes consumers of caffeine containing beverages to coronary heart disease.

  10. The Effect of a Physiological Evaluation Program on Coronary Heart Disease Risk Scores for Sedentary Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkenberg, Mel; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to compare the coronary heart disease (CHD) probability estimates of a group of sedentary males involved in an exercise stress test program from 1968 through 1974 with those of a comparison group of sedentary males not involved in the program. The program was designed to evaluate cardiopulmonary function and improve…

  11. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non–hig...

  12. Genetic APOC3 mutation, serum triglyceride concentrations, and coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent decades have witnessed an increased awareness of the importance of lowering triglyceride concentrations in conjunction with lowering LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) to achieve optimal reduction of the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Historically, LDL-C was the only target of pharmacologic ther...

  13. Small dense low density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease: results from the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sought to establish reference values for a new direct assay for small dense LDL cholesterol (sdLDL-C) and to measure sdLDL-C concentrations in patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) vs controls. Direct LDL-C and sdLDL-C were measured in samples from 3188 male and female participan...

  14. Nuclear medical determination of left ventricular diastolic function in coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, P.; Laesser, W.K.; Kullich, W.; Stoiberer, I.; Klein, G.

    1985-06-01

    In 64 patients with coronary heart disease, the left ventricular diastolic function was determined by means of a new nuclear medical method (nuclear stethoscope). The investigations revealed an abnormal diastolic filling in 85.9% of the cases on the basis of the parameters peak filling rate and time to peak filling rate as manifestation of a disturbed ventricular function.

  15. Blood lead and coronary heart disease risk among elderly men in Zutphen, the Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Kromhout, D.

    1988-06-01

    Information about blood lead and other coronary heart disease risk factors was collected in 1977 among 152 men aged 57 to 76 years in the town of Zutphen, the Netherlands. Blood lead was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The blood lead distribution was skewed to the right. The median blood lead concentration was 167 ..mu..g/L, and the mean was 183 ..mu..g/L. Blood lead levels above 300 ..mu..g/L were present among 8.6% and levels above 400 ..mu..g/L among 1.3% of the Zutphen men. Blood lead was of borderline significance to cigarette smoking. Above both univariate and multivariate analyses, a significant association was found between blood lead and blood pressure. This relation was stronger for systolic than for diastolic blood pressure. Of the 141 elderly men free of coronary heart disease in 1977, 26 developed coronary heart disease between 1977 and 1985. Blood lead was not associated with coronary heart disease incidence in both univariate and multivariate analyses.

  16. Primary Care Physicians and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Practice Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makrides, Lydia; Veinot, Paula L.; Richard, Josie; Allen, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of primary care physicians in coronary heart disease prevention is explored, and a model for patient education by physicians is offered. A qualitative study in Nova Scotia examines physicians' expectations about their role in prevention, obstacles to providing preventive care, and mechanisms by which preventive care occurs. (Author/EMK)

  17. Hospitalization Cost Offset of a Hostility Intervention for Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Karina W.; Gidron, Yori; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors evaluated hospitalization cost offset of hostility management group therapy for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) from a previously published randomized controlled trial (Y. Gidron, K. Davidson, & I. Bata, 1999). Twenty-six male patients with myocardial infarction or unstable angina were randomized to either 2 months of…

  18. Cognition and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Late Midlife: The Whitehall II Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Severine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition…

  19. Adiponectin: an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in men in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our aim was to determine whether plasma adiponectin levels were an independent predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 3,188 male and female participants from cycle 6 of the Framingham Offspring Study (mean age: 57 years in both men and women; BMI:...

  20. Physical activity for coronary heart disease: cardioprotective mechanisms and effects on prognosis.

    PubMed

    Scrutinio, Domenico; Bellotto, Fabio; Lagioia, Rocco; Passantino, Andrea

    2005-06-01

    A sedentary lifestyle is one of the five major risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) along with hypertension, abnormal values of blood lipids, smoking and obesity. After an acute myocardial infarction, risk factors continue to contribute synergically to the clinical progression and prognosis of CHD. Regular physical exercise has been shown to improve exercise capacity and quality of life, to reduce symptoms and to decrease the risk of new coronary events in patients with CHD. Regular physical activity with its favourable effects on coronary risk factors, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, tendency to thrombosis, on autonomic tone and myocardial ischemia, may play a role in reducing the risk of new coronary events and death. In view of the clinical benefits yielded and its well-documented cardioprotective mechanisms, regular physical activity should be regarded, by general practitioners and cardiologists, as a true and effective form of therapy for patients with CHD.

  1. Reconsidering the back door approach by targeting the coronary sinus in ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Kassimis, George; Raina, Tushar; Banning, Adrian P

    2016-08-15

    Coronary sinus interventions (CSI) are a class of invasive techniques (surgical and percutaneous) originally proposed in the first half of the 20th century, aiming to treat ischaemic heart disease by acting on the venous coronary system. Three main classes of CSI have been proposed and tested: (1) retroperfusion technique, (2) retroinfusion technique and (3) coronary sinus occlusion techniques. They all share the principle that a controlled increased pressure within the coronary sinus may promote a retrograde perfusion of the ischaemic myocardium with consequent cardioprotection. Development of arterial treatments including coronary aortic bypass grafting and then percutaneous coronary intervention deflected interest from interventions on the coronary venous system. However, CSI may still have a possible niche role today in specific and selected clinical contexts in which existing therapies are insufficient. In this review paper, we aim to revise the rationale for CSI, describing the details and the evidence collected so far about these techniques and to provide insights about the main clinical scenarios in which these strategies may find a contemporary application in combination or as an alternative to existing approaches.

  2. Radiologic evaluation of coronary artery disease in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, David M; Ordovas, Karen G

    2016-01-01

    Improved surgical and medical therapy have prolonged survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) such that general medical conditions like coronary artery disease (CAD) are now the main determinants of mortality. A summary of the association of CAD with CHD, as well as a discussion of the radiologic evaluation of the coronary arteries in adults with CHD is described herein. Cross sectional imaging to evaluate CAD in adults with CHD should follow the same appropriateness criteria as gender and aged matched patients without CHD. Coronary CT imaging may be particularly valuable in evaluating the coronary arteries in this patient population as invasive coronary angiography may prove challenging secondary to complicated or unconventional anatomy of the coronary arteries. Further, typical methods for evaluating CAD such as stress or echocardiography may be impractical in adults with CHD. Finally, delineating the anatomic relationship of the coronary arteries and their relationship with the sternum, chest wall, conduits, grafts, and valves is highly recommended in patients with CHD prior to reintervention to avoid iatrogenic complications.

  3. Inactivating Mutations in NPC1L1 and Protection from Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ezetimibe lowers plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by inhibiting the activity of the Niemann–Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) protein. However, whether such inhibition reduces the risk of coronary heart disease is not known. Human mutations that inactivate a gene encoding a drug target can mimic the action of an inhibitory drug and thus can be used to infer potential effects of that drug. Methods We sequenced the exons of NPC1L1 in 7364 patients with coronary heart disease and in 14,728 controls without such disease who were of European, African, or South Asian ancestry. We identified carriers of inactivating mutations (nonsense, splice-site, or frameshift mutations). In addition, we genotyped a specific inactivating mutation (p.Arg406X) in 22,590 patients with coronary heart disease and in 68,412 controls. We tested the association between the presence of an inactivating mutation and both plasma lipid levels and the risk of coronary heart disease. Results With sequencing, we identified 15 distinct NPC1L1 inactivating mutations; approximately 1 in every 650 persons was a heterozygous carrier for 1 of these mutations. Heterozygous carriers of NPC1L1 inactivating mutations had a mean LDL cholesterol level that was 12 mg per deciliter (0.31 mmol per liter) lower than that in noncarriers (P = 0.04). Carrier status was associated with a relative reduction of 53% in the risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio for carriers, 0.47; 95% confidence interval, 0.25 to 0.87; P = 0.008). In total, only 11 of 29,954 patients with coronary heart disease had an inactivating mutation (carrier frequency, 0.04%) in contrast to 71 of 83,140 controls (carrier frequency, 0.09%). Conclusions Naturally occurring mutations that disrupt NPC1L1 function were found to be associated with reduced plasma LDL cholesterol levels and a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:25390462

  4. Does job strain increase the risk for coronary heart disease or death in men and women? The Framingham Offspring Study.

    PubMed

    Eaker, Elaine D; Sullivan, Lisa M; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Benjamin, Emelia J

    2004-05-15

    Conflicting findings in the literature have made the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease (CHD) controversial. The effect of high job strain on the 10-year incidence of CHD and total mortality was examined in men and women participating in the Framingham Offspring Study; 3,039 participants, 1,711 men and 1,328 women, aged 18-77 years, were examined between 1984 and 1987 and followed for 10 years. Measures of job strain, occupational characteristics, and risk factors for CHD were collected at the baseline examination. Before and after controlling for systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cigarette smoking, diabetes, and the total/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio in Cox proportional hazards models, the authors found that high job strain was not associated with mortality or incident CHD in either men or women over the follow-up period. Contrary to expectation, women with active job strain (high demands-high control) had a 2.8-fold increased risk of CHD (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 7.2) compared with women with high job strain (high demands-low control). For men, higher education, personal income, and occupational prestige were related to decreased risk of total mortality and CHD. These findings do not support high job strain as a significant risk factor for CHD or death in men or women.

  5. Cholinergic mechanisms on the heart and coronary circulation

    PubMed Central

    Blesa, Marta I.; Ross, G.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effects of rapid intracoronary injection of acetylcholine (ACh) were studied in anaesthetized open chest dogs. Changes in phasic coronary blood flow were followed with non-cannulating electromagnetic flow probes and in contractile force with isometric strain gauges. 2. Increasing doses of ACh from 0·01 to 100 μg produced progressively larger increases in systolic and diastolic coronary blood flow and progressive decreases in end-diastolic vascular resistance which were blocked by atropine but not by propranolol. 3. Contractile force showed both negative and positive responses. The negative inotropic effect was small and was blocked by atropine but not by propranolol. The threshold for the negative inotropic response was higher than for the coronary vasodilator effect and the dose response curve was flatter. The positive inotropic response usually showed two components. One component reached its maximum 13 to 18 s after injection, had a high threshold (over 1 μg), was potentiated by atropine and blocked by propranolol. The other reached its maximum 25 to 60 s after the injection, had a threshold between 0·01 and 0·1 μg, and was blocked by atropine but not by propranolol. 4. These results suggest that the coronary dilator response, the negative inotropic response and part of the positive inotropic response are mediated through “muscarinic” receptors. The remaining component of the positive inotropic response appears to involve catecholamine release. PMID:5413294

  6. Copeptin in acute coronary syndromes and heart failure management: State of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schurtz, Guillaume; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe; Goldstein, Patrick; Lemesle, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of multiple biomarkers has changed cardiovascular disease management. Recently, several trials have assessed the diagnostic and prognostic performances of copeptin, especially in patients with heart failure or acute coronary syndromes. Primary results are interesting, with copeptin looking promising for: the management of patients who present at emergency departments early after chest pain onset and the risk stratification of patients with heart failure. The purpose of this article is to review the data on the place of copeptin in the management of patients with chest pain or heart failure.

  7. The use of Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 and Andersen testing for fitness and maximal heart rate assessments of 6- to 10-year-old school children.

    PubMed

    Bendiksen, Mads; Ahler, Thomas; Clausen, Helle; Wedderkopp, Niels; Krustrup, Peter

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated a submaximal and maximal version of the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's (YYIR1C) test and the Andersen test for fitness and maximal heart rate assessments of children aged 6-10 years. Two repetitions of the YYIR1C and Andersen tests were carried out within 1 week by 6- to 7-year-olds and 8- to 9-year-olds (grade 0, n = 17; grade 2, n = 16) and 6 weeks apart by 9- to 10-year-olds (grade 3, n = 49). Grade 0-2 pupils also performed an incremental treadmill test (ITT). Grade 2 pupils had a better (p < 0.05) YYIR1C (84%; 994 ± 399 m (±SD) vs. 536 ± 218 m) and Andersen test performance (10%; 1,050 ± 71 m vs. 955 ± 56 m) than grade 0 pupils. For grade 0-2 pupils, YYIR1C, Andersen, and ITT peak heart rates were 205 ± 11, 207 ± 9, and 203 ± 7 b·min(-1), respectively (Andersen > ITT, p < 0.05), and for grade 3 pupils, YYIR1C and Andersen peak heart rates were 208 ± 9 and 204 ± 9 b·min(-1), respectively (YYIR1C > Andersen, p < 0.05). Submaximal YYIR1C heart rate (HR) was inversely correlated (p < 0.05) with YYIR1C test performance (r = -0.54 to -0.67) and VO2peak (r = -0.42). The 6-week change in submaximal HR correlated with the change in YYIR1C test performance (r = -0.42 to -0.53, p < 0.05). In conclusion, YYIR1C and Andersen tests are simple and inexpensive intermittent field tests that can detect differences in fitness levels and determine maximal HR of 6- to 10-year-old children. Additionally, submaximal YYIR1C testing can be used for frequent nonexhaustive fitness assessments.

  8. Four-Dimensional Respiratory Motion-Resolved Whole Heart Coronary MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Davide; Feng, Li; Bonanno, Gabriele; Coppo, Simone; Yerly, Jérôme; Lim, Ruth P.; Schwitter, Juerg; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Otazo, Ricardo; Stuber, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Free-breathing whole-heart coronary MR angiography (MRA) commonly uses navigators to gate respiratory motion, resulting in lengthy and unpredictable acquisition times. Conversely, self-navigation has 100% scan efficiency, but requires motion correction over a broad range of respiratory displacements, which may introduce image artifacts. We propose replacing navigators and self-navigation with a respiratory motion-resolved reconstruction approach. Methods Using a respiratory signal extracted directly from the imaging data, individual signal-readouts are binned according to their respiratory states. The resultant series of undersampled images are reconstructed using an extradimensional golden-angle radial sparse parallel imaging (XD-GRASP) algorithm, which exploits sparsity along the respiratory dimension. Whole-heart coronary MRA was performed in 11 volunteers and four patients with the proposed methodology. Image quality was compared with that obtained with one-dimensional respiratory self-navigation. Results Respiratory-resolved reconstruction effectively suppressed respiratory motion artifacts. The quality score for XD-GRASP reconstructions was greater than or equal to self-navigation in 80/88 coronary segments, reaching diagnostic quality in 61/88 segments versus 41/88. Coronary sharpness and length were always superior for the respiratory-resolved datasets, reaching statistical significance (P < 0.05) in most cases. Conclusion XD-GRASP represents an attractive alternative for handling respiratory motion in free-breathing whole heart MRI and provides an effective alternative to self-navigation. PMID:27052418

  9. PROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN PRENATAL CORTISOL AND ADULTHOOD CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK: THE NEW ENGLAND FAMILY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, Lynda J.; Stroud, Laura R.; Buka, Stephen L.; Eaton, Charles B.; Lu, Bing; Niaura, Raymond; Loucks, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Increasing evidence suggests that early life factors may influence coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, however little is known about contributions of prenatal cortisol. Objectives were to prospectively assess associations of maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy with offspring’s 10-year CHD risk during middle-age. METHODS Participants were 262 mother-offspring dyads from the New England Family Study. Maternal free cortisol was assessed in third trimester maternal serum samples. Ten-year CHD risk was calculated in offspring at mean age 42 years, using the validated Framingham risk algorithm incorporating diabetes, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total and HDL cholesterol, smoking, age and sex. RESULTS In multivariable-adjusted linear regression analyses adjusted for age and race/ethnicity, high vs. low maternal cortisol tertile was associated with 36.7% (95% CI: 8.4%, 72.5%) greater mean 10-year CHD risk score in females. There was no association in males (−2.8%, 95% CI: −23.8%, 24.0%). Further adjustment for in utero socioeconomic position showed 25.9% (95% CI: −1.0%, 60.0%) greater CHD risk in females. Adjustment for maternal age and size for gestational age had little effect on findings. CONCLUSIONS Maternal prenatal cortisol levels were positively associated with 10-year CHD risk among female, and not male, offspring. Adjusting for socioeconomic position during pregnancy reduced effect size in females, suggesting it may be a common prior factor in both maternal cortisol and CHD risk. These findings provide evidence that targeting mothers who have elevated prenatal cortisol levels, including elevated cortisol in the setting of low socioeconomic position, may potentially reduce long-term CHD risk in their offspring. PMID:25768844

  10. Tributyltin impairs the coronary vasodilation induced by 17β-estradiol in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Roger Lyrio; Podratz, Priscila Lang; Sena, Gabriela Cavati; Filho, Vicente Sathler Delgado; Lopes, Pedro Francisco Iguatemy; Gonçalves, Washington Luiz Silva; Alves, Leandro Miranda; Samoto, Vivian Yochiko; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro Miguel, Emilio; Moysés, Margareth Ribeiro; Graceli, Jones Bernardes

    2012-01-01

    Triorganotins, such as tributyltin (TBT), are environmental contaminants that are commonly used as antifouling agents for boats. However, TBT is also known to alter mammalian reproductive functions. Although the female sex hormones are primarily involved in the regulation of reproductive functions, 17β-estradiol also protects against cardiovascular diseases, in that this hormone reduces the incidence of coronary artery disease via coronary vasodilation. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of 100 ng/kg TBT administered daily by oral gavage for 15 d on coronary functions in female Wistar rats. Findings were correlated with changes in sex steroids concentrations. Tributyltin significantly increased the baseline coronary perfusion pressure and impaired vasodilation induced by 17β-estradiol. In addition, TBT markedly decreased serum 17β-estradiol levels accompanied by a significant rise in serum progesterone levels. Tributyltin elevated collagen deposition in the heart interstitium and number of mast cells proximate to the cardiac vessels. There was a positive correlation between the increase in coronary perfusion pressure and incidence of cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, TBT induced endothelium denudation (scanning electron microscopy) and accumulation of platelets. Moreover, TBT impaired coronary vascular reactivity to estradiol (at least in part), resulting in endothelial denudation, enhanced collagen deposition and elevated number of mast cells. Taken together, the present results demonstrate that TBT exposure may be a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disorders in rats.

  11. Change in Leukocyte Telomere Length Predicts Mortality in Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease from the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Goglin, Sarah E.; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Short telomere length independently predicts mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. Whether 5-year change in telomere length predicts subsequent mortality in patients with coronary heart disease has not been evaluated. Methods In a prospective cohort study of 608 individuals with stable coronary artery disease, we measured leukocyte telomere length at baseline and after five years of follow-up. We divided the sample into tertiles of telomere change: shortened, maintained or lengthened. We used Cox survival models to evaluate 5-year change in telomere length as a predictor of mortality. Results During an average of 4.2 years follow-up, there were 149 deaths. Change in telomere length was inversely predictive of all-cause mortality. Using the continuous variable of telomere length change, each standard deviation (325 base pair) greater increase in telomere length was associated with a 24% reduction in mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61–0.94; p = 0.01), adjusted for age, sex, waist to hip ratio, exercise capacity, LV ejection fraction, serum creatinine, and year 5 telomere length. Mortality occurred in 39% (79/203) of patients who experienced telomere shortening, 22% (45/203) of patients whose telomere length was maintained, and 12% (25/202) of patients who experienced telomere lengthening (p<0.001). As compared with patients whose telomere length was maintained, those who experienced telomere lengthening were 56% less likely to die (HR 0.44, 95% CI, 0.23–0.87). Conclusions In patients with coronary heart disease, an increase in leukocyte telomere length over 5 years is associated with decreased mortality. PMID:27783614

  12. Quality of Life and Coping Strategies in Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Seyedeh-Monavar; Hosseinian, Simin; Eslami, Mansoure; Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali

    This study aims to find the relationship between quality of life and coping strategies in coronary heart disease patients. Two hundred coronary heart disease patients at Tehran Heart Center, who had been diagnosed with the disease 3 months before, were selected and filled out The Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) and Quality of Life-SF36. Results showed a discrepancy between quality of life indices and coping strategies. Task-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with total quality of life and PF indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with MH, RE and RP indices. Emotional-oriented strategy had a positive and significant relationship with RP and RE indices while it had a negative and significant relationship with PF, GH, PH, total psychological health and total quality of life indices. Avoidance-oriented strategy had a negative and significant relationship only with MH index. Furthermore, quality of life aspects (physical and psychological) had a positive and significant relationship with emotional-oriented strategy, but it did not have a significant relationship with task-oriented and avoidance-oriented strategies. Also, the social aspect of quality of life did not have a significant relationship with any of the strategies. Considering the effect of stress on decreasing the quality of life, we recommend a psychologist train coping strategies to coronary heart disease patients along with medical treatments in order to improve recovery, maintain health and reduce recurrence.

  13. Coronary heart disease and the zinc-to-copper ratio in human aorta and drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Kinard, J.T.; Moses, H.A.; Stackhouse, C.; Fludd, R.; Thompson, R.

    1986-01-01

    Trace levels of zinc and copper have been determined in the aorta from individuals with known histories of coronary heart disease (experimental group) and from individuals without a history of heart disease (control group) or any condition with an alleged or known association with trace zinc and copper. Subjects for the experimental and control groups were matched in terms of age, sex, and race. The zinc-to-copper ratio in the aorta for the experimental group was found to be significantly higher than the zinc-to-copper ratio in the control group at the 90% level of confidence. The results suggest that an imbalance in the zinc-to-copper ratio is a risk factor in coronary artery disease. Data for trace elements in major water sources for different geographical areas of the US from 1962-1967 were compiled and correlations with mortality rates for heart diseases from 1969-1971 were made. The results revealed that there was an extremely high correlation between the zinc-to-copper ratio in water and mortality rates of non-white females with coronary heart disease.

  14. Correlates of lung/heart ratio of thallium-201 in coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, S.; Kaul, S.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-10-01

    We studied 306 patients with chest pain (262 with coronary artery disease and 44 with no coronary artery disease) to determine which of 23 clinical, exercise, thallium, and angiographic variables best discriminate between patients with increased lung/heart ratios of thallium versus those with normal ratios. Normal lung/heart ratio values were defined using an additional 45 subjects with less than 1% probability of coronary artery disease. The number of diseased vessels was the best discriminator between patients with increased ratios versus those with normal ratios. Double product at peak exercise, number of segments with abnormal wall motion, patient gender, and duration of exercise were also significant discriminators. Using discriminant function analysis these variables could correctly identify 81% of cases with increased lung/heart ratios and 72% of cases with normal ratios. These results indicate that an increased lung/heart ratio of thallium reflects exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction and affords a better understanding of why this thallium parameter is a powerful prognostic indicator in patients with chest pain.

  15. Socioeconomic inequalities in coronary heart disease risk in older age: contribution of established and novel coronary risk factors

    PubMed Central

    RAMSAY, S E; MORRIS, R W; WHINCUP, P H; PAPACOSTA, O; RUMLEY, A; LENNON, L; LOWE, G; WANNAMETHEE, S G

    2009-01-01

    Background:Evidence on socioeconomic inequalities in coronary heart disease (CHD) and their pathways in the elderly is limited. Little is also known about the contributions that novel coronary risk factors (particularly inflammatory/hemostatic markers) make to socioeconomic inequalities in CHD. Objectives:To examine the extent of socioeconomic inequalities in CHD in older age, and the contributions (relative and absolute) of established and novel coronary risk factors. Methods:A population-based cohort of 3761 British men aged 60–79 years was followed up for 6.5 years for CHD mortality and incidence (fatal and non-fatal). Social class was based on longest-held occupation recorded at 40–59 years. Results:There was a graded relationship between social class and CHD incidence. The hazard ratio for CHD incidence comparing social class V (unskilled workers) with social class I (professionals) was 2.70 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37–5.35; P-value for trend = 0.008]. This was reduced to 2.14 (95% CI 1.06–4.33; P-value for trend = 0.11) after adjustment for behavioral factors (cigarette smoking, physical activity, body mass index, and alcohol consumption), which explained 38% of the relative risk gradient (41% of absolute risk). Additional adjustment for inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and von Willebrand factor) explained 55% of the relative risk gradient (59% of absolute risk). Blood pressure and lipids made little difference to these estimates; results were similar for CHD mortality. Conclusions:Socioeconomic inequalities in CHD persist in the elderly and are at least partly explained by behavioral risk factors; novel (inflammatory) coronary risk markers made some further contribution. Reducing inequalities in behavioral factors (especially cigarette smoking) could reduce these social inequalities by at least one-third. PMID:20015318

  16. Diagnostic value of plasma morphology in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Sergeeva, Yuliya V.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Denisova, Tatiana P.

    2006-08-01

    Blood plasma can be considered as a special water system with self-organization possibilities. Plasma slides as the results of wedge dehydration reflect its stereochemical interaction and their study can be used in diagnostic processes. 46 patients with coronary heart disease were studied. The main group was formed of men in age ranged from 54 to 72 years old with stable angina pectoris of II and III functional class (by Canadian classification) (n=25). The group of compare was of those who was hospitalized with diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, men in age range 40-82. Clinical examination, basic biochemical tests and functional plasma morphology characteristics were studied. A number of qualitative and quantitative differences of blood plasma morphology of patients with chronic and acute coronary disease forms was revealed.

  17. Stressful Life Events: Their Relationships with Coronary Heart Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    and accelerating heart rate. The hormone also plays a vital role in providing emergency energy by breaking down stored sugar and fat and releasing...cause migraine headaches, duodenal ulcers, hypertension, and various cardiac difficulties (Bowers & Kelly, 1979). Other 11 - 7- dysfunctions associated

  18. Generalized anxiety disorder prevalence and comorbidity with depression in coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tully, Phillip J; Cosh, Suzanne M

    2013-12-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder prevalence and comorbidity with depression in coronary heart disease patients remain unquantified. Systematic searching of Medline, Embase, SCOPUS and PsycINFO databases revealed 1025 unique citations. Aggregate generalized anxiety disorder prevalence (12 studies, N = 3485) was 10.94 per cent (95% confidence interval: 7.8-13.99) and 13.52 per cent (95% confidence interval: 8.39-18.66) employing Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria (random effects). Lifetime generalized anxiety disorder prevalence was 25.80 per cent (95% confidence interval: 20.84-30.77). In seven studies, modest correlation was evident between generalized anxiety disorder and depression, Fisher's Z = .30 (95% confidence interval: .19-.42), suggesting that each psychiatric disorder is best conceptualized as contributing unique variance to coronary heart disease prognosis.

  19. Coronary Heart Disease in Women: A Challenge for the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Solimene, Maria Cecília

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the first killer of women in the modern era, regardless of age, race and of ethnicity, although its prevalence rises after menopause. Modern women have professional and housewife responsibilities, consume excess of fat and carbohydrates, smoke, do not exercise regularly and do not have enough time to rest. This situation leads to overweight, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Women do not often participate in preventive studies and still undergo less intensive and invasive evaluation and treatment for chest pain when compared to men. However, the rate of coronary death is twice higher in women than in men after myocardial infarction and revascularization procedures. The objective of this review is to analyze the main gender differences regarding symptoms, diagnosis, management and prognosis of coronary heart disease and to discuss the influence of hormonal replacement therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. PMID:20126352

  20. Alkaline phosphatase levels in patients with coronary heart disease saliva and its relation with periodontal status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunita, Dina Suci; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Tadjoedin, Fatimah M.; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a disease that causes narrowing of the coronary arteries. Currently, there is a hypothesis regarding periodontal infection that increases risk for heart disease. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a marker of inflammation will increase in atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. The objective of this research is analyzing the relationship between the levels of alkaline phosphatase in saliva with periodontal status in patients with CHD and non CHD. Here, saliva of 104 subjects were taken, each 1 ml, and levels of Alkaline Phosphatase was analyzed using Abbott ci4100 architect. We found that no significant difference of Alkaline Phosphatase levels in saliva between CHD patients and non CHD. Therefore, it can be concluded that Alkaline Phosphatase levels in patients with CHD saliva was higher than non CHD and no association between ALP levels with periodontal status.

  1. Correlation of ascending aorta elasticity and the severity of coronary artery stenosis in hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease assessed by M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qixiu; Liu, Houlin

    2015-03-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between ascending aorta elasticity and the severity of coronary artery stenosis in essential hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) using M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography. A total of 184 hypertensive patients with CHD were enrolled. Patients were divided into three groups based on the severity of coronary stenosis measured by coronary arteriography (CAG): slight stenosis (group 1), moderate stenosis (group 2) and serious stenosis (group 3). M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography were performed, and elasticity indexes of ascending aorta including stiffness index, distensibility index, and S wave speed of anterior wall were calculated and correlated with the severity of coronary stenosis. Ascending aorta stiffness index was increased, whereas distensibility index and S wave speed of anterior wall were decreased in moderate and severe stenosis groups compared with slight stenosis group (P < 0.01). Elasticity indexes change in a stepwise pattern with the narrowness of coronary artery, and there was a significant correlation between aortic elasticity and severity of coronary artery by Pearson correlation analysis (P < 0.01). Elasticity indexes of ascending aorta correlate well with severity of coronary stenosis. Elasticity indexes of ascending aorta can serve as predictors for coronary arterial lesion in hypertensive patients.

  2. 75 FR 76525 - Food Labeling; Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend the regulation authorizing a health claim on the relationship between plant sterol esters and plant stanol esters and reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) for use on food labels and in food labeling. The agency is taking this action based on evidence previously considered by the agency, and FDA's own review of data on......

  3. [Applying toothpaste and mouthwash BLUEM in complex oral care in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Tambovtseva, N V

    2014-01-01

    For patients with coronary heart disease oral hygiene and treatment of oral mucosa inflammatory changes and periodontal disease are of vital importance. Dental status assessment in 110 patients hospitalized in cardiology department revealed that they all suffered from periodontal disease, diseases of teeth and oral mucosa. In 100% of cases it was necessary to improve oral hygiene. Inclusion in everyday hygienic oral care of toothpaste and mouthwash Bluem reduced the severity of inflammatory changes and improved the hygienic condition of the oral cavity.

  4. Quantitative determination of fibrinogen of patients with coronary heart diseases through piezoelectric agglutination sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinghai; Hua, Xing; Fu, Weiling; Liu, Dongbo; Chen, Ming; Cai, Guoru

    2010-01-01

    Fibrinogen can transform fibrin through an agglutination reaction, finally forming fibrin polymer with grid structure. The density and viscosity of the reaction system changes drastically during the course of agglutination. In this research, we apply an independently-developed piezoelectric agglutination sensor to detect the fibrinogen agglutination reaction in patients with coronary heart diseases. The terminal judgment method of determining plasma agglutination reaction through piezoelectric agglutination sensor was established. In addition, the standard curve between plasma agglutination time and fibrinogen concentration was established to determinate fibrinogen content quantitatively. The results indicate the close correlation between the STAGO paramagnetic particle method and the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor for the detection of Fibrinogen. The correlation coefficient was 0.91 (γ = 0.91). The determination can be completed within 10 minutes. The fibrinogen concentration in the coronary heart disease group was significantly higher than that of the healthy control group (P < 0.05). The results reveal that high fibrinogen concentration is closely correlated to the incurrence, development and prognosis of coronary heart diseases. Compared with other traditional methods, the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor has some merits such as operation convenience, small size, low cost, quick detecting, good precision and the common reacting agents with paramagnetic particle method.

  5. Historical overview of n-3 fatty acids and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Leaf, Alexander

    2008-06-01

    The first evidence that fish oil fatty acids might have a beneficial effect on coronary heart disease came from the discovery that Greenland Eskimos, who have a diet high in n-3 fatty acids, have a lower mortality from coronary heart disease than do Danes and Americans. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential in our diets and can be classified in 2 groups: n-6 fatty acids found in plant seeds and n-3 fatty acids found in marine vertebrates. Further evidence of n-3 benefits to human health include a 1989 study demonstrating a 29% reduction in fatal cardiac arrhythmias among subjects with a recent myocardial infarction who had been advised to consume fish oil. The GISSI-Prevenzione Trial found a significant reduction in relative reduction of death, cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke in subjects consuming n-3 fatty acids. In a recent study, subjects with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) at high risk for fatal ventricular arrhythmias were randomly assigned to four 1-g capsules of either an ethyl ester concentrate of n-3 fatty acids or olive oil daily for 12 mo. Subjects receiving n-3 who thus had significantly higher levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in their red blood cell membranes showed a longer time to first ICD events and had a significantly lower relative risk of having an ICD event or probable event (P = 0.033). These studies demonstrate that fish oil fatty acids have beneficial effects on coronary heart disease.

  6. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  7. ST Elevation Infarction after Heart Transplantation Induced by Coronary Spasms and Mural Thrombus Detected by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Niels Ramsing; Eiskjær, Hans; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Maeng, Michael; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Christiansen, Evald Høj

    2016-01-01

    The case illustrates the possible link between coronary spasms, intraluminal thrombus formation, and widespread organized and layered thrombi in HTx patients. Furthermore, the case underlines the clinical value of OCT as a novel method for high-resolution vessel imaging in heart-transplanted (HTx) patients with coronary spasms and suspected coronary artery disease. Coronary spasms and sudden death are frequent complications after HTx. The underlying mechanisms leading to these complications are unknown. The present case displays the clinical course of a 19-year-old HTx patient who was hospitalized due to acute myocardial infarction induced by severe coronary spasms. The patients remained unstable on conservative therapy. Therefore, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed and revealed massive, organized thrombi in the left main coronary artery, the circumflex coronary artery, and the left anterior descending coronary artery. The patient was stabilized after percutaneous coronary intervention. As a mural thrombus often goes undetected by coronary angiography, OCT may prove benefit in HTx patients with myocardial infarction or suspected coronary spasms. PMID:27980873

  8. [Using the Tabu-search-algorithm-based Bayesian network to analyze the risk factors of coronary heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Wei, Z; Zhang, X L; Rao, H X; Wang, H F; Wang, X; Qiu, L X

    2016-06-01

    Under the available data gathered from a coronary study questionnaires with 10 792 cases, this article constructs a Bayesian network model based on the tabu search algorithm and calculates the conditional probability of each node, using the Maximum-likelihood. Pros and cons of the Bayesian network model are evaluated to compare against the logistic regression model in the analysis of coronary factors. Applicability of this network model in clinical study is also investigated. Results show that Bayesian network model can reveal the complex correlations among influencing factors on the coronary and the relationship with coronary heart diseases. Bayesian network model seems promising and more practical than the logistic regression model in analyzing the influencing factors of coronary heart disease.

  9. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the heart muscle and supporting blood vessels. High blood total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk of developing coronary heart disease. High CHD rates occur among people with high total cholesterol levels of 240 milligrams per...

  10. [Combined surgical treatment for coronary heart disease as well as heart valve diseases and carotid artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Reichart, B; Kemkes, B M; Klinner, W; Kreuzer, E; Becker, H M; Harrington, O B; Crosby, V G; Wolf, R Y

    1979-04-26

    This is an account on combined procedures in 124 patients suffering from arteriosclerotic vessel disease. In order to judge the proceedings and the results the patients were divided up into two groups. in 15 patients (group I) a carotid endarterectomy combined with an aorto-coronary bypass operation was performed; once a subclavian artery stenosis was resected at the same time. One patient of that group died after 31 days (7%). In group II 108 heart valve operations were performed together with a coronary artery revascularisation. Early and late mortality divided up as follows: aortic stenosis 6/44 (14%) respectively 2/44 (5%); aortic insufficiency 1/14 (7%) resp. 0; combined aortic disease 1/8 )13%) resp. 0; mitral stenosis 1/11 (9%) resp. 0; mitral insufficiency 6/26 (23%) resp. 2/26 (8%); combined mitral valve disease 1/2 (50%) resp. 0; three times both valves (aorta, mitral) were replaced without mortality. In our opinion combined procedures, resection of supraaortic artery stenosis respectively cardiac valve operations and aorto-coronary bypass are indicated especially since the functional long-term results are excellent. Though one should consider the high operative risk in patients with mitral insufficiency and combined mitral valve disease.

  11. Ethnic differences in coronary heart disease case fatality rates in Auckland.

    PubMed

    Bullen, C; Beaglehole, R

    1997-12-01

    Data from the Auckland Coronary or Stroke (ARCOS) study for the years 1983 to 1992 were analysed to describe 28-day case fatality rates from coronary heart disease among Europeans, Maori and Pacific Islands people in Auckland, New Zealand. The case fatality rate was consistently higher in each age group and for both sexes among Maori and Pacific Islands people than in Europeans. Age-standardised case fatalities for Maori and Pacific Islands people were similar at around 65 per cent, compared with around 45 per cent among Europeans, and these differences were not explained by ethnic differences in possible underreporting of nonfatal myocardial infarction, in socioeconomic status, smoking, symptoms or past myocardial infarction. There was evidence of a more rapid progression of acute coronary events to a fatal outcome among Maori and Pacific Islands people, partly explained by delays in access to life support and coronary care: greater proportions of Pacific Islands people than Maori or Europeans who died did so within an hour of onset of symptoms (56 per cent of Pacific Islands people, 47 per cent of Maori, 45 per cent of Europeans). Pacific Islands and Maori people with acute coronary events took longer to reach a coronary care unit (mean times: Pacific Islands people 8.6 hours, Maori 7.4 hours, Europeans 6.7 hours, P < 0.05), although the median times were not significantly different; life-support units were used by a majority of Pacific Islands people and Europeans (57 per cent and 55 per cent, respectively), compared with only 46 per cent of Maori, but hospital care was similar for the three groups. Further qualitative and quantitative research is needed to investigate the reasons for these ethnic disparities in case fatality rates.

  12. Spanish flu and early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Azambuja, Maria Inês Reinert

    2004-01-01

    According to Stephen Jay Gould, "we have a strong preference for seeing trends as entities moving somewhere." However, trends may instead be the product of relative expansions and contractions of different subpopulations constituting the system. Variation in attributes of coronary heart disease cases during the decline in coronary heart disease mortality suggests a change in the primary source-subpopulation of cases over time. It is proposed that an early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation, characterized by high serum-cholesterol phenotype and high case-fatality--which contributed to most of the coronary heart disease cases and deaths during the 1960s--may have been a late result of the 1918 influenza pandemic. The same unusual immune response to infection that in 1918 killed preferentially men, whites, and those born from 1880 to 1900 (20-40 years old) may have "primed" survivors of those birth cohorts to late coronary heart disease mortality. Ecologic evidence in favor of a birth cohort and geographic association between both epidemics is presented. Cross-reactive auto-immune response upon reinfection could explain the excess coronary heart disease deaths reported during influenza epidemics from the late 1920s onward. Mimicry between the viral hemagglutinin and the apolipoprotein B or the low-density lipoprotein receptor could be the link between infection and hypercholesterolemia. The extinction of those birth cohorts would result in a relative increase in cases coming from a 2nd subpopulation, which was characterized by insulin resistance and chronic expression of low-grade inflammation markers and was comparatively less vulnerable to die acutely from coronary heart disease.

  13. Cohort study of effect of being overweight and change in weight on risk of coronary heart disease in old age.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T. B.; Launer, L. J.; Madans, J.; Feldman, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk of late life coronary heart disease associated with being overweight in late middle or old age and to assess whether weight change modifies this risk. DESIGN: Longitudinal study of subjects in the epidemiological follow up study of the national health and nutrition examination survey I. SETTING: United States. SUBJECTS: 621 men and 960 women free of coronary heart disease in 1982-84 (mean age 77 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incidence of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Body mass index of 27 or more in late middle age was associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease in late life (relative risk = 1.7 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 2.1)) while body mass index of 27 or more in old age was not (1.1 (0.8 to 1.5)). This difference in risk was due largely to weight loss between middle and old age. Exclusion of those with weight loss of 10% or more increased risk associated with heavier weight in old age (1.4 (1.0 to 1.9)). Thinner older people who lost weight and heavier people who had gained weight showed increased risk of coronary heart disease compared with thinner people with stable weight. CONCLUSIONS: Heavier weight in late middle age was a risk factor for coronary heart disease in late life. Heavier weight in old age was associated with an increased risk once those with substantial weight loss were excluded. The contribution of weight to risk of coronary heart disease in older people may be underestimated if weight history is neglected. PMID:9224080

  14. Physical inactivity as a risk factor for coronary heart disease: a WHO and International Society and Federation of Cardiology position statement.

    PubMed Central

    Bijnen, F. C.; Caspersen, C. J.; Mosterd, W. L.

    1994-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is responsible for a considerable amount of the morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases in industrialized countries. Many countries have therefore adopted prevention policies designed to reduce the prevalence of three of the major risk factors for coronary heart disease--high serum cholesterol, smoking, and high blood pressure. Physical inactivity is, however, also an important risk factor for developing coronary heart disease. This article presents a position statement by WHO and the International Society and Federation of Cardiology on physical inactivity and coronary heart disease. PMID:8131243

  15. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  16. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  17. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography.

    PubMed

    Umetani, K; Fukushima, K

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  18. Causes and Predictors of Death in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease (from the Heart and Soul Study).

    PubMed

    Wang, Elizabeth Y; Dixson, Jeffrey; Schiller, Nelson B; Whooley, Mary A

    2017-01-01

    Although the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States has increased during the past 25 years, cardiovascular mortality has decreased due to advances in CHD therapy and prevention. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with CHD who die from cardiovascular versus noncardiovascular causes and the causes and predictors of death, in a cohort of patients with CHD. The Heart and Soul Study enrolled 1,024 participants with stable CHD from 2000 to 2002 and followed them for 10 years. Causes of mortality were assigned based on detailed review of medical records, death certificates, and coroner reports by blinded adjudicators. During 7,680 person-years of follow-up, 401 participants died. Of these deaths, 42.4% were cardiovascular and 54.4% were noncardiovascular. Myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death accounted for 72% of cardiovascular deaths. Cancer, pneumonia, and sepsis accounted for 67% of noncardiovascular deaths. Independent predictors of cardiac mortality were older age, inducible ischemia on stress echocardiography, higher heart rate at rest, smoking, lower hemoglobin, and higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (all p values <0.05); independent predictors of noncardiac mortality included older age, inducible ischemia, higher heart rate, lower exercise capacity, and nonuse of statins (all p values <0.05). In conclusion, mortality in this cohort was more frequently due to noncardiovascular causes, and predictors of noncardiovascular mortality included factors traditionally associated with cardiovascular mortality.

  19. Dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Dynamics of glucose concentration in human organism is an important diagnostic characteristic for it's parameters correlate significantly with the severity of metabolic, vessel and perfusion disorders. 36 patients with stable angina pectoris of II and III functional classes were involved in this study. All of them were men in age range of 45-59 years old. 7 patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (aged from 49 to 59 years old) form the group of compare. Control group (n = 5) was of practically healthy men in comparable age. To all patients intravenous glucose solution (40%) in standard loading dose was injected. Capillary and vein blood samples were withdrawn before, and 5, 60, 120, 180 and 240 minutes after glucose load. At these time points blood pressure and glucose concentration were measured. In prepared blood smears shape, deformability and sizes of erythrocytes, quantity and degree of shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were studied. Received data were approximated by polynomial of high degree to receive concentration function of studied parameters, which first derivative elucidate velocity characteristics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease and practically healthy persons. Received data show principle differences in dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease as a possible mechanism of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  20. Complete heart block in late presentation of inferior STEMI successfully treated with percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Liang, Michael; Chin, John; Pasupati, Sanjeevan

    2011-09-01

    A 55-year-old female presented with 4-day history of fatigue and exertional shortness of breath. A late presentation inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was diagnosed based on ST elevation in the inferior leads of electrocardiography and elevated cardiac troponin T (TnT). She developed complete heart block 1 day after admission to the hospital and remained hemodynamically stable. She was taken to the catheterization laboratory for a temporary pacing wire insertion. Coronary angiogram at the same time showed an occluded right coronary artery at the mid-section. The lesion was successfully opened. Within 24 hours, the patient's heart rhythm returned to sinus with first-degree atrioventricular block (AVB), thus avoiding the need for a permanent pacemaker. Current guidelines recommend medical management for late presentation hemodynamically stable STEMI of more than 72 H onset. Current ACC/AHA/HRS Pacemaker Guidelines recommend reperfusion strategy for acute presentation inferior STEMI associated with AVB. However, no clear strategy exists in the case of late presentation inferior STEMI with advanced AVB. Our case report suggests that late coronary intervention could be a management strategy in such a scenario in order to avoid a permanent pacemaker.

  1. Direct effects of smoking on the heart: silent ischemic disturbances of coronary flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deanfield, J.E.; Shea, M.J.; Wilson, R.A.; Horlock, P.; de Landsheere, C.M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1986-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is strongly associated with ischemic heart disease and acute coronary events. The effect of smoking a single cigarette on regional myocardial perfusion was studied in 13 chronic smokers with typical stable angina pectoris using positron emission tomography and rubidium-82 (/sup 82/Rb). Findings were compared with the effects of physical exercise. After exercise, 8 patients (61%) had angina, ST depression and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion. Uptake of /sup 82/Rb increased from 49 +/- 8 to 60 +/- 7 in remote myocardium, but decreased from 46 +/- 3 to 37 +/- 5 in an ischemic area. The remaining 5 patients (39%) had homogeneous increases in /sup 82/Rb uptake without angina or ST depression. After smoking, 6 of the 8 patients with positive exercise test responses had a decrease in /sup 82/Rb uptake, from 47 +/- 3 to 35 +/- 6 in the same segment of myocardium affected during exercise. However, in contrast to exercise, the events during smoking were largely silent. The absolute decreases in regional /sup 82/Rb uptake after smoking occurred at significantly lower levels of myocardial oxygen demand than after exercise. This suggests that an impairment of coronary blood supply is responsible. Thus, in smokers with coronary artery disease, each cigarette can cause profound silent disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion that are likely to occur frequently during daily life. Such repeated insults may represent an important mechanism linking smoking with coronary events.

  2. Correlation of coronary artery stenosis evaluation with left heart structure and function by multi-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Song, L N; Cao, A D; Niu, Y J; Liu, N

    2014-08-07

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) evaluation of coronary artery stenosis on left heart structure and systolic function. Coronary artery CT angiography was performed in 200 patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease, and then according to the AHA coronary artery 17-segment fractionation method, the Gensini score (GS) was determined for every narrow segment, and one-stop assessment of the correlation between left heart structure and function was performed. After the grouping of GS quartiles from low to high, there were differences between different patients with regard to LVDD, LADD, LVEDV, LVESV, MM, LVEF, and FS, while no difference in SV and CO. GS showed linear negative correlation with LVEF and FS, and linear positive correlation with LVDD, LADD, LVEDV, LVESV, and MM, while no correlation with SV and CO. That is, GS of coronary artery stenosis was negatively correlated with left ventricular systolic function and positively correlated with myocardial mass. The narrower the coronary artery, the worse the cardiac function and the higher the myocardial hypertrophy. Coronary artery stenosis was one of the important causes of the decrease in left ventricular systolic function and cardiac remodeling.

  3. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in coronary heart disease: a collaborative meta-analysis of 82 studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Persistent inflammation has been proposed to contribute to various stages in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) signalling propagates downstream inflammation cascades. To assess whether this pathway is causally relevant to coronary heart disease, we studied a functional genetic variant known to affect IL6R signalling. Methods In a collaborative meta-analysis, we studied Asp358Ala (rs2228145) in IL6R in relation to a panel of conventional risk factors and inflammation biomarkers in 125 222 participants. We also compared the frequency of Asp358Ala in 51 441 patients with coronary heart disease and in 136 226 controls. To gain insight into possible mechanisms, we assessed Asp358Ala in relation to localised gene expression and to postlipopolysaccharide stimulation of interleukin 6. Findings The minor allele frequency of Asp358Ala was 39%. Asp358Ala was not associated with lipid concentrations, blood pressure, adiposity, dysglycaemia, or smoking (p value for association per minor allele ≥0·04 for each). By contrast, for every copy of 358Ala inherited, mean concentration of IL6R increased by 34·3% (95% CI 30·4–38·2) and of interleukin 6 by 14·6% (10·7–18·4), and mean concentration of C-reactive protein was reduced by 7·5% (5·9–9·1) and of fibrinogen by 1·0% (0·7–1·3). For every copy of 358Ala inherited, risk of coronary heart disease was reduced by 3·4% (1·8–5·0). Asp358Ala was not related to IL6R mRNA levels or interleukin-6 production in monocytes. Interpretation Large-scale human genetic and biomarker data are consistent with a causal association between IL6R-related pathways and coronary heart disease. Funding British Heart Foundation; UK Medical Research Council; UK National Institute of Health Research, Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre; BUPA Foundation. PMID:22421339

  4. Ischemic heart disease due to compression of the coronary arteries by malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagasako, Yuki; Akaeda, Shun; Yanase, Fumitaka; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Atsushi; Higuchi, Takakazu; Okada, Sadamu

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man presented with a two-month history of angina pectoris. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a serial enlargement of the supraclavicular and mediastinal lymph nodes compressing the heart, pulmonary artery and aorta. CT angiography (CTA) showed stenosis of the coronary arteries as a result of compression by the enlarged lymph nodes. First-pass contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at rest revealed a perfusion defect, thus indicating myocardial ischemia. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was diagnosed and multidrug combination chemotherapy led to prompt improvement of the symptoms. Relief of the stenosis in the coronary arteries and improvements in myocardial perfusion were noted on follow-up CTA and MRI.

  5. Inflammatory cytokine levels in patients with periodontitis and/or coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haihua; Lin, Xiaolong; Zheng, Pei; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate systemic and local levels of four classic inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, MCP-1, VEGF, PDGF) in patients with periodontitis and coronary heart disease (CHD). 109 volunteers were enrolled and the condition of their periodontal tissue and coronary artery were assessed. The patients were then divided into four distinct groups: periodontitis only, CHD only, periodontitis with CHD, and healthy controls. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and venous blood were collected. The concentrations of cytokines were detected meanwhile by specific ELISA. The IL-1β and MCP-1 concentrations in the serum and GCF of the three disease groups were significantly higher than those in the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Serum VEGF concentrations of the patients with existing disease was lower than that of the controls. VEGF levels in the GCF of all disease groups were significantly higher than that of the control group (P ≤ 0.05).

  6. Amaranth oil application for coronary heart disease and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Danik M; Miroshnichenko, Lidia A; Kulakova, Svetlana N; Pogojeva, Ala V; Zoloedov, Vladimir I

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the Nation's leading killer for both men and women among all racial and ethnic groups. Development and progression of CVD is linked to the presence of risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. It is known that cholesterol is an indicator of increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Low-density cholesterol (LDL) above 130 mg/dl high-density cholesterol (HDL) cholesterol below 35 mg/dl and total blood cholesterol above 200 mg/dl are indicators of problematic cholesterol. Proper ranges of cholesterol are important in the prevention of CVD. It has been suggested that a reduction in the consumption of saturated and an increase in unsaturated fatty acids is beneficial and prevents CVD. Amaranth grain contains tocotrienols and squalene compounds, which are known to affect cholesterol biosynthesis. The cholesterol precursors squalene, lanosterol and other methyl sterols, reflect cholesterol synthesis [1-3], whereas plant sterols and cholestanol, a metabolite of cholesterol, reflect the efficiency of cholesterol absorption in normal and hyperlipidemic populations [4-6]. Qureshi with co-authors [7] showed that feeding of chickens with amaranth oil decreases blood cholesterol levels, which are supported by the work of others [8]. Previously, we have shown that Amaranth oil modulates the cell membrane fluidity [9] and stabilized membranes that could be one reason as to why it is beneficial to those who consume it. It is known that in hypertension, the cell membrane is defective and hence, the movement of the Na and K ions across the cell membranes could defective that could contribute to the development of increase in blood pressure. Based on these properties of amaranth oil we hypothesize that it could be of significant benefit for patients with CVD. PMID:17207282

  7. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that it is present at birth. It generally occurs when one of the ...

  8. Coffee consumption and death from coronary heart disease in middle aged Norwegian men and women.

    PubMed Central

    Tverdal, A; Stensvold, I; Solvoll, K; Foss, O P; Lund-Larsen, P; Bjartveit, K

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the association between number of cups of coffee consumed per day and coronary death when taking other major coronary risk factors into account. DESIGN--Men and women attending screening and followed up for a mean of 6.4 years. SETTING--Cardiovascular survey performed by ambulatory teams from the National Health Screening Service in Norway. PARTICIPANTS--All middle aged people in three counties: 19,398 men and 19,166 women aged 35-54 years who reported neither cardiovascular disease or diabetes nor symptoms of angina pectoris or intermittent claudication. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Predictive value of number of cups of coffee consumed per day. RESULTS--At initial screening total serum cholesterol concentration, high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, blood pressure, height, and weight were measured and self reported information about smoking history, physical activity, and coffee drinking habits was recorded. Altogether 168 men and 16 women died of coronary heart disease during follow up. Mean cholesterol concentrations for men and women were almost identical and increased from the lowest to highest coffee consumption group (13.1% and 10.9% respectively). With the proportional hazards model and adjustment for age, total serum and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, systolic blood pressure, and number of cigarettes per day the coefficient for coffee corresponded to a relative risk between nine or more cups of coffee and less than one cup of 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 4.5) for men and 5.1 (0.4 to 60.3) for women. For men the relative risk varied among the three counties. CONCLUSIONS--Coffee may affect mortality from coronary heart disease over and above its effect in raising cholesterol concentrations. PMID:2108750

  9. Trends in age-adjusted coronary heart disease mortality rates in Slovakia between 1993 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Psota, Marek; Pekarciková, Jarmila; O'Mullane, Monica; Rusnák, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and especially coronary heart disease (CHD) are the main causes of death in the Slovak Republic (SR). The aim of this study is to explore trends in age-adjusted coronary heart disease mortality rates in the whole Slovak population and in the population of working age between the years 1993 and 2009. A related indicator - potential years of life lost (PYLL) due to CHD--was calculated in the same period for males and females. Crude CHD mortality rates were age-adjusted using European standard population. The joinpoint Poisson regression was performed in order to find out the annual percentage change in trends. The age-adjusted CHD mortality rates decreased in the Slovak population and also in the population of working age. The change was significant only within the working-age sub-group. We found that partial diagnoses (myocardial infarction and chronic ischaemic heart disease) developed in the mirror-like manner. PYLL per 100,000 decreased during the observed period and the decline was more prominent in males. For further research we recommend to focus on several other issues, namely, to examine the validity of cause of death codes, to examine the development of mortality rates in selected age groups, to find out the cause of differential development of mortality rates in the Slovak Republic in comparison with the Czech Republic and Poland, and to explain the causes of decrease of the age-adjusted CHD mortality rates in younger age groups in Slovakia.

  10. A new apex-ejecting perfused rat heart preparation: relation between coronary flow and loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wikman-Coffelt, J; Coffelt, R J; Rapcsak, M; Sievers, R; Rouleau, J L; Parmley, W W

    1983-12-01

    The isolated perfused rat heart is an important experimental preparation for both mechanical and biochemical studies. In order to define better the relationship between coronary flow and loading conditions, a new preparation was developed in which the left ventricle ejected through the apex, while the aortic perfusion pressure could be separately controlled at a higher level than the apex afterload. Results were compared with a standard aortic perfused and ejecting preparation. All analyses were made at low calcium concentration (1.6 mmol X litre-1) for reducing cardiac performance. Coronary flow was related to perfusion pressure in the aortic ejecting preparation when the aortic afterload chamber was between 6.0 and 9.3 kPa (45 and 70 mmHg). Coronary autoregulation was demonstrable in the apex ejecting preparation irrespective of the height of the apex afterload chamber and the aortic ejecting preparation when the aortic chamber was between 11.0 and 16.0 kPa (83 and 120 mmHg). Following the addition of 10(-6) mol X litre-1 adenosine, there was significant coronary vasodilatation, and flow became pressure dependent in all cases. In the apex-ejecting preparation, with a high aortic pressure, coronary flow remained at relatively fixed level, and increases in oxygen demand were met by increasing oxygen extraction. Thus, in this preparation oxygen extraction was directly related to workload. With abrupt increases in afterload, going from 6.0 to 9.3 kPa (45 to 70 mmHg) to a higher level, there was evidence of transient hypoxia with the aortic ejecting but not the apex ejecting preparation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Intelligence System for Diagnosis Level of Coronary Heart Disease with K-Star Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kusnanto, Hari; Herianto, Herianto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, and it is important to diagnose the level of the disease. Intelligence systems for diagnosis proved can be used to support diagnosis of the disease. Unfortunately, most of the data available between the level/type of coronary heart disease is unbalanced. As a result system performance is low. Methods This paper proposes an intelligence systems for the diagnosis of the level of coronary heart disease taking into account the problem of data imbalance. The first stage of this research was preprocessing, which included resampled non-stratified random sampling (R), the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE), clean data out of range attribute (COR), and remove duplicate (RD). The second step was the sharing of data for training and testing using a k-fold cross-validation model and training multiclass classification by the K-star algorithm. The third step was performance evaluation. The proposed system was evaluated using the performance parameters of sensitivity, specificity, positive prediction value (PPV), negative prediction value (NPV), area under the curve (AUC) and F-measure. Results The results showed that the proposed system provides an average performance with sensitivity of 80.1%, specificity of 95%, PPV of 80.1%, NPV of 95%, AUC of 87.5%, and F-measure of 80.1%. Performance of the system without consideration of data imbalance provide showed sensitivity of 53.1%, specificity of 88,3%, PPV of 53.1%, NPV of 88.3%, AUC of 70.7%, and F-measure of 53.1%. Conclusions Based on these results it can be concluded that the proposed system is able to deliver good performance in the category of classification. PMID:26893948

  12. Genetic determinants of coronary heart disease: new discoveries and insights from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Riyaz S; Ye, Shu

    2011-09-01

    With the advent of the Human Genome Project and the genomic era, new tools and methodologies have revitalised genetic research into coronary heart disease (CHD). Unprecedented collaborative efforts are discovering novel risk variants for CHD, with most in hitherto unknown molecular pathways. These findings have stimulated a plethora of follow-up of functional and risk prediction studies to mine this wealth of new data. This review will explore the current state of knowledge of the genetic basis of CHD, with an emphasis on recent genomic studies and how these may eventually lead to the promised goals of new therapeutics and personalised medicine.

  13. Cystatin C as a Marker of Progressing Cardiovascular Events during Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Gevorgyan, M M; Voronina, N P; Goncharova, N V; Kozaruk, T V; Russkikh, G S; Bogdanova, L A; Korolenko, T A

    2017-02-01

    The role of cystatin C, an inhibitor of cysteine proteases, as an alternative and potent predictor of acute cardiovascular events in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients was examined and compared to that of other markers of cardiorenal abnormalities. The patients with CHD demonstrated elevated serum cystatin C, especially in cases with serious risk of cardiovascular complications. In comparison with other indicators of cardiorenal dysfunction, cystatin C can be viewed as an alternative predictor of cardiovascular complications, although its sensitivity is inferior to that of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and natriuretic peptide.

  14. Biomarkers in Cardiology - Part 2: In Coronary Heart Disease, Valve Disease and Special Situations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality and morbidity in Brazil. Their primary and secondary preventions are a priority for the health system and require multiple approaches for increased effectiveness. Biomarkers are tools used to identify with greater accuracy high-risk individuals, establish a faster diagnosis, guide treatment, and determine prognosis. This review aims to highlight the importance of biomarkers in clinical cardiology practice and raise relevant points regarding their application and perspectives for the next few years. This document was divided into two parts. This second part addresses the application of biomarkers in coronary heart disease, valvular diseases, cardio-oncology, pulmonary embolism, and cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:26083777

  15. Dietary patterns and their association with acute coronary heart disease: Lessons from the REGARDS Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2015-01-01

    Shikany et al used data from 17,418 participants in the REGARDS study, a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥ 45 years, enrolled between 2003–2007. They examined 536 acute coronary heart disease events at follow-up (median 5.8 years) in relation to five dietary patterns (Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad). After adjustment for baseline variables, the highest consumers of the Southern pattern experienced a 56% higher hazard for acute CHD. PMID:26779528

  16. Diabetes mellitus is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jonathan D; Rockman, Caron B; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Guo, Yu; Zhong, Hua; Weintraub, Howard S; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z; Adelman, Mark A; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is associated with significantly increased risk of peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes is classified as a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent, but it is unknown whether diabetes is a CHD risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease. The objective was to evaluate the odds of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or carotid artery stenosis (CAS) among participants with diabetes, CHD, or both, compared with participants without diabetes or CHD, in a nationwide vascular screening database. We hypothesized that diabetes and CHD would confer similar odds of PAD and CAS.

  17. Treating depression in coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure: what's new in using selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Palios, John; Parissis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Depression is a common co-morbidity in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, post by-pass surgery and chronic heart failure. The presence of depression is independently associated with a decline in health status and an increase in the risk of hospitalization and death for patients with coronary artery disease or congestive heart failure. Novel treatment modalities such as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may improve depressive symptoms and prognosis of post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patients interacting with the common pathophysiological mechanisms of depression and cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes current experimental and clinical evidence regarding the effects of SSRIs on platelet functions, immune and neurohormonal activation, and cardiac rhythm disturbances in patients with cardiovascular disease.

  18. Applications of Data Mining Methods in the Integrative Medical Studies of Coronary Heart Disease: Progress and Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixin; Guo, Fang

    2014-01-01

    A large amount of studies show that real-world study has strong external validity than the traditional randomized controlled trials and can evaluate the effect of interventions in a real clinical setting, which open up a new path for researches of integrative medicine in coronary heart disease. However, clinical data of integrative medicine in coronary heart disease are large in amount and complex in data types, making exploring the appropriate methodology a hot topic. Data mining techniques are to analyze and dig out useful information and knowledge from the mass data to guide people's practices. The present review provides insights for the main features of data mining and their applications of integrative medical studies in coronary heart disease, aiming to analyze the progress and prospect in this field. PMID:25544853

  19. Unusual Combination of Total Occlusion of Left Main Coronary Artery and Heart Failure with Pulmonary Hemosiderosis: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Elayda, MacArthur A.; Mathur, Virendra S.; Hall, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    A case of total occlusion of the left main coronary artery, congestive heart failure, and pulmonary hemosiderosis in a 54-year-old man is reported. Cardiac catheterization showed total occlusion of the left main coronary artery, subtotal occlusion of the right coronary artery, severely deranged hemodynamics, and an akinetic left ventricle except for a hypokinetic posterobasal segment. A radionuclide left ventricular performance study revealed an ejection fraction of 0.16 with diffuse biventricular hypokinesis and dilatation. Despite all the risk factors, the patient underwent a total of six saphenous vein grafts without perioperative or immediate postoperative complications. Images PMID:15227138

  20. Trace metals and coronary heart disease risk indicators in 152 elderly men (the Zutphen study)

    SciTech Connect

    Kromhout, D.; Wibowo, A.A.E.; Herber, R.F.M.; Dalderup, L.M.; Heerdink, H.; de Lezenne Coulander, C.; Zielhuis, R.L.

    1985-09-01

    Information about trace metals and coronary heart disease risk indicators was collected in 1977 among 152 men aged 57-76 years in the town of Zutphen, the Netherlands. Serum zinc, serum copper, blood cadmium, and blood lead were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry and serum lithium by flame emission spectrometry. After uni- and multivariate regression analysis, the following statistically significant relations were found: serum zinc was inversely related to resting heart rate; serum copper was positively related to cigarette smoking and inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol; blood cadmium was strongly positively related to cigarette smoking and inversely to Quetelet index; the positive relation between blood lead and cigarette smoking was of borderline significance; and blood lead was related to blood pressure, with the relation being stronger for systolic than for diastolic blood pressure.

  1. NO-Synthase Activity in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease Associated with Hypertension of Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for the development of CHD. Abnormalities in NO generation or activity have been proposed as a major mechanism of CHD. The purpose of this article is to determine the activity of eNOS and iNOS in patients with isolated CHD and CHD associated with HT of different age groups. Methods Fifty patients with isolated CHD and 42 patients with CHD associated with HT were enrolled in this study. NOS activity was determined by nitrite anion formed in the reaction. Results A statistically significant increase in iNOS activity is observed in elderly donors. In patients with isolated coronary heart disease cNOS activity is statistically significantly reduced with respect to the control group. The reduction of enzymatic activity of cNOS is more expressed in elderly patients than in middle-aged patients with coronary heart disease. Alterations in eNOS activity are more expressed in patients with coronary heart disease associated with hypertension than in patients with isolated coronary heart disease. Against the background of cNOS inhibition in the patients, a sharp increase in iNOS activity is observed. Conclusions It has been shown that disturbance of endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease associated with hypertension is characterized by reduced endothelial NO synthesis by cNOS and increased systemic NO synthesis due to increased iNOS activity. It has been found that the lack of endothelial NO and hyperproduction of »harmful« NO by iNOS are more expressed in elderly patients. PMID:28356863

  2. A decrease in the percentage of circulating mDC precursors in patients with coronary heart disease: a relation to the severity and extent of coronary artery lesions?

    PubMed

    Wen, Jin; Wen, Yan; Zhiliang, Li; Lingling, Chen; Longxing, Cao; Ming, Wang; Qiang, Fu

    2013-03-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in coronary heart disease. Dendritic cells (DCs) are principal players in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Although the percentage of circulating DC precursors in coronary heart disease have been investigated, circulating myeloid DC (mDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC) precursors have not been extensively studied, particularly in relation to the severity of coronary artery lesions in patients with coronary heart disease. In this study, we recruited controls (n = 29), patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP, n = 30), patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP, n = 56), and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI, n = 50). The severity and extent of coronary artery lesions was evaluated by Gensini score, following coronary angiograms. The percentage of circulating mDC and pDC precursors was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Plasma levels of MCP-1 and MMP-9, which correlate with atherosclerosis and DC migration, were also measured. The percentage of circulating mDC precursors was reduced in patients with AMI and UAP compared with control and SAP patients, respectively (p < 0.01 for AMI vs. SAP and Control, p < 0.05 for UAP vs. SAP and Control). The percentage of circulating pDC precursors was not significant changed. The levels of plasma MMP-9 and MCP-1 and Genisi score were all increased in patients with AMI and UAP, compared to control and SAP patients, respectively (p < 0.01 for AMI vs. SAP and control, p < 0.05 for UAP vs. SAP and control). Overall, the percentage of circulating mDC precursors was negatively correlated with MCP-1 (p < 0.001), MMP-9 (p < 0.001) and Genisi scores (p < 0.001). Genisi scores were positively correlated with the levels of MCP-1 (p < 0.001) and MMP-9 (p < 0.001). Our study suggested that the percentage of circulating mDC precursors is negatively correlated with the severity and extent of coronary artery lesions in patients with coronary heart disease.

  3. Mendelian Randomisation study of the influence of eGFR on coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Charoen, Pimphen; Nitsch, Dorothea; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; White, Jonathan; Zabaneh, Delilah; Jefferis, Barbara; Wannamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Mulick Cassidy, Amy; Gaunt, Tom; Day, Ian; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Brunner, Eric; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hingorani, Aroon; Whittaker, John; Pablo Casas, Juan; Dudbridge, Frank; Dale, Caroline; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Ong, Ken; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Sofat, Reecha; Schmidt, Floriaan; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Morris, Richard; Plagno, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Impaired kidney function, as measured by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), has been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in observational studies, but it is unclear whether this association is causal or the result of confounding or reverse causation. In this study we applied Mendelian randomisation analysis using 17 genetic variants previously associated with eGFR to investigate the causal role of kidney function on CHD. We used 13,145 participants from the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium and 194,427 participants from the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis plus Coronary Artery Disease (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D) consortium. We observed significant association of an unweighted gene score with CHD risk (odds ratio = 0.983 per additional eGFR-increasing allele, 95% CI = 0.970–0.996, p = 0.008). However, using weights calculated from UCLEB, the gene score was not associated with disease risk (p = 0.11). These conflicting results could be explained by a single SNP, rs653178, which was not associated with eGFR in the UCLEB sample, but has known pleiotropic effects that prevent us from drawing a causal conclusion. The observational association between low eGFR and increased CHD risk was not explained by potential confounders, and there was no evidence of reverse causation, therefore leaving the remaining unexplained association as an open question. PMID:27338949

  4. Optimal use of available claims to identify a Medicare population free of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kent, Shia T; Safford, Monika M; Zhao, Hong; Levitan, Emily B; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Kilpatrick, Ryan D; Kilgore, Meredith L; Muntner, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We examined claims-based approaches for identifying a study population free of coronary heart disease (CHD) using data from 8,937 US blacks and whites enrolled during 2003-2007 in a prospective cohort study linked to Medicare claims. Our goal was to minimize the percentage of persons at study entry with self-reported CHD (previous myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization). We assembled 6 cohorts without CHD claims by requiring 6 months, 1 year, or 2 years of continuous Medicare fee-for-service insurance coverage prior to study entry and using either a fixed-window or all-available look-back period. We examined adding CHD-related claims to our "base algorithm," which included claims for myocardial infarction and coronary revascularization. Using a 6-month fixed-window look-back period, 17.8% of participants without claims in the base algorithm reported having CHD. This was reduced to 3.6% using an all-available look-back period and adding other CHD claims to the base algorithm. Among cohorts using all-available look-back periods, increasing the length of continuous coverage from 6 months to 1 or 2 years reduced the sample size available without lowering the percentage of persons with self-reported CHD. This analysis demonstrates approaches for developing a CHD-free cohort using Medicare claims.

  5. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  6. Effect of age and methacholine on the rate and coronary flow of isolated hearts of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, X S; Tanz, R D; Chang, K S

    1989-08-01

    1. Isolated hearts perfused by the method of Langendorff from 6, 12 and 24 week streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats displayed a significant bradycardia following 60 min equilibration. The rate of hearts from 12-week diabetic rats (164 +/- 17) displayed the greatest bradycardia compared to age-matched controls (268 +/- 15; P less than 0.001), and diabetics treated with insulin (232 +/- 17; P less than 0.01), but by 52 weeks the heart rate of the 3 groups was similar. With advancing age the effect of STZ diabetes on the rate of rat isolated perfused hearts remained unchanged but the rate of the control and diabetic + insulin groups declined. 2. Hearts from 6-52 week STZ-treated rats were found to be more sensitive to the negative chronotropic effect of methacholine, the greatest difference occurring in hearts from the 12 week animals. Atropine (10(-7) M) did not affect the resting heart rate of age-matched controls or diabetics but blocked methacholine (2.6 x 10(-6) M)-induced bradycardia in both, suggesting that the site of action of diabetic bradycardia is not the muscarinic receptors. 3. At the end of equilibration there was a significant decrease in coronary flow in hearts from 12 week diabetic animals. In spontaneously beating diabetic rat hearts administration of methacholine (2.6 x 10(-6) M) produced a significantly greater decrease in coronary flow in the 12, 24 and 52 week diabetic hearts. When electrically paced (5 Hz) however, there was no difference in response to methacholine between the three groups except at 52 weeks between the age-matched control and diabetic groups. This suggests that the more pronounced reduction induced by methacholine on the coronary flow of diabetic hearts is secondary to its negative chronotropic effect. 4. In general, hearts from diabetic animals treated with insulin respond similarly to their agematched controls in the presence and absence of methacholine.

  7. Contrast material injection protocol with the flow rate adjusted to the heart rate for dual source CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaomei; Chen, Wenping; Li, Mei; Xu, Yi; Xu, Hai; Zhu, Yinsu; Wang, Dehang; Tang, Lijun

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effect on coronary arterial attenuations of contrast material flow rate adjusted to a patient's heart rate during dual source CT coronary angiography (DSCT-CCTA). A total of 296 consecutive patients (mean age: 58.7 years) undergoing DSCT-CCTA without previous coronary stent placement, bypass surgery, congenital or valvular heart disease were included. The image acquisition protocol was standardized (120 kV, 380 mAs) and retrospective electrocardiograph (ECG) gating was used. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups [flow rate: G1: dosage/16, G2: dosage/(scan time +8), G3: fixed flow rate]. The groups were compared with respect to the attenuations of the ascending aorta (AA) above coronary ostia, the left main coronary artery (LM), the proximal right coronary artery (RCA), the left anterior descending artery (LAD), the left circumflex artery (LCX), and the contrast to noise ratio of the LM (LM(CNR)) and the proximal RCA (RCA(CNR)). Correlations between heart rate and attenuation of the coronary arteries were evaluated in three groups with linear regression. There was no significant difference in the three groups among the mean attenuations of AA (P = 0.141), LM (P = 0.068), RCA (P = 0.284), LM(CNR) (P = 0.598) and RCA(CNR) (P = 0.546). The attenuations of the LAD and the LCX in group 1 were slightly higher than those in group 2 and 3 (P < 0.05). In group 1, the attenuations of the AA (P < 0.01), LM (P < 0.01), RCA (P < 0.01), LAD (P = 0.02) and LCX (P < 0.01) decreased, respectively, with an increasing heart rate. A similar finding was detected in group 3 (AA: P < 0.01, LM: P < 0.01, RCA: P < 0.01, LAD: P < 0.01 and LCX: P < 0.01). In contrast, the attenuations of the AA (P = 0.55), LM (P = 0.27), RCA (P = 0.77), LAD (P = 0.22) and LCX (P = 0.74) had no significant correlation with heart rate in group 2. In all three groups, LM(CNR) (P = 0.77, 0.69 and 0.73 respectively) and RCA(CNR) (P = 0.75, 0.39 and 0.61 respectively) had no

  8. Diagnostic Utility of ANG in Coronary Heart Disease Complicating Chronic Heart Failure: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Yang, Xue; Yu, Ying; Zhao, Ji; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Rui; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenin (ANG) has been shown to be elevated in several cardiovascular diseases. To detect its levels and diagnostic capacity in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients complicating chronic heart failure (CHF), we performed this cross-sectional study and enrolled 616 CHD patients and 53 healthy controls. According to complicating CHF or not, the patients were divided into CHF group (n = 203) and CHD disease controls (n = 413), in which the CHF group was subdivided as heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) group or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) group on the basis of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), or as different NYHA class group. Their plasma ANG levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Plasma ANG was 342.8 (IQR [273.9,432.9]), 304.5 (IQR [254.0,370.5]), and 279.7 (IQR [214.4,344.0]) ng/mL in the CHF group, CHD disease controls, and healthy controls, respectively, significantly higher in the CHF group compared with the others. Furthermore, among CHF group, ANG is dramatically higher in the HFrEF patients compared with the HFpEF patients. As for the diagnostic capacity of ANG, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.71 (95% CI 0.63–0.78). We concluded that plasma ANG is elevated in CHD complicating CHF patients and may be a moderate discriminator of CHF from CHD or the healthy. PMID:27872509

  9. Low-dose copper infusion into the coronary circulation induces acute heart failure in diabetic rats: New mechanism of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carlos Chun Ho; Soon, Choong Yee; Chuang, Chia-Lin; Phillips, Anthony R J; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impairs copper (Cu) regulation, causing elevated serum Cu and urinary Cu excretion in patients with established cardiovascular disease; it also causes cardiomyopathy and chronic cardiac impairment linked to defective Cu homeostasis in rats. However, the mechanisms that link impaired Cu regulation to cardiac dysfunction in diabetes are incompletely understood. Chronic treatment with triethylenetetramine (TETA), a Cu²⁺-selective chelator, improves cardiac function in diabetic patients, and in rats with heart disease; the latter displayed ∼3-fold elevations in free Cu²⁺ in the coronary effluent when TETA was infused into their coronary arteries. To further study the nature of defective cardiac Cu regulation in diabetes, we employed an isolated-perfused, working-heart model in which we infused micromolar doses of Cu²⁺ into the coronary arteries and measured acute effects on cardiac function in diabetic and non-diabetic-control rats. Infusion of CuCl₂ solutions caused acute dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts. Several measures of baseline cardiac function were impaired in diabetic hearts, and these defects were exacerbated by low-micromolar Cu²⁺ infusion. The response to infused Cu²⁺ was augmented in diabetic hearts, which became defective at lower infusion levels and underwent complete pump failure (cardiac output = 0 ml/min) more often (P < 0.0001) at concentrations that only moderately impaired function of control hearts. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the acute effects on cardiac function of pathophysiological elevations in coronary Cu²⁺. The effects of Cu²⁺ infusion occur within minutes in both control and diabetic hearts, which suggests that they are not due to remodelling. Heightened sensitivity to the acute effects of small elevations in Cu²⁺ could contribute substantively to impaired cardiac function in patients with diabetes and is thus identified as a new mechanism of heart disease.

  10. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart smart substitutions; Wellness - heart smart substitutions

  11. [Competitive sports and leisure-time physical activity in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Pedrinazzi, Claudio; Durin, Ornella; Inama, Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    During recent years, the central role of exercise in the prevention of cardiovascular disease has gradually been demonstrated, and in 2003 the consensus document of the Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism on the role of physical exercise in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease defined sedentary lifestyle as a modifiable independent cardiovascular risk factor, responsible for 12% of total mortality in the United States and for a 1.9-fold increase in the risk of ischemic heart disease. The reduction in cardiovascular mortality and cardiac ischemic events in subjects who perform regular physical activity is mainly due to the action that exercise plays on the control of cardiovascular risk factors. In particular, physical training has proved capable of improving lipid profile, reducing blood pressure and body weight, and improving glycemic control in diabetic subjects. In patients with coronary artery disease, combined exercise training, including both aerobic activities and strength training, is currently recommended. However, physical training in patients suffering from ischemic heart disease should be carefully prescribed, in order to maximize the positive effects and minimize the risks. It is also important that physical training programs are conducted in suitable facilities, with appropriately trained staff and with technical equipment suitable to deal with any emergency situations.

  12. Parity and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Middle-aged and Older Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lijun; Wu, Jing; Xu, Guiqiang; Song, Lulu; Yang, Siyi; Yuan, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Youjie

    2015-11-26

    Pregnancy leads to physiological changes in lipid, glucose levels, and weight, which may increase the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in later life. The purpose of this study was to examine whether parity is associated with CHD in middle-aged and older Chinese women. A total of 20,207 women aged 37 to 94 years from Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort who completed the questionnaire, were medically examined and provided blood samples, were included in our analysis. CHD cases were determined by self-report of physician diagnosis through face-to-face interviews. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between parity and CHD. The rate of CHD was 15.8%. Parity had a positive association with CHD without adjustment of covariates. After controlling for the potential confounders, increasing risk of coronary heart disease was observed in women who had two (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.41-1.93), three (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.44-2.16), and four or more live births (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.33-2.20) compared with women with just one live birth. High parity was significantly associated with increasing risk of CHD in Chinese women. This suggests that multiparity may be a risk factor for CHD among Chinese women.

  13. Perceptions of coronary heart disease: the development and psychometric testing of a measurement scale.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W

    2014-01-01

    Individuals' perceptions of coronary heart disease (CHD) have implications for the ways in which they respond to the disease, process risks, make decisions, and take action to reduce CHD risks. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the perceptions of coronary heart disease scale (PCS) among a Hong Kong Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenient sample (n = 232) of participants recruited from a variety of catchments including public domains, a cardiac unit, and a cardiac rehabilitation and prevention center. Exploratory factor analysis identified a nine-item, two-factor model that accounted for 52.5% of the total explained variance. The two factors were the perceived risk (five items) and perceived seriousness (four items) of CHD. The PCS demonstrated good content validity; acceptable total, and subscale internal consistency (.73, .61 - .81); and significant contrast-group differences with higher levels of CHD perceptions among males (p = .002), younger participants (p < .001), and those with higher educational levels (p < .001), suggesting excellent construct validity. The newly developed PCS demonstrates acceptable psychometric properties as a short measurement scale, which supports its use in future research. Future validation of this scale is warranted.

  14. Risk factors for coronary heart disease among Asian Indians living in Australia.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ritin; Rolley, John X; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Sundar, Subbaram; Patel, Navin C; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the coronary heart disease risk factors in the Asian Indian community living in a large city in Australia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the Australia India Friendship Fair in 2010. All people of Asian Indian descent who attended the Fair and visited the health promotion stall were eligible to participate in the study if they self-identified as of Asian Indian origin, were aged between 18 and 80 years, and were able to speak English. Blood pressure, blood glucose, waist circumference, height, and weight were measured by a health professional. Smoking, cholesterol levels, and physical activity status were obtained through self-reports. Data were analyzed for 169 participants. More than a third of the participants under the age of 65 years had high blood pressure. Prevalence of diabetes (16%) and obesity (61%) was significantly higher compared with the national average. Ten women identified themselves as smokers. Physical activity patterns were similar to that of the wider Australian population. The study has provided a platform for raising awareness among nurses and promoting advocacy on the cardiovascular risk among Asian Indians. Strategies involving Asian Indian nurses and other Asian Indian health professionals as well as support from the private and public sectors can assist in the reduction of the coronary heart disease risk factors among this extremely susceptible population.

  15. Exhaustion of the Frank-Starling mechanism in conscious dogs with heart failure induced by chronic coronary microembolization.

    PubMed

    Gill, Robert M; Jones, Bonita D; Corbly, Angela K; Ohad, Dan G; Smith, Gerald D; Sandusky, George E; Christe, Michael E; Wang, Jie; Shen, Weiqun

    2006-07-04

    The role of the Frank-Starling mechanism in the regulation of cardiac systolic function in the ischemic failing heart was examined in conscious dogs. Left ventricular (LV) dimension, pressure and systolic function were assessed using surgically implanted instrumentations and non-invasive echocardiogram. Heart failure was induced by daily intra-coronary injections of microspheres for 3-4 weeks via implanted coronary catheters. Chronic coronary embolization resulted in a progressive dilation of the left ventricle (12+/-3%), increase in LV end-diastolic pressure (118+/-19%), depression of LV dP/dt(max) (-19+/-4%), fractional shortening (-36+/-7%), and cardiac work (-60+/-9%), and development of heart failure, while the LV contractile response to dobutamine was depressed. A brief inferior vena caval occlusion in dogs with heart failure decreased LV preload to match the levels attained in their control state and caused a further reduction of LV dP/dt(max), fractional shortening, stroke work and cardiac work. Moreover, in response to acute volume loading, the change in the LV end-diastolic dimension-pressure (DeltaLVEDD-DeltaLVEDP) curve in the failing heart became steeper and shifted significantly to the left, while the increases in LV stroke work and cardiac work were blunted. Thus, our results suggest that the Frank-Starling mechanism is exhausted in heart failure and unable to further respond to increasing volume while it plays an important compensatory role in adaptation to LV dysfunction in heart failure.

  16. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, P<0.001). In conclusion, the decrease in HR with ivabradine was associated with an increase in central systolic pressure, which may have antagonized possible benefits of HR lowering in coronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389.

  17. Electrocardiograms of Menopausal Women With Coronary Heart Disease or at Increased Risk for Its Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Nanette K.; Mischke, Jennifer M.; Schroeder, Rolf; Schroeder, Klaus; Collins, Peter; Grady, Deborah; Kornitzer, Marcel; Mosca, Lori; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about electrocardiographic (ECG) characteristics of menopausal women with or at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Data from 10,101 participants in the Raloxifene Use for The Heart (RUTH) trial were used to correlate baseline ECG abnormalities with clinical characteristics. Baseline characteristics that were statistically significantly associated (p ≤ 0.05) with ECG findings in univariate analyses were used to derive multivariate model selection. Of 59% normal electrocardiograms, 50% were from women with CHD and 69% from women at increased risk of CHD. In the women with CHD, 59% reported a previous myocardial infarction (MI); 43% had a normal electrocardiogram, and 49% had a definite ECG Q-wave MI. Women in the increased-risk group had not reported a previous MI, yet 11% had a definite ECG Q-wave MI. Of women reporting hypertension, 35% had ECG evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy, but 58% did not have an abnormal electrocardiogram. Significantly more women with diabetes in the increased-risk and documented CHD cohorts had abnormal electrocardiograms (p < 0.01 for the 2 cohorts). Percent abnormal electrocardiograms increased with increasing age (55 to 64, 65 to 74, and ≥75 years, p < 0.01) in all cohorts. Angina and coronary artery bypass graft surgery, but not percutaneous coronary intervention, predicted an abnormal electrocardiogram. In conclusion, there were high percentages of normal electrocardiograms in the increased-risk and documented CHD groups of RUTH participants, with substantial discrepancy between MI history and ECG MI documentation, and increasing age was the predominant correlate with an abnormal electrocardiogram in all 3 cohorts. PMID:21094358

  18. Low intensity physical conditioning: effects on patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Franklin, B A; Besseghini, I; Golden, L H

    1978-06-01

    The effects of 12 weeks of low intensity physical conditioning on serum lipid levels, body composition, and cardiorespiratory function were studied among patients with coronary heart disease. Twenty-three men, 45 to 59 years old, volunteered to participate. Three were excluded for medical reasons, and one voluntarily discontinued exercise. The conditioning program included a 10-minute warmup, 15 to 30 minutes of walking-jogging at an individually prescribed intensity corresponding to 70% to 75% of maximum heart rate (HRmax), and a 5-minute recovery period. The conditioning resulted in a decrease (p less than 0.05) in heart rate and blood pressure during standard submaximal work (200 kg/m/min). Maximal heart rate increased (p less than 0.05) by five beats per minute. Symptom-limited maximal oxygen uptake increased 12.8% (p less than 0.001) when expressed per unit body weight. Body weight remained essentially unchanged (-0.34 kg), while fat-free weight and fat weight increased (+0.68 kg, p less than 0.05) and decreased (-1.02 kg, p less than 0.05), respectively. Serum lipid levels remained unaffected by the conditioning regimen. Low intensity exercise is effective in cardiac reconditioning and should be favored at least during the initial stages of a training regimen in view of the decreased orthopedic problems, added safety, high adherence level and tolerable working rate.

  19. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  20. Image Quality of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography with 320-Row Area Detector Computed Tomography in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Tada, Akihiro; Sato, Shuhei; Kanie, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Takashi; Inai, Ryota; Akagi, Noriaki; Morimitsu, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess factors affecting image quality of 320-row computed tomography angiography (CTA) of coronary arteries in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). We retrospectively reviewed 28 children up to 3 years of age with CHD who underwent prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction. We assessed image quality of proximal coronary artery segments using a five-point scale. Age, body weight, average heart rate, and heart rate variability were recorded and compared between two groups: patients with good diagnostic image quality in all four coronary artery segments and patients with at least one coronary artery segment with nondiagnostic image quality. Altogether, 96 of 112 segments (85.7 %) had diagnostic-quality images. Patients with nondiagnostic segments were significantly younger (10.0 ± 11.6 months) and had lower body weight (5.9 ± 2.9 kg) (each p < 0.05) than patients with diagnostic image quality of all four segments (20.6 ± 13.8 months and 8.4 ± 2.5 kg, respectively; each p < 0.05). Differences in heart rate and heart rate variability between the two imaging groups were not significant. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for predicting patients with nondiagnostic image quality revealed an optimal body weight cutoff of ≤5.6 kg and an optimal age cutoff of ≤12.5 months. Prospective ECG-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction provided feasible image quality of coronary arteries in children with CHD. Younger age and lower body weight were factors that led to poorer image quality of coronary arteries.

  1. The effects of exercise capacity and sedentary lifestyle on haemostasis among middle-aged women with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Edit; Janszky, Imre; Eriksson-Berg, Margita; Al-Khalili, Faris; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies have established a link/relationship between haemostatic factors and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition, physical conditioning is associated with lower coronary heart disease risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between physical exercise and haemostatic factors among middle-aged women surviving an acute coronary event. The Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Study included 292 women aged < 65 years, resident in the greater Stockholm area, who were hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome. Extensive clinical screening including exercise testing, and blood tests were performed 3-6 months after the coronary event. Self-reported physical activity was assessed by a WHO questionnaire. Patients on warfarin treatment were excluded from our analyses. Haemostatic factors were generally higher among physically inactive patients when compared to physically active women in our univariate models. Exercise capacity had a statistically significant relationship with factor VII antigen (p = 0.039) and vWFag (p = 0.038) even in our multiadjusted analyses. Physical inactivity and poor physical fitness are associated with a potentially prothrombotic blood profile in middle aged women with coronary heart disease.

  2. Left Atrial Function Predicts Heart Failure Hospitalization in Subjects with Preserved Ejection Fraction and Coronary Heart Disease: Longitudinal Data from the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Welles, Christine C.; Ku, Ivy A.; Kwan, Damon M.; Whooley, Mary A.; Schiller, Nelson B.; Turakhia, Mintu P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine whether left atrial (LA) dysfunction predicts heart failure (HF) hospitalization in subjects with preserved baseline ejection fraction (EF). Background Among patients with preserved EF, factors leading to HF are not fully understood. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated LA dysfunction at the time of HF, but longitudinal data on antecedent atrial function are lacking. Methods We performed resting transthoracic echocardiography in 855 subjects with coronary heart disease and EF≥50%. Left atrial functional index (LAFI) was calculated as [(LA emptying fraction × left ventricular outflow tract-velocity time integral)/(indexed LA end systolic volume)], where LA emptying fraction was defined as (LA end systolic volume - LA end diastolic volume)/LA end systolic volume. We used Cox models to evaluate the association between LAFI and HF hospitalization. Results Over a median follow-up of 7.9 years, 106 participants (12.4%) were hospitalized for HF. Rates of HF hospitalization were inversely proportional to quartile of LAFI: Q1: 47 per 1000 person-years; Q2: 18.3; Q3: 9.6; and Q4: 5.3 (p<0.001). Each standard deviation decrease in LAFI was associated with a 2.6-fold increased hazard of adverse cardiovascular outcomes (unadjusted HR: 2.6, 95% CI 2.1–3.3, p<0.001), and the association persisted even after adjustment for clinical risk factors, NT-proBNP, and a wide range of echocardiographic parameters (adjusted HR: 1.5, 95% CI 1.0–2.1, p=0.05). Conclusions LA dysfunction independently predicts HF hospitalization in subjects with coronary heart disease and preserved baseline EF. LAFI may be useful for HF risk stratification, and LA dysfunction may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22322084

  3. Psychosocial factors in the epidemiology of coronary heart disease in women.

    PubMed

    Eaker, E D

    1989-03-01

    Although the study of coronary heart disease has provided a fruitful area of research for the psychosocial risk factors for disease, the amount of information among women is limited. Many of the psychological concepts tested in women have been developed from studies of men. The assumption that these psychological constructs (such as type A behavior) are pertinent to the psychology of women must be questioned. When women are included in studies of any disease, the questions asked of them must be applicable to their environment, behaviors, and psychological milieu. Because of the limited amount of data on women, it is difficult to draw conclusions regarding the relationships of psychosocial variables and the development of CHD. Several studies have indicated, however, that the change from a positive to an inverse relationship of SES to CHD in men has not been observed in women. Across various time periods and in different populations low SES is related to the occurrence of CHD in women. The reason for this is not known, and this is clearly an area for future investigations. Several measures of low social support have been found to be related to increase risk of CHD mortality and morbidity in women. A problem with this research is that each study demonstrated a different measure of social support to be the detrimental factor. This may be due to true differences between populations or may be a result of bias introduced from studying different age groups and different populations. It seems to be fairly clear that type A behavior, as measured in Framingham, is not related to definite CHD in women. The fact, however, that type A is related to anginal pain should not be minimized. These men and women are suffering from chest pain and are at increased risk to develop subsequent acute coronary events. For the most part, other personality variables, such as emotional lability, anxiety, depression, and neuroticism, have not been shown to be related to coronary disease in women

  4. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  5. Regular Exercise and Plasma Lipid Levels Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A 20-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teramoto, Masaru; Golding, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of regular exercise on the plasma lipid levels that contribute to coronary heart disease (CHD), of 20 sedentary men who participated in an exercise program over 20 consecutive years. The men, whose initial ages ranged from 30-51 years, participated in the University of Nevada-based exercise program for an average of 45…

  6. 76 FR 49707 - Food Labeling; Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... discretion to Cargill Health and Food Technologies. Based on concerns that 75 days was not enough time for... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 101 Food Labeling; Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and...

  7. Genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus, low density lipoproteins, response to pravastatin and coronary heart disease: results from PROSPER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caucasian carriers of the T allele at R46L in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) locus have been reported to have 15% lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (C) levels and 47% lower coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Our objective was to examine two PCSK9 single nucle...

  8. 21 CFR 101.81 - Health claims: Soluble fiber from certain foods and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Health claims: Soluble fiber from certain foods and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.81 Section 101.81 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... body weight; high blood pressure; cigarette smoking; diabetes; and physical inactivity. The claim...

  9. 21 CFR 101.81 - Health claims: Soluble fiber from certain foods and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Health claims: Soluble fiber from certain foods and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.81 Section 101.81 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... body weight; high blood pressure; cigarette smoking; diabetes; and physical inactivity. The claim...

  10. 21 CFR 101.81 - Health claims: Soluble fiber from certain foods and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Health claims: Soluble fiber from certain foods and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.81 Section 101.81 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... body weight; high blood pressure; cigarette smoking; diabetes; and physical inactivity. The claim...

  11. Lipoprotein(a) levels, apo(a) isoform size, and coronary heart disease risk in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], Lp(a) cholesterol, and of apo(a) isoform size to prospective coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma Lp(a) and Lp(a) cholesterol levels, and apo(a) isoform size were measured at examinati...

  12. Health Gain through Screening--Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: Developing Primary Health Care Services for People with Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, M. B.; Turner, S.; Martin, D. M.; Roy, A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 120 British adults with intellectual disability found they had higher risk factors of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than the general population. There was a greater incidence of obesity and considerably lower physical activity levels than the general population. Several also had abnormal cholesterol readings. (CR)

  13. Community Health Representatives: A Valuable Resource for Providing Coronary Heart Disease Health Education Activities for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Vicki L.

    1989-01-01

    This article addresses select health issues of Native Americans, emphasizing coronary heart disease (CHD). The link between lifestyle and CHD is discussed. CHD risk data from a study of 67 Community Health Representatives is presented, and the role these paraprofessionals can play in health education among Native Americans is discussed. (IAH)

  14. Evidence of the Role of Physical Activity and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Arthur S.; Norstrom, Jane

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents epidemiologic evidence on the contributions of physical inactivity and reduced cardiorespiratory fitness to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The types and dose of physical activity to reduce risk of CHD and plausible biologic mechanisms for the partial protective effect are reviewed. (Author/SM)

  15. Gendered Uncertainty and Variation in Physicians' Decisions for Coronary Heart Disease: The Double-Edged Sword of "Atypical Symptoms"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lisa C.; Lutfey, Karen E.; Gerstenberger, Eric; Grace, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Nonmedical factors and diagnostic certainty contribute to variation in clinical decision making, but the process by which this occurs remains unclear. We examine how physicians' interpretations of patient sex-gender affect diagnostic certainty and, in turn, decision making for coronary heart disease. Data are from a factorial experiment of 256…

  16. Dietary Patterns Predict Subsequent Coronary Heart Disease Risk In Postmenopausal Women : The Women’s Health Initiative Observational Cohort Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Evidence suggests that dietary patterns predispose to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship between dietary patterns and CHD risk was assessed in postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS). Methods: Case-co...

  17. Red blood cell membrane concentration of cis-palmitoleic and cis-vaccenic acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although previous studies have suggested associations between plasma palmitoleic acid and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including blood pressure, inflammation, and insulin resistance, little is known about the relation of palmitoleic acid and CHD. This ancillary study of the Physicians'...

  18. Genetic variation in CYP2J2 and risk of coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CYP2J2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) which regulate endothelial function and serve as a reserve system to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3). We sought to determine if genetic variation in CYP2J2 was associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events...

  19. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of multiple risk factor interventions for preventing coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, S.; Smith, G. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of multiple risk factor intervention in reducing cardiovascular risk factors, total mortality, and mortality from coronary heart disease among adults. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials in workforces and in primary care in which subjects were randomly allocated to more than one of six interventions (stopping smoking, exercise, dietary advice, weight control, antihypertensive drugs, and cholesterol lowering drugs) and followed up for at least six months. SUBJECTS: Adults aged 17-73 years, 903000 person years of observation were included in nine trials with clinical event outcomes and 303000 person years in five trials with risk factor outcomes alone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking rates, blood cholesterol concentrations, total mortality, and mortality from coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Net decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking prevalence, and blood cholesterol were 4.2 mm Hg (SE 0.19 mm Hg), 2.7 mm Hg (0.09 mm Hg), 4.2% (0.3%), and 0.14 mmol/l (0.01 mmol/l) respectively. In the nine trials with clinical event end points the pooled odds ratios for total and coronary heart disease mortality were 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.92 to 1.02) and 0.96 (0.88 to 1.04) respectively. Statistical heterogeneity between the studies with respect to changes in mortality and risk factors was due to trials focusing on hypertensive participants and those using considerable amounts of drug treatment, with only these trials showing significant reductions in mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The pooled effects of multiple risk factor intervention on mortality were insignificant and a small, but potentially important, benefit of treatment (about a 10% reduction in mortality) may have been missed. Changes in risk factors were modest, were related to the amount of pharmacological treatment used, and in some cases may have been overestimated

  20. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... angina? This content was last reviewed July 2015. Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ... Recovery FAQs • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources What Is a Heart Attack? How ...

  1. Utility of genetic and non-genetic risk factors in predicting coronary heart disease in Singaporean Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xuling; Salim, Agus; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Han, Yi; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; van Dam, Rob M; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay; Liu, Jianjun; Goh, Daniel Yt; Wang, Xu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Friedlander, Yechiel; Heng, Chew-Kiat

    2017-01-01

    Background Although numerous phenotype based equations for predicting risk of 'hard' coronary heart disease are available, data on the utility of genetic information for such risk prediction is lacking in Chinese populations. Design Case-control study nested within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Methods A total of 1306 subjects comprising 836 men (267 incident cases and 569 controls) and 470 women (128 incident cases and 342 controls) were included. A Genetic Risk Score comprising 156 single nucleotide polymorphisms that have been robustly associated with coronary heart disease or its risk factors ( p < 5 × 10(-8)) in at least two independent cohorts of genome-wide association studies was built. For each gender, three base models were used: recalibrated Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) Model (M1); ATP III model fitted using Singapore Chinese Health Study data (M2) and M3: M2 + C-reactive protein + creatinine. Results The Genetic Risk Score was significantly associated with incident 'hard' coronary heart disease ( p for men: 1.70 × 10(-10)-1.73 × 10(-9); p for women: 0.001). The inclusion of the Genetic Risk Score in the prediction models improved discrimination in both genders (c-statistics: 0.706-0.722 vs. 0.663-0.695 from base models for men; 0.788-0.790 vs. 0.765-0.773 for women). In addition, the inclusion of the Genetic Risk Score also improved risk classification with a net gain of cases being reclassified to higher risk categories (men: 12.4%-16.5%; women: 10.2% (M3)), while not significantly reducing the classification accuracy in controls. Conclusions The Genetic Risk Score is an independent predictor for incident 'hard' coronary heart disease in our ethnic Chinese population. Inclusion of genetic factors into coronary heart disease prediction models could significantly improve risk prediction performance.

  2. Coronary heart disease incidence in women by waist circumference within categories of body mass index.

    PubMed

    Canoy, Dexter; Cairns, Benjamin J; Balkwill, Angela; Wright, F Lucy; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie

    2013-10-01

    High body mass index (BMI) and large waist circumference are separately associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk but these measures are highly correlated. Their separate associations with incident CHD, cross-classifying one variable by the other, are less investigated in large-scale studies. We examined these associations in a large UK cohort (the Million Women Study), which is a prospective population-based study. We followed 496,225 women (mean age 60 years) with both waist circumference and BMI measurements who had no vascular disease or cancer. Adjusted relative risk and 20-year cumulative CHD incidence (first coronary hospitalization or death) from age 55 to 74 years were calculated using Cox regression. Plasma apolipoproteins were assayed in 6295 randomly selected participants. There were 10,998 incident coronary events after mean follow up of 5.1 years. Within each BMI category (<25, 25-29.9, ≥30 kg/m(2)), CHD risk increased with increasing waist circumference; within each waist circumference category (<70, 70-79.9, ≥79 cm), CHD risk increased with increasing BMI. The cumulative CHD incidence was lowest in women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) and waist circumference <70 cm, with 1 in 14 (95% confidence interval 1 in 12 to 16) women developing CHD in the 20 years from age 55 to 74 years, and highest in women with BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) and waist circumference ≥80 cm, with 1 in 8 (95% confidence interval 1 in 7 to 9) women developing CHD over the same period. Similar associations for apolipoprotein B to A1 ratio across adiposity categories were observed, particularly in non-obese women. Our conclusions were that both waist circumference and BMI are independently associated with incident CHD.

  3. Blood stasis syndrome of coronary heart disease: A perspective of modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gui; Wang, Jie

    2014-04-01

    The medical community as a whole is attempting to start preventive therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD) patients earlier in life. However, the main limitations of such interventions are drug resistance and adverse reactions. Additionally, traditional biomarker discovery methods for CHD focus on the behavior of individual biomarkers regardless of their relevance. These limitations have led to attempting novel approaches to multi-dimensionally investigate CHD and identify safe and efficacious therapies for preventing CHD. Recently, the benefit of Chinese medicine (CM) in CHD has been proven by increasing clinical evidence. More importantly, linking CM theory with modern biomedicine may lead to new scientific discoveries. According to CM theory, all treatments for patients should be based on patients' syndromes. A recent epidemiological investigation has demonstrated that blood stasis syndrome (BSS) is the major syndrome type of CHD. BSS is a type of complex pathophysiological state characterized by decreased or impeded blood flow. Common clinical features of BSS include a darkish complexion, scaly dry skin, and cyanosis of the lips and nails, a purple or dark tongue with purple spots, a thready and hesitant pulse, and stabbing or pricking pain fixed in location accompanied by tenderness, mass formation and ecchymosis or petechiae. The severity of BSS is significantly correlated with the complexity of coronary lesions and the degree of stenosis, and is an important factor affecting the occurrence of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. The mechanisms of BSS of CHD patients should be investigated from a modern medicine perspective. Although many studies have attempted to explore the biomedical mechanisms of BSS of CHD, from hemorheological disorders to inflammation and immune responses, the global picture of BSS of CHD is still unclear. In this article, the current status of studies investigating the biomedical mechanisms of BSS of CHD and future

  4. Serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease--Causal association or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, Setor K

    2015-12-01

    Observational epidemiological evidence supports a linear inverse and independent association between serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but whether this association is causal remains to be ascertained. A Mendelian randomization approach was employed to test whether serum total bilirubin is causally linked to CHD. The genetic variant rs6742078--well known to specifically modify levels of serum total bilirubin and accounting for up to 20% of the variance in circulating serum total bilirubin levels--was used as an instrumental variable. In pooled analysis of estimates reported from published genome-wide association studies, every copy of the T allele of rs6742078 was associated with 0.42 standard deviation (SD) higher levels of serum total bilirubin (95% confidence interval, 0.40 to 0.43). Based on combined data from the Coronary Artery Disease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analyses and the Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics Consortium involving a total of 36,763 CHD cases and 76,997 controls, the odds ratio for CHD per copy of the T allele was 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.04). The odds ratio of CHD for a 1 SD genetically elevated serum total bilirubin level was 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.98 to 1.09). The current findings casts doubt on a strong causal association of serum total bilirubin levels with CHD. The inverse associations demonstrated in observational studies may be driven by biases such as unmeasured confounding and/or reverse causation. However, further research in large-scale consortia is needed.

  5. Correlation of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianying; Zhang, Jingying; Wen, Jing; Ming, Qiang; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Yawei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the relationship between different risk factors (especially serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] and aspartate aminotransferase [AST]) and coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: A total of 610 inpatients were recruited. Initial coronary angiography (CAG) was performed to evaluate the severity of coronary lesions. On the basis of findings from CAG, patients were divided into control group (n=260) and CHD group (n=350). Logistic regression analysis was employed for the evaluation of clinical characteristics and biochemical parameters, aiming to explore the relationship between risk factors (including AST and ALT) and CHD. Results: Results showed type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking and family history of CHD were clinical risk factors of CHD. Laboratory examinations showed the serum levels of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, AST and ALT in CHD group were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05). Of these parameters, the AST was 50.98±8.12 U/L in CHD group and 20.14±3.94 U/L in control group (P<0.01); the ALT was 42.31±8.34 U/L in CHD group and 18.25±6.38 U/L in control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: The serum levels of AST and ALT in CHD patients are higher than those in controls. High serum AST and ALT are biochemical markers which can be used to predict the severity of CHD and are also independent risk factors of CHD. PMID:26064360

  6. Frequency of angina pectoris and secondary events in patients with stable coronary heart disease (from the Heart and Soul Study).

    PubMed

    Beatty, Alexis L; Spertus, John A; Whooley, Mary A

    2014-10-01

    The extent to which angina pectoris (AP) predicts secondary cardiovascular events beyond independent of measures of disease severity is unknown. We evaluated the association between AP frequency and secondary events in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). We administered the Seattle Angina Questionnaire to 1,023 participants with stable CHD enrolled from September 2000 to December 2002 and followed for a median of 8.9 years. We used Cox proportional hazards to evaluate the association of AP frequency with death and subsequent hospitalization for AP, revascularization, myocardial infarction (MI), or heart failure. At enrollment, 633 (62%) participants reported no AP, 279 (27%) reported monthly AP, and 111 (11%) reported daily or weekly AP. During follow-up, 396 participants died, 204 were hospitalized for AP, 194 for revascularization, 140 for MI, and 188 for heart failure. Compared with participants without AP, participants with daily or weekly AP were more likely to be hospitalized for AP (hazard ratio [HR] 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3 to 4.7; p<0.001), revascularization (HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.9; p=0.001), or heart failure (HR 1.6; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.5; p=0.03) and more likely to die (HR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0; p=0.01). AP was not independently associated with MI (HR 1.3; 95% CI 0.8 to 2.3; p=0.29). After adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, treadmill exercise capacity, ejection fraction, and inducible ischemia, frequency of AP remained independently associated with hospitalization for AP (HR 2.4; 95% CI 1.6 to 3.6; p<0.001), revascularization (HR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.7; p=0.02), and death (HR 1.4; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.0; p=0.045). In conclusion, in outpatients with stable CHD, AP frequency predicts higher rates of secondary cardiovascular events and death, independent of objective measures of disease severity.

  7. Reliability and validity of a twelve-minute walking test for coronary heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    de Greef, Mathieu H G; Sprenger, Siska R; Elzenga, Corrie T A; Popkema, Dorien Y; Bennekers, Johan H; Niemeijer, Menco G; Middel, Berry; Mook, Gerrit A

    2005-04-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of a 12-min. walking test for coronary heart disease patients. CHD patients (28 men, 18 women) were recruited out of 86 CHD patients of the Martini Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands. 46 CHD patients (age M=66.0 yr., SD=6.8) participated in the reliability study and 24 (age M=62.0 yr., SD=9.2) in the validity study. A test-retest analysis showed a satisfactory Bland-Altman plot and an intraclass coefficient of .98. The Pearson correlation between the score on the test and the VO2 peak was .77. This test gives a reliable and valid assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness of CHD patients.

  8. How older workers with coronary heart disease perceive the health effects of work.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan

    2013-11-01

    More than 3.4 million workers have coronary heart disease (CHD) with significant work limitations and disability. Although the cohort of aging workers with CHD is growing, little is known about how older workers with CHD perceive the relationship between the work environment, including job stress, and their health. The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive study was to explore the perceptions of the health effects of work among older workers with CHD and describe how they cope with work stress. The sample was 47% female and 33% African American. Their mean age was 59.21 (± 5.4) years, and most (55%) worked in professional or managerial jobs. Themes emerged about perceptions of the health effects of work and coping strategies. Because older employees are a vulnerable work group, understanding the perceived health effects of work may guide future workplace program development and policy.

  9. Primordial prevention of coronary heart disease in India: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K S

    1999-12-01

    Demographic shifts, lifestyle changes, and adverse effects of childhood nutrition portend an epidemic of coronary heart disease in the Indian subcontinent, which is currently experiencing health transition. Indian susceptibility includes atherogenic blood lipid levels and a metabolic complex of central obesity, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia due to insulin resistance. These characteristics are demonstrated dramatically in urban Indians and in Indian migrants to the west. Prime targets for effective strategies of primordial prevention include children and families in lower socio-economic classes now in transition. There is the greatest urgency in India for medical, political, and social action to prevent high risk in the first place, combating the tobacco trade, enlisting food and agriculture agencies, and promoting physical activity in the population. An empowered community with an enlightened policy can prevent the threatened epidemic.

  10. Type A Behavior Pattern and Coronary Heart Disease: Philip Morris’s “Crown Jewel”

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley; McKee, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The type A behavior pattern (TABP) was described in the 1950s by cardiologists Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman, who argued that TABP was an important risk factor for coronary heart disease. This theory was supported by positive findings from the Western Collaborative Group Study and the Framingham Study. We analyzed tobacco industry documents to show that the tobacco industry was a major funder of TABP research, with selected results used to counter concerns regarding tobacco and health. Our findings also help explain inconsistencies in the findings of epidemiological studies of TABP, in particular the phenomenon of initially promising results followed by negative findings. Our analysis suggests that these “decline effects” are partly explained by tobacco industry involvement in TABP research. PMID:22994187

  11. Coronary heart disease risk factors in men with light and dark skin in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed Central

    Costas, R; Garcia-Palmieri, M R; Sorlie, P; Hertzmark, E

    1981-01-01

    The association of skin color with coronary heart disease risk factors was studied in 4,000 urban Puerto Rican men. Skin color on the inner upper arm was classified according to the von Luschan color tiles. Using this grading, men were separated into two groups of light or dark skin color. The dark group had a lower socioeconomic status (SES) based on income, education, and occupation. Dark men had slightly higher mean systolic blood pressures (SBP) and lower mean serum cholesterol levels than the light, but the relative weights and cigarette smoking habits of both groups were similar. After controlling for the differences in SES, skin color showed a small but statistically significant association with SBP. Whether this association with skin color represents genetic or environmental influences on SBP could not be determined from this study. PMID:7235099

  12. Coronary heart disease and associated risk factors in Qazvin: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fakhrzadeh, H; Bandarian, F; Adibi, H; Samavat, T; Malekafzali, H; Hodjatzadeh, E; Larijani, B

    2008-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study in Qazvin, Islamic Republic of Iran, 846 residents (425 men and 421 women) aged > or = 25 years were assessed for coronary heart disease and its associated risk factors comparing ischaemic and non-ischaemic groups. The age-adjusted prevalence of possible myocardial infarction, ischaemic ECG changes and angina pectoris were 4.2%, 36.8% and 2.2% respectively. There was no difference in the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index between ischaemic and non-ischaemic groups. There was a significant association between possible myocardial infarction and hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and smoking in women. There was also a significant association between ischaemic ECG changes and waist-hip ratio in women and between ischaemic ECG changes and hypertension in men.

  13. [Advances in the Association between Apolipoprotein (a) Gene Polymorphisms and Coronary Heart Disease].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; L, Zhan; Song, Yong-yan

    2015-08-01

    Human apolipoprotein (a) (LPA) gene is highly polymorphic, and the polymorphic loci on this gene include the Kringle 4 subtype 2(KIV-2) repeat polymorphism, the pentanucleotide repeat (TTTTA)n polymorphism, and a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms. KIV-2 repeat polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with coronary heart disease(CHD), and the reducing number of KIV-2 repeats is a risk factor for CHD. Both the increase and decrease of the pentanucleotide repeat(TTTTA)n polymorphism repeats are possibly associated with CHD risk. In single nucleotide polymorphisms loci, the rs10455872 and rs3798220 loci were widely reported to be associated with CHD, while other loci were less reported. The association between LPA polymorphisms and CHD may be mediated by either the elevation of plasma LPA level or the change of LPA subtypes. This article reviews the association between the LPA polymorphisms and CHD and the underlying mechanisms.

  14. Growing Epidemic of Coronary Heart Disease in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Gaziano, Thomas A.; Bitton, Asaf; Anand, Shuchi; Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika; Murphy, Adrianna

    2010-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single largest cause of death in the developed countries and is one of the leading causes of disease burden in developing countries. In 2001, there were 7.3 million deaths due to CHD worldwide. Three-fourths of global deaths due to CHD occurred in the low and middle-income countries. The rapid rise in CHD burden in most of the low and middle and income countries is due to socio-economic changes, increase in life span and acquisition of lifestyle related risk factors. The CHD death rate, however, varies dramatically across the developing countries. The varying incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates reflect the different levels of risk factors, other competing causes of death, availability of resources to combat CVD, and the stage of epidemiologic transition that each country or region finds itself. The economic burden of CHD is equally large but solutions exist to manage this growing burden. PMID:20109979

  15. Clinical review of treatment options for major depressive disorder in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; Baker, Brian

    2012-11-01

    It is established that the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) in coronary heart disease (CHD) populations is high and is associated with increased mortality. In this systematic review, we examined the evidence for the effective treatment of MDD in CHD patients by reviewing randomized control trials (RCTs) between 1980 and 2011 and then assessing whether these treatments were clinically meaningful. A total of 8 RCTs were retrieved. Sertraline, citalopram, and mirtazapine were safe from a cardiac perspective, but only sertraline and citalopram were clearly more effective than placebo in CHD patients with moderate-to-severe type, recurrent MDD, or MDD episode onset before the CHD event. Augmenting sertraline with omega-3 fatty acids did not result in superior depression outcomes. Cognitive-behavioral therapy was equivocally superior to usual care. Interpersonal psychotherapy was only superior to clinical management in patients with high baseline functional status. Exercise is a potential treatment for those with mild depression.

  16. Low density lipoprotein levels linkage with the periodontal status patients of coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nafisah Ibrahim; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Studies found an association between periodontitis and coronary heart disease (CHD), but relationship between periodontal status CHD patients with LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) levels, as risk factors for atherosclerosis, has not been studied. Objective: To analyze relationship between LDL and periodontal status CHD. Methods: Periodontal status of 60 CHD, 40 controls were examined (PBI, PPD, CAL) and their blood was taken to assess levels of LDL. Result: Found significant differences LDL (p=0.005), correlation between LDL with PPD (p=0.003) and CAL CHD (p=0.013), and PPD (p=0.001), CAL (p=0.008) non-CHD, but no significant correlation between LDL with PBI CAD (p=0.689) and PBI non-CHD (p=0.320). Conclusion: There is a correlation between the LDL levels with periodontal status.

  17. Relationship of lipoprotein(a) levels to physical activity and family history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, S; Elosua, R; Covas, M I; Pavesi, M; Vila, J; Marrugat, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association of physical activity with serum lipoprotein(a) [La(a)] levels in individuals according to whether they had a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: Lp(a) levels in 332 healthy Spanish men aged 20 to 60 years were measured. Physical activity and family history of CHD were assessed. RESULTS: For men with a family history of CHD, the odds ratio for Lp(a) levels above the median value was 0.13 (95% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.50) in very active men (energy expended in physical activity > 300 kcal/day) compared with active men (energy expended in physical activity < 300 kcal/day). CONCLUSIONS: Regular daily physical activity in individuals with a family history of CHD could be useful for controlling Lp(a) levels. PMID:10076490

  18. Gender-Specific Characteristics of Individuals with Depressive Symptoms and Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Lynn V.; McKinley, Sharon; Riegel, Barbara; Moser, Debra K.; Meischke, Hendrika; Pelter, Michele M.; Dracup, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Objective In individuals suffering from depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease (CHD), little is known about gender-specific characteristics that may inform treatments and outcomes. This study sought to identify characteristics that distinguish men from women with both conditions Methods By cross-sectional design, 1951 adults with CHD and elevated depressive symptoms completed questionnaires to measure anxiety, hostility, perceived control, and knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about CHD. Gender differences were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression. Results Women were more likely to be single (OR 3.61, p < .001), unemployed (OR 2.52, p < .001), poorly educated (OR 2.52, p < .001), anxious (OR 1.14, p < .01), and to perceive lower control over health (OR 1.34, p < .01) than males. Conclusions Women with CHD and depressive symptoms have fewer resources, greater anxiety, and lower perceived control than men. In women, targeting of modifiable factors, like anxiety and perceived control, is warranted. PMID:20561880

  19. The relationship between urban sprawl and coronary heart disease in women.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Beth Ann; Eibner, Christine; Bird, Chloe E; Jewell, Adria; Margolis, Karen; Shih, Regina; Ellen Slaughter, Mary; Whitsel, Eric A; Allison, Matthew; Escarce, Jose J

    2013-03-01

    Studies have reported relationships between urban sprawl, physical activity, and obesity, but - to date - no studies have considered the relationship between sprawl and coronary heart disease (CHD) endpoints. In this analysis, we use longitudinal data on post-menopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Clinical Trial to analyze the relationship between metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level urban compactness (the opposite of sprawl) and CHD endpoints including death, any CHD event, and myocardial infarction. Models control for individual and neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics. Women who lived in more compact communities at baseline had a lower probability of experiencing a CHD event and CHD death or MI during the study follow-up period. One component of compactness, high residential density, had a particularly noteworthy effect on outcomes. Finally, exploratory analyses showed evidence that the effects of compactness were moderated by race and region.

  20. Saturated Fat Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke: A Science Update.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Joyce A; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Hornstra, Gerard

    2017-01-27

    At a workshop to update the science linking saturated fatty acid (SAFA) consumption with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke, invited participants presented data on the consumption and bioavailability of SAFA and their functions in the body and food technology. Epidemiological methods and outcomes were related to the association between SAFA consumption and disease events and mortality. Participants reviewed the effects of SAFA on CHD, causal risk factors, and surrogate risk markers. Higher intakes of SAFA were not associated with higher risks of CHD or stroke apparently, but studies did not take macronutrient replacement into account. Replacing SAFA by cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with significant CHD risk reduction, which was confirmed by randomized controlled trials. SAFA reduction had little direct effect on stroke risk. Cohort studies suggest that the food matrix and source of SAFA have important health effects.

  1. Catechol-O-methyltransferase promoter hypomethylation is associated with the risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jinyan; Chen, Xiaoying; Wu, Nan; Shen, Caijie; Cui, Hanbin; Du, Weiping; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Feng, Mingjun; Liu, Junsong; Lin, Shaoyi; Zhang, Lulu; Wang, Jian; Chen, Xiaomin; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-11-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene variation is known to be associated with the risk of acute coronary events. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of COMT promoter methylation towards the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). COMT methylation was evaluated in 48 CHD cases and 48 well-matched non-CHD controls using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology. The results demonstrated that CHD cases had a significantly lower level of methylation at COMT CpG3 sites compared with the controls (33.77±5.71 vs. 36.42±5.00%; P=0.018). Further analysis, according to gender, showed that CpG3 methylation was associated with CHD in males (P=0.038) but not in females (P=0.253), suggesting that there is a gender disparity in the association between COMT methylation and CHD. In conclusion, it was determined that COMT CpG3 hypomethylation is associated with an increased risk of CHD in males.

  2. Catechol-O-methyltransferase promoter hypomethylation is associated with the risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jinyan; Chen, Xiaoying; Wu, Nan; Shen, Caijie; Cui, Hanbin; Du, Weiping; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Feng, Mingjun; Liu, Junsong; Lin, Shaoyi; Zhang, Lulu; Wang, Jian; Chen, Xiaomin; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene variation is known to be associated with the risk of acute coronary events. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of COMT promoter methylation towards the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). COMT methylation was evaluated in 48 CHD cases and 48 well-matched non-CHD controls using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology. The results demonstrated that CHD cases had a significantly lower level of methylation at COMT CpG3 sites compared with the controls (33.77±5.71 vs. 36.42±5.00%; P=0.018). Further analysis, according to gender, showed that CpG3 methylation was associated with CHD in males (P=0.038) but not in females (P=0.253), suggesting that there is a gender disparity in the association between COMT methylation and CHD. In conclusion, it was determined that COMT CpG3 hypomethylation is associated with an increased risk of CHD in males. PMID:27882177

  3. Coronary atherosclerosis in transplanted mouse hearts. I. Time course and immunogenetic and immunopathological considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, P. S.; Chase, C. M.; Winn, H. J.; Colvin, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental system is described in which coronary arteries of mouse hearts transplanted heterotopically develop obstructive lesions by 4 weeks. Transient immunosuppression permits graft survival. Donor/recipient antigenic differences may be either class I or class II major histocompatibility antigens (H-2) or non-H-2 antigens. An infiltrate including CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophages concentrates early in the intima and adventitia of larger coronary arteries, with little in the myocardium. Subsequently, the intima expands with cells of donor origin and the infiltrate invades the media. Endothelial and intimal cells express ICAM-1, leukocytes LFA-1: Endothelium expresses class I, but not class II, antigens. As class II disparity alone suffices, the endothelium can apparently be an indirect target of immune injury. We propose that graft atherosclerosis is T cell initiated and elicited by heterogeneous antigens in the endothelium or media. It is separable from rejection of the myocardium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7906094

  4. Behavioral, emotional and neurobiological determinants of coronary heart disease risk in women.

    PubMed

    Vaccarino, Viola; Bremner, J Douglas

    2017-03-01

    Women have more of the stress-related behavioral profile that has been linked to cardiovascular disease than men. For example, women double the rates of stress-related mental disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than men, and have higher rates of exposure to adversity early in life. This profile may increase women's long-term risk of cardiometabolic conditions linked to stress, especially coronary heart disease (CHD). In addition to having a higher prevalence of psychosocial stressors, women may be more vulnerable to the adverse effects of these stressors on CHD, perhaps through altered neurobiological physiology. Emerging data suggest that young women are disproportionally susceptible to the adverse effects of stress on the risk of cardiovascular disease, both in terms of initiating the disease as well as worsening the prognosis in women who have already exhibited symptoms of the disease. Women's potential vulnerability to psychosocial stress could also help explain their higher propensity toward abnormal coronary vasomotion and microvascular disease compared with men.

  5. Correlation between calcium and phosphate levels to calculus accumulation on coronary heart disease patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahaya, Cindy; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) or Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is a disease that happened because of blood flow being blocked by atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a process of hardening of the arteries which characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the intimal layer of vascular wall, by lipid deposit. Periodontitis is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory disease caused by microorganism and characterized by progressive destruction of the tooth supporting apparatus leading to tooth loss. Many studies use saliva as a valuable source for clinically information, as an asset for early diagnosis, prognostic and reviewer for pascatherapy status. Dental calculus had happened as a consequence of saliva supersaturation by calcium and phosphate. Salivary flow rate and its composition influence the formation of calculus. Increasing salivary calcium levels is characteristic of periodontitis patients. An important hipotesis in Cardiology is chronic infections contribute in atherosclerosis. Objective: To analyse the correlation between calcium and phosphate levels in saliva to calculus accumulation on CHD patients. Result: Correlation analysis between salivary calcium levels with calculus accumulation in patients with CHD and non-CHD showed no significant p value, p=0.59 and p=0.518. Correlation analysis between salivary phosphate levels and calculus accumulation showed no significant p value, p=0.836 for CHD patients and p=0.484 for non-CHD patients. Conclusion: There are no correlation between calcium levels and phosphate levels with calculus accumulation in CHD patients. Further research need to be done.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Coronary Arteries and Heart Valves in a Living Mouse: Techniques and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Jan; Wiesmann, Frank; Lanz, Titus; Haase, Axel

    2000-10-01

    New investigations in MRI of a mouse heart showed high-contrast cardiac images and thereby the possibility of doing functional cardiac studies of in vivo mice. But is MRI, in addition, capable of visualizing microstructures such as the coronary arteries and the heart valves of a living mouse? To answer this question, 2D and 3D gradient echo sequences with and without flow compensation were used to image the coronary arteries. To increase signal-to-noise ratio, a birdcage resonator was optimized for mouse heart imaging. Contrast between blood and myocardium was achieved through the inflow effect. A segmented three-dimensional FLASH sequence acquired with a multiple overlap thin slab technique showed the best results. With this technique an isotropic resolution of 100 μm was achieved. The left coronary artery could be visualized up to the apex of the heart. This is demonstrated with short axis views and 3D surface reconstructions of the mouse heart. The four cardiac valves were also visible with the 3D method.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of coronary arteries and heart valves in a living mouse: techniques and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ruff, J; Wiesmann, F; Lanz, T; Haase, A

    2000-10-01

    New investigations in MRI of a mouse heart showed high-contrast cardiac images and thereby the possibility of doing functional cardiac studies of in vivo mice. But is MRI, in addition, capable of visualizing microstructures such as the coronary arteries and the heart valves of a living mouse? To answer this question, 2D and 3D gradient echo sequences with and without flow compensation were used to image the coronary arteries. To increase signal-to-noise ratio, a birdcage resonator was optimized for mouse heart imaging. Contrast between blood and myocardium was achieved through the inflow effect. A segmented three-dimensional FLASH sequence acquired with a multiple overlap thin slab technique showed the best results. With this technique an isotropic resolution of 100 microm was achieved. The left coronary artery could be visualized up to the apex of the heart. This is demonstrated with short axis views and 3D surface reconstructions of the mouse heart. The four cardiac valves were also visible with the 3D method.

  8. Food Choices and Coronary Heart Disease: A Population Based Cohort Study of Rural Swedish Men with 12 Years of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Sara; Thelin, Anders; Stiernström, Eva-Lena

    2009-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is associated with diet. Nutritional recommendations are frequently provided, but few long term studies on the effect of food choices on heart disease are available. We followed coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality in a cohort of rural men (N = 1,752) participating in a prospective observational study. Dietary choices were assessed at baseline with a 15-item food questionnaire. 138 men were hospitalized or deceased owing to coronary heart disease during the 12 year follow-up. Daily intake of fruit and vegetables was associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease when combined with a high dairy fat consumption (odds ratio 0.39, 95% CI 0.21–0.73), but not when combined with a low dairy fat consumption (odds ratio 1.70, 95% CI 0.97–2.98). Choosing wholemeal bread or eating fish at least twice a week showed no association with the outcome. PMID:20054459

  9. Psychometric Testing of the Self-Care of Coronary Heart Disease Inventory (SC-CHDI).

    PubMed

    Vaughan Dickson, Victoria; Lee, Christopher S; Yehle, Karen S; Mola, Ana; Faulkner, Kenneth M; Riegel, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    Although coronary heart disease (CHD) requires a significant amount of self-care, there are no instruments available to measure self-care in this population. The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Care of Coronary Heart Disease Inventory (SC-CHDI). Using the Self-Care of Chronic Illness theory, we developed a 22-item measure of maintenance, management, and confidence appropriate for persons with stable CHD and tested it in a convenience sample of 392 adults (62% male, mean age 61.4 ± 9.6 years). Factorial validity was tested with confirmatory factor analysis. Convergent validity was tested with the Medical Outcomes Study MOS-SAS Specific Adherence Scale and the Decision Making Competency Inventory (DMCI). Cronbach alpha and factor determinacy scores (FDS) were calculated to assess reliability. Two multidimensional self-care scales were confirmed: self-care maintenance included "consultative behaviors" (e.g., taking medicines as prescribed) and "autonomous behaviors" (e.g., exercising 30 minute/day; FDS = .87). The multidimensional self-care management scale included "early recognition and response" (e.g., recognizing symptoms) and "delayed response" (e.g., taking an aspirin; FDS = .76). A unidimensional confidence factor captured confidence in each self-care process (α = .84). All the self-care dimensions were associated with treatment adherence as measured by the MOS-SAS. Only self-care maintenance and confidence were associated with decision-making (DCMI). These findings support the conceptual basis of self-care in patients with CHD as a process of maintenance that includes both consultative and autonomous behaviors, and management with symptom awareness and response. The SC-CHDI confidence scale is promising as a measure of self-efficacy, an important factor influencing self-care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Exposure to Concentrated Ambient Particles Does Not Affect Vascular Function in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Nicholas L.; Robinson, Simon D.; Fokkens, Paul H. B.; Leseman, Daan L. A. C.; Miller, Mark R.; Anderson, David; Freney, Evelyn J.; Heal, Mathew R.; Donovan, Robert J.; Blomberg, Anders; Sandström, Thomas; MacNee, William; Boon, Nicholas A.; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E.; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to fine particulate air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We previously demonstrated that exposure to dilute diesel exhaust causes vascular dysfunction in humans. Objectives We conducted a study to determine whether exposure to ambient particulate matter causes vascular dysfunction. Methods Twelve male patients with stable coronary heart disease and 12 age-matched volunteers were exposed to concentrated ambient fine and ultrafine particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 2 hr using a randomized, double-blind cross-over study design. We measured peripheral vascular vasomotor and fibrinolytic function, and inflammatory variables—including circulating leukocytes, serum C-reactive protein, and exhaled breath 8-isoprostane and nitrotyrosine—6–8 hr after both exposures. Results Particulate concentrations (mean ± SE) in the exposure chamber (190 ± 37 μg/m3) were higher than ambient levels (31 ± 8 μg/m3) and levels in filtered air (0.5 ± 0.4 μg/m3; p < 0.001). Chemical analysis of CAPs identified low levels of elemental carbon. Exhaled breath 8-isoprostane concentrations increased after exposure to CAPs (16.9 ± 8.5 vs. 4.9 ± 1.2 pg/mL, p < 0.05), but markers of systemic inflammation were largely unchanged. Although there was a dose-dependent increase in blood flow and plasma tissue plasminogen activator release (p < 0.001 for all), CAPs exposure had no effect on vascular function in either group. Conclusions Despite achieving marked increases in particulate matter, exposure to CAPs—low in combustion-derived particles—did not affect vasomotor or fibrinolytic function in either middle-aged healthy volunteers or patients with coronary heart disease. These findings contrast with previous exposures to dilute diesel exhaust and highlight the importance of particle composition in determining the vascular effects of particulate matter in humans. PMID:18560524

  11. Alcohol Intake and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Younger, Middle-aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla A.; Tolstrup, Janne S.; Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Heitmann, Berit L.; Grønbæk, Morten; O’Reilly, Eilis; Bälter, Katarina; Goldbourt, Uri; Hallmans, Göran; Knekt, Paul; Liu, Simin; Pereira, Mark; Pietinen, Pirjo; Spiegelman, Donna; Stevens, June; Virtamo, Jarmo; Willett, Walter C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). This protective effect of alcohol, however, may be confined to middle-aged or older individuals. CHD Incidence is low in men younger than 40 and in women younger than 50 years and for this reason, study cohorts rarely have the power to investigate effects of alcohol on CHD risk in younger adults. This study examined whether the beneficial effect of alcohol on CHD depends on age. Methods and results A pooled analysis of eight prospective studies from North America and Europe including 192,067 women and 74,919 men free of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancers at baseline. Average daily alcohol intake was assessed at baseline using a food frequency or diet history questionnaire. An inverse association between alcohol and risk of coronary heart disease was observed in all age groups: hazard ratios among moderately drinking men (5.0–29.9 g/day) aged 39–50, 50–59, and 60+ years were 0.58 (95% C.I. 0.36 to 0.93), 0.72 (95% C.I. 0.60–0.86), and 0.85 (95% C.I. 0.75 to 0.97) compared with abstainers. However, the analyses indicated a smaller incidence rate difference (IRD) between abstainers and moderate consumers in younger adults (IRD=45 per 100,000; 90% C.I. 8 to 84), than in middle-aged (IRD=64 per 100,000; 90% C.I. 24 to 102) and older adults (IRD=89 per 100,000; 90% C.I. 44 to 140). Similar results were observed in women. Conclusions Alcohol is also associated with a decreased risk of CHD in younger adults; however, the absolute risk was small compared with middle-aged and older adults. PMID:20351238

  12. Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy and the Risks of Coronary Heart Disease, Breast Cancer, and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Ross L.

    2014-01-01

    The principal findings are briefly reviewed from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trials of the most commonly used postmenopausal hormone regimens in the US, conjugated equine estrogens and these same estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate. A more detailed review is presented for three major clinical outcomes: coronary heart disease, the primary trial outcome for which a major benefit was hypothesized; invasive breast cancer, the primary safety outcome for which some adverse effect was expected; and stroke which surfaced as an important adverse effect with both regimens, and one that is influential in decisions concerning the continued use of postmenopausal estrogens alone. The review for these outcomes includes an update on interactions of treatment effects with study subject characteristics and exposures and with pre-randomization biomarker levels. It also includes a focus on timing issues that are important to the understanding of treatment effects. Specifically, with combined estrogen plus progestin coronary heart disease risk was elevated early with the elevation dissipating after a few years of treatment, whereas breast cancer elevations increased during the treatment period, and climbed to about a 3-fold increase following 5 years of adherence. Importantly, breast cancer risk elevations appear to be higher among women who initiate treatment at the menopause, or soon thereafter, compared to women having a longer gap time. Stroke effects, on the other hand didn't seem to vary appreciably with these timing issues. The adverse effect was evidently localized to ischemic strokes, for which there was an approximate 50% increase with either regimen. The rather limited knowledge concerning the biomarkers and biological pathways that mediate the hormone therapy effects on these diseases is also briefly reviewed. PMID:25321418

  13. Adult asthma and risk of coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and heart failure: a prospective study of 2 matched cohorts.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Carlos; Tolstykh, Irina V; Miller, Mary K; Sobel, Erica; Eisner, Mark D

    2012-12-01

    Asthma has been associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The authors ascertained the association of asthma with CVD and the roles that sex, concurrent allergy, and asthma medications may play in this association. They assembled a cohort of 203,595 Northern California adults with asthma and a parallel asthma-free referent cohort (matched 1:1 on age, sex, and race/ethnicity); both cohorts were followed for incident nonfatal or fatal CVD and all-cause mortality from January 1, 1996, through December 31, 2008. Each cohort was 66% female and 47% white. After adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, cardiac risk factors, and comorbid allergy, asthma was associated with a 1.40-fold (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35, 1.45) increased hazard of coronary heart disease, a 1.20-fold (95% CI: 1.15, 1.25) hazard of cerebrovascular disease, a 2.14-fold (95% CI: 2.06, 2.22) hazard of heart failure, and a 3.28-fold (95% CI: 3.15, 3.41) hazard of all-cause mortality. Stronger associations were noted among women. Comorbid allergy predicted CVD but did not synergistically increase the CVD risk associated with asthma. Only asthma patients using asthma medications (particularly those on oral corticosteroids alone or in combination) were at enhanced risk of CVD. In conclusion, asthma was prospectively associated with increased risk of major CVD. Modifying effects were noted for sex and asthma medication use but not for comorbid allergy.

  14. Association of total cholesterol and HDL-C levels and outcome in coronary heart disease patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qin; Li, Jianfei; Yang, Jin; Li, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate associations of total cholesterol (TC) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels with prognosis in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with heart failure (HF). Patients who were angiographical-diagnosis of CHD and echocardiographical-diagnosis of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 45% were enrolled. Baseline characteristics were collected and association of TC and HDL-C levels with rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality was assessed. A total of 118 patients were recruited. Mean age was 58.6 ± 10.9 years and male accounted for 65%. Mean LVEF was 39.5 ± 4.0%. Twenty-eight patients were rehospitalized for HF and 6 patients were dead. In patients with poor prognosis, lower body mass index (BMI), TC, HDL-C and albumin while higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) was observed. TC was positively correlated with BMI and albumin, and HDL-C was inversely correlated with Hs-CRP. The associations of TC level and rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality were attenuated but consistently significant through model 1 to 4, with odds ratio (OR) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92–0.99). Associations of HDL-C level and rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality were also consistently significant through model 1 to 4, with OR of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–0.98). Strength of association was attenuated prominently in model 3 after adjusted for Hs-CRP, and no change was observed after further adjusted for BMI and albumin. Higher baseline TC and HDL-C levels are associated with better outcome in CHD patients with HF. PMID:28248864

  15. Effects of altitude on exercise level and heart rate in patients with coronary artery disease and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    de Vries, S T; Komdeur, P; Aalbersberg, S; van Enst, G C; Breeman, A; van 't Hof, A W J

    2010-03-01

    Background. To evaluate the safety and effects of high altitude on exercise level and heart rate in patients with coronary artery disease compared with healthy controls.Methods. Eight patients with a history of an acute myocardial infarction (ejection fraction >5%) with a low-risk score were compared with seven healthy subjects during the Dutch Heart Expedition at the Aconcagua in Argentina in March 2007. All subjects underwent a maximum exercise test with a cycle ergometer at sea level and base camp, after ten days of acclimatisation, at an altitude of 4200 m. Exercise capacity and maximum heart rate were compared between groups and within subjects.Results. There was a significant decrease in maximum heart rate at high altitude compared with sea level in both the patient and the control group (166 vs. 139 beats/min, p<0.001 and 181 vs. 150 beats/min, p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the decrease of the exercise level and maximum heart rate between patients and healthy controls (-31 vs. -30%, p=0.673).Conclusion. Both patients and healthy controls showed a similar decrease in exercise capacity and maximum heart rate at 4200 m compared with sea level, suggesting that patients with a history of coronary artery disease may tolerate stay and exercise at high altitude similarly to healthy controls. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:118-21.).

  16. [VIABILITY OF MYOCAROIUM AS RISK FACTOR FOR MORTALITY IN EARLY AND LATE PERIOD AFTER BYPASS SURGERY OF CORONARY ARTERIES IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND SEVERE LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION].

    PubMed

    Todurov, B M; Zelenchuk, V; Kuzmich, I M; Ivanyuk, N B; Nikolaichuk, M V

    2015-06-01

    In coronary heart disease and low ejection fraction of the left ventricle (LV) in patients after coronary artery bypass surgery tend mortality and complication rate higher than preserved LV systolic function. Significant preoperative predictors of early mortality and remote in these patients, and the incidence of complications in the early postoperative period were reveald.

  17. Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Attributable to Major Risk Factors is Similar in Argentina and the United States: the Coronary Heart Disease Policy Model

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Andrew; DeGennaro, Vincent; Ferrante, Daniel; Coxson, Pamela G.; Palmas, Walter; Mejia, Raul; Perez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Goldman, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in Argentina and the U.S. Argentina is 92% urban, with cardiovascular disease risk factor levels approximating the U.S. Methods The Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Policy Model is a national-scale computer model of CHD and stroke. Risk factor data were obtained from the Cardiovascular Risk Factor Multiple Evaluation in Latin America Study (2003–04), Argentina National Risk Factor Survey (2005) and U.S. national surveys. Proportions of cardiovascular events over 2005–2015 attributable to risk factors were simulated by setting risk factors to optimal exposure levels [systolic blood pressure (SBP) 115 mm Hg, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) 2.00 mmol/l (78 mg/dl), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) 1.03 mmol/l (60 mg/dl), absence of diabetes, and smoking]. Cardiovascular disease attributable to body mass index (BMI) > 21 kg/m2 was assumed mediated through SBP, LDL, HDL, and diabetes. Results Cardiovascular disease attributable to major risk factors was similar between Argentina and the U.S., except for elevated SBP in men (CHD 8 % points higher in Argentine men, 6% higher for stroke). CHD attributable to BMI > 21 kg/m2 was substantially higher in the U.S. (men 10–11 % points higher; women CHD 13–14% higher). Conclusions Projected cardiovascular disease attributable to major risk factors appeared similar in Argentina and the U.S., though elevated BMI may be responsible for more of U.S. cardiovascular disease. A highly urbanized middle-income nation can have cardiovascular disease rates and risk factor levels comparable to a high income nation, but fewer resources for fighting the epidemic. PMID:21550675

  18. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  19. Successful Ventricular Remodeling with Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Mitral Valve Repair in a Patient with Severe Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Letsou, George V.; Frazier, O. H.

    2006-01-01

    Left ventricular remodeling is becoming a frequent treatment for severe heart failure, but its use in combination with other surgical techniques is controversial. We report a case in which left ventricular remodeling was combined with coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve repair to treat a patient with severely depressed ejection fraction, mitral insufficiency, coronary artery disease, and a recent history of myocardial infarction. Cardiac function improved after the combined treatment. This case suggests that left ventricular remodeling can be used safely and effectively in conjunction with other surgical techniques. PMID:16878634

  20. Going High with Heart Disease: The Effect of High Altitude Exposure in Older Individuals and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, Benjamin D

    2015-06-01

    Levine, Benjamin D. Going high with heart disease: The effect of high altitude exposure in older individuals and patients with coronary artery disease. High Alt Med Biol 16:89-96, 2015.--Ischemic heart disease is the largest cause of death in older men and women in the western world (Lozano et al., 2012 ; Roth et al., 2015). Atherosclerosis progresses with age, and thus age is the dominant risk factor for coronary heart disease in any algorithm used to assess risk for cardiovascular events. Subclinical atherosclerosis also increases with age, providing the substrate for precipitation of acute coronary syndromes. Thus the risk of high altitude exposure in older individuals is linked closely with both subclinical and manifest coronary heart disease (CHD). There are several considerations associated with taking patients with CHD to high altitude: a) The reduced oxygen availability may cause or exacerbate symptoms; b) The hypoxia and other associated environmental conditions (exercise, dehydration, change in diet, thermal stress, emotional stress from personal danger or conflict) may precipitate acute coronary events; c) If an event occurs and the patient is far from advanced medical care, then the outcome of an acute coronary event may be poor; and d) Sudden death may occur. Physicians caring for older patients who want to sojourn to high altitude should keep in mind the following four key points: 1). Altitude may exacerbate ischemic heart disease because of both reduced O2 delivery and paradoxical vasoconstriction; 2). Adverse events, including acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death, are most common in older unfit men, within the first few days of altitude exposure; 3). Ensuring optimal fitness, allowing for sufficient acclimatization (at least 5 days), and optimizing medical therapy (especially statins and aspirin) are prudent recommendations that may reduce the risk of adverse events; 4). A graded exercise test at sea level is probably sufficient for

  1. What Causes Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors ... Microvascular Disease? The same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis may cause coronary microvascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a ...

  2. Association between blood cholesterol level with periodontal status of coronary heart disease patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valensia, Rosy; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an abnormal narrowing of heart arteries associated with local accumulation of lipids, in the form of cholesterol and triglycerides. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory that suggests link to the development of CHD. In periodontitis have been reported changes in lipid profile, include increased of cholesterol levels of blood. Objective: to analyse correlation between blood cholesterol level with periodontal status of CHD and non CHD subjects. Methods: Periodontal status and blood cholesterol level of 60 CHD and 40 non CHD subjects was measured. Result: Blood cholesterol level in CHD subjects differs from non CHD subjects (p=0.032). Blood cholesterol level correlates with pocket depth (p=0.003) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) (p=0.000) in CHD subjects. Blood cholesterol level correlates with pocket depth (p=0.010) in non CHD subjects. There is no significant correlation between blood cholesterol level and bleeding on probing (BOP) in CHD subjects. There is no significant correlation between blood cholesterol level with BOP and CAL in non CHD subjects. Conclusion: Blood cholesterol level in control group is higher than CHD patients. Blood cholesterol level positively associated with pocket depth (r=0.375) and CAL (r=0.450) in CHD patients. Blood cholesterol level is positively associated with pocket depth (r=0.404) in control group.

  3. Traditional chinese herbal products for coronary heart disease: an overview of cochrane reviews.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; Xu, Hao; Shi, Dazhuo

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this overview was to evaluate and summarize Cochrane reviews of traditional Chinese herbal products (TCHPs) as the treatment for coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods. We searched the Cochrane Database that was concerned with the effectiveness of TCHPs for CHD. We also searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Reviews and primary studies of TCHP as the treatment of any type of CHD were included. Data were extracted according to predefined inclusion criteria by two independent reviewers. Results. Six Cochrane reviews were included. They related to a wide range of TCHPs for different types of CHD. Four reviews were concerned with angina pectoris (unstable or stable), one review was concerned with heart failure, and for acute myocardial infarction. No reviews concluded that TCHPs were definitely effective for CHD because of the weak evidence. Eight primary studies were TCHPs from CHD. These studies also maybe result in bias, but better than before. Conclusion. Several Cochrane reviews of TCHPs for the treatment of different types of CHD have recently been published. None of these reviews got definite conclusion favoring the effectiveness of TCHPs due to the weak evidence. With the improved quality of the new registered RCTs. The potential role of TCHPs in treating CHD is anticipated to be detected.

  4. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease in men and women: does 1 size fit all? Yes!

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2011-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality in both women and men in the industrialized nations. Coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for the single largest share of this toll in both sexes. Although it had long been known that the number 1 cause of death in men is CHD, it was determined only relatively recently that this was also true in women. Identification of the traditional risk factors (RFs) for CHD by the Framingham Heart Study and other investigations during the last 5 decades has provided the basis of preventive cardiology. These RFs can be considered as fixed or modifiable. Numerous epidemiologic and clinical studies have demonstrated that, with few exceptions, the major RFs that increase the hazard for CHD are the same for both men and women, whether fixed (age, sex, family history) or modified (lipids, blood pressure, smoking). A number of other RFs are under investigation and await confirmation in rigorous prospective studies. Even those conditions unique to women, which can predispose patients to CHD, such as polycystic ovaries and complications of pregnancy, act through provocation of the traditional RFs. Thus, the large body of evidence that supports the similarity of RFs for CHD in men and women provides a rational foundation for similar strategies of prevention in the 2 sexes.

  5. Prospective Coronary Heart Disease Screening in Asymptomatic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Using Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Results and Risk Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, Theodore; M’Kacher, Radhia; Koscielny, Serge; Elfassy, Eric; Raoux, François; Carde, Patrice; Santos, Marcos Dos; Margainaud, Jean-Pierre; Sabatier, Laure; Paul, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the coronary artery status using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma treated with combined modalities and mediastinal irradiation. Methods and Materials: All consecutive asymptomatic patients with Hodgkin lymphoma entered the study during follow-up, from August 2007 to May 2012. Coronary CT angiography was performed, and risk factors were recorded along with leukocyte telomere length (LTL) measurements. Results: One hundred seventy-nine patients entered the 5-year study. The median follow-up was 11.6 years (range, 2.1-40.2 years), and the median interval between treatment and the CCTA was 9.5 years (range, 0.5-40 years). Coronary artery abnormalities were demonstrated in 46 patients (26%). Coronary CT angiography abnormalities were detected in nearly 15% of the patients within the first 5 years after treatment. A significant increase (34%) occurred 10 years after treatment (P=.05). Stenoses were mostly nonostial. Severe stenoses were observed in 12 (6.7%) of the patients, entailing surgery with either angioplasty with stent placement or bypass grafting in 10 of them (5.5%). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that age at treatment, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, as well as radiation dose to the coronary artery origins, were prognostic factors. In the group of patients with LTL measurements, hypertension and LTL were the only independent risk factors. Conclusions: The findings suggest that CCTA can identify asymptomatic individuals at risk of acute coronary artery disease who might require either preventive or curative measures. Conventional risk factors and the radiation dose to coronary artery origins were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic value of LTL needs further investigation.

  6. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Spontaneous coronary artery dissection — sometimes referred to as SCAD — is an ... the blood vessels in the heart. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) can slow or block blood flow ...

  7. [Coronary heart disease in Mexico and the clinical epidemiological and preventive relevance].

    PubMed

    Chávez Domínguez, Rafael; Ramírez Hernández, Jorge A; Casanova Garcés, José Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is dominant among heart diseases in the population, a problem to control. Heart diseases have been first place in the general mortality for the last 20 years. The trend show an annual increase without control. Atherosclerosis is responsible for at least for one fourth of all deaths in the country. The combined data of mortality and morbidity, from hospital discharges or the whole country, disclose that one out of three die of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). While only 8% of all deaths registered were admitted to a hospital. Most, 92% were never admitted to any hospital for some reason. The estimated annual incidence of AMI cases is 140,000, on the basis of 3 cases surviving for each case death, accounted by the Death Certification System, which rounds 35,000. Standardized mortality rates of AMI in Mexico are greater than in USA o Canada creating a more concerned worry. The most probable explanation to that situation is lack of preventive care, which should also include the acute care and before reaching the hospital facilities. Running the same chances are hypertension crisis and strokes and diabetic complications. The appropriate care for critical situations might reduce significantly the cardiovascular mortality in the country, in a short and middle term. Prevention is not only for chronic conditions but for acute and critical situations. The programs of preventive care should also include cultural promotion and community awareness. The timely care is life and myocardium saving. The reinforcement of prior to hospital care reduces the delay for AMI adequate intervention. These activities agree quite well with the ongoing programs of CPR, organizing the surviving chain and the training programs for paramedical emergency technicians.

  8. Serum Urate Is Not Associated with Coronary Artery Calcification: The NHLBI Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    NEOGI, TUHINA; TERKELTAUB, ROBERT; ELLISON, R. CURTIS; HUNT, STEVEN; ZHANG, YUQING

    2011-01-01

    Objective Urate may have effects on vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis. We had shown an association between serum uric acid (SUA) and carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Inflammation and vascular remodeling in atherosclerosis promote coronary artery calcification (CAC), a preclinical marker for atherosclerosis. Here, we examined whether SUA is associated with CAC, using the same study sample and methods as for our previous carotid atherosclerosis study. Methods The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study is a multicenter study designed to assess risk factors for heart disease. Participants were recruited from population-based cohorts in the US states of Massachusetts, North Carolina, Minnesota, Utah, and Alabama. CAC was assessed with helical computed tomography (CT). We conducted sex-specific and family-cluster analyses, as well as additional analyses among persons without risk factors related to both cardiovascular disease and hyperuricemia, adjusting for potential confounders as we had in the previous study of carotid atherosclerosis. Results For the CAC study, 2412 subjects had both SUA and helical CT results available (55% women, age 58 ± 13 yrs, body mass index 27.6 ± 5.3). We found no association of SUA with CAC in men or women [OR in men: 1.0, 1.11, 0.86, 0.90; women: 1.0, 0.83, 1.00, 0.87 for increasing categories of SUA: < 5 (referent group), 5 to < 6, 6 to < 6.8, ≥ 6.8 mg/dl, respectively], nor in subgroup analyses. Conclusion Replicating the methods used to demonstrate an association of SUA with carotid atherosclerosis did not reveal any association between SUA and CAC, suggesting that SUA likely does not contribute to atherosclerosis through effects on arterial calcification. The possibility that urate has divergent pathophysiologic effects on atherosclerosis and artery calcification merits further study. PMID:20889594

  9. Chest pain for coronary heart disease in general practice: clinical judgement and a clinical decision rule

    PubMed Central

    Haasenritter, Jörg; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Bösner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Marburg Heart Score (MHS) is a simple, valid, and robust clinical decision rule assisting GPs in ruling out coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients presenting with chest pain. Aim To investigate whether using the rule adds to the GP’s clinical judgement. Design and setting A comparative diagnostic accuracy study was conducted using data from 832 consecutive patients with chest pain in general practice. Method Three diagnostic strategies were defined using the MHS: diagnosis based solely on the MHS; using the MHS as a triage test; and GP’s clinical judgement aided by the MHS. Their accuracy was compared with the GPs’ unaided clinical judgement. Results Sensitivity and specificity of the GPs’ unaided clinical judgement was 82.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 72.4 to 89.9) and 61.0% (95% CI = 56.7 to 65.2), respectively. In comparison, the sensitivity of the MHS was higher (difference 8.5%, 95% CI = −2.4 to 19.6) and the specificity was similar (difference −0.4%, 95% CI = −5.3 to 4.5); the sensitivity of the triage was similar (difference −1.5%, 95% CI = −9.8 to 7.0) and the specificity was higher (difference 11.6%, 95% CI = 7.8 to 15.4); and both the sensitivity and specificity of the aided clinical judgement were higher (difference 8.0%, 95% CI = −6.9 to 23.0 and 5.8%, 95% CI = −1.6 to 13.2, respectively). Conclusion Using the Marburg Heart Score for initial triage can improve the clinical diagnosis of CHD in general practice. PMID:26500322

  10. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Mok, Greta S. P.; Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu; Yang, Ching-Ching; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm.MaterialsAll reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique.ResultsNo statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients.ConclusionThis study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  11. [Examination of the effectiveness of heart rate control using intravenous β-blocker in 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Takahashi, Daichi; Nakagawa, Shingo; Morita, Mari; Noda, Rie; Nakamura, Yoko; Igarashi, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the effectiveness of the use of β-blocker in coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). In 1783 patients, heart rate was controlled by propranolol injection to patients with heart rates of 61 bpm or more. As a result, the scan heart rate (58.8±6.5 bpm) decreased significantly compared with the initial heart rate (72.7±9.4 bpm). Prospective gating method was used by 61.9% including 64.3% of the intravenous β-blocker injection group. Moreover, daily use of oral β-blocker had influence on reduction of the scan heart rate (daily use group: 60.1±6.5 bpm vs. unuse group: 58.5±6.3 bpm p<0.01). When we evaluated the image quality of CCTA by the score, the improvement of the score was obviously admitted by 65 bpm or less of the scan heart rate. The ratio of scan heart rate that was controlled by 65 bpm or less was decreased in the initial heart rate groups that were 81 bpm or more. The incidence of adverse reactions by the propranolol injection was few, and these instances only involved slight symptoms. Therefore, heart rate control with the use of β-blocker is useful for the image quality improvement of CCTA. This form of treatment can be safely enforced.

  12. [Methods of the multivariate statistical analysis of so-called polyetiological diseases using the example of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Lifshits, A M

    1979-01-01

    General characteristics of the multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) is given. Methodical premises and criteria for the selection of an adequate MSA method applicable to pathoanatomic investigations of the epidemiology of multicausal diseases are presented. The experience of using MSA with computors and standard computing programs in studies of coronary arteries aterosclerosis on the materials of 2060 autopsies is described. The combined use of 4 MSA methods: sequential, correlational, regressional, and discriminant permitted to quantitate the contribution of each of the 8 examined risk factors in the development of aterosclerosis. The most important factors were found to be the age, arterial hypertension, and heredity. Occupational hypodynamia and increased fatness were more important in men, whereas diabetes melitus--in women. The registration of this combination of risk factors by MSA methods provides for more reliable prognosis of the likelihood of coronary heart disease with a fatal outcome than prognosis of the degree of coronary aterosclerosis.

  13. Screening for coronary artery disease in respiratory patients: comparison of single- and dual-source CT in patients with a heart rate above 70 bpm.

    PubMed

    Pansini, Vittorio; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Tacelli, Nunzia; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Flohr, Thomas; Deken, Valérie; Duhamel, Alain; Remy, Jacques

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the assessibility of coronary arteries in respiratory patients with high heart rates. This study was based on the comparative analysis of two paired populations of 54 patients with a heart rate >70 bpm evaluated with dual-source (group 1) and single-source (group 2) CT. The mean heart rate was 89.1 bpm in group 1 and 86.7 bpm in group 2 (P=0.26). The mean number of assessable segments per patient was significantly higher in group 1 compared to group 2 (P coronary segments were assessable (i.e., the anatomical level enabling screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease) were 35.3% for heart rates <110 bpm, 35.6% for heart rates <100 bpm, 40% for heart rates <90 bpm, and 60% for heart rates <80 bpm in group 1 and 11.3, 12.2, 8.8, and 10% for the corresponding thresholds in group 2 (P<0.05). In both groups of patients, coronary artery imaging was obtained from standard CT angiograms of the chest. The improvement in coronary imaging with dual-source CT suggests that high heart rates should no longer be considered as contraindications for ECG-gated CT angiograms of the chest whenever clinically relevant.

  14. Serum Gamma-glutamyl Transferase Concentration Within the Reference Range is Related to the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction in Korean Men: Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (V-1, 2010 and V-2, 2011)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Doo-Yeoun; Kim, Young-Sang; Kim, Kyu-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limited data exist on the association of serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level within the reference range with the increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) prediction in men. The study examined the association between serum GGT concentration within the reference range and the CHD risk prediction in Korean men. Methods: The study employed data from Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (V-1, 2010 and V-2, 2011) where a total of 1301 individuals were analyzed. A 10-year CHD risk prediction was computed using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) modified by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III). Results: Positive correlations were established between log-transformed GGT concentration and FRS (r = 0.237, P < 0.001). After adjustment of body mass index, the amount of alcohol intake and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for intermediate risk and beyond of 10-year CHD prediction (10-year risk ≥10%) with lowest quartile of participants was 1.21 (0.78–1.87) for second quartiles, 1.39 (0.88–2.21) for third quartiles and 2.03 (1.23–3.34) for highest quartiles. Conclusions: Higher serum GGT within its reference range was significantly correlated with a 10-year CHD risk prediction estimation using NCEP ATP III in Korean men. PMID:26228210

  15. Epidemiology as a Guide to Clinical Decisions—II. Diet and Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hulley, Stephen B.; Sherwin, Roger; Nestle, Marion; Lee, Philip R.

    1981-01-01

    Should clinicians prescribe fat-controlled diets to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD), and, if so, which patients should be given this advice? In this report, we use a three-step model to explain the hypothesis that dietary fats are a cause of CHD: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol raise serum cholesterol levels (step 1), which are a cause of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis (step 2), and, in turn, clinically manifest CHD (step 3). An evaluation of the scientific evidence for each step leads us to conclude that dietary fats definitely influence the level of serum cholesterol, and that serum cholesterol is probably a cause of atherosclerosis and CHD. To determine the clinical implications, we examined the potential of various foods to keep cholesterol levels lower, as well as the projected magnitude of reduction in CHD risk. The likelihood of benefit varies among patients, ranging from uncertain or trivial (for those with lower serum cholesterol levels, those who are free of other risk factors and the elderly) to substantial (for patients with higher serum cholesterol levels, those who have other risk factors and those who are young). This analysis supports an individualized approach to clinical management; each decision to prescribe a fat-controlled diet should be a judgment that depends on art—the therapeutic philosophy of each clinician and the particular needs of each patient—as well as on science. The implication for public health policies is that they should promote rather than a uniform eating pattern for all Americans, a uniform environment that enhances individual choices. This should include efforts to educate the medical profession and the public, and more comprehensive and informative foodlabeling practices. PMID:7257376

  16. Modelling Future Coronary Heart Disease Mortality to 2030 in the British Isles

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, John; Kabir, Zubair; Bennett, Kathleen; Hotchkiss, Joel W.; Kee, Frank; Leyland, Alastair H.; Davies, Carolyn; Bandosz, Piotr; Guzman-Castillo, Maria; O’Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon; Critchley, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite rapid declines over the last two decades, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates in the British Isles are still amongst the highest in Europe. This study uses a modelling approach to compare the potential impact of future risk factor scenarios relating to smoking and physical activity levels, dietary salt and saturated fat intakes on future CHD mortality in three countries: Northern Ireland (NI), Republic of Ireland (RoI) and Scotland. Methods CHD mortality models previously developed and validated in each country were extended to predict potential reductions in CHD mortality from 2010 (baseline year) to 2030. Risk factor trends data from recent surveys at baseline were used to model alternative future risk factor scenarios: Absolute decreases in (i) smoking prevalence and (ii) physical inactivity rates of up to 15% by 2030; relative decreases in (iii) dietary salt intake of up to 30% by 2030 and (iv) dietary saturated fat of up to 6% by 2030. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were then conducted. Results Projected populations in 2030 were 1.3, 3.4 and 3.9 million in NI, RoI and Scotland respectively (adults aged 25–84). In 2030: assuming recent declining mortality trends continue: 15% absolute reductions in smoking could decrease CHD deaths by 5.8–7.2%. 15% absolute reductions in physical inactivity levels could decrease CHD deaths by 3.1–3.6%. Relative reductions in salt intake of 30% could decrease CHD deaths by 5.2–5.6% and a 6% reduction in saturated fat intake might decrease CHD deaths by some 7.8–9.0%. These projections remained stable under a wide range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Feasible reductions in four cardiovascular risk factors (already achieved elsewhere) could substantially reduce future coronary deaths. More aggressive polices are therefore needed in the British Isles to control tobacco, promote healthy food and increase physical activity. PMID:26422012

  17. Heart disease and diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  18. Gendered uncertainty and variation in physicians' decisions for coronary heart disease: the double-edged sword of "atypical symptoms".

    PubMed

    Welch, Lisa C; Lutfey, Karen E; Gerstenberger, Eric; Grace, Matthew

    2012-09-01

    Nonmedical factors and diagnostic certainty contribute to variation in clinical decision making, but the process by which this occurs remains unclear. We examine how physicians' interpretations of patient sex-gender affect diagnostic certainty and, in turn, decision making for coronary heart disease. Data are from a factorial experiment of 256 physicians who viewed 1 of 16 video vignettes with different patient-actors presenting the same symptoms of coronary heart disease. Physician participants completed a structured interview and provided a narrative about their decision-making processes. Quantitative analysis showed that diagnostic uncertainty reduces the likelihood that physicians will order tests and medications appropriate for an urgent cardiac condition in particular. Qualitative analysis revealed that a subset of physicians applied knowledge that women have "atypical symptoms" as a generalization, which engendered uncertainty for some. Findings are discussed in relation to social-psychological processes that underlie clinical decision making and the social framing of medical knowledge.

  19. Associations of Adiponectin and Leptin with Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Bidulescu, Aurelian; Liu, Jiankang; Chen, Zhimin; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Musani, Solomon K.; Samdarshi, Tandaw E.; Fox, Ervin R.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gibbons, Gary H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Because the predictive significance of previously reported racial differences in leptin and adiponectin levels remains unclear, we assessed the prospective association of these adipokines with the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in African Americans, a population with a high prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods: Serum specimens from 4,571 Jackson Heart Study participants without prevalent CVD at baseline examination (2000–2004) were analyzed for adiponectin and leptin levels. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the associations of the two adipokines with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and incident ischemic stroke. Results: During 6.2 years average of follow-up, 98 incident CHD and 87 incident ischemic stroke events were documented. Among study participants (64% women; mean age 54 ± 13 years), the mean (standard deviation, SD) was 6.04 (4.32) μg/mL in women and 4.03 (3.14) μg/mL in men for adiponectin and 37.35 (23.90) ng/mL in women and 11.03 (10.05) ng/mL in men for leptin. After multivariable adjustment that included age, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, systolic blood pressure, hypertension medication, smoking, and physical activity, adiponectin was directly associated in women with incident stroke, HR = 1.41 (1.04–1.91) per one SD increase (p = 0.03), but not in men (p = 0.42). It was not associated with incident CHD in women or men. Leptin was not associated with incident CHD or incident stroke. Conclusion: In the largest community-based African American cohort, adiponectin was associated among women with a higher risk of incident stroke. Whether adiponectin harbors harmful properties, or it is produced in response to vascular inflammation to counter the atherosclerotic process, or the putative “adiponectin resistance

  20. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  1. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome: A review and expert consensus opinion.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, Michael; Cohen-Solál, Alain; Costa, Susana; Édes, István; Erlikh, Alexey; Franco, Fatima; Gibson, Charles; Gorjup, Vojka; Guarracino, Fabio; Gustafsson, Finn; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Husebye, Trygve; Karason, Kristjan; Katsytadze, Igor; Kaul, Sundeep; Kivikko, Matti; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Masip, Josep; Matskeplishvili, Simon; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Møller, Jacob E; Nessler, Jadwiga; Nessler, Bohdan; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Oliva, Fabrizio; Pichler-Cetin, Emel; Põder, Pentti; Recio-Mayoral, Alejandro; Rex, Steffen; Rokyta, Richard; Strasser, Ruth H; Zima, Endre; Pollesello, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure, and especially in cardiogenic shock related to ischemic conditions, vasopressors and inotropes are used. However, both pathophysiological considerations and available clinical data suggest that these treatments may have disadvantageous effects. The inodilator levosimendan offers potential benefits due to a range of distinct effects including positive inotropy, restoration of ventriculo-arterial coupling, increases in tissue perfusion, and anti-stunning and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials levosimendan improves symptoms, cardiac function, hemodynamics, and end-organ function. Adverse effects are generally less common than with other inotropic and vasoactive therapies, with the notable exception of hypotension. The decision to use levosimendan, in terms of timing and dosing, is influenced by the presence of pulmonary congestion, and blood pressure measurements. Levosimendan should be preferred over adrenergic inotropes as a first line therapy for all ACS-AHF patients who are under beta-blockade and/or when urinary output is insufficient after diuretics. Levosimendan can be used alone or in combination with other inotropic or vasopressor agents, but requires monitoring due to the risk of hypotension.

  2. Coronary heart disease is associated with a worse clinical outcome of hand osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Courties, Alice; Sellam, Jérémie; Maheu, Emmanuel; Cadet, Christian; Barthe, Yoann; Carrat, Fabrice; Berenbaum, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine whether cardiometabolic factors are associated with hand osteoarthritis (HOA) symptoms, radiographic severity and progression in a post hoc analysis of the phase III Strontium ranelate Efficacy in Knee OsteoarthrItis triAl (SEKOIA) trial, designed to determine the effect of strontium ranelate on knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Among the 1683 patients randomised in the SEKOIA study, 869 with radiographic HOA at baseline (rHOA≥2 joints with Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥2) were included in a cross-sectional analysis. For longitudinal study, we included only the 307 patients with rHOA at baseline from the placebo group. We evaluated whether baseline symptomatic HOA, radiographic severity and clinical and rHOA progression were associated with coronary heart disease and/or metabolic diseases (obesity, diabetes and hypertension, dyslipidaemia) by multivariate regression analysis. Results At baseline, 869 patients (72% women) were included in the cross-sectional analysis; 26% were symptomatic. On multivariate analysis, symptomatic HOA was associated with coronary heart disease (OR 3.59, 95% CI (1.78 to 7.26)) but not metabolic diseases. After a mean follow-up of 2.6 years, for the 307 participants in the placebo group, on multivariate analysis, worse clinical HOA outcome was associated with coronary heart disease (OR 2.91, 95% CI (1.02 to 8.26)). The slow radiographic progression did not allow for revealing any associated factors. Conclusions Symptomatic HOA and worse HOA clinical course are associated with coronary heart disease. These results strengthen the systemic component of HOA and the association between OA pain and cardiac events. Trial registration number ISRCTN41323372. PMID:28243467

  3. Vitamin C and risk of death from stroke and coronary heart disease in cohort of elderly people.

    PubMed Central

    Gale, C. R.; Martyn, C. N.; Winter, P. D.; Cooper, C.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine whether vitamin C status, as measured by dietary intake and plasma ascorbic acid concentration, is related to mortality from stroke and coronary heart disease in people aged 65 and over. DESIGN--A 20 year follow up study of a cohort of randomly selected elderly people living in the community who had taken part in the 1973-4 Department of Health and Social Security nutritional survey and for whom dietary and other data had been recorded. SETTING--Eight areas in Britain (five in England, two in Scotland, and one in Wales). SUBJECTS--730 men and women who had completed a seven day dietary record and who had no history or symptoms of stroke, cerebral arteriosclerosis, or coronary heart disease when examined by a geriatrician in 1973-4. RESULTS--Mortality from stroke was highest in those with the lowest vitamin C status. Those in the highest third of the distribution of vitamin C intake had a relative risk of 0.5 (95% confidence interval 0.3 to 0.8) compared with those in the lowest third, after adjustment for age, sex, and established cardiovascular risk factors. The relation between vitamin C intake and stroke was independent of social class and other dietary variables. A similar gradient in risk was present for plasma ascorbic acid concentrations. No association was found between vitamin C status and risk of death from coronary heart disease. CONCLUSION--In elderly people vitamin C concentration, whether measured by dietary intake or plasma concentration of ascorbic acid, is strongly related to subsequent risk of death from stroke but not from coronary heart disease. PMID:7787644

  4. Meta-analysis of Egg Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Dominik D; Miller, Paula E; Vargas, Ashley J; Weed, Douglas L; Cohen, Sarah S

    2016-01-01

    The possible relationship between dietary cholesterol and cardiac outcomes has been scrutinized for decades. However, recent reviews of the literature have suggested that dietary cholesterol is not a nutrient of concern. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis of egg intake (a significant contributor to dietary cholesterol) and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. A comprehensive literature search was conducted through August 2015 to identify prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for egg consumption in association with CHD or stroke. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate summary relative risk estimates (SRREs) for high vs low intake and stratified intake dose-response analyses. Heterogeneity was examined in subgroups where sensitivity and meta regression analyses were conducted based on increasing egg intake. A 12% decreased risk (SRRE = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81-0.97) of stroke was observed in the meta-analysis of 7 studies of egg intake (high vs low; generally 1/d vs <2/wk), with little heterogeneity (p-H = 0.37, I(2) = 7.50). A nonstatistically significant SRRE of 0.97 (95% CI, 0.88-1.07, p-H = 0.67, I(2) = 0.00) was observed in the meta-analysis of 7 studies of egg consumption and CHD. No clear dose-response trends were apparent in the stratified intake meta-analyses or the meta regression analyses. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, consumption of up to one egg daily may contribute to a decreased risk of total stroke, and daily egg intake does not appear to be associated with risk of CHD. Key Teaching Points: • The role of egg consumption in the risk of stroke and coronary heart disease has come under scrutiny over many years. • A comprehensive meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for egg consumption in association with CHD or stroke was performed on the peer-reviewed epidemiologic literature through August 2015. • Overall, summary associations indicate that

  5. Is the prevalence of coronary heart disease falling in British men?

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, F; Morris, R; Whincup, P; Walker, M; Ebrahim, S; Shaper, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess whether long term trends over time in acute coronary heart disease (CHD) event rates have influenced the burden of prevalent CHD in British men.
DESIGN—Longitudinal cohort study.
PARTICIPANTS—7735 men, aged 40-59 at entry (1978-80), selected from 24 British towns.
METHODS—The prevalences of current angina symptoms and history of diagnosed CHD were ascertained by questionnaire in 1978-80, 1983-85, 1992, and 1996. New major CHD events (fatal and non-fatal) were ascertained throughout the study from National Health Service central registers and general practice record reviews. Age adjusted trends in CHD prevalence were compared with trends in major CHD event rates.
RESULTS—From 1978-1996 there was a clear decline in the prevalence of current angina symptoms: the age adjusted annual percentage change in odds was -1.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.8% to -0.8%). However, there was no evidence of a trend in the prevalence of history of diagnosed CHD (annual change in odds 0.1%, 95% CI -1.0% to 1.2%). Over the same period, the CHD mortality rate fell substantially (annual change -4.1%, 95% CI -6.5% to -1.6%); rates of non-fatal myocardial infarction, all major CHD events, and first major CHD event fell by -1.7% (95% CI -3.9% to 0.5%), -2.5% (95% CI -4.1% to -0.8%), and -2.4% (95% CI% -4.3 to -0.4%), respectively.
CONCLUSIONS—These results suggest that middle aged British men are less likely to experience symptoms of angina than in previous decades but are just as likely to have a history of diagnosed CHD. Despite falling rates of new major events and falling symptom prevalence, the need for secondary prevention among middle aged men with established CHD is as great as ever.


Keywords: coronary heart disease; angina; prevalence; trends PMID:11602539

  6. Body mass index and incident coronary heart disease in women: a population-based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A high body mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD); however, a low BMI may also be associated with an increased mortality risk. There is limited information on the relation of incident CHD risk across a wide range of BMI, particularly in women. We examined the relation between BMI and incident CHD overall and across different risk factors of the disease in the Million Women Study. Methods 1.2 million women (mean age = 56 years) participants without heart disease, stroke, or cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer) at baseline (1996 to 2001) were followed prospectively for 9 years on average. Adjusted relative risks and 20-year cumulative incidence from age 55 to 74 years were calculated for CHD using Cox regression. Results After excluding the first 4 years of follow-up, we found that 32,465 women had a first coronary event (hospitalization or death) during follow-up. The adjusted relative risk for incident CHD per 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI was 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22 to 1.25). The cumulative incidence of CHD from age 55 to 74 years increased progressively with BMI, from 1 in 11 (95% CI 1 in10 to 12) for BMI of 20 kg/m2, to 1 in 6(95% CI 1 in 5 to 7) for BMI of 34 kg/m2. A 10 kg/m2 increase in BMI conferred a similar risk to a 5-year increment in chronological age. The 20 year cumulative incidence increased with BMI in smokers and non-smokers, alcohol drinkers and non-drinkers, physically active and inactive, and in the upper and lower socioeconomic classes. In contrast to incident disease, the relation between BMI and CHD mortality (n = 2,431) was J-shaped. For the less than 20 kg/m2 and ≥35 kg/m2 BMI categories, the respective relative risks were 1.27 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.53) and 2.84 (95% CI 2.51 to 3.21) for CHD deaths, and 0.89 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.94) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.78 to 1.92) for incident CHD. Conclusions CHD incidence in women increases progressively with BMI, an

  7. Interethnic differences in the accuracy of anthropometric indicators of obesity in screening for high risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, VM; Casas, JP; Miranda, JJ; Perel, P; Pichardo, R; González, A; Sanchez, JR; Ferreccio, C; Aguilera, X; Silva, E; Oróstegui, M; Gómez, LF; Chirinos, JA; Medina-Lezama, J; Pérez, CM; Suárez, E; Ortiz, AP; Rosero, L; Schapochnik, N; Ortiz, Z; Ferrante, D; Diaz, M; Bautista, LE

    2009-01-01

    Background Cut points for defining obesity have been derived from mortality data among Whites from Europe and the United States and their accuracy to screen for high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in other ethnic groups has been questioned. Objective To compare the accuracy and to define ethnic and gender-specific optimal cut points for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) when they are used in screening for high risk of CHD in the Latin-American and the US populations. Methods We estimated the accuracy and optimal cut points for BMI, WC and WHR to screen for CHD risk in Latin Americans (n=18 976), non-Hispanic Whites (Whites; n=8956), non-Hispanic Blacks (Blacks; n=5205) and Hispanics (n=5803). High risk of CHD was defined as a 10-year risk ≥20% (Framingham equation). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) and the misclassification-cost term were used to assess accuracy and to identify optimal cut points. Results WHR had the highest AUC in all ethnic groups (from 0.75 to 0.82) and BMI had the lowest (from 0.50 to 0.59). Optimal cut point for BMI was similar across ethnic/gender groups (27 kg/m2). In women, cut points for WC (94 cm) and WHR (0.91) were consistent by ethnicity. In men, cut points for WC and WHR varied significantly with ethnicity: from 91 cm in Latin Americans to 102 cm in Whites, and from 0.94 in Latin Americans to 0.99 in Hispanics, respectively. Conclusion WHR is the most accurate anthropometric indicator to screen for high risk of CHD, whereas BMI is almost uninformative. The same BMI cut point should be used in all men and women. Unique cut points for WC and WHR should be used in all women, but ethnic-specific cut points seem warranted among men. PMID:19238159

  8. Effect of heart rate on zonal tension and ischaemia following coronary occlusion: optimal rate for Treppe versus ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, M M; Banka, V S; Helfant, R H

    1976-05-01

    The optimal heart rate in the immediate period following acute coronary occlusion has been controversial from the standpoint of arrhythmias and the extent of ischaemic injury. In the present study we have examined the effect of heart rate on both local myocardial contractile ability and ischaemia in 10 open chested dogs using strain gauge arches and epicardial electrograms. After sinus node destruction, atrial pacing was instituted for rate control at 100/min and increased randomly to 150, 175, and 200/min. Before coronary occlusion, total tension and rate of tension rise progressively increased at higher rates while ST segments demonstrated no significant changes. After coronary artery occlusion, total tension and rate of tension rise in the ischaemic zone decreased markedly and showed no significant change with increments in pacing rate. In the border zone, after the initial decrease in tension, pacing at 150 beats/min improved tension without a change in ST segments. However, when the rate was increased to 175 and 200 beats/min, although border zone tension increased further, ST segments rose significantly. Thus, a heart rate between 100-150/min provides the optimal range for increasing contractile ability in the nonischaemic and border zones without adversely affecting the degree of ischaemic injury.

  9. Explaining the Decline in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2007

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Carla; Vaartjes, Ilonca; van Dis, Ineke; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Engelfriet, Peter; Heintjes, Edith M.; Blokstra, Anneke; Deeg, Dorly J. H.; Visser, Marjolein; Bots, Michiel L.; O’Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objective We set out to determine what proportion of the mortality decline from 1997 to 2007 in coronary heart disease (CHD) in the Netherlands could be attributed to advances in medical treatment and to improvements in population-wide cardiovascular risk factors. Methods We used the IMPACT-SEC model. Nationwide information was obtained on changes between 1997 and 2007 in the use of 42 treatments and in cardiovascular risk factor levels in adults, aged 25 or over. The primary outcome was the number of CHD deaths prevented or postponed. Results The age-standardized CHD mortality fell by 48% from 269 to 141 per 100.000, with remarkably similar relative declines across socioeconomic groups. This resulted in 11,200 fewer CHD deaths in 2007 than expected. The model was able to explain 72% of the mortality decline. Approximately 37% (95% CI: 10%-80%) of the decline was attributable to changes in acute phase and secondary prevention treatments: the largest contributions came from treating patients in the community with heart failure (11%) or chronic angina (9%). Approximately 36% (24%-67%) was attributable to decreases in risk factors: blood pressure (30%), total cholesterol levels (10%), smoking (5%) and physical inactivity (1%). Ten% more deaths could have been prevented if body mass index and diabetes would not have increased. Overall, these findings did not vary across socioeconomic groups, although within socioeconomic groups the contribution of risk factors differed. Conclusion CHD mortality has recently halved in The Netherlands. Equally large contributions have come from the increased use of acute and secondary prevention treatments and from improvements in population risk factors (including primary prevention treatments). Increases in obesity and diabetes represent a major challenge for future prevention policies. PMID:27906998

  10. Genetic Susceptibility to Coronary Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes: Three Independent Studies

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lu; Parast, Layla; Cai, Tianxi; Powers, Christine; Gervino, Ernest V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Hu, Frank B.; Doria, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether coronary heart disease (CHD)-susceptibility loci identified by genome-wide association studies of the general population also contribute to CHD in type 2 diabetes. Background No study has examined the effects of these genetic variants on CHD in diabetic patients. Methods We genotyped 15 genetic markers of 12 loci in three studies of diabetic patients: the prospective Nurses’ Health Study (309 CHD cases and 544 controls) and Health Professional Follow-up Study (345 CHD cases and 451 controls), and the cross-sectional Joslin Heart Study (422 CHD cases and 435 controls). Results Five SNPs, rs4977574 (CDKN2A/2B), rs12526453 (PHACTR1), rs646776 (CELSR2-PSRC1-SORT1), rs2259816 (HNF1A), and rs11206510 (PCSK9) showed directionally consistent associations with CHD in the three studies, with combined odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.17 to 1.25 (p=0.03 to 0.0002). None of the other SNPs reached significance in individual or combined analyses. A genetic risk score (GRS) was created by combining the risk alleles of the five significantly associated loci. The OR of CHD per GRS unit was 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13– 1.26; p<0.0001). Individuals with GRS ≥8 (19% of diabetic subjects) had almost a two-fold increase in CHD risk (OR=1.94, 95% CI 1.60–2.35) as compared to individuals with GRS ≤5 (30% of diabetic subjects). Prediction of CHD was significantly improved (p<0.001) when the GRS was added to a model including clinical predictors in the combined samples. Conclusions Our results illustrate the consistency and differences in the determinants of genetic susceptibility to CHD in diabetic patients and the general populations. PMID:22152955

  11. Knowledge of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors among a Community Sample in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Ammouri, Ali A.; Tailakh, Ayman; Isac, Chandrani; Kamanyire, Joy K.; Muliira, Joshua; Balachandran, Shreedevi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of Omani adults regarding conventional coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and to identify demographic variables associated with these knowledge levels. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional pilot study was carried out among a convenience sample of 130 adults attending a health awareness fair held in a local shopping mall in Muscat, Oman, in November 2012. A modified version of the Heart Disease Facts Questionnaire in both English and Arabic was used to assess knowledge of CHD risk factors. Scores were calculated by summing the correct answers for each item (range: 0–21). Inadequate knowledge was indicated by a mean score of <70%. Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to establish the participants’ knowledge levels and identify associated demographic variables. Results: A total of 114 subjects participated in the study (response rate: 87.7%). Of these, 69 participants (60.5%) had inadequate mean CHD knowledge scores. Knowledge of CHD risk factors was significantly associated with body mass index (odds ratio [OR] = 0.739; P = 0.023), marital status (OR = 0.057; P = 0.036) and education level (OR = 9.243; P = 0.006). Conclusion: Low knowledge levels of CHD risk factors were observed among the studied community sample in Oman; this is likely to limit the participants’ ability to engage in preventative practices. These findings support the need for education programmes to enhance awareness of risk factors and prevention of CHD in Oman. PMID:27226910

  12. Outcomes of a multidisciplinary coronary heart disease prevention programme in southern India

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Sakthi Vinayagam, N; Ezhil Vani, N; Chockalingam, V

    2016-01-01

    Objective Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause for mortality and morbidity in India but the focus on lifestyle interventions is very low. This study aims to evaluate the role of a multidisciplinary CHD prevention programme in southern India. Methods All patients enrolled between May 2014 and March 2016 with CHD (disease group) or with risk factors but no CHD (risk group) were included. Participants attended one–two sessions per week for 6–12 weeks; each session lasted 90–120 min, including exercise and education, and was adapted to the participants' sociocultural requirements. Resting heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and functional capacity (FC) were documented at start and end of programme. Results Disease group was older (61±10 vs 51±14  years, p<0.01), had lower BMI and WC (26±4 vs 30±7 kg/m2, p<0.01; 39±4 vs 42±5 inches, p<0.01), attended more sessions (12±7 vs 6±3, p<0.0001) and had higher completion rates (82% vs 53%, p=0.02) than the risk group. Programme-completers (n=45, 67%) showed significant improvement in health-related behaviour, angina threshold (in all 8 subjects with stable angina), BMI (p=0.03), WC (p<0.01) and FC (p<0.01). Follow-up for a period of 16±6 months showed continued adherence to the healthy behaviour (n=44, 1 lost to follow-up) and maintenance of anthropometric and FC parameters. Conclusions A multidisciplinary approach to preventing CHD is lacking in India. This study shows that a comprehensive lifestyle intervention programme has significant benefits and can be incorporated in the routine management of all patients and at-risk individuals in the region. PMID:27822315

  13. Coronary artery disease affects cortical circuitry associated with brain-heart integration during volitional exercise.

    PubMed

    Norton, Katelyn N; Badrov, Mark B; Barron, Carly C; Suskin, Neville; Heinecke, Armin; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2015-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that coronary artery disease (CAD) alters the cortical circuitry associated with exercise. Observations of changes in heart rate (HR) and in cortical blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were made in 23 control subjects [control; 8 women; 63 ± 11 yr; mean arterial pressure (MAP): 90 ± 9 mmHg] (mean ± SD) and 17 similarly aged CAD patients (4 women; 59 ± 9 yr; MAP: 87 ± 10 mmHg). Four repeated bouts each of 30%, 40%, and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force (LAB session), and seven repeated bouts of isometric handgrip (IHG) at 40% MVC force (fMRI session), were performed, with each contraction lasting 20 s and separated by 40 s of rest. There was a main effect of group (P = 0.03) on HR responses across all IHG intensities. Compared with control, CAD demonstrated less task-dependent deactivation in the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, and reduced activation in the right anterior insula, bilateral precentral cortex, and occipital lobe (P < 0.05). When correlated with HR, CAD demonstrated reduced activation in the bilateral insula and posterior cingulate cortex, and reduced deactivation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral precentral cortex (P < 0.05). The increased variability in expected autonomic regions and decrease in total cortical activation in response to the IHG task are associated with a diminished HR response to volitional effort in CAD. Therefore, relative to similarly aged and healthy individuals, CAD impairs the heart rate response and modifies the cortical patterns associated with cardiovascular control during IHG.

  14. The Michigan Model for Coronary Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes: Development and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Brandle, Michael; Brown, Morton B.; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a computer simulation model for coronary heart disease (CHD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that reflects current medical and surgical treatments. Research Design and Methods: We modified the structure of the CHD submodel in the Michigan Model for Diabetes to allow for revascularization procedures before and after first myocardial infarction, for repeat myocardial infarctions and repeat revascularization procedures, and for congestive heart failure. Transition probabilities that reflect the direct effects of medical and surgical therapies on outcomes were derived from the literature and calibrated to recently published population-based epidemiologic studies and randomized controlled clinical trials. Monte Carlo techniques were used to implement a discrete-state and discrete-time multistate microsimulation model. Performance of the model was assessed using internal and external validation. Simple regression analysis (simulated outcome=b0+b1×published outcome) was used to evaluate the validation results. Results: For the 21 outcomes in the six studies used for internal validation, R2 was 0.99, and the slope of the regression line was 0.98. For the 16 outcomes in the five studies used for external validation, R2 was 0.81, and the slope was 0.84. Conclusions: Our new computer simulation model predicted the progression of CHD in patients with T2DM and will be incorporated into the Michigan Model for Diabetes to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies to prevent and treat T2DM. PMID:26222704

  15. Risk profile of coronary heart disease among the staff members of Qassim University, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Nohair, Sultan A. L.; Mohaimeed, Abdulrahman A. L.; Sharaf, Fawzy; Naeem, Zahid; Midhet, Farid; Homaidan, Homaidan A. L.; Winter, Sandra J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the risk profile of coronary heart disease (CHD) among the staff members of Qassim University and assess their knowledge in a screening campaign in Qassim region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among male and female staff at Qassim University campus. All employees of Qassim University were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. The study sample size was 233 staff and employees. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 18. The data analysis focused on providing point estimates for the risk factors. Results: The study found that 30% of participants have one or more risk factors for CHD, namely obesity 20.6%, diabetes 10.3%, hypertension 12.4%, dyslipidemia 10.7%, and smokers (11.6%). About 54% of the participants have a family history of at least one chronic disease as a risk factor for CHD. Conclusion: The most common risk factor of CHD among the staff members is obesity by 20.6%. Risk factors for CHD are quite common among Qassim University staff. These findings need to increase the health education and disease promotion program as an important intervention to reduce the occurrence and severity of CHD risk factors and to improve the quality of the life of the staff members of Qassim University. PMID:28293152

  16. Research on Zheng Classification Fusing Pulse Parameters in Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Wang, Yi-Qin; Xu, Jin; Yan, Hai-Xia; Yan, Jian-Jun; Li, Fu-Feng; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Xu, Wen-Jie

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to illustrate that nonlinear dynamic variables of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) pulse can improve the performances of TCM Zheng classification models. Pulse recordings of 334 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and 117 normal subjects were collected in this study. Recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) was employed to acquire nonlinear dynamic variables of pulse. TCM Zheng models in CHD were constructed, and predictions using a novel multilabel learning algorithm based on different datasets were carried out. Datasets were designed as follows: dataset1, TCM inquiry information including inspection information; dataset2, time-domain variables of pulse and dataset1; dataset3, RQA variables of pulse and dataset1; and dataset4, major principal components of RQA variables and dataset1. The performances of the different models for Zheng differentiation were compared. The model for Zheng differentiation based on RQA variables integrated with inquiry information had the best performance, whereas that based only on inquiry had the worst performance. Meanwhile, the model based on time-domain variables of pulse integrated with inquiry fell between the above two. This result showed that RQA variables of pulse can be used to construct models of TCM Zheng and improve the performance of Zheng differentiation models. PMID:23737839

  17. Resveratrol: a promising agent in promoting cardioprotection against coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Penumathsa, Suresh Varma; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2009-04-01

    The inverse association between alcohol intake and coronary heart disease has been consistently reported in cross-culture, case-control, and cohort studies. Over the past couple of decades, however, many studies have explained promising health benefits associated with wine consumption. Some studies suggest that red wine is more cardioprotective than white wine, possibly due to the increased content of flavanoid antioxidants found in red wine. Several experimental studies, including ours, support the evidence that these beneficial effects are due to resveratrol, the polyphenolic compound present in red wine. Many studies have provided evidence that resveratrol possesses antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects apart from activation of longevity proteins (such as SIRT-1). We have recently reported the angiogenic, antihypercholesterolemic, and antidiabetic effects of resveratrol and the mechanisms involved in reduced ventricular remodeling and increased cardiac functions. We have also shown different strategic target molecules involved in resveratrol-mediated cardioprotection. Therefore, this review discusses the potential effect of resveratrol and the mechanisms involved in resveratrol-mediated cardioprotection during myocardial infarction, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes rendering its beneficial effects during health and disease.

  18. Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

    1987-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

  19. Coronary heart disease prevalence and occupational structure in U.S. metropolitan areas: a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Michimi, Akihiko; Ellis-Griffith, Gregory; Nagy, Christine; Peterson, Tina

    2013-05-01

    This research explored the link between coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence and metropolitan-area level occupational structure among 137 metropolitan/micropolitan statistical areas (MMSA) in the United States. Using data from the 2006-2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 2007 County Business Patterns, logistic mixed models were developed to estimate CHD prevalence between MMSAs controlling for individual-level socioeconomic characteristics and various types of occupational structure. Results showed that CHD prevalence was lower in MMSAs where their economy was dominated by 'tourism and resort' and 'the quaternary sector' and higher in MMSAs dominated by 'manufacturing', 'transportation and warehousing', and 'mining'. MMSA-level effects on CHD were found in 'tourism and resort' and 'the quaternary sector' having lower risk and 'mining' having higher risk of CHD. Although these effects prevailed in many MMSAs, some MMSAs did not fit into these effects. Additional analysis indicated a possible link between metropolitan population loss and higher CHD prevalence especially in the coal mining region of the Appalachian Mountains.

  20. Dietary Patterns, Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Adults: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Shu, Long; Si, Cai-Juan; Yu, Xiao-Long; Liao, Dan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Zheng, Pei-Fen

    2015-08-07

    Previous studies reported the potential associations between dietary patterns and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adulthood, however a consistent perspective has not been established to date. Herein, we carried out this meta-analysis to evaluate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of CHD. MEDLINE and EBSCO were searched for relevant articles published up to April 2015. A total of 35 articles (reporting 37 original studies) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the present meta-analysis. The decreased risk of CHD was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy/prudent dietary patterns (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60, 0.75; p < 0.00001) and alcohol consumption (OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.78; p < 0.00001). There was evidence of an increased risk of CHD in the highest compared with the lowest categories of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02). The results of this meta-analysis indicate that different dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of CHD.

  1. Effects of an angry temperament on coronary heart disease risk : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, J E; Nieto, F J; Sanford, C P; Tyroler, H A

    2001-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine which component of an anger-prone personality more strongly predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Proneness to anger, as assessed by the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale, is composed of two distinct subcomponents-anger-temperament and anger-reaction. Participants were 12,990 middle-aged Black men and women and White men and women from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study who were followed for the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (MI)/fatal CHD, silent MI, or cardiac revascularization procedures (average = 53 months; maximum = 72 months) through December 31, 1995. Among normotensive persons, a strong, angry temperament (tendency toward quick, minimally provoked, or unprovoked anger) was associated with combined CHD (acute MI/fatal CHD, silent MI, or cardiac revascularization procedures) (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio = 2.10, 95% confidence interval: 1.34, 3.29) and with 'hard" events (acute MI/fatal CHD) (multivariate adjusted hazard ratio = 2.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.29, 4.02). CHD event-free survival among normotensives who had a strong, angry temperament was not significantly different from that of hypertensives at either level of anger. These data suggest that a strong, angry temperament rather than anger in reaction to criticism, frustration, or unfair treatment places normotensive, middle-aged persons at increased risk for cardiac events and may confer a CHD risk similar to that of hypertension.

  2. Dysfunctional high-density lipoproteins in coronary heart disease: implications for diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Annema, Wijtske; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2016-07-01

    Low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are associated with increased risks of coronary heart disease. HDL mediates cholesterol efflux from macrophages for reverse transport to the liver and elicits many anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities which are potentially anti-atherogenic. Nevertheless, HDL has not been successfully targeted by drugs for prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases. One potential reason is the targeting of HDL cholesterol which does not capture the structural and functional complexity of HDL particles. Hundreds of lipid species and dozens of proteins as well as several microRNAs have been identified in HDL. This physiological heterogeneity is further increased in pathologic conditions due to additional quantitative and qualitative molecular changes of HDL components which have been associated with both loss of physiological function and gain of pathologic dysfunction. This structural and functional complexity of HDL has prevented clear assignments of molecules to the functions of normal HDL and dysfunctions of pathologic HDL. Systematic analyses of structure-function relationships of HDL-associated molecules and their modifications are needed to test the different components and functions of HDL for their relative contribution in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The derived biomarkers and targets may eventually help to exploit HDL for treatment and diagnostics of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes: part I: recent advances in prevention and noninvasive management.

    PubMed

    Berry, Colin; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Bourassa, Martial G

    2007-02-13

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a worldwide epidemic. Its prevalence is rapidly increasing in both developing and developed countries. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is highly prevalent and is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. The purpose of this review is to assess the clinical impact of recent advances in the epidemiology, prevention, and management of CHD in diabetic patients. A systematic review of publications in this area, referenced in MEDLINE in the past 5 years (2000 to 2005), was undertaken. Patients with CHD and prediabetic states should undergo lifestyle modifications aimed at preventing DM. Pharmacological prevention of DM is also promising but requires further study. In patients with CHD and DM, routine use of aspirin and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I)--unless contraindicated or not tolerated-and strict glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid control are strongly recommended. The targets for secondary prevention in these patients are relatively well defined, but the strategies to achieve them vary and must be individualized. Intense insulin therapy might be needed for glycemic control, and high-dose statin therapy might be needed for lipid control. For blood pressure control, ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers are considered as first-line therapy. Noncompliance, particularly with lifestyle measures, and underprescription of evidence-based therapies remain important unsolved problems.

  4. PREVALENCE OF DEPRESSION AND ITS GRADING IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Rasputina, L; Rasputin, V; Ovcharuk, M; Serhiichuk, O; Broniuk, A

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of our work was to determine a prevalence of depression and its distribution by grades in patients with a coronary heart disease, namely - with the myocardial infarction. The study involved 125 patients of average age 64.2±4.7 years, treated at cardiology department for myocardial infarction. The first stage was a depression screening using PHQ - 2 questionnaire. In case of positive answer to at least one question, we assessed the severity of depression using a PHQ-9 tool. We established, that PHQ-2 questionnaire questions for screening depressive disorders were positively answered by 80 patients (64.3%). Total signs of depression of various severity grades was diagnosed in 68 patients (54.4%). Minimal depression was diagnosed in 25 (36.8%) patients, mild depression - in 20 (29.4%) patients, moderately severe disease - in 16 (23.6%) patients, and severe depression - in 7 (10.2%) patients. The severity of depression was clearly related to age, gender of patients, comorbid diseases, and a history of MI and revascularization.

  5. High-intensity interval training in patients with coronary heart disease: Prescription models and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Paula A B; Boidin, Maxime; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Gayda, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has emerged as an alternative and/or complementary exercise modality to continuous aerobic exercise training (CAET) in CHD patients. However, the literature contains descriptions of many HIIT protocols with different stage durations, nature of recovery and intensities. In this review, we discuss the most recent forms of validated HIIT protocols in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and how to prescribe and use them during short- and long-term (phase II and III) cardiac rehabilitation programs. We also compare the superior and/or equivalent short- and long-term effects of HIIT versus CAET on aerobic fitness, cardiovascular function, and quality of life; their efficiency, safety, and tolerance; and exercise adherence. Short interval HIIT was found beneficial for CHD patients with lower aerobic fitness and would ideally be used in initiation and improvement stages. Medium and/or long interval HIIT protocols may be beneficial for CHD patients with higher aerobic fitness, and would be ideally used in the improvement and maintenance stages because of their high physiological stimulus. Finally, we propose progressive individualized models of HIIT programs (phase II to III) for patients with CHD and how to ideally use them according to the clinical status of patients and phase of the cardiac rehabilitation program.

  6. [Hormonal regulation of lipoprotein metabolism: the role in pathogenesis of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, E I; Metel'skaia, V A; Perova, N V; Shchukina, G N

    2006-01-01

    The character and role of hormonal dysregulation of lipoprotein metabolism during postprandial hyperlipemia were studied in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and hyperthyroidism as compared with healthy subjects. Pronounced hypertriglyceridemia alongside with the decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL C) after standard fat load were associated with increased level of insulin and decreased level of cortisol. Moreover, in CHD patients fasting hyperinsulinemia becoming even stronger postprandially resulted in prevalence of antilipolytic action of insulin over lipid-mobilizing effect of cortisol; and an extended postprandial hypertriglyceridemia took place. Patients with hyperthyroidism and low cholesterol level both in atherogenic LDL and antiatherogenic HDL, demonstrated decreased level of apo AI (as in CHD patients) and apo B (three times lower than in CHD patients). Very low ratio of apo B/AI in patients with hyperthyroidism both in fasting and postprandial state was a clear indication of their lipoprotein profile antiatherogeneity. Thus, in patients with hyperthyroidism despite of low HDL C and apo AI levels, antiatherogenic properties of lipoprotein profile are probably determined by very low apo B/AI ratio induced by thyroid hormones, and might be explained by the influence of thyroid hormones on the expression of genes coding these apoproteins.

  7. Cognition and incident coronary heart disease in late midlife: The Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Séverine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition and CHD in analyses adjusted for socio-demographic variables, cardiovascular risk factors and health behaviors. The results show a one standard deviation lower score on the “general” cognitive measure and measures of reasoning and vocabulary to be associated with elevated CHD risk. There was some evidence that these effects differed between high and low socioeconomic status (SES) groups with associations only seen in the low SES group. These results were not explained by threshold effects or by the different SES groups representing different parts of the cognitive test score distribution. Three other possible explanations of these results are discussed: sub clinical vascular disease drives the observed association but no effect is observed in the high SES group due to compensation provided by greater cognitive reserve, cognition is a marker of overall bodily integrity particularly in low-SES groups, and SES is a moderator of the association between cognition and CHD, because it marks a range of other risk factors. PMID:20161539

  8. Saturated fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease: modulation by replacement nutrients.

    PubMed

    Siri-Tarino, Patty W; Sun, Qi; Hu, Frank B; Krauss, Ronald M

    2010-11-01

    Despite the well-established observation that substitution of saturated fats for carbohydrates or unsaturated fats increases low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in humans and animal models, the relationship of saturated fat intake to risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in humans remains controversial. A critical question is what macronutrient should be used to replace saturated fat. Substituting polyunsaturated fat for saturated fat reduces LDL cholesterol and the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. However, replacement of saturated fat by carbohydrates, particularly refined carbohydrates and added sugars, increases levels of triglyceride and small LDL particles and reduces high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, effects that are of particular concern in the context of the increased prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials have provided consistent evidence that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat, but not carbohydrates, is beneficial for coronary heart disease. Therefore, dietary recommendations should emphasize substitution of polyunsaturated fat and minimally processed grains for saturated fat.

  9. [Study on application of SVM in prediction of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue; Wu, Jianghua; Fang, Ying

    2013-12-01

    Base on the data of blood pressure, plasma lipid, Glu and UA by physical test, Support Vector Machine (SVM) was applied to identify coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients and non-CHD individuals in south China population for guide of further prevention and treatment of the disease. Firstly, the SVM classifier was built using radial basis kernel function, liner kernel function and polynomial kernel function, respectively. Secondly, the SVM penalty factor C and kernel parameter sigma were optimized by particle swarm optimization (PSO) and then employed to diagnose and predict the CHD. By comparison with those from artificial neural network with the back propagation (BP) model, linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression method and non-optimized SVM, the overall results of our calculation demonstrated that the classification performance of optimized RBF-SVM model could be superior to other classifier algorithm with higher accuracy rate, sensitivity and specificity, which were 94.51%, 92.31% and 96.67%, respectively. So, it is well concluded that SVM could be used as a valid method for assisting diagnosis of CHD.

  10. Prevalence and correlates of coronary heart disease: first population-based study in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Rouba Karen; Farah, Rita; Chahine, Mirna N; Asmar, Roland; Hosseini, Hassan; Salameh, Pascale; Pathak, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background Lebanon is experiencing a growing epidemic of coronary heart diseases (CHDs), as most low- and middle-income countries currently are. However, this growth can be attenuated if effective preventive strategies are adopted. Purpose To provide the first national population-based prevalence of CHD and to describe the profile of Lebanese adults with prevalent CHD. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study using a multistage cluster sample across Lebanon. We interviewed residents aged 40 years and older using a questionnaire that captured the presence of CHDs and their risk factors (RFs). Results Our study showed that 13.4% of the Lebanese population aged ≥40 years suffer from a prevalent CHD. CHD seemed to appear more prematurely than in developed countries, and males seemed to be more subject to CHD than females until a certain age. CHD was associated with older age, male sex, a lower economic situation, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, having a family history of premature cardiovascular diseases, and suffering from diabetes. However, smoking and waist circumference did not seem to have an independent effect on CHD, but rather an effect mediated by biological RFs. Conclusion This is the first nationwide endeavor conducted in Lebanon to assess the prevalence of CHD. This study also confirms the relevance of the classic RFs of CHD and their applicability to the Lebanese population, thus allowing for prevention strategies. PMID:27051290

  11. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD): a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqian; Zhu, Zhigang; Lou, Huiling; Zhu, Guodong; Huang, Weimin; Zhang, Shaogang; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Some studies reported a significant association between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the results are controversial. A systematic search was conducted in the PubMed, Science Direct, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases. Five case-control studies and 5 cohort studies were selected, involving a total of 104392 subjects in this meta-analysis. PCOS was significantly associated with the increased risk of CVD (OR = 1.30; 95% CI 1.09 – 1.56; P = 0.004). In the subgroup analysis of study design, both case-control studies and prospective cohort studies showed significant results (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 – 2.77; P = 0.009; OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.06 – 1.37; P = 0.005), while retrospective cohort studies did not show positive result (OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.60 – 1.40; P = 0.68). In a further stratified analysis by type of CVD, a significant association was found between PCOS and coronary heart disease (CHD) (OR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.13 – 1.84; P = 0.004). However, no significant association was observed between PCOS and myocardial infarction (MI) (OR = 1.01; 95% CI 0.68 – 1.51; P = 0.95). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that PCOS is significantly associated with increased CHD risk. PMID:27220885

  12. [Optimal rehabilitation of patients with coronary heart disease in outpatient setting].

    PubMed

    Korzhenkov, N P; Kuzichkina, S F; Shcherbakova, N A; Kukhaleishvili, N R; Iarlykov, I I

    2012-01-01

    The problem of invalid rehabilitation in Russia is an important state task and dictates necessity of design of an effective state program of primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Common global practice of medico-social model is based on complex detailed medico-social aid. Rehabilitation of postmyocardial infarction patients consists of three phases (stages): hospital posthospital (readaptation) and postreconvalescent (supportive). The program includes physical, psychological and pharmacological rehabilitation. Departments of readaptation and medico-social rehabilitation provide effective conduction of all kinds of rehabilitation. The Moscow North-East Regional Administration has a rich experience in organization of departments of readaptation and medico-social rehabilitation. The departments practice an individual approach to the patients and work in a close contact with bureaus of medico-social commission of experts. Management of patients by cardiologist, rehabilitation specialist and outpatient clinic's physicians provides uninterrupted staged rehabilitation, timely correction of pharmacotherapy, early patient referral to invasive investigations and treatment of coronary heart disease. A course of rehabilitative measures lasts 2 months. Setting up departments of medico-social rehabilitation in outpatient clinics provides more effective use of money assigned by the state for social support of invalids.

  13. Magnesium Levels in Drinking Water and Coronary Heart Disease Mortality Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; He, Pengcheng; Chen, Jiyan; Liu, Yong; Liu, Dehui; Qin, Genggeng; Tan, Ning

    2016-01-02

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated inconsistent associations between drinking water magnesium levels and risk of mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD); thus, a meta-analysis was performed to assess the association between them. Relevant studies were searched by the databases of Cochrane, EMBASE, PubMed and Web of Knowledge. Pooled relative risks (RR) with their 95% CI were calculated to assess this association using a random-effects model. Finally, nine articles with 10 studies involving 77,821 CHD cases were used in this study. Our results revealed an inverse association between drinking water magnesium level and CHD mortality (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79-0.99, I² = 70.6). Nine of the 10 studies came from Europe, and the association was significant between drinking water magnesium level and the risk of CHD mortality (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.69-0.98). In conclusion, drinking water magnesium level was significantly inversely associated with CHD mortality.

  14. Gender differences and disparities in all-cause and coronary heart disease mortality: epidemiological aspects

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This overview is primarily concerned with large recent prospective cohort studies of adult populations, not patients, because the latter studies are confounded by differences in medical and surgical management for men vs. women. When early papers are uniquely informative they are also included. Because the focus is on epidemiology, details of age, sex, sample size, and source as well as study methods are provided. Usually the primary outcomes were all-cause or coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality using baseline data from midlife or older adults. Fifty years ago few prospective cohort studies of all-cause or CHD mortality included women. Most epidemiologic studies that included community-dwelling adults did not include both sexes and still do not report men and women separately. Few studies consider both sex (biology) and gender (behavior and environment) differences. Lifespan studies describing survival after live birth are not considered here. The important effects of prenatal and early childhood biologic and behavioral factors on adult mortality are beyond the scope of this review. Clinical trials are not discussed. Overall, presumptive evidence for causality was equivalent for psychosocial and biological exposures, and these attributes were often associated with each other. Inconsistencies or gaps were particularly obvious for studies of sex or gender differences in age and optimal measures of body size for CHD outcomes, and in the striking interface of diabetes and people with the metabolic syndrome, most of whom have unrecognized diabetes. PMID:24054926

  15. Coronary heart disease mortality in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia in 1989 and 1990.

    PubMed

    Alobaid, A A; Gilchrist, R; Bointon, B

    1994-09-01

    Unfortunately, mortality statistics are not available for Saudi Arabia. In the absence of such data, this paper introduces data collected on the number of deaths from coronary heart disease (CHD), considered as a proportion of the total number of deaths, for patients in six hospitals in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, for each month of the years 1409H and 1410H of the Hijri lunar calendar. These proportions, the so-called proportionate mortality ratio (PMR), are categorized in terms of gender and age, and in terms of a three-level lifestyle variable; namely, rural, urban, or bedouin. The data were analyzed using logistic regression. As might be expected, female deaths from CHD are a lower proportion of total deaths than are male deaths from CHD. However, an interesting conclusion is that CHD seems to be a less prevalent recorded cause of death among bedouins than among rural or urban Saudis. Some possible reasons are discussed. The proportion of recorded CHD deaths is higher in winter months and generally increases with increasing age (except for the very old). This study suggests some hypotheses about the size of the future CHD incidence in Saudi Arabia; it a) indicates the urgent need for comprehensive data collection and b) suggests the need for an effective health care program.

  16. Plasma lipids profile and erythrocytes system in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.

    2006-08-01

    Erythrocytes system study can provide a framework for detailed exploration of blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions, one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. Our objective was to explore erythrocytes system in patients with stable angina pectoris II f.c. (Canadian classification). The participants (N = 56, age 40 - 55 years) without obesity, glucose tolerance violations, lipid lowering drugs treating, heart failure of II and more functional classes (NYHA), coronary episode at least 6 months before study were involved in the study. Blood samples were incubated with glucose solutions of increasing concentrations (from 2.5% to 20% with 2.5% step) during 60 mm (36° C). In prepared blood smears erythrocyte's sizes were studied. Plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose levels were also measured. Received data were approximated by polynomials of high degree, with after going first and second derivations. Erythrocytes system "behavior" was studied by means of phase pattern constructing. By lipids levels all the patient were divided into five groups: 1) patients with normal lipids levels, 2) patients with borderline total cholesterol level, 3) patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia, 4) patients with isolated hypertriglyceridemia and 5) patients with combined hyperlipidemia. Erythrocytes size lowering process was of set of "stages", which characteristics differ significantly (p > 0.05) in all five groups. Their rate and acceleration characteristics allow us to detect type of lipid profile in patients. Erythrocyte system disturbing by glucose concentration increase show to be most resistant in group of patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia.

  17. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Larach, Daniel B.; Hancock-Cerutti, William F.; Millar, John S.; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J. Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J.; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J.; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  18. Subgroup differences in psychosocial factors relating to coronary heart disease in the UK South Asian population☆

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Emily D.; Nazroo, James Y.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To explore the differences in psychosocial risk factors related to coronary heart disease (CHD) between South Asian subgroups in the UK. South Asian people suffer significantly higher rates of CHD than other ethnic groups, but vulnerability varies between South Asian subgroups, in terms of both CHD rates and risk profiles. Psychosocial factors may contribute to the excess CHD propensity that is observed; however, subgroup heterogeneity in psychosocial disadvantage has not previously been systematically explored. Methods With a cross-sectional design, 1065 healthy South Asian and 818 white men and women from West London, UK, completed psychosocial questionnaires. Psychosocial profiles were compared between South Asian religious groups and the white sample, using analyses of covariance and post hoc tests. Results Of the South Asian sample, 50.5% was Sikh, 28.0% was Hindu, and 15.8% was Muslim. Muslim participants were more socioeconomically deprived and experienced higher levels of chronic stress, including financial strain, low social cohesion, and racial discrimination, compared with other South Asian religious groups. In terms of health behaviors, Muslim men smoked more than Sikhs and Hindus, and Muslims also reported lower alcohol consumption and were less physically active than other groups. Conclusion This study found that Muslims were exposed to more psychosocial and behavioral adversity than Sikhs and Hindus, and highlights the importance of investigating subgroup heterogeneity in South Asian CHD risk. PMID:20846539

  19. Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denova-Gutiérrez, Edgar; Huitrón-Bravo, Gerardo; Talavera, Juan O.; Castañón, Susana; Gallegos-Carrillo, Katia; Flores, Yvonne; Salmerón, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD) in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS). Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-administered questionnaires. Dietary GI and dietary GL were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric and clinical measurements were assessed with standardized procedures. CHD risk was estimated according to the sex-specific Framingham prediction algorithms. Results. IIn the 5,830 individuals aged 20 to 70 who were evaluated, dietary GI and GL were significantly associated with HDL-C, LDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and triglycerides serum levels. Subjects with high dietary GI have a relative risk of 1.56 (CI 95%; 1.13–2.14), and those with high dietary GL have a relative risk of 2.64 (CI 95%; 1.15–6.58) of having an elevated CHD risk than those who had low dietary GI and GL. Conclusions. Our results suggest that high dietary GI and dietary GL could have an unfavorable effect on serum lipid levels, which are in turn associated with a higher CHD risk. PMID:20700407

  20. Contribution of climate and air pollution to variation in coronary heart disease mortality rates in England.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Peter; Allender, Steven; Rayner, Mike; Goldacre, Michael

    2012-01-01

    There are substantial geographic variations in coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates in England that may in part be due to differences in climate and air pollution. An ecological cross-sectional multi-level analysis of male and female CHD mortality rates in all wards in England (1999-2004) was conducted to estimate the relative strength of the association between CHD mortality rates and three aspects of the physical environment--temperature, hours of sunshine and air quality. Models were adjusted for deprivation, an index measuring the healthiness of the lifestyle of populations, and urbanicity. In the fully adjusted model, air quality was not significantly associated with CHD mortality rates, but temperature and sunshine were both significantly negatively associated (p<0.05), suggesting that CHD mortality rates were higher in areas with lower average temperature and hours of sunshine. After adjustment for the unhealthy lifestyle of populations and deprivation, the climate variables explained at least 15% of large scale variation in CHD mortality rates. The results suggest that the climate has a small but significant independent association with CHD mortality rates in England.

  1. [Action mechanism of drugs for preventing and treating coronary heart disease based on biological networks].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Ling; Huang, Ming-Feng; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2013-08-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) related genes and targets, as well as drug targets for preventing and treating CHD were taken as the study objects to build a CHD disease network and a drug action network preventing and treating CHD. Such topological characteristic parameters of the networks as degree distribution, characteristic path length, connectivity and heterogeneity were analyzed to verify the reliability of the networks. On that basis, the intersection calculation was conducted for both networks to analyze the drug action mechanism of their sub-networks. The disease network are composed of 15,221 nodes and 31,177 sides, while the drug action network preventing and treating CHD has 15,073 nodes and 32,376 sides. Both of their topological characteristic parameters showed scale-free small world structural characteristics. Two reaction pathways in the sub-networks-calcitonin gene-related peptide and IL-6 activated JAK/STAT were taken as examples to discuss the indirect action mechanism for preventing and treating CHD. The results showed that the biological network analysis method combining the disease network and the drug action network is helpful to further studies on the action mechanism of the drugs, and significant to the prevention and treatment of diseases.

  2. The potential protective effects of taurine on coronary heart disease2

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Oktawia P.; Koenig, Karen L.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2009-01-01

    In humans, taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is mainly obtained from diet. Despite the fact that the health effects of taurine are largely unknown, taurine has become a popular supplement and ingredient in energy drinks in recent years. Evidence from mechanistic and animal studies has shown that the main biological actions of taurine include its ability to conjugate bile acids, regulate blood pressure (BP), and act as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. These actions suggest that high levels of taurine may be protective against coronary heart disease (CHD). However, data from epidemiologic and intervention studies in humans are limited. We review what is known about taurine’s metabolism, its transportation in the body, its food sources, and evidence of its effect on cardiovascular health from in vitro, animal, and epidemiologic studies. We also discuss shortcomings of the human studies that need to be addressed in the future. The identification of taurine as a preventive factor for CHD may be of great public health importance. PMID:19592001

  3. Sex differences in risk factors for coronary heart disease: a study in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Castanho, Vera S; Oliveira, Letícia S; Pinheiro, Hildete P; Oliveira, Helena CF; de Faria, Eliana C

    2001-01-01

    Background In Brazil coronary heart disease (CHD) constitutes the most important cause of death in both sexes in all the regions of the country and interestingly, the difference between the sexes in the CHD mortality rates is one of the smallest in the world because of high rates among women. Since a question has been raised about whether or how the incidence of several CHD risk factors differs between the sexes in Brazil the prevalence of various risk factors for CHD such as high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, sedentary lifestyle and cigarette smoking was compared between the sexes in a Brazilian population; also the relationships between blood cholesterol and the other risk factors were evaluated. Results The population presented high frequencies of all the risk factors evaluated. High blood cholesterol (CHOL) and hypertension were more prevalent among women as compared to men. Hypertension, diabetes and smoking showed equal or higher prevalence in women in pre-menopausal ages as compared to men. Obesity and physical inactivity were equally prevalent in both sexes respectively in the postmenopausal age group and at all ages. CHOL was associated with BMI, sex, age, hypertension and physical inactivity. Conclusions In this population the high prevalence of the CHD risk factors indicated that there is an urgent need for its control; the higher or equal prevalences of several risk factors in women could in part explain the high rates of mortality from CHD in females as compared to males. PMID:11305930

  4. Toenail nicotine levels as predictors of coronary heart disease among women.

    PubMed

    Al-Delaimy, Wael K; Stampfer, Meir J; Manson, Joann E; Willett, Walter C

    2008-06-01

    The authors assess the ability of toenail nicotine levels as a biomarker to predict incident coronary heart disease (CHD). A nested case-control study was carried out among 62,641 women aged 36-61 years in the Nurses' Health Study cohort who provided toenail clippings in 1982. Between 1984 and 1998, 905 incident CHD cases were diagnosed and matched with two controls by age and date of toenail collection. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, the authors found a statistically significant dose-response association between increasing toenail nicotine levels and risk of CHD (p(trend) < 0.0001); women in the highest quintile had a relative risk of 3.44 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.56, 4.62) compared with women in the lowest quintile. With each increase in the log-transformed unit of continuous toenail nicotine levels, there was a 42% increase in the risk of CHD (relative risk = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.33, 1.52). The association remained significant when the number of cigarettes smoked and passive smoking were included as covariates (relative risk = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.24). In conclusion, toenail nicotine levels are predictive of CHD among women independent of other risk factors and remained significant even after adjustment for history of cigarette smoking.

  5. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B; Hancock-Cerutti, William F; Millar, John S; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Peloso, Gina M; Stitziel, Nathan O; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-03-11

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant).

  6. The value of C-reactive protein in screening for future coronary heart disease events.

    PubMed

    Wald, David S; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Bestwick, Jonathan P

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) events, has been proposed as a means of screening for future CHD. In prospective studies about a three-fold increase in risk of CHD observed between the top fifth and bottom fifth of the CRP distribution has been taken to support the use of CRP as a screening test. This however gives an over-optimistic impression of its value, because people in the middle of the distribution, where most CHD events occur, are excluded from the analysis. A different analysis is needed to assess whether screening is worthwhile. Examination of the relative frequency distributions of CRP in individuals from 22 prospective studies of individuals without previous cardiovascular disease who subsequently did and did not have a CHD event shows that the detection rate (or sensitivity) was 18% for a false-positive rate of 10% (CRP cut-off 6.65 mg/L); a poor screening test. Whatever CRP cut-off is used, the overlap in CRP values between affected and unaffected individuals is too great for CRP to usefully discriminate between those who will and will not have a CHD event.

  7. Purinergic component in the coronary vasodilatation to acetylcholine after ischemia-reperfusion in perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    García-Villalón, Ángel Luis; Granado, Miriam; Monge, Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Carreño-Tarragona, Gonzalo; Amor, Sara

    2014-01-01

    To determine the involvement of purinergic receptors in coronary endothelium-dependent relaxation, the response to acetylcholine (1 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-7)M) was recorded in isolated rat hearts perfused according to the Langendorff procedure before and after 30 min of ischemia and 15 min of reperfusion and after the inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with L-NAME (10(-4)M), in the absence and presence of the antagonist of purinergic P2X receptors, PPADS (3 × 10(-6)M), and of the antagonist of purinergic P2Y receptors, Reactive Blue 2 (3 × 10(-7)M). In control conditions, the relaxation to acetylcholine was not altered by PPADS or Reactive Blue 2. The relaxation to acetylcholine was reduced after ischemia-reperfusion, and, in this condition, it was further reduced by treatment with PPADS or Reactive Blue 2. Likewise, the relaxation to acetylcholine was reduced by L-NAME, and reduced further by Reactive Blue 2 but not by PPADS. These results suggest that the relaxation to acetylcholine may be partly mediated by purinergic receptors after ischemia-reperfusion, due to the reduction of nitric oxide release in this condition.

  8. Contribution of Climate and Air Pollution to Variation in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality Rates in England

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, Peter; Allender, Steven; Rayner, Mike; Goldacre, Michael

    2012-01-01

    There are substantial geographic variations in coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates in England that may in part be due to differences in climate and air pollution. An ecological cross-sectional multi-level analysis of male and female CHD mortality rates in all wards in England (1999–2004) was conducted to estimate the relative strength of the association between CHD mortality rates and three aspects of the physical environment - temperature, hours of sunshine and air quality. Models were adjusted for deprivation, an index measuring the healthiness of the lifestyle of populations, and urbanicity. In the fully adjusted model, air quality was not significantly associated with CHD mortality rates, but temperature and sunshine were both significantly negatively associated (p<0.05), suggesting that CHD mortality rates were higher in areas with lower average temperature and hours of sunshine. After adjustment for the unhealthy lifestyle of populations and deprivation, the climate variables explained at least 15% of large scale variation in CHD mortality rates. The results suggest that the climate has a small but significant independent association with CHD mortality rates in England. PMID:22427884

  9. Identification of coronary heart disease in asymptomatic individuals with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Psaty, Bruce M; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Branch, Kelley R

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is highly prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and remains the single most common cause of death among this population. Regrettably, a significant percentage of diabetics fail to perceive the classic symptoms associated with myocardial ischemia. Among asymptomatic diabetics, the prevalence of abnormal cardiac testing appears to be high, ranging between 10% and 62%, and mortality is significantly higher in those with abnormal scans. Hence, the potential use of screening for CHD detection among asymptomatic DM individuals is appealing and has been recommended in certain circumstances. However, it was not until recently, that this question was addressed in clinical trials. Two studies randomized a total of 2,023 asymptomatic diabetics to screening or not using cardiac imaging with a mean follow up of 4.4 ± 1.4 years. In combination, both trials showed lower than expected annual event rates, and failed to reduce major cardiovascular events in the screened group compared to the standard of care alone. The results of these trials do not currently support the use of screening tools for CHD detection in asymptomatic DM individuals. However, these studies have important limitations, and potential explanations for their negative results that are discussed in this manuscript. PMID:26019384

  10. An epidemiological study of coronary heart disease in different ethnic groups in Delhi urban population.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, N; Chadha, S L; Jain, P; Shekhawat, S; Tandon, R

    1995-01-01

    A community based epidemiologival survey of coronary heart disease (CHD) was carried out on a random urban sample of 13,560 adults of different ethnic groups in Delhi. CHD was diagnosed either on the basis of clinical history, supported by documentary evidence of treatment in hospital/home or on the ECG evidence in accordance with Minnesota Code. The prevalence rate of CHD on clinical basis per 1000 adults was the highest in Sikhs (47.3), lowest in Muslims (22.8) and identical in Hindus (31.8) and Christians (31.2). The prevalence rate/1000 of silent CHD on the basis of ECG was high in Muslims (89.5) and Sikhs (87.3), low in Christians (25.0) and intermediate in Hindus (60.0). The Sikhs showed the highest prevalence rate of myocardial infarct (MI) (15.5) and angina (AP) (31.8) compared to other communities. The prevalence rate of CHD on clinical basis was higher in males than females in all communities. The prevalence of silent CHD was higher in females in Hindus and Sikhs but in Muslims it was higher in men (94.8) than in women (85.2). The wide variations in prevalence rates of CHD in different ethnic groups cannot be explained satisfactorily on the basis of conventional risk factors and support the multifactorial etiological character of CHD.

  11. Association of ideal cardiovascular health and calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Jeremy M.; Petrone, Andrew B.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Pankow, James S.; Hunt, Steven C.; Heiss, Gerardo; Arnett, Donna K.; Ellison, R. Curtis; Gaziano, J. Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Heart Association (AHA) established recommendations based on 7 ideal health behaviors and factors with the goal of improving cardiovascular health (CVH) and reducing both morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) by 20% by 2020. Few studies have investigated their association with subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to examine whether the 7 AHA CVH metrics were associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. Methods and Results In a cross-sectional design, we studied 1731 predominantly Caucasian men and women from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study without prevalent CHD. Diet was assessed by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by cardiac CT. We defined prevalent CAC using an Agatston score of 100+ and fitted generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence odds ratios of CAC. Mean age was 56.8 years and 41% were male. The median number of ideal CVH metrics was 3, and no participants met all 7. There was a strong inverse relationship between number of ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC. Odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC of 100+ were 1.0 (reference), 0.37 (0.29–0.45), 0.35 (0.26–0.44), and 0.27 (0.20–0.36) among subjects with 0–1, 2, 3, and 4+ ideal CVH metrics, respectively (p for trend: 0.0001), adjusting for sex, age, field center, alcohol, income, education, and calorie consumption. Conclusions These data demonstrate a strong and graded inverse relationship between AHA ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC in adult men and women. PMID:25728727

  12. B‐type Natriuretic Peptides for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease: The Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K.; Beatty, Alexis L.; Jaganath, Rajesh; Regan, Mathilda; Wu, Alan H.B.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain‐type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the amino‐terminal fragment of its prohormone (NT‐proBNP) are known predictors of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease; however, the relative prognostic value of these 2 biomarkers for secondary events remains unclear. Methods and Results In 983 participants with stable coronary heart disease, we evaluated the association of BNP and NT‐proBNP with time to hospitalization for heart failure, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke or transient ischemic attack, cardiovascular death, and combined major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). During an average follow‐up of 6.5±3.3 years, both BNP and NT‐proBNP were associated with increased risk of MACE in a multivariable‐adjusted model (hazard ratio per standard deviation of log BNP: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.32 to 1.89; hazard ratio per standard deviation of log NT‐proBNP: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.52 to 2.24). When added to traditional risk factors, NT‐proBNP predicted MACE better than BNP (C statistic: 0.76 versus 0.72, P<0.001). Similarly, the addition of NT‐proBNP resulted in a greater net reclassification improvement for predicting MACE than the addition of BNP (65% for NT‐proBNP, 56% for BNP). Conclusions Both BNP and NT‐proBNP were significant predictors of MACE in stable coronary heart disease; however, NT‐proBNP was superior to BNP for net risk reclassification for MACE. PMID:25053234

  13. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries from becoming clogged again. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Coronary Artery Bypass (Texas Heart ... in Spanish Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) What Is Coronary Bypass Surgery? (American Heart ...

  14. Side effects of using nitrates to treat heart failure and the acute coronary syndromes, unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho; Ripley, Toni L

    2007-07-01

    Nitrates are potent venous dilators and anti-ischemic agents. They are widely used for the relief of chest pain and pulmonary congestion in patients with acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. Nitrates, however, do not reduce mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Combination of nitrates and hydralazine when given in addition to beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction who are of African-American origin. Side effects during nitrate therapy are common but are less well described in the literature compared with the reported side effects in patients with stable angina pectoris. The reported incidence of side effects varies highly among different studies and among various disease states. Headache is the most commonly reported side effect with an incidence of 12% in acute heart failure, 41-73% in chronic heart failure, 3-19% in unstable angina and 2-26% in acute myocardial infarction. The reported incidence of hypotension also differs: 5-10% in acute heart failure, 20% in chronic heart failure, 9% in unstable angina and < 1-48% in acute myocardial infarction, with the incidence being much higher with concomitant nitrate therapy plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Reported incidence of dizziness is as low as 1% in patients with acute myocardial infarction to as high as 29% in patients with heart failure. Severe headaches and/or symptomatic hypotension may necessitate discontinuation of nitrate therapy. Severe life threatening hypotension or even death may occur when nitrates are used in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction associated with right ventricular dysfunction or infarction, or with concomitant use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine. Despite the disturbing observational reports in the literature that continuous and prolonged use of nitrates may lead to

  15. Impact of CYP2C19 Variants on Clinical Efficacy of Clopidogrel and 1-Year Clinical Outcomes in Coronary Heart Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Qu, Qiang; Chen, Zhen-Fan; Tan, Sheng-Lan; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Qu, Jian; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The impact of pharmacogenetic variants of cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) on clopidogrel-mediated effects on platelet inhibition, inflammatory response and endothelial function, as well as risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), in coronary heart patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was investigated. To this end, we assessed the residual platelet aggregation rate (RPA), maximal aggregation rate (MAR) and plasma levels of sCD40L, sP-selectin, MMP-9, sVCAM-1 and sE-selectin after 24 h of PCI in 559 patients treated with clopidogrel and followed up for 1 year for evidence of MACE. CYP2C19 *2 and *3 variants were identified using a clopidogrel-sensitive gene detection kit. Our results showed higher RPA and MAR as well as increased sE-selectin, sCD40L, sP-selectin, MMP-9, and sVCAM-1 levels in CYP2C19 intermediate metabolizer (IM, CYP2C19*1/*2, or *1/*3), poor metabolizer (PM, CYP2C19*2/*2, *2/*3, or *3/*3) and combined IM+PM groups, relative to those in extensive metabolizers (EM, CYP2C19*1/*1). In total, 519 patients completed 1 year of follow-up, among which 69 (13.3%) experienced MACE. The risk of MACE in CYP2C19 IM+PM patients was 2.664 times higher than that in CYP2C19 EM patients (OR = 2.664 (1.397–5.193), P = 0.004). The data suggest that CYP2C19*2 and *3 variants modulate the drug efficacy of clopidogrel in coronary heart patients undergoing PCI and further enhance the risk of MACE. Accordingly, CYP2C19 pharmacogenetic profiling may be beneficial for coronary heart patients undergoing PCI to predict the efficacy of treatment with clopidogrel. We propose that IM and PM patients should benefit from treatment with higher clopidogrel doses to improve efficacy and reduce the incidence of MACE. PMID:27932982

  16. ENDOMYOCARDIAL BIOPSY AND SELECTIVE CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY ARE LOW RISK PROCEDURES IN PEDIATRIC HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: RESULTS OF A MULTICENTER EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin P.; Marshall, Audrey C.; Vincent, Julie A.; Zuckerman, Warren A.; Hoffman, Timothy M.; Canter, Charles E.; Blume, Elizabeth D.; Bergersen, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Background No prior reports documenting the safety and diagnostic yield of cardiac catheterization and endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) in heart transplant recipients include multicenter data. Methods Data on the safety and diagnostic yield of EMB procedures performed in heart transplant recipients were recorded in the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Outcomes Project database at 8 pediatric centers over a 3 year period. Adverse events (AE) were classified according to a 5 level severity scale. Generalized estimating equation models identified risk factors for high severity adverse events (HSAE) (Levels 3-5) and non-diagnostic biopsy samples. Results A total of 2665 EMB cases were performed in 744 pediatric heart transplant recipients (median age 12 years [IQR: 4.8,16.7] and 54% male). AE occurred in 88 cases (3.3%), of which 28 (1.1%) were HSAE. AE attributable to EMB included tricuspid valve injury, transient complete heart block, and RBBB. Amongst 822 cases involving coronary angiography, 10 (1.2%) resulted in a coronary related AE. There were no myocardial perforations or deaths. Multivariable risk factors for HSAE included fewer prior catheterizations (p=0.006) and longer case length (p=<0.001). EMB yielded sufficient tissue for diagnosis in 99% of cases. Longer time since heart transplant was the most significant predictor of a non-diagnostic biopsy sample (p<0.001). Conclusions In the current era, cardiac catheterizations involving EMB can be performed in pediatric heart transplant recipients with a low AE rate and high diagnostic yield. Risk of HSAE is increased in early post-transplant biopsies and with longer case length. Longer time since heart transplant is associated with non-diagnostic EMB sample. PMID:22209354

  17. Coronary flow and oxidative stress during local anaphylactic reaction in isolated mice heart: the role of nitric oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Milicic, Vesna; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Jeremic, Nevena; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Djuric, Dragan; Jakovljevic, Vladimir Lj

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) in cardiac anaphylaxis regarding changes in coronary reactivity and oxidative status of the mice heart. The animals were divided into two groups: experimental group (CBA, iNOS(-/-) mice) and control group: wild-type mice (CBA/H). The hearts of male mice (n = 24; 6-8 weeks old, body mass 20-25 g, 12 in each experimental group) were excised and retrogradely perfused according to the Langendorff technique at a constant perfusion pressure (70 cm H2O). Cardiac anaphylaxis was elicited by injection of solution (1 mg/1 ml) of ovalbumin into the aortic cannula. For the next 10 min, in intervals of 2 min (0-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, 8-10 min) coronary flow (CF) rates were measured and samples of coronary effluent were collected. Markers of oxidative stress including index of lipid peroxidation measured as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), NO measured in the form of nitrites (NO2(-)), superoxide anion radical (O2(-)), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the coronary venous effluent were assessed spectrophotometrically. After the ovalbumin challenge, CF was significantly lower in the wild mice group. NO and H2O2 release were significantly higher in iNOS(-/-) mice group. TBARS and O2(-) values did not vary significantly between wild and iNOS(-/-) mice groups. Our results indicate that coronary vasoconstriction during cardiac anaphylaxis does not necessarily depend on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/NO activity and that iNOS/NO pathway may not be an only influential mediator of redox changes in this model of cardiac anaphylaxis.

  18. Combination of High Ankle–Brachial Index and Hard Coronary Heart Disease Framingham Risk Score in Predicting the Risk of Ischemic Stroke in General Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Kong, Minyi; Chen, Renhua; Liu, Yu; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Zhiyu; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that the patients with more metabolic risk factors had higher risk of high ankle–brachial index (ABI), but the relationship between high ABI and the risk of severe cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases is still under debate. This study aims to evaluate this association in the general population. 1486 subjects of South China were recruited in the study. 61 subjects were defined as high ABI group (ABI≥1.3) and 65 subjects were randomly selected as normal ABI group (0.910-year hard coronary heart disease (HCHD) Framingham Risk Score (FRS) were compared between two groups. The results showed that the 10-year HCHD FRS of high ABI group was significantly higher than normal ABI group (7.87±6.11 vs. 3.98±2.90%, P<0.001). There was a positive correlation between ABI value and HCHD FRS in overweight participants (R = 0.576, P<0.01). The prevalence of ischemic stroke was higher in high ABI group than normal ABI group (21.3% vs. 6.2%, P<0.05), and it was higher in participants with HCHD FRS≥6% than those with HCHD FRS<6% (19.1% vs. 6.9%, P<0.05). Moreover, the prevalence of ischemic stroke was higher in participants with high ABI and HCHD FRS≥6% than those with normal ABI and HCHD FRS<6% (26.7% vs. 4.1%, P<0.05). BMI, hypertension, hsCRP and smoking were proved to be the independent factors and effective predictors for high ABI (P<0.05). In conclusion, high ABI combined with high HCHD FRS should be a potential predictor of ischemic stroke in the general population of South China. PMID:25198106

  19. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  20. Gender Differences in Risks of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Their Association with Metabolic Syndrome in China

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Mei-Fang; He, Jie; Ding, Yue; Lou, Han-Yu; Song, Xiao-Xiao; Shan, Li-Zhen; Kang, Ying-Xiu; Zhang, Song-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke are common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We aimed to explore the differences in the risks of CHD and stroke between Chinese women and men with T2DM and their association with metabolic syndrome (MS). This study included 1514 patients with T2DM. The Asian Guidelines of ATPIII (2005) were used for MS diagnosis, and the UKPDS risk engine was used to evaluate the 10-year CHD and stroke risks. Women had lower CHD risk (15.3% versus 26.3%), fatal CHD risk (11.8% versus 19.0%), stroke risk (8.4% versus 10.3%), and fatal stroke risk (1.4% versus 1.6%) compared with men with T2DM (p < 0.05–0.001). The CHD risk (28.4% versus 22.6%, p < 0.001) was significantly higher in men with MS than in those without MS. The CHD (16.2% versus 11.0%, p < 0.001) and stroke risks (8.9% versus 5.8%, p < 0.001) were higher in women with MS than in those without MS. In conclusion, our findings indicated that Chinese women with T2DM are less susceptible to CHD and stroke than men. Further, MS increases the risk of both these events, highlighting the need for comprehensive metabolic control in T2DM. PMID:28042294

  1. miRNA-146a induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in a rat model of coronary heart disease via NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Liu, Y F; Wang, S; Li, B

    2015-12-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNA-146a in modulating the function of vascular smooth muscle cells in a rat model of coronary heart disease. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the rat coronary heart disease model and normal rats (controls). miRNA-146a levels were measured in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease and control rats. The proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and activation of the NF-κB pathway in the vascular smooth muscle cells were detected using the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The role of the NF-κB pathway in modulating the apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was investigated by measuring the reactivity of the cells to an NF-κB pathway inhibitor (TPCA-1). Vascular smooth muscle cells from the disease model exhibited higher levels of miRNA-146a than that by the normal controls (P = 0.0024). The vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease showed decreased proliferation and growth and increased apoptosis. miRNA-146a overexpression elevated the rate of cell apoptosis. The NF-κB pathway was activated in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease. Inhibition of the NF- κB pathway significantly decreased the rate of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in coronary heart disease rats (P = 0.0038). In conclusion, miRNA- 146a was found to induce vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rats with coronary heart disease via the activation of the NF-κB signal pathway.

  2. Patients’ perceptions of depression and coronary heart disease: a qualitative UPBEAT-UK study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of depression in people with coronary heart disease (CHD) is high but little is known about patients’ own perceptions and experiences of this. This study aimed to explore (i) primary care (PC) patients’ perceptions of links between their physical condition and mental health, (ii) their experiences of living with depression and CHD and (iii) their own self-help strategies and attitudes to current PC interventions for depression. Method Qualitative study using consecutive sampling, in-depth interviews and thematic analysis using a process of constant comparison. 30 participants from the UPBEAT-UK cohort study, with CHD and symptoms of depression. All participants were registered on the General Practitioner (GP) primary care, coronary register. Results A personal and social story of loss underpinned participants’ accounts of their lives, both before and after their experience of having CHD. This theme included two interrelated domains: interpersonal loss and loss centred upon health/control issues. Strong links were made between CHD and depression by men who felt emasculated by CHD. Weaker links were made by participants who had experienced distressing life events such as divorce and bereavement or were living with additional chronic health conditions (i.e. multimorbidity). Participants also felt ‘depressed’ by the ‘medicalisation’ of their lives, loneliness and the experience of ageing and ill health. Just under half the sample had consulted their GP about their low mood and participants were somewhat ambivalent about accessing primary care interventions for depression believing the GP would not be able to help them with complex health and social issues. Talking therapies and interventions providing the opportunity for social interaction, support and exercise, such as Cardiac Rehabilitation, were thought to be helpful whereas anti-depressants were not favoured. Conclusions The experiences and needs of patients with CHD and

  3. Positive correlation between variants of lipid metabolism-related genes and coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LI-NA; LIU, PAN-PAN; ZHOU, JIANQING; HUANG, R. STEPHANIE; YUAN, FANG; FEI, LI-JUAN; HUANG, YI; XU, LIMIN; HAO, LING-MEI; QIU, XU-JUN; LE, YANPING; YANG, XI; XU, WEIFENG; HUANG, XIAOYAN; YE, MENG; LIAN, JIANGFANG; DUAN, SHIWEI

    2013-01-01

    Four gene variants related to lipid metabolism (including the rs562338 and rs503662 variants of the APOB gene, the rs7767084 variant of the LPA gene and the rs2246942 variant of the LIPA gene) have been shown to be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of the present study was to assess their association with CHD in the Han Chinese population and to assess the contribution of these gene variants to CHD. Using the standardized coronary angiography method, we enrolled 290 CHD patients and 193 non-CHD patients as non-CHD controls from Lihuili Hospital (Ningbo, China). In addition, we recruited 330 unrelated healthy volunteers as healthy controls from the Xi Men Community (Ningbo, China). Our results demonstrated that the rs503662 and rs562338 variants of the APOB gene were extremely rare in the Han Chinese population (minor allele frequency <1%). Genotype rs2246942-GG of the LIPA gene was associated with an increased risk of CHD [CHD cases versus healthy controls: P=0.04; odds ratio (OR)=1.63; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02–2.60). Genotype rs7767084-CC of the LPA gene was identified as a protective factor against CHD in females (CHD cases versus non-CHD controls: P=0.04, OR=0.21; CHD cases versus healthy controls: P=0.02, OR=0.21). The results of our meta-analysis indicated that rs7767084 was not associated with a high risk of CHD (P=0.83; combined OR=0.93; 95% CI=0.47–1.85). In the present study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes involved in lipid metabolism (rs2246942 and rs7767084) were identified to be significantly associated with CHD in the Han Chinese population. Specifically, rs2246942-GG of the LIPA gene was a risk factor for CHD, while rs7767084-CC of the LPA gene was a protective factor against CHD in females. However, our meta-analysis indicated that rs7767084 is not associated with a higher risk of CHD. PMID:23653095

  4. Prospectively versus retrospectively ECG-gated 256-slice coronary CT angiography: image quality and radiation dose over expanded heart rates.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yang; Yue, Yong; Guo, Wenli; Feng, Guoqiang; Yu, Tao; Li, Guangwei; Vembar, Mani; Olszewski, Mark E; Guo, Qiyong

    2012-01-01

    To compare image quality and radiation dose estimates for coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) obtained with a prospectively gated transaxial (PGT) CT technique and a retrospectively gated helical (RGH) CT technique using a 256-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner and establish an upper limit of heart rate to achieve reliable diagnostic image quality using PGT. 200 patients (135 males, 65 females) with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent CCTA on a 256-slice MDCT scanner. The PGT patients were enrolled prospectively from January to June, 2009. For each PGT patient, we found the paired ones in retrospective-gating patients database and randomly selected one patient in these match cases and built up the RGH group. Image quality for all coronary segments was assessed and compared between the two groups using a 4-point scale (1: non-diagnostic; 4: excellent). Effective radiation doses were also compared. The average heart rate ± standard deviation (HR ± SD) between the two groups was not significantly different (PGT: 64.6 ± 12.9 bpm, range 45-97 bpm; RGH: 66.7 ± 10.9 bpm, range 48-97 bpm, P = 0.22). A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis determined a cutoff HR of 75 bpm up to which diagnostic image quality could be achieved using the PGT technique (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in assessable coronary segments between the two groups for HR ≤ 75 bpm (PGT: 99.9% [961 of 962 segments]; RGH: 99.8% [1038 of 1040 segments]; P = 1.0). At HR > 75 bpm, the performance of the PGT technique was affected, resulting in a moderate reduction of percentage assessable coronary segments using this approach (PGT: 95.5% [323 of 338 segments]; RGH: 98.5% [261 of 265 segments]; P = 0.04). The mean estimated effective radiation dose for the PGT group was 3.0 ± 0.7 mSv, representing reduction of 73% compared to that of the RGH group (11.1 ± 1.6 mSv) (P < 0.001). Prospectively-gated axial coronary computed tomography using a 256

  5. Contesting lifestyle risk and gendering coronary candidacy: lay epidemiology of heart disease in Finland in the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Jauho, Mikko

    2017-02-24

    This study addresses two issues currently under critical discussion in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the relative neglect of women and the individualised nature of key risk factors. It focuses on the North Karelia project (NKP), a community programme aimed at coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention in a predominantly rural Finnish region in the early 1970s, that is, during a period when the epidemiological understanding of CVD still was relatively new and actively promoted. Adopting the notions of lay epidemiology and coronary candidacy, culturally mediated explanatory models lay people use to assess who is likely to develop heart disease and why, the study shows that locals targeted by the project critically engaged with both of these bias. Based on the rich materials resulting from project activities the study shows, first, how many locals subsumed the individualised and lifestyle-based approach to CHD prevention promoted by NKP under a more general framework emphasising the health effects of ongoing structural changes in the area, and second, how women constructed themselves as viable coronary candidates. The case supports the position in the current discussions on lay expertise that wants to integrate lay experiences more firmly into epidemiological studies and public health.

  6. Detection of coronary artery disease by vasodilator thallium imaging of the heart with amyl nitrite inhalation: a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Rifkin, R.D.; Sharma, S.C.; Spraragen, S.; Claunch, B.; Shackford, H.; Patton, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Thallium imaging of the heart using dipyridamole-induced coronary arteriolar vasodilation has proven to be an effective means of detecting significant coronary stenosis. However, intravenous dipyridamole has not yet been made available for general use. We therefore examined the feasibility of substituting amyl nitrite inhalation as an arteriolar vasodilator prior to thallium imaging. Seventeen patients, all of whom had catheterization-proven coronary stenosis, inhaled amyl nitrite for 2-5 min. Thallium was injected after 45-60 s of inhalation. Completion of inhalation was followed immediately by planar imaging. Of 6 patients who inhaled amyl nitrite for at least 4 min, 5 had moderate or severe image defects on immediate scans which completely resolved on delayed scans. Only 3 of 11 who inhaled amyl nitrite for 2 min or less prior to scanning had similarly positive tests. Overall sensitivity for significant stenosis was 8 of 17 (47%). Inhalation was well tolerated with only one episode of angina and hypotension. We conclude that amyl nitrite inhalation for at least 4 min may offer an effective and readily available alternative to intravenous dipyridamole for vasodilator imaging of the heart.

  7. Pulmonary Instillation of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Promotes Coronary Vasoconstriction and Exacerbates Injury in Isolated Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Leslie C.; Frasier, Chad R.; Sloan, Ruben C.; Mann, Erin E.; Harrison, Benjamin S.; Brown, Jared M.; Brown, David A.; Wingard, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) across industry has increased human exposures. We tested the hypothesis that pulmonary instillation of MWCNT would exacerbate cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. One day following intratracheal instillation of 1, 10, or 100 μg MWCNT in Sprague-Dawley rats, we used a Langendorff isolated heart model to examine cardiac I/R injury. In the 100 μg MWCNT group we report increased premature ventricular contractions at baseline and increased myocardial infarction. This was associated with increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) release and depression of coronary flow during early reperfusion. We also tested if isolated coronary vascular responses were affected by MWCNT instillation and found trends for enhanced coronary tone, which were dependent on ET-1, cyclooxygenase, thromboxane, and Rho-kinase. We conclude that instillation of MWCNT promoted cardiac injury by depressing coronary flow, invoking vasoconstrictive mechanisms involving ET-1, cyclooxygenase, thromboxane, and Rho-kinase. PMID:23102262

  8. Toward modeling of regional myocardial ischemia and infarction: generation of realistic coronary arterial tree for the heart model of the XCAT phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, George S. K.; Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2009-02-01

    A realistic 3D coronary arterial tree (CAT) has been developed for the heart model of the computer generated 3D XCAT phantom. The CAT allows generation of a realistic model of the location, size and shape of the associated regional ischemia or infarction for a given coronary arterial stenosis or occlusion. This in turn can be used in medical imaging applications. An iterative rule-based generation method that systematically utilized anatomic, morphometric and physiologic knowledge was used to construct a detailed realistic 3D model of the CAT in the XCAT phantom. The anatomic details of the myocardial surfaces and large coronary arterial vessel segments were first extracted from cardiac CT images of a normal patient with right coronary dominance. Morphometric information derived from porcine data from the literature, after being adjusted by scaling laws, provided statistically nominal diameters, lengths, and connectivity probabilities of the generated coronary arterial segments in modeling the CAT of an average human. The largest six orders of the CAT were generated based on the physiologic constraints defined in the coronary generation algorithms. When combined with the heart model of the XCAT phantom, the realistic CAT provides a unique simulation tool for the generation of realistic regional myocardial ischemia and infraction. Together with the existing heart model, the new CAT provides an important improvement over the current 3D XCAT phantom in providing a more realistic model of the normal heart and the potential to simulate myocardial diseases in evaluation of medical imaging instrumentation, image reconstruction, and data processing methods.

  9. Modification of the association between smoking status and severity of coronary stenosis by vitamin D in patients suspected of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kuibao; Yang, Xiyan; Wang, Lefeng; Chen, Mulei; Zhao, Wenshu; Xu, Li; Yang, Xinchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Given both smoking and vitamin D are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) via inflammation and smoking may interfere with the local antiinflammatory effects of vitamin D. We hypothesized that the relationship between smoking and severity of CHD may be modified by vitamin D. A cross-sectional study was conducted. 25-OH vitamin D values were determined in 348 consecutive patients (mean age 62.4 ± 10.5 years; 56.3% male) undergoing coronary angiography at the Heart Center of Chaoyang Hospital affiliated to Capital Medical University between the period of September 2014 and May 2015. We categorized the patients into 2 groups based on 25-OH vitamin D levels, that is, severe hypovitaminosis D (25-OH vitamin D < 10 ng/mL) and higher vitamin D (25-OH vitamin D > =  10 ng/mL). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of severe coronary stenosis or higher Gensini score across three smoking status, that is, never smokers, former smokers, and current smokers in severe hypovitaminosis D and higher vitamin D groups, respectively. Of these patients, we identified 212 (60.9%) cases of severe CHD and 161 (46.3%) cases of severe hypovitaminosis D. Multivariable logistic regression model showed the ORs of severe CHD were 1.94 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.47, 7.98) for former smokers and 2.62 (95% CI: 0.83, 8.24) for current smokers, compared with never smokers in group with severe hypovitaminosis D (P-trend = 0.005). In contrast, smoking was not found to be significantly associated with severe CHD in group with higher 25-OH vitamin D (P-trend = 0.115). We found a significant interaction between smoking status and vitamin D on presence of severe CHD (P-interaction = 0.015). In terms of Gensini score as a dependent variable, similar results were identified. Our finding indicated the association between smoking and severity of CHD appeared to be substantially stronger among patients with severe hypovitaminosis

  10. Compound Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) dripping pill for coronary heart disease: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Song, Weijiang; Yang, Guoyan; Xu, Hao; Chen, Keji

    2015-01-01

    Compound Danshen dripping pill (CDDP) is commonly used to treat coronary heart disease (CHD) in China. However, clinical practice has not been informed by evidence from relevant systematic reviews (SRs). This overview aims at summarizing evidence from SRs on CDDP for the treatment of CHD. We included SRs of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on CDDP in treating CHD until March 2014 by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE and four Chinese databases. Data were extracted according to a pre-designed form. We assessed the quality of SRs according to AMSTAR and graded the quality of evidence in the included SRs using the GRADE approach. All data analyses were descriptive. About 13 SRs involving a total of 34,071 participants with angina or acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were included. Few SRs assessed endpoints (5/13, 38.5%) and quality of life (QOL) (4/13, 30.8%). Most of the SRs suggested that CDDP had potential benefits for patients with CHD, such as improving symptoms and electrocardiogram (ECG) results, with few adverse reactions, while benefits in endpoints were unproved. Moreover, the overall quality of evidence in the SRs was poor, ranging from "very low" to "moderate", and most of the included SRs were of "low" (3/13, 23.1%) or "moderate" (9/13, 69.2%) quality with many serious flaws. Current SRs suggested potential benefits of CDDP for the treatment of CHD. However, high-quality evidence is warranted to support the application of CDDP in treating CHD.

  11. Microsimulation Modeling of Coronary Heart Disease: Maximizing the Impact of Nonprofit Hospital-Based Interventions.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, Peggy Vadillo; Shi, Lu

    We use microsimulation to forecast changes in coronary heart disease (CHD) among adults 45 or above over a 20-year time horizon in Los Angeles County (N = 3.4 million), a county with 12 635 CHD deaths in 2010. We simulate individuals' life course and calibrate CHD trends to observed trends in the past. Using the Health Forecasting Community Health Simulation Model, we simulate CHD prevalence and CHD mortality in 2 CHD prevention scenarios: (1) "comprehensive hypertension intervention" and (2) "gradual reduction of the average adult body mass index back to the year 2000 level." We use microsimulation methodology so that nonprofit hospitals can easily use our model to forecast intervention results in their specific hospital catchment area. Our baseline model (without intervention) forecasts an increase in CHD prevalence that will reach 13.01% among those 45+ in Los Angeles County in 2030. Under scenario 1, the increase in CHD prevalence is slower (12.47% in 2030), and the prevalence in scenario 2 reaches 12.83% in 2030. The baseline scenario projects a number of 21 300 CHD deaths in 2030, whereas there will be 20 070 CHD deaths under scenario 1 and 20 970 CHD deaths under scenario 2. At the population level, the CHD mortality outcome, as compared with the metric of CHD prevalence, might be more sensitive to preventive lifestyle interventions. Both CHD prevalence and CHD mortality might be more sensitive to the hypertension intervention than to the obesity reduction in the time horizon of 20 years.

  12. Loci influencing lipid levels and coronary heart disease risk in 16 European population cohorts.

    PubMed

    Aulchenko, Yurii S; Ripatti, Samuli; Lindqvist, Ida; Boomsma, Dorret; Heid, Iris M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Wilson, James F; Spector, Tim; Martin, Nicholas G; Pedersen, Nancy L; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Kaprio, Jaakko; Hofman, Albert; Freimer, Nelson B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Johansson, Asa; Marroni, Fabio; Hayward, Caroline; Vitart, Veronique; Jonasson, Inger; Pattaro, Cristian; Wright, Alan; Hastie, Nick; Pichler, Irene; Hicks, Andrew A; Falchi, Mario; Willemsen, Gonneke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Geus, Eco J C; Montgomery, Grant W; Whitfield, John; Magnusson, Patrik; Saharinen, Juha; Perola, Markus; Silander, Kaisa; Isaacs, Aaron; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Oostra, Ben A; Elliott, Paul; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sabatti, Chiara; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Kronenberg, Florian; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Smit, Johannes H; McCarthy, Mark I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Peltonen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of lipids have been conducted in samples ascertained for other phenotypes, particularly diabetes. Here we report the first GWA analysis of loci affecting total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides sampled randomly from 16 population-based cohorts and genotyped using mainly the Illumina HumanHap300-Duo platform. Our study included a total of 17,797-22,562 persons, aged 18-104 years and from geographic regions spanning from the Nordic countries to Southern Europe. We established 22 loci associated with serum lipid levels at a genome-wide significance level (P < 5 x 10(-8)), including 16 loci that were identified by previous GWA studies. The six newly identified loci in our cohort samples are ABCG5 (TC, P = 1.5 x 10(-11); LDL, P = 2.6 x 10(-10)), TMEM57 (TC, P = 5.4 x 10(-10)), CTCF-PRMT8 region (HDL, P = 8.3 x 10(-16)), DNAH11 (LDL, P = 6.1 x 10(-9)), FADS3-FADS2 (TC, P = 1.5 x 10(-10); LDL, P = 4.4 x 10(-13)) and MADD-FOLH1 region (HDL, P = 6 x 10(-11)). For three loci, effect sizes differed significantly by sex. Genetic risk scores based on lipid loci explain up to 4.8% of variation in lipids and were also associated with increased intima media thickness (P = 0.001) and coronary heart disease incidence (P = 0.04). The genetic risk score improves the screening of high-risk groups of dyslipidemia over classical risk factors.

  13. A quantitative analysis of fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality.

    PubMed

    König, Ariane; Bouzan, Colleen; Cohen, Joshua T; Connor, William E; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Gray, George M; Lawrence, Robert S; Savitz, David A; Teutsch, Steven M

    2005-11-01

    Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government recommendations for women of childbearing age are to modify consumption of high-MeHg fish to reduce MeHg exposure, while recommendations encourage fish consumption among the general population because of the nutritional benefits. The Harvard Center for Risk Analysis convened an expert panel (see acknowledgements) to quantify the net impact of resulting hypothetical changes in fish consumption across the population. This paper estimates the impact of fish consumption on coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI). Other papers quantify stroke risk and the impacts of both prenatal MeHg exposure and maternal intake of n-3 PUFAs on cognitive development. This analysis identified articles in a recent qualitative review appropriate for the development of a dose-response relationship. Studies had to satisfy quality criteria, quantify fish intake, and report the precision of the relative risk estimates. Relative risk results were averaged, weighted proportionately by precision. CHD risks associated with MeHg exposure were reviewed qualitatively because the available literature was judged inadequate for quantitative analysis. Eight studies were identified (29 exposure groups). Our analysis estimated that consuming small quantities of fish is associated with a 17% reduction in CHD mortality risk, with each additional serving per week associated with a further reduction in this risk of 3.9%. Small quantities of fish consumption were associated with risk reductions in nonfatal MI risk by 27%, but additional fish consumption conferred no incremental benefits.

  14. Stock volatility as a risk factor for coronary heart disease death

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjuan; Chen, Honglei; Jiang, Lili; Song, Guixiang; Kan, Haidong

    2011-01-01

    Aims The volatility of financial markets may cause substantial emotional and physical stress among investors. We hypothesize that this may have adverse effects on cardiovascular health. The Chinese stock markets were extremely volatile between 2006 and 2008. We, therefore, examined the relationship between daily change of the Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE) Composite Index (referred as the Index) and coronary heart disease (CHD) deaths from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2008 in Shanghai, the financial capital of China. Methods and results Daily death and stock performance data were collected from the Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention and SSE, respectively. Data were analysed with over-dispersed generalized linear Poisson models, controlling for long-term and seasonal trends of CHD mortality, day of the week, Index closing value, weather conditions, and air pollution levels. We observed a U-shaped relationship between the Index change and CHD deaths: both rising and falling of the Index were associated with more deaths and the fewest deaths coincided with little or no change of the index. We also examined the absolute daily change of the Index in relation to CHD deaths: in a 1-day lag model, each 100-point change of the Index corresponded to 5.17% (95% confidence interval: 1.71, 8.63%) increase in CHD deaths. Further analysis showed that the association was stronger for out-of-hospital CHD death than for in-hospital death. Conclusion We found that CHD deaths fluctuated with daily stock changes in Shanghai, suggesting that stock volatility may adversely affect cardiovascular health. PMID:21196446

  15. Resistance training increases total daily energy expenditure in disabled older women with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ades, Philip A; Savage, Patrick D; Brochu, Martin; Tischler, Marc D; Lee, N Melinda; Poehlman, Eric T

    2005-04-01

    Physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) is a determinant of prognosis and fitness in older patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). PAEE and total energy expenditure (TEE) are closely related to fatness, physical function, and metabolic risk in older individuals. The goal of this study was to assess effects of resistance training on PAEE, TEE, and fitness in older women with chronic CHD and physical activity limitations (N = 51, mean age: 72 + 5 yr). The study intervention consisted of a progressive, 6-mo program of resistance training vs. a control group condition of low-intensity yoga and deep breathing. The study interventions were completed by 42 of the 51 participants. The intervention group manifested a 177 +/- 213 kcal/day (+9%) increase in TEE, pre- to posttraining, measured by the doubly labeled water technique during a nonexercise 10-day period (P < 0.03 vs. controls). This was due to a 50 +/- 74 kcal/day (4%) increase in resting metabolic rate measured by indirect calorimetry (P < 0.01, P < 0.05 vs. controls) and a 123 +/- 214 kcal/day (9%) increase in PAEE (P < 0.03, P = 0.12 vs. controls). Resistance training was associated with significant increases in upper and lower body strength, but no change in fat-free mass, measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry, or left ventricular function, measured by echocardiography and Doppler. Women in the control group showed no alterations in TEE or its determinants. There were no changes between groups in body composition, aerobic capacity, or measures of mental depression. These results demonstrate that resistance training of 6-mo duration leads to an increase in TEE and PAEE in older women with chronic CHD.

  16. Food patterns associated with blood lipids are predictive of coronary heart disease: the Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Sarah A.; Mishra, Gita D.; Brunner, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the epidemiological effects of overall dietary patterns offers an alternative approach to the investigation of the role of diet in coronary heart disease (CHD).We analyzed the role of blood lipid-related dietary patterns using a two-step method to confirm the prospective association of dietary pattern with incident CHD. Analysis is based on 7314 participants of the Whitehall II study. Dietary intake was measured using a 127-item food frequency questionnaire. Reduced rank regression (RRR) was used to derive dietary pattern scores using baseline serum total and HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels as dependent variables. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to confirm the association between dietary patterns and incident CHD (n=243) over 15 years of follow-up. Increased CHD risk (hazard ratio for top quartile:2.01, 95%CI 1.41-2.85, adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity and energy misreporting) was observed with a diet characterised by high consumption of white bread, fried potatoes, sugar in tea and coffee, burgers & sausages, soft drinks, and low consumption of French dressing and vegetables. The diet-CHD relationship was attenuated after adjustment for employment grade and health behaviors (HR for top quartile:1.81, 95%CI 1.26-2.62), and further adjustment for blood pressure and BMI (HR for top quartile:1.57, 95% CI 1.08-2.27). Dietary patterns are associated with serum lipids and predict CHD risk after adjustment for confounders. RRR identifies dietary patterns uses prior knowledge and focuses on the pathways through which diet may influence disease. This study adds to the evidence that diet is an important risk factor for CHD. PMID:19327192

  17. Heritability of longitudinal changes in coronary-heart-disease risk factors in women twins.

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Y; Austin, M A; Newman, B; Edwards, K; Mayer-Davis, E I; King, M C

    1997-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated genetic influences on levels of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, but there also may be genetic effects on the intraindividual variation in these risk factors over time. Changes in risk factors are likely to reflect genetic-environmental interactions and may have important implications for understanding CHD risk. The present study examines the heritability of changes in CHD risk factors, using data from the two examinations by the Kaiser Permanente Women Twins Study, performed a decade apart. The sample consisted of 348 pairs of women twins who participated in both examinations, including 203 MZ pairs and 145 DZ pairs. Average ages at the two examinations were 41 and 51 years, respectively. By means of three different statistical analytic approaches, moderate heritability estimates were demonstrated for changes in LDL cholesterol (h2 = .25-.36) and in HDL cholesterol (h2 = .23-.58), some of which were statistically significant. Although small to moderate heritability estimates were found for systolic blood pressure (.18-.37; P < .05 for some estimates), no genetic influence on changes in diastolic blood pressure was detected. Based on longitudinal twin data in women, this study demonstrates a genetic influence on changes in both lipoprotein risk factors and systolic blood pressure over a decade. In addition to environmental factors, which clearly are operating, the effect of various "variability genes" may be acting independently of the genetic influences on the absolute levels of these risk factors. Both mapping the gene(s) underlying intraindividual variations in these CHD risk factors and understanding their function(s) could lead to targeted intervention strategies to reduce CHD risk among genetically susceptible individuals. PMID:9199573

  18. Associations between Interleukin-1 Gene Polymorphisms and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Cai, Jianguang; Liu, Gang; Wei, Yuan; Tang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Objective A great number of studies regarding the associations between IL-1B-511, IL-1B+3954 and IL-1RN VNTR polymorphisms within the IL-1gene cluster and coronary heart disease (CHD) have been published. However, results have been inconsistent. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate the associations. Methods Published literature from PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible publications. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- or fixed- effect model. Results Thirteen studies (3,219 cases/2,445 controls) for IL-1B-511 polymorphism, nine studies (1,828 cases/1,818 controls) for IL-1B+3954 polymorphism and twelve studies (2,987 cases/ 2,208 controls) for IL-1RN VNTR polymorphism were included in this meta analysis. The results indicated that both IL-1B-511 and IL-1B+3954 polymorphisms were not associated with CHD risk (IL-1B-511 T vs. C: OR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.87–1.09; IL-1B+3954 T vs. C: OR = 1.06, 95%CI 0.95–1.19). Similarly, there was no association between IL-1RN VNTR polymorphism and CHD risk (*2 vs. L: OR = 1.00, 95%CI 0.85–1.17). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggested that there were no associations between IL-1 gene cluster polymorphisms and CHD. PMID:23029154

  19. Determinants of heart rate recovery in coronary artery disease patients with and without type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Jaana J; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Hautala, Arto J; Piira, Olli-Pekka; Lepojärvi, E Samuli; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Huikuri, Heikki V; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2012-11-02

    Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, which is a common complication of diabetes, is associated with increased mortality in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the reasons of autonomic dysfunction in CAD patients with or without diabetes are not well known. We examine the association between heart rate recovery (HRR) and other potential factors among CAD patients with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D). Correlations between HRR 60s after exercise (HRR(60)), characteristics, laboratory and echocardiographic variables, exercise capacity and physical activity were assessed in 50 CAD patients with T2D and 55 patients with CAD alone. HRR(60) had the closest univariate correlation with physical activity and exercise capacity in patients with T2D (r=0.38, p=0.006 and r=0.37, p=0.008, respectively). Age, exercise capacity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level explained 30% of the HRR(60) in patients with T2D (p=0.001), while the high intensity physical activity was the only predictor of HRR(60) in CAD patients (12%, p=0.010). HRR(60) was reduced in patients with T2D as compared with those without (34±9 vs. 39±9bpm, p=0.005), but the difference was no longer significant after adjustments for physical activity, exercise capacity, body mass index and the use of calcium antagonists and nitrates (p=0.273). In conclusion, blunted HRR is more common among CAD patients with T2D than in those without, and this is more closely related to physical activity and obesity than to the duration of T2D or associated co-morbidities.

  20. Neutrophil proteolytic activation cascades: a possible mechanistic link between chronic periodontitis and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alfakry, Hatem; Malle, Ernst; Koyani, Chintan N; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Sorsa, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that affect a large segment of society. Coronary heart disease (CHD), the most common cardiovascular disease, progresses over several years and affects millions of people worldwide. Chronic infections may contribute to the systemic inflammation and enhance the risk for CHD. Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic infections that affects up to 50% of the adult population. Under inflammatory conditions the activation of endogenous degradation pathways mediated by immune responses leads to the release of destructive cellular molecules from both resident and immigrant cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their regulators can activate each other and play an important role in immune response via degrading extracellular matrix components and modulating cytokines and chemokines. The action of MMPs is required for immigrant cell recruitment at the site of inflammation. Stimulated neutrophils represent the major pathogen-fighting immune cells that upregulate expression of several proteinases and oxidative enzymes, which can degrade extracellular matrix components (e.g. MMP-8, MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase). The activity of MMPs is regulated by endogenous inhibitors and/or candidate MMPs (e.g. MMP-7). The balance between MMPs and their inhibitors is thought to mirror the proteolytic burden. Thus, neutrophil-derived biomarkers, including myeloperoxidase, may activate proteolytic destructive cascades that are involved in subsequent immune-pathological events associated with both periodontitis and CHD. Here, we review the existing studies on the contribution of MMPs and their regulators to the infection-related pathology. Also, we discuss the possible proteolytic involvement and role of neutrophil-derived enzymes as an etiological link between chronic periodontitis and CHD.

  1. sTNF-R Levels: Apical Periodontitis Linked to Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Rajnish K.; Rai, Balwant

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different studies have implicated the exposure to systemic conditions in the aetiology of cardiovascular diseases like chronic inflammation including chronic periodontitis. AIM: The present study has been conducted to examine whether biomarker sTNF-R was elevated in apical periodontitis as sTNF-R is a systemic marker of inflammation and has been identified as risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: sTNF-R levels were measured in 52 patients with apical periodontitis (M:F::25:27), aged 20-45 years and in 20 control patients without periodontitis (M:F::10:10, aged 20-48 years). Measurement of sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 was carried out in duplicate with standardised, commercially available enzyme immunoassays (R&D Systems Europe, Abingdon, UK). RESULTS: The mean sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 levels in periodontitis were 820 (240) pg/ml (413 – 1620 pg/ml) and 1309 (403) pg/ml (540 – 2430 pg/ml), while in normal sTNF-R1 and sTNF – R2 levels were 740 (340) pg/ml (407-1240 pg/ml) and 1283 (414) pg (480 – 2340 pg/ml) respectively. Results indicated a positive high relationship between cardiovascular markers such as sTNF-R1 and sTNF – R2 and apical periodontitis. CONCLUSION: Elevated levels of sTNF-R1 and sTNF – R2 in apical periodontitis patients indicate an increased independent risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:28293320

  2. Physical activity in patients with stable coronary heart disease: an international perspective

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ralph; Held, Claes; Brown, Rebekkah; Vedin, Ola; Hagstrom, Emil; Lonn, Eva; Armstrong, Paul; Granger, Christopher B.; Hochman, Judith; Davies, Richard; Soffer, Joseph; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Aims Despite the known benefits of regular exercise, the reasons why many coronary heart disease (CHD) patients engage in little physical activity are not well understood. This study identifies factors associated with low activity levels in individuals with chronic CHD participating in the STABILITY study, a global clinical outcomes trial evaluating the lipoprotein phospholipaseA2 inhibitor darapladib. Methods and results Prior to randomization, 15 486 (97.8%) participants from 39 countries completed a lifestyle questionnaire. Total physical activity was estimated from individual subject self-reports of hours spend each week on mild, moderate, and vigorous exercise, corresponding approximately to 2, 4, and 8 METS, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression evaluated clinical and demographic variables for the lowest compared with higher overall exercise levels, and for individuals who decreased rather than maintained or increased activity since diagnosis of CHD. The least active 5280 subjects (34%) reported exercise of ≤24MET.h/week. A total of 7191 subjects (46%) reported less exercise compared with before diagnosis of CHD. The majority of participants were either ‘not limited’ or ‘limited a little’ walking 100 m (84%), climbing one flight of stairs (82%), or walking 1 km/½ mile (68%), and <10% were limited ‘a lot’ by dyspnoea or angina. Variables independently associated with both low physical activity and decreasing exercise after diagnosis of CHD included more co-morbid conditions, poorer general health, fewer years of education, race, and country (P < 0.001 for all). Conclusion In this international study, low physical activity was only partly explained by cardiovascular symptoms. Potentially modifiable societal and health system factors are important determinants of physical inactivity in patients with chronic CHD. PMID:24014220

  3. A primary care intervention programme for obesity and coronary heart disease risk factor reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Read, Anna; Ramwell, Helen; Storer, Helen; Webber, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a growing problem, with its associated morbidity, mortality, and economic costs. Treatment options and the availability of resources are limited and inconsistent. AIM: To implement and evaluate a primary care dietitian-run weight management programme. DESIGN OF STUDY: Pilot intervention study. SETTING: Three health centres in the north locality of Nottingham City Primary Care Trust. METHOD: Two hundred and sixteen individuals, with a body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m(2) and coronary heart disease risk factors, were recruited to attend education and support groups. Changes in BMI, waist circumference, percentage body fat, blood pressure, blood lipids, glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)), and assessment of psychological wellbeing using the "short form" (SF-36) general health questionnaire, were conducted at 0, 3, and 12 months. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty patients completed the 3-month phase, and 75 completed the follow-up 9-month phase. Four per cent of patients entering the programme achieved a 10% weight loss, and 13% achieved a weight loss between 5 and 10%. Those continuing to attend achieved a mean weight loss of 2.9% (mean = 3.1 kg, ranging from a loss of 23.6 kg to a gain of 3.8 kg, P < 0.001) at 3 months, which was maintained at 12 months. Waist circumference, percentage body fat, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, HbA(1c) (in those with diabetes) (P < 0.001), and triglycerides (P = 0.004) showed reduction. Psychological wellbeing improved in seven of the nine categories of the SF-36. CONCLUSION: Those who continued to attend the programme showed significant reduction in weight and other clinical parameters at 3 months, and this was maintained at 1 year with less intensive support. An attrition rate of approximately 66% by 12 months demonstrated that, in spite of intensive dietetic resources, patient retention and follow-up of progress was difficult. PMID:15113494

  4. Coronary heart disease and household air pollution from use of solid fuel: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fatmi, Zafar; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence is emerging that indoor air pollution (IAP) from use of solid fuels for cooking and heating may be an important risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Sources of data We searched the Ovid Medline, Embase Classic, Embase and Web of Science databases through to 12 June 2015 to identify reports of primary epidemiological research concerning the relationship of CHD to IAP from solid fuel, the likely magnitude of any increase in risk, and potential pathogenic mechanisms. Areas of agreement The current balance of epidemiological evidence points to an increased risk of CHD from IAP as a consequence of using solid, and especially biomass, fuels for cooking and heating. Relative risks from long-term exposure could be two- to fourfold. Areas of controversy The evidence base is still limited, and although an association of CHD with such IAP from solid fuel is consistent with the known hazards from smoking, environmental tobacco smoke and ambient air pollution, and supported by evidence of effects on inflammatory processes, atherosclerosis and blood pressure, it requires confirmation by larger and more robust studies. Growing points The completion of two relatively small case-control studies on CHD and IAP from use of biomass fuel demonstrates the feasibility of such research, and is an encouragement to further, larger studies using similar methods. Areas timely for developing research The need for such research is particularly pressing because the incidence of CHD in developing countries is rising, and IAP may interact synergistically with the risk factors that are driving that increase. Furthermore, relatively cheap methods are available to reduce IAP from use of solid fuels, and there are indications from intervention studies that these may impact beneficially on CHD as well as other diseases caused by such pollution. PMID:27151956

  5. Effect of cyclosporin A intervention on the immunological mechanisms of coronary heart disease and restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Hu, Yue-Cheng; Zhang, Ru-Yan; Jin, Dong-Xia; Jiang, Yuan; Zhang, He-Nan; Cong, Hong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of cyclosporin A (CSA) intervention on the immunological mechanisms underlying coronary heart disease (CHD) and restenosis (RS) in rabbits. A total of 48 rabbits were randomly divided into normal control (N), N + CSA, CHD model, CHD + CSA, RS model and RS + CSA groups. Rabbits in the respective groups received different treatments prior to sacrifice at the end of week 12. Iliac arteries were harvested from the rabbits for morphological analysis and to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of cluster of differentiation (CD) 40/CD40 ligand (CD40L), CD134/CD134 ligand (CD134L) and inflammatory factors, including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-9, vascular cell adhesion protein (VCAM)-1, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining. As compared with the N group, the mRNA expression levels of MMP-9, VCAM-1 and TNF-α were significantly increased in the CHD and RS groups (P<0.05), but were significantly decreased in the groups with CSA intervention, as compared with those without CSA intervention (P<0.05). Conversely, there were no significant differences in the expression levels of MMP-1 and IL-6 among the six groups, although a decreasing trend of IL-6 expression was observed following intervention with CSA. Furthermore, there were significant differences in the mRNA and protein expression levels of CD40/CD40L and CD134/CD134L among the N, CHD and RS groups (P<0.05), and between the groups with and without CSA intervention. The present study demonstrated that CSA intervention exerted beneficial effects on CHD and RS, and further studies are required to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effects of CSA on CHD. PMID:27882144

  6. Positive association between PPARD rs2016520 polymorphism and coronary heart disease in a Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ye, H D; Li, Y R; Hong, Q X; Zhou, A N; Zhao, Q L; Xu, L M; Xu, M Q; Xu, X T; Tang, L L; Dai, D J; Jiang, D J; Huang, Y; Wang, D W; Duan, S W

    2015-06-11

    PPARD encodes peroxisome proliferator-activated re-ceptor delta, which has been shown to play an important role in control-ling lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis. In this case-control study, we explored the relationship between PPARD rs2016520 polymorphism and coronary heart disease (CHD) in a Han Chinese population. A to-tal of 657 CHD cases and 640 controls were included in the associa-tion study. rs2016520 polymorphism genotyping was performed using the melting temperature-shift polymerase chain reaction method. The PPARD rs2016520-G allele reduced CHD risk by 17.9% (χ(2) = 5.061, P = 0.025, OR = 0.821, 95%CI = 0.692-0.975). Furthermore, a signifi-cant difference in CHD risk was observed for the PPARD rs2016520 polymorphism in the dominant model (AG + GG vs AA: χ(2) = 4.751, degrees of freedom (df) = 1, P = 0.029, OR = 0.784, 95%CI = 0.631- 0.976). Analysis by age suggested that the G-allele decreased CHD risk by 14.8% in ages greater than 65 years (χ(2) = 4.446, P = 0.035, OR = 0.852, 95%CI = 0.684-1.060). In contrast, meta-analysis of PPARD rs2016520 among 3732 cases and 5042 controls revealed no associa-tion between PPARD rs2016520 and CHD (P = 0.19). We found that the PPARD rs2016520-GG genotype decreased CHD risk in a Han Chinese population. Moreover, we found an association between serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and PPARD rs2016520 in senior individuals aged ≥ 65 years. The meta-analysis revealed no association between PPARD rs2016520 and CHD, suggesting ethnic differences in the association between the PPARD locus and CHD.

  7. Coronary heart disease knowledge test: developing a valid and reliable tool.

    PubMed

    Smith, M M; Hicks, V L; Heyward, V H

    1991-04-01

    This study tested the validity and reliability of a written test designed to assess knowledge of coronary heart disease (CHD) and its risk factors. The subjects were 93 males diagnosed with CHD. Subjects were classified into a treatment group (n = 48) or a control group (n = 45) based on whether or not they participated in a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP). An additional 38 subjects were used to pilot test the original form of the knowledge test, which consisted of 80 multiple-choice questions. Content validity was established by a five-member jury of cardiac rehabilitation experts. Each question was rated using a Likert-type scale. Questions that did not receive an average rating of at least four were eliminated. The revised form was pilot tested for validity and internal consistency with the discrimination index (point biserial correlation coefficient) and the Kuder-Richardson formula 20 (KR-20). Questions with a discrimination index of less than 0.14 were eliminated; thus, the final form of the test consisted of 40 questions. Validation of this test yielded difficulty ratings (DRs) between 0 percent and 98 percent, with an average DR of 63 percent. Construct validation indicated that the average test score of subjects participating in a CRP was significantly higher than that of non-participants (t = 3.51, df = 91, p less than or equal to 0.01). The internal-consistency reliability of the test was 0.84. The results indicate that this test is a valid and reliable tool for assessing patients' knowledge of CHD and its risk factors.

  8. Firefighters and on-duty deaths from coronary heart disease: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Kales, Stefanos N; Soteriades, Elpidoforos S; Christoudias, Stavros G; Christiani, David C

    2003-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) is responsible for 45% of on-duty deaths among United States firefighters. We sought to identify occupational and personal risk factors associated with on-duty CHD death. Methods We performed a case-control study, selecting 52 male firefighters whose CHD deaths were investigated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. We selected two control populations: 51 male firefighters who died of on-duty trauma; and 310 male firefighters examined in 1996/1997, whose vital status and continued professional activity were re-documented in 1998. Results The circadian pattern of CHD deaths was associated with emergency response calls: 77% of CHD deaths and 61% of emergency dispatches occurred between noon and midnight. Compared to non-emergency duties, fire suppression (OR = 64.1, 95% CI 7.4–556); training (OR = 7.6, 95% CI 1.8–31.3) and alarm response (OR = 5.6, 95% CI 1.1–28.8) carried significantly higher relative risks of CHD death. Compared to the active firefighters, the CHD victims had a significantly higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in multivariate regression models: age ≥ 45 years (OR 6.5, 95% CI 2.6–15.9), current smoking (OR 7.0, 95% CI 2.8–17.4), hypertension (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.0–11.1), and a prior diagnosis of arterial-occlusive disease (OR 15.6, 95% CI 3.5–68.6). Conclusions Our findings strongly support that most on-duty CHD fatalities are work-precipitated and occur in firefighters with underlying CHD. Improved fitness promotion, medical screening and medical management could prevent many of these premature deaths. PMID:14613487

  9. Sexual activity and concerns in people with coronary heart disease from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Steptoe, Andrew; Jackson, Sarah E; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sexual activity is a central component of intimate relationships, but sexual function may be impaired by coronary heart disease (CHD). There have been few representative population-based comparisons of sexual behaviour and concerns in people with and without CHD. We therefore investigated these issues in a large nationally representative sample of older people. Methods We analysed cross-sectional data from 2979 men and 3711 women aged 50 and older from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Sexual behaviour and concerns were assessed by validated self-completion questionnaire and analyses were weighted for non-response. Covariates included age, partnerships status and comorbidities. Results There were 376 men and 279 women with CHD. Men with CHD were less likely to be sexually active (68.7% vs 80.0%, adjusted OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.81), thought less about sex (74.7% vs 81.9%, OR 0.72, CI 0.54 to 0.95), and reported more erectile difficulties (47.4% vs 38.1%, OR 1.46, CI 1.10 to 1.93) than men without CHD. Effects were more pronounced among those diagnosed within the past 4 years. Women diagnosed <4 years ago were also less likely to be sexually active (35.4% vs 55.6%, OR 0.44, CI 0.23 to 0.84). There were few differences in concerns about sexual activity. Cardiovascular medication showed weak associations with erectile dysfunction. Conclusions There is an association between CHD and sexual activity, particularly among men, but the impact of CHD is limited. More effective advice after diagnosis might reverse the reduction in sexual activity, leading to improved quality of life. PMID:27126394

  10. Social isolation, C-reactive protein, and coronary heart disease mortality among community-dwelling adults.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Kathi L; Waring, Molly E; Roberts, Mary B; Eaton, Charles B; Gramling, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Social isolation confers increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) events and mortality. In two recent studies, low levels of social integration among older adults were related to higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, suggesting a possible biological link between social isolation and CHD. The current study examined relationships among social isolation, CRP, and 15-year CHD death in a community sample of US adults aged 40 years and older without a prior history of myocardial infarction. A nested case-cohort study was conducted from a parent cohort of community-dwelling adults from the southeastern New England region of the United States (N = 2321) who were interviewed in 1989 and 1990. CRP levels were measured from stored sera provided by the nested case-cohort (n = 370), which included all cases of CHD death observed through 2005 (n = 48), and a random sample of non-cases. We found that the most socially isolated individuals had two-and-a-half times the odds of elevated CRP levels compared to the most socially integrated. In separate logistic regression models, both social isolation and CRP predicted later CHD death. The most socially isolated continued to have more than twice the odds of CHD death compared to the most socially integrated in a model adjusting for CRP and more traditional CHD risk factors. The current findings support social isolation as an independent risk factor of both high levels of CRP and CHD death in middle-aged adults without a prior history of myocardial infarction. Prospective study of inflammatory pathways related to social isolation and mortality are needed to fully delineate whether and how CRP or other inflammatory markers contribute to mechanisms linking social isolation to CVD health.

  11. Correlation between plasma angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoyu; Shou, Xiling; Liang, Lei; Yao, Xiaowei; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) plays a critical role in inducing tumor cell infiltration, and this invasive phenotype is caused by up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. The relationship between Ang-2 and MMP-2 in atherosclerosis has not been reported yet. The aim is to measure the plasma concentrations of Ang-1, Ang-2 and MMP-2 and assess the correlation between the concentrations of these factors in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. Material and methods The testing was done in a cross-sectional study. We prospectively enrolled 42 individuals with acute myocardial infarction, 42 individuals with unstable angina pectoris, 42 individuals with stable angina pectoris and 45 healthy control subjects. Concentrations of Ang-1, Ang-2 and MMP-2 were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Spearman’s rank correlation was calculated to evaluate the relationships between MMP-2 and Ang-1, and MMP-2 and Ang-2 in patients with CHD. Results Patients with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris had higher Ang-2 and MMP-2 levels compared with stable angina patients and healthy control subjects (p < 0.05), while concentrations of Ang-1 were not statistically different between the groups. Spearman’s rank correlation showed that Ang-2 levels positively correlated with MMP-2 in patients with CHD (r = 0.679, p < 0.001). Conclusions Plasma Ang-2 and MMP-2 levels but not Ang-1 levels were increased in patients with CHD. Ang-1 correlated weakly with MMP-2, whereas the Ang-2 and MMP-2 correlation was strong in patients with CHD. Ang-2 may play a role in atherosclerosis, and have an interaction with MMP-2. PMID:27904510

  12. Association between dietary patterns and coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lina; Li, Fei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ou, Zejin; Xu, Dingli; Tan, Wanlong; Dai, Meng

    2015-01-01

    The associations of dietary patterns with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk remain unclear. Thereby, a meta-analysis was conducted to examine potential relations between dietary patterns and CHD. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched up to March 2014 for eligible prospective cohort studies regarding the relationships between common dietary patterns and CHD. Random-effects models were applied to calculate the summary relative risk estimates (SRRE) for the highest versus the lowest category of dietary pattern. Sensitivity analyses were conducted and publication bias was assessed using Begg or Egger’s tests. Twelve prospective cohort studies were included involving 409,780 participants and 6298 CHD cases. There was an inverse association between prudent/healthy dietary pattern and CHD risk (SRRE = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.74-0.87, P-value for heterogeneity = 0.497, I2 = 0%). Furthermore, no significant association was observed between western/unhealthy dietary pattern and risk of CHD (SRRE = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.86-1.27, P-value for heterogeneity = 0.007, I2 = 61.9%). However, increased risk was detected between western/unhealthy dietary pattern and CHD in the United States (USA) (SRRE = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15-1.82, P-value for heterogeneity = 0.930, I2 = 0%). In conclusion, our analysis provides evidence of an inverse association between prudent/healthy dietary pattern and CHD risk, and suggests null association between western/unhealthy dietary pattern and CHD. However, greater adherence to western/unhealthy pattern possibily increases by 45% the risk of CHD in USA. Further efforts are warranted to confirm these findings and clarify the role of dietary patterns and CHD risk. PMID:25785058

  13. The Evidence for Saturated Fat and for Sugar Related to Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    DiNicolantonio, James J.; Lucan, Sean C.; O’Keefe, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary guidelines continue to recommend restricting intake of saturated fats. This recommendation follows largely from the observation that saturated fats can raise levels of total serum cholesterol (TC), thereby putatively increasing the risk of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD). However, TC is only modestly associated with CHD, and more important than the total level of cholesterol in the blood may be the number and size of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that contain it. As for saturated fats, these fats are a diverse class of compounds; different fats may have different effects on LDL and on broader CHD risk based on the specific saturated fatty acids (SFAs) they contain. Importantly, though, people eat foods, not isolated fatty acids. Some food sources of SFAs may pose no risk for CHD or possibly even be protective. Thus, advice to reduce saturated fat in the diet without regard to such nuance could actually increase people’s risk of CHD. When saturated fats are replaced with refined carbohydrates, and specifically with added sugars (like sucrose or high fructose corn syrup), the end result is not favorable for heart health. Such replacement leads to changes in LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides that may increase the risk of CHD. Additionally, diets high in sugar may induce many other abnormalities associated with elevated CHD risk, including elevated levels of glucose, insulin, and uric acid, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin and leptin resistance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and altered platelet function. A diet high in added sugars has been found to cause a 3-fold increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. But sugars, like saturated fats, are a diverse class of compounds. The monosaccharide, fructose, and fructose-containing sweeteners (e.g., sucrose) result in greater degrees of metabolic abnormalities than seen with glucose (either isolated as a monomer or in chains as starch) and may present

  14. The Evidence for Saturated Fat and for Sugar Related to Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Lucan, Sean C; O'Keefe, James H

    2016-01-01

    Dietary guidelines continue to recommend restricting intake of saturated fats. This recommendation follows largely from the observation that saturated fats can raise levels of total serum cholesterol (TC), thereby putatively increasing the risk of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD). However, TC is only modestly associated with CHD, and more important than the total level of cholesterol in the blood may be the number and size of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that contain it. As for saturated fats, these fats are a diverse class of compounds; different fats may have different effects on LDL and on broader CHD risk based on the specific saturated fatty acids (SFAs) they contain. Importantly, though, people eat foods, not isolated fatty acids. Some food sources of SFAs may pose no risk for CHD or possibly even be protective. Advice to reduce saturated fat in the diet without regard to nuances about LDL, SFAs, or dietary sources could actually increase people's risk of CHD. When saturated fats are replaced with refined carbohydrates, and specifically with added sugars (like sucrose or high fructose corn syrup), the end result is not favorable for heart health. Such replacement leads to changes in LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides that may increase the risk of CHD. Additionally, diets high in sugar may induce many other abnormalities associated with elevated CHD risk, including elevated levels of glucose, insulin, and uric acid, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin and leptin resistance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and altered platelet function. A diet high in added sugars has been found to cause a 3-fold increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, but sugars, like saturated fats, are a diverse class of compounds. The monosaccharide, fructose, and fructose-containing sweeteners (e.g., sucrose) produce greater degrees of metabolic abnormalities than does glucose (either isolated as a monomer, or in chains as starch

  15. Relationship between quantitative measurement of Porphyromonas gingivalis on dental plaque with periodontal status of patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwiyanti, Stephani; Soeroso, Yuniarti; Sunarto, Hari; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a narrowing of coronary artery due to plaque build-up. [1] Chronic periodontitis increases risk of cardiovascular disease. P.gingivalis is linked to both diseases. Objective: to analyse quantitative difference of P.gingivalis on dental plaque and its relationship with periodontal status of CHD patient and control. Methods: Periodontal status of 66 CHD patient and 40 control was checked. Subgingival plaque was isolated and P.gingivalis was measured using real-time PCR. Result: P.gingivalis of CHD patient differs from control. P.gingivalis is linked to pocket depth of CHD patient. Conclusion: P.gingivalis count of CHD patient is higher than control. P.gingivalis count is not linked to any periodontal status, except for pocket depth of CHD patient.

  16. Effect of heart rate on the diagnostic accuracy of 256-slice computed tomography angiography in the detection of coronary artery stenosis: ROC curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GANG; WU, YIFEN; ZHANG, ZHENTAO; ZHENG, XIAOLIN; ZHANG, YULAN; LIANG, MANQIU; YUAN, HUANCHU; SHEN, HAIPING; LI, DEWEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of heart rate (HR) on the diagnostic accuracy of 256-slice computed tomography angiography (CTA) in the detection of coronary artery stenosis. Coronary imaging was performed using a Philips 256-slice spiral CT, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic value of 256-slice CTA in coronary artery stenosis. The HR of the research subjects in the study was within a certain range (39–107 bpm). One hundred patients suspected of coronary heart disease underwent 256-slice CTA examination. The cases were divided into three groups: Low HR (HR <75 bpm), moderate HR (75≤ HR <90 bpm) and high HR (HR ≥90 bpm). For the three groups, two observers independently assessed the image quality for all coronary segments on a four-point ordinal scale. An image quality of grades 1–3 was considered diagnostic, while grade 4 was non-diagnostic. A total of 97.76% of the images were diagnostic in the low-HR group, 96.86% in the moderate-HR group and 95.80% in the high-HR group. According to the ROC curve analysis, the specificity of CTA in diagnosing coronary artery stenosis was 98.40, 96.00 and 97.60% in the low-, moderate- and high-HR groups, respectively. In conclusion, 256-slice coronary CTA can be used to clearly show the main segments of the coronary artery and to effectively diagnose coronary artery stenosis. Within the range of HRs investigated, HR was found to have no significant effect on the diagnostic accuracy of 256-slice coronary CTA for coronary artery stenosis. PMID:27168831

  17. Importance of adequate exercise in the detection of coronary heart disease by radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.H.; Lo, K.; Pitt, B.

    1980-12-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained on 77 symptomatic patients without prior documented coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease was present by angiograms in 48. Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was abnormal in 41 patients (overall sensitivity 85%). In 29 patients with normal coronary arteries, RNV was normal in 24 (specificity 83%). To determine if the exercise level affects sensitivity, the studies were graded for adequacy of exercise. It was considered adequate if patients developed (a) chest pain, or (b) ST segment depression of at least 1 mm, or (c) if they achieved a pressure rate product greater than 250. Among the 48 patients with coronary artery disease, 35 achieved adequate exercise. Thirty-three had an abnormal RNV (sensitivity 94%). In 13 patients who failed to achieve adequate exercise, RNV was abnormal in eight (sensitivity of only 62%). Some patients with coronary artery disease may have a normal ventricular response at inadequate levels of stress.

  18. Role of genetic polymorphisms of ion channels in the pathophysiology of coronary microvascular dysfunction and ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Francesco; Mancone, Massimo; Chilian, William M; Severino, Paolo; Canali, Emanuele; Logan, Suzanna; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Volterrani, Maurizio; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2013-11-01

    Conventionally, ischemic heart disease (IHD) is equated with large vessel coronary disease. However, recent evidence has suggested a role of compromised microvascular regulation in the etiology of IHD. Because regulation of coronary blood flow likely involves activity of specific ion channels, and key factors involved in endothelium-dependent dilation, we proposed that genetic anomalies of ion channels or specific endothelial regulators may underlie coronary microvascular disease. We aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding for ion channels expressed in the coronary vasculature and the possible correlation with IHD resulting from microvascular dysfunction. 242 consecutive patients who were candidates for coronary angiography were enrolled. A prospective, observational, single-center study was conducted, analyzing genetic polymorphisms relative to (1) NOS3 encoding for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS); (2) ATP2A2 encoding for the Ca²⁺/H⁺-ATPase pump (SERCA); (3) SCN5A encoding for the voltage-dependent Na⁺ channel (Nav1.5); (4) KCNJ8 and KCNJ11 encoding for the Kir6.1 and Kir6.2 subunits of K-ATP channels, respectively; and (5) KCN5A encoding for the voltage-gated K⁺ channel (Kv1.5). No significant associations between clinical IHD manifestations and polymorphisms for SERCA, Kir6.1, and Kv1.5 were observed (p > 0.05), whereas specific polymorphisms detected in eNOS, as well as in Kir6.2 and Nav1.5 were found to be correlated with IHD and microvascular dysfunction. Interestingly, genetic polymorphisms for ion channels seem to have an important clinical impact influencing the susceptibility for microvascular dysfunction and IHD, independent of the presence of classic cardiovascular risk factors.

  19. Running nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease in primary care: qualitative study of health professionals' perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Thain, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Background A randomised trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease resulted in improved secondary prevention and significantly lowered all-cause mortality at 4-year follow-up. This qualitative trial was conducted to explore the experience of health professionals that had been involved in running the clinics. Aim To identify the barriers and facilitators to establishing secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease within primary care. Design of study Semi-structured audiotaped telephone interviews with GPs and nurses involved in running clinics. Setting A stratified, random sample of 19 urban, suburban, and rural general practices in north-east Scotland. Method Semi-structured telephone interviews with 19 GPs and 17 practice-based nurses involved in running nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Results Eight practices had run clinics continuously and 11 had stopped, with eight subsequently restarting. Participants accounted for these patterns by referring to advantages and disadvantages of the clinics in four areas: patient care, development of nursing skills, team working, and infrastructure. Most practitioners perceived benefits for patients from attending secondary prevention clinics, but some, from small rural practices, thought they were unnecessary. The extended role for nurses was welcomed, but was dependent on motivated staff, appropriate training and support. Clinics relied on, and could enhance, team working, however, some doctors were wary of delegating. With regard to infrastructure, staff shortages (especially nurses) and accommodation were as problematic as lack of funds. Conclusions Nurse-led secondary prevention clinics were viewed positively by most healthcare professionals that had been involved in running them, but barriers to their implementation had led most to stop running them at some point. Lack of space and staff shortages are likely to remain ongoing problems

  20. Validation of Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire to assess exercise tolerance of Chinese elderly with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Shi, Jing-Jing; Wang, Bo-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Veterans Specific Activity Questionnaire (VSAQ) has been used to assess exercise tolerance. Nevertheless, there is no validated Chinese version. The aim of this study is to determine whether a questionnaire-based method using the Chinese version of VSAQ (the modified VSAQ) is a practical tool to assess exercise tolerance of Chinese elderly with coronary heart disease. Methods One hundred thirty consecutive elderly patients who were diagnosed with coronary heart disease (CHD) (mean age 68.9 ± 6.0 years) referred for treadmill exercise testing (TET) for clinical reasons were included in the study. They were asked to complete a questionnaire for clinical characteristics information on age, sex, history, exercise habits, medications, the original VSAQ and the modified VSAQ. We investigated the relationship between exercise tolerance in metabolic equivalents (METs) estimated by VSAQ and that obtained by TET. Results The METs by the original VSAQ and the modified VSAQ did not difference significantly (P = 0.528). The modified VSAQ scores were significantly correlated with the METs obtained by TET (r = 0.819, 95% CI: 0.753–0.873, P < 0.01), and the scores of original VSAQ also correlated with the METs by TET (r = 0.804, 95% CI: 0.745–0.854, P < 0.01). The Bland-Altman graph analysis showed few values outside the limits of agreement, suggesting good precision between the METs estimated by questionnaire and the METs obtained by TET. Conclusions The Chinese version of the VSAQ confirmed its validity and equivalence to the original version, especially when evaluating individuals with coronary heart disease and older adults. The results showed that the VSAQ is a valuable tool to assess the exercise tolerance. PMID:28321240

  1. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Mental Stress–Induced Myocardial Ischemia in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Samad, Zainab; Boyle, Stephen; Becker, Richard C.; Williams, Redford; Kuhn, Cynthia; Ortel, Thomas L.; Rogers, Joseph; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; O’Connor, Christopher; Velazquez, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of mental stress–induced myocardial ischemia. Background Mental stress–induced myocardial ischemia is prevalent and a risk factor for poor prognosis in patients with coronary heart disease, but past studies mainly studied patients with exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. Methods Eligible patients with clinically stable coronary heart disease, regardless of exercise stress testing status, underwent a battery of 3 mental stress tests followed by a treadmill test. Stress-induced ischemia, assessed by echocardiography and electrocardiography, was defined as: 1) development or worsening of regional wall motion abnormality; 2) left ventricular ejection fraction reduction ≥8%; and/or 3) horizontal or downsloping ST-segment depression ≥1 mm in 2 or more leads lasting for ≥3 consecutive beats during at least 1 mental test or during the exercise test. Results Mental stress–induced ischemia occurred in 43.45%, whereas exercise-induced ischemia occurred in 33.79% (p = 0.002) of the study population (N = 310). Women (odds ratio [OR]: 1.88), patients who were not married (OR: 1.99), and patients who lived alone (OR: 2.24) were more likely to have mental stress–induced ischemia (all p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that compared with married men or men living with someone, unmarried men (OR: 2.57) and married women (OR: 3.18), or living alone (male OR: 2.25 and female OR: 2.72, respectively) had higher risk for mental stress-induced ischemia (all p < 0.05). Conclusions Mental stress-induced ischemia is more common than exercise-induced ischemia in patients with clinically stable coronary heart disease. Women, unmarried men, and individuals living alone are at higher risk for mental stress-induced ischemia. (Responses of Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment [REMIT]; NCT00574847) PMID:23410543

  2. An automated multi-modal object analysis approach to coronary calcium scoring of adaptive heart isolated MSCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. This can be challenging for a human observer as it is difficult to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. The inclusion or exclusion of false positive or true positive calcified plaques respectively will alter the patient calcium score incorrectly, thus leading to the possibility of incorrect treatment prescription. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the Volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the requirement and

  3. Off-pump or on-pump beating heart: which technique offers better outcomes following coronary revascularization?

    PubMed

    Sepehripour, Amir H; Chaudhry, Umar A R; Harling, Leanne; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2015-04-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether on-pump beating heart coronary artery bypass (BH-ONCAB) surgery has a different outcome profile in comparison to off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). A total of 205 papers were found by systematic search of which 7 provided the largest and most recent outcome analysis comparing BH-ONCAB with OPCAB, and represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, study type, population, main outcome measures and results were tabulated. Reported outcome measures included mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal failure, myocardial damage, change in ejection fraction, number of bypass grafts and completeness of revascularization. With the exception of one study that favoured the off-pump technique, our review did not demonstrate a statistically significant difference in terms of mortality between the groups. We did not identify a statistically significant difference in any reported morbidity outcomes. However, there was a trend towards better outcomes for the on-pump beating heart technique, despite a higher risk profile in terms of age, ejection fraction and burden of coronary disease in this group. Consistent statistically significant differences between the groups were the mean number of grafts performed and the completeness of revascularization, both of which were higher with the on-pump beating heart technique. Limitations to the current evidence include the finding that most of the current data arise from specialist off-pump surgeons or centres that would usually only carry out BH-ONCAB in the higher risk patients where the added safety of cardiopulmonary bypass is desired.

  4. Hostility, Anger and Depression Predict Increases in C3 over a 10-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Stephen H.; Jackson, William G.; Suarez, Edward C.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relation of hostility, anger and depression to 10-year changes in the third (C3) and fourth (C4) complement in 313, apparently healthy male participants enrolled in the Air Force Health Study (AFHS), a 20-year study designed to evaluate the health consequences of dioxin exposure. Hostility, depression and anger were assessed using subscales from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), which was administered in 1985. Given the high intercorrelations among these psychological scales, we used a principal component analysis to generate a composite score representing the linear combination of the hostility, anger and depression scales. The dependent variables, C3 and C4 levels, were determined from samples collected in 1992, 1997 and 2002. Regression analyses controlling for age, race, alcohol use, body mass index and cigarette use as well as onset of disease and use of lipid lowering and blood pressure medications during follow-up revealed a significant time X composite score interaction for C3 complement (p < .0003), but not C4. Post-hoc analyses revealed that high composite scores were associated with larger 10-year increases in C3. These observations suggest that men who are hostile and are prone to experience frequent and intense feelings of anger and depression show activation of the complement system, and specifically increases in C3, that may contribute to the development of coronary heart disease. PMID:17321106

  5. Hostility, anger, and depression predict increases in C3 over a 10-year period.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Stephen H; Jackson, William G; Suarez, Edward C

    2007-08-01

    We examined the relation of hostility, anger, and depression to 10-year changes in the third (C3), and fourth (C4) complement in 313, apparently healthy male participants enrolled in the Air Force Health Study (AFHS), a 20-year study designed to evaluate the health consequences of dioxin exposure. Hostility, depression, and anger were assessed using subscales from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), which was administered in 1985. Given the high intercorrelations among these psychological scales, we used a principal component analysis to generate a composite score representing the linear combination of the hostility, anger, and depression scales. The dependent variables, C3 and C4 levels, were determined from samples collected in 1992, 1997, and 2002. Regression analyses controlling for age, race, alcohol use, body mass index, and cigarette use as well as onset of disease, and use of lipid lowering and blood pressure medications during follow-up revealed a significant timexcomposite score interaction for C3 complement (p<.0003), but not C4. Post-hoc analyses revealed that high composite scores were associated with larger 10-year increases in C3. These observations suggest that men who are hostile and are prone to experience frequent and intense feelings of anger, and depression show activation of the complement system, and specifically increases in C3, that may contribute to the development of coronary heart disease.

  6. The ASSURE ROT Registry: Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold Following Rotablation for Complex Coronary Lesions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Coronary Restenosis; Heart Diseases; Coronary Stenosis; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  7. Coronary heart disease in South Asian immigrants: synthesis of research and implications for health promotion and prevention in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Rahel; Zachariah, Rachel

    2008-07-01

    Although the literature reflects that Asian Indians in the United States and globally have the highest rates of morbidity and mortality because of coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes, few studies have described the clinical implications in the United States. Traditional risk factors dictate practice, yet these risk factors do not fully explain the rates. Central obesity, lipoprotein (a), and insulin resistance may have a strong role. The literature suggests that proactive nursing using culturally specific clinical measures are necessary to reduce risk factors for CHD and diabetes in South Asians. Additional research and prevention strategies focused on immigrant South Asians in the United States are recommended.

  8. Association of structural variants of the gene of apolipoprotein B with coronary heart disease and serum lipid level

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, V.A.; Puzyrev, V.P.; Lemza, S.V.; Karpov, R.S.; Fedorov, A.Yu.

    1995-07-01

    Xba I and EcoR I polymorphism of the apolipoprotein B (APOB) gene was studied by PCR. A significant increase in the frequency of allele X{sup +} and haplotype X{sup +}E{sup +} was demonstrated in patients with coronarographically documented coronary heart disease (CHD) over that of the general population. Association of allele E{sup {minus}} with increased levels of serum triglycerides was found. The results provide evidence about the contribution of structural variants of the APOB gene to determining CHD. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Do we need clinical trials to test the ability of transdermal HRT to prevent coronary heart disease?

    PubMed

    Crook, David

    2001-01-01

    Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with oral oestrogen was predicted to reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk by 50%. Randomized controlled trials show no such benefit, however, pointing instead to an initial increase in CHD events. Although the cardiovascular effects of transdermal HRT are largely unknown, improvements in arterial function are maintained when oestrogen is administered transdermally. Transdermal HRT also avoids the increased plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) that are seen with oral HRT. However, the clinical significance of this general reduction in hepatic over-synthesis of plasma proteins is difficult to assess. Nevertheless, the available evidence on transdermal HRT appears to justify a formal clinical trial.

  10. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  11. What are the evidences of solar activity influence on coronary heart disease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Yury; Breus, Tamara

    Researches of last two decades have shown that the cardiovascular system represents the most probable target for influence of helio - and geomagnetic activity. Both cardiovascular system and blood connect very closely: one system cannot exist without another. For the same reason the effects perceived by one system, are easily transferred to another. Laboratory tests as blood coagulation, platelet aggregation, and capillary blood velocity performed in our hospital in patients suffering from coronary heart disease (CHD) revealed a high their dependence on a level of geomagnetic activity (Gurfinkel et al., 1995, 1998). Later Gmitrov and Ohkubo (2002) in experiments on animals also found a significant negative correlation between geomagnetic field disturbances and capillary blood velocity. The analyzing data collected by the Moscow ambulance services covering more then one million observations over three years, cleaned up by seasonal effects of meteorological and social causes, showed that the number of cases of myocardial infarction increased during geomagnetic storms (Breus et al., 1995). During 14 years we collected more than 25000 cases of acute myocardial infarction and brain stroke at seven medical hospitals located in Russia, China and some other countries. We used only cases with established date of acute attack of diseases. Undated cases were excluded from the analysis. Average numbers of patients on geomagnetic active days and days with quiet geomagnetic condition were compared. It was shown statistically that during geomagnetic disturbances the frequency of myocardial infarction and brain stroke cases increased on the average by a factor of two in comparison with quiet geomagnetic conditions. These results are close to results obtained by (Stoupel, 1999), for patients suffering with acute cardiological pathology. Our recent study (with L.Parfeonova) revealed the relation between heart ventricular ectopic activity (VEA) and geomagnetic conditions in patients

  12. [Effect of different concentrations liposomal emoxipine on coronary flow, contractive and pump function of the isolated rat heart after normotermic ischema and further reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Toropova, Ia G; Mukhamadiiarov, R A; Golovkin, A S

    2013-07-01

    In the experiments on the isolated perfused rat heart we studied the effects of liposomes containing different concentrations (0.25 and 0.1 mg/ml) of emoxipine on coronary flow, contractive and pump function of the isolated heart, which was effected by total normothermical ischemia and reperfusion. The parameters of the contractile activity of hearts, coronary flow and pump function of the hearts were assessed. It was detected that the introduction of the liposomal emoxipine during ischemia provides a protective effect against ischemic and reperfusion myocardial damage and smaller concentration of the emoxipin (0.1 mg/ml) in composition with the liposomes promote the best recovery of contractile activity and the pumping function of the ischemic heart in the period of the reperfusion.

  13. The Relationship of Metabolic Syndrome with Stress, Coronary Heart Disease and Pulmonary Function - An Occupational Cohort-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Nowobilski, Roman; Dropinski, Jerzy; Kotula-Horowitz, Katarzyna; Laskowicz, Bartosz; Stanisz, Andrzej; Lelakowski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Higher levels of stress impact the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease. The association between MetS, impaired pulmonary function and low level of physical activity is still pending assessment in the subjects exposed to stress. The study aimed to examine whether higher levels of stress might be related to MetS and the plaque presence, as well as whether MetS might affect pulmonary function. Design and Methods The study embraced 235 police officers (mean age 40.97 years) from the south of Poland. The anthropometrics and biochemical variables were measured; MetS was diagnosed using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Computed tomography coronary angiography of coronary arteries, exercise ECG, measurements of brachial flow-mediated dilation, and carotid artery intima-media thickness were completed. In order to measure the self-perception of stress, 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was applied. Pulmonary function and physical activity levels were also addressed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to determine the relationships between: 1/ incidence of coronary plaque and MetS per se, MetS components and the number of classical cardiovascular risk factors, 2/ perceived stress and MetS, 3/ MetS and pulmonary function parameters. Results Coronary artery atherosclerosis was less associated with MetS (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.24–5.52; p = 0.011) than with a co-existence of classical cardiovascular risk factors (OR = 5.67, 95% CI 1.07–29.85, p = 0.03; for 3 risk factors and OR = 9.05; 95% CI 1.24–66.23, p = 0.02; for 6 risk factors, respectively). Perceived stress increased MetS prevalence (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03–1.13; p = 0.03), and impacted coronary plaque prevalence (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.001–1.10; p = 0.04). Leisure-time physical activity reduced the chances of developing MetS (OR = 0.98 95% CI 0.96–0.99; p = 0.02). MetS subjects had significantly lower values of certain

  14. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors for the treatment of depression in coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure: evidence for pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Parissis, John T; Fountoulaki, Katerina; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Kremastinos, Dimitrios

    2006-10-01

    Depression is a common co-morbidity in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, post by-pass surgery and chronic heart failure. There is a significant body of evidence suggesting that the presence of depression is independently associated with a decline in health status and an increase in the risk of hospitalization and death for patients with coronary artery disease or congestive heart failure. Novel treatment modalities such as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may improve depressive symptoms and prognosis of post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patients interacting with the common pathophysiologic mechanisms of depression and cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes current experimental and clinical evidence regarding the pleiotropic effects of SSRIs on platelet functions, immune and neurohormonal activation, and cardiac rhythm disturbances in patients with cardiovascular disease. These bio-modulatory properties of SSRIs may be translated into improvement of patient clinical outcomes beyond their anti-depressant action.

  15. Failed heart rate control with oral metoprolol prior to coronary CT angiography: effect of additional intravenous metoprolol on heart rate, image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Juan, Laura; Nguyen, Elsie T; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Moshonov, Hadas; Crean, Andrew M; Deva, Djeven P; Paul, Narinder S; Torres, Felipe S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intravenous (i.v.) metoprolol after a suboptimal heart rate (HR) response to oral metoprolol (75-150 mg) on HR control, image quality (IQ) and radiation dose during coronary CTA using 320-MDCT. Fifty-three consecutive patients who failed to achieve a target HR of < 60 bpm after an oral dose of metoprolol and required supplementary i.v. metoprolol (5-20 mg) prior to coronary CTA were evaluated. Patients with HR < 60 bpm during image acquisition were defined as responders (R) and those with HR ≥ 60 bpm as non-responders (NR). Two observers assessed IQ using a 3-point scale (1-2, diagnostic and 3, non-diagnostic). Effective dose (ED) was estimated using dose-length product and a 0.014 mSV/mGy.cm conversion factor. Baseline characteristics and HR on arrival were similar in the two groups. 58% of patients didn't achieve the target HR after receiving i.v. metoprolol (NR). R had a significantly higher HR reduction after oral (mean HR 63.9 ± 4.5 bpm vs. 69.6 ± 5.6 bpm) (p < 0.005) and i.v. (mean HR 55.4 ± 3.9 bpm vs. 67.4 ± 5.3 bpm) (p < 0.005) doses of metoprolol. Studies from NR showed a significantly higher ED in comparison to R (8.0 ± 2.9 vs. 6.1 ± 2.2 mSv) (p = 0.016) and a significantly higher proportion of non-diagnostic coronary segments (9.2 vs. 2.5%) (p < 0.001). 58% of patients who do not achieve a HR of <60 bpm prior to coronary CTA with oral fail to respond to additional i.v. metoprolol and have studies with higher radiation dose and worse image quality.

  16. Racial differences in the association of coronary calcified plaque with left ventricular hypertrophy: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study and Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihong; Arnett, Donna K; Province, Michael A; Lewis, Cora E; North, Kari; Carr, J Jeffrey; Pankow, James S; Hopkins, Paul N; Devereux, Richard B; Wilk, Jemma B; Wagenknecht, Lynne

    2006-05-15

    Studies have reported a lower burden of calcified atherosclerotic plaque in coronary arteries in African-Americans than in whites. Findings from autopsy studies of sudden cardiac death have suggested a link between left ventricular hypertrophy and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Echocardiograms and cardiac computed tomograms were analyzed in 334 African-American (84% hypertensive) and 196 white (66% hypertensive) adults with no history of coronary heart disease or revascularization procedures at study entry. The relation of coronary artery calcium (CAC) score to left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area was assessed by Spearman's correlations and mixed linear models. Covariates included age, gender, field center, weight, height, systolic blood pressure, number of antihypertensive medications, diabetes, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and current smoking and alcohol consumption. In African-Americans, a significant and independent association between CAC score and left ventricular mass or left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area was present with the 2 analytic strategies. Spearman's correlation coefficients for CAC score with left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area were 0.14 (p = 0.015) and 0.13 (p = 0.025), respectively, after multivariable adjustment. In whites, the associations of CAC score with measurements of left ventricular mass were weaker and only marginally significant in mixed linear models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that CAC reflects a different risk burden between African-Americans and whites, and future studies examining the prognostic implications of CAC in African-Americans should consider the potential association between CAC and left ventricular hypertrophy.

  17. The effects of homocysteine-related compounds on cardiac contractility, coronary flow, and oxidative stress markers in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Zivkovic, Vladimir; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Djordjevic, Dusica; Vuletic, Milena; Barudzic, Nevena; Djuric, Dragan

    2012-11-01

    Research on the effects of homocysteine on the vascular wall, especially in endothelial and smooth muscle cells, has indicated that increased homocysteine levels lead to cellular stress and cell damage. Considering the adverse effects of homocysteine on vascular function and the role of oxidative stress in these mechanisms, the aim of this study was to estimate the influence of different homocysteine isoforms on cardiac contractility, coronary flow, and oxidative stress markers in isolated rat heart. The hearts of male Wistar albino rats (n = 36, age 8 weeks, body mass 180-200 g), were excised and retrogradely perfused according to the Langendorff technique at a constant perfusion pressure (70 cmH(2)O) and administered with three isoforms of 10 μM homocysteine [DL-Hcy, DL-Hcy thiolactone-hydrochloride (TLHC) and L-Hcy TLHC). After the insertion and placement of the sensor in the left ventricle, the parameters of heart function: maximum rate of pressure development in the left ventricle (dP/dt max), minimum rate of pressure development in the left ventricle (dP/dt min), systolic left ventricular pressure (SLVP), diastolic left ventricular pressure (DLVP), mean blood pressure (MBP) and heart rate (HR)] were continuously registered. Flowmetry was used to evaluate the coronary flow. Markers of oxidative stress: index of lipid peroxidation measured as TBARS, nitric oxide measured through nitrites (NO(2)(-)), superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)), and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the coronary venous effluent were assessed spectrophotometrically. Our results showed that administration of Hcy compounds in concentration of 10 μM induced depression of cardiac contractility, manifested by a decrease in dp/dt max after administration of any Hcy compound, decrease in dp/dt min after administration of L-Hcy TLHC, decrease in SLVP after administration of DL-Hcy TLHC and DL-Hcy, and the drop in CF after administration of any Hcy compound. Regarding the effects of Hcy on

  18. [Functional state of endothelium and oxidant activity of leucocytes in patients with ischemic heart disease after coronary bypass surgery].

    PubMed

    Panov, A V; Abesadze, I T; Korzhenevskaia, K V; Nil'k, R Ia; Kozulin, V Iu; Gordeev, M L; Shliakhto, E V

    2007-01-01

    Relationship between disorders of endothelial function, proinflammatory activity of leucocytes and effects of therapy with simvastatin or its combination with ezetimibe was studied in 72 patients with ischemic heart disease subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Vascular endothelial function was assessed by ultrasound detection of brachial artery response to its compression, oxidant activity of leucocytes - by chemiluminescent microscopy, severity of coronary artery atherosclerosis - by invasive coronary angiography. Twenty two healthy individuals comprised control group. Endothelial function, activity of leucocytes, and lipid levels were evaluated before and in 12 months after CABG. Patients with multivessel involvement revealed more complex disorders of endothelial function and higher levels of leucocytes activity compared to patients with single-vessel disease. CABG resulted in disappearance of anginal attacks and negative stress echo test during 1-year observation in 80.6% of patients. Patients with recurrent angina after CABG had more severe endothelial and leucocytes disorders. Combined lipid lowering therapy (simvastatin plus ezetimibe) compared to simvastatin alone demonstrated higher efficacy in terms of achievement of target lipid levels, improvement of endothelial function and leucocytes disorders.

  19. Epidemiology of cardioprotective pharmacological agent use in stable coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Mathur, Mukul; Gupta, Rakesh; Guptha, Soneil; Roy, Sanjeeb; Khedar, R.S.; Gupta, Nishant; Gupta, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine use of class and type of cardioprotective pharmacological agents in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) we performed a prescription audit. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted in major districts of Rajasthan in years 2008–09. We evaluated prescription for classes (anti-platelets, β-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), calcium channel blockers (CCB) and statins) and specific pharmacological agents at clinics of physicians in tertiary (n = 18), secondary (n = 69) and primary care (n = 43). Descriptive statistics are reported. Results Prescriptions of 2290 stable CHD patients were audited. Anti-platelet use was in 2031 (88.7%), β-blockers 1494 (65.2%), ACE inhibitors 1196 (52.2%), ARBs 712 (31.1%), ACE inhibitors – ARB combinations 19 (0.8%), either ACE inhibitors or ARBs 1908 (83.3%), CCBs 1023 (44.7%), statins 1457 (63.6%) and other lipid lowering agents in 170 (7.4%). Among anti-platelets aspirin–clopidogrel combination was used in 88.5%. Top three molecules in β-blockers were atenolol (37.8%), metoprolol (26.4%) and carvedilol (11.9%); ACE inhibitors ramipril (42.1%), lisinopril (20.3%) and perindopril (10.9%); ARB's losartan (47.7%), valsartan (22.3%) and telmisartan (14.9%); CCBs amlodipine (46.7%), diltiazem (29.1%) and verapamil (9.5%) and statins were atorvastatin (49.8%), simvastatin (28.9%) and rosuvastatin (18.3%). Use of metoprolol, ramipril, valsartan, diltiazem and atorvastatin was more at tertiary care, and atenolol, lisinopril, losartan, amlodipine and simvasatin in primary care (p < 0.01). Conclusions There is low use of β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs and statins in stable CHD patients among physicians in Rajasthan. Significant differences in use of specific molecules at primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare are observed. PMID:23809376

  20. Thyroid Function Within the Normal Range and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Vatten, Lars J.; Bjøro, Trine; Bauer, Douglas C.; Bremner, Alexandra; Cappola, Anne R.; Ceresini, Graziano; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H.; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Iervasi, Giorgio; Imaizumi, Misa; Kearney, Patricia M.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Newman, Anne. B.; Peeters, Robin P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Razvi, Salman; Sgarbi, José A.; Stott, David J.; Trompet, Stella; Vanderpump, Mark P. J.; Völzke, Henry; Walsh, John P.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Importance Some experts suggest that serum thyrotropin levels in the upper part of the current reference range should be considered abnormal, an approach that would reclassify many individuals as having mild hypothyroidism. Health hazards associated with such thyrotropin levels are poorly documented, but conflicting evidence suggests that thyrotropin levels in the upper part of the reference range may be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Objective To assess the association between differences in thyroid function within the reference range and CHD risk. Design, Setting, and Participants Individual participant data analysis of 14 cohorts with baseline examinations between July 1972 and April 2002 and with median follow-up ranging from 3.3 to 20.0 years. Participants included 55 412 individuals with serum thyrotropin levels of 0.45 to 4.49 mIU/L and no previously known thyroid or cardiovascular disease at baseline. Exposures Thyroid function as expressed by serum thyrotropin levels at baseline. Mainoutcomes and Measures Hazard ratios (HRs) of CHD mortality and CHD events according to thyrotropin levels after adjustment for age, sex, and smoking status. Results Among 55 412 individuals, 1813 people (3.3%) died of CHD during 643 183 person-years of follow-up. In 10 cohorts with information on both nonfatal and fatal CHD events, 4666 of 48 875 individuals (9.5%) experienced a first-time CHD event during 533 408 person-years of follow-up. For each 1-mIU/L higher thyrotropin level, the HR was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.90-1.04) for CHD mortality and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.97-1.03) for a first-time CHD event. Similarly, in analyses by categories of thyrotropin, the HRs of CHD mortality (0.94 [95% CI, 0.74-1.20]) and CHD events (0.97 [95% CI, 0.83-1.13]) were similar among participants with the highest (3.50-4.49 mIU/L) compared with the lowest (0.45-1.49 mIU/L) thyrotropin levels. Subgroup analyses by sex and age group yielded similar results. Conclusions and

  1. Racial Differences in the Association of Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration With Coronary Heart Disease Events

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Ix, Joachim H.; Sachs, Michael C.; Tracy, Russell P.; Siscovick, David S.; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; de Boer, Ian H.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Low circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) have been consistently associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in white populations. This association has not been rigorously evaluated in other races or ethnicities, in which the distributions of 25(OH)D concentration and possibly other aspects of 25(OH)D metabolism differ. OBJECTIVE To examine the association of serum 25(OH)D concentration with risk of CHD in a multiethnic population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied 6436 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), recruited from July 2000 through September 2002, who were free of known cardiovascular disease at baseline. We measured baseline serum 25(OH)D concentrations using a mass spectrometry assay calibrated to established standards. We tested associations of 25(OH)D with adjudicated CHD events assessed through May 2012. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES Primary outcome measure was time to first adjudicated CHD event, defined as myocardial infarction, angina, cardiac arrest, or CHD death. RESULTS During a median follow-up of 8.5 years, 361 participants had an incident CHD event (7.38 events per 1000 person-years). Associations of 25(OH)D with CHD differed by race/ethnicity (P for interaction < .05). After adjustment, lower 25(OH)D concentration was associated with a greater risk of incident CHD among participants who were white (n = 167 events; hazard ratio [HR], 1.26 [95%CI, 1.06–1.49] for each 10-ng/mL decrement in 25(OH)D) or Chinese (HR, 1.67 [95%CI, 1.07–2.61]; n = 27). In contrast, 25(OH)D was not associated with risk of CHD in participants who were black (HR, 0.93 [95%CI, 0.73–1.20]; n = 94) or Hispanic (HR, 1.01 [95%CI, 0.77–1.33]; n = 73). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Lower serum 25(OH)D concentration was associated with an increased risk of incident CHD events among participants who were white or Chinese but not black or Hispanic. Results evaluating 25(OH)D in

  2. Is There Any Association between Use of Smokeless Tobacco Products and Coronary Heart Disease in Bangladesh?

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Muhammad Aziz; Spurrier, Nicola; Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal; Rahman, Mahmudur; Choudhury, Sohel Reza; Leeder, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Background Most epidemiological studies exploring the association between smokeless tobacco (SLT) use and coronary heart disease (CHD) have been in Western populations, and have focused on SLT products used in those countries. Few studies come from South Asian countries. Our objective was to determine the association between SLT use and CHD among non-smoking adults in Bangladesh. Methods A matched case-control study of non-smoking Bangladeshi adults aged 40–75 years was conducted in 2010. Incident cases of CHD were selected from two cardiac hospitals. Community controls, matched to CHD cases, were selected from neighbourhoods, and hospital controls were selected from outpatient departments of the same hospitals. The Rose Angina Questionnaire (RAQ) was also used to re-classify cases and controls. Results The study enrolled 302 cases, 1,208 community controls and 302 hospital controls. Current use was higher among community controls (38%) compared to cases (33%) and hospital controls (32%). Current use of SLT was not significantly associated with an increased risk of CHD when community controls were used (adjusted OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.63–1.19), or when hospital controls were used (adjusted OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.63–1.60), or when both control groups were combined (adjusted OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.74–1.34). Risk of CHD did not increase with use of individual types except gul, frequency, duration, past use of SLT products, or using the RAQ to re-classify cases and controls. There was a significant association between gul use and CHD when both controls were combined (adjusted OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.28–6.70). Conclusions There was no statistically significant association between SLT use in general and CHD among non-smoking adults in Bangladesh. Further research on the association between gul use and CHD in Bangladesh along with SLT use and CHD in other parts of the subcontinent will guide public health policy and interventions that focus on SLT-related diseases. PMID:22276217

  3. Acute Effects of Particulate Air Pollution on the Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaofang; Peng, Li; Kan, Haidong; Wang, Weibing; Geng, Fuhai; Mu, Zhe; Zhou, Ji; Yang, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Evidence based on ecological studies in China suggests that short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiovascular mortality. However, there is less evidence of PM-related morbidity for coronary heart disease (CHD) in China. This study aims to investigate the relationship between acute PM exposure and CHD incidence in people aged above 40 in Shanghai. Methods Daily CHD events during 2005–2012 were identified from outpatient and emergency department visits. Daily average concentrations for particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns (PM10) were collected over the 8-year period. Particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) were measured from 2009 to 2012. Analyses were performed using quasi-poisson regression models adjusting for confounders, including long-term trend, seasonality, day of the week, public holiday and meteorological factors. The effects were also examined by gender and age group (41–65 years, and >65 years). Results There were 619928 CHD outpatient and emergency department visits. The average concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 81.7μg/m3 and 38.6μg/m3, respectively. Elevated exposure to PM10 and PM2.5 was related with increased risk of CHD outpatients and emergency department visits in a short time course. A 10 μg/m3 increase in the 2-day PM10 and PM2.5 was associated with increase of 0.23% (95% CI: 0.12%, 0.34%) and 0.74% (95% CI: 0.44%, 1.04%) in CHD morbidity, respectively. The associations appeared to be more evident in the male and the elderly. Conclusion Short-term exposure to high levels of PM10 and PM2.5 was associated with increased risk of CHD outpatient and emergency department visits. Season, gender and age were effect modifiers of their association. PMID:26942767

  4. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium intake is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). BACKGROUND: Animal and cell studies suggest that magnesium may prevent calcification within atherosclerotic plaques underlying c...

  5. Coronary arteriography and angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.B.; Douglas, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book explores biomedical radiography of the heart. Topics considered include six bench marks in the history of cardiac catheterization; normal coronary anatomy; anomalies of the coronary arteries; pathoanotomy of the coronary arteries and complications; indications, limitations, and risks of coronary arteriography and left ventriculography; catheterization techniques in coronary arteriography and left ventriculography: the Sones technique; catheterization techniques in coronary arteriography and left ventriculography: the Judkins technique; modification of Judkins catheters; catheterization techniques in coronary arteriography and left ventriculography multipurpose technique; new views in coronary arteriography; quantitative evaluation of left ventricular function; complications of coronary arteriography: management during and following the procedure; interpretation of coronary arteriograms and left ventriculograms; prevalence and distribution of disease in patients catheterized for suspected coronary disease at Emory University Hospital; the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory; selection for surgery or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; intracoronary thrombolysis; and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

  6. Do blacks and whites differ in their use of health care for symptoms of coronary heart disease?

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, S L; McGraw, S A; Smith, K W; McKinlay, J B; Pierson, J E

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to identify the role of race in seeking and receipt of care for symptoms of coronary heart disease. METHODS. Data on medical care, sociodemographic characteristics, symptoms, risk factors, income, and insurance were collected in a telephone interview for a random sample of 2030 Black and White adults in inner-city Boston. Rates of care-seeking for symptoms, amounts of delay in seeking care, and rates of receipt of care were compared for Blacks and Whites after adjustment for other characteristics. RESULTS. Before and after adjustment for other factors, Blacks and Whites were equally likely to seek care. Average delay time was shorter for Blacks, particularly Black women. With the exception of a lower rate of referral to cardiologists among Blacks, receipt of care was similar for Blacks and Whites who sought medical attention for symptoms. CONCLUSIONS. In an urban population of Blacks and Whites who were similar in socioeconomic status and access to medical care, there were few racial differences in coronary heart disease-related care patterns. PMID:8203693

  7. Identification of metabolic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetic coronary heart diseases based on metabolomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Gao, Jian; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Qi; Man, Hongxue; Guo, Shuzhen; Wang, Yingfeng; Li, Zhongfeng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic coronary heart disease (T2DM-CHD) is a kind of serious and complex disease. Great attention has been paid to exploring its mechanism; however, the detailed understanding of T2DM-CHD is still limited. Plasma samples from 15 healthy controls, 13 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, 15 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 T2DM-CHD patients were analyzed in this research. The potential biomarkers of CHD and T2DM were detected and screened out by 1H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling and multivariate data analysis. About 11 and 12 representative metabolites of CHD and T2DM were identified respectively, mainly including alanine, arginine, proline, glutamine, creatinine and acetate. Then the diagnostic model was further constructed based on the previous metabolites of CHD and T2DM to detect T2DM-CHD with satisfying sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 93.3% and accuracy of 93.2%, validating the robustness of 1H NMR-based plasma metabolic profiling to diagnostic strategy. The results demonstrated that the NMR-based metabolomics approach processed good performance to identify diagnostic plasma biomarkers and most identified metabolites related to T2DM and CHD could be considered as predictors of T2DM-CHD as well as the therapeutic targets for prevention, which provided new insight into diagnosing and forecasting of complex diseases. PMID:27470195

  8. The Impact of Clinical Pharmacist Support on Patients Receiving Multi-drug Therapy for Coronary Heart Disease in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S J; Zhao, H W; Du, S; Qin, Y H

    2015-01-01

    The study determined pharmacist support on patients receiving multi-drug therapy for coronary heart disease by evaluating patient self-care ability, quality of life, and drug therapy compliance. In this study, ninety patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=45) and a control group (n=45). The control group received conventional clinical care. The experimental group received clinical care plus pharmacist support that included medication review, patient education, lifestyle management, discharge guidance, and telephone follow-up. Eighty-five patients completed the study. Self-care ability and quality of life were evaluated before hospital discharge. The experimental group understood their condition better than the control group (P<0.05), the differences between the groups in understanding treatment goals, drug regimens, lifestyle modifications, psychogenic disorders, and satisfaction evaluations were more pronounced (P<0.01). At six-month follow-up, the difference between the groups in drug therapy compliance was P<0.01, as was success rate by intention-to-treat (77.8% vs. 48.9%) and per-protocol (81.4% vs. 52.4%). Two adverse drug reactions occurred in the experimental group and three in the control group. Pharmacist support improved self-care ability, quality of life, drug therapy compliance, and treatment success rate in coronary heart disease patients.

  9. Morphology characterization and biocompatibility study of PLLA (Poly-L-Llactid-Acid) coating chitosan as stent for coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyanti, Prihartini; Paramadini, Adanti W.; Jabbar, Hajria; Fatimah, Inas; Nisak, Fadila N. K.; Puspitasari, Rahma A.

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a global disease with high urgency. In the severe case of coronary heart disease while a blockage in the coronary arteries reach 75% or more, the patient required stent implantation. Stents are made of metal which has many limitations that can lead to blood clots and stent incompatibility toward the size of the blood vessels. There is a metal stent replacement solution that made from polymer material which is biocompatible. PLLA also has biocompatibility and good mechanical strength. PLLA stent will be coated with chitosan as a candidate for drug-coated stents which is able to work as a drug carrier. The aim of this study is to know the morphology information and biocompability status of PLLA coating chitosan as candidate of heart stent. Morphological results using SEM showed a smooth surface structure which reinforced clinical standard of stent material. Results of cytotoxicity test by MTT Assay method showed that the result of four samples in this experiment living cells is reached 90% which is non toxic and safe to use in the human body. %). The conclusion of this study is PLLA is polymer has potency to be used as stent material.

  10. Chocolate Consumption is Inversely Associated with Calcified Atherosclerotic Plaque in the Coronary Arteries: The NHLBI Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Hopkins, Paul N.; Arnett, Donna K.; Pankow, James S.; Borecki, Ingrid; North, Kari E.; Ellison, R. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims While a diet rich in anti-oxidant has been favorably associated with coronary disease and hypertension, limited data have evaluated the influence of such diet on subclinical disease. Thus, we sought to examine whether chocolate consumption is associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries (CAC). Methods In a cross-sectional design, we studied 2,217 participants of the NHLBI Family Heart Study. Chocolate consumption was assessed by a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire and CAC was measured by cardiac CT. We defined prevalent CAC using an Agatston score of at least 100 and fitted generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence odds ratios of CAC. Results There was an inverse association between frequency of chocolate consumption and prevalent CAC. Odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC were 1.0 (reference), 0.94 (0.66-1.35), 0.78 (0.53-1.13), and 0.68 (0.48-0.97) for chocolate consumption of 0, 1-3 times per month, once per week, and 2+ times per week, respectively (p for trend 0.022), adjusting for age, sex, energy intake, waist-hip ratio, education, smoking, alcohol consumption, ratio of total-to-HDL-cholesterol, non-chocolate candy, and diabetes mellitus. Controlling for additional confounders did not alter the findings. Exclusion of subjects with coronary heart disease or diabetes mellitus did not materially change the odds ratio estimates but did modestly decrease the overall significance (p = 0.07). Conclusions These data suggest that chocolate consumption might be inversely associated with prevalent CAC. PMID:20655129

  11. Association of egg consumption and calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries: the NHLBI Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Jeremy M.; Petrone, Andrew B.; Ellison, R. Curtis; Hunt, Steven C.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Heiss, Gerardo; Arnett, Donna K.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Eggs are a ubiquitous and important source of dietary cholesterol and nutrients, yet their relationship to coronary heart disease (CHD) remains unclear. While some data have suggested a positive association between egg consumption and CHD, especially among diabetic subjects, limited data exist on the influence of egg consumption on subclinical disease. Thus, we sought to examine whether egg consumption is associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries. Methods In a cross-sectional design, we studied 1848 participants of the NHLBI Family Heart Study without known CHD. Egg consumption was assessed by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and coronary-artery calcium (CAC) was measured by cardiac CT. We defined prevalent CAC using an Agatston score of at least 100 and fitted generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence odds ratios of CAC. Results Mean age was 56.5 years and 41% were male. Median consumption of eggs was 1/week. There was no association between frequency of egg consumption and prevalent CAC. Odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC were 1.0 (reference), 0.95 (0.66-1.38), 0.94 (0.63-1.40), and 0.90 (0.57-1.42) for egg consumption of almost never, 1-3 times per month, once per week, and 2+ times per week, respectively (p for trend 0.66), adjusting for age, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, income, field center, total calories, and bacon. Additional control for hypertension and diabetes mellitus, or restricting the analysis to subjects with diabetes mellitus or fasting glucose >126 mg/dL did not alter the findings. Conclusions These data do not provide evidence for an association between egg consumption and prevalent CAC in adult men and women. PMID:25642410

  12. Coping subtypes for men with coronary heart disease: relationship to well-being, stress and Type-A behaviour.

    PubMed

    Denollet, J; De Potter, B

    1992-08-01

    We used cluster analysis to delineate coping subtypes in a sample of 166 men with coronary heart disease who completed the Antwerp out-patient rehabilitation programme. These subtypes were identified on the basis of three well-defined superordinate traits that were selected from a comprehensive taxonomy: negative affectivity, social inhibition, and self-deception. Using Ward's minimum variance method and the cubic clustering criterion, we identified four coping subtypes; low-negative affectivity (N = 48), high-negative affectivity (N = 30), inhibited (N = 62), and repressive (N = 26) individuals. The accuracy of the resulting classification was demonstrated across parallel data sets and was further validated against external, health-related correlates that were not included in the clustering. The identified coping subtypes were significantly related to self-reports of subjective distress/perceived stress, ratings of Type A behaviour and anger-in, return to work, prevalence of chest-pain complaints, and use of minor tranquillizers and sleeping pills. The major findings of this study suggest that (a) male coronary patients represent a heterogeneous population with distinctly different coping subtypes, and that (b) a relatively small number of homogeneous subtypes can account for a substantial amount of variance in subjective well-being, coronary-prone behaviour, and return to work. These findings indicate that psychosomatic research should focus on how superordinate traits interact within individuals and corroborate the appropriateness of a class model to describe coping styles of male coronary patients. It is argued that discrepant findings across studies of Type-A behaviour and hostility may be related to the coping subtypes of the subject sample. Further attempts to cross-validate this classification scheme and to examine its health-related correlates are needed.

  13. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Arrhythmia Congenital Heart Defects Coronary Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease High Blood Pressure Send a link to NHLBI ... with the heart’s structure are present at birth. Heart valve disease . Occurs if one or more of your heart ...

  14. Cardiac mortality is associated with low levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the heart of cadavers with a history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chattipakorn, Nipon; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Petsophonsakul, Petnoi; Suwannahoi, Padiphat; Mahakranukrauh, Pasuk; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2009-10-01

    The benefits of omega-3 (ie, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) and omega-6 (ie, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid [AA]) fatty acids on reducing cardiac mortality are still debated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues are associated with low cardiac mortality in Thai cadavers. One hundred fresh cadavers were examined in this study. The cause of death, history of coronary heart disease (CHD), and fish consumption habits were obtained from death certificates, cadaver medical record profiles, and a questionnaire to a person who lived with the subject before death. In each cadaver, biopsies of cardiac tissues were taken from the interventricular septum for measurement of fatty acid. Of the 100 cadavers (average age, 69 +/- 13 years), 60 were men. The frequency of fish consumption was directly associated with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues (P < .01). History of CHD and cause of death (cardiac vs noncardiac) were not significantly associated with levels of omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids. However, in cadavers with a history of CHD, high levels of omega-3 and omega-6, particularly DHA and AA, were associated with low cardiac mortality (P < .05). Fish consumption is associated with levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues. Although omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are not associated with cardiac mortality in the overall studied population, their low levels (especially DHA and AA) in heart tissues are associated with high cardiac mortality in cadavers with a history of CHD.

  15. Effect of eprosartan-based antihypertensive therapy on coronary heart disease risk assessed by Framingham methodology in Canadian patients: results of the POWER survey

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Robert J; Tremblay, Guy; De Backer, Guy; Gill, Dawn P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/introduction The Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) has identified blood pressure (BP) control as a key target for an overall reduction in cardiovascular disease risk. The POWER survey (Physicians’ Observational Work on Patient Education According to their Vascular Risk) used Framingham methodology to investigate the impact of an angiotensin-receptor-blocker-based regimen on arterial BP and total coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in a subset of patients recruited in Canada. Methods 309 Canadian practices screened for patients with either newly diagnosed or uncontrolled mild/moderate hypertension (sitting systolic blood pressure [SBP] >140 mmHg with diastolic blood pressure [DBP] <110 mmHg). Treatment comprised eprosartan 600 mg/day with add-on antihypertensive therapy after 1 month if required. The primary efficacy variable was change in SBP at 6 months; the secondary variable was the absolute change in the Framingham 10-year CHD risk score. Results 1,385 patients were identified, of whom 1,114 were included in the intention-to-treat (ITT) cohort. Thirty-eight point four percent of ITT patients were managed with monotherapy at 6 months, versus 35.2% and 13.7% with two-drug or multiple-drug therapy, respectively. SBP in the ITT cohort declined 22.4 (standard deviation [SD] 14.8) mmHg and DBP declined 10.5 (SD 10.3) mmHg during that time. The absolute mean Framingham score declined 2.1 (SD 3.1) points with significant age and sex variation (P<0.001) and differences between the various Framingham methods used. Discussion/conclusion Primary care physicians were able to use a strategy of BP lowering and CHD risk assessment to achieve significant reductions in BP and Framingham-assessed CHD risk. The effect size estimate of the different Framingham methods varied noticeably; reasons for those differences warrant further investigation. PMID:24493928

  16. Appearance of adenosine triphosphate in the coronary sinus effluent from isolated working rat heart in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, M G; Forrester, T

    1981-01-01

    1. A working rat heart preparation was used to study the release of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) into the coronary sinus effluent in response to hypoxia. 2. The left ventricle was set to pump against an hydrostatic pressure of 65 cm water; the left atrial filling pressure was kept constant at 10 cm water. The power output of the heart at these pressures was estimated to be approximately one half of the maximum power development. 3. Samples for ATP assay were collected (a) 30 sec before onset of hypoxia, (b) 60-90 sec after onset of hypoxia, (c) 5 min after restoration of oxygenated buffer solution. Respective concentrations of ATP were (nM +/- S.E.) 0.63 (+/- 0.18), 4.70 (+/- 0.39) and 0.63 (+/- 0.06). The total amounts of ATP detected were (p-mole/min) 5.9 (+/- 0.9), 46.1 (+/- 6.0) and 5.5 (+/- 1.2) respectively. 4. Viability of the hearts was judged to be satisfactory on the following grounds. Alterations in left atrial filling pressure produced typical Frank-Starling responses of the left ventricle. Oxygen extraction from the perfusate increased in response to increased workload. Coronary blood flow increased immediately upon introduction of hypoxic conditions and mechanical recovery from hypoxia was always complete within 5 min of restoring oxygen. 5. In view of the marked extracellular ATPase activity it is concluded that significant vasodilatory concentrations of ATP are released into the myocardial extracellular space in response to hypoxia. A scheme is proposed describing the possible role of adenine nucleotides in the local control of myocardial blood flow. PMID:7264990

  17. Rottlerin increases cardiac contractile performance and coronary perfusion through BKCa++ channel activation following cold cardioplegic arrest in isolated hearts

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Richard T; Cordeiro, Brenda; Feng, Jun; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardioplegia and cardiopulmonary bypass(CP/CPB) subjects myocardium to complex injurious stimuli that can result in cardiomyocyte and vascular contractile abnormalities. Rottlerin, originally identified as a PKCδ inhibitor has a number of known additional effects that may be beneficial in the setting of CP/CPB. We tested the hypothesis that rottlerin would mitigate deleterious effects associated with CP/CPB. Methods and Results Langendorff-perfused isolated rat hearts were subjected to 2 hours intermittent cold (10 deg C) cardioplegia (St Thomas II) followed by 30 min normothermic reperfusion. Cardioplegia was delivered every 30 min, for 1 min. Hearts were treated with (CP+R, n=7) or without (CP, n=9) the PKCδ inhibitor, rottlerin (1μM) and/or the BKCa++ channel inhibitor Paxilline (100 nM) supplied in the cardioplegia. Hearts constantly perfused with Krebs-Heinslet buffer served as controls (n=6). Baseline parameters of cardiac function were similar between groups. CP resulted in reduced cardiac function (LVDP:39±3.8%,±dP/dt: 32±4.4%,-41±5.1% decrease compared to baseline). Treatment with 1uM Rottlerin significantly improved CP-induced cardiac function (LVDP: 20±5.9%, ±dP/dt: 5.2 ±4.5%, -11.6 ± 4.7% decrease versus baseline, (p < .05 CP+R vs CP)). Rottlerin also caused a significant increase in coronary flow post reperfusion (CP 34±4.2% decrease from baseline, vs CP+R 26±9.6% increase over baseline, p=.01). Independent of vascular effects, CP significantly decreased isolated myocyte contraction which was restored by rottlerin treatment. The BKCa++ channel inhibitor greatly reduced the majority of beneficial effects associated with Rottlerin. Conclusions Rottlerin significantly improves cardiac performance following cardioplegic arrest via improved cardiomyocyte contraction and coronary perfusion. PMID:21911819

  18. Resting heart rate associates with one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Li; Wang, Cheng-Long; Wang, Pei-Li; Xu, Hao; Du, Jian-Peng; Zhang, Da-Wu; Gao, Zhu-Ye; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Chang-Geng; Chen, Ke-Ji; Shi, Da-Zhuo

    2016-03-01

    The study was to access the association between resting heart rate (RHR) and one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients with ACS after PCI (n = 808) were prospectively followed-up for MACE. RHR was obtained from electrocardiogram. MACE was defined as a composite of cardiac death, nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction, ischemic-driven revascularization, and ischemic stroke. The association between RHR and one-year risk of MACE was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model. Compared with patients with RHR >76 bpm, the adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) was 0.51 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.23-1.14; P = 0.100) for patients with RHR < 61 bpm, and 0.44 (95%CI: 0.23-0.85; P = 0.014) for those with RHR 61-76 bpm. For patients with RHR ≥ 61 bpm, an increase of 10 bpm in RHR was associated with an increase by 38.0% in the risk of MACE (AHR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.04-1.83; P = 0.026). ACS patients after PCI with RHR >76 bpm were at higher risk of MACE during one-year follow-up compared with patients with RHR 61-76 bpm. An elevated RHR ≥ 61 bpm was associated with increased risk of one-year MACE in ACS patients.

  19. Prevalence and Genotypes of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients Underwent Coronary Angiography and