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Sample records for 100 km s-1

  1. Changes in single skinfold thickness in 100 km ultramarathoners

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Beat; Baumgartner, Sabrina; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Bescós, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in single skinfold thickness and body fat have been investigated in ultraswimmers and ultracyclists, but not in ultrarunners. The present study investigated the changes in single skinfold thickness during a 100 km ultramarathon. Methods Firstly, we investigated associations between prerace preparation and prerace body composition and, secondly, changes in single skinfold thickness during a 100 km ultramarathon in 219 male ultramarathoners. Changes in fat mass and skeletal muscle were estimated using anthropometric methods. Results Kilometers run weekly prerace and running speed during training were negatively associated with all skinfold thicknesses (P < 0.05) except for the front thigh skinfold. During the race, skinfold thickness at the pectoral (−0.1%), suprailiac (−1.8%), and calf (−0.8%) sites decreased (P < 0.05). The subjects lost 1.9 ± 1.4 kg of body mass (P < 0.001), 0.7 ± 1.0 kg of estimated skeletal muscle mass (P < 0.001), and 0.2 ± 1.3 kg of estimated fat mass (P < 0.05). The decrease in body mass was positively related to the decrease in both estimated skeletal muscle mass (r = 0.21, P = 0.0017) and estimated fat mass (r = 0.41, P < 0.0001). Conclusion Firstly, prerace fat mass and prerace skinfold thickness were associated with both volume and speed in running training. Secondly, during the ultramarathon, skinfold thickness decreased at the pectoral, suprailiac, and calf sites, but not at the thigh site. Percent decreases in skinfold thickness for ultrarunners was lower than the percent decreases in skinfold thickness reported for ultraswimmers and ultracyclists. PMID:24198597

  2. The Case for a Hubble Constant of 30 km s-1 Mpc-1.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, J G; Blanchard, A; Silk, J; Turner, M S

    1995-02-17

    Although recent determinations of the distance to the Virgo cluster based on Cepheid variable stars represent an important step in pinning down the Hubble constant, after 65 years a definitive determination of the Hubble constant still eludes cosmologists. At present, most of the observational determinations place the Hubble constant between 40 and 90 kilometers per second per megaparsec (km s(-1) Mpc(-1)). The case is made here for a Hubble constant that is even smaller than the lower bound of the accepted range on the basis of the great advantages, all theoretical in nature, of a Hubble constant of around 30 kilometers per second per megaparsec. Such a value for the Hubble cures all of the ills of the current theoretical orthodoxy, that is, a spatially flat universe composed predominantly of cold dark matter. PMID:17811436

  3. The Case for a Hubble Constant of 30 km s-1 Mpc-1.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, J G; Blanchard, A; Silk, J; Turner, M S

    1995-02-17

    Although recent determinations of the distance to the Virgo cluster based on Cepheid variable stars represent an important step in pinning down the Hubble constant, after 65 years a definitive determination of the Hubble constant still eludes cosmologists. At present, most of the observational determinations place the Hubble constant between 40 and 90 kilometers per second per megaparsec (km s(-1) Mpc(-1)). The case is made here for a Hubble constant that is even smaller than the lower bound of the accepted range on the basis of the great advantages, all theoretical in nature, of a Hubble constant of around 30 kilometers per second per megaparsec. Such a value for the Hubble cures all of the ills of the current theoretical orthodoxy, that is, a spatially flat universe composed predominantly of cold dark matter.

  4. Capture of Cometary Dust Grains in Impacts at 6.1 km s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Foster, N.; Kearsley, A.; Wozniakiewicz, P.

    2009-12-01

    The NASA Stardust mission to comet 81P/Wild 2 collected grains of cometary dust freshly ejected from the comet during a fly-by at a speed of 6.1 km s-1. These were captured on aluminum foils and in blocks of silica aerogel. The dust underwent a severe shock during capture. The nature of the shock process depends on the properties of the dust and the collecting media. On the aluminium, the shock process and impact damage is typical of that between high-density (or hard materials) at high velocity, resulting in craters lined with impactor residues. The peak shock pressures are estimated at 60-80 GPa. Two main crater types are seen, simple bowl shaped and multiple pit craters: these reflect the degree of consolidation of the original dust grain. Capture in the low density aerogel was via a more gradual slowing of the dust grains accompanied by a variety of effects on the grains (complete break up of weak grains vs. ablation of well consolidated grains). The relation between the structure of the dust grains and the resulting impact features in both collector materials is discussed.

  5. Cloud-cloud collision in the Galactic center 50 km s-1 molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Masato; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uehara, Kenta

    2015-12-01

    We performed a search of star-forming sites influenced by external factors, such as SNRs, H II regions, and cloud-cloud collisions (CCCs), to understand the star-forming activity in the Galactic center region using the NRO Galactic Center Survey in SiO v = 0, J = 2-1, H13CO+J = 1-0, and CS J = 1-0 emission lines obtained with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We found a half-shell-like feature (HSF) with a high integrated line intensity ratio of ∫TB(SiO v = 0, J = 2-1)dv/∫TB(H13CO+J = 1-0)dv ˜ 6-8 in the 50 km s-1 molecular cloud; the HSF is a most conspicuous molecular cloud in the region and harbors an active star-forming site where several compact H II regions can be seen. The high ratio in the HSF indicates that the cloud contains huge shocked molecular gas. The HSF can be also seen as a half-shell feature in the position-velocity diagram. A hypothesis explaining the chemical and kinetic properties of the HSF is that the feature originates from a CCC. We analyzed the CS J = 1-0 emission line data obtained with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array to reveal the relation between the HSF and the molecular cloud cores in the cloud. We made a cumulative core mass function (CMF) of the molecular cloud cores within the HSF. The CMF in the CCC region is not truncated at least up to ˜2500 M⊙, although the CMF of the non-CCC region reaches the upper limit of ˜1500 M⊙. Most massive molecular cores with Mgas > 750 M⊙ are located only around the ridge of the HSF and adjoin the compact H II region. These may be a sign of massive star formation induced by CCCs in the Galactic center region.

  6. Survival of the Tardigrade Hypsibius Dujardini during Hypervelocity Impact Events up to 5.49 km s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D.

    2014-04-01

    Studies have previously been conducted to verify the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events to test the panspermia and lithopanspermia hypotheses [1, 2]. It has been demonstrated that bacteria survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1], whilst larger, more complex, objects (such as seeds) break up at ~1 km s-1 [2]. The survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 has also recently been shown [3]. Previous work by the authors demonstrated the survivability of Nannochloropsis Oculata Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone' (sunlit surface layers of oceans [4]), at impact velocities up to 6.07 km s-1 [5]. Other groups have also reported that lichens are able to survive shocks in similar pressure ranges [6]. However, whilst many simple single celled organisms have now been shown to survive such impacts (and the associated pressures) as those encountered during the migration of material from one planet to another [1, 3, 5], complex multicellular organisms have either largely not been tested or, those that have been, have not survived the process [2]. Hypsibius dujardini, like most species of tardigrade, are complex organisms composed of approximately 40,000 cells [7]. When humidity decreases they enter a highly dehydrated state known as a 'tun' and can survive extreme temperatures (as low as - 253°C or as high as 151°C), as well as exposure to Xrays and the vacuum of space [7]. Here we test the shock survivability of Hypsibius dujardini by firing a nylon projectile onto a frozen sample of water containing frozen tardigrades using a light gas gun (LGG) [8]. The recovered ice and water were then analysed under an optical microscope to check the viability of any remnant organisms that may have survived impact, and the pressures generated.

  7. Survival of yeast spores in hypervelocity impact events up to velocities of 7.4 km s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M. C.; Solscheid, C.; Burchell, M. J.; Josse, L.; Adamek, N.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the survivability in hypervelocity impacts of yeast in spore form, and as mature cultures, at impact velocities from 1 to 7.4 km s-1, corresponding to an estimated peak shock pressure of ˜43 GPa. Spores from a yeast strain (BY4743), deficient in an enzyme required for uracil production, were fired into water (to simulate oceanic impact from space) using a light gas gun. The water was then retrieved and filtered and the resulting retentate and filtrate cultured to determine viability and survival rates of remnant spores. Yeast growth (confirmed as coming from the original sample as it had the same enzyme deficiency) was found in recovered samples at all impact speeds, albeit in smaller quantities at the higher speeds. The survival probabilities were measured as ˜50% at 1 km s-1, falling to ˜10-3% at 7.4 km s-1. This follows the pattern observed in previous work on survival of microbial life and spores exposed to extreme shock loading, where there is reasonable survival at low peak shock pressures with more severe lethality above a critical shock pressure at the GPa scale (here between 2 and 10 GPa). These results are explained in the context of a general model for survival against extreme shock and are relevant to the hypotheses of panspermia and litho-panspermia, showing that extreme shocks during transfer across space are not necessarily sterilising.

  8. Effects of training and anthropometric factors on marathon and 100 km ultramarathon race performance

    PubMed Central

    Tanda, Giovanni; Knechtle, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Background Marathon (42 km) and 100 km ultramarathon races are increasing in popularity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential associations of anthropometric and training variables with performance in these long-distance running competitions. Methods Training and anthropometric data from a large cohort of marathoners and 100 km ultramarathoners provided the basis of this work. Correlations between training and anthropometric indices of subjects and race performance were assessed using bivariate and multiple regression analyses. Results A combination of volume and intensity in training was found to be suitable for prediction of marathon and 100 km ultramarathon race pace. The relative role played by these two variables was different, in that training volume was more important than training pace for the prediction of 100 km ultramarathon performance, while the opposite was found for marathon performance. Anthropometric characteristics in terms of body fat percentage negatively affected 42 km and 100 km race performance. However, when this factor was relatively low (ie, less than 15% body fat), the performance of 42 km and 100 km races could be predicted solely on the basis of training indices. Conclusion Mean weekly training distance run and mean training pace were key predictor variables for both marathon and 100 km ultramarathon race performance. Predictive correlations for race performance are provided for runners with a relatively low body fat percentage. PMID:25995653

  9. 500 km unrepeatered 200 Gbit·s-1 transmission over a G.652-compliant ultra-low loss fiber only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainov, V. V.; Gurkin, N. V.; Lukinih, S. N.; Shikhaliev, I. I.; Skvortsov, P. I.; Makovejs, S.; Akopov, S. G.; Ten, S. Y.; Nanii, O. E.; Treshchikov, V. N.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we experimentally demonstrate 200 Gb·s-1 (2  ×  100 G) unrepeatered transmission over 502.1 km using a dual polarization quadrature phase-shift-keyed (DP-QPSK) format and real-time processing. Such ultra-long distance is enabled by the use of high-performance 100 G DP-QPSK transponders (the required optical signal-to-noise ratio is 12 dB), Corning® SMF-28® ULL fiber (the average attenuation of the spools used in this experiment ~0.160 dB km-1), and optimization of remotely pumped optical amplifiers, bidirectional Raman amplifiers, and dispersion precompensation.

  10. Compilation of known and suspected Quaternary faults within 100 km of Yucca Mountain, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Piety, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    Geologic data have been compiled for known and suspected Quaternary faults in southern Nevada and southeastern California within about 100 km of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. The data set includes regional studies that attempt to identify and evaluate lineaments, scraps, and other possible tectonic landforms of possible Quaternary age, detailed studies that focus on a single fault, and geologic studies that were completed for purposes other than evaluation of Quaternary fault activity. Studies included in this compilation are those that were available as of December 1993. Faults that have known or suspected Quaternary activity are presented on a topographic base map at a scale of 1:250,000. Data for each fault that are pertinent to the assessment of future faulting and earthquake events are assembled on description sheets and summarized on tables. This compilation identifies ten faults within 50 km of the site but outside the site area and an additional fourteen faults between 50 km and 100 km of the site for which evidence for Holocene or late Pleistocene surface rupture has been reported in the literature. The longest and most continuous of these faults is the northwest-striking, 250-km-long Furnace Creek fault (including its possible extension into Fish Lake Valley), which is located about 50 km west of the site. In addition to identifying known or suspected Quaternary faults within about 100 km of the site, this compilation demonstrates the lack of information for most of these faults.

  11. Silicon ions below 100 km - A case for SiO2/+/. [during meteoroid shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation regarding the occurrence of Si ions is conducted, taking into account an unusual metal ion structure observed during a meteor shower event. Loss processes involving silicon oxides are considered in connection with a study of the reasons for the unique Si(+) distribution found. It is suggested that below 100 km Si(+) is rapidly depleted by two- and three-body reactions with molecular oxygen, forming SiO2(+) which then recombines.

  12. A faster running speed is associated with a greater body weight loss in 100-km ultra-marathoners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Wirth, Andrea; Alexander Rüst, Christoph; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In 219 recreational male runners, we investigated changes in body mass, total body water, haematocrit, plasma sodium concentration ([Na(+)]), and urine specific gravity as well as fluid intake during a 100-km ultra-marathon. The athletes lost 1.9 kg (s = 1.4) of body mass, equal to 2.5% (s = 1.8) of body mass (P < 0.001), 0.7 kg (s = 1.0) of predicted skeletal muscle mass (P < 0.001), 0.2 kg (s = 1.3) of predicted fat mass (P < 0.05), and 0.9 L (s = 1.6) of predicted total body water (P < 0.001). Haematocrit decreased (P < 0.001), urine specific gravity (P < 0.001), plasma volume (P < 0.05), and plasma [Na(+)] (P < 0.05) all increased. Change in body mass was related to running speed (r = -0.16, P < 0.05), change in plasma volume was associated with change in plasma [Na(+)] (r = -0.28, P < 0.0001), and change in body mass was related to both change in plasma [Na(+)] (r = -0.36) and change in plasma volume (r = 0.31) (P < 0.0001). The athletes consumed 0.65 L (s = 0.27) fluid per hour. Fluid intake was related to both running speed (r = 0.42, P < 0.0001) and change in body mass (r = 0.23, P = 0.0006), but not post-race plasma [Na(+)] or change in plasma [Na(+)] (P > 0.05). In conclusion, faster runners lost more body mass, runners lost more body mass when they drank less fluid, and faster runners drank more fluid than slower runners. PMID:22668199

  13. The influence of performance level, age and gender on pacing strategy during a 100-km ultramarathon.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Andrew; Crivoi do Carmo, Everton; Martin, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the influence of performance level, age and gender on pacing during a 100-km ultramarathon. Results of a 100-km race incorporating the World Masters Championships were used to identify differences in relative speeds in each 10-km segment between participants finishing in the first, second, third and fourth quartiles of overall positions (Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively). Similar analyses were performed between the top and bottom 50% of finishers in each age category, as well as within male and female categories. Pacing varied between athletes achieving different absolute performance levels. Group 1 ran at significantly lower relative speeds than all other groups in the first three 10-km segments (all P < 0.01), and significantly higher relative speeds than Group 4 in the 6th and 10th (both P < 0.01), and Group 2 in the 8th (P = 0.04). Group 4 displayed significantly higher relative speeds than Group 2 and 3 in the first three segments (all P < 0.01). Overall strategies remained consistent across age categories, although a similar phenomenon was observed within each category whereby 'top' competitors displayed lower relative speeds than 'bottom' competitors in the early stages, but higher relative speeds in the later stages. Females showed lower relative starting speeds and higher finishing speeds than males. 'Top' and 'bottom' finishing males displayed differing strategies, but this was not the case within females. Although pacing remained consistent across age categories, it differed with level of performance within each, possibly suggesting strategies are anchored on direct competitors. Strategy differs between genders and differs depending on performance level achieved in males but not females. PMID:26034882

  14. Spatially Explicit Modelling of the Belgian Major Endurance Event ‘The 100 km Dodentocht’

    PubMed Central

    Van Nieuland, Steffie; Baetens, Jan M.; De Baets, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    ‘The 100 km Dodentocht’, which takes place annually and has its start in Bornem, Belgium, is a long distance march where participants have to cover a 100 km trail in at most 24 hours. The approximately 11 000 marchers per edition are tracked by making use of passive radio-frequency-identification (RFID). These tracking data were analyzed to build a spatially explicit marching model that gives insights into the dynamics of the event and allows to evaluate the effect of changes in the starting procedure of the event. For building the model, the empirical distribution functions (edf) of the marching speeds at every section of the trail in between two consecutive checkpoints and of the checkpoints where marchers retire, are determined, taking into account age, gender, and marching speeds at previous sections. These distribution functions are then used to sample the consecutive speeds and retirement, and as such to simulate the times when individual marchers pass by the consecutive checkpoints. We concluded that the data-driven model simulates the event reliably. Furthermore, we tested three scenarios to reduce the crowdiness along the first part of the trail and in this way were able to conclude that either the start should be moved to a location outside the town center where the streets are at least 25% wider, or that the marchers should start in two groups at two different locations, and that these groups should ideally merge at about 20 km after the start. The crowdiness at the start might also be reduced by installing a bottleneck at the start in order to limit the number of marchers that can pass per unit of time. Consequently, the operating hours of the consecutive checkpoints would be longer. The developed framework can likewise be used to analyze and improve the operation of other endurance events if sufficient tracking data are available. PMID:27764202

  15. Modes of zonal mean temperature variability 20-100 km from the TIMED/SABER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Sheng, Z.; Shi, H. Q.

    2014-03-01

    In this study we investigate the spatial variabilities of the zonal mean temperature (20-100 km) from the TIMED (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics)/SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) satellite using the empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). After removing the climatological annual mean, the first three EOFs are able to explain 87.0% of temperature variabilities. The primary EOF represents 74.1% of total anomalies and is dominated by the north-south contrast. Patterns in the second and third EOFs are related to the semiannual oscillations (SAO) and mesospheric temperature inversions (MTI), respectively. The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) component is also decomposed into the seventh EOF with contributions of 1.2%. Last, we use the first three modes and annual mean temperature to reconstruct the data. The result shows small differences are in low latitude, which increase with latitude in the middle stratosphere and upper mesosphere.

  16. Lower thermosphere (80-100 km) dynamics response to solar and geomagnetic activity: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazimirovsky, E. S.

    1989-01-01

    The variations of solar and geomagnetic activity may affect the thermosphere circulation via plasma heating and electric fields, especially at high latitudes. The possibility exists that the energy involved in auroral and magnetic storms can produce significant changes of mesosphere and lower thermosphere wind systems. A study of global radar measurements of winds at 80 to 100 km region revealed the short term effects (correlation between wind field and geomagnetic storms) and long term variations over a solar cycle. It seems likely that the correlation results from a modification of planetary waves and tides propagated from below, thus altering the dynamical regime of the thermosphere. Sometimes the long term behavior points rather to a climatic variation with the internal atmospheric cause than to a direct solar control.

  17. Microprobe Evaluations of Grain Boundary Segregation in KM4 and IN100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Smith, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Turbine disk alloys subjected to fatigue cycles with dwells at high temperatures and stresses can fail by cracking along grain boundaries. This could be due to concentrated creep deformation or environmental attack at grain boundaries. It would be important to identify any chemical segregation along grain boundaries to aid understanding of this intergranular failure mode. The objective of this study was to evaluate the degree of chemical segregation present at the grain boundaries of two disk alloys, KM4 and IN 100. An electron microprobe employing wavelength dispersive x-ray chemical analyses was used to characterize the chemistry along multiple grain boundaries in metallographically prepared samples of each alloy. Some degrees of boron, chromium, and cobalt enrichment of grain boundaries were observed in each alloy.

  18. Status Update Report for the Peregrine 100km Sounding Rocket Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Jonny; Zilliac, Greg; Doran, Eric; Marzona, Mark Thadeus; Lohner, Kevin; Karlik, Evan; Cantwell, Brian; Karabeyoglu, Arif

    2008-01-01

    The Peregrine Sounding Rocket Program is a joint basic research program of NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Wallops, Stanford University and the Space Propulsion Group, Inc. (SPG). The goal is to determine the applicability of liquifying hybrid technology to a small launch system. The approach is to design, build, test and y a stable, efficient liquefying fuel hybrid rocket vehicle to an altitude of 100 km. The program was kicked o in October of 2006 and has seen considerable progress in the subsequent 18 months. Two virtually identical vehicles will be constructed and own out of the NASA Sounding Rocket Facility at Wallops Island. This paper presents the current status of the project as of June 2008. For background on the project, the reader is referred to last year's paper.

  19. Patterns of Mass Mortality among Rocky Shore Invertebrates across 100 km of Northeastern Pacific Coastline.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Laura J; Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Raimondi, Peter T; Schiebelhut, Lauren M; Dawson, Michael N; Grosberg, Richard K; Gaylord, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Mass mortalities in natural populations, particularly those that leave few survivors over large spatial areas, may cause long-term ecological perturbations. Yet mass mortalities may remain undocumented or poorly described due to challenges in responding rapidly to unforeseen events, scarcity of baseline data, and difficulties in quantifying rare or patchily distributed species, especially in remote or marine systems. Better chronicling the geographic pattern and intensity of mass mortalities is especially critical in the face of global changes predicted to alter regional disturbance regimes. Here, we couple replicated post-mortality surveys with preceding long-term surveys and historical data to describe a rapid and severe mass mortality of rocky shore invertebrates along the north-central California coast of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In late August 2011, formerly abundant intertidal populations of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a well-known ecosystem engineer), and the predatory six-armed sea star (Leptasterias sp.) were functionally extirpated from ~100 km of coastline. Other invertebrates, including the gumboot chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), and subtidal populations of purple sea urchins also exhibited elevated mortality. The pattern and extent of mortality suggest the potential for long-term population, community, and ecosystem consequences, recovery from which may depend on the different dispersal abilities of the affected species.

  20. No fluid overload in male ultra-runners during a 100 km ultra-run.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Senn, Oliver; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Joleska, Irena; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the change in body composition and hydration status in 27 male ultra-runners during a 100 km ultra-run. The athletes drank fluids ad libitum during the run; intake of calories, fluids, and electrolytes during performance were determined. Body mass decreased by 1.9 kg, haematocrit decreased, plasma [Na(+)] remained unchanged, and urinary specific gravity and plasma volume increased. Fluid intake was 0.52 (0.18) L/h and was related to running speed (r = 0.50; p = 0.0081). Δ body mass was associated with total fluid intake during the race (r = 0.49, p = 0.0095). Sodium intake amounted to 425 (478) mg/h and potassium intake to 140 (179) mg/h. Sodium and potassium intake were not related to either postrace concentration or change in plasma concentration. Sodium intake, however, was related to Δ urinary sodium concentration (r = 0.45, p = 0.0227). The increase in plasma volume was significantly and negatively related to both postrace plasma [Na(+)] (r = - 0.42, p = 0.0278) and the postrace potassium-to-sodium ratio in urine (r = - 0.44, p = 0.0218). To conclude, we found no fluid overload in these ultra-runners, the increase in plasma volume was most probably due to a stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) since sodium intake was not related to both the change in plasma [Na(+)] or postrace plasma [Na(+)]. PMID:21253973

  1. Influence of a 100-km ultra-marathon on hepatitis B carrier runners.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Y-H; Hou, S-K; How, C-K; Li, L-H; Kao, W-F; Yang, C-C; Chou, S-L; Shiau, Y-T S; Lam, C; Chen, R-J

    2013-09-01

    This study compares the serological markers between runners who are hepatitis B virus carries (HBVc) and runners who are non-HBVc in a 100-km ultra-marathon race. Blood samples of 8 HBVc and 18 non-HBVc runners were drawn 1 week before, immediately following, and 24 h after the race. Samples were analyzed and compared between the 2 groups for liver function tests, muscle damage markers and oxidative stress cytokines. For HBVc runners, HBV-DNA (hepatitis B virus-deoxyribonucleic acid) levels were also evaluated for virus reactivation. The results demonstrate a statistically significant increase in both immediate and 24-h post-race values for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), compared with pre-race values. No statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups for the values of AST, LDH, CK, hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α either before or after the race. There was also no statistically significant change in the levels of HBV-DNA in HBVc runners. These findings suggest that HBVc runners do not have higher risks of liver function impairment, muscle breakdown and inflammatory response compared to non-HBVc runners in such endurance races. PMID:23444084

  2. Patterns of Mass Mortality among Rocky Shore Invertebrates across 100 km of Northeastern Pacific Coastline.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Laura J; Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Raimondi, Peter T; Schiebelhut, Lauren M; Dawson, Michael N; Grosberg, Richard K; Gaylord, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Mass mortalities in natural populations, particularly those that leave few survivors over large spatial areas, may cause long-term ecological perturbations. Yet mass mortalities may remain undocumented or poorly described due to challenges in responding rapidly to unforeseen events, scarcity of baseline data, and difficulties in quantifying rare or patchily distributed species, especially in remote or marine systems. Better chronicling the geographic pattern and intensity of mass mortalities is especially critical in the face of global changes predicted to alter regional disturbance regimes. Here, we couple replicated post-mortality surveys with preceding long-term surveys and historical data to describe a rapid and severe mass mortality of rocky shore invertebrates along the north-central California coast of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In late August 2011, formerly abundant intertidal populations of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a well-known ecosystem engineer), and the predatory six-armed sea star (Leptasterias sp.) were functionally extirpated from ~100 km of coastline. Other invertebrates, including the gumboot chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), and subtidal populations of purple sea urchins also exhibited elevated mortality. The pattern and extent of mortality suggest the potential for long-term population, community, and ecosystem consequences, recovery from which may depend on the different dispersal abilities of the affected species. PMID:26039349

  3. Patterns of Mass Mortality among Rocky Shore Invertebrates across 100 km of Northeastern Pacific Coastline

    PubMed Central

    Jurgens, Laura J.; Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Raimondi, Peter T.; Schiebelhut, Lauren M.; Dawson, Michael N.; Grosberg, Richard K.; Gaylord, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Mass mortalities in natural populations, particularly those that leave few survivors over large spatial areas, may cause long-term ecological perturbations. Yet mass mortalities may remain undocumented or poorly described due to challenges in responding rapidly to unforeseen events, scarcity of baseline data, and difficulties in quantifying rare or patchily distributed species, especially in remote or marine systems. Better chronicling the geographic pattern and intensity of mass mortalities is especially critical in the face of global changes predicted to alter regional disturbance regimes. Here, we couple replicated post-mortality surveys with preceding long-term surveys and historical data to describe a rapid and severe mass mortality of rocky shore invertebrates along the north-central California coast of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. In late August 2011, formerly abundant intertidal populations of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a well-known ecosystem engineer), and the predatory six-armed sea star (Leptasterias sp.) were functionally extirpated from ~100 km of coastline. Other invertebrates, including the gumboot chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus), and subtidal populations of purple sea urchins also exhibited elevated mortality. The pattern and extent of mortality suggest the potential for long-term population, community, and ecosystem consequences, recovery from which may depend on the different dispersal abilities of the affected species. PMID:26039349

  4. Dynamic plumbing systems along the 100 km long Arctic Vestnesa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Buenz, Stefan; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Mienert, Jurgen; Chand, Shyam; Johnson, Joel; Greinert, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Vestnesa is a ridge-like contour-current controlled sediment succession that lies above young oceanic crust created during the tectonic opening of Fram Strait. It is surrounded by the Molloy transform fault to the southwest, the Molloy deep to the north-west, the Knipovich oceanic ridge to the south-east, and the continental margin of Svalbard to the northeast. Although interrupted in places, a mostly continuous bottom simulating reflector (BSR), the seismic indicator for the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), extends for tens of kilometers from the crest of the ridge towards its northern and southern flanks. High-resolution P-Cable 2D seismic data show vertical fluid migration pathways, distributed in clusters along the 100 km long ridge, connecting the free gas system beneath the GHSZ through a 160-180 m thick hydrate stability zone to seabed pockmarks at the crest of the ridge. Among these clusters only those lying towards the easternmost end of the ridge have been documented to be periodically active in terms of present-day seafloor gas seepage. The methane release activity shows particularly well on 18 kHz echosounder data over a time period from 2008 to 2013. Gas hydrates have been recovered in shallow sediment cores (<6 mbsf) at the active seafloor seepage site. Gas analyses show heavier gases in addition to methane, as a hydrate-forming gas. Within the framework of CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate, we are investigating the development of the plumbing systems of the Arctic Vestnesa Ridge in space and time domains. We compare the modeled base of the GHSZ for different gas compositions against the depth of the BSR in the region and discuss the elements of fluid migration systems that could explain observed lateral changes in BSR depths and the switching between active and inactive plumbing systems. The Centre of Excellence is funded by the Norwegian Research Council (grant No. 223259) over a period of ten years.

  5. Herschel HIFI observations of the Sgr A +50 km s-1 Cloud. Deep searches for O2 in emission and foreground absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandqvist, Aa.; Larsson, B.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Encrenaz, P.; Gerin, M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Lis, D. C.; Liseau, R.; Pagani, L.; Roueff, E.; Viti, S.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The Herschel Oxygen Project (HOP) is an open time key program, awarded 140 h of observing time to search for molecular oxygen (O2) in a number of interstellar sources. To date O2 has definitely been detected in only two sources, namely ρ Oph A and Orion, reflecting the extremely low abundance of O2 in the interstellar medium. Aims: One of the sources in the HOP program is the +50 km s-1 Cloud in the Sgr A Complex in the centre of the Milky Way. Its environment is unique in the Galaxy and this property is investigated to see if it is conducive to the presence of O2. Methods: The Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) is used to search for the 487 and 774 GHz emission lines of O2. Results: No O2 emission is detected towards the Sgr A +50 km s-1 Cloud, but a number of strong emission lines of methanol (CH3OH) and absorption lines of chloronium (H2Cl+) are observed. Conclusions: A 3σ upper limit for the fractional abundance ratio of [O2]/[H2] in the Sgr A +50 km s-1 Cloud is found to be X(O2) ≤ 5 × 10-8. However, since we can find no other realistic molecular candidate than O2 itself, we very tentatively suggest that two weak absorption lines at 487.261 and 487.302 GHz may be caused by the 487 GHz line of O2 in two foreground spiral arm clouds. By considering that the absorption may only be apparent, the estimated upper limit to the O2 abundance of ≤ (10-20) × 10-6 in these foreground clouds is very high, as opposed to the upper limit in the Sgr A +50 km s-1 Cloud itself, but similar to what has been reached in recent chemical shock models for Orion. This abundance limit was determined also using Odin non-detection limits, and assumes that O2 fills the beam. If the absorption is due to a differential Herschel OFF-ON emission, the O2 fractional abundance may be of the order of ≈ (5-10) × 10-6. With the assumption of pure absorption by foreground clouds, the unreasonably high abundance of (1.4-2.8) × 10-4 was obtained. The

  6. Neutral hydrogen flux measured at 100- to 200-km altitude in an electron aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Anderson, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen fluxes were measured at altitudes of 120-200 km by a rocket payload that also measured electron and proton fluxes and vector magnetic fields. An intense electron arc was crossed, while an upper limit to the flux of 0.5- to 20-keV protons was 1,000,000 per sq cm s sr keV. A neutral flux of 50,000,000 per sq cm s sr was observed, assuming hydrogen with greater than 1-keV energy, with greater north-south extent than the electron flux. Its pitch angle distribution was peaked toward 90 deg, tending toward isotropy in the center. This is fitted to a model describing spreading of an initial proton arc above 500 km.

  7. Extending the Purple Crow Lidar Temperature Climatology Above 100 km Altitude Using an Inversion Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, A.; Sica, R. J.; Argall, S.; McCullough, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature retrievals from Rayleigh-scattering lidar measurements have been performed using the algorithm given by Chanin and Hauchecorne (1980; henceforth CH) for the last 3 decades. Recently Khanna et al. have presented an inversion approach to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles. This method uses a nonlinear inversion method with a Monte Carlo technique to determine the statistical uncertainties for the retrieved nightly average temperature profiles. Using this approach, Purple Crow Lidar temperature profiles can now be extended 10 km higher in altitude compared to those calculated with the CH method, with reduced systematic uncertainty. Argall and Sica (2007) used the CH method to produce a climatology of the Purple Crow Lidar measurements from 1994 to 2004 which was compared with the CIRA-86 model. The CH method integrates temperatures downward, and requires the assumption of a 'seed' pressure at the highest altitude, taken from a model. Geophysical variation here, in the lower thermosphere, is sufficiently large to cause temperature retrievals to be unreliable for the top 10 or more km; uncertainties due to this pressure assumption cause the top two scale heights of temperatures from each profile to be discarded until the retrieval is no longer sensitive to the seed pressure. Khanna et al. (2012) use an inversion approach which allows the corrected lidar photocount profile to be integrated upward, as opposed to downward as required by the CH method. Khanna et al. (2012) showed that seeding the retrieval at the lowest instead of top height allows a much smaller uncertainty in the contribution of the seed pressure to the temperature compared to integrating from the top of the profile. Two other benefits to seeding the retrieval at the lower altitudes (around 30 km) include reduced geophysical variability, and the availability of routine pressure measurements from radiosondes. This presentation will show an extension of the Khanna et al. (2012) comparison

  8. Mean zonal acceleration and heating of the 70- to 100-km region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, S.; Portnyagin, Yu.I.; Forbes, J.M. ); Solovjeva, T.V. )

    1991-02-01

    The dynamical interactions which occur in the atmospheric region around the mesopause ({approximately} 90 km) determine the boundary characteristics for the thermospheric region above. In the present work, using an empirical model of Eulerian-mean meridional motions based on monthly climatological winds from these radar data, the net vertical motions in this atmospheric regime are derived from the continuity equation. Assuming empirical prescriptions of the mean density and temperature fields, mean heat flux divergences and momentum flux divergences are estimated which exhibit very specific characteristics in the height versus latitude domain for winter, summer, and equinox conditions in both hemispheres. A numerical circulation model including gravity wave/mean flow and tide/mean flow interactions is utilized to examine possible origins of these heat and acceleration sources. At low latitudes ({le}30{degree}), it is evident that atmospheric tides represent the primary wave source contribution to zonal mean acceleration and heating of this region of the atmosphere; similarly, at middle and high latitudes ({ge}30{degree}) below about 90 km, dissipation of vertically propagating gravity waves appears to provide the dominant momentum source for the mean zonal circulation. However, above approximately 90 km and between about 40{degree} and 70{degree} latitude, very significant regions of mean heating and acceleration exist which are not accounted for by the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves and tides. The possible origins of these effects are examined. The authors suggest that the two most likely candidates to explain these observed features are (1) obliquely propagating gravity waves and/or (2) planetary scale waves.

  9. Increase of Total Body Water with Decrease of Body Mass while Running 100 km Nonstop--Formation of Edema?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether ultraendurance runners in a 100-km run suffer a decrease of body mass and whether this loss consists of fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, or total body water. Male ultrarunners were measured pre- and postrace to determine body mass, fat mass, and skeletal muscle mass by using the anthropometric method. In addition,…

  10. Record 500 km unrepeatered 1 Tbit/s (10 x 100 G) transmission over an ultra-low loss fiber.

    PubMed

    Gainov, Vladimir; Gurkin, Nikolay; Lukinih, Sergey; Makovejs, Sergejs; Akopov, Sergey; Ten, Sergey; Nanii, Oleg; Treshchikov, Vladimir; Sleptsov, Mikhail

    2014-09-22

    In this work we experimentally demonstrate 1 Tbit/s (10 x 100 Gbit/s) unrepeatered transmission over 500.5 km using dual polarization quadrature phase shift keyed (DP-QPSK) format and real-time processing. Such ultra-long distance is enabled by the use of high-performance 100G DP-QPSK transponders (the required optical signal-to-noise ratio is 12 dB), ultra-low loss Corning SMF-28 ULL fiber (the average attenuation of the spools used in this experiment <0.160 dB/km), and optimization of remotely-pumped optical amplifiers. To the best of our knowledge this is the longest unrepeatered 100G-based 1 Tb/s WDM transmission distance reported to date. PMID:25321702

  11. Gravity-gradient measurements down to approximately 100-km height by means of long-tethered satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Grossi, M. D.; Weiffenbach, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    Long-tethered satellite systems for Shuttle flights would make measurements of the earth's gravitational field possible to a spatial resolution approaching 100 km. For instance, a subsatellite carrying a gravity gradiometer could be made to orbit at a height of 110 km by means of a 110-km tether tied to the Shuttle in a 220-km orbit. Even with an overall instrument sensitivity as poor as 1 Eotvos unit (e.u.), it would be possible to measure spatial wavelengths of approximately 600 to 700 km (i.e., harmonics of 80th to 70th degree). Also, a system of two satellites (one of which could be the Shuttle orbiter or one of its payloads) connected by a tether a few tens of kilometers long could provide a simple and sensitive means of detecting gravity anomalies characterized by wavelengths of a few hundred kilometers. In this system, the observable would be the mechanical tension on the tether, and a sensitivity up to 0.01 e.u. could be attained, provided the two satellites are tracked from the ground with sufficient accuracy.

  12. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation during a 100-km ultra-marathon--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Mrazek, Claudia; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Ballmer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-marathon running is supposed to increase the parameters of skeletal muscle damage and impair renal function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of branched-chain amino acid supplementation on skeletal muscle damage and renal function during a 100-km ultra-marathon. Twenty-eight athletes were randomly divided into two groups, one group using branched-chain amino acid supplementation (BCAA) and a control group (CON). The athletes in the BCAA group were supplemented with a total of 50 g of an amino acid concentrate including 20 g of BCAA. The intake of energy, antioxidants and parameters of both skeletal muscle damage and renal function were determined. Race time was not different between BCAA and CON when controlled for the personal best time in a 100-km ultra-marathon. Neither the intake of energy and antioxidants nor the parameters of skeletal muscle damage and renal function were different between BCAA and CON. We concluded that BCAA-supplementation before and during a 100-km ultra-marathon had no effect on performance, skeletal muscle damage or renal function. PMID:23007065

  13. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation during a 100-km ultra-marathon--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Mrazek, Claudia; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Ballmer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-marathon running is supposed to increase the parameters of skeletal muscle damage and impair renal function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of branched-chain amino acid supplementation on skeletal muscle damage and renal function during a 100-km ultra-marathon. Twenty-eight athletes were randomly divided into two groups, one group using branched-chain amino acid supplementation (BCAA) and a control group (CON). The athletes in the BCAA group were supplemented with a total of 50 g of an amino acid concentrate including 20 g of BCAA. The intake of energy, antioxidants and parameters of both skeletal muscle damage and renal function were determined. Race time was not different between BCAA and CON when controlled for the personal best time in a 100-km ultra-marathon. Neither the intake of energy and antioxidants nor the parameters of skeletal muscle damage and renal function were different between BCAA and CON. We concluded that BCAA-supplementation before and during a 100-km ultra-marathon had no effect on performance, skeletal muscle damage or renal function.

  14. Transmission of 100 Gb/s coherent PDM-QPSK over 16 x 100 km of standard fiber with allerbium amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Renaudier, J; Charlet, G; Bertran-Pardo, O; Mardoyan, H; Tran, P; Salsi, M; Bigo, S

    2009-03-30

    We report on the performance of 100 Gb/s coherent non return-to- zero (NRZ-) polarization division multiplexed (PDM-) quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) transmission over 16 x 100 km of standard single mode fibre under constraints of typical transparent terrestrial networks, employing Erbium-Doped Fibre Amplifiers. We first evaluate the impact of cross non linear effects onto the performance of 100 Gb/s coherent PDM-QPSK signals and we investigate the impact of shifting one of the polarization multiplexed tributaries by half a symbol duration with respect to the other one. Finally we show that this solution is robust against channel-to-channel cross-talk from transparent nodes and does not suffer from performance degradation stemming from co-propagating 40 Gb/s channels.

  15. Modeling Relativistic Electron Precipitation Bremsstrahlung X-Ray Intensities at 10-100 km Manned Vehicle Altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash Krause, L.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Nishikawa, K.; Williams, A.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events occur when beams or bunches of relativistic electrons of magnetospheric origin enter the Earth's atmosphere, typically at auroral latitudes. REP events are associated with a variety of space weather effects, including production of transitional and bremsstrahlung radiation, catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone, and scintillation of transionospheric radio waves. This study examines the intensities of x-rays produced at airliner, manned balloon, and suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV) altitudes. The monoenergetic beam is modeled in cylindrical symmetry using the paraxial ray equation. Bremsstrahlung photon production is calculated using the traditional Sauter-Elwert cross-section, providing x-ray emission spectra differential in energy and angle. Attenuation is computed for a plane-stratified standard atmosphere, and the loss processes include photoionization, Rayleigh and Compton scattering, electron-positron pair production, and photonuclear interaction. Peak altitudes of electron energy deposition and bremsstrahlung x-ray production were calculated for beams of energies from 1 MeV through 100 MeV. The altitude peak of bremsstrahlung deposition was consistently and significantly lower that that of the electron deposition due to the longer mean free paths of x-rays compared to electrons within the atmosphere. For example, for a nadir-directed monoenergetic 5 MeV beam, the peak deposition altitude was calculated to be 42 km, but the resulting bremmstrahlung deposition peaked at 25 km. This has implications for crew and passenger safety, especially with the growth of the space tourism industry that relies on sRLVs with a nominal apogee of 100 km. A survey of results covering the 1-100 MeV spectrum for the three altitude ranges of interest will be presented.

  16. An increased fluid intake leads to feet swelling in 100-km ultra-marathoners - an observational field study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An association between fluid intake and changes in volumes of the upper and lower limb has been described in 100-km ultra-marathoners. The purpose of the present study was (i) to investigate the association between fluid intake and a potential development of peripheral oedemas leading to an increase of the feet volume in 100-km ultra-marathoners and (ii) to evaluate a possible association between the changes in plasma sodium concentration ([Na+]) and changes in feet volume. Methods In seventy-six 100-km ultra-marathoners, body mass, plasma [Na+], haematocrit and urine specific gravity were determined pre- and post-race. Fluid intake and the changes of volume of the feet were measured where the changes of volume of the feet were estimated using plethysmography. Results Body mass decreased by 1.8 kg (2.4%) (p < 0.0001); plasma [Na+] increased by 1.2% (p < 0.0001). Haematocrit decreased (p = 0.0005). The volume of the feet remained unchanged (p > 0.05). Plasma volume and urine specific gravity increased (p < 0.0001). Fluid intake was positively related to the change in the volume of the feet (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001) and negatively to post-race plasma [Na+] (r = -0.28, p = 0.0142). Running speed was negatively related to both fluid intake (r = -0.33, p = 0.0036) and the change in feet volume (r = -0.23, p = 0.0236). The change in the volume of the feet was negatively related to the change in plasma [Na+] (r = -0.26, p = 0.0227). The change in body mass was negatively related to both post-race plasma [Na+] (r = -0.28, p = 0.0129) and running speed (r = -0.34, p = 0.0028). Conclusions An increase in feet volume after a 100-km ultra-marathon was due to an increased fluid intake. PMID:22472466

  17. Experimental comparison of coherent polarization-switched QPSK to polarization-multiplexed QPSK for 10 × 100 km WDM transmission.

    PubMed

    Nelson, L E; Zhou, X; Mac Suibhne, N; Ellis, A D; Magill, P

    2011-05-23

    Polarization-switched quadrature phase-shift keying has been demonstrated experimentally at 40.5 Gb/s with a coherent receiver and digital signal processing. Compared to polarization-multiplexed QPSK at the same bit rate, its back-to-back sensitivity at 10(-3) bit-error-ratio shows 0.9dB improvement, and it tolerates about 1.6 dB higher launch power for 10 × 100 km, 50 GHz-spaced WDM transmission allowing 1 dB penalty in required optical-signal-to-noise ratio relative to back-to-back.

  18. Optical refractive synchronization: bidirectional information transport over a single wavelength/single laser for distances > 100 Km: analysis and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, James R.

    1999-11-01

    The direction of this paper is to describe the experiments and analytical techniques used by SilkRoad, Inc. for sending 40 GHz of bandwidth, incorporating an eclectic body of data, over a single laser - single fiber over > 100Km of optical fiber using the same wavelength in both directions. The paper will outline the various basic tenets of Optical Refractive Synchronization and the subsequent use of Ellipsometric Phase, based on these tenets, that allows a compilation of CATV, voice, video and SONET data to be transported in both directions without interference between the otpical signals going in both directions over the single fiber. The second portion of the paper will describe the test setup and measurement techniques that were used to validate the analytical models. Pictures of the Spectrum Analyzer data and the subsequent recovery of the eclectic information is then provided for all of the signals that have been transported.

  19. Modeling Relativistic Electron Precipitation Bremsstrahlung X-Ray Intensities at 10-100 km Manned Vehicle Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habsh; Gilchrist, B. E.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Relativisitic electron precipitation (REP) events occur when beams or bunches of relativistic electrons of magnetospheric origin enter the Earth's atmosphere, typically at auroral latitudes. REP events are associated with a variety of space weather effects, including production of transitional and bremsstrahlung radiation, catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone, and scintillation of transionospheric radio waves. This study examines the intensities of x-rays produced at airliner, manned balloon, and space reuseable launch vehicles (sRLVs). The monoenergetic beam is modeled in cylindrical symetry using the paraxial ray equation. Bremsstrahlung photon production is calculated using the traditional Sauter-Elwert cross-section, providing x-ray emission spectra differential in energy and angle. Attenuation is computed for a plane-stratified standard atmosphere, and the loss processes include photoionization, Rayleigh and Compton scattering, electron-positron pair production, and photonuclear interaction. Peak altitudes of electron energy deposition and bremsstrahlung x-ray production were calculated for beams of energies from 1 MeV through 100 MeV. The altitude peak of bremsstrahlung deposition was consistently and significantly lower that that of the electron deposition due to the longer mean free paths of x-rays compared to electrons within the atmosphere. For example, for a nadir-directed monoenergetic 5 MeV beam, the peak deposition altitude was calculated to be 42 km, but the resulting bremsstrahlung deposition peaked at 25 km. This has implications for crew and passenger safety, especially with the growth of the space tourism industry. A survey of results covering the 1-100 MeV spectrum for the three altitude ranges of interest will be presented.

  20. Seismic Hazard Implications of a Vanished Punjab Mountain Rammed 100 km Beneath the Southeast End of the Kashmir Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, C. R.; Bali, B. S.; Bilham, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    An active normal fault parallel-to, and midway between, the Zanskar and Pir Pinjal ranges at the SE end of the Kashmir Valley (33.56N, 75.51E) raises the intriguing question of why a normal fault should exist in a region of prevailing Himalayan compression. We believe the normal fault is caused by a prominent bulge on the Indian plate. The fault is approximately 5 km long and has a surface scarp of approximately 4 m, tapering to zero to the WNW and ESE. Its recent origin is indicated by its offset of glacial moraines and stream channels with the subsequent formation of several poorly developed uphill-facing colluvial wedges, and a conspicuous 40 m x 60 m Alpine sag pond (Oldham, 1988). The fault dips steeply to the SW and its limited offset suggests that it was possibly formed in a single earthquake with Mw less than 6.0. The fault lies approximately 70 km northeast of a prominent salient in the Himalayan frontal thrusts west of the town of Jammu, and is one of several similar faults spaced roughly 5 km apart in a north-south line. The tensile surface stress implied by normal faulting is suggestive of north-south convex flexure of the region, possibly caused by the passage of a bulge on the Indian plate beneath SE Kashmir. We suggest that the Jammu salient and these normal faults record the passage of a mountain or range of mountains on the Indian plate beneath the divide separating the Chenab and Jhelum river drainages. The passage of the range is presumably responsible for the current location of the river divide and for the high passes that close the SE end of the Kashmir valley. Assuming that the crest of the range has passed 100 km beneath the Himalaya places the date of its initial collision with the frontal thrusts at 6 Mya. We anticipate that subduction of this range has resulted in significantly higher friction of the décollement here, influencing the style of Himalayan thrust faulting, and perhaps controlling the along-strike initiation or termination of

  1. Modelling 100 kyr of transient climate change during the Pliocene (MIS M2 to MIS KM5c)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, S. J.; Dolan, A. M.; Haywood, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The mid-Pliocene warm period (3.264-3.025 Ma) is a key target for palaeoclimate modellers in the investigation of warm intervals in Earth history. This research is driven by the need to evaluate climate models against geological data in order to assess model performance in warmer than present climates. The mid-Pliocene has generally been modelled using fixed-boundary condition climate model experiments, such as those performed for the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP). This means that orbital-timescale variability in climate is often overlooked. In the past data-model comparisons have primarily focussed on comparing snap-shot experiments (fixed boundary conditions) with time-averaged data (for example PRISM3 data which is representative of an average of ~250,000 years). In order to improve the validity of proxy-data and model comparisons it is critical that we move towards climate simulations that better capture changing bounding conditions occurring over orbital timescales and compare these with timeseries data. Here, we present two sets of transient simulations; the first is centred on the warm interglacial peak, MIS KM5c (+/-20 kyr) whilst the second runs from the glacial peak MIS M2 through to MIS KM5c (~100 kyr). We use the full-complexity intermediate-resolution FAMOUS climate model driven by PRISM3 boundary conditions (which were also used in PlioMIP phase 1). Our initial experiments apply a changing orbit, with and without dynamic vegetation. We present an overview of climate variability during these time windows, but also discuss the difficulties that have been faced in such modelling and detail some ideal future directions to explore

  2. Two-way optical frequency comparisons at 5 ×10-21 relative stability over 100-km telecommunication network fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercy, Anthony; Stefani, Fabio; Lopez, Olivier; Chardonnet, Christian; Pottie, Paul-Eric; Amy-Klein, Anne

    2014-12-01

    By using two-way frequency transfer, we implement a real-time frequency comparison over a uni-directional telecommunication network of 100 km using a pair of parallel fibers with simultaneous digital data transfer. The relative frequency stability is 10-15 at 1-s integration time and reaches 2 ×10-17 at 40 000 s, three orders of magnitude below the one-way fiber instability. We also demonstrate ultrahigh-resolution comparison of optical frequencies with a bidirectional scheme using a single fiber. We show that the relative stability at 1-s integration time is 7 ×10-18 and scales down to 5 ×10-21 . The same level of performance is reached when an optical link is implemented with an active compensation of the fiber noise. The fractional uncertainty of the frequency comparisons was evaluated for the best case to 2 ×10-20 . These results open the way to accurate and high-resolution frequency comparison of optical clocks over intercontinental fiber networks.

  3. Relations between surface conductance and spectral vegetation indices at intermediate (100 m2 to 15 km2) length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Piers J.; Heiser, Mark D.; Hall, Forrest G.

    1992-11-01

    The theoretical analysis of Sellers et al. (1992) indicates that the relative response of the unstressed canopy conductance (g*c) to changes in incident (nonsaturating) PAR flux (F0) should be proportional to some spectral vegetation indices (SVI), specifically the simple ratio (SR) vegetation index, for vegetation covers of similar physiology and physiognomy; or ∇F ≡ (∂g*c/∂F0) ∝ SR. This relationship was tested using the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) flux station data set (g*c) and the FIFE Landsat thematic mapper image data (SVI). The flux station data were used to invert a soil-plant-atmosphere model (the simple biosphere model (SiB) of Sellers et al., 1986) to derive estimates of g*c separate from the soil evaporation contribution and corrected for the "stress" effects of vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture deficit. The Landsat imagery was sampled to produce SR vegetation index values for small areas (90 × 90 m) centered on each flux station. The derived ∇F and SR values were found to be near-linearly related on a site-by-site basis. Differences between sites are thought to be related to the fractional cover of C3 versus C4 vegetation so that ∇S,F ≡ (∂∇F/∂(SR)) ∝ V3, where V3 is the fractional cover of C3 vegetation. The above equations form the basis for a simple biophysically based model of canopy-scale conductance. The model was applied on the flux station scale (100 m)2 and was also used to calculate fluxes for the entire FIFE site (15 × 15 km)2; the latter results were compared with airborne flux measurements. It is demonstrated that because the proposed relationship between ∇F and SR is near-linear, the calculation of evapotranspiration rates for large areas using this model is effectively scale-invariant.

  4. A Synthetic Nickel Electrocatalyst With a Turnover Frequency Above 100,000 s-1 for H2 Production

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, Monte L.; Stewart, Michael P.; Bullock, R. Morris; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-08-12

    Increased worldwide energy demand will require greater use of carbon-neutral sustainable energy sources. The intermittent nature of solar and wind power requires storage of energy, so electrocatalysts that convert electrical energy to chemical bonds in fuels are needed. Platinum is an excellent catalyst, but it is of low abundance and high cost. Hydrogenase enzymes in Nature catalyze the evolution of H2 and use earth-abundant metals such as nickel and iron. We report that a synthetic nickel catalyst, [Ni(7PPh2NPh)2](BF4)2, (7PPh2NPh = 1,3,6-triphenyl-1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane) catalyzes the production of H2 using [(DMF)H]+OTf as the proton source, with turnover frequencies of 31,000 s-1 in dry acetonitrile and 108,000 s-1 in the presence of H2O (1.2 M), at a potential of -1.13 V (vs. the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple). These turnover frequencies exceed those reported for the [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme by more than an order of magnitude, and are the fastest reported for any molecular catalyst for H2 production. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  5. All-optical clock recovery for 100 Gb/s RZ-OOK signal after 25km transmission using a dual-mode beating DBR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liqiang; Pan, Biwei; Lu, Dan; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2014-11-01

    All-optical clock recovery (AOCR) for 100 Gb/s RZ-OOK signal is demonstrated by using a dualmode beating DBR laser. Based on the injection-locking of the DBR (distributed Bragg reflector) laser, a 100-GHz optical clock is recovered. Timing jitter (<1 ps) derived from both phase noise and power fluctuation is measured by an optical sampling oscilloscope (OSO). Furthermore, clock recovery is also realized for the 100 Gb/s signal after 25 km transmission. After the 25-km SMF (5- dB loss) transmission, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the signal drops from 18 dB to 5.2 dB. The dependence of the timing jitter on the input power is investigated. The lowest timing jitter of 665 fs is realized when the input power is 3 dBm.

  6. Dependence of the bit error rate on the signal power and length of a single-channel coherent single-span communication line (100 Gbit s-1) with polarisation division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurkin, N. V.; Konyshev, V. A.; Nanii, O. E.; Novikov, A. G.; Treshchikov, V. N.; Ubaydullaev, R. R.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied experimentally and using numerical simulations and a phenomenological analytical model the dependences of the bit error rate (BER) on the signal power and length of a coherent single-span communication line with transponders employing polarisation division multiplexing and four-level phase modulation (100 Gbit s-1 DP-QPSK format). In comparing the data of the experiment, numerical simulations and theoretical analysis, we have found two optimal powers: the power at which the BER is minimal and the power at which the fade margin in the line is maximal. We have derived and analysed the dependences of the BER on the optical signal power at the fibre line input and the dependence of the admissible input signal power range for implementation of the communication lines with a length from 30 - 50 km up to a maximum length of 250 km.

  7. Damage to Liver and Skeletal Muscles in Marathon Runners During a 100 km Run With Regard to Age and Running Speed

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Żychowska, Małgorzata; Radzimiński, Łukasz; Konieczna, Anna; Kortas, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) whether damage to liver and skeletal muscles occurs during a 100 km run; (2) whether the metabolic response to extreme exertion is related to the age or running speed of the participant; (3) whether it is possible to determine the optimal running speed and distance for long-distance runners’ health by examining biochemical parameters in venous blood. Fourteen experienced male amateur ultra-marathon runners, divided into two age groups, took part in a 100 km run. Blood samples for liver and skeletal muscle damage indexes were collected from the ulnar vein just before the run, after 25, 50, 75 and 100 km, and 24 hours after termination of the run. A considerable increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was observed with the distance covered (p < 0.05), which continued during recovery. An increase in the mean values of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p < 0.05) was observed with each sequential course. The biggest differences between the age groups were found for the activity of liver enzymes and LDH after completing 75 km as well as after 24 hours of recovery. It can be concluded that the response to extreme exertion deteriorates with age in terms of the active movement apparatus. PMID:25964813

  8. Body mass change and ultraendurance performance: a decrease in body mass is associated with an increased running speed in male 100-km ultramarathoners.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph A; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Wirth, Andrea; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We investigated, in 50 recreational male ultrarunners, the changes in body mass, selected hematological and urine parameters, and fluid intake during a 100-km ultramarathon. The athletes lost (mean and SD) 2.6 (1.8) % in body mass (p < 0.0001). Running speed was significantly and negatively related to the change in body mass (p < 0.05). Serum sodium concentration ([Na⁺]) and the concentration of aldosterone increased with increasing loss in body mass (p < 0.05). Urine-specific gravity increased (p < 0.0001). The change in body mass was significantly and negatively related to postrace serum [Na⁺] (p < 0.05). Fluid intake was significantly and positively related to both running speed (r = 0.33, p = 0.0182) and the change in body mass (r = 0.44, p = 0.0014) and significantly and negatively to both postrace serum [Na⁺] (r = -0.42, p = 0.0022) and the change in serum [Na⁺] (r = -0.38, p = 0.0072). This field study showed that recreational, male, 100-km ultramarathoners dehydrated as evidenced by the decrease in >2 % body mass and the increase in urine-specific gravity. Race performance, however, was not impaired because of the loss in body mass. In contrast, faster athletes lost more body mass compared with slower athletes while also drinking more. The concept that a loss of >2% in body mass leads to dehydration and consequently impairs endurance performance must be questioned for ultraendurance athletes competing in the field. For practical applications, a loss in body mass during a 100-km ultramarathon was associated with a faster running speed.

  9. Body mass change and ultraendurance performance: a decrease in body mass is associated with an increased running speed in male 100-km ultramarathoners.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph A; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Wirth, Andrea; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We investigated, in 50 recreational male ultrarunners, the changes in body mass, selected hematological and urine parameters, and fluid intake during a 100-km ultramarathon. The athletes lost (mean and SD) 2.6 (1.8) % in body mass (p < 0.0001). Running speed was significantly and negatively related to the change in body mass (p < 0.05). Serum sodium concentration ([Na⁺]) and the concentration of aldosterone increased with increasing loss in body mass (p < 0.05). Urine-specific gravity increased (p < 0.0001). The change in body mass was significantly and negatively related to postrace serum [Na⁺] (p < 0.05). Fluid intake was significantly and positively related to both running speed (r = 0.33, p = 0.0182) and the change in body mass (r = 0.44, p = 0.0014) and significantly and negatively to both postrace serum [Na⁺] (r = -0.42, p = 0.0022) and the change in serum [Na⁺] (r = -0.38, p = 0.0072). This field study showed that recreational, male, 100-km ultramarathoners dehydrated as evidenced by the decrease in >2 % body mass and the increase in urine-specific gravity. Race performance, however, was not impaired because of the loss in body mass. In contrast, faster athletes lost more body mass compared with slower athletes while also drinking more. The concept that a loss of >2% in body mass leads to dehydration and consequently impairs endurance performance must be questioned for ultraendurance athletes competing in the field. For practical applications, a loss in body mass during a 100-km ultramarathon was associated with a faster running speed. PMID:22614141

  10. 128-Gb/s 100-km transmission with direct detection using silicon photonic Stokes vector receiver and I/Q modulator.

    PubMed

    Dong, Po; Chen, Xi; Kim, Kwangwoong; Chandrasekhar, S; Chen, Young-Kai; Sinsky, Jeffrey H

    2016-06-27

    Recently, there is increasing interest in utilizing Stokes vector receiver, which is a direct-detection technique with the capability to digitally track the polarization changes in fibers and decode information in multiple dimensions. Here, we report a monolithically integrated silicon photonic Stokes vector receiver, which consists of one polarization beam splitter, two polarization rotators, one 90-degree optical hybrid, and six germanium photodetectors. Paired with a silicon in-phase/quadrature modulator incorporating a power-tunable carrier in the orthogonal polarization, transmission at 128-Gb/s over 100-km fiber is achieved with direct detection. PMID:27410578

  11. 28 Gb/s duobinary signal transmission over 40 km based on 10 GHz DML and PIN for 100 Gb/s PON.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengxuan; Yi, Lilin; Wang, Xiaodong; Hu, Weisheng

    2015-08-10

    In this paper, we demonstrate the direct modulation and direct detection of 28-Gb/s duobinary signal for the future downstream capacity upgrade in next generation passive optical network (PON). Commercial 10-GHz directly modulated laser (DML) and PIN with a combined modulation bandwidth of ~7 GHz are used as transmitter and receiver respectively. In order to mitigate the chromatic dispersion induced signal distortion, an optical delay interferometer (DI) is employed to narrow down the signal spectrum, thereby realizing 40-km single mode fiber (SMF) transmission in C-band. Besides, the chirp-induced spectral broadening of the directly modulated signal enables a higher launch power than external modulation schemes, which increases the loss budget of the system. As a result, 31-dB loss budget is achieved, supporting 64 users with 40-km reach. Also, as the transceivers in both optical line terminal (OLT) and optical network unit (ONU) are commercial l0-GHz devices, the proposed scheme is compatible with 40-Gb/s time and wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (TWDM-PON) systems, providing a cost-efficient alternative for the development of 100G PON.

  12. 28 Gb/s duobinary signal transmission over 40 km based on 10 GHz DML and PIN for 100 Gb/s PON.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengxuan; Yi, Lilin; Wang, Xiaodong; Hu, Weisheng

    2015-08-10

    In this paper, we demonstrate the direct modulation and direct detection of 28-Gb/s duobinary signal for the future downstream capacity upgrade in next generation passive optical network (PON). Commercial 10-GHz directly modulated laser (DML) and PIN with a combined modulation bandwidth of ~7 GHz are used as transmitter and receiver respectively. In order to mitigate the chromatic dispersion induced signal distortion, an optical delay interferometer (DI) is employed to narrow down the signal spectrum, thereby realizing 40-km single mode fiber (SMF) transmission in C-band. Besides, the chirp-induced spectral broadening of the directly modulated signal enables a higher launch power than external modulation schemes, which increases the loss budget of the system. As a result, 31-dB loss budget is achieved, supporting 64 users with 40-km reach. Also, as the transceivers in both optical line terminal (OLT) and optical network unit (ONU) are commercial l0-GHz devices, the proposed scheme is compatible with 40-Gb/s time and wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (TWDM-PON) systems, providing a cost-efficient alternative for the development of 100G PON. PMID:26367880

  13. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: NORAMET intercomparison of volume standards at 50 mL and 100 mL (SIM.M.FF-S1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, C.; Trujillo Juarez, S.; Maldonado, J. M.; Bean, V.

    2003-01-01

    An intercomparison of volume standards, 50 mL and 100 mL pycnometers, was decided on at the NORAMET Technical Contacts Meeting of 8-9 June 1998. The participating laboratories were CENAM, NIST, and NRC. NRC acted as the pilot laboratory. The comparison was done between April 1999 and October 1999. The pycnometers were not protected against evaporation by a supplementary cap. Even with this handicap, the three laboratories agreed with one another very well. The difference between maximum and minimum reported volumes never exceeded 0.014%. This comparison was assigned the number SIM.M.FF-S1. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the SIM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  14. Maintained total body water content and serum sodium concentrations despite body mass loss in female ultra-runners drinking ad libitum during a 100 km race.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Senn, Oliver; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Joleska, Irena; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We investigated in 11 female ultra-runners during a 100 km ultra-run, the association between fluid intake and prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in a cross-sectional study. Athletes drank ad libitum and recorded their fluid intake. They competed at 8.0 (1.0) km/h and finished within 762 (91) min. Fluid intake was 4.1 (1.3) L during the race, equal to 0.3 (0.1) L/h. Body mass decreased by 1.5 kg (p< 0.01); pre race body mass was related to speed in the race (r = -0.78, p< 0.05); and change (Delta) in body mass was not associated with speed in the race. Change in body mass was positively (r = 0.70; p< 0.05), and Delta urinary specific gravity negatively (r = -0.67; p< 0.05), correlated to Delta percent total body water. Changes in body mass were not related to fluid intake during the race. Fluid intake was not correlated to running speed and showed no association with either Delta percent total body water nor Delta [Na] in plasma. Fluid intake showed no relationship with both Delta haematocrit and Delta plasma volume. No exercise-associated hyponatremia occurred. Female ultra- runners consuming fluids ad libitum during the race experienced no fluid overload, and ad libitum drinking protects against exercise-associated hyponatremia. The reported higher incidence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in women is not really a gender effect but due to women being more prone to overdrink. PMID:20199991

  15. Fading-free transmission of 124-Gb/s PDM-DMT signal over 100-km SSMF using digital carrier regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Cai; Hu, Rong; Yang, Qi; Luo, Ming; Li, Wei; Yu, Shaohua

    2016-01-25

    The coherent reception of intensity modulated signal has been recently widely investigated, in which the signal is recovered by the envelop detection. High linewidth tolerance is achieved with such scheme. However, strong optical carrier exists during the transmission, which degrades the optical power efficiency. In this paper, an efficient modulation scheme for discrete multi-tone (DMT) signal is proposed based on the Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM). Different from the traditional intensity modulation, the proposed method employs both intensity and phase domain. Thus, the optical carrier power can be greatly reduced by adjusting the bias of MZM around the null point. By employing coherent detection and digital carrier regeneration (DCR), the carrier suppressed DMT signal can be recovered using envelop detection. No carrier frequency or phase estimation is required. Numerical investigations are made to demonstrate the feasibility, in which significant improvements are found for the proposed DCR method, showing great tolerance against laser linewidth and carrier power reduction. Finally, a 124-Gb/s transmission of polarization-division multiplexed DMT (PDM-DMT) signal is demonstrated over 100-km SSMF, with only -8 dB optical carrier to signal power ratio (CSPR).

  16. Plasma concentration of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) after 100 drop to vertical jumps and after a 1200-km bicycle race.

    PubMed

    Behringer, M; Kilian, Y; Montag, J; Geesmann, B; Mester, J

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been reported to be involved in proinflammation and tissue repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that HMGB1 is released into the bloodstream after eccentric exercises or prolonged endurance activities. Blood samples from 11 participants that performed 100 drop to vertical jumps (DVJ) and from 10 participants that took part in the 1200-km 'Paris-Brest-Paris' bicycle race (PBP) were tested for HMGB1 and creatine kinase (CK) levels. CK increased after both DVJ (pre: 150.6 ± 81.5 U/L; post: 188.8 ± 95.5 U/L 8 h: 790.5 ± 346.4 U/L) and PBP (pre: 81.3 ± 36.4 U/L; post: 725.2 ± 229.5 U/L; 12 h: 535.8 ± 188.6 U/L), indicating membrane damage. However, HMGB1 plasma levels remained below the detection limit (78 pg/mL) of the applied enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit for all blood samples analysed. That is, neither high intensity eccentric exercises (DVJ) nor prolonged endurance events (PBP) seemed to affect HMGB1 levels in blood at selected time points. PMID:26880688

  17. Fading-free transmission of 124-Gb/s PDM-DMT signal over 100-km SSMF using digital carrier regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Cai; Hu, Rong; Yang, Qi; Luo, Ming; Li, Wei; Yu, Shaohua

    2016-01-25

    The coherent reception of intensity modulated signal has been recently widely investigated, in which the signal is recovered by the envelop detection. High linewidth tolerance is achieved with such scheme. However, strong optical carrier exists during the transmission, which degrades the optical power efficiency. In this paper, an efficient modulation scheme for discrete multi-tone (DMT) signal is proposed based on the Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM). Different from the traditional intensity modulation, the proposed method employs both intensity and phase domain. Thus, the optical carrier power can be greatly reduced by adjusting the bias of MZM around the null point. By employing coherent detection and digital carrier regeneration (DCR), the carrier suppressed DMT signal can be recovered using envelop detection. No carrier frequency or phase estimation is required. Numerical investigations are made to demonstrate the feasibility, in which significant improvements are found for the proposed DCR method, showing great tolerance against laser linewidth and carrier power reduction. Finally, a 124-Gb/s transmission of polarization-division multiplexed DMT (PDM-DMT) signal is demonstrated over 100-km SSMF, with only -8 dB optical carrier to signal power ratio (CSPR). PMID:26832465

  18. Platinum-coated probes sliding at up to 100 mm s-1 against coated silicon wafers for AFM probe-based recording technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Kwak, Kwang Joo

    2007-08-01

    One of the new alternative information storage technologies being researched is based on the probe-based recording technique. In one technique, a phase-change medium is used, and the phase change is accomplished by applying either a high or low magnitude of current which heats the interface to different temperatures. Tip wear is a serious concern. For wear protection of the phase-change chalcogenide medium with a silicon substrate, diamond-like carbon (DLC) film with various lubricant overcoats was deposited on the recording layer surface. Nanowear properties of platinum (Pt)-coated probes with high electrical conductivity have been investigated in sliding against the coated medium using an atomic force microscope (AFM). A silicon grating sample and software to deconvolute tip shape were used to characterize the change in the tip shape and evaluate the tip radius and its wear volume. The nanowear experiments were performed at sliding velocities ranging from 0.1 to 100 mm s-1. Pt-coated tips on the lubricant-coated DLC film surfaces showed less sensitivity to the velocity and the load as compared to the unlubricated DLC film surfaces. In wear life threshold experiments, the threshold reaches a smaller sliding distance at higher loads. In high-temperature experiments at 80 °C, the wear rate is higher compared to that at 20 °C. The results suggest that the wear mechanism at low velocity appears to be primarily adhesive and abrasive. At high velocity, an additional wear mechanism of the tribochemical reaction is important.

  19. 1.92 Tb/s coherent DWDM-OFDMA-PON with no high-speed ONU-side electronics over 100 km SSMF and 1:64 passive split.

    PubMed

    Cvijetic, Neda; Huang, Ming-Fang; Ip, Ezra; Shao, Yin; Huang, Yue-Kai; Cvijetic, Milorad; Wang, Ting

    2011-11-21

    Record 1.92-Tb/s (40λ × 48 Gb/s/λ) coherent DWDM-OFDMA-PON without high-speed ONU-side ADCs/DACs/DSP/RF clock sources is demonstrated over 100 km straight SSMF with a 1:64 passive split. Novel optical-domain OFDMA sub-band selection, coherent detection, and simple RF components are exploited. As the first experimental verification of a next-generation optical platform capable of delivering 1 Gb/s to 1000(+) users over 100 km, the new architecture is promising for future optical access/metro systems.

  20. 1.92 Tb/s coherent DWDM-OFDMA-PON with no high-speed ONU-side electronics over 100 km SSMF and 1:64 passive split.

    PubMed

    Cvijetic, Neda; Huang, Ming-Fang; Ip, Ezra; Shao, Yin; Huang, Yue-Kai; Cvijetic, Milorad; Wang, Ting

    2011-11-21

    Record 1.92-Tb/s (40λ × 48 Gb/s/λ) coherent DWDM-OFDMA-PON without high-speed ONU-side ADCs/DACs/DSP/RF clock sources is demonstrated over 100 km straight SSMF with a 1:64 passive split. Novel optical-domain OFDMA sub-band selection, coherent detection, and simple RF components are exploited. As the first experimental verification of a next-generation optical platform capable of delivering 1 Gb/s to 1000(+) users over 100 km, the new architecture is promising for future optical access/metro systems. PMID:22109481

  1. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Large Scale (100's of km) Waves Below the Equatorial F-peak as Seeds of Spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-12-01

    Electric field and plasma density observations gathered on the C/NOFS satellite are presented in cases where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the satellite perigee of 400 km in the evening. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite frequently show evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. We present statistics of numerous examples of these large scale waves detected by instruments on the C/NOFS satellite.

  2. Cloud Structure and Cloud-Radiation Interaction: From Smallest Observable Scales (Less than 10 m) to GCM Grid Scales (More than 100 km)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Davis, A. B.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this presentation we review the fractal nature of internal cloud structure from cm- to km-scales as captured by in-situ probes during long horizontal penetrations by aircraft. We uncover the non-Poissonian spatial distribution of cloud droplets at submeter scales and confirm scale-invariant behavior for large scales. Based on these structural characteristics, we generate simple fractal cloud models that reproduce statistical scaling properties of real clouds. These stochastic models represent a link between nonlinear science, in general, and cloud-radiation interaction, in particular. Next we run three-dimensional radiative transfer computations on these synthetic fractal clouds and compare the structure of the resulting radiation fields with the known structure of the cloud model and with satellite images of real clouds. The different behaviors observed for small and large-scale variabilities will be discussed in detail. We find that while the large-scale fluctuations of the resulting radiation fields resemble those in the original scale-invariant cloud structure, the radiation at small scales is much smoother than its cloud liquid water counterpart. This violates scale-invariance and produces a scale-break at 0.2-0.5 km that is clearly observed in high-resolution satellite data such as from Landsat. Finally, we show how radiative transfer Green function theory in the photon diffusion limit explains (and predicts) the above phenomena of "radiative smoothing."

  3. An Assessment of New Satellite Data Products for the Development of a Long-Term Global Solar Resource at 10-100 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Minnis, Patrick; Perez, Richard; Sengupta, Manajit; Knapp, Kenneth; Mikovitz, J. Colleen; Schlemmer, James; Scarino, Benjamin; Zhang, Taiping; Cox, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    A project representing an effort to reprocess the NASA based solar resource data sets is reviewed. The effort represented a collaboration between NASA, NOAA, NREL and the SUNY-Albany and aimed to deliver a 10 km resolution, 3-hourly data set spanning from 1983 through near-present. Part of the project was to transition project capability to NREL for annual processing to extend data set. Due to delays in the key input project called ISCCP, we evaluate only Beta versions of this data set and also introduce the potential use of another NASA Langley based cloud data set for the CERES project. The CERES project uses these cloud properties to compute global top-of-atmosphere and surface fluxes at the 1x1 degree resolution. Here, we also briefly discuss these data sets in potential usage for solar resource benchmarking.

  4. Fiber-wireless transmission system of 108  Gb/sdata over 80 km fiber and 2×2multiple-input multiple-output wireless links at 100 GHz W-band frequency.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Dong, Ze; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan; Shao, Yufeng; Chang, G K

    2012-12-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a seamlessly integrated fiber-wireless system that delivers a 108  Gb/s signal through 80 km fiber and 1 m wireless transport over free space at 100 GHz adopting polarization-division-multiplexing quadrature-phase-shift-keying (PDM-QPSK) modulation and heterodyning coherent detection. The X- and Y-polarization components of the optical PDM-QPSK baseband signal are simultaneously upconverted to 100 GHz wireless carrier by optical polarization-diversity heterodyne beating, and then independently transmitted and received by two pairs of transmitter and receiver antennas, which form a 2×2 multiple-input multiple-output wireless link. At the wireless receiver, two-stage downconversion is performed firstly in the analog domain based on balanced mixer and sinusoidal radio frequency signal, and then in the digital domain based on digital signal processing (DSP). Polarization demultiplexing is realized by the constant modulus algorithm in the DSP part at the receiver. The bit-error ratio for the 108  Gb/s PDM-QPSK signal is less than the pre-forward-error-correction threshold of 3.8×10(-3) after both 1 m wireless delivery at 100 GHz and 80 km single-mode fiber-28 transmission. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration to realize 100  Gb/s signal delivery through both fiber and wireless links at 100 GHz.

  5. Temperature Structure of the 80 Km to 120 Km Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Between 80 and 120 km the CIRA 1972 model is based heavily on NASA Meteorological Sounding Rocket Program (MSRP) data collected prior to 1967. Since about 1970 an abundance of E-region (100-130 km) temperature data from the incoherent scatter facilities at Arecibo, Millstone Hill, and St. Santin have also become available. The present study examines the temperature structure of the 80 to 120 km region given considerable additional MSRP rocket data, thus providing better seasonal, latitudinal, and longitudinal coverage in the 80 to 100 km region, and a combination of incoherent scatter and rocket data in the 100 to 120 km region which allows a much improved delineation of lower thermosphere temperature structue. Although some individual station comparisons indicate measurable asymmetries in longitude and latitude, data are still insufficient to separate these effects. Specific recommendations of the new CIRA are given.

  6. Seismic belt in the upper plane of the double seismic zone extending in the along-arc direction at depths of 70-100km beneath NE Japan, and its relation with the dehydration embrittlement hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, S.; Okada, T.; Nakajima, J.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2006-12-01

    1. Introduction Dehydration embrittlement or CO2¨Cbearing devolatization embrittlement hypothesis has been proposed as a possible cause of intraslab earthquakes in several studies [e.g., Peacock, 2001; Kirby et al., 1996; Meade and Jeanloz, 1991]. Precise location of intraslab seismicity is needed to discuss its cause in these studies. Recently, a very dense nationwide seismic network (Hi-net) has been constructed by NIED in Japan. In this study, we relocate microearthquakes more precisely by using data obtained by this dense seismic network to detect the characteristic distribution of the seismicity within the Pacific slab beneath Hokkaido and Tohoku, NE Japan. 2. Data and method In the present study, we relocated events at depths of 20¨C300 km for the period from January 2002 to August 2005 from the JMA earthquake catalog. Hypocenter locations and arrival time data in the JMA catalog were used as the initial hypocenters and data for relocations. We applied the double-difference hypocenter location method (DDLM) by Waldhauser and Ellsworth (2000) to the arrival time data of the events. We also checked spatial distribution of the focal mechanisms of the events in the seismic belts and the surrounding upper seismic plane. We used focal mechanism solutions determined by Igarashi et al. (2001). 3. Results and discussion 1) There exist earthquakes occurring in the area between the upper and lower seismic planes (interplane earthquakes), and their focal mechanisms tend to be the down-dip compressional (DC-) type like those of upper plane events. 2) We found a seismic "belt" which is parallel to the iso-depth contour of the plate interface beneath the forearc area at depths of 80¨C100 km. The location of the seismic belt seems to correspond to one phase boundary (from jadeite lawsonite blueschist (H2O content: 5.4 wt% ) to lawsonite amphibole eclogite (3.0wt %) (Hacker et al., 2003)) with dehydration reaction. 3) The location of the deeper limit of seismicity of the

  7. Neutrophil haptotaxis induced by the lectin KM+.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, L; Martins, A R; Espreáfico, E M; Roque-Barreira, M C

    1998-05-01

    KM+ is a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces neutrophil migration in vitro and in vivo. This attractant activity was shown to be caused by haptotaxis rather than chemotaxis. The inhibition by D-mannose of the neutrophil attraction exerted by KM+, both in vitro and in vivo, supports the idea that haptotaxis is triggered in vivo by the sugar binding sites interacting with glycoconjugates located on the neutrophil surface and in the extracellular matrix. In the present study an in vivo haptotaxis assay was performed by intradermally (i.d.) injecting 125I-KM+ (200 ng), which led to a selective staining of loose connective tissue and vascular endothelium. The radiolabelled area exhibited a maximum increase (five-fold) in neutrophil infiltration 3 h after injection, relative to i.d. 200 ng 125I-BSA. We characterized the ex vivo binding of KM+ to tissue elements by immunohistochemistry, using paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded, untreated rat skin. Bound KM+ was detected with an affinity-purified rabbit IgG anti-KM+ and visualized with an alkaline phosphatase based system. KM+ binding to connective tissue and vascular endothelium was inhibited by preincubating KM+ with 0.4 mM D-mannose and was potentiated by heparan sulfate (100 microg ml(-1)). An in vitro assay carried out in a Boyden microchamber showed that heparan sulfate potentiated the attractant effect of 10 microg KM+ by 34%. The present data suggest that KM+ induces neutrophil migration in vivo by haptotaxis and that the haptotactic gradient could be provided by the interaction of the KM+ carbohydrate recognition site(s) with mannose-containing glycoconjugate(s) in vascular endothelium and connective tissue. Heparan sulfate would act as an accessory molecule, enhancing the KM+ tissue binding and potentiating the induced neutrophil haptotaxis.

  8. Optimal Inflatable Space Towers with 3 - 100 km Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Theory and computations are provided for building inflatable space towers up to one hundred kilometers in height. These towers can be used for tourism, scientific observation of space, observation of the Earth's surface, weather and upper atmosphere, and for radio, television, and communication transmissions. These towers can also be used to launch space ships and Earth satellites. These projects are not expensive and do not require rockets. They require thin strong films composed from artificial fibers and fabricated by current industry. The towers can be built using present technology. The towers can be used (for tourism, communication, etc.) during the construction process and provide self-financing for further construction. The tower design does not require work at high altitudes; all construction can be done at the Earth's surface. The transport system for a tower consists of a small engine (used only for friction compensation) located at the Earth's surface. The tower is separated into sections and has special protection mechanisms in case of damage. Problems involving security, control, repair, and stability of the proposed towers are addressed in other publications. The author is prepared to discuss these and other problems with serious organizations desiring to research and develop these projects.

  9. KM Education in LIS Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehman, Sajjad ur; Chaudhry, Abdus Sattar

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the perceptions of the heads of 12 Library and Information Science (LIS) schools on Knowledge Management (KM) education. These heads from North America, Europe and the Pacific region had either been offering KM courses or had an apparent interest in such programs. Data about perceptions were gathered on the nature of their…

  10. KM3NeT

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, M. de; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2015-07-15

    KM3NeT is a large research infrastructure, that will consist of a network of deep-sea neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. The main objective of KM3NeT is the discovery and subsequent observation of high-energy neutrino sources in the Universe. A further physics perspective is the measurement of the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. A corresponding study, ORCA, is ongoing within KM3NeT. A cost effective technology for (very) large water Cherenkov detectors has been developed based on a new generation of low price 3-inch photo-multiplier tubes. Following the successful deployment and operation of two prototypes, the construction of the KM3NeT research infrastructure has started. The prospects of the different phases of the implementation of KM3NeT are summarised.

  11. KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M.

    2015-07-01

    KM3NeT is a large research infrastructure, that will consist of a network of deep-sea neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. The main objective of KM3NeT is the discovery and subsequent observation of high-energy neutrino sources in the Universe. A further physics perspective is the measurement of the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. A corresponding study, ORCA, is ongoing within KM3NeT. A cost effective technology for (very) large water Cherenkov detectors has been developed based on a new generation of low price 3-inch photo-multiplier tubes. Following the successful deployment and operation of two prototypes, the construction of the KM3NeT research infrastructure has started. The prospects of the different phases of the implementation of KM3NeT are summarised.

  12. Imaging Resolution of the 410-km and 660-km Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, K.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Structure of seismic discontinuities at depths of about 410 km and 660 km provides important constraints on mantle convection as the associated phase transformations in the transition zone are sensitive to thermal perturbations. Teleseismic P-to-S receiver functions have been widely used to map the depths of the two discontinuities. In this study, we investigate the resolution of receiver functions in imaging topographic variations of the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities based on wave propagation simulations using the Spectral Element Method (SEM). We investigate finite-frequency effects of direct P waves as well as P-to-S converted waves by varying the length scale of discontinuity topography in the transition zone. We show that wavefront healing effects are significant in broadband receiver functions. For example, at a period of 10 to 20 seconds, the arrival anomaly in P-to-S converted waves is about 50% of what predicted by ray theory when the topography length scale is in the order of 400 km. The observed arrival anomaly further reduces to 10-20% when the topography length scale reduces to about 200 km. We calculate 2-D boundary sensitivity kernels for direct P waves as well as receiver functions based on surface wave mode summation and confirm that finite frequency-effects can be properly accounted for. Three-dimensional wavespeed structure beneath seismic stations can also introduce significant artifacts in transition zone discontinuity topography if time corrections are not applied, and, the effects are dependent on frequency.

  13. Imaging Resolution of 410-km and 660-km Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Kai; Zhou, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Seismic discontinuities in the mantle transition zone at depths of about 410 and 660 km are associated with olivine phase transformations. The depths of the discontinuities provide important constraints on the thermal structure of the mid mantle. Teleseismic receiver functions as well as PP and SS precursors have been widely used in imaging topographic variations of the 410 and 660 discontinuities. Ray-theory based migration and stacking methods are often used to enhance signals of the converted and reflected waves, assuming that the effects of 3-D structure in wavespeed can be averaged out. In this study, we investigate the resolution of traditional methods in imaging the 410-km and 660-km discontinuity topography based on wave propagation simulations using the Spectral Element Method (SEM). We calculate synthetic seismograms in laterally heterogeneous wavespeed models with lateral variations in the 410-km and 660-km discontinuity depths. The SEM synthetics are processed following standard migration and stacking techniques to image the discontinuities. We show that 3-D wave speed structure beneath seismic stations can introduce significant artifacts in transition zone discontinuity topography. We also investigate finite-frequency effects of P-to-S converted waves as well as PP and SS precursors in imaging the discontinuities by varying the length scale of depth variations in the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities in SEM simulations, and show that wave front healing effects depend on the length scale of the depth variation as well as epicentral distances. Finally we compare receiver function delay times with calculations based on finite frequency sensitivity and show that wave front healing effects can be properly accounted for.

  14. Will women outrun men in ultra-marathon road races from 50 km to 1,000 km?

    PubMed

    Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Karner-Rezek, Klaus; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat; Lepers, Romuald; Rüst, Christoph Alexander

    2014-01-01

    It has been assumed that women would be able to outrun men in ultra-marathon running. The present study investigated the sex differences in running speed in ultra-marathons held worldwide from 50 km to 1,000 km. Changes in running speeds and the sex differences in running speeds in the annual fastest finishers in 50 km, 100 km, 200 km and 1,000 km events held worldwide from 1969-2012 were analysed using linear, non-linear and multi-level regression analyses. For the annual fastest and the annual ten fastest finishers, running speeds increased non-linearly in 50 km and 100 km, but not in 200 km and 1,000 km where running speeds remained unchanged for the annual fastest. The sex differences decreased non-linearly in 50 km and 100 km, but not in 200 and 1,000 km where the sex difference remained unchanged for the annual fastest. For the fastest women and men ever, the sex difference in running speed was lowest in 100 km (5.0%) and highest in 50 km (15.4%). For the ten fastest women and men ever, the sex difference was lowest in 100 km (10.0 ± 3.0%) and highest in 200 km (27.3 ± 5.7%). For both the fastest (r(2) = 0.003, p = 0.82) and the ten fastest finishers ever (r(2) = 0.34, p = 0.41) in 50 km, 100 km, 200 km and 1,000 km, we found no correlation between sex difference in performance and running speed. To summarize, the sex differences in running speeds decreased non-linearly in 50 km and 100 km but remained unchanged in 200 km and 1,000 km, and the sex differences in running speeds showed no change with increasing length of the race distance. These findings suggest that it is very unlikely that women will ever outrun men in ultra-marathons held from 50 km to 100 km.

  15. Vertical profile of H 2SO 4 vapor at 70-110 km on Venus and some related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2011-09-01

    The vertical profile of H 2SO 4 vapor is calculated using current atmospheric and thermodynamic data. The atmospheric data include the H 2O profiles observed at 70-112 km by the SOIR solar occultations, the SPICAV-UV profiles of the haze extinction at 220 nm, the VeRa temperature profiles, and a typical profile of eddy diffusion. The thermodynamic data are the saturated vapor pressures of H 2O and H 2SO 4 and chemical potentials of these species in sulfuric acid solutions. The calculated concentration of sulfuric acid in the cloud droplets varies from 85% at 70 km to a minimum of 70% at 90 km and then gradually increasing to 90-100% at 110 km. The H 2SO 4 vapor mixing ratio is ˜10 -12 at 70 and 110 km with a deep minimum of 3 × 10 -18 at 88 km. The H 2O-H 2SO 4 system matches the local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions up to 87 km. The column photolysis rate of H 2SO 4 is 1.6 × 10 5 cm -2 s -1 at 70 km and 23 cm -2 s -1 at 90 km. The calculated abundance of H 2SO 4 vapor at 90-110 km and its photolysis rate are smaller than those presented in the recent model by Zhang et al. (Zhang, X., Liang, M.C., Montmessin, F., Bertaux, J.L., Parkinson, C., Yung, Y.L. [2010]. Nat. Geosci. 3, 834-837) by factors of 10 6 and 10 9, respectively. Assumptions of 100% sulfuric acid, local thermodynamic equilibrium, too warm atmosphere, supersaturation of H 2SO 4 (impossible for a source of SO X), and cross sections for H 2SO 4·H 2O (impossible above the pure H 2SO 4) are the main reasons of this huge difference. Significant differences and contradictions between the SPICAV-UV, SOIR, and ground-based submillimeter observations of SO X at 70-110 km are briefly discussed and some weaknesses are outlined. The possible source of high altitude SO X on Venus remains unclear and probably does not exist.

  16. Evolution of SINE S1 retroposons in Cruciferae plant species.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, A; Cournoyer, B; Warwick, S; Picard, G; Deragon, J M

    1997-09-01

    The S1 element is a plant short interspersed element (SINE) that was first described and studied in Brassica napus. In this work, we investigated the distribution and the molecular phylogeny of the S1 element within the Cruciferae (= Brassicaceae). S1 elements were found to be widely distributed within the Cruciferae, especially in species of the tribe Brassiceae. The molecular phylogeny of S1 elements in eight Cruciferae species (Brassica oleracea, Brassica rapa, Brassica napus, Brassica nigra, Sinapis, arvensis, Sinapis pubescens, Coincya monensis, and Vella spinosa) was inferred using 14-36 elements per species. Significant neighbor-joining and maximum-parsimony phylogenetic clusters, supported by high bootstrap P values and/or represented in 100% of the most-parsimonious trees, were observed for each species. Most of these clusters probably correspond to recent species-specific bursts of S1 amplification. Since these species diverged recently, S1 amplification in Cruciferae plants is proposed to be a highly dynamic process that could contribute to genome rearrangements and eventually lead to reproductive isolation. S1 sequence analysis also revealed putative gene conversion events that occurred between different S1 elements of a given species. These events suggest that gene conversion is a minor but significant component of the molecular drive governing S1 concerted evolution.

  17. Search for ammonia in comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Codella, C.; Tozzi, G.; Comoretto, G.; Crovisier, J.; Nesti, R.; Panella, D.; Boissier, J.; Bolli, P.; Brucato, J.; Massi, F.; Tofani, G.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are pristine bodies of the Solar System and their studies can give precious hints on the formation of the Solar System itself. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important, because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of organic matter close to the surface. Here we report the results of a search for NH_3(1,1) emission at 23.7 GHz in comet C/2012 S1 ISON using a new dual-feed K-band receiver mounted on the Medicina 32-m antenna. We observed the comet once close to its perihelion, from 2013 Nov. 25 to Nov. 28, when its heliocentric distance changed from 0.25 au to 0.03 au. We integrated about 6 hrs per day, obtaining high-spectral-resolution (1 km/s) spectra with a typical rms noise of 10 mK. Such sensitivity allowed us to derive an upper limit of Q(NH_3) of about 2.5 ×10^{29} mol/s on November 26. This upper limit would correspond to a Q(H_2O) of about 2.5 ×10^{31} mol/s, assuming the typical Q(H_2O)/Q(NH_3) ratio of 100. These findings confirm that no significant Q(H_2O) enhancement happened near the perihelion, consistent with a definitive decrease of molecules production rate.

  18. The Milky Way's rotation curve out to 100 kpc and its constraint on the Galactic mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Liu, X.-W.; Yuan, H.-B.; Xiang, M.-S.; Zhang, H.-W.; Chen, B.-Q.; Ren, J.-J.; Wang, C.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Cao, Z.-H.

    2016-08-01

    The rotation curve (RC) of the Milky Way out to ˜ 100 kpc has been constructed using ˜ 16,000 primary red clump giants (PRCGs) in the outer disk selected from the LSS-GAC and the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey, combined with ˜ 5700 halo K giants (HKGs) selected from the SDSS/SEGUE survey. To derive the RC, the PRCG sample of the warm disc population and the HKG sample of halo stellar population are respectively analyzed using a kinematical model allowing for the asymmetric drift corrections and re-analyzed using the spherical Jeans equation along with measurements of the anisotropic parameter β currently available. The typical uncertainties of RC derived from the PRCG and HKG samples are respectively 5-7 km s-1 and several tens km s-1. We determine a circular velocity at the solar position, Vc(R0) = 240 ± 6 km s-1 and an azimuthal peculiar speed of the Sun, V⊙ = 12.1 ± 7.6 km s-1, both in good agreement with the previous determinations. The newly constructed RC has a generally flat value of 240 km s-1 within a Galactocentric distance r of 25 kpc and then decreases steadily to 150 km s-1 at r ˜ 100 kpc. On top of this overall trend, the RC exhibits two prominent localized dips, one at r ˜ 11 kpc and another at r ˜ 19 kpc. From the newly constructed RC, combined with other constraints, we have built a parametrized mass model for the Galaxy, yielding a virial mass of the Milky Way's dark matter halo of 0.90^{+0.07}_{-0.08} × 10^{12} M⊙ and a local dark matter density, ρ _{odot , dm} = 0.32^{+0.02}_{-0.02} GeV cm-3.

  19. Pan-STARRS 1 observations of the unusual active Centaur P/2011 S1(Gibbs)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H. W.; Ip, W. H.; Chen, W. P.; Chen, Y. T.; Lacerda, P.; Holman, M.; Protopapas, P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is an outer solar system comet or active Centaur with a similar orbit to that of the famous 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has been observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) sky survey from 2010 to 2012. The resulting data allow us to perform multi-color studies of the nucleus and coma of the comet. Analysis of PS1 images reveals that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has a small nucleus <4 km radius, with colors g {sub P1} – r {sub P1} = 0.5 ± 0.02, r {sub P1} – i {sub P1} = 0.12 ± 0.02, and i {sub P1} – z {sub P1} = 0.46 ± 0.03. The comet remained active from 2010 to 2012, with a model-dependent mass-loss rate of ∼100 kg s{sup –1}. The mass-loss rate per unit surface area of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is as high as that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, making it one of the most active Centaurs. The mass-loss rate also varies with time from ∼40 kg s{sup –1} to 150 kg s{sup –1}. Due to its rather circular orbit, we propose that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) has 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1-like outbursts that control the outgassing rate. The results indicate that it may have a similar surface composition to that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. Our numerical simulations show that the future orbital evolution of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is more similar to that of the main population of Centaurs than to that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. The results also demonstrate that P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) is dynamically unstable and can only remain near its current orbit for roughly a thousand years.

  20. 45 Km Horizontal Path Optical Link Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Ceniceros, J.; Novak, M.; Jeganathan, M.; Portillo, A.; Erickson, D.; Depew, J.; Sanii, B.; Lesh, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Mountain-top to mountain-top optical link experiments have been initiated at JPL, in order to perform a systems level evaluation of optical communications. Progress made so far is reported. ne NASA, JPL developed optical communications demonstrator (OCD) is used to transmit a laser signal from Strawberry Peak (SP), located in the San Bernadino mountains of California. This laser beam is received by a 0.6 m aperture telescope at JPL's Table Mountain Facility (TMF), located in Wrightwood, California. The optical link is bi-directional with the TMF telescope transmitting a continuous 4-wave (cw) 780 run beacon and the OCD sending back a 840 nm, 100 - 500 Mbps pseudo noise (PN) modulated, laser beam. The optical link path is at an average altitude of 2 km above sea level, covers a range of 46.8 km and provides an atmospheric channel equivalent to approx. 4 air masses. Average received power measured at either end fall well within the uncertainties predicted by link analysis. The reduction in normalized intensity variance (sigma(sup 2, sub I)) for the 4-beam beacon, compared to each individual beam, at SP, was from approx. 0.68 to 0.22. With some allowance for intra-beam mis-alignment, this is consistent with incoherent averaging. The sigma(sup2, sub I) measured at TMF approx. 0.43 +/- 0.22 exceeded the expected aperture averaged value of less than 0.1, probably because of beam wander. The focused spot sizes of approx. 162 +/- 6 microns at the TMF Coude and approx. 64 +/- 3 microns on the OCD compare to the predicted size range of 52 - 172 microns and 57 - 93 microns, respectively. This is consistent with 4 - 5 arcsec of atmospheric "seeing". The preliminary evaluation of OCD's fine tracking indicates that the uncompensated tracking error is approx. 3.3 micro rad compared to approx. 1.7 micro rad observed in the laboratory. Fine tracking performance was intermittent, primarily due to beacon fades on the OCD tracking sensor. The best bit error rates observed while

  1. From NEMO to KM3NeT-Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolau, Carlo A.

    2014-04-01

    The KM3NeT-Italy Collaboration has entered the production stage of an 8 tower apparatus that will be deployed at about 100 km off the Sicily coast. The architecture of the system is based on the NEMO Phase2 prototype tower which is taking data since the deployment in March 2013. In order to optimize production costs, power consumption, and usability, some components have been re-engineered by taking advantage of the previously gained experience and technological progress. The aim of this contribution is to give an overview of the main features that characterize the new apparatus.

  2. CYP2S1: A short review

    SciTech Connect

    Saarikoski, Sirkku T. . E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P.; Hankinson, Oliver; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2005-09-01

    A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

  3. News from KM3NeT

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Ulrich F.; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    KM3NeT is a future research infrastructure in the Mediterranean Sea, hosting a multi-cubic-kilometre neutrino telescope and nodes for Earth and Sea sciences. In this report we shortly summarise the genesis of the KM3NeT project and present key elements of its technical design. The physics objectives of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope and some selected sensitivity estimates are discussed. Finally, some first results from prototype operations and the next steps towards implementation – in particular the first construction phase in 2014/15 – are described.

  4. Gravity Waves Near 300 km Over the Polar Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hodges, R. R.; Coley, W. R.; Carignan, G. R.; Spencer, N. W.

    1995-01-01

    Distinctive wave forms in the distributions of vertical velocity and temperature of both neutral particles and ions are frequently observed from Dynamics Explorer 2 at altitudes above 250 km over the polar caps. These are interpreted as being due to internal gravity waves propagating in the neutral atmosphere. The disturbances characterized by vertical velocity perturbations of the order of 100 m/s and horizontal wave lengths along the satellite path of about 500 km. They often extend across the entire polar cap. The associated temperature perturbations indicate that the horizontal phase progression is from the nightside to the dayside. Vertical displacements are inferred to be of the order of 10 km and the periods to be of the order of 10(exp 3) s. The waves must propagate in the neutral atmosphere, but they usually are most clearly recognizable in the observations of ion vertical velocity and ion temperature. By combining the neutral pressure calculated from the observed neutral concentration and temperature with the vertical component of the neutral velocity, an upward energy flux of the order of 0.04 erg/sq cm-s at 250 km has been calculated, which is about equal to the maximum total solar ultraviolet heat input above that altitude. Upward energy fluxes calculated from observations on orbital passes at altitudes from 250 to 560 km indicate relatively little attenuation with altitude.

  5. Status of KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccobene, G.

    2016-07-01

    The recent observation of cosmic neutrinos by IceCube has pushed the quest towards the identification of cosmic sources of high-energy particles. The KM3NeT Collaboration is now ready to launch the massive construction of detection units to be installed in deep sea to build a km-cubic size neutrino telescope. The main elements of the detector, the status of the project and the expected perfomances are briefly reported.

  6. Cardiomyocyte S1P1 Receptor–mediated Extracellular Signal–related Kinase Signaling and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rong; Hoover, Holly E.; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Alano, Conrad C.; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the ability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) to desensitize extracellular signal–related kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase linked to antiapoptotic responses in the heart. In isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes, S1P (10 nM–5 μM) induced ERK phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. S1P stimulation of ERK was completely inhibited by an S1P1/3 subtype receptor antagonist (VPC23019), by a Gi protein inhibitor (pertussis toxin) and by a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor (PD98059). A selective S1P3 receptor antagonist (CAY10444) had no effect on S1P-induced ERK activation. The selective S1P1 agonist SEW2871 also induced ERK phosphorylation. Activation of ERK by restimulation with 100 nM S1P was suppressed after 1 hour of preincubation with 100 nM S1P but recovered fully the next day, suggesting receptor recycling. Similar results were obtained in protein kinase Cε-null cardiomyocytes. Treatment with the nonselective S1P receptor agonist FTY720 for 1 hour also reduced phospho-ERK expression in response to subsequent S1P stimulation. In contrast to S1P, some desensitization to FTY720 persisted after overnight exposure. Cell death induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation was reduced by pretreatment with exogenous S1P. This enhanced survival was abrogated by pretreatment with PD98059, VPC23019, or pertussis toxin. Thus, exogenous S1P induces rapid and reversible S1P1-mediated ERK phosphorylation. S1P-induced adult mouse cardiomyocyte survival requires ERK activation mediated via an S1P1–Gi pathway. PMID:19433984

  7. Origins of the 520-km discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnik, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The 520-km discontinuity is often explained by the phase transition from wadsleyite to ringwoodite, although the theoretical impedance of this transition is so small that the related converted and reflected seismic phases could hardly be seen in the seismograms. At the same time there are numerous reports on observations of a large discontinuity at this depth, especially in the data on SS precursors and P-wave wide-angle reflections. Revenaugh and Jordan (1991) argued that this discontinuity is related to the garnet/post-garnet transformation. Gu et al. (1998) preferred very deep continental roots extending into the transition zone. Deuss and Woodhouse proposed splitting of the 520-km discontinuity into two discontinuities, whilst Bock (1994) denied evidence of the 520-km discontinuity in the SS precursors. Our approach to this problem is based on the analysis of S and P receiver functions. Most of our data are related to hot-spots in and around the Atlantic where the appropriate converted phases are often comparable in amplitude with P410s and S410p. Both S and P receiver functions provide strong evidence of a low S velocity in a depth range from 450 km to 510 km at some locations. The 520-km discontinuity appears to be the base of this low-velocity layer. Our observations of the low S velocity in the upper transition zone are very consistent with the indications of a drop in the solidus temperature of carbonated peridotite in the same pressure range (Keshav et al. 2011), and this phenomenon provides a viable alternative to the other explanations of the 520-km discontinuity.

  8. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

  9. ALMA observations of gas and dust in the coma of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, M.; Remijan, A.; Milam, S.; Mumma, M.; Charnley, S.; Paganini, L.; Boissier, J.; Villanueva, G.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Kuan, Y.; Lis, D.; Crovisier, J.; Coulson, I.; Minniti, D.

    2014-07-01

    Ground-based studies of cometary comae provide indirect information on the compositions of the nuclear ices, and thus provide insight into the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar nebula. To realize the full potential of gas-phase coma observations as probes of solar-system evolution requires a complete understanding of the gas-release mechanisms. However, previous observations have been unable to ascertain the precise origins of fundamental coma species including H_2CO, HCN, and HNC, and details regarding the possible formation of these species in the coma are not well understood. Here, we present spatially and spectrally-resolved ALMA sub-mm images of the distributions of HCN, HNC, CH_3OH, H_2CO, and dust in the coma of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), observed during the outburst event on November 15-17 (at r_H = 0.54-0.61 au and Δ = 0.9 au). Our observations reveal an unprecedented level of detail in the distributions of these fundamental coma constituents, and permit accurate measurement of their origins in the coma. Observations were made using ALMA Band 7 in Cycle 1 (Early Science) mode in the frequency range 339-364 GHz, with 25-29 12-m antennae. Weather conditions were excellent, with good atmospheric phase stability and low precipitable water vapor (0.5-0.8 mm at zenith). The spatial resolution was 0.4-0.8'' (with maximum recoverable angular scales approx. 5-10''), and the spectral resolution was 0.4 km s^{-1}. The ALMA image cubes show kinematically and spatially-resolved structures in HCN, HNC, CH_3OH, and H_2CO emission. Whereas the CH_3OH and HCN distributions are consistent with release from (or within 100 km of) the nucleus, the H_2CO data indicate coma release from a parent species with scale-length on the order of a few hundred km. The HNC distribution suggests release in clumpy, collimated outflows possibly as a result of the breakdown of a macromolecular/dust precursor. Clear 0.9-mm continuum emission was detected, showing a sharp central

  10. The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

  11. 100 Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    One hundred repetitions--100 "useful" repetitions. This notion has guided the author's work in alternative education programs for almost 20 years, dealing with the most challenging students, from addicts to conduct-disordered adolescents to traumatized 5th graders. There are no magic tricks. The role of educators is to align with the healthy…

  12. Identification of benzoxazole analogs as novel, S1P(3) sparing S1P(1) agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guanghui; Meng, Qinghua; Liu, Qian; Xu, Xuesong; Xu, Qiongfeng; Ren, Feng; Guo, Taylor B; Lu, Hongtao; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen

    2012-06-15

    A novel series of benzoxazole-derived S1P(1) agonists were designed based on scaffold hopping molecular design strategy combined with computational approaches. Extensive SAR studies led to the discovery of compound 17d as a selective S1P(1) agonist (over S1P(3)) with high CNS penetration and favorable DMPK properties. 17d also demonstrated in vivo pharmacological efficacy to reduce blood lymphocyte in mice after oral administration.

  13. Characterizing the Dust Coma of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) at 4.15 AU from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Knight, Matthew M.; Farnham, Tony L.; Weaver, Harold A.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Mutchler, Max J.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Lamy, Philippe; Toth, Imre

    2013-12-01

    We report results from broadband visible images of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 on 2013 April 10. C/ISON's coma brightness follows a 1/ρ (where ρ is the projected distance from the nucleus) profile out to 5000 km, consistent with a constant speed dust outflow model. The turnaround distance in the sunward direction suggests that the dust coma is composed of sub-micron-sized particles emitted at speeds of tens of m s-1. A(θ)fρ, which is commonly used to characterize the dust production rate, was 1340 and 1240 cm in the F606W and F438W filters, respectively, in apertures <1.''6 in radius. The dust colors are slightly redder than solar, with a slope of 5.0% ± 0.2% per 100 nm, increasing to >10% per 100 nm 10,000 km down the tail. The colors are similar to those of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and other long-period comets, but somewhat bluer than typical values for short-period comets. The spatial color variations are also reminiscent of C/Hale-Bopp. A sunward jet is visible in enhanced images, curving to the north and then tailward in the outer coma. The 1.''6 long jet is centered at a position angle of 291°, with an opening angle of ~45°. The jet morphology remains unchanged over 19 hr of our observations, suggesting that it is near the rotational pole of the nucleus, and implying that the pole points to within 30° of (R.A., decl.) = (330°, 0°). This pole orientation indicates a high obliquity of 50°-80°.

  14. Coma in Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) at ~4 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Zubko, Evgenij; Hines, Dean C.; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Kaydash, Vadym; Muinonen, Karri; Knight, Matthew W.; Sitko, Michael L.; Lisse, Carrey M.; Mutchler, Max; Wooden, Diane H.; Li, Jian-Yang; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    We analyze HST observations of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) at heliocentric distance ~4 au and phase angle ~12-14 degree. The inner coma (< 5000 km) reveals two polarimetric features, positive degree of linear polarization P = (2.48 ± 0.45)% at projected distances less than 236 km and negative polarization P = - (1.6 ± 0.45)% at 1000 - 5000 km [Hines et al. 2014: ApJL 780, L32]. At these projected distances, average color slope was found to be ~6% per 100 nm [Li et al. 2013: ApJL 779, L3]. When considered simultaneously, these two features place significant constraint on the physical and chemical properties of dust particles [Zubko et al. 2015: Planet. Space Sci., http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2015.08.002].We model this response with agglomerated debris particles, having highly irregular morphology and density of constituent material being consistent with in situ studies of comets. We consider particles of 28 different refractive indices that correspond to in situ studies of comets and plausible assumptions on chemical composition of cometary dust and ices. What emerges from our analysis is that the ISON coma was chemically heterogeneous at the epoch of observation. The positive polarization at small projected distances suggests a high spatial concentration of highly absorbing materials, such as amorphous carbon and/or organics highly irradiated with UV radiation. At larger distances, the negative polarization P = - (1.6 ± 0.45)% and color slope ~6% per 100 nm appear consistent with organics slightly processed with UV radiation, tholins, Mg-Fe silicates, and Mg-rich silicates contaminated with ~10% (by volume) amorphous carbon. A significant abundance of pure water-ice particles and/or pure Mg-rich silicates must be ruled out in this region. These materials have been found in situ in other comets and also detected with imaging polarimetry in the circumnucleus halo regions. Analyses of polarimetric images suggest that Mg-rich silicates could originate from a

  15. The estimation of 550 km x 550 km mean gravity anomalies. [from free atmosphere gravimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, M. R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    The calculation of 550 km X 550 km mean gravity anomalies from 1 degree X 1 degree mean free-air gravimetry data is discussed. The block estimate procedure developed by Kaula was used, and estimates for 1452 of the 1654 blocks were obtained.

  16. Using of Optic Fiber Links for Reference Frequency Transmission Over a Distance up to 85 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, D. M.; Malymon, A. N.; Balaev, R. I.; Kurchanov, A. F.; Troyan, V. I.

    A scheme of standard RF signal transmission over an electronically stabilized fiber link is described in the paper. The system was tested for fiber link length up to 85 km. In this scheme an intermediate controlled crystal oscillator of 100 MHz was used as a compensation node. Experimental results of the 100 MHz RF signal transmission over the 85 km optical fiber are presented. It is demonstrated that using a system of electronic compensation provides significant advantages in spatially separated standards comparison.

  17. Large Circular Basin - 1300-km diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Close-up view of one-half of a 1300-km diameter circular basin the largest observed on Mercury. The other half is hidden beyond the terminator to the left. Hills and valleys extend in a radial fashion outward from the main ring. Interior of the large basin is completely flooded by plains materials; adjacent lowlands are also partially flooded and superimposed on the plains are bowl shaped craters. Wrinkle ridges are abundant on the plains materials. The area shown is 1008 miles (1600 km) from the top to the bottom of the picture. Sun's illumination is from the right. Blurred linear lines extending across the picture near bottom are missing data lines that have been filled in by the computer. Mariner 10 encountered Mercury on Friday, March 29th, 1974, passing the planet on the darkside 431 miles (690-km) from the surface.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    NOTE: This image was scanned from physical media.

  18. Km3Net Italy - Seafloor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaleo, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT European project aims to construct a large volume underwater neutrino telescope in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea. INFN and KM3NeT collaboration, thanks to a dedicated funding of 21.000.000 € (PON 2007-2013), are committed to build and deploy the Phase 1 of the telescope, composed of a network of detection units: 8 towers, equipped with single photomultiplier optical modules, and 24 strings, equipped with multi-photomultipliers optical modules. All the towers and strings are connected to the main electro optical cable by means of a network of junction boxes and electro optical interlink cables. Each junction box is an active node able to provide all the necessary power to the detection units and to guarantee the data transmission between the detector and the on-shore control station. The KM3NeT Italia project foresees the realization and the installation of the first part of the deep sea network, composed of three junction boxes, one for the towers and two for the strings. In July 2015, two junction boxes have been deployed and connected to the new cable termination frame installed during the same sea campaign. The third and last one will be installed in November 2015. The status of the deep sea network is presented together with technical details of the project.

  19. Laboratory 20-km cycle time trial reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Zavorsky, G S; Murias, J M; Gow, J; Kim, D J; Poulin-Harnois, C; Kubow, S; Lands, L C

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the reproducibility of laboratory based 20-km time trials in well trained versus recreational cyclists. Eighteen cyclists (age = 34 +/- 8 yrs; body mass index = 23.1 +/- 2.2 kg/m (2); VO(2max) = 4.19 +/- 0.65 L/min) completed three 20-km time trials over a month on a Velotron cycle ergometer. Average power output (PO) (W), speed, and heart rate (HR) were significantly lower in the first time trial compared to the second and third time trial. The coefficients of variation (CV) between the second and third trial of the top eight performers for average PO, time to completion, and speed were 1.2 %, 0.6 %, 0.5 %, respectively, compared to 4.8 %, 2.0 %, and 2.3 % for the bottom ten. In addition, the average HR, VO(2), and percentage of VO(2max) were similar between trials. This study demonstrated that (1) a familiarization session improves the reliability of the measurements (i.e., average PO, time to completion and speed), and (2) the CV was much smaller for the best performers.

  20. Global modeling with GEOS-5 from 50-km to 1-km with a single unified GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, William; Suarez, Max; Molod, Andrea; Barahona, Donifan

    2015-04-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5) of the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is uniquely designed to adapt to increasing resolution. This supports application of GEOS-5 for decadal scale climate simulation and reanalysis with a horizontal resolution of 50-kilometers (km), high-resolution numerical weather prediction at 25- to 14-km, and global mesoscale modeling at resolutions of 7- to 1.5-km. Resolution-aware parameterizations and dynamics support this diverse portfolio of applications within a single unified GEOS-5 GCM code-base. We will discuss the adaptation of physics parameterizations with increasing resolution. This includes the role of deep convective parameterization, the move to an improved two-moment microphysics scheme, the need for shallow convective parameterization, and the role of non-hydrostatic dynamics and implicit/explicit damping. Parameterization and dynamics evaluation are explored not only in global integrations with GEOS-5 but with radiative convective equilibrium tests that permit the rapid exploration of high-resolution simulations in a smaller doubly periodic Cartesian domain. Simulation results will highlight intercomparisons of model biases in cloud forcing and precipitation from the 30-year 50-km MERRA-2 reanalysis, 50- to 25-km free-running AMIP simulations, a 2-year 7-km global mesoscale simulation, and monthly global simulations at 3.5-km. A global 1.5-km simulation with GEOS-5 highlights our pursuit of truly convection permitting global simulations with GEOS-5. The tuning evaluation for this simulation using doubly periodic radiative convective equilibrium experiments will be discussed.

  1. Improved Blocking at 25km Resolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemann, R.; Demory, M. E.; Mizielinski, M.; Roberts, M.; Shaffrey, L.; Strachan, J.; Vidale, P. L.; Matsueda, M.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that relatively coarse resolution of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) limits their ability to represent mid-latitude blocking. Assessing the role of model resolution for blocking is computationally expensive, as multi-decadal simulations at the desired resolution are necessary for a robust estimation of blocking statistics. Here, we use an ensemble of three atmosphere-only global models for which simulations that fulfil this requirement are available at resolutions of roughly 25km horizontal grid spacing in the mid-latitudes. This corresponds to about a fourfold increase in resolution over the highest-resolution CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5) models. The three models are (i) the ECMWF model (IFS) as used in the project Athena, (ii) the MRI-AGCM 3.2, and (iii) our own HadGEM3-GA3 simulations obtained in the UPSCALE project (UK on PrACE - weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk). We use a two-dimensional blocking index to assess the representation of blocking in these simulations and in three reanalyses (ERA-Interim, ERA-40, MERRA). We evaluate the spatial distribution of climatological blocking frequency, the interannual variability of blocking occurrence as well as the persistence of blocking events. Furthermore, the degree to which blocking biases are associated with mean-state biases is quantified in the different models. We find that the representation of blocking remains very sensitive to atmospheric resolution as the grid spacing is reduced to about 25km. The simulated blocking frequency increases with resolution, mostly so as to reduce the model bias, yet there is considerable variation between the results obtained for different models, seasons, and for the Atlantic and Pacific regions.

  2. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Thomas; Scheidl, Thomas; Fink, Matthias; Handsteiner, Johannes; Wittmann, Bernhard; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2015-11-17

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for unknown quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g., for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e., entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 SDs beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Because our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our research to lay the ground for a fully fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel.

  3. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Thomas; Scheidl, Thomas; Fink, Matthias; Handsteiner, Johannes; Wittmann, Bernhard; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2015-01-01

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for unknown quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g., for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e., entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 SDs beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Because our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our research to lay the ground for a fully fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel. PMID:26578764

  4. Teleportation of entanglement over 143 km.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Thomas; Scheidl, Thomas; Fink, Matthias; Handsteiner, Johannes; Wittmann, Bernhard; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2015-11-17

    As a direct consequence of the no-cloning theorem, the deterministic amplification as in classical communication is impossible for unknown quantum states. This calls for more advanced techniques in a future global quantum network, e.g., for cloud quantum computing. A unique solution is the teleportation of an entangled state, i.e., entanglement swapping, representing the central resource to relay entanglement between distant nodes. Together with entanglement purification and a quantum memory it constitutes a so-called quantum repeater. Since the aforementioned building blocks have been individually demonstrated in laboratory setups only, the applicability of the required technology in real-world scenarios remained to be proven. Here we present a free-space entanglement-swapping experiment between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife, verifying the presence of quantum entanglement between two previously independent photons separated by 143 km. We obtained an expectation value for the entanglement-witness operator, more than 6 SDs beyond the classical limit. By consecutive generation of the two required photon pairs and space-like separation of the relevant measurement events, we also showed the feasibility of the swapping protocol in a long-distance scenario, where the independence of the nodes is highly demanded. Because our results already allow for efficient implementation of entanglement purification, we anticipate our research to lay the ground for a fully fledged quantum repeater over a realistic high-loss and even turbulent quantum channel. PMID:26578764

  5. Far-ultraviolet Observations of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from FORTIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Feldman, Paul D.; Weaver, Harold; Fleming, Brian; Redwine, Keith; Li, Mary J.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2016-09-01

    We have used the unique far-UV imaging capability offered by a sounding-rocket-borne instrument to acquire observations of C/2012 S1 (ISON) when its angular separation with respect to the Sun was 26.°3 on 2013 November 20.49. At the time of observation, the comet’s heliocentric distance and velocity relative to the Sun were r h = 0.43 au and {\\dot{r}}h = -62.7 km s-1. Images dominated by C i λ1657 and H i λ1216 were acquired over a 106 × 106 km2 region. The water production rate implied by the Lyα observations is constrained to be {Q}{{{H}}2{{O}}}≈ 8 × 1029 s-1 while the neutral carbon production rate was {Q}C ≈ 4 ×1028 s-1. The radial profile of C i was consistent with it being a dissociation product of a parent molecule with a lifetime τ ˜ 5 × 104 s, favoring a parent other than CO. We constrain the Q CO production rate to {5}-7.5+1.5 × 1028 s-1 with 1σ errors derived from photon statistics. The upper limit on the Q CO/{Q}{{{H}}2{{O}}} is ≲6%.

  6. Mapping Land Cover Types in Amazon Basin Using 1km JERS-1 Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sassan S.; Nelson, Bruce; Podest, Erika; Holt, John

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the 100 meter JERS-1 Amazon mosaic image was used in a new classifier to generate a I km resolution land cover map. The inputs to the classifier were 1 km resolution mean backscatter and seven first order texture measures derived from the 100 m data by using a 10 x 10 independent sampling window. The classification approach included two interdependent stages: 1) a supervised maximum a posteriori Bayesian approach to classify the mean backscatter image into 5 general land cover categories of forest, savannah, inundated, white sand, and anthropogenic vegetation classes, and 2) a texture measure decision rule approach to further discriminate subcategory classes based on taxonomic information and biomass levels. Fourteen classes were successfully separated at 1 km scale. The results were verified by examining the accuracy of the approach by comparison with the IBGE and the AVHRR 1 km resolution land cover maps.

  7. International Space Station (ISS) S1 Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Shown here is the International Space Station (ISS) S1 Truss in preparation for installation in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at NASA's Kennedy Space Center )KSC)in Florida. The truss launched October 7, 2002 on the STS-112 mission and will be attached during three spacewalks. Constructed primarily of aluminum, it measures 45 feet long, 15 feet wide, 10 feet tall, and weighs over 27,000 pounds. It is one of nine similar truss segments that, combined, will serve as the Station's main backbone, measuring 356 feet from end to end upon completion. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss was flown to the Marshall Space Flight Center, in Huntsville, Alabama where brackets, cable trays, fluid tubing, and other secondary components and outfitting items were added. In Huntsville, it was screened for manufacturing flaws, including pressure and leak checking tubing, and electrical checks for cabling, before being shipped to KSC for final hardware installation and testing. The Space Station's labs, living modules, solar arrays, heat radiators, and other main components will be attached to the truss.

  8. Observing Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) With Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Bauer, J. M.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Kelley, M. S.; Knight, M. M.; Hines, D. C.; Li, J.; Reach, W. T.; Sitko, M. L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Meech, K. J.; Rayner, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    In this talk we discuss the design, implementation, and reduction of observations of Comet ISON from space using the Spitzer Space Telescope on 13.00 - 13.96 Jun UT and from the ground at Lowell Observatory on Jun 11.16 UT and from APO on 14.13 Jun UT. The comet was at distance rh = 3.34 AU from the Sun, distance ΔSpitzer = 3.29 AU and 17.4o phase from SST, and distance ΔEarth = 4.25 AU and 6.8 - 7.3o phase at the time of observation. Preliminary analyses show ISON's Spitzer coma morphology was relatively compact and simple, with a linear anti-solar dust tail > 3x105 km in length and a 1/p profile gas coma extending > 105 km from the nucleus. Afp values in an 18,200 km radius aperture of 840, 890, and 840 ± 80 cm were found at VRI, and 650 ± 100 cm were found at 3.6 micron. Together, the ground-based and Spitzer photometry imply near-neutral dust scattering from the visual through the infrared. An excess at 4.5 µm due to emission from a neutral gas coma is clearly found both morphologically and photometrically. The gas coma total flux and spatial profile and ISON’s discovery distance imply a coma dominated by the stronger CO_2 line emission at 4.67 μm, but we cannot rule out a preponderance of CO emission at 4.26 μm. No variability in our Spitzer photometry at the 0.03 mag level over 24 hrs was seen. We present our imagery, spectrophotometry, and lightcurves, and discuss the physical implications of these measurements of the comet made well outside the ice line.

  9. Hybrid fine scale climatology and microphysics of in-cloud icing: From 32 km reanalysis to 5 km mesoscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamraoui, Fayçal; Benoit, Robert; Perron, Jean; Fortin, Guy; Masson, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In-cloud icing can impose safety concerns and economic challenges for various industries. Icing climate representations proved beneficial for optimal designs and careful planning. The current study investigates in-cloud icing, its related cloud microphysics and introduces a 15-year time period climatology of icing events. The model was initially driven by reanalysis data from North American Regional Reanalysis and downscaled through a two-level nesting of 10 km and 5 km, using a limited-area version of the Global Environment Multiscale Model of the Canadian Meteorological Center. In addition, a hybrid approach is used to reduce time consuming calculations. The simulation realized exclusively on significant icing days, was combined with non-significant icing days as represented by data from NARR. A proof of concept is presented here for a 1000 km area around Gaspé during January for those 15 years. An increase in the number and intensity of icing events has been identified during the last 15 years. From GEM-LAM simulations and within the atmospheric layer between 10 m and 200 m AGL, supercooled liquid water contents indicated a maximum of 0.4 g m- 3, and 50% of the values are less than 0.05 g m- 3. All values of median volume diameters (MVD) are approximately capped by 70 μm and the typical values are around 15 μm. Supercooled Large Droplets represent approximately 5%. The vertical profile of icing climatology demonstrates a steady duration of icing events until the level of 60 m. The altitudes of 60 m and 100 m indicate substantial icing intensification toward higher elevations. GEM-LAM demonstrated a substantial improvement in the calculation of in-cloud icing, reducing significantly the challenge posed by complex terrains.

  10. CHARACTERIZING THE DUST COMA OF COMET C/2012 S1 (ISON) AT 4.15 AU FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Farnham, Tony L.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Knight, Matthew M.; Weaver, Harold A.; Mutchler, Max J.; Lamy, Philippe; Toth, Imre E-mail: msk@astro.umd.edu E-mail: ma@astro.umd.edu E-mail: knight@lowell.edu E-mail: mutchler@stsci.edu E-mail: tothi@konkoly.hu

    2013-12-10

    We report results from broadband visible images of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 on 2013 April 10. C/ISON's coma brightness follows a 1/ρ (where ρ is the projected distance from the nucleus) profile out to 5000 km, consistent with a constant speed dust outflow model. The turnaround distance in the sunward direction suggests that the dust coma is composed of sub-micron-sized particles emitted at speeds of tens of m s{sup –1}. A(θ)fρ, which is commonly used to characterize the dust production rate, was 1340 and 1240 cm in the F606W and F438W filters, respectively, in apertures <1.''6 in radius. The dust colors are slightly redder than solar, with a slope of 5.0% ± 0.2% per 100 nm, increasing to >10% per 100 nm 10,000 km down the tail. The colors are similar to those of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and other long-period comets, but somewhat bluer than typical values for short-period comets. The spatial color variations are also reminiscent of C/Hale-Bopp. A sunward jet is visible in enhanced images, curving to the north and then tailward in the outer coma. The 1.''6 long jet is centered at a position angle of 291°, with an opening angle of ∼45°. The jet morphology remains unchanged over 19 hr of our observations, suggesting that it is near the rotational pole of the nucleus, and implying that the pole points to within 30° of (R.A., decl.) = (330°, 0°). This pole orientation indicates a high obliquity of 50°-80°.

  11. S1PR1 Tyr143 phosphorylation downregulates endothelial cell surface S1PR1 expression and responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Alejandra; Schmidt, Tracy Thennes; Yazbeck, Pascal; Rajput, Charu; Desai, Bhushan; Sukriti, Sukriti; Giantsos-Adams, Kristina; Knezevic, Nebojsa; Malik, Asrar B.; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) plays a key role in repairing endothelial barrier function. We addressed the role of phosphorylation of the three intracellular tyrosine residues of S1PR1 in endothelial cells in regulating the receptor responsiveness and endothelial barrier function regulated by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-mediated activation of S1PR1. We demonstrated that phosphorylation of only Y143 site was required for S1PR1 internalization in response to S1P. Maximal S1PR1 internalization was seen in 20 min but S1PR1 returned to the cell surface within 1 h accompanied by Y143-dephosphorylation. Cell surface S1PR1 loss paralleled defective endothelial barrier enhancement induced by S1P. Expression of phospho-defective (Y143F) or phospho-mimicking (Y143D) mutants, respectively, failed to internalize or showed unusually high receptor internalization, consistent with the requirement of Y143 in regulating cell surface S1PR1 expression. Phosphorylation of the five S1PR1 C-terminal serine residues did not affect the role of Y143 phosphorylation in signaling S1PR1 internalization. Thus, rapid reduction of endothelial cell surface expression of S1PR1 subsequent to Y143 phosphorylation is a crucial mechanism of modulating S1PR1 signaling, and hence the endothelial barrier repair function of S1P. PMID:25588843

  12. Intersystem crossing rates of S1 state keto-amino cytosine at low excess energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Etinski, Mihajlo; Blaser, Susan; Frey, Hans-Martin; Marian, Christel; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    The amino-keto tautomer of supersonic jet-cooled cytosine undergoes intersystem crossing (ISC) from the v = 0 and low-lying vibronic levels of its S1(1ππ∗) state. We investigate these ISC rates experimentally and theoretically as a function of S1 state vibrational excess energy Eexc. The S1 vibronic levels are pumped with a ˜5 ns UV laser, the S1 and triplet state ion signals are separated by prompt or delayed ionization with a second UV laser pulse. After correcting the raw ISC yields for the relative S1 and T1 ionization cross sections, we obtain energy dependent ISC quantum yields QISC corr = 1 % -5%. These are combined with previously measured vibronic state-specific decay rates, giving ISC rates kISC = 0.4-1.5 ṡ 109 s-1, the corresponding S1⇝S0 internal conversion (IC) rates are 30-100 times larger. Theoretical ISC rates are computed using SCS-CC2 methods, which predict rapid ISC from the S1; v = 0 state with kISC = 3 ṡ 109 s-1 to the T1(3ππ∗) triplet state. The surprisingly high rate of this El Sayed-forbidden transition is caused by a substantial admixture of 1nOπ∗ character into the S1(1ππ∗) wave function at its non-planar minimum geometry. The combination of experiment and theory implies that (1) below Eexc = 550 cm-1 in the S1 state, S1⇝S0 internal conversion dominates the nonradiative decay with kIC ≥ 2 ṡ 1010 s-1, (2) the calculated S1⇝T1 (1ππ∗⇝3ππ∗) ISC rate is in good agreement with experiment, (3) being El-Sayed forbidden, the S1⇝T1 ISC is moderately fast (kISC = 3 ṡ 109 s-1), and not ultrafast, as claimed by other calculations, and (4) at Eexc ˜ 550 cm-1 the IC rate increases by ˜50 times, probably by accessing the lowest conical intersection (the C5-twist CI) and thereby effectively switching off the ISC decay channels.

  13. Hidden treasures - 50 km points of interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lommi, Matias; Kortelainen, Jaana

    2015-04-01

    Tampere is third largest city in Finland and a regional centre. During 70's there occurred several communal mergers. Nowadays this local area has both strong and diversed identity - from wilderness and agricultural fields to high density city living. Outside the city center there are interesting geological points unknown for modern city settlers. There is even a local proverb, "Go abroad to Teisko!". That is the area the Hidden Treasures -student project is focused on. Our school Tammerkoski Upper Secondary School (or Gymnasium) has emphasis on visual arts. We are going to offer our art students scientific and artistic experiences and knowledge about the hidden treasures of Teisko area and involve the Teisko inhabitants into this project. Hidden treasures - Precambrian subduction zone and a volcanism belt with dense bed of gold (Au) and arsenic (As), operating goldmines and quarries of minerals and metamorphic slates. - North of subduction zone a homogenic precambrian magmastone area with quarries, products known as Kuru Grey. - Former ashores of post-glasial Lake Näsijärvi and it's sediments enabled the developing agriculture and sustained settlement. Nowadays these ashores have both scenery and biodiversity values. - Old cattle sheds and dairy buildings made of local granite stones related to cultural stonebuilding inheritance. - Local active community of Kapee, about 100 inhabitants. Students will discover information of these "hidden" phenomena, and rendering this information trough Enviromental Art Method. Final form of this project will be published in several artistic and informative geocaches. These caches are achieved by a GPS-based special Hidden Treasures Cycling Route and by a website guiding people to find these hidden points of interests.

  14. Exogenous S1P Exposure Potentiates Ischemic Stroke Damage That Is Reduced Possibly by Inhibiting S1P Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunjung; Han, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sejin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Choi, Ji Woong; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Initial and recurrent stroke produces central nervous system (CNS) damage, involving neuroinflammation. Receptor-mediated S1P signaling can influence neuroinflammation and has been implicated in cerebral ischemia through effects on the immune system. However, S1P-mediated events also occur within the brain itself where its roles during stroke have been less well studied. Here we investigated the involvement of S1P signaling in initial and recurrent stroke by using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (M/R) model combined with analyses of S1P signaling. Gene expression for S1P receptors and involved enzymes was altered during M/R, supporting changes in S1P signaling. Direct S1P microinjection into the normal CNS induced neuroglial activation, implicating S1P-initiated neuroinflammatory responses that resembled CNS changes seen during initial M/R challenge. Moreover, S1P microinjection combined with M/R potentiated brain damage, approximating a model for recurrent stroke dependent on S1P and suggesting that reduction in S1P signaling could ameliorate stroke damage. Delivery of FTY720 that removes S1P signaling with chronic exposure reduced damage in both initial and S1P-potentiated M/R-challenged brain, while reducing stroke markers like TNF-α. These results implicate direct S1P CNS signaling in the etiology of initial and recurrent stroke that can be therapeutically accessed by S1P modulators acting within the brain. PMID:26576074

  15. Neuromuscular characteristics and fatigue during 10 km running.

    PubMed

    Paavolainen, L; Nummela, A; Rusko, H; Häkkinen, K

    1999-11-01

    This study investigated neuromuscular characteristics and fatigue during 10 km running (10 K) performance in well-trained endurance athletes with different distance running capability. Nine high (HC) and ten low (LC) caliber endurance athletes performed the 10 K on a 200 m indoor track, constant velocity lap (CVL, 4.5 m x s(-1)) 5 times during the course of the 10 K and maximal 20 m speed test before (20 m(b)) and after (20 m(a)) the 10 K. Running velocity (V), ground contact times (CT), ground reaction forces (F) and electromyographic activity (EMG) of the leg muscles (vastus lateralis; VL, biceps femoris; BF, gastrocnemius; GA) were measured during 20 m(b), 20 m(a), and CVLs. The 10 K times differed (p<0.001) between HC and LC (36.3+/-1.2 and 39.2+/-2.0 min, respectively) but no differences were observed in 20 m(b) velocity. The 10 K led to significant (p<0.05) decreases in V, F and integrated EMG (IEMG) and increases in CTs of 20 m(a) in both groups. No changes were observed in HC or LC in F and IEMG during the CVLs but HC showed shorter (p<0.05) mean CT of CVLs than LC. A significant correlation (r = -0.56, p<0.05) was observed between the mean CT of CVLs and velocity of 10 K (V10K). Pre-activity of GA in relation to the IEMG of the total contact phase during the CVLs was higher (p<0.05) in HC than LC. The relative IEMGs of VL and GA in the propulsion phase compared to the IEMG of the 20 m(b) were lower (p<0.05) in HC than LC. In conclusion, marked fatigue took place in both HC and LC during the 10 K but the fatigue-induced changes in maximal 20 m run did not differentiate endurance athletes with different V10K. However, a capability to produce force rapidly throughout the 10 K accompanied with optimal preactivation and contact phase activation seem to be important for 10 km running performance in well trained endurance athletes.

  16. Nature and statistical properties of quasar associated absorption systems in the XQ-100 Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, S.; D'Odorico, V.; Prochaska, J. X.; Cristiani, S.; Cupani, G.; Ellison, S.; López, S.; Becker, G. D.; Berg, T. A. M.; Christensen, L.; Denney, K. D.; Hamann, F.; Pâris, I.; Vestergaard, M.; Worseck, G.

    2016-11-01

    We statistically study the physical properties of a sample of narrow absorption line (NAL) systems looking for empirical evidences to distinguish between intrinsic and intervening NALs without taking into account any a priori definition or velocity cut-off. We analyse the spectra of 100 quasars with 3.5 < zem < 4.5, observed with X-shooter/Very Large Telescope in the context of the XQ-100 Legacy Survey. We detect an ˜8σ excess in the C IV number density within 10 000 km s- 1 of the quasar emission redshift with respect to the random occurrence of NALs. This excess does not show a dependence on the quasar bolometric luminosity and it is not due to the redshift evolution of NALs. It extends far beyond the standard 5000 km s- 1 cut-off traditionally defined for associated absorption lines. We propose to modify this definition, extending the threshold to 10 000 km s- 1 when weak absorbers (equivalent width < 0.2 Å) are also considered. We infer N V is the ion that better traces the effects of the quasar ionization field, offering the best statistical tool to identify intrinsic systems. Following this criterion, we estimate that the fraction of quasars in our sample hosting an intrinsic NAL system is 33 per cent. Lastly, we compare the properties of the material along the quasar line of sight, derived from our sample, with results based on close quasar pairs investigating the transverse direction. We find a deficiency of cool gas (traced by C II) along the line of sight connected to the quasar host galaxy, in contrast with what is observed in the transverse direction.

  17. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  18. 21 CFR 100.100 - Misleading containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (e.g., where some minimum package size is necessary to accommodate required food labeling (excluding... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Misleading containers. 100.100 Section 100.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  19. 21 CFR 100.100 - Misleading containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (e.g., where some minimum package size is necessary to accommodate required food labeling (excluding... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Misleading containers. 100.100 Section 100.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  20. 21 CFR 100.100 - Misleading containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (e.g., where some minimum package size is necessary to accommodate required food labeling (excluding... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Misleading containers. 100.100 Section 100.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  1. 21 CFR 100.100 - Misleading containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (e.g., where some minimum package size is necessary to accommodate required food labeling (excluding... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Misleading containers. 100.100 Section 100.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  2. 21 CFR 100.100 - Misleading containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (e.g., where some minimum package size is necessary to accommodate required food labeling (excluding... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Misleading containers. 100.100 Section 100.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  3. Conformationally Constrained, Stable, Triplet Ground State (S = 1) Nitroxide Diradicals. Antiferromagnetic Chains of S = 1 Diradicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Takahashi, Masahiro; Pink, Maren; Spagnol, Gaelle; Rajca, Suchada

    2008-06-30

    Nitroxide diradicals, in which nitroxides are annelated to m-phenylene forming tricyclic benzobisoxazine-like structures, have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, magnetic resonance (EPR and {sup 1}H NMR) spectroscopy, as well as magnetic studies in solution and in solid state. For the octamethyl derivative of benzobisoxazine nitroxide diradical, the conformationally constrained nitroxide moieties are coplanar with the m-phenylene, leading to large values of 2J (2J/k > 200 K in solution and 2J/k >> 300 K in the solid state). For the diradical, in which all ortho and para positions of the m-phenylene are sterically shielded, distortion of the nitroxide moieties from coplanarity is moderate, such that the singlet-triplet gaps remain large in both solution (2J/k > 200 K) and the solid state (2J/k {approx} 400-800 K), though an onset of thermal depopulation of the triplet ground state is detectable near room temperature. These diradicals have robust triplet ground states with strong ferromagnetic coupling and good stability at ambient conditions. Magnetic behavior of the nitroxide diradicals at low temperature is best fit to the model of one-dimensional S = 1 Heisenberg chains with intrachain antiferromagnetic coupling. The antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = 1 diradicals may be associated with the methyl nitroxide C-H {hor_ellipsis} O contacts, including nonclassical hydrogen bonds. These unprecedented organic S = 1 antiferromagnetic chains are highly isotropic, compared to those of the extensively studied Ni(II)-based chains.

  4. Lectin KM+-induced neutrophil haptotaxis involves binding to laminin.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, Luciane; Martins, Antônio R; Freymüller, Edna; Mortara, Renato A; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2005-01-18

    The lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia, also known as artocarpin, induces neutrophil migration by haptotaxis. The interactions of KM+ with both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and neutrophils depend on the lectin ability to recognize mannose-containing glycans. Here, we report the binding of KM+ to laminin and demonstrate that this interaction potentiates the KM+-induced neutrophil migration. Labeling of lung tissue by KM+ located its ligands on the endothelial cells, in the basement membrane, in the alveolus, and in the interstitial connective tissue. Such labeling was inhibited by 400 mM D-mannose, 10 mM Manalpha1-3[Manalpha1-6]Man or 10 microM peroxidase (a glycoprotein-containing mannosyl heptasaccharide). Laminin is a tissue ligand for KM+, since both KM+ and anti-laminin antibodies not only reacted with the same high molecular mass components of a lung extract, but also determined colocalized labeling in basement membranes of the lung tissue. The relevance of the KM+-laminin interaction to the KM+ property of inducing neutrophil migration was evaluated. The inability of low concentrations of soluble KM+ to induce human neutrophil migration was reversed by coating the microchamber filter with laminin. So, the interaction of KM+ with laminin promotes the formation of a substrate-bound KM+ gradient that is able to induce neutrophil haptotaxis.

  5. KM3NeT tower data acquisition and data transport electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolau, C. A.; Ameli, F.; Biagioni, A.; Capone, A.; Frezza, O.; Lonardo, A.; Masullo, R.; Mollo, C. M.; Orlando, A.; Simeone, F.; Vicini, P.

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the KM3Net European project, the production stage of a large volume underwater neutrino telescope has started. The forthcoming installation includes 8 towers and 24 strings, that will be installed 100 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy) at 3500 m depth. The KM3NeT tower, whose layout is strongly based on the NEMO Phase-2 prototype tower deployed in March 2013, has been re-engineered and partially re-designed in order to optimize production costs, power consumption, and usability. This contribution gives a description of the main electronics, including front-end, data transport and clock distribution system, of the KM3NeT tower detection unit.

  6. MODIS 3km Aerosol Product: Algorithm and Global Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S.; Levy, R. C.; Munchak, L.

    2013-01-01

    After more than a decade of producing a nominal 10 km aerosol product based on the dark target method, the MODIS aerosol team will be releasing a nominal 3 km product as part of their Collection 6 release. The new product differs from the original 10 km product only in the manner in which reflectance pixels are ingested, organized and selected by the aerosol algorithm. Overall, the 3 km product closely mirrors the 10 km product. However, the finer resolution product is able to retrieve over ocean closer to islands and coastlines, and is better able to resolve fine aerosol features such as smoke plumes over both ocean and land. In some situations, it provides retrievals over entire regions that the 10 km product barely samples. In situations traditionally difficult for the dark target algorithm, such as over bright or urban surfaces the 3 km product introduces isolated spikes of artificially high aerosol optical depth (AOD) that the 10 km algorithm avoids. Over land, globally, the 3 km product appears to be 0.01 to 0.02 higher than the 10 km product, while over ocean, the 3 km algorithm is retrieving a proportionally greater number of very low aerosol loading situations. Based on collocations with ground-based observations for only six months, expected errors associated with the 3 km land product are determined to be greater than for the 10 km product: 0.05 0.25 AOD. Over ocean, the suggestion is for expected errors to be the same as the 10 km product: 0.03 0.05 AOD. The advantage of the product is on the local scale, which will require continued evaluation not addressed here. Nevertheless, the new 3 km product is expected to provide important information complementary to existing satellite-derived products and become an important tool for the aerosol community.

  7. Estimation and Attribution of the Temperature Variances in Height Range 60~140 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zeyu

    The SABER/TIMED temperatures collected during 2002 2006 are used to estimate for height range 60 120 km the variances of temperature (Temp-VARs) that are contributed from nonstationary perturbations. The estimation results disclose that the height range 60 140 km can be separated into two regions that are characterized by significant differences of the attributions of the Temp-VARs. In the region below 100 km height, the Temp-VARs generally increase with height, the corresponding standard deviations of temperature (Temp-SDEVs) ranges from 4 K at 60 km and 18 K at 100 km. The regions exhibiting intense Temp-VARs appear at the equator and the extra-tropics of both hemispheres. Moreover, these non-stationary temperature disturbances can be accounted primarily by the tidal variances that are derived independently by using the same data-set, in particular by the migrating diurnal, semidiurnal, and terdiurnal tide. It is also found that the region above 100 km is characterized by surprisingly large Temp-VARs with the corresponding Temp-SDEVs greater than 30 K. In a height-latitude cross-section, a stagnant maximum of Temp-SDEVs embraced by the 30-K contour remains over the course of a year at the Equator in a narrow height range 110 125 km. At the same height in Southern hemisphere, the same kind maxima appears at latitudes from the extra-tropics to polar region except during the June solstice. In contrast, the maxima appearing in Northern hemisphere high latitudes exhibits intra-seasonal variations, there such maximum are seen during the course of a year. Further investigation results confirm that the large Temp-VARs have no relevance to the tidal variances, implying the control from other processes, e.g., non-stationary planetary waves. The details will be introduced in the presentation.

  8. Survival of Nannochloropsis Phytoplankton in Hypervelocity Impact Events up to Velocities of 6.07 km/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D. L. S.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Studies have previously been conducted to verify the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events to test the panspermia and lithopanspermia hypothesis [1], [2]. It has been demonstrated that bacteria survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1] whilst larger more complex objects (such as seeds) break up at ~1 km s-1 [2]. The survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 has also recently been shown [3]. We demonstrate here the survivability of Nannochloropsis Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone'(sunlit surface layers of oceans) [4] at impact velocities up to 6.07 km s-1. Phytoplankton from a culture sample was frozen and then fired into water (to simulate oceanic impacts, as described in [5]) using a light gas gun (LGG) [6]. The water was then retrieved and placed into a sealed culture vessel and left under a constant light source to check the viability of any remnant organisms.

  9. Human mesotrypsin exhibits restricted S1' subsite specificity with a strong preference for small polar side chains.

    PubMed

    Szepessy, Edit; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2006-07-01

    Mesotrypsin, an inhibitor-resistant human trypsin isoform, does not activate or degrade pancreatic protease zymogens at a significant rate. These observations led to the proposal that mesotrypsin is a defective digestive protease on protein substrates. Surprisingly, the studies reported here with alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) revealed that, even though mesotrypsin was completely resistant to this serpin-type inhibitor, it selectively cleaved the Lys10-Thr11 peptide bond at the N-terminus. Analyzing a library of alpha1AT mutants in which Thr11 was mutated to various amino acids, we found that mesotrypsin hydrolyzed lysyl peptide bonds containing Thr or Ser at the P1' position with relatively high specificity (kcat/KM approximately 10(5) m(-1) x s(-1)). Compared with Thr or Ser, P1' Gly or Met inhibited cleavage 13- and 25-fold, respectively, whereas P1' Asn, Asp, Ile, Phe or Tyr resulted in 100-200-fold diminished rates of proteolysis, and Pro abolished cleavage completely. Consistent with the Ser/Thr P1' preference, mesotrypsin cleaved the Arg358-Ser359 reactive-site peptide bond of alpha1AT Pittsburgh and was rapidly inactivated by the serpin mechanism (ka approximately 10(6) m(-1) s(-1)). Taken together, the results indicate that mesotrypsin is not a defective protease on polypeptide substrates in general, but exhibits a relatively high specificity for Lys/Arg-Ser/Thr peptide bonds. This restricted, thrombin-like subsite specificity explains why mesotrypsin cannot activate pancreatic zymogens, but might activate certain proteinase-activated receptors. The observations also identify alpha1AT Pittsburgh as an effective mesotrypsin inhibitor and the serpin mechanism as a viable stratagem to overcome the inhibitor-resistance of mesotrypsin. PMID:16759229

  10. Microphysical Model of the Venus clouds between 40km and 80km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGouldrick, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    I am continuing to adapt the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) to successfully simulate the multi-layered clouds of Venus. The present version of the one-dimensional model now includes a simple parameterization of the photochemicial production of sulfuric acid around altitudes of 62km, and its thermochemical destruction below cloud base. Photochemical production in the model is limited by the availability of water vapor and insolation. Upper cloud particles are introduced into the model via binary homogeneous nucleation, while the lower and middle cloud particles are created via activation of involatile cloud condensation nuclei. Growth by condensation and coagulation and coalescence are also treated. Mass loadings and particle sizes compare favorably with the in situ observations by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe Particle Size Spectrometer, and mixing ratios of volatiles compare favorably with remotely sensed observations of water vapor and sulfuric acid vapor. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program, grant number NNX11AD79G.

  11. Daytime zonal drifts in the ionospheric E and 150 km regions estimated using EAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddapati, PavanChaitanya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Patra, Amit

    2016-07-01

    The Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), located at Kototabang (0.2o S, 100.32o E, mag. lat. 10.36o S), Indonesia, is capable of detecting both E region and 150 km echoes during daytime. We have conducted multi-beam observations using the EAR during daytime covering all seasons to study seasonal variations of these echoes and their dynamics. Given the facts that drifts at the 150 km region are governed primarily by electric field, drifts at the E region are governed by both electric field and neutral wind, simultaneous observations of drifts in both E and 150 km regions would help understand their variations. In this paper we present local time and seasonal variations of zonal drifts in the E and 150 km regions estimated using multi-beam observations. Zonal drifts (positive eastward) in the E and 150 km regions are found to be in the range of -10 to -60 m/s and -40 to 80 m/s, respectively. In the E region, zonal drifts show height reversal and temporal variations having tidal signature and noticeable seasonal variations. Zonal drifts in the 150 km region also show noticeable height and seasonal variations. These results are compared with model drifts and evaluated in terms of electric field and neutral wind.

  12. Resonating Valence Bond states for low dimensional S=1 antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Xin; Zhou, Yi; Ng, Tai-Kai

    2014-03-01

    We study S = 1 spin liquid states in low dimensions. We show that the resonating-valence-bond (RVB) picture of S = 1 / 2 spin liquid state can be generalized to S = 1 case. For S = 1 system, a many-body singlet (with even site number) can be decomposed into superposition of products of two-body singlets. In other words, the product states of two-body singlets, called the singlet pair states (SPSs), are over complete to span the Hilbert space of many-body singlets. Furthermore, we generalized fermionic representation and the corresponding mean field theory and Gutzwiller projected stats to S = 1 models. We applied our theory to study 1D anti-ferromagnetic bilinear-biquadratic model and show that both the ground states (including the phase transition point) and the excited states can be understood excellently well within the framework. Our method can be applied to 2D S = 1 antiferromagnets.

  13. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  14. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  15. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  16. 26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prior regulation provisions of § 1.414(s)-1T. (See § 1.414(s)-1T as contained in the CFR edition revised... to the extent necessary to satisfy the requirements of 29 CFR 2530.204-2(d) (regarding double... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section...

  17. Negative infrared photoconductivity in CdS1-xSex films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdinov, A. S.; Jafarov, M. A.; Mamedov, H. M.; Nasirov, E. F.

    2003-09-01

    The negative infrared photoconductivity (NPH) has been observed for the first time in CdS1-xSex films, in the wavelength region of 0.700 - 1.23 μm. at values of stimulating light intensity Φ = 100 - 400 Lk. electrical field E = 0.5 - 130 V/cm and temperature T = 265 - 310 Κ. It is established, that basic laws of NPH explains on the basis of two-barrier model and in the considered conditions a charge carriers, overcome a barrier by tunneling. A films of CdS1-xSex can be used in IR engineering and negatronics.

  18. Chemical abundances of the Damped Lyman Alpha systems in the XQ-100 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, T. A. M.; Ellison, S. L.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Prochaska, J. X.; Lopez, S.; D'Odorico, V.; Becker, G.; Christensen, L.; Cupani, G.; Denney, K.; Worsek, G.

    2016-09-01

    The XQ-100 survey has provided high signal-noise spectra of 100 redshift 3-4.5 quasars with the X-Shooter spectrograph. The metal abundances for 13 elements in the 41 damped Lyα systems (DLAs) identified in the XQ-100 sample are presented, and an investigation into abundances of a variety of DLA classes is conducted. The XQ-100 DLA sample contains five DLAs within 5000 km s-1 of their host quasar (proximate DLAs; PDLAs) as well as three sightlines which contain two DLAs within 10,000 km s-1 of each other along the same line-of-sight (multiple DLAs; MDLAs). Combined with previous observations in the literature, we demonstrate that PDLAs with logN(HI)<21.0 show lower [S/H] and [Fe/H] (relative to intervening systems with similar redshift and N(HI)), whilst higher [S/H] and [Si/H] are seen in PDLAs with logN(HI)>21.0. These abundance discrepancies are independent of their line-of-sight velocity separation from the host quasar, and the velocity width of the metal lines (v90). Contrary to previous studies, MDLAs show no difference in [α/Fe] relative to single DLAs matched in metallicity and redshift. In addition, we present follow-up UVES data of J0034+1639, a sightline containing 3 DLAs, including a metal-poor DLA with [Fe/H]=-2.82 (the third lowest [Fe/H] in DLAs identified to date) at zabs=4.25. Lastly we study the dust-corrected [Zn/Fe], emphasizing that near-IR coverage of X-Shooter provides unprecedented access to MgII, CaII and TiII lines (at redshifts 3-4) to provide additional evidence for subsolar [Zn/Fe] ratio in DLAs.

  19. Hundred lightcurves of sub-km main-belt asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, F.; Souami, D.; Bouquillon, S.; Nakamura, T.; Dermawan, B.; Yagi, M.; Souchay, J.

    2014-07-01

    We observed a single sky field near opposition and near the ecliptic plane using the Subaru telescope equipped with the Suprime-Cam. Taking advantage of the wide field of view (FOV) for the Suprime-Cam, the plan was to obtain 100 lightcurves of asteroids at the same time. The total observing time interval was about 8 hours on September 2, 2002, with 2-min exposures. We detected 147 moving objects in the single FOV (34'×27') on the Suprime-Cam (see Figure). Of those, 112 detections corresponded to different objects. We used the R filter during almost the entire observing run, but we took a few images with the B filter at the beginning, the middle, and the end of the run. We classified main-belt asteroids into S- and C-complexes with the B-R color of the object (Yoshida & Nakamura 2007). Although we carefully avoided regions of bright stars, the sky in the images taken by Suprime-Cam were actually crowded with faint objects. Therefore, the asteroids overlapped with background stars very often. Thus, it was very difficult to get lightcurves with high accuracy. We modified the GAIA-GBOT (Ground Based Optical Tracking) PIPELINE to measure the position and brightness of each object (Bouquillon et al. 2012). Once the objects were identified and their positions measured in pixel coordinates, the pipeline proceeded to the astrometric calibration and then to the photometric calibrations with the Guide Star Catalog II (Lasker et al. 2008). The pipeline produced time series of photometry for each object. The average brightness of each lightcurve ranged between 19--24 mag. We then estimated the rotational period from the lightcurve of each object. In our presentation, we will show the spin-period distribution of sub- km main-belt asteroids and compare it with that of large main-belt asteroids obtained from the lightcurve catalogue.

  20. Exploring the Benefits of KM Education for LIS Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazeri, Afsaneh; Martin, Bill; Sarrafzadeh, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    It is to be expected that in a new and emerging discipline like knowledge management (KM) there still will be ambivalence among both LIS educational institutions and their students, as to the need to have KM courses. Investigating the benefits of engaging with these programs might help to clear up this ambiguity. The present paper seeks to shed…

  1. 7 CFR 29.1035 - Mixed color (KM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixed color (KM). 29.1035 Section 29.1035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1035 Mixed color (KM). Distinctly different colors of the type mingled together....

  2. 7 CFR 29.1035 - Mixed color (KM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixed color (KM). 29.1035 Section 29.1035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1035 Mixed color (KM). Distinctly different colors of the type mingled together....

  3. 7 CFR 29.1035 - Mixed color (KM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixed color (KM). 29.1035 Section 29.1035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1035 Mixed color (KM). Distinctly different colors of the type mingled together....

  4. 7 CFR 29.1035 - Mixed color (KM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixed color (KM). 29.1035 Section 29.1035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1035 Mixed color (KM). Distinctly different colors of the type mingled together....

  5. 7 CFR 29.1035 - Mixed color (KM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixed color (KM). 29.1035 Section 29.1035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1035 Mixed color (KM). Distinctly different colors of the type mingled together....

  6. Emissions in potassium vapour under 4S1/2-7S1/2 two-photon nsec excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentaris, D.; Chatzikyriakos, G.; Armyras, A.; Efthimiopoulos, T.

    2010-11-01

    The two-photon excitation of 4S1/2-7S1/2 transition of potassium atoms is studied. Several coherent emissions and processes are possible, such as parametric four-wave (PFWM), parametric six-wave (PSWM) mixing and competition with the stimulated hyper Raman (SHRS) and the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The radiations at the transitions 6P3/2,1/2-4S1/2, 6S1/2-4P3/2,1/2 and 5P3/2,1/2-4S1/2 are emitted only in the forward direction (indicating a parametric process), while the radiation at the transition 4P3/2,1/2-4S1/2 is emitted in the forward and in the backward direction, indicating an ASE process.

  7. Exploring KM Features of High-Performance Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Wen

    2007-12-01

    For reacting to an increasingly rival business environment, many companies emphasize the importance of knowledge management (KM). It is a favorable way to explore and learn KM features of high-performance companies. However, finding out the critical KM features of high-performance companies is a qualitative analysis problem. To handle this kind of problem, the rough set approach is suitable because it is based on data-mining techniques to discover knowledge without rigorous statistical assumptions. Thus, this paper explored KM features of high-performance companies by using the rough set approach. The results show that high-performance companies stress the importance on both tacit and explicit knowledge, and consider that incentives and evaluations are the essentials to implementing KM.

  8. Precision polarizability measurements of atomic cesium's 8 s 2S1 / 2 and 9 s 2S1 / 2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Hannah; Kortyna, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    We report hyperfine-resolved scalar polarizabilities for cesium's 8 s 2S1 / 2 and 9 s 2S1 / 2 states using resonant two-photon spectroscopy. Two single-mode, external-cavity diode lasers drive the 6 s 2S1 / 2 --> 6 p 2P1 / 2 --> ns 2S1 / 2 transition (n = 8 or 9). Both laser beams are split and counter-propagate through an effusive beam and a vapor cell. An electric field applied across two parallel plates imposes Stark shifts on the ns 2S1 / 2 levels in the effusive beam. Electric-field strengths are measured in situ. The laser frequency is calibrated in the vapor cell using a phase modulation technique, with the modulation frequency referenced to the ground-state hyperfine splitting of atomic rubidium. Our measured 8 s 2S1 / 2 polarizability, 38370 +/- 380 a03, agrees with previous theory and experiments. Our measured 9 s 2S1 / 2 polarizability, 150700 +/- 1100 a03, agrees within two sigma of theory, but we are unaware of previous measurements. We also verify that these polarizabilities are independent of the hyperfine levels, placing upper limits on the differential polarizabilities of 200 +/- 260 a03 for the 8 s 2S1 / 2 state and 490 +/- 450 a03 for the 9 s 2S1 / 2 state. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-0653107.

  9. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) KM Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnadoe, Tom; McCarter, Mike

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities with in the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center Of Excellence (AISCE), Intergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KM implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to support the planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have been performed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural/KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  10. Human casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) skews in vitro differentiation of monocytes towards macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The milk-derived protein human Casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) has recently been detected in blood cells and was shown to possess proinflammatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CSN1S1 on the differentiation of monocytes. Methods Primary human monocytes were stimulated with recombinant CSN1S1 and compared to cells stimulated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or M-CSF/IFNγ. Morphological changes were assessed by microscopy and quantification of surface markers of differentiation by FACS analysis. Phagocytic activity of CSN1S1 stimulated cells was measured by quantification of zymosan labeled particle uptake. The role of mitogen activated protein kinases for CSN1S1-induced differentiation of monocytes and proinflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by supplementation of specific inhibitors. Results CSN1S1 at a concentration of 10 μg/ml resulted in morphological changes (irregular shape, pseudopodia) and aggregation of cells, comparable to changes observed in M-CSF/IFNγ differentiated macrophages. Surface marker expression was altered after 24 h with an upregulation of CD14 (mean 2.5 fold) and CD64 (1.9 fold) in CSN1S1 stimulated cells. CSN1S1 treated cells showed a characteristic surface marker pattern for macrophages after 120 h of incubation (CD14high, CD64high, CD83low, CD1alow) comparable to changes observed in M-CSF/IFNγ treated monocytes. Furthermore, phagocytic activity was increased 1.4 and 1.9 fold following stimulation with 10 μg/ml CSN1S1 after 24 and 48 h, respectively. Early GM-CSF, but not GM-CSF/IL-4 induced differentiation of monocytes towards dendritic cells (DC) was inhibited by addition of CSN1S1. Finally, CSN1S1 induced upregulation of CD14 was impeded by inhibition of ERK1/2, while inhibition of the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and p38 did not influence cellular differentiation. However, JNK and p38 inhibitors impeded CSN1S1 induced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1b or IL-6. Conclusions CSN1S1

  11. The KM phase in semi-realistic heterotic orbifold models

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, Joel

    2000-07-05

    In string-inspired semi-realistic heterotic orbifolds models with an anomalous U(1){sub X},a nonzero Kobayashi-Masakawa (KM) phase is shown to arise generically from the expectation values of complex scalar fields, which appear in nonrenormalizable quark mass couplings. Modular covariant nonrenormalizable superpotential couplings are constructed. A toy Z{sub 3} orbifold model is analyzed in some detail. Modular symmetries and orbifold selection rules are taken into account and do not lead to a cancellation of the KM phase. We also discuss attempts to obtain the KM phase solely from renormalizable interactions.

  12. The isolated 678-km deep 30 May 2015 MW 7.9 Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Lay, T.; Zhan, Z.; Kanamori, H.; Hao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-focus earthquakes, located 300 to 700 km below the Earth's surface within sinking slabs of relatively cold oceanic lithosphere, are mysterious phenomena. Seismic radiation from deep events is essentially indistinguishable from that for shallow stick-slip frictional-sliding earthquakes, but the confining pressure and temperature are so high for deep-focus events that a distinct process is likely needed to account for their abrupt energy release. The largest recorded deep-focus earthquake (MW 7.9) in the Izu-Bonin slab struck on 30 May 2015 beneath the Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, isolated from prior seismicity by over 100 km in depth, and followed by only 2 small aftershocks. Globally, this is the deepest (678 km) major (MW > 7) earthquake in the seismological record. Seismicity indicates along-strike contortion of the Izu-Bonin slab, with horizontal flattening near a depth of 550 km in the Izu region and progressive steepening to near-vertical toward the south above the location of the 2015 event. Analyses of a large global data set of P, SH and pP seismic phases using short-period back-projection, subevent directivity, and broadband finite-fault inversion indicate that the mainshock ruptured a shallowly-dipping fault plane with patchy slip that spread over a distance of ~40 km with variable expansion rate (~5 km/s down-dip initially, ~3 km/s up-dip later). During the 17 s rupture duration the radiated energy was ~3.3 x 1016 J and the stress drop was ~38 MPa. The radiation efficiency is moderate (0.34), intermediate to that of the 1994 Bolivia and 2013 Sea of Okhotsk MW 8.3 earthquakes, indicating a continuum of processes. The isolated occurrence of the event suggests that localized stress concentration associated with the pronounced deformation of the Izu-Bonin slab likely played a role in generating this major earthquake.

  13. Isolation of new Stenotrophomonas bacteriophages and genomic characterization of temperate phage S1.

    PubMed

    García, Pilar; Monjardín, Cristina; Martín, Rebeca; Madera, Carmen; Soberón, Nora; Garcia, Eva; Meana, Alvaro; Suárez, Juan E

    2008-12-01

    Twenty-two phages that infect Stenotrophomonas species were isolated through sewage enrichment and prophage induction. Of them, S1, S3, and S4 were selected due to their wide host ranges compared to those of the other phages. S1 and S4 are temperate siphoviruses, while S3 is a virulent myovirus. The genomes of S3 and S4, about 33 and 200 kb, were resistant to restriction digestion. The lytic cycles lasted 30 min for S3 and about 75 min for S1 and S4. The burst size for S3 was 100 virions/cell, while S1 and S4 produced about 75 virus particles/cell. The frequency of bacteriophage-insensitive host mutants, calculated by dividing the number of surviving colonies by the bacterial titer of a parallel, uninfected culture, ranged between 10(-5) and 10(-6) for S3 and 10(-3) and 10(-4) for S1 and S4. The 40,287-bp genome of S1 contains 48 open reading frames (ORFs) and 12-bp 5' protruding cohesive ends. By using a combination of bioinformatics and experimental evidence, functions were ascribed to 21 ORFs. The morphogenetic and lysis modules are well-conserved, but no lysis-lysogeny switch or DNA replication gene clusters were recognized. Two major clusters of genes with respect to transcriptional orientation were observed. Interspersed among them were lysogenic conversion genes encoding phosphoadenosine phosphosulfate reductase and GspM, a protein involved in the general secretion system II. The attP site of S1 may be located within a gene that presents over 75% homology to a Stenotrophomonas chromosomal determinant.

  14. Isolation of New Stenotrophomonas Bacteriophages and Genomic Characterization of Temperate Phage S1

    PubMed Central

    García, Pilar; Monjardín, Cristina; Martín, Rebeca; Madera, Carmen; Soberón, Nora; Garcia, Eva; Meana, Álvaro; Suárez, Juan E.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-two phages that infect Stenotrophomonas species were isolated through sewage enrichment and prophage induction. Of them, S1, S3, and S4 were selected due to their wide host ranges compared to those of the other phages. S1 and S4 are temperate siphoviruses, while S3 is a virulent myovirus. The genomes of S3 and S4, about 33 and 200 kb, were resistant to restriction digestion. The lytic cycles lasted 30 min for S3 and about 75 min for S1 and S4. The burst size for S3 was 100 virions/cell, while S1 and S4 produced about 75 virus particles/cell. The frequency of bacteriophage-insensitive host mutants, calculated by dividing the number of surviving colonies by the bacterial titer of a parallel, uninfected culture, ranged between 10−5 and 10−6 for S3 and 10−3 and 10−4 for S1 and S4. The 40,287-bp genome of S1 contains 48 open reading frames (ORFs) and 12-bp 5′ protruding cohesive ends. By using a combination of bioinformatics and experimental evidence, functions were ascribed to 21 ORFs. The morphogenetic and lysis modules are well-conserved, but no lysis-lysogeny switch or DNA replication gene clusters were recognized. Two major clusters of genes with respect to transcriptional orientation were observed. Interspersed among them were lysogenic conversion genes encoding phosphoadenosine phosphosulfate reductase and GspM, a protein involved in the general secretion system II. The attP site of S1 may be located within a gene that presents over 75% homology to a Stenotrophomonas chromosomal determinant. PMID:18952876

  15. The -145 km/s Absorption System of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G.; Gull, Theodore R.; Danks, A.; Johansson, S.

    2002-01-01

    With the STIS E230H mode (R approx. 118,000), we have identified about twenty absorption components in line of sight from Eta Carinae. Two components, one at -513 km/s and another at -145 km/s, are quite different in character from the others, mostly at intermediate velocities. The -145 km/s component is significantly wider in fwhm, is seen in many more species, and the lower level can be above 20,000/cm, well above the 2000/cm noted in the -513 km/s component. In the spectral region from 2400 to 3160A, approximately 500 absorption lines have been identified. In this poster, we will present line identifications and atomic parameters of the measured lines, hopefully providing insight as to what levels are being excited and by what processes. Observations were accomplished through STScI under proposal 9242. Funding is through the STIS GTO resources.

  16. 4-km body(ies?) embedded in Saturn's Huygens Ringlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitale, Joseph N.; Hahn, Joseph M.; Tamayo, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Saturn's 20-km-wide Huygens ringlet, located ~250 km exterior to the B ring, displays unusual kinematics, as evidenced by a time variable width-relation. The cause of this behavior is not clear, but may be related to the presence of large embedded bodies (Spitale and Hahn 2016). The largest such bodies produce half-propeller-shaped disturbances originating at the inner edge of the ringlet, whose radial widths imply a size of ~4 km, based on simple scaling from A-ring propellers. Here, we show that a numerical N-body model of the ringlet with a 4-km body embedded near the inner edge produces features that are consistent with the observed half propellers.

  17. High energy neutrino detection with KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliozzi, Pasquale; KM3NeT Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The KM3NeT Collaboration has started the construction of a next generation high-energy neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea: the largest and most sensitive neutrino research infrastructure. The full KM3NeT detector will be a several cubic kilometres distributed, networked infrastructure. In Italy, off the coast of Capo Passero, and in France, off the coast of Toulon. Thanks to its location in the Northern hemisphere and to its large instrumented volume, KM3NeT will be the optimal instrument to search for neutrinos from the Southern sky and in particular from the Galactic plane, thus making it complementary to IceCube. In this work the technologically innovative component of the detector, the status of construction and the first results from prototypes of the KM3NeT detector will be described as well as its capability to discover neutrino sources are reported.

  18. Akeno 20 km (2) air shower array (Akeno Branch)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teshima, M.; Ohoka, H.; Matsubara, Y.; Hara, T.; Hatano, Y.; Hayashida, N.; He, C. X.; Honda, M.; Ishikawa, F.; Kamata, K.

    1985-01-01

    As the first stage of the future huge array, the Akeno air shower array was expanded to about 20 sq. km. by adding 19 scintillation detectors of 2.25 sq m area outside the present 1 sq. km. Akeno array with a new data collection system. These detectors are spaced about 1km from each other and connected by two optical fiber cables. This array has been in partial operation from 8th, Sep. 1984 and full operation from 20th, Dec. 1984. 20 sq m muon stations are planned to be set with 2km separation and one of them is now under construction. The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays is studied.

  19. How does music aid 5 km of running?

    PubMed

    Bigliassi, Marcelo; León-Domínguez, Umberto; Buzzachera, Cosme F; Barreto-Silva, Vinícius; Altimari, Leandro R

    2015-02-01

    This research investigated the effects of music and its time of application on a 5-km run. Fifteen well-trained male long-distance runners (24.87 ± 2.47 years; 78.87 ± 10.57 kg; 178 ± 07 cm) participated in this study. Five randomized experimental conditions during a 5-km run on an official track were tested (PM: motivational songs, applied before 5 km of running; SM: slow motivational songs, applied during 5 km of running; FM: fast and motivational songs, applied during 5 km of running; CS: calm songs, applied after 5 km of running; CO: control condition). Psychophysiological assessments were performed before (functional near-infrared spectroscopy, heart rate variability [HRV], valence, and arousal), during (performance time, heart rate, and rate of perceived exertion [RPE]), and after (mood, RPE, and HRV) tests. The chosen songs were considered pleasurable and capable of activating. Furthermore, they activated the 3 assessed prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas (medial, right dorsolateral, and left dorsolateral) similarly, generating positive emotional consequences by autonomous system analysis. The first 800 m was accomplished faster for SM and FM compared with other conditions (p ≤ 0.05); moreover, there was a high probability of improving running performance when music was applied (SM: 89%; FM: 85%; PM: 39%). Finally, music was capable of accelerating vagal tonus after 5 km of running with CS (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, music was able to activate the PFC area, minimize perceptions, improve performance, and accelerate recovery during 5 km of running.

  20. How does music aid 5 km of running?

    PubMed

    Bigliassi, Marcelo; León-Domínguez, Umberto; Buzzachera, Cosme F; Barreto-Silva, Vinícius; Altimari, Leandro R

    2015-02-01

    This research investigated the effects of music and its time of application on a 5-km run. Fifteen well-trained male long-distance runners (24.87 ± 2.47 years; 78.87 ± 10.57 kg; 178 ± 07 cm) participated in this study. Five randomized experimental conditions during a 5-km run on an official track were tested (PM: motivational songs, applied before 5 km of running; SM: slow motivational songs, applied during 5 km of running; FM: fast and motivational songs, applied during 5 km of running; CS: calm songs, applied after 5 km of running; CO: control condition). Psychophysiological assessments were performed before (functional near-infrared spectroscopy, heart rate variability [HRV], valence, and arousal), during (performance time, heart rate, and rate of perceived exertion [RPE]), and after (mood, RPE, and HRV) tests. The chosen songs were considered pleasurable and capable of activating. Furthermore, they activated the 3 assessed prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas (medial, right dorsolateral, and left dorsolateral) similarly, generating positive emotional consequences by autonomous system analysis. The first 800 m was accomplished faster for SM and FM compared with other conditions (p ≤ 0.05); moreover, there was a high probability of improving running performance when music was applied (SM: 89%; FM: 85%; PM: 39%). Finally, music was capable of accelerating vagal tonus after 5 km of running with CS (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, music was able to activate the PFC area, minimize perceptions, improve performance, and accelerate recovery during 5 km of running. PMID:25029009

  1. 7S(1/2) ? 9S(1/2) two-photon spectroscopy of trapped francium.

    PubMed

    Simsarian, J E; Shi, W; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D; Zhao, W Z

    1996-12-01

    We report on the spectroscopic measurement of the (210)Fr 9S(1/2) energy obtained by two-photon excitation of atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optic trap. The resonant intermediate level 7P(3/2) is the upper state of the trapping transition. We have measured the energy difference between the 9S(1/2) state and the 7S(1/2) ground state to be 25 671.021 +/- 0.006 cm(-1). PMID:19881852

  2. Local fluctuations of ozone from 16 km to 45 km deduced from in situ vertical ozone profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, G.; Robert, C.

    1994-01-01

    A vertical ozone profile obtained by an in situ ozone sonde from 16 km to 45 km, has allowed to observe local ozone concentration variations. These variations can be observed, thanks to a fast measurement system based on a UV absorption KrF excimer laser beam in a multipass cell. Ozone standard deviation versus altitude calculated from the mean is derived. Ozone variations or fluctuations are correlated with the different dynamic zones of the stratosphere.

  3. Source and development of large manganese enrichments above eastern Mediterranean sapropel S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Anja; Thomson, John; de Lange, Gert J.; Hensen, Christian

    2006-09-01

    The residual dark unit of the most recent eastern Mediterranean sapropel (S1) is usually overlain by sediments with enhanced concentrations of MnOx in two separated layers. The variability and magnitude of the Mn enrichment at different locations and water depths indicate that Mn must have been added preferentially to sediments at intermediate (1-2 km) water depths. We propose a two-stage mechanism for the Mn enrichment that involves decreasing oxygenation with increasing water depth. This mechanism involves the loss of reduced Mn2+ from the deepest sediments (>2 km water depth) into overlying anoxic waters and a variable gain of MnOx in sediments in contact with oxygenated waters at shallower depth. In the S1 unit that receives the extra MnOx input, an upper higher Mn-enriched zone (>3 wt %) is maintained continuously at the top of the accumulating S1 unit because the pore waters are anoxic at shallow sediment depth while bottom waters are oxic to some degree. In a reactive-transport model, the Mn enrichment in the upper zone could not be supported by normal sediment diagenesis. Thus the MnOx in the upper Mn horizon must have formed mainly in the water column. The MnOx in the upper Mn-enriched zone adsorbed Mo and Li from seawater in a similar manner as other Mn-enriched oxic sediments, nodules, and crusts, with a Mn:Mo ratio of ˜600:1, a Mn:Li ratio of ˜750:1, and a δ98/95MoMOMO of -2.5 ‰.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC Imaging Polarimetry of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, D. C.; Videen, G.; Zubko, E.; Muinonen, K.; Shkuratov, Y.; Kaydash, V.; Knight, M. M.; Sitko, M.; Lisse, C. M.; Mutchler, M.; Hammer, D.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first polarization images of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on UTC 2013 May 8 (r = 3.81 AU, Delta = 4.34 AU), when the phase angle was α = 12.25 degrees. Although this phase angle is approximately centered in the negative polarization branch for cometary dust, there is no evidence of a negative polarization circumnucleus halo region that has been observed in previous polarimetric images of short-period comets. Instead, the central region (~ 0.32 arcseconds = 6 pixels ≈ 1000 km) of the image shows a polarization amplitude p% = 2.0 - 2.5%, and a polarization direction that is approximately perpendicular to the scattering plane. Such positive polarization has been observed previously as a characteristic feature of cometary jets. The region beyond 1000 km, with sufficient signal-to-noise to make a polarization measurement (≤ 5000 km), shows a negative polarization amplitude p% ~ -1.8% that varies only slightly. Our results provide the first polarimetric observations of such a distant NIC at a small phase angle with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution

  5. The KM3NeT Digital Optical Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivolo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    KM3NeT is a European deep-sea multidisciplinary research infrastructure in the Mediterranean Sea. It will host a km3-scale neutrino telescope and dedicated instruments for long-term and continuous measurements for Earth and Sea sciences. The KM3NeT neutrino telescope is a 3-dimensional array of Digital Optical Modules, suspended in the sea by means of vertical string structures, called Detection Units, supported by two pre-stretched Dyneema ropes, anchored to the seabed and kept taut with a system of buoys. The Digital Optical Module represents the active part of the neutrino telescope. It is composed by a 17-inch, 14 mm thick borosilicate glass (Vitrovex) spheric vessel housing 31 photomultiplier tubes with 3-inch photocathode diameter and the associated front-end and readout electronics. The technical solution adopted for the KM3NeT optical modules is characterized by an innovative design, considering that existing neutrino telescopes, Baikal, IceCube and ANTARES, all use large photomultipliers, typically with a diameter of 8″ or 10″. It offers several advantages: higher sensitive surface (1260 cm2), weaker sensitivity to Earth's magnetic field, better distinction between single-photon and multi-photon events (photon counting) and directional information with an almost isotropic field of view. In this contribution the design and the performance of the KM3NeT Digital Optical Modules are discussed, with a particular focus on enabling technologies and integration procedure.

  6. The 100 People Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Keri

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the 100 People Project and how the author integrates the project in her class. The 100 People Project is a nonprofit organization based in New York City. The organization poses the question: If there were only 100 people in the world, what would the world look like? Through the project, students were taught about ethics in…

  7. Wave analysis in the atmosphere of Venus below 100-km altitude, simulated by the LMD Venus GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebonnois, Sébastien; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Gilli, Gabriella

    2016-11-01

    A new simulation of Venus atmospheric circulation obtained with the LMD Venus GCM is described and the simulated wave activity is analyzed. Agreement with observed features of the temperature structure, static stability and zonal wind field is good, such as the presence of a cold polar collar, diurnal and semi-diurnal tides. At the resolution used (96 longitudes × 96 latitudes), a fully developed superrotation is obtained both when the simulation is initialized from rest and from an atmosphere already in superrotation, though winds are still weak below the clouds (roughly half the observed values). The atmospheric waves play a crucial role in the angular momentum budget of the Venus's atmospheric circulation. In the upper cloud, the vertical angular momentum is transported by the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides. Above the cloud base (approximately 1 bar), equatorward transport of angular momentum is done by polar barotropic and mid- to high-latitude baroclinic waves present in the cloud region, with frequencies between 5 and 20 cycles per Venus day (periods between 6 and 23 Earth days). In the middle cloud, just above the convective layer, a Kelvin type wave (period around 7.3 Ed) is present at the equator, as well as a low-latitude Rossby-gravity type wave (period around 16 Ed). Below the clouds, large-scale mid- to high-latitude gravity waves develop and play a significant role in the angular momentum balance.

  8. Relations between surface conductance and spectral vegetation indices at intermediate (100 m sq to 15 km sq) length scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers J.; Heiser, Mark D.; Hall, Forrest G.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between surface conductance and spectral vegetation indices is investigated utilizing the FIFE data set, principally the surface flux station data and images from the TM instrument. It is found that the unstressed canopy conductance for a given site for a given day is near-linearly related to the incident PAR flux. Estimates of unstressed canopy conductance were acquired via a model inversion that separated the soil and vegetation contributions to evapotranspiration and made adjustments for the effects of vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture stress.

  9. Relations between surface conductance and spectral vegetation indices at intermediate (100 m sq to 15 km sq) length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, P.J.; Heiser, M.D.; Hall, F.G. Maryland Univ., College Park )

    1992-11-01

    The relationship between surface conductance and spectral vegetation indices is investigated utilizing the FIFE data set, principally the surface flux station data and images from the TM instrument. It is found that the unstressed canopy conductance for a given site for a given day is near-linearly related to the incident PAR flux. Estimates of unstressed canopy conductance were acquired via a model inversion that separated the soil and vegetation contributions to evapotranspiration and made adjustments for the effects of vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture stress. 30 refs.

  10. The -145 km/S Absorption System of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G.; Gull, T. R.; Danks, A.; Johansson, S.

    2002-01-01

    With the STIS E230H mode (R-118,000) , we have identified about twenty absorption components in line of sight from Eta Carinae. Two components, one at -513 km/s and another at -145 W s , are quite different in character from the others, mostly at intermediate velocities. The -145 km/s component is significantly wider in fwhm, is seen in many more species, and the lower level can be above 20,000/cm, well above the 2000/cm noted in the -513 km/s component. In the spectral region from 2400 to 3160A, approximately 500 absorption lines have been identified. In this poster, we will present line identifications and atomic parameters of the measured lines, hopefully providing insight as to what levels are being excited and by what processes.

  11. Potential of KM+ lectin in immunization against Leishmania amazonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Clarissa R; Cavassani, Karen A; Gomes, Regis B; Teixeira, Maria Jania; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Cavada, Benildo S; da Silva, João Santana; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2006-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated Canavalia brasiliensis (ConBr), Pisum arvense (PAA) and Artocarpus integrifolia (KM+) lectins as immunostimulatory molecules in vaccination against Leishmania amazonensis infection. Although they induced IFN-gamma production, the combination of the lectins with SLA antigen did not lead to lesion reduction. However, parasite load was largely reduced in mice immunized with KM+ lectin and SLA. KM+ induced a smaller inflammatory reaction in the air pouch model and was able to inhibit differentiation of dendritic cells (BMDC), but to induce maturation by enhancing the expression of MHC II, CD80 and CD86. These observations indicate the modulatory role of plant lectins in leishmaniasis vaccination may be related to their action on the initial innate response.

  12. Changes in S1 Neural Responses During Tactile Discrimination Learning

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Michael C.; Pantoja, Janaina; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2010-01-01

    In freely moving rats that are actively performing a discrimination task, single-unit responses in primary somatosensory cortex (S1) are strikingly different from responses to comparable tactile stimuli in immobile rats. For example, in the active discrimination context prestimulus response modulations are common, responses are longer in duration and more likely to be inhibited. To determine whether these differences emerge as rats learned a whisker-dependent discrimination task, we recorded single-unit S1 activity while rats learned to discriminate aperture-widths using their whiskers. Even before discrimination training began, S1 responses in freely moving rats showed many of the signatures of active responses, such as increased duration of response and prestimulus response modulations. As rats subsequently learned the discrimination task, single unit responses changed: more cortical units responded to the stimuli, neuronal sensory responses grew in duration, and individual neurons better predicted aperture-width. In summary, the operant behavioral context changes S1 tactile responses even in the absence of tactile discrimination, whereas subsequent width discrimination learning refines the S1 representation of aperture-width. PMID:20445033

  13. Seismological detection of "730-km" discontinuity beneath Japan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Park, J. J.; Karato, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    Because the mantle transition zone likely contains a large amount of water (Karato, 2011; Pearson et al., 2014), vertical material transport across the transition would cause partial melting that may produce seismic signals above and/or below the transition zone. Schmandt et al. (2014) observed a seismic low-velocity zone (LVZ) at the top of the lower mantle (~730 km) beneath the southwestern US, arguing for dehydration melting due to downward flow across the 670-km discontinuity (670) from the transition zone. These authors further proposed a correlation between seismic velocity reductions and the direction of water transport, in which LVZ at ~730 km indicates materials moving downward from the transition zone, while the lack of LVZ at this depth would suggest an upward flow of mantle materials. Other regions also need to be investigated to confirm the correlation between this seismic feature and mantle water transport. We test their model by detecting "730-km" discontinuity beneath the Japan subduction zone using frequency-dependent receiver functions. In addition, water transport above the 410-km discontinuity (410) also plays an important role in global water circulation (Bercovici and Karato, 2003). Seismological studies (e.g. Courtier and Revenaugh, 2007; Schaeffer and Bostock, 2010) have observed LVZs above the 410, which might be caused by dehydration melting due to the upwelling of hydrated materials across the 410-km discontinuity from the transition zone. In this study, we also detect potential LVZs above 410 to establish a correlation between seismic velocity drop and flow direction. Around the Japan subduction zone, our preliminary results show evidence of low velocity zones below 670 in regions where stagnant slab is present for a substantial amount of time but not in other regions suggesting a variety of vertical mass transport in this region. Key words: transition zone, water transport, subduction zone, melting, receiver functions

  14. Ad-libitum drinking and performance during a 40-km cycling time trial in the heat.

    PubMed

    Berkulo, Meriam A R; Bol, Susan; Levels, Koen; Lamberts, Robert P; Daanen, Hein A M; Noakes, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if drinking ad-libitum can counteract potential negative effects of a hypohydrated start caused by fluid restriction during a 40-km time trial (TT) in the heat. Twelve trained males performed one 40-km cycling TT euhydrated (EU: no water during the TT) and two 40-km cycling TTs hypohydrated. During one hypohydrated trial no fluid was ingested (HYPO), during the other trial ad-libitum water ingestion was allowed (FLUID). Ambient temperature was 35.2 ± 0.2 °C, relative humidity 51 ± 3% and airflow 7 m·s(-1). Body mass (BM) was determined at the start of the test, and before and after the TT. During the TT, power output, heart rate (HR), gastrointestinal temperature, mean skin temperature, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal sensation, thermal comfort and thirst sensation were measured. Prior to the start of the TT, BM was 1.2% lower in HYPO and FLUID compared to EU. During the TT, BM loss in FLUID was lower compared to EU and HYPO (1.0 ± 0.8%, 2.7 ± 0.2% and 2.6 ± 0.3%, respectively). Hydration status had no effect on power output (EU: 223 ± 32 W, HYPO: 217 ± 39 W, FLUID: 224 ± 35 W), HR, gastrointestinal temperature, mean skin temperature, RPE, thermal sensation and thermal comfort. Thirst sensation was higher in HYPO than in EU and FLUID. It was concluded that hypohydration did not adversely affect performance during a 40-km cycling TT in the heat. Therefore, whether or not participants consumed fluid during exercise did not influence their TT performance.

  15. Water Ice in the Comae of Comets C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) and C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S.; Protopapa, Silvia; Li, Jian-Yang; Woodward, Charles E.

    2014-11-01

    Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) passes Mars with a closest approach distance of about 138,000 km on 2014 October 19. This short distance gives our Mars-orbiting spacecraft the opportunity to observe a comet under conditions similar to a flyby mission, never before accomplished for a dynamically new comet. Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 observations of the comet in 2013 October, 4.6 AU from the Sun, revealed an inner coma with an optical spectral slope of ~3%/100 nm (Li et al., in preparation). The near-neutral slope is bluer than most observations of comet comae, which suggests the presence of water ice. Subsequent HST observations showed a coma that reddened as the comet's heliocentric distance decreased to 3.3 AU. On 2014 January 26, we observed comet Siding Spring with the NASA IRTF SpeX instrument, when the comet was at a heliocentric distance of 3.7 AU. Our 1 to 2.5-μm, low-resolution spectrum of the comet has a subtle 2.0-μm absorption feature, possibly indicating the presence of water ice. We model our spectrum using the approaches of Hapke (1993) and Protopapa et al. (2014, Icarus 238, 191). Our best-fit model suggests a coma of water-ice grains with a radius near 0.5 μm, and an areal fraction of about 5%. We present our SpeX spectrum and best-fit model of the comet. In light of the modeling results, we consider the temporal and spatial color variations in the coma of comet Siding Spring, as well as similar HST observations of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from Li et al. (2013, ApJL 779, L3).

  16. Simulation of CO2 release at 800 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayesh, A.

    1993-08-01

    The SOCRATES contamination-interaction code has been used to simulate the reactions of 0 + CO2 yields CO2(v) + O, O + CO2 - CO(v) + O2, and CO2 + H - CO + OH(v) at an altitude of 800 km in both ram and wake directions of the spacecraft. These simulations show that the radiation from these reactions can be measurable for the parameters which have been used in these calculations. The investigation carries out the simulations as much as 30 km from the spacecraft. The radiative intensity of CO(v) and OH(v) show the highest and lowest, respectively.

  17. Cascade sensitivity studies for KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Luigi Antonio

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT is a future research infrastructure in the deep seas of the Mediterranean housing a large scale neutrino telescope. The first phase of construction of the telescope has started. Next step is an intermediate phase realising a detector volume of about one-third of the final detector volume. We report on calculations of the sensitivity of the KM3NeT detector to showering neutrino events, the strategy to optimise the detector to a cosmic neutrino flux analogous to the one reported by the IceCube Collaboration and the results of this strategy applied to the intermediate phase detector.

  18. Cruise report R/V Surf Surveyor cruise S1-00-CL, mapping the bathymetry of Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Mayer, Larry A.; Buktenica, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    During the Spring of 1999, the US Geological Survey (USGS) Pacific Seafloor Mapping Project (PSMP) was contacted by the US National Park Service Crater Lake National Park (CLNP) to inquire about the plausibility of producing a high-resolution multibeam bathymetric map of Crater Lake. The purpose was to generate a much higher-resolution and more geographically accurate bathymetric map than was produced in 1959, the last time the lake had been surveyed. Scientific interest in various aspects of Crater Lake (aquatic biology, geochemistry, volcanic processes, etc.) has increased during the past decade but the basemap of bathymetry was woefully inadequate. Funds were gathered during the early part of 2000 and the mapping began in late July, 2000. Crater Lake (see fig. 1 in report) is located in south central Oregon (see fig. 2 in report) within the Cascades Range, a chain of volcanoes that stretches from northern California to southern British Columbia. Crater Lake is the collapsed caldera of Mt. Mazama from a climatic eruption about 7700-yr ago (Nelson et al., 1988; Bacon and Lanphere, 1990; Bacon et al., 1997). The floor of Crater Lake has only been mapped three times since the lake was first stumbled upon by gold prospectors in the 1853. The first survey was carried by out by William G. Steel during a joint USGS-US Army expedition under the direction of Maj. Clarence E. Dutton in 1886 (Dutton, 1889). Steel�s mapping survey collected 186 soundings using a Millers lead-line sounding machine (see fig.3 in report). The resulting map (see fig.4 in report) shows only soundings and no attempts were made to generate contours. The second survey, conducted in 1959 by the US Coast and Geodetic Survey, mapped the bathymetry of Crater Lake with an acoustic echo sounder using radar navigation and collected 4000 soundings. The data were contoured by Williams (1961) and Byrne (1962) and the result is a fairly detailed map of the large-scale features of Crater Lake (see fig. 5 in report). The third mapping survey, the one of this report, was a joint USGS-NPS project carried out under a Cooperative Agreement with the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire. The 2000 survey used a Kongsberg Simrad EM1002 high-resolution multibeam mapping system owned and operated by C&C Technologies, Inc. of Lafayette, LA.

  19. Densities inferred from ESA's Venus Express aerobraking campaign at 130 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, Sean; Marty, Jean-Charles; Svedhem, Håkan; Williams, Adam; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    In June-July 2014, ESA performed a planned aerobraking campaign with Venus Express to measure neutral densities above 130 km in Venus' atmosphere by means of the engineering accelerometers. To that purpose, the orbit perigee was lowered to approximately 130 km in order to enhance the atmospheric drag effect to the highest tolerable levels for the spacecraft; the accelerometer resolution and precision were not sufficient at higher altitudes. This campaign was requested as part of the Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VExADE). A total of 18 orbits (i.e. days) were processed using the attitude quaternions to correctly orient the spacecraft bus and solar arrays in inertial space, which is necessary to accurately compute the exposed surface in the ram direction. The accelerometer data provide good measurements approximately from 130-140 km altitude; the length of the profiles is about 85 seconds, and they are on the early morning side (LST=4.5) at high northern latitude (70°N-82°N). The densities are a factor 2-3 larger than Hedin's VTS-3 thermosphere model, which is consistent with earlier results obtained via classical precise orbit determination at higher altitudes. Wavelike structures with amplitudes of 20% and more are detected, with wavelengths of about 100-500 km. We cannot entirely rule out that these waves are caused by the spacecraft or due to some unknown instrumental effect, but we estimate this probability to be very low.

  20. Gm and Km immunoglobulin allotypes in Reindeer Chukchi and Siberian Eskimos.

    PubMed

    Sukernik, R I; Osipova, L P

    1982-01-01

    Blood samples from 403 Reindeer Chukchi of inland Chukotka, and 100 samples from Chaplin Eskimos of the Chukot Peninsula were tested for G 1 m (z,a,x,f), G2m (n), G3m (g,b0,b1,b3,b5,s,t), and Km (1) allotypic determinants. An apparent affinity between the Chukchi and the Eskimos could be inferred from similar frequencies of the two common haplotypes, Gmza;g and Gmza;bst, and from very similar frequencies of the Km1 allele. However, none of the Eskimos had Gmzax;g, though it occurred at a low or moderate frequency in the five Chukchi populations studied. It is assumed that Chukchi can be distinguished from adjoining Eskimos by the same G1m (x) outlier, that has been considered as a taxonomic marker useful in differentiating between Eskimos and American Indians. Comparison of North Asian and North American populations with respect to the array and frequencies of Gm haplotypes and the Km1 allele, supports the hypothesis of a nonrandom distribution of the Gmza;bst and Km1 on both sides of the Bering Strait. PMID:6957376

  1. The Integrated Truss Assembly S-1 (S-One) Buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image shows the Integrated Truss Assembly S-1 (S-One), the Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss, for the International Space Station (ISS) undergoing final construction in the Space Station manufacturing facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. Delivered and installed by the STS-112 mission, the S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. Manufactured by the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, California, the truss primary structure was transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center in February 1999 for hardware installations and manufacturing acceptance testing.

  2. S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Zhou, Yan; Min, Ke; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Ni

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). METHODS: We extracted reported endpoints, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time-to-treatment failure (TTF), objective response rate (ORR) and adverse effects, from randomized controlled trials identified in PubMed, the Cochrane library, Science Direct, EMBASE and American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings. Stata software was used to calculate the pooled values. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials involving 2176 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Compared to non-S-1-based regimens, the use of S-1-based regimens were associated with an increase in ORR (RR = 1.300; 95%CI: 1.028-1.645); OS (HR = 0.89; 95%CI: 0.81-0.99; P = 0.025), TTF (HR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.75-0.92; P = 0.000), and a lower risk of febrile neutropenia (RR = 0.225; P = 0.000) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032). OS, PFS and TTF were prolonged, especially in the Asian population. In subgroup analysis, statistically significant increases in ORR (RR = 1.454; P = 0.029), OS (HR = 0.895; P = 0.041) and TTF (HR = 0.832; P = 0.000) were found when S-1-based chemotherapy was compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. The incidence of leukopenia (RR = 0.584; P = 0.002) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032) was higher in the 5-FU-based arm. S-1-based regimens had no advantage in ORR, OS, PFS, TTF and grade 3 or 4 adverse events over capecitabine-based regimens. CONCLUSION: S-1-based chemotherapy may be a good choice for AGC because of longer survival times, better tolerance and more convenient use. PMID:25206296

  3. Data Assimilation of PROBA-V 100 m and 300 m.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliams, S. J. B.; Kempeneers, P.

    2015-12-01

    One of the goals of the FP7 SIGMA projects is the extension of remote sensing time series to better monitor agricultural productivity at global scale. Extending these time series can be seen in differnt ways; on the one hand we are looking at the integration of different existing data sets with equal resolution e.g. SPOT-VGT and PROBA-V 1km resolution, or building new time series for Eta and Soil moisture. on the other hand we are also updating methods to extend existing time series with respect to their resolution and revisting frequency. The research presentend here will focus on the latter, focussing on the integration of PROBA-V 100 and 300m. The PROBA-V microsatellite is designed to offer a global coverage of land surfaces at four spectral bands at a spatial resolution of 300 m and 1 km with a daily revisit for latitudes 75°N to 56°S [1]. Due to the specific design, data can also be acquired at 100 m for a reduced swath, providing partial coverage (global coverage only every 5 days). This study proposes a data assimilation method that combines the 100 m data at the reduced swath with PROBA-V 300 m resolution data at the full swath. The resulting product is a synthetic product at 100 m spatial resolution, with a potential revisit time equal to the 300 m products (S10@300). Here, we concentrate on a ten day composite product (K10@100), to mitigate the effect of clouds. The goal of the proposed method is to produce continuous and cloud free time series of PROBA-V data at 100 m spatial resolution. The S10@300 and S10@100 ten day composits serve as input, with respective spatial resolutions of 300 m and 100 m. Whereas the S10@300 is obtained from all sensors onbaord the PROBA-V platform, the S10@100 is the product from the central viewing sensor only. Due to a combination of the reduced swath and potential cloud cover, the S10@100 is typically sparse (gaps). The data assimilation method follows the approach proposed in that is based on a Kalman filter. It is a

  4. Observations of the new gravitational lens system UM 673 = Q 0142-100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdej, J.; Magain, P.; Swings, J.-P.; Borgeest, U.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Kayer, R.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kuhr, H.; Refsdal, S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors have recently initiated a high resolution direct imaging survey of a selected sample of highly luminous quasars (HLQs). The observations are carried out with the 2.2 m telescope at ESO, and with the VLA at the NRAO, New Mexico. Following the first observing run at ESO, the authors have reported the discovery of a new gravitational lens system for the HLQ UM 673 = Q 0142-100. Additional observations supporting this interpretation are discussed here. Application of gravitational optometry to this system is given: a value of M0 = 2.4×1011M_sun; is derived for the mass of the lensing galaxy located between UM 673 A and B and a most likely estimate of Δt = 7 weeks is found for the expected delay between the arrival times of a similar variability event in the two lensed images of the quasar (H0 = 75 km s-1Mpc-1, q0 = 0).

  5. Production of recombinant Conkunitzin-S1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bayrhuber, Monika; Graf, Roland; Ferber, Michael; Zweckstetter, Markus; Imperial, Julita; Garrett, James E; Olivera, Baldomero M; Terlau, Heinrich; Becker, Stefan

    2006-06-01

    Conkunitzin-S1 from the cone snail Conus striatus is the first member of a new neurotoxin family with a canonical Kunitz domain fold. Conk-S1 is 60 amino acids long and lacks one of the three conserved disulfide bonds typically found in Kunitz domain modules. It binds specifically to voltage activated potassium channels of the Shaker family. The peptide was expressed in insoluble form in fusion with an N-terminal intein. Refolding in the presence of glutathione followed by pH shift-induced cleavage of the fusion protein resulted in a functional toxin as demonstrated by voltage-clamp measurements. PMID:16542850

  6. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  7. Winding Hopfions on R2×S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-11-01

    We study Hopfions in the Faddeev-Skyrme model with potential terms on R2×S1. Apart from the conventional Hopfions, there exist winding Hopfions, that is, the lump (baby Skyrmion) strings with the lump charge Q with the U(1) modulus twisted P times along S1, having the Hopf charge PQ. We consider two kinds of potential terms, that is, the potential linear in the field and the ferromagnetic potential with two easy axes, and present stable solutions numerically. We also point out that a Q-lump carries the unit Hopf charge per the period in d=2+1.

  8. Ensemble flood simulation for a small dam catchment in Japan using 10 and 2 km resolution nonhydrostatic model rainfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Otsuka, Shigenori; Apip; Saito, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a study on short-term ensemble flood forecasting specifically for small dam catchments in Japan. Numerical ensemble simulations of rainfall from the Japan Meteorological Agency nonhydrostatic model (JMA-NHM) are used as the input data to a rainfall-runoff model for predicting river discharge into a dam. The ensemble weather simulations use a conventional 10 km and a high-resolution 2 km spatial resolutions. A distributed rainfall-runoff model is constructed for the Kasahori dam catchment (approx. 70 km2) and applied with the ensemble rainfalls. The results show that the hourly maximum and cumulative catchment-average rainfalls of the 2 km resolution JMA-NHM ensemble simulation are more appropriate than the 10 km resolution rainfalls. All the simulated inflows based on the 2 and 10 km rainfalls become larger than the flood discharge of 140 m3 s-1, a threshold value for flood control. The inflows with the 10 km resolution ensemble rainfall are all considerably smaller than the observations, while at least one simulated discharge out of 11 ensemble members with the 2 km resolution rainfalls reproduces the first peak of the inflow at the Kasahori dam with similar amplitude to observations, although there are spatiotemporal lags between simulation and observation. To take positional lags into account of the ensemble discharge simulation, the rainfall distribution in each ensemble member is shifted so that the catchment-averaged cumulative rainfall of the Kasahori dam maximizes. The runoff simulation with the position-shifted rainfalls shows much better results than the original ensemble discharge simulations.

  9. Body Composition Measurements of 161-km Ultramarathon Participants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compares body composition characteristics with performance among participants in a 161-km trail ultramarathon. Height, mass, and percent body fat from bioimpedence spectroscopy were measured on 72 starters. Correlation analyses were used to compare body characteristics with finish time, ...

  10. The -145 km/s Absorption System of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, G. L.; Gull, T. R.; Danks, A. C.; Johansson, S.

    2002-12-01

    With the STIS E230H mode (R 118,000), we have identified about twenty absorption components in line of sight from Eta Carinae. Two components, one at -513 km/s and another at -145 km/s, are quite different in character from the others, mostly at intermediate velocities (See adjacent posters by T. Gull and A. Danks). The -145 km/s component is significantly wider in fwhm, is seen in many more species, and the lower level can be above 20,000 cm-1, well above the 2000 cm-1 noted in the -513 km/s component. In the spectral region from 2400 to 3160A, approximately 500 absorption lines have been identified. In this poster, we will present line identifications and atomic parameters of the measured lines, hopefully providing insight as to what levels are being excited and by what processes. Observations were accomplished through STScI under proposal 9242 (Danks, P.I.). Funding is through the STIS GTO resources.

  11. Models of earth's atmosphere (90 to 2500 km)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This monograph replaces a monograph on the upper atmosphere which was a computerized version of Jacchia's model. The current model has a range from 90 to 2500 km. In addition to the computerized model, a quick-look prediction method is given that may be used to estimate the density for any time and spatial location without using a computer.

  12. Gravity wave vertical energy flux at 95 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, P. G.; Jacka, F.

    1985-01-01

    A three-field photometer (3FP) located at Mt. Torrens near Adelaide, is capable of monitoring different airglow emissions from three spaced fields in the sky. A wheel containing up to six different narrow bandpass interference filters can be rotated, allowing each of the filters to be sequentially placed into each of the three fields. The airglow emission of interest is the 557.7 nm line which has an intensity maximum at 95 km. Each circular field of view is located at the apexes of an equilateral triangle centered on zenith with diameters of 5 km and field separations of 13 km when projected to the 95-km level. The sampling period was 30 seconds and typical data lengths were between 7 and 8 hours. The analysis and results from the interaction of gravity waves on the 557.7 nm emission layer are derived using an atmospheric model similar to that proposed by Hines (1960) where the atmosphere is assumed isothermal and perturbations caused by gravity waves are small and adiabatic, therefore, resulting in linearized equations of motion. In the absence of waves, the atmosphere is also considered stationary. Thirteen nights of quality data from January 1983 to October 1984, covering all seasons, are used in this analysis.

  13. Bacterial versus human sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) in the design of potential S1PL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luis; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-09-15

    A series of potential active-site sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) inhibitors have been designed from scaffolds 1 and 2, arising from virtual screening using the X-ray structures of the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Both enzymes are very similar at the active site, as confirmed by the similar experimental kinetic constants shown by the fluorogenic substrate RBM13 in both cases. However, the docking scoring functions used probably overestimated the weight of electrostatic interactions between the ligands and key active-site residues in the protein environment, which may account for the modest activity found for the designed inhibitors. In addition, the possibility that the inhibitors do not reach the enzyme active site should not be overlooked. Finally, since both enzymes show remarkable structural differences at the access channel and in the proximity to the active site cavity, caution should be taken when designing inhibitors acting around that area, as evidenced by the much lower activity found in StS1PL for the potent hS1PL inhibitor D. PMID:27475537

  14. Measured electric field in the vicinity of a thunderstorm system at an altitude of 37 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benbrook, J. R.; Kern, J. W.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon-borne experiment to measure the atmospheric electric field was flown from the National Scientific Balloon Facility at Palestine, Texas, on July 10, 1973. The electric field and atmospheric conductivity were measured during ascent and for a 4-hour float period at 37-km altitude. Termination of the flight occurred near a thunderstorm line in west Texas. The perturbing influence of the thunderstorms on the electric field was observed at least 100 km from the storm line. The measured electric field is in reasonable agreement with calculations based on simple models of cloud structure and atmospheric conductivity. Large pulses in the measured electric field are interpreted as being the result of intracloud lightning.

  15. The RF spectra of first and subsequent lightning return strokes in the 1- to 200-km range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serhan, G. I.; Uman, M. A.; Childers, D. G.; Lin, Y. T.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental characterization of the frequency spectra of first and subsequent stroke electric fields are presented over a distance range from about 1 km, where the fields are primarily electrostatic, to 200 km, where they are primarily radiation. Spectra are presented to about 700 kHz for lightning within 12 km and to about 300 kHz for lightning at 50 and 200 km. It is shown that the return stroke ground wave spectrum beyond 50 km has a peak near 4 kHz but that within 10 km the spectrum shows a steady increase with decreasing frequency to 1 kHz. Frequency spectra at all ranges fall off roughly as 1/f for frequencies between 5 and 100 kHz, while the falloff above 100 kHz is faster as the distance to the stroke increases. From this high-frequency attenuation an RF conductivity for central Florida of between 0.002 and 0.005/ohm/m was determined.

  16. Redox-Controled Preservation of Mediterranean Sapropel S1 deposits during Formation and Interruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, Gert J.; Filippidi, Amalia; Goudeau, Marie-Louise; Hennekam, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Organic-rich units (sapropels) occur in Mediterraneran sediments in a repetitive, climate-controled way. Their deposition is thought to be precession-related and to be associated with humid climate conditions. The last humid period from 11 - 5 kyr 14C ago, occurred simultaneous with a sustained circum-Mediterranean wet period and vegetated Sahara. Within that period, the most recent sapropel (S1) formed synchronously between 9.8 and 5.7 14C ky BP at all water depths greater than a few hundred metres. As a consequence of increased fresh water (monsoon) input, surface waters had a reduced salinity and concomitantly the deep (> 1.8 km) eastern Mediterranean Sea was devoid of oxygen during 4,000 years of S1 formation. This has resulted in a differential basin-wide preservation of S1sediments determined by water depth, as a result of different ventilation/climate-related redox conditions above and below 1.8 km. The end of this period is marked by a basin-wide high sedimentary manganese-oxide peak that represents an abrupt re-ventilation of the deep-water at 5.7 kyr. The sustaining oxic conditions thereafter have resulted in a downward progressing oxidation-front that is not only characterized by the degradation of most organic matter over its active pathway, but also by the built-up of manganese oxide. The latter has resulted in a secondary diagenetic Mn-peak below the first, upper, ventilation Mn-peak. Apart from the major re-ventilation event at the end of sapropel S1 formation, also other, short-term ventilation events appear to have occurred during its formation, notably during the 8.2 ka event. This potentially basin-wide event is particularly noticeable at relatively shallow near-coastal sites of high sedimentation rates. It marks a brief episode of not only re-oxygenated deep water thus reduced preservation, but also decreased primary productivity thus nutrient supply. This 8.2 cal ka BP interruption event is thought to be related to enhanced deep water formation

  17. Formation, Redox-Controled Preservation, and Interruption of Organic-rich Sapropel S1 sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lange, Gert J.; Hennekam, Rick; Goudeau, Marie-Louise; Filippidi, Amalia

    2015-04-01

    Distinct, organic-rich units (sapropels) occur in Mediterraneran sediments in a repetitive, climate-controled way. Their deposition is thought to be precession-related and to be associated with humid climate conditions. The last humid period from 11 - 5 kyr 14C ago, occurred simultaneous with a sustained circum-Mediterranean wet period. Within that period, the most recent sapropel (S1) formed synchronously between 9.8 and 5.7 14C ky BP at all water depths greater than a few hundred metres. As a consequence of increased fresh water (monsoon) input, surface waters had a reduced salinity and concomitantly the deep (> 1.8 km) eastern Mediterranean Sea was devoid of oxygen during 4,000 years of S1. This has resulted in a differential basin-wide preservation of S1 determined by water depth, as a result of different ventilation/climate-related redox conditions above and below 1.8 km. The end of this period is marked by a basin-wide high sedimentary manganese-oxide peak that represents an abrupt re-ventilation of the deep-water at 5.7 kyr. The sustaining oxic conditions thereafter have resulted in a downward progressing oxidation-front that is not only characterized by the degradation of most organic matter over its active pathway, but also by the built-up of manganese oxide. The latter has resulted in a secondary Mn-peak below the first, upper, ventilation Mn-peak. Apart from the major re-ventilation event at the end of sapropel S1 formation, also other, short-term ventilation events appear to have occurred during its formation, notably the 8.2 ka event. This potentially basin-wide event is particularly noticeable at relatively shallow near-coastal sites of high sedimentation rates. It marks a brief episode of not only re-oxygenated deep water thus reduced preservation, but also decreased primary productivity thus nutrient supply. This 8.2 cal ka BP interruption event is thought to be related to enhanced deep water formation in the Aegean or Adriatic due to a period of

  18. Emerging role of S-1 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Krasniqi, Eriseld; Pellicori, Stefania; Formica, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most important malignancies worldwide in terms of incidence and mortality. The treatment is based on the combination of local surgery and radiation therapy as well as systemic chemotherapy and targeted molecules. Fluoropyrimidines and particularly 5-fluorouracil (FU) represent still the backbone for gastric cancer chemotherapy and new molecular versions of this molecule have been brought to clinical practice in order to improve benefits and reduce adverse effects. S-1 is an oral prodrug of 5-FU, which has demonstrated high effectiveness for gastric cancer treatment and a favorable safety profile. Currently, there are geographic differences in the treatment of gastric cancer and in the use of S-1, which is a mainstay of gastric cancer management in Eastern countries, but is not part of the standard care in the rest of the world. In this review, we gathered data from phase I, II, and III trials of S-1 in gastric cancer, in order to define its real benefit-risk ratio and assess whether geographic differences in S-1 use are justified by unchangeable factors.

  19. L5-S1 Laparoscopic Anterior Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Tallal M.; Phillips, Frank M.; Mathur, Sameer; Zografakis, John G.; Moore, Ronald M.; Laguna, Luis E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated our experience with laparoscopic L5-S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). Methods: This represents a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who underwent L5-S1 laparoscopic ALIF between February 1998 and August 2003. Results: Twenty-eight patients underwent L5-S1 LAIF (15 males and 13 females). The mean age was 43 years (range, 26 to 67). Mean operative time was 225 minutes (range, 137 to 309 minutes). No conversions to an open procedure were necessary. Twenty-four (85.7%) patients underwent successful bilateral cage placement. Four patients (14.3%) in whom only a single cage could be placed underwent supplementary posterior pedicle screw placement. Mean length of stay (LOS) was 4.1 days (range, 2 to 15). Two patients underwent reoperation subacutely secondary to symptomatic lateral displacement of the cage. One patient developed radiculopathy 6 months postoperatively and required reoperation. One patient developed a small bowel obstruction secondary to adhesions to the cage requiring laparoscopic reoperation. Fusion was achieved in all patients. Visual analogue scale scores for back pain were significantly improved from 8.6±0.8 to 2.8±0.8 (P<0.0001) at 1 year. Conclusion: L5-S1 LAIF is feasible and safe with all the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Fusion rates and pain improvement were comparable to those with an open repair. PMID:17575763

  20. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders. PMID:26687487

  1. CCD polarimetry of distant comets C/2010 S1 (LINEAR) and C/2010 R1 (LINEAR) at the 6-m telescope of the SAO RAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Oleksandra V.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Afanasiev, Viktor L.; Reshetnyk, Volodymyr M.; Korsun, Pavlo P.

    2015-12-01

    We present first measurements of the degree of linear polarization of distant comets C/2010 S1 (LINEAR) and C/2010 R1 (LINEAR) at heliocentric distances r=5.9-7.0 AU. Observations were carried out with the SCORPIO-2 focal reducer at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia). Both comets showed considerable level of activity (significant dust comae and tails) beyond a zone where water ice sublimation is negligible (up to 5 AU). Significant spatial variations both in the intensity and polarization are found in both the comets. The slope of radial profiles of intensity changes gradually with the distance from the photocenter: from -0.7 near the nucleus up to about -1.3 for larger distances (up to 100,000 km). The variation in polarization profiles indicates the non-uniformity in the polarization distribution over the coma. The polarization degree over the coma gradually increases (in absolute value) with increasing photocentric distance from of about -1.9% up to -3% for comet C/2010 S1 (LINEAR), and from of about -2.5% up to -3.5% for comet C/2010 R1 (LINEAR). These polarization values are significantly higher than typical value of the whole coma polarization (∼-1.5%) for comets at heliocentric distances less than 5 AU. The obtained photometric and polarimetric data are compared with those derived early for other comets at smaller heliocentric distances. Numerical modeling of light scattering characteristics was performed for media composed of particles with different refractive indexes, shapes, and sizes. The computations were made by using the superposition T-matrix method. We obtained that for comet C/2010 S1 (LINEAR), the dust in the form of aggregates of overall radius R~1.3 μm composed of N=1000 spherical monomers with radius a=0.1 μm and refractive index m=1.65+i0.05, allows to obtain a satisfactory agreement between the results of polarimetric observations of comet C/2010 S1 and computations.

  2. Relationship between the 2.4-km run and multistage shuttle run test performance in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David M; Blacker, Sam D; Richmond, Victoria L; Rayson, Mark P; Bilzon, James L J

    2014-02-01

    In the United Kingdom, all branches of the armed forces use 2.4-km run time and/or the 20-m multistage shuttle run test (MSRT) to assess the aerobic fitness of their personnel. This study quantified the relationship between these two tests in 156 army recruits and officer cadets (100 men and 56 women) to ensure equivalence in the required aerobic fitness standards. The 2.4-km run was performed on surfaced roads and tracks around the training establishment and the MSRT in a gymnasium. Ordinary least product regression was used to describe the relationship between average 2.4-km running speed (km · h(-1)) and the total number of shuttles completed on the U.K. version of the MSRT (r = 0.91, p < 0.01), showing MSRT shuttles = (9.708×2.4-km run speed) - 52.56, with a standard error of prediction of approximately 8 shuttles or 0.8 km · h(-1). The British Army 2.4-km run biannual fitness assessment standard for young men of 10:30 min:s equates to a MSRT score of 82 shuttles (level 10 and 1 shuttle) and for young women of 13:00 min:s equates to 56 shuttles (level 7 and 6 shuttles), with a standard error of estimate of approximately 8 shuttles. PMID:24491618

  3. Fact Sheet for KM200 Front-end Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas

    2015-07-08

    The KM200 device is a versatile, configurable front-end electronics boards that can be used as a functional replacement for Canberra’s JAB-01 boards based on the Amptek A-111 hybrid chip, which continues to be the preferred choice of electronics for large number of the boards in junction boxes of multiplicity counters that process the signal from an array of 3He detectors. Unlike the A-111 chip’s fixed time constants and sensitivity range, the shaping time and sensitivity of the new KM200 can be optimized for demanding applications such as spent fuel, and thus could improve the safeguards measurements of existing systems where the A-111 or PDT electronics does not perform well.

  4. Remote (250 km) Fiber Bragg Grating Multiplexing System

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Rota-Rodrigo, Sergio; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate two ultra-long range fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor interrogation systems. In the first approach four FBGs are located 200 km from the monitoring station and a signal to noise ratio of 20 dB is obtained. The second improved version is able to detect the four multiplexed FBGs placed 250 km away, offering a signal to noise ratio of 6–8 dB. Consequently, this last system represents the longest range FBG sensor system reported so far that includes fiber sensor multiplexing capability. Both simple systems are based on a wavelength swept laser to scan the reflection spectra of the FBGs, and they are composed by two identical-lengths optical paths: the first one intended to launch the amplified laser signal by means of Raman amplification and the other one is employed to guide the reflection signal to the reception system. PMID:22164101

  5. Remote (250 km) fiber Bragg grating multiplexing system.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Rota-Rodrigo, Sergio; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate two ultra-long range fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor interrogation systems. In the first approach four FBGs are located 200 km from the monitoring station and a signal to noise ratio of 20 dB is obtained. The second improved version is able to detect the four multiplexed FBGs placed 250 km away, offering a signal to noise ratio of 6-8 dB. Consequently, this last system represents the longest range FBG sensor system reported so far that includes fiber sensor multiplexing capability. Both simple systems are based on a wavelength swept laser to scan the reflection spectra of the FBGs, and they are composed by two identical-lengths optical paths: the first one intended to launch the amplified laser signal by means of Raman amplification and the other one is employed to guide the reflection signal to the reception system. PMID:22164101

  6. KM3NeT-ARCA project status and plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coniglione, R.

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT Collaboration aims at building a research infrastructure in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea hosting a cubic kilometre neutrino telescope. The KM3NeT/ARCA detector is the ideal instrument to look for high-energy neutrino sources thanks to the latitude of the detector and to the optical characteristics of the sea water. The detector latitude allows for a wide coverage of the observable sky including the region of the Galactic centre and the optical sea water properties allow for the measure of the neutrino direction with excellent angular resolution also for cascade events. The technologically innovative components of the detector and the status of construction will be presented as well as the capability it offers to discover neutrinos.

  7. Real Km-synthesis via generalized Popov multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, R. Y.; Safonov, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    The authors refine their H-infinity control designs presented at the 1990 and 1991 American Control Conference by introducing a new real Km-synthesis technique involving the use of generalized Popov multipliers. This multiplier technique substantially reduces, and in some cases may even eliminate altogether, the conservativeness associated with traditional Km-synthesis solutions in which all uncertainties are treated as complex, even when they arise from real parameters such as the masses and spring constants in the benchmark problem. The design results demonstrate how this approach permits a very precise analysis of the intrinsic tradeoffs between robustness, performance, and control energy requirements. Also included is an open-loop H-infinity prefilter design that makes it possible to address the command response shaping issue. The design concept has been applied to the benchmark problem no. 4 and successfully removes the initial undesired transient and cuts down the percent overshoot.

  8. Depressed mantle discontinuities beneath Iceland: Evidence of a garnet controlled 660 km discontinuity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, J.; Cottaar, S.; White, R. S.; Deuss, A.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mantle plume beneath Iceland has long been hypothesised to explain its high volumes of crustal volcanism. Practical constraints in seismic tomography mean that thin, slow velocity anomalies representative of a mantle plume signature are difficult to image. However it is possible to infer the presence of temperature anomalies at depth from the effect they have on phase transitions in surrounding mantle material. Phase changes in the olivine component of mantle rocks are thought to be responsible for global mantle seismic discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depth, though exact depths are dependent on surrounding temperature conditions. This study uses P to S seismic wave conversions at mantle discontinuities to investigate variation in topography allowing inference of temperature anomalies within the transition zone. We employ a large data set from a wide range of seismic stations across the North Atlantic region and a dense network in Iceland, including over 100 stations run by the University of Cambridge. Data are used to create over 6000 receiver functions. These are converted from time to depth including 3D corrections for variations in crustal thickness and upper mantle velocity heterogeneities, and then stacked based on common conversion points. We find that both the 410 and 660 km discontinuities are depressed under Iceland compared to normal depths in the surrounding region. The depression of 30 km observed on the 410 km discontinuity could be artificially deepened by un-modelled slow anomalies in the correcting velocity model. Adding a slow velocity conduit of -1.44% reduces the depression to 18 km; in this scenario both the velocity reduction and discontinuity topography reflect a temperature anomaly of 210 K. We find that much larger velocity reductions would be required to remove all depression on the 660 km discontinuity, and therefore correlated discontinuity depressions appear to be a robust feature of the data. While it is not possible

  9. Kinematic characteristics of elite men's 50 km race walking.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Brian; Bissas, Athanassios; Drake, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Race walking is an endurance event which also requires great technical ability, particularly with respect to its two distinguishing rules. The 50 km race walk is the longest event in the athletics programme at the Olympic Games. The aims of this observational study were to identify the important kinematic variables in elite men's 50 km race walking, and to measure variation in those variables at different distances. Thirty men were analysed from video data recorded during a World Race Walking Cup competition. Video data were also recorded at four distances during the European Cup Race Walking and 12 men analysed from these data. Two camcorders (50 Hz) recorded at each race for 3D analysis. The results of this study showed that walking speed was associated with both step length (r=0.54,P=0.002) and cadence (r=0.58,P=0.001). While placing the foot further ahead of the body at heel strike was associated with greater step lengths (r=0.45,P=0.013), it was also negatively associated with cadence (r= -0.62,P<0.001). In the World Cup, knee angles ranged between 175 and 186° at initial contact and between 180 and 195° at midstance. During the European Cup, walking speed decreased significantly (F=9.35,P=0.002), mostly due to a decrease in step length between 38.5 and 48.5 km (t=8.59,P=0.014). From this study, it would appear that the key areas a 50 km race walker must develop and coordinate are step length and cadence, although it is also important to ensure legal walking technique is maintained with the onset of fatigue. PMID:23679143

  10. Towards a 1km resolution global flood risk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeff; Sampson, Chris; Smith, Andy

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in computationally efficient numerical algorithms and new High Performance Computing architectures now make high (1-2km) resolution global hydrodynamic models a realistic proposition. However in many areas of the world the data sets and tools necessary to undertake such modelling do not currently exist. In particular, five major problems need to be resolved: (1) the best globally available terrain data (SRTM) was generated from X-band interferometric radar data which does not penetrate vegetation canopies and which has significant problems in determining ground elevations in urban areas; (2) a global river bathymetry data set does not currently exist; (3) most river channels globally are less than the smallest currently resolvable grid scale (1km) and therefore require a sub-grid treatment; (4) a means to estimate the magnitude of the T year flood at any point along the global river network does not currently exist; and (5) a large proportion of flood losses are generated by off-floodplain surface water flows which are not well represented in current hydrodynamic modelling systems. In this paper we propose solutions to each of these five issues as part of a concerted effort to develop a 1km (or better) resolution global flood hazard model. We describe the new numerical algorithms, computer architectures and computational resources used, and demonstrate solutions to the five previously intractable problems identified above. We conduct a validation study of the modelling against satellite imagery of major flooding on the Mississippi-Missouri confluence plain in the central USA before outlining a proof-of-concept regional study for SE Asia as a step towards a global scale model. For SE Asia we simulate flood hazard for ten different flood return periods over the entire Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia and Laos region at 1km resolution and show that the modelling produces coherent, consistent and sensible simulations of extent and water depth.

  11. Saqqar: A 34 km diameter impact structure in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Afifi, Abdulkader M.; Stewart, Simon A.; Poelchau, Michael H.; Cook, Douglas J.; Neville, Allen S.

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the first proof of an impact origin for the Saqqar circular structure in northwestern Saudi Arabia (Neville et al. ), with an apparent diameter of 34 km, centered at 29°35'N, 38°42'E. The structure is formed in Cambrian-Devonian siliciclastics and is unconformably overlain by undeformed Cretaceous and Paleogene sediments. The age of impact is not well constrained and lies somewhere between 410 and 70 Ma. The subsurface structure is constrained by 2-D reflection seismic profiles and six drilled wells. First-order structural features are a central uplift that rises approximately 2 km above regional datums, surrounded by a ring syncline. The crater rim is defined by circumferential normal faults. The central uplift and ring syncline correspond to a Bouguer gravity high and an annular ring-like low, respectively. The wells were drilled within the central uplift, the deepest among them exceed 2 km depth. Sandstone core samples from these wells show abundant indicators of a shock metamorphic overprint. Planar deformation features (PDFs) were measured with orientations along (0001), {101¯3}, and less frequently along {101¯1} and {101¯4}. Planar fractures (PFs) predominantly occur along (0001) and {101¯1}, and are locally associated with feather features (FFs). In addition, some shocked feldspar grains and strongly deformed mica flakes were found. The recorded shock pressure ranges between 5 and 15 GPa. The preserved level of shock and the absence of an allochthonous crater fill suggest that Saqqar was eroded by 1-2 km between the Devonian and Maastrichtian. The documentation of unequivocal shock features proves the formation of the Saqqar structure by a hypervelocity impact event.

  12. Organizations, Paradigms, and People: The Challenge of KM Interventions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Teresa; Burton, Yvette

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Knowledge Management (KM) and how these interventions are put into practice by organizations and society. The topics include: 1) The Multiple Paradigm Tool; 2) Four Paradigms: tool for the Analyzing Organizations; 3) Assumptions About the Nature of Social Science; 4) Assumptions About the Nature of Society; 5) Schools of Sociological and Organizational Theory; 6) Meaning and Metaphors in the Four Paradigms; and 7) Possibilities and Conclusions.

  13. Towards Mapping the Ocean Surface Topography at 1 km Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Rodriquez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    We propose to apply the technique of synthetic aperture radar interferometry to the measurement of ocean surface topography at spatial resolution approaching 1 km. The measurement will have wide ranging applications in oceanography, hydrology, and marine geophysics. The oceanographic and related societal applications are briefly discussed in the paper. To meet the requirements for oceanographic applications, the instrument must be flown in an orbit with proper sampling of ocean tides.

  14. The lectin KM+ induces corneal epithelial wound healing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chahud, Fernando; Ramalho, Leandra N Z; Ramalho, Fernando S; Haddad, Antonio; Roque-Barreira, Maria C

    2009-04-01

    Neutrophil influx is essential for corneal regeneration (Gan et al. 1999). KM+, a lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia, induces neutrophil migration (Santos-de-Oliveira et al. 1994). This study aims at investigating a possible effect of KM+ on corneal regeneration in rabbits. A 6.0-mm diameter area of debridement was created on the cornea of both eyes by mechanical scraping. The experimental eyes received drops of KM+ (2.5 microg/ml) every 2 h. The control eyes received buffer. The epithelial wounded areas of the lectin-treated and untreated eyes were stained with fluorescein, photographed and measured. The animals were killed 12 h (group 1, n = 5), 24 h (group 2, n = 10) and 48 h (group 3, n = 5) after the scraping. The corneas were analysed histologically (haematoxylin and eosin and immunostaining for proliferation cell nuclear antigen, p63, vascular endothelial growth factor, c-Met and laminin). No significant differences were found at the epithelial gap between treated and control eyes in the group 1. However, the number of neutrophils in the wounded area was significantly higher in treated eyes in this group. Three control and seven treated eyes were healed completely and only rare neutrophils persisted in the corneal stroma in group 2. No morphological distinction was observed between treated and control eyes in group 3. In treated corneas of group 2, there was an increase in immunostaining of factors involved in corneal healing compared to controls. Thus, topical application of KM+ may facilitate corneal epithelial wound healing in rabbits by means of a mechanism that involves increased influx of neutrophils into the wounded area induced by the lectin.

  15. Acceleration of barium ions near 8000 km above an aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Wescott, E. M.; Foeppl, H.

    1984-01-01

    A barium shaped charge, named Limerick, was released from a rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, on March 30, 1982, at 1033 UT. The release took place in a small auroral breakup. The jet of ionized barium reached an altitude of 8100 km 14.5 min after release, indicating that there were no parallel electric fields below this altitude. At 8100 km the jet appeared to stop. Analysis shows that the barium at this altitude was effectively removed from the tip. It is concluded that the barium was actually accelerated upward, resulting in a large decrease in the line-of-sight density and hence the optical intensity. The parallel electric potential in the acceleration region must have been greater than 1 kV over an altitude interval of less than 200 km. The acceleration region, although presumably auroral in origin, did not seem to be related to individual auroral structures, but appeared to be a large-scale horizontal structure. The perpendicular electric field below, as deduced from the drift of the barium, was temporally and spatially very uniform and showed no variation related to individual auroral structures passing through.

  16. Faraday laser using 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Pan, Duo; Chen, Mo; Zhu, Chuanwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a Faraday laser using a 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity, which provides optical feedback and obtains small free spectrum range (FSR) of 83 kHz, and have succeeded in limiting the laser frequency to a crossover transition {5}2{S}1/2,F=2\\to {5}2{P}3/2,F\\prime =1,3 of the natural 87Rb at 780 nm. The Faraday laser is based on a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) with an ultra-narrow bandwidth and the long fiber extended cavity of 1.2 km. The peak transmission assigned to the crossover transition F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3 in the FADOF is 20.5% with an ultra-narrow bandwidth of 29.1 MHz. The Allan deviation of the Faraday laser is around 6.0× {10}-11 in 0.06 to 1 s sampling time. Laser frequency is always kept in the center of the transmitted peak assigned to F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3. The Faraday laser realized here can provide light exactly resonant with an atomic transition used for atom-photon interaction experiments and is insensitive to diode temperature and injection current fluctuations.

  17. Faraday laser using 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Pan, Duo; Chen, Mo; Zhu, Chuanwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a Faraday laser using a 1.2 km fiber as an extended cavity, which provides optical feedback and obtains small free spectrum range (FSR) of 83 kHz, and have succeeded in limiting the laser frequency to a crossover transition {5}2{S}1/2,F=2\\to {5}2{P}3/2,F\\prime =1,3 of the natural 87Rb at 780 nm. The Faraday laser is based on a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) with an ultra-narrow bandwidth and the long fiber extended cavity of 1.2 km. The peak transmission assigned to the crossover transition F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3 in the FADOF is 20.5% with an ultra-narrow bandwidth of 29.1 MHz. The Allan deviation of the Faraday laser is around 6.0× {10}-11 in 0.06 to 1 s sampling time. Laser frequency is always kept in the center of the transmitted peak assigned to F=2\\to F\\prime =1,3. The Faraday laser realized here can provide light exactly resonant with an atomic transition used for atom–photon interaction experiments and is insensitive to diode temperature and injection current fluctuations.

  18. Super-Nyquist-WDM transmission over 7,326-km seven-core fiber with capacity-distance product of 1.03 Exabit/s · km.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Koji; Tsuritani, Takehiro; Morita, Itsuro; Tsuchida, Yukihiro; Maeda, Koichi; Tadakuma, Masateru; Saito, Tsunetoshi; Watanabe, Kengo; Imamura, Katsunori; Sugizaki, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    2014-01-27

    We show super-Nyquist-WDM transmission technique, where optical signals with duobinary-pulse shaping can be wavelength-multiplexed with frequency spacing of below baudrate. Duobinary-pulse shaping can reduce the signal bandwidth to be a half of baudrate while controlling inter-symbol interference can be compensated by the maximum likelihood sequence estimation in a receiver. First, we experimentally evaluate crosstalk characteristics as a function of channel spacing between the dual-channel DP-QPSK signals with duobinary-pulse shaping. As a result, the crosstalk penalty can be almost negligible as far as the ratio of baudrate to frequency spacing is maintained to be less than 1.20. Next, we demonstrate 140.7-Tbit/s, 7,326-km transmission of 7 × 201-channel 25-GHz-spaced super-Nyquist-WDM 100-Gbit/s optical signals using seven-core fiber and full C-band seven-core EDFAs. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports of high-capacity transmission experiments with capacity-distance product in excess of 1 Exabit/s · km.

  19. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, a strongback is lowered toward the S1 truss below it in order to lift the truss from the Guppy cargo carrier that protected it during flight and transfer. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When full y outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001

  20. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, the top of the Guppy cargo carrier is lifted off the S1 truss (background). Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communica tions systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 200 1

  1. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A KSC transporter moves the Guppy cargo carrier encasing the S1 truss into the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001.

  2. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, a strongback lifts the S1 truss from the Guppy cargo carrier that protected it during flight and transfer. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss se gment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The tr uss is slated for flight in 2001

  3. Spatially frustrated S = 1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet with single ion anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, A. S. T.

    2016-10-01

    Using the SU(3) Schwinger boson formalism, I study the S = 1 square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet, at zero temperature, with spatially anisotropic nearest-neighbor couplings frustrated by a next-nearest neighbor interaction and single ion anisotropy. The phase diagram at zero temperature is presented. My calculations show two magnetically ordered phases separated by a quantum-disordered region for all values of the anisotropy.

  4. The Global S_1 Tide in Earth's Nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Einšpigel, David; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Diurnal S_1 tidal oscillations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system induce small perturbations of Earth's prograde annual nutation, but matching geophysical model estimates of this Sun-synchronous rotation signal with the observed effect in geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data has thus far been elusive. The present study assesses the problem from a geophysical model perspective, using four modern-day atmospheric assimilation systems and a consistently forced barotropic ocean model that dissipates its energy excess in the global abyssal ocean through a parameterized tidal conversion scheme. The use of contemporary meteorological data does, however, not guarantee accurate nutation estimates per se; two of the probed datasets produce atmosphere-ocean-driven S_1 terms that deviate by more than 30 μ as (microarcseconds) from the VLBI-observed harmonic of -16.2+i113.4 μ as. Partial deficiencies of these models in the diurnal band are also borne out by a validation of the air pressure tide against barometric in situ estimates as well as comparisons of simulated sea surface elevations with a global network of S_1 tide gauge determinations. Credence is lent to the global S_1 tide derived from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the operational model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). When averaged over a temporal range of 2004 to 2013, their nutation contributions are estimated to be -8.0+i106.0 μ as (MERRA) and -9.4+i121.8 μ as (ECMWF operational), thus being virtually equivalent with the VLBI estimate. This remarkably close agreement will likely aid forthcoming nutation theories in their unambiguous a priori account of Earth's prograde annual celestial motion.

  5. Angular momentum budget of the radiational S1 ocean tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Dobslaw, Henryk; Poropat, Lea; Salstein, David; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The balance of diurnal S1 oceanic angular momentum (OAM) variations through torques at the sea surface and the bottom topography is validated using both a barotropic and a baroclinic numerical tide model. This analysis discloses the extent to which atmosphere-driven S1 forward simulations are reliable for use in studies of high-frequency polar motion and changes in length-of-day. Viscous and dissipative torques associated with wind stress, bottom friction, as well as internal tidal energy conversion are shown to be small, and they are overshadowed by gravitational and pressure-related interaction forces. In particular, the zonal OAM variability of S1 is almost completely balanced by the water pressure torque on the local bathymetry, whereas in the prograde equatorial case also the air pressure torque on the seafloor as well as ellipsoidal contributions from the non-spherical atmosphere and solid Earth must be taken into account. Overall, the OAM budget is well closed in both the axial and the equatorial directions, thus allowing for an identification of the main diurnal angular momentum sinks in the ocean. The physical interaction forces are found to be largest at shelf breaks and continental slopes in low latitudes, with the most dominant contribution coming from the Indonesian archipelago.

  6. Search for ammonia in comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Codella, C.; Tozzi, G. P.; Comoretto, G.; Crovisier, J.; Nesti, R.; Panella, D.; Boissier, J.; Brucato, J. R.; Bolli, P.; Massi, F.; Tofani, G.

    2015-12-01

    Comets are uniquely pristine bodies providing unique insights about the formation of our Solar System. In this work, we focus on a dynamically new comet as it enters the inner Solar System for the first time after residing for billion of years in the Oort Cloud. Such comets are particularly important because they are thought to be not differentiated by solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of organic matter close to the surface. Here we report the results of a search for NH3(1,1) emission at 23.7 GHz towards comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) using a new dual-feed K band receiver mounted on the Medicina 32-m antenna. We observed the comet close to its perihelion, from 25 to 29 November 2013, when its heliocentric distance changed from 0.25 AU to 0.03 AU. We derive an upper limit of Q(NH3) of about 2.5×1029 mol s-1 on 26 November, that is consistent with the last peak of water production rate of ∼2×1030 mol s-1 within the last few days before the perihelion.

  7. Yielding of tantalum at strain rates up to 109 s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Gates, Sean D.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Radousky, Harry B.; Teslich, Nick E.

    2016-08-01

    We have used a 45 μJ laser pulse to accelerate the free surface of fine-grained tantalum films up to peak velocities of ˜1.2 km s-1. The films had thicknesses of ˜1-2 μm and in-plane grain widths of ˜75-150 nm. Using ultrafast interferometry, we have measured the time history of the velocity of the surface at different spatial positions across the accelerated region. The initial part of the histories (assumed to correspond to the "elastic precursor" observed previously) exhibited measured strain rates of ˜0.6 to ˜3.2 × 109 s-1 and stresses of ˜4 to ˜22 GPa. Importantly, we find that elastic amplitudes exhibit little variation with strain rate for a constant peak surface velocity, even though, via covariation of the strain rate with peak surface velocity, they vary with strain rate. Furthermore, by comparison with data obtained at lower strain rates, we find that amplitudes are much better predicted by peak velocities rather than by either strain rate or sample thickness.

  8. Plasma distribution of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) observed using the radio scintillation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iju, Tomoya; Abe, Shinsuke; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

    2015-05-01

    We report the electron density in a plasma tail of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) derived from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations during November 1-28, 2013. Comet ISON showed a well-developed plasma tail (longer than 2.98 ×107 km) before its perihelion passage on November 28. We identified a radio source whose line-of-sight approached the ISON's plasma tail in the above period and obtained its IPS data using the Solar Wind Imaging Facility at 327 MHz. We used the Heliospheric Imager onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relation Observatory to distinguish between the cometary tail and solar eruption origins of their enhanced scintillation. From our examinations, we confirmed three IPS enhancements of a radio source 1148-00 on November 13, 16, and 17, which could be attributed to the disturbance in the cometary tail. Power spectra of 1148-00 had the steeper slope than normal ones during its occultation by the plasma tail. We estimated the electron density in the ISON's plasma tail and found 84 cm-3 around the tail axis at a distance of 3.74 ×107 km from the cometary nucleus and an unexpected variation of the electron density in the vicinity of the tail boundary.

  9. Far-ultraviolet Observations of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from FORTIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Feldman, Paul D.; Weaver, Harold; Fleming, Brian; Redwine, Keith; Li, Mary J.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2016-09-01

    We have used the unique far-UV imaging capability offered by a sounding-rocket-borne instrument to acquire observations of C/2012 S1 (ISON) when its angular separation with respect to the Sun was 26.°3 on 2013 November 20.49. At the time of observation, the comet’s heliocentric distance and velocity relative to the Sun were r h = 0.43 au and {\\dot{r}}h = ‑62.7 km s‑1. Images dominated by C i λ1657 and H i λ1216 were acquired over a 106 × 106 km2 region. The water production rate implied by the Lyα observations is constrained to be {Q}{{{H}}2{{O}}}≈ 8 × 1029 s‑1 while the neutral carbon production rate was {Q}C ≈ 4 ×1028 s‑1. The radial profile of C i was consistent with it being a dissociation product of a parent molecule with a lifetime τ ˜ 5 × 104 s, favoring a parent other than CO. We constrain the Q CO production rate to {5}-7.5+1.5 × 1028 s‑1 with 1σ errors derived from photon statistics. The upper limit on the Q CO/{Q}{{{H}}2{{O}}} is ≲6%.

  10. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE NUCLEUS OF COMET C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    SciTech Connect

    Lamy, Philippe L.; Toth, Imre; Weaver, Harold A.

    2014-10-10

    We report on the analysis of several sequences of broadband visible images of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 of the Hubble Space Telescope on 2013 April 10, May 8, October 9, and November 1 in an attempt to detect and characterize its nucleus. Whereas the overwhelming coma precluded the detection of the nucleus in the first two sequences, the contrast was sufficient in early October to unambiguously retrieve the signal from the nucleus. Two images taken within a few minutes led to similar V magnitudes for the nucleus of 21.97 and 22.0 with a 1σ uncertainty of 0.065. Assuming a standard value for the geometric albedo (0.04) and a linear phase function with a coefficient of 0.04 mag deg{sup –1}, these V values imply that the nucleus radius is 0.68 ± 0.02 km. Although this result does depend on these two assumptions, we argue that the radius most likely lies in the range 0.6-0.9 km. This result is consistent with the constraints derived from the water production rates reported by Combi et al. The last sequence of images in 2013 November revealed temporal variation of the innermost coma. If attributed to a single rotating jet, this coma brightness variation suggests the rotational period of the nucleus may be close to ∼10.4 hr.

  11. Science at 100 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Neil

    2012-10-01

    Within the last year, Los Alamos National Labs produced magnetic fields of 100 tesla strength non-destructively for the first time. Fields of such a strength open up many new possibilities for condensed matter research. I will present some recent examples of condensed matter physics experiments performed in magnetic fields reaching 100 tesla, which includes recent work on high temperature superconductivity, magnetism and low dimensional materials.

  12. Comparison of broadband mode arrivals at ranges of 3515 km and 5171 km in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wage, Kathleen E.

    2003-04-01

    The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) provided an opportunity to observe signals propagating in the low-order modes of the ocean waveguide. Understanding the fluctuations of these mode signals is an important prerequisite to using them for tomography or other applications. In previous work, we characterized the cross-mode coherence and temporal variability of the low-order mode arrivals at 3515 km range [Wage et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. (in press)]. This study compares the mode arrivals for two different ranges : 3515 km and 5171 km, using data from the ATOC vertical line arrays at Hawaii and Kiritimati. We discuss the mode intensity and coherence statistics for each of the arrays and examine mean arrival time trends over the year-long deployment. Experimental results are compared to PE simulations of propagation through a realistic background environment perturbed by internal waves of varying strengths. The dependence of mode statistics on the path-dependent changes in the background sound speed and the parameters of the internal wave field is explored. [Work supported by an ONR Ocean Acoustics Young Faculty Award.] a)A. B. Baggeroer, T. G. Birdsall, C. Clark, J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, D. Costa, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, A. M. G. Forbes, B. M. Howe, D. Menemenlis, J. A. Mercer, K. Metzger, W. H. Munk, R. C. Spindel, P. F. Worcester, and C. Wunsch.

  13. Albedo Properties of Small (0.5 to 20 km) Main Belt Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Erin L.; Woodward, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    Serendipitous observations of main belt asteroids by the Spitzer Space Telescope have enabled determination of main belt asteroid albedos and diameters for targets as small as 0.5 km (eg., Ryan et al. 2009, AJ, 137, 5134). We have used multi-epoch data at 5.8, 8.0 and 24 microns from the MIPSGAL and Taurus Legacy Surveys to obtain diameters and albedos for a sample of approximately 2000 main belt asteroids. Using STM and NEATM, we have obtained diameters ranging from 0.5 to 30 km and albedos ranging from 0.02 to 0.5. Results of this program reveal an albedo distribution that is more diverse in range than the albedo distribution seen in the IRAS and MSX surveys. This diversity may reflect effects of space weathering reddening which is selectively reddening larger asteroids. This reddening effect may reinforce the findings from accretion models that indicate that asteroids in the early solar system were 100 km and larger (Morbidelli et al., 2009, Icarus, in press), by suggesting that the larger asteroids are indeed the oldest members of the main belt. We will present results on the albedo distribution as a function of semi-major axis and new analysis of the mean albedo of dynamical families within the main belt. Support for this work provided in part by a National Science Foundation grant AST-0706980 to the University of Minnesota.

  14. Far-UV observations of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with FORTIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Feldman, Paul D.; Weaver, Harold A.; Fleming, Brian; Redwine, Keith; Li, Mary J.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Moseley, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-UV imagery and objective grating spectroscopy of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) were acquired from NASA sounding rocket 36.296 UG, launched on 20 November 2013 at 04:40 MST (20.48 Nov 2013 UT), 8.32 days pre-perihelion, from the White Sands Missile Range, NM. The comet was 0.1° below ground horizon, 0.44 AU from the Sun, 0.86 AU from the Earth, and at a solar elongation of 26.3°. The payload reached an apogee of 279 km and the total time pointed at the comet was 353 s. At the time of launch ISON was undergoing a factor of 5 increase in water production rate, going from 3.5e29 to 19.6e29 molecules s-1between 19.6 and 21.6 Nov (Combi et al. 2014), marking what is thought to be a final fragmentation event (Sekanina & Kracht 2014). Our instrument, a wide-field multi-object spectro-telescope called FORTIS (Far-UV Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy), observed Lyα emissions in an objective grating mode through an open microshutter array, developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center, over a (1/2°)2 field-of-view. After accounting for slit losses and deadtime corrections we find a preliminary lower limit to the Lyα surface brightness of ~ 400 kilorayleighs, yielding a hydrogen production rate of QH ~ 5e29 atoms s-1, in reasonable agreement with the Combi result. We also acquired a broadband image of the comet in the 1280 to 1900 Å bandpass. This image shows a drop in count rate proportional to altitude caused by increased absorption of cometary emissions by terrestrial O2 located in the lower thermosphere. O2 absorption acts as a selective time dependent filter that attenuates cometary emissions from different atomic and molecular species at different rates during descent. Preliminary analysis suggests that the dominant species in a (1e5 km)2 nuclear region is neutral carbon. The radial profile in comparison to a Haser model suggests that the C parent molecule had a lifetime (at 1 AU) ~ 105 s; much shorter than the expected lifetime of CO. We

  15. fine structure of 410km discontinuity beneath the Southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, K.; Wan, X.; Ni, S.

    2005-12-01

    In the distance range of 10-14 degrees, P waves from the topside reflection off the 410km discontinuity are very sensitive to the fine structure of the discontinuity. We analyzed 49 broadband seismograms from an earthquake ( May 18, 1998) in Italy (Mw 5.8) , recorded by Orfeus and SZGRF networks. Distances between the source and the stations were from 9° to 19°, and provided a detailed look at the 410km structure. On the other hand, the azimuth of these records were in a narrow range from 334° and 356°, so the differences in azimuth may have little effects on the waveforms. From our observation, P410 phase has little change in amplitude when the distance decreases from 15° to about 11.5°. However, an abrupt termination was observed from distance 11° to 10.5°. These features cannot be explained with PREM model. We calculated several groups of models with F-K method and compared their synthetic seismograms with the observed one. These models are: 1) two-step sharp jump models, with different thickness; 2) linear models; 3) linear-sharp jump models[Tim Melbourne, Don Helmberger, Journal of Geophysical Research, 1998]; 4) models calculated from a mineralogical model[Gaherty, Wang, Geophysical research letters, 1999]; Features in the observed waveform can be well modeled with model 3 and 4 while only parts of them fitted to model 1 or 2. But when we calculated with a less detailed model, seismograms of model 4 should have more noise than model 3. In conclusion, the structure of 410km discontinuity can be considered as a linear-sharp velocity jump, which is consistent with mineralogical models.

  16. Mapping the global land surface using 1 km AVHRR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauer, D.T.; Eidenshink, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The scientific requirements for mapping the global land surface using 1 km advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data have been set forth by the U.S. Global Change Research Program; the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP); The United Nations; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); the Committee on Earth Observations Satellites; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission to planet Earth (MTPE) program. Mapping the global land surface using 1 km AVHRR data is an international effort to acquire, archive, process, and distribute 1 km AVHRR data to meet the needs of the international science community. A network of AVHRR receiving stations, along with data recorded by NOAA, has been acquiring daily global land coverage since April 1, 1992. A data set of over 70,000 AVHRR images is archived and distributed by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) EROS Data Center, and the European Space Agency. Under the guidance of the IGBP, processing standards have been developed for calibration, atmospheric correction, geometric registration, and the production of global 10-day maximum normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) composites. The major uses of the composites are for the study of surface vegetation condition, mapping land cover, and deriving biophysical characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems. A time-series of 54 10-day global vegetation index composites for the period of April 1, 1992 through September 1993 has been produced. The production of a time-series of 33 10-day global vegetation index composites using NOAA-14 data for the period of February 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995 is underway. The data products are available from the USGS, in cooperation with NASA's MTPE program and other international organizations.

  17. 157km BOTDA with pulse coding and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xianyang; Wang, Zinan; Wang, Song; Xue, Naitian; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Bin; Rao, Yunjiang

    2016-05-01

    A repeater-less Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer (BOTDA) with 157.68km sensing range is demonstrated, using the combination of random fiber laser Raman pumping and low-noise laser-diode-Raman pumping. With optical pulse coding (OPC) and Non Local Means (NLM) image processing, temperature sensing with +/-0.70°C uncertainty and 8m spatial resolution is experimentally demonstrated. The image processing approach has been proved to be compatible with OPC, and it further increases the figure-of-merit (FoM) of the system by 57%.

  18. The relational database system of KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Arnauld; Bozza, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT Collaboration is building a new generation of neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. For these telescopes, a relational database is designed and implemented for several purposes, such as the centralised management of accounts, the storage of all documentation about components and the status of the detector and information about slow control and calibration data. It also contains information useful during the construction and the data acquisition phases. Highlights in the database schema, storage and management are discussed along with design choices that have impact on performances. In most cases, the database is not accessed directly by applications, but via a custom designed Web application server.

  19. An evaluation of the global 1-km AVHRR land dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teillet, P.M.; El Saleous, N.; Hansen, M.C.; Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Justice, C.O.; Townshend, J.R.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the steps taken in the generation of the global 1-km AVHRR land dataset, and it documents an evaluation of the data product with respect to the original specifications and its usefulness in research and applications to date. The evaluation addresses data characterization, processing, compositing and handling issues. Examples of the main scientific outputs are presented and options for improved processing are outlined and prioritized. The dataset has made a significant contribution, and a strong recommendation is made for its reprocessing and continuation to produce a long-term record for global change research.

  20. Highly selective and potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 (S1P1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Vachal, Petr; Toth, Leslie M; Hale, Jeffrey J; Yan, Lin; Mills, Sander G; Chrebet, Gary L; Koehane, Carol A; Hajdu, Richard; Milligan, James A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Mandala, Suzanne

    2006-07-15

    Novel series of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists were developed through a systematic SAR aimed to achieve high selectivity for a single member of the S1P family of receptors, S1P1. The optimized structure represents a highly S1P1-selective and efficacious agonist: S1P1/S1P2, S1P1/S1P3, S1P1/S1P4>10,000-fold, S1P1/S1P5>600-fold, while EC50 (S1P1) <0.2 nM. In vivo experiments are consistent with S1P1 receptor agonism alone being sufficient for achieving desired lymphocyte-lowering effect.

  1. Analysis of sex differences in open-water ultra-distance swimming performances in the FINA World Cup races in 5 km, 10 km and 25 km from 2000 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study investigated the changes in swimming speeds and sex differences for elite male and female swimmers competing in 5 km, 10 km and 25 km open-water FINA World Cup races held between 2000 and 2012. Methods The changes in swimming speeds and sex differences across years were analysed using linear, non-linear, and multi-level regression analyses for the annual fastest and the annual ten fastest competitors. Results For the annual fastest, swimming speed remained stable for men and women in 5 km (5.50 ± 0.21 and 5.08 ± 0.19 km/h, respectively), in 10 km (5.38 ± 0.21 and 5.05 ± 0.26 km/h, respectively) and in 25 km (5.03 ± 0.32 and 4.58 ± 0.27 km/h, respectively). In the annual ten fastest, swimming speed remained constant in 5 km in women (5.02 ± 0.19 km/h) but decreased significantly and linearly in men from 5.42 ± 0.03 km/h to 5.39 ± 0.02 km/h. In 10 km, swimming speed increased significantly and linearly in women from 4.75 ± 0.01 km/h to 5.74 ± 0.01 km/h but remained stable in men at 5.36 ± 0.21 km/h. In 25 km, swimming speed decreased significantly and linearly in women from 4.60 ± 0.06 km/h to 4.44 ± 0.08 km/h but remained unchanged at 4.93 ± 0.34 km/h in men. For the annual fastest, the sex difference in swimming speed remained unchanged in 5 km (7.6 ± 3.0%), 10 km (6.1 ± 2.5%) and 25 km (9.0 ± 3.7%). For the annual ten fastest, the sex difference remained stable in 5 km at 7.6 ± 0.6%, decreased significantly and linearly in 10 km from 7.7 ± 0.7% to 1.2 ± 0.3% and increased significantly and linearly from 4.7 ± 1.4% to 9.6 ± 1.5% in 25 km. Conclusions To summarize, elite female open-water ultra-distance swimmers improved in 10 km but impaired in 25 km leading to a linear decrease in sex difference in 10 km and a linear increase in sex difference in 25 km. The linear changes in sex differences

  2. AFR-100 safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, T.; Moisseytsev, A.; Wei, T. Y. C.

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Fast Reactor-100 (AFR-100) is Argonne National Laboratory's 250 MWth metal-fueled modular sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept. [1] A series of accident sequences that focused on the AFR-100's ability to provide protection against reactor damage during low probability accident sequences resulting from multiple equipment failures were examined. Protected and Unprotected Loss of Flow (PLOF and ULOF) and Unprotected Transient Over-Power (UTOP) accidents were simulated using the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 safety analysis code. The large heat capacity of the sodium in the pool-type reactor allows the AFR-100 to absorb large amounts of energy during a PLOF with relatively small temperature increases throughout the system. During a ULOF with a 25-second flow halving time, coolant and cladding temperatures peak around 720 deg. C within the first minute before reactivity feedback effects decrease power to match the flow. Core radial expansion and fuel Doppler provide the necessary feedback during the UTOP to bring the system back to critical before system temperatures exceed allowable limits. Simulation results indicate that adequate ULOF safety margins exist for the AFR-100 design with flow halving times of twenty-five seconds. Significant safety margins are maintained for PLOF accidents as well as UTOP accidents if a rod stop is used. (authors)

  3. Seismic evidence of negligible water carried below 400-km depth in subducting lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Green, Harry W; Chen, Wang-Ping; Brudzinski, Michael R

    2010-10-14

    Strong evidence exists that water is carried from the surface into the upper mantle by hydrous minerals in the uppermost 10-12 km of subducting lithosphere, and more water may be added as the lithosphere bends and goes downwards. Significant amounts of that water are released as the lithosphere heats up, triggering earthquakes and fluxing arc volcanism. In addition, there is experimental evidence for high solubility of water in olivine, the most abundant mineral in the upper mantle, for even higher solubility in olivine's high-pressure polymorphs, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, and for the existence of dense hydrous magnesium silicates that potentially could carry water well into the lower mantle (deeper than 1,000 km). Here we compare experimental and seismic evidence to test whether patterns of seismicity and the stabilities of these potentially relevant hydrous phases are consistent with a wet lithosphere. We show that there is nearly a one-to-one correlation between dehydration of minerals and seismicity at depths less than about 250 km, and conclude that the dehydration of minerals is the trigger of instability that leads to seismicity. At greater depths, however, we find no correlation between occurrences of earthquakes and depths where breakdown of hydrous phases is expected. Lastly, we note that there is compelling evidence for the existence of metastable olivine (which, if present, can explain the distribution of deep-focus earthquakes) west of and within the subducting Tonga slab and also in three other subduction zones, despite metastable olivine being incompatible with even extremely small amounts of water (of the order of 100 p.p.m. by weight). We conclude that subducting slabs are essentially dry at depths below 400 km and thus do not provide a pathway for significant amounts of water to enter the mantle transition zone or the lower mantle.

  4. Quantum crytography over 14km of installed optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Simmons, C.

    1995-09-01

    We have made the first demonstration that low error rate quantum cryptography over long distances (14km) of installed optical fiber in a real-world environment, subject to uncontrolled temperature and mechanical influences, representing an important new step towards incorporation of quantum cryptography into existing information security systems. We also point out that the high visibility single-photon interference in our experiment allows us to infer a test of the superposition principle of quantum mechanics: a photon reaching the detector has traveled over 14km of optical fiber in a wavepacket comprising a coherent superposition of two components that are spatially separated by about 2m. In principle, there are decoherence processes (or even possible modifications of quantum mechanics) that could cause the photon`s wavefunction to collapse into one component or the other during propagation, leading to a reduction in visibility. However, our results are consistent with no such loss of quantum coherence during the 67-{mu}s propagation time.

  5. Infrared emission from the atmosphere above 200 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    The infrared radiation over the range from 4 to 1000 microns from atoms and molecules in the earth's atmosphere, between 200 and 400 km, was calculated. Only zenith lines of sight were considered. The excitation of the atoms and molecules is due to collisions with other molecules and to absorption of radiation from the earth and sun. In some cases, the abundances of the molecules had to be estimated. The most important lines are the forbidden lines from atomic oxygen at 63.1 and 147 micron, and the vibration-rotation band of nitric oxide at 5.3 micron. These lines can have intensities as high as a few times 0.001 ergs/sq cm/sec/steradian at 200 km altitude. In addition, the vibration-rotation bands of NO(+) at 4.3 micron and CO at 4.7 micron and the pure rotation lines of NO and NO(+) could be detected by infrared telescopes in space.

  6. KM3NeT/ORCA status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samtleben, Dorothea F. E.

    2016-04-01

    Neutrinos created in interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere can serve as a powerful tool to unveil the neutrino mass hierarchy (NMH). At low energies, around a few GeV, matter effects from the transition through the Earth are expected to imprint a distinct but also subtle signature on the oscillation pattern, specific to the ordering of the neutrino masses. KM3NeT/ORCA (Oscillations Research with Cosmics in the Abyss), a densely instrumented building block of the upcoming KM3NeT neutrino telescope, will be designated to measuring this signature in the Mediterranean Sea. Using detailed simulations the sensitivity towards this signature has been evaluated. The multi-PMT detectors allow in the water for an accurate reconstruction of GeV neutrino event signatures and distinction of neutrino flavours. For the determination of the mass hierarchy a median significance of 2-6σ has been estimated for three years of data taking, depending on the actual hierarchy and the oscillation parameters. At the same time the values of several oscillation parameters like θ23 will be determined to unprecedented precision.

  7. Spangolite: an s = 1/2 maple leaf lattice antiferromagnet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, T.; Piatek, J. O.; Stephenson, R. A.; Nilsen, G. J.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2011-04-01

    Spangolite, Cu6Al(SO4)(OH)12Cl·3H2O, is a hydrated layered copper sulfate mineral. The Cu2 + ions of each layer form a systematically depleted triangular lattice which approximates a maple leaf lattice. We present details of the crystal structure, which suggest that in spangolite this lattice actually comprises two species of edge linked trimers with different exchange parameters. However, magnetic susceptibility measurements show that despite the structural trimers, the magnetic properties are dominated by dimerization. The high temperature magnetic moment is strongly reduced below that expected for the six s = 1/2 in the unit cell.

  8. Local carbon diffusion coefficient measurement in the S-1 spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, R.M.; Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Chu, T.K.; Paul, S.F.; Yamada, M.

    1988-10-01

    The local carbon diffusion coefficient was measured in the S - 1 spheromak by detecting the radial spread of injected carbon impurity. The radial impurity density profile is determined by the balance of ionization and diffusion. Using measured local electron temperature T/sub e/ and density n/sub e/, the ionization rate is determined from which the particle diffusion coefficient is inferred. The results found in this work are consistent with Bohm diffusion. The absolute magnitude of D/sub /perpendicular// was determined to be (4/approximately/6) /times/ D/sub Bohm/. 25 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Upper-crustal velocity structure along 150 km of the Mendeleev Ridge from tomographic inversion of long-offset refraction data collected during HLY0602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P. M.; van Avendonk, H. J.; Lawver, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    In the summer of 2006 we acquired a unique seismic refraction data set on the Chukchi Borderlands and Mendeleev Ridge utilizing USCGC Healy and two helicopters. The array on the Mendeleev Ridge consisted of 14 instrument sites with 12 km spacing between instruments. On every site we deployed a Sea-Ice Seismometer (S- IS) especially designed for this experiment in the ice-covered part of the Arctic Ocean. Each S-IS contained a vertical component geophone that was buried in the ice and a hydrophone that was hanging from the ice edge in the water. From the 14 instrument sites, 10 contained useful data with refracted crustal arrivals up to offsets of 40 km. Because of extensive drifting of the receivers (40 km in 5 days and containing numerous loops), and because of the irregular geometry of airgun shots due to the problems of sailing through ice-covered seas, a 3D ray-shooting code was developed to calculate ray paths within a 3D velocity model that extends along 150 km in the X- direction and along 35 km in the Y-direction. Using the velocity model proposed by Lebedeva-Ivanova et al. (2006) we observe that the maximum depth of our calculated ray paths is 11 km below sealevel. Using all the available data, the Root Mean Square (RMS) difference between observed and calculated travel-times is of the order of 500 ms. Initially a simple 1D travel-time inversion was developed to constrain the velocity structure of the basement underneath a layer of water (3D) and a layer of sediment (1D). This inversion was carried out on 2 pairs of receivers: one pair in the NNE and one more towards the SSW part of the line. Inversion of S-IS 45N-42 (NNE) results in a model with a velocity of 5.5 km s-1 at the top of the basement, slowly increasing to a velocity of 5.7 km s-1 at 3 km below the top of the basement (RMS = 117 ms). Inversion of S-IS 49-45S (SSW) results in a model with a velocity of 4.8 km s-1 at the top of the basement, increasing to a velocity of 5.9 km s-1 at 3 km below

  10. [A Case of Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer with a Complete Response to S-1 Alternate-Day Administration].

    PubMed

    Eto, Ryuichi; Nakatsu, Hiroki; Ozasa, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    An 86-year-old woman underwent a cholecystectomy for gallbladder cancer. Seven months later, an abdominal CT scan showed multiple liver and lymph node metastases. Treatment with S-1 was started at a dose of 100 mg/day, but was changed to alternate-day administration because of diarrhea. Metastatic lesions showed a complete response after 7 months of chemotherapy. S-1 alternate-day therapy could be maintained without any severe adverse events. This method can be managed safely and with certainty in an elderly patient and it has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of recurrent gallbladder cancer. PMID:26809537

  11. Measurements of laser phase fluctuations induced by atmospheric turbulence over 2 km and 17.5 km distances.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Kevin D

    2011-09-10

    A laser heterodyne system was used to measure the phase fluctuations imposed on a 1.5 μm wavelength laser beam when double-passed over long atmospheric paths. Two distances were used: 2 and 17.5 km. Results are given for intensity scintillation, phase fluctuation time series and spectra, and phase structure function. The results are found to agree well with theory: the spectrum of phase fluctuations follows the 8/3 power law predicted for Kolmogorov turbulence over 3 orders of magnitude in frequency. The methods reported here could be used to investigate large-scale temperature variations in the atmosphere. PMID:21946989

  12. Taxonomic characterization and metabolic analysis of the Halomonas sp. KM-1, a highly bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)-producing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Shi, Lian-Hua; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    In a brief previous report, the gram-negative moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas sp. KM-1, that was isolated in our laboratory was shown to produce the bioplastic, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), using biodiesel waste glycerol (Kawata and Aiba, Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 74, 175-177, 2010). Here, we further characterized this KM-1 strain and compared it to other Halomonas strains. Strain KM-1 was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain KM-1 was rod-shaped and formed colonies on a plate that were cream-beige in color, smooth, opaque, and circular with entire edges. KM-1 grew under environmental conditions of 0.1%-10% (w/v) NaCl, pH 6.5-10.5 and at temperatures between 10°C and 45°C. The G+C content of strain KM-1 was 63.9 mol%. Of the 16 Halomonas strains examined in this study, the strain KM-1 exhibited the highest production of PHB (63.6%, w/v) in SOT medium supplemented with 10% glycerol, 10.0 g/L sodium nitrate and 2.0 g/L dipotassium hydrogen phosphate. The intracellular structures within which PHB accumulated had the appearance of intracellular granules with a diameter of approximately 0.5 μm, as assessed by electron microscopy. The intra- and extra-cellular metabolites of strain KM-1 were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry. In spite of the high amount of PHB stored intra-cellularly, as possible precursors for PHB only a small quantity of 3-hydroxybutyric acid and acetyl CoA, and no quantity of 3-hydroxybutyl CoA, acetoacetyl CoA and acetoacetate were detected either intra- or extra-cellularly, suggesting highly efficient conversion of these precursors to PHB.

  13. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the newly arrived S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is offloaded from NASA's Super Guppy aircraft. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated fo r flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to b e moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is being transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building.

  14. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Escort vehicles prepare to leave the Shuttle Landing Facility with the S1 truss (at right) on its trek to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, seen in the background. The aircraft is uniquely built with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads and a 'fold-away' nose that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight

  15. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers attach cranes to the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, to lift the truss to a payload transporter for its transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufa ctured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully out fitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails al low pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight

  16. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility from Marshall Space Flight Center. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif ., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment al so will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is s lated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircr aft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtu res to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be moved to the Operations and Checkout Building

  17. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, rolls to a stop at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the I SS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communicatio ns systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an elec tric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building

  18. STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, NASA's Super Guppy opens to reveal its cargo, the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the f irst starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super G uppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building

  19. Argyres-Douglas theories, S 1 reductions, and topological symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buican, Matthew; Nishinaka, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, we proposed closed-form expressions for the superconformal indices of the ({A}1,{A}2n-3) and ({A}1,{D}2n) Argyres-Douglas (AD) superconformal field theories (SCFTs) in the Schur limit. Following up on our results, we turn our attention to the small S 1 regime of these indices. As expected on general grounds, our study reproduces the S 3 partition functions of the resulting dimensionally reduced theories. However, we show that in all cases—with the exception of the reduction of the ({A}1,{D}4) SCFT—certain imaginary partners of real mass terms are turned on in the corresponding mirror theories. We interpret these deformations as R symmetry mixing with the topological symmetries of the direct S 1 reductions. Moreover, we argue that these shifts occur in any of our theories whose four-dimensional { N }=2 superconformal U{(1)}R symmetry does not obey an SU(2) quantization condition. We then use our R symmetry map to find the four-dimensional ancestors of certain three-dimensional operators. Somewhat surprisingly, this picture turns out to imply that the scaling dimensions of many of the chiral operators of the four-dimensional theory are encoded in accidental symmetries of the three-dimensional theory. We also comment on the implications of our work on the space of general { N }=2 SCFTs.

  20. S1P metabolism in cancer and other pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Leong, Weng In; Saba, Julie D

    2010-06-01

    Nearly two decades ago, the sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate was discovered to function as a lipid mediator and regulator of cell proliferation. Since that time, sphingosine 1-phosphate has been shown to mediate a diverse array of fundamental biological processes including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, vascular maturation and lymphocyte trafficking. Sphingosine 1-phosphate acts primarily via signaling through five ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors. Intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate molecules are transported extracellularly and gain access to cognate receptors for autocrine and paracrine signaling and for signaling at distant sites reached through blood and lymphatic circulation systems. Intracellular pools of sphingosine 1-phosphate available for signaling are tightly regulated primarily by three enzymes: sphinosine kinase, S1P lyase and S1P phosphatase. Alterations in sphingosine 1-phosphate as well as the enzymes involved in its synthesis and catabolism have been observed in many types of malignancy. These enzymes are being evaluated for their role in mediating cancer formation and progression, as well as their potential to serve as targets of anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, the impact of sphingosine 1-phosphate, its cognate receptors, and the enzymes of sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolism on cell survival, apoptosis, autophagy, cellular transformation, invasion, angiogenesis and hypoxia in relation to cancer biology and treatment are discussed.

  1. Science 100, 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This teacher's manual is the approved provincial guide for grade 10 science in Manitoba schools. Part 1 (an overview) discusses rationale, learning theory/design, and goals/objectives for the curriculum; design of Science 100 and 101; effects of metric system on the curriculum; special needs students; and student evaluation. Part 2 discusses…

  2. 100 Essential Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas School for the Deaf, Austin.

    The booklet contains illustrations of 100 basic signs for use by school employees in working with the deaf. The signs were chosen for inclusion in the booklet by a committee which reviewed hundreds of signs and evaluated their importance in communicating with the deaf. The illustrations, taken in large part from the "Preferred Signs for…

  3. [100 years of ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Nover, A

    1982-12-16

    100 years ago ophthalmology was already an own special sector of medicine. In 1850, when Hermann von Helmholtz invented the ophthalmoscope, the beginning of modern ophthalmology was established. The "Ophthalmologische Gesellschaft" was founded in 1863. From thereon major advances in all divisions of ophthalmology were achieved. Some outstanding personalities and highlights are mentioned.

  4. Science at 100 T

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Neil

    2012-06-01

    100 tesla fields are essential for answering many key questions in condensed matter: (1) Collapse of magnetic length crucial tool for understanding high Tc superconductors; (2) Field can also behave as 'negative pressure' in condensed matter; and (3) Field-tuned emergent phenomena involving commensurability effects.

  5. Tuskegee: 100 Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Renelda

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the history and accomplishments of Tuskegee Institute over the past 100 years. Highlights the role played by Booker T. Washington, and W. E. B. DuBois; discusses the career of the school's retiring president, Luther Foster. Provides information on the new president, Dr. Benjamin Payton, and discusses future directions for the college. (APM)

  6. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, Harunori; Kitano, Masayasu; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Miyazawa, Keiji; Hla, Timothy; Sano, Hajime

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  7. The ion population between 1300 km and 230000 km in the coma of comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Geiss, J.; Goldstein, R.; Ip, W. -H.; Meier, A.; Neugebauer, M.; Rosenbauer, H.; Shelley, E.

    1993-01-01

    During the encounter of the spacecraft Giotto with Comet Halley the two sensors of the ion mass spectrometer (IMS), high energy range spectrometer (HERS) and high intensity spectrometer (HIS), measured the mass and the three-dimensional velocity distributions of cometary ions. HIS looked mainly at the cold, slow part of the distribution close to the nucleus, HERS at the more energetic pick-up ions further out. After a thorough recalibration of the HIS flight spare unit and an extensive data analysis we present here continuous ion density-, composition-, velocity-, and temperature profiles for the water group ion (mass range 16-19 amu/e) along Giotto's inbound trajectory from 230,000 to 1300 km from the comet nucleus. The two sensors are in very good agreement in the region where their measurements overlap thus giving an excellent data base for the discussion of theoretical comet models. The most prominent feature where models and observations disagree is the so called pile up region between 8000 and 15,000 km from the nucleus.

  8. P/2008 CL94 (Lemmon) and P/2011 S1 (Gibbs): comet-like activity at large heliocentric distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyk, I.; Korsun, P.; Rousselot, P.; Afanasiev, V.; Ivanova, O.

    2016-06-01

    Based on spectroscopic and photometric observations we analyzed the dust environment of two minor distant objects, P/2008 CL94 (Lemmon) and P/2011 S1 (Gibbs). Both targets demonstrated the comet-like activity beyond the "zone of water-ice sublimation". Meanwhile the spectrum of P/2008 CL94 (Lemmon) did not reveal molecular emission features above reflected continuum in a spectral region of 4100-6800Å. Reddening of the continuum is linear along the dispersion with the mean normalized reflectivity gradient equals to 2.0% ± 0.4%. The normalized reflectivity of P/2011 S1 (Gibbs) derived from the V-R and R-I color indices equals 11% ± 9% and 26% ± 6% respectively. Both objects have likely small nuclei (about 2 and 4 km in the radii for P/2008 CL94 and P/2011 S1 respectively), which are consistent with nucleus sizes of 'Jupiter-family' comets. The level of physical activity of P/2008 CL94 and S/2011 S1 is characterized by R-Afρ quantity of 106 ± 3 cm and 76 ± 8 cm respectively. The Afρ values are resulted in dust production rates of about 1-2 kg/s, assuming the average geometric albedo of grains of 0.1 and the dust outflow velocities between 1 and 10 m/s.

  9. Wintertime density perturbations near 50 km in relation to latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Standard and reference atmospheres which depict the horizontal distribution of air density in the stratosphere and mesosphere are not realistic in that they do not provide information on the large departures from standard that may occur during a given month, nor on the time- and space-scales of atmospheric perturbations responsible for these departures. In the present paper, it is shown how this information can be obtained from a special analysis of satellite radiance measurements. Plots of the mean zonal radiance, obtained with the VTPR instrument, and the corresponding 50-km density show not only the expected strong poleward gradient of density, but also a strong density surge from late December to early January, affecting all latitudes.

  10. Transport System for Delivery Tourists At Altitude 140 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The author offers a new method and installation for flight in space. This method uses the centrifugal force of a rotating circular cable that provides a means for the launch of a payload into outer space, to keep the fixed space stations at high altitudes (up to 200 km). The method may also be useful for landing to space bodies, for launching of the space ships (crafts), and for moving and accelerating other artificial apparatuses. The offered installation may be used as a propulsion system for space ships and/or probes. This system uses the material of any space body (i.e. stones) for acceleration and change of the space vehicle trajectory. The suggested system may be also used as a high capacity energy accumulator.

  11. Estimating worldwide solar radiation resources on a 40km grid

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, E.L.; George, R.L.; Brady, E.H.

    1996-11-01

    During 1995, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), initiated the Data Grid Task under the auspices of DOE`s Resource Assessment Program. A data grid is a framework of uniformly spaced locations (grid points) for which data are available. Estimates of monthly averages of direct normal, diffuse horizontal, and global horizontal daily-total solar radiation energy (kWh/m{sup 2}) are being made for each point on a grid covering the US, Mexico, the Caribbean, and southern Canada. The grid points are separated by approximately 40 km. Using interpolation methods, the digital data grid can be used to estimate solar resources at any location. The most encouraging result to date has been the location of sources providing worldwide data for most of the input parameters required for modeling daily total solar radiation. This is a multiyear task expected to continue through the rest of this century.

  12. Readout and data acquisition for KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belias, Anastasios; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos

    2013-05-01

    In the KM3NeT neutrino telescope design the readout concept is based on a point-to-point network connecting tenthousands of optical modules in the deep sea through a photonic network with the shore station. The time-over-threshold data from each Photo Multiplier Tube (PMT) of each optical module will be send to shore over fibres using dedicated wavelengths. Nanosecond timing accuracy will be schieved using a clock signal embedded in the data stream and measuring the roundtrip time from the shore to each optical module individually. The DAQ software architecture based on the Internet Communications Engine (ICE) will provide a common and uniform software framework for the control of each optical module and the data acquisition of the whole neutrino telescope.

  13. Constraining density and velocity jumps across the 410 km discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saki, Morvarid; Thomas, Christine; Cobden, Laura; Abreu, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the velocity and density structure of the olivine-to-wadsleyite transition using polarities of precursor arrivals to PP seismic waves that reflect off the 410 km discontinuity beneath the Northern Atlantic. Numerous source-receiver combinations have been used in order to collect a dataset of reflection points beneath our investigation area. We analyzed over 1700 seismograms from Mw > 5.8 using array seismology methods to enhance the signal to noise ratio. For each event the polarity of the PP phase is compared to polarity of the precursor signal and we find several events where the polarity of the precursors are opposite to that of PP. There does not seem to be any dependency of the observed polarities on the propagation direction of the seismic waves but interestingly there seems to be a dependency on the distance between source and receiver. The events with epicentral distances greater than 119 degrees mostly show opposite polarities, while for those with smaller epicentral distances the same polarity of the main phase and precursor signal is dominant. Using Zeoppritz equations, we analyzed more than 64 million combinations of density, compressional and shear wave velocities for both layers, above and below the 410 km discontinuity in order to find the best combination of those parameters that can explain the observations. The results are indicating combinations of density, P and S wave velocity exhibiting a smaller contrast compared to those from the pyrolite model (the density jump, however is still positive to provide physically meaningful results). The calculated reductions in both compressional and shear wave velocities go up to 13% but mostly fall within the range of less than 7- 8%. We interpret this reduction in elastic properties and seismic velocity of minerals as the effect of a higher than normal content of water of wadsleyite in this region, while we can exclude a reduction in iron.

  14. Discovery of potent 3,5-diphenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P1) receptor agonists with exceptional selectivity against S1P2 and S1P3.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Chen, Weirong; Hale, Jeffrey J; Lynch, Christopher L; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Parent, Stephen A; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Quackenbush, Elizabeth J; Wickham, L Alexandra; Vargas, Hugo; Evans, Rose M; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2005-10-01

    A class of 3,5-diphenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole based compounds have been identified as potent sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P1) receptor agonists with minimal affinity for the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor subtypes. Analogue 26 (S1P1 IC50 = 0.6 nM) has an excellent pharmacokinetics profile in the rat and dog and is efficacious in a rat skin transplant model, indicating that S1P3 receptor agonism is not a component of immunosuppressive efficacy.

  15. Potential of MuS1 Transgenic Tobacco for Phytoremediation of the Urban Soils Contaminated with Cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. N.; Kim, S. H.

    2010-05-01

    Urban soils are prone to contamination by trace elements such as Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Phytoremediation is one of the attractive remediation methods for soils contaminated with trace elements due to its non-destructive and environmentally-friendly characteristic. Scientists have tried to find hyper-accumulator plants in nature or to develop transgenic plant through genetic engineering. This study was carried out to identify a potential of MuS1 transgenic tobacco for phytoremediation of the urban soils contaminated with Cd. MuS1 is known as a multiple stress related gene with several lines. The previous study using RT-PCR showed that the expression of MuS1 gene in tobacco plant induced tolerance to Cd stress. For this study, MuS1 transgenic tobacco and wild-type tobacco (control) were cultivated in a hydroponic system treated with Cd (0, 50, 100 and 200μM Cd) for 3 weeks. At harvest, both tobacco and nutrient solution were collected and were analyzed for Cd. Effect of Cd treatment on morphological change of the tobacco leaves was also observed by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). The tolerance of MuS1 transgenic tobacco to Cd stress was better than that of wild-type tobacco at all Cd levels. Especially, wild-type tobacco showed chlorosis and withering with 200μM Cd treatment, whereas MuS1 transgenic tobacco gradually recovered from Cd damage. Wild-type tobacco accumulated more Cd (4.65mg per plant) than MuS1 transgenic tobacco (2.37mg per plant) with 200μM Cd treatment. Cd translocation rate from root to leaves was 81.8 % for wild-type tobacco compared to 37.1 % for MuS1 transgenic tobacco. Result of VP-SEM showed that the number of trichome in the leaves for wild-type tobacco increased in comparison with that for untreated samples after 3 weeks, while that for MuS1 transgenic tobacco was not changed by Cd treatment. Results showed that the mechanism of the recovery of the MuS1 tobacco plant was not by high level of Cd uptake and accumulation

  16. 100 most powerful.

    PubMed

    Romano, Michael

    2002-08-26

    Compiling a list of the 100 Most Powerful People in Healthcare requires some contemplation. Exactly what is power in this industry? C. Thomas Smith, president and CEO of VHA, calls power simply "the ability to make a difference." The influential figures chosen by Modern Healthcare readers represent a broadly varied and diverse group of movers and shakers. But they share the ability to change things.

  17. Dynamical instability in the S =1 Bose-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaoka, Rui; Tsuchiura, Hiroki; Yamashita, Makoto; Toga, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical instabilities of superfluid flows in the S =1 Bose-Hubbard model. The time evolution of each spin component in a condensate is calculated based on the dynamical Gutzwiller approximation for a wide range of interactions, from a weakly correlated regime to a strongly correlated regime near the Mott-insulator transition. Owing to the spin-dependent interactions, the superfluid flow of the spin-1 condensate decays at a different critical momentum from a spinless case when the interaction strength is the same. We furthermore calculate the dynamical phase diagram of this model and clarify that the obtained phase boundary has very different features depending on whether the average number of particles per site is even or odd. Finally, we analyze the density and spin modulations that appear in association with the dynamical instability. We find that spin modulations are highly sensitive to the presence of a uniform magnetic field.

  18. Lattice study of the exotic s = +1 baryon.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shoichi

    2004-10-01

    We propose S = +1 baryon interpolating operators, which are based on an exotic description of the antidecuplet baryon, like the diquark-diquark-antiquark structure. By using one of the new operators, the mass spectrum of the spin-1/2 pentaquark states is calculated in quenched lattice QCD at beta = 6/g(2) = 6.2 on a 32(3) x 48 lattice. It is found that the J(P) assignment of the lowest Theta(uudds) state is most likely (1/2)(-). We also calculate the mass of the charm analog of the Theta and find that the Theta(c)(uuddc) state lies much higher than the DN threshold, in contrast to several model predictions. PMID:15524864

  19. Effect of anisotropy in the S=1 underscreened Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Lacroix, Claudine; Iglesias, José Roberto; Coqblin, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    We study the effect of crystal field anisotropy in the underscreened S=1 Kondo lattice model. Starting from the two orbital Anderson lattice model and including a local anisotropy term, we show, through Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, that local anisotropy is equivalent to an anisotropic Kondo interaction (J∥≠J⊥). The competition and coexistence between ferromagnetism and Kondo effect in this effective model is studied within a generalized mean-field approximation. Several regimes are obtained, depending on the parameters, exhibiting or not coexistence of magnetic order and Kondo effect. Particularly, we show that a re-entrant Kondo phase at low temperature can be obtained. We are also able to describe phases where the Kondo temperature is smaller than the Curie temperature (TK

  20. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  1. SP-100 surety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    This report describes surety evaluations conducted during GFY 1985 in support of the General Electric design for a Space Nuclear Power System - SP-100. Those surety evaluations address both safety and safeguards requirements, which are derived from OSNP-1 and supporting documents. The report includes results of neutronics (criticality) calculations performed by Los Alamos. The results have been benchmarked against independent calculations performed by General Electric with different codes. These comparisons show close agreement, and are summarized. Los Alamos has also provided specifications of explosion and fire environments, which have been used in evaluation of the GE SP-100 concept. Following the summary of key results, surety requirements are given and recommendations toward specification of requirements for later SP-100 project phases are presented. A conceptual design summary is presented. To establish a comprehensive background for surety evaluations, a reference mission profile and potential accidents for each phase of the mission are identified. The main body of the report addresses surety of the General Electric Thermoelectric Conversion design. GE has also developed a Stirling Engine concept, and performed comprehensive surety evaluations for it. These evaluations are reported.

  2. Evaluation of the 7-km GEOS-5 Nature Run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ronald; Putman, William M.; Pawson, Steven; Draper, Clara; Molod, Andrea; Norris, Peter M.; Ott, Lesley; Prive, Nikki; Reale, Oreste; Achuthavarier, Deepthi; Bosilovich, Michael; Buchard, Virginie; Chao, Winston; Coy, Lawrence; Cullather, Richard; da Silva, Arlindo; Darmenov, Anton; Koster, Randal; McCarty, Will; Schubert, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    This report documents an evaluation by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) of a two-year 7-km-resolution non-hydrostatic global mesoscale simulation produced with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model. The simulation was produced as a Nature Run for conducting observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs). Generation of the GEOS-5 Nature Run (G5NR) was motivated in part by the desire of the OSSE community for an improved high-resolution sequel to an existing Nature Run produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), which has served the community for several years. The intended use of the G5NR in this context is for generating simulated observations to test proposed observing system designs regarding new instruments and their deployments. Because NASA's interest in OSSEs extends beyond traditional weather forecasting applications, the G5NR includes, in addition to standard meteorological components, a suite of aerosol types and several trace gas concentrations, with emissions downscaled to 10 km using ancillary information such as power plant location, population density and night-light information. The evaluation exercise described here involved more than twenty-five GMAO scientists investigating various aspects of the G5NR performance, including time mean temperature and wind fields, energy spectra, precipitation and the hydrological cycle, the representation of waves, tropical cyclones and midlatitude storms, land and ocean surface characteristics, the representation and forcing effects of clouds and radiation, dynamics of the stratosphere and mesosphere, and the representation of aerosols and trace gases. Comparisons are made with observational data sets when possible, as well as with reanalyses and other long model simulations. The evaluation is broad in scope, as it is meant to assess the overall realism of basic aspects of the G5NR deemed relevant to the conduct of OSSEs

  3. Measurement of the vertical gradient of the semidiurnal tidal wind phase in winter at the 95 km level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schminder, R.; Kurschner, D.

    1984-05-01

    When supplemented by absolute reflection height measurements, low frequency wind measurements in the 90-100 km height range become truly competitive in comparison with the more widely used radar meteor wind observations. For example, height profiles of the wind parameters in the so-called meteor zone can be obtained due to the considerable interdiurnal variability of the average nighttime reflection heights controlled by geomagnetic activity. The phase of the semidiurnal tidal wind is particularly height-dependent. The measured vertical gradient of 1/4 h/km in winter corresponds to a vertical wavelength of about 50 km. Wind measurements in the upper atmosphere, at heights between 90 and 100 km, were carried out at the Collm Geophysical Observatory of Karl Marx University Leipzig for a number of years. These measurements use the closely-spaced receiver method and three measuring paths, on 179, 227, and 272 kHz. They take place every day between sunset and sunrise, i.e., nightly. A night in this sense may last as long as 18 hours in winter. Both the measurements and their evaluation are completely automatic, and the prevailing winds and tides are separated.

  4. Measurement of the Vertical Gradient of the Semidiurnal Tidal Wind Phase in Winter at the 95 Km Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schminder, R.; Kurschner, D.

    1984-01-01

    When supplemented by absolute reflection height measurements, low frequency wind measurements in the 90-100 km height range become truly competitive in comparison with the more widely used radar meteor wind observations. For example, height profiles of the wind parameters in the so-called meteor zone can be obtained due to the considerable interdiurnal variability of the average nighttime reflection heights controlled by geomagnetic activity. The phase of the semidiurnal tidal wind is particularly height-dependent. The measured vertical gradient of 1/4 h/km in winter corresponds to a vertical wavelength of about 50 km. Wind measurements in the upper atmosphere, at heights between 90 and 100 km, were carried out at the Collm Geophysical Observatory of Karl Marx University Leipzig for a number of years. These measurements use the closely-spaced receiver method and three measuring paths, on 179, 227, and 272 kHz. They take place every day between sunset and sunrise, i.e., nightly. A night in this sense may last as long as 18 hours in winter. Both the measurements and their evaluation are completely automatic, and the prevailing winds and tides are separated.

  5. Selecting against S1P3 enhances the acute cardiovascular tolerability of 3-(N-benzyl)aminopropylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hale, Jeffrey J; Doherty, George; Toth, Leslie; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Sun, Shu-Yu; West, Sarah; Xie, Huijuan; Nomura, Naomi; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2004-07-01

    Structurally modified 3-(N-benzylamino)propylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists that maintain affinity for S1P1, and have decreased affinity for S1P3 are efficacious, but exhibit decreased acute cardiovascular toxicity in rodents than do nonselective agonists.

  6. Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) coma composition at ~4 au from HST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Videen, Gorden; Hines, Dean C.; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Kaydash, Vadym; Muinonen, Karri; Knight, Matthew M.; Sitko, Michael L.; Lisse, Carey M.; Mutchler, Max; Wooden, Diane H.; Li, Jian-Yang; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the first color and polarization images of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) taken during two measurement campaigns of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on UTC 2013 April 10 and May 8, when the phase angles of Comet ISON were α≈13.7° and 12.2°, respectively. We model the particles in the coma using highly irregular agglomerated debris particles. Even though the observations were made over a small range of phase angle, the data still place significant constraints on the material properties of the cometary coma. The different photo-polarimetric responses are indicative of spatial chemical heterogeneity of coma in Comet ISON. For instance, at small projected distances to the nucleus (<500 km), our modeling suggests the cometary particles are composed predominantly of small, highly absorbing particles, such as amorphous carbon and/or organics material heavily irradiated with UV radiation; whereas, at longer projected distances (>1000 km), the refractive index of the particles is consistent with organic matter slightly processed with UV radiation, tholins, Mg-Fe silicates, and/or Mg-rich silicates contaminated with ~10% (by volume) amorphous carbon. The modeling suggests low relative abundances of particles with low material absorption in the visible, i.e., Im(m)≤0.02. Such particles were detected unambiguously in other comets in the vicinity of nucleus through very strong negative polarization near backscattering (P≈-6%) and very low positive polarization (P≈3-5%) at side scattering. These materials were previously attributed to Mg-rich silicates forming a refractory surface layer on the surface of cometary nuclei (Zubko et al., 2012). The absence of such particles in Comet ISON could imply an absence of such a layer on its nucleus.

  7. Topography of the 660-km seismic discontinuity beneath Izu-Bonin: Implications for tectonic history and slab deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, John C.; Creager, Kenneth C.

    1998-06-01

    We analyze the P wave codas of 65 paths from deep northwestern Pacific earthquakes recorded by arrays of stations in Germany, the western United States, India, and Turkmenistan. We identify a phase resulting from a near-source S-to-P conversion at a nearly horizontal discontinuity ranging in depth from 650 to 730 km, which we interpret as a thermally depressed spinel to perovskite and magnesiowüstite phase transition. We migrate these data along with 39 more from Wicks and Richards [1993], accounting for three-dimensional ray bending by the sloping discontinuity, to produce a high-resolution topography map of the 660-km discontinuity in the Izu-Bonin region. Assuming an equilibrium phase transition, we interpret the discontinuity depth in terms of local temperatures. The slab, if defined by a thermal anomaly greater than -400°K, is only about 100 km thick near 28°N suggesting the slab is penetrating into the lower mantle with little or no advective thickening. Farther to the north, however, cold material appears spread out over a wide region, consistent with the slab having been laid down flat on the 660-km discontinuity as the trench retreated 2000 km eastward. Both the narrow slab to the south and the flat-lying slab to the north are consistent with recent high-resolution tomographic images. The depression to 745 km along the arc is consistent with a maximum thermal anomaly of about 1100°K. Along the entire arc, the depression occurs directly beneath the deepest earthquakes, even where seismicity is dipping at 45° and stops at 450 km depth, suggesting that the slab steepens to a vertical dip at the deepest seismicity. This change to a vertical orientation suggests that the slab loses strength temporarily through a physical process which causes the seismicity to increase dramatically and then abruptly cease.

  8. KM3NeT Digital Optical Module electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Diego

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT collaboration is currently building of a neutrino telescope with a volume of several cubic kilometres at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea. The telescope consists of a matrix of Digital Optical Modules that will detect the Cherenkov light originated by the interaction of the neutrinos in the proximity of the detector. This contribution describes the main components of the read-out electronics of the Digital Optical Module: the Power Board, which delivers all the power supply required by the Digital Optical Molule electronics; the Central Logic Board, the main core of the read-out system, hosting 31 Time to Digital Converters with 1 ns resolution and the White Rabbit protocol embedded in the Central Logic Board Field Programmable Gate Array; the Octopus boards, that transfer the Low Voltage Digital Signals from the PMT bases to the Central Logic Board and finally the PMT bases, in charge of converting the analogue signal produced in the 31 3" PMTs into a Low Voltage Digital Signal.

  9. Stratospheric microbiology at 20 km over the Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David J.; Griffin, Dale W.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    An aerobiology sampling flight at 20 km was conducted on 28 April 2008 over the Pacific Ocean (36.5° N, 118–149° W), a period of time that coincided with the movement of Asian dust across the ocean. The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of viable bacteria and fungi within a transoceanic, atmospheric bridge and to improve the resolution of flight hardware processing techniques. Isolates of the microbial strains recovered were analyzed with ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequencing to identify bacterial species Bacillus sp., Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus endophyticus, and the fungal genus Penicillium. Satellite imagery and ground-based radiosonde observations were used to measure dust movement and characterize the high-altitude environment at the time of collection. Considering the atmospheric residency time (7–10 days), the extreme temperature regime of the environment (-75°C), and the absence of a mechanism that could sustain particulates at high altitude, it is unlikely that our samples indicate a permanent, stratospheric ecosystem. However, the presence of viable fungi and bacteria in transoceanic stratosphere remains relevant to understanding the distribution and extent of microbial life on Earth.

  10. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T.

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  11. Nausea is associated with endotoxemia during a 161-km ultramarathon.

    PubMed

    Stuempfle, Kristin J; Valentino, Taylor; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hecht, Frederick M; Hoffman, Martin D

    2016-09-01

    This study explored possible contributing factors to gastrointestinal distress, including endotoxemia, hyperthermia, dehydration and nutrition, during a 161-km ultramarathon. Thirty runners participated in the study and 20 finished the race. At three checkpoints and the finish, runners were interviewed to assess the incidence and severity of 12 gastrointestinal symptoms and to determine dietary intake. Core temperature was measured at the same locations. Runners were weighed pre-race, at the three checkpoints and the finish to monitor hydration status. Blood markers for endotoxemia (sCD14) and inflammation (interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein) were measured pre- and post-race. Gastrointestinal symptoms were experienced by most runners (80%), with nausea being the most common complaint (60%). Runners with nausea experienced significantly greater (P = 0.02) endotoxemia than those without nausea (sCD14 mean increase 0.7 versus 0.5 µg · mL(-1)). There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.652, P = 0.005) between nausea severity and endotoxemia level. Inflammatory response, core temperature, hydration level and race diet were similar between runners with and without nausea. This study links endotoxemia to nausea in ultramarathon runners. Other possible contributing factors to nausea such as hyperthermia, dehydration and nutrition did not appear to play a role in the symptomatic runners in this study. PMID:26707127

  12. ASIC design in the KM3NeT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajanana, D.; Gromov, V.; Timmer, P.

    2013-02-01

    In the KM3NeT project [1], Cherenkov light from the muon interactions with transparent matter around the detector, is used to detect neutrinos. Photo multiplier tubes (PMT) used as photon sensor, are housed in a glass sphere (aka Optical Module) to detect single photons from the Cherenkov light. The PMT needs high operational voltage ( ~ 1.5 kV) and is generated by a Cockroft-Walton (CW) multiplier circuit. The electronics required to control the PMT's and collect the signals is integrated in two ASIC's namely: 1) a front-end mixed signal ASIC (PROMiS) for the readout of the PMT and 2) an analog ASIC (CoCo) to generate pulses for charging the CW circuit and to control the feedback of the CW circuit. In this article, we discuss the two integrated circuits and test results of the complete setup. PROMiS amplifies the input charge, converts it to a pulse width and delivers the information via LVDS signals. These LVDS signals carry accurate information on the Time of arrival ( < 2 ns) and Time over Threshold. A PROM block provides unique identification to the chip. The chip communicates with the control electronics via an I2C bus. This unique combination of the ASIC's results in a very cost and power efficient PMT base design.

  13. Functional Characterization of Human Cytochrome P450 2S1 Using a Synthetic Gene-Expressed Protein in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2S1 was recently identified and shown to be inducible by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and hypoxia. It is highly expressed in epithelial cells of tissues that are exposed to the environment and in many tumors of epithelial origin. The biological function of CYP2S1 has not yet been determined, although its possible role in carcinogen metabolism has been suggested. In this report, we investigated its ability to metabolize carcinogens. To obtain a large quantity of active enzyme for substrate screening, we overexpressed CYP2S1 in Escherichia coli (200 nM culture), using a synthetic gene approach. High-level expression allowed us to achieve purification of CYP2S1 with high specific content and purity (16 nmol/mg). Despite high-level expression, we found that CYP2S1 was not readily reduced by cytochrome P450 reductase, and thus no activity was found using NADPH. However, the oxidative activity of CYP2S1 was supported by cumene hydroperoxide or H2O2, such that CYP2S1 oxidized many important environmental carcinogens, including benzo[a]pyrene, 9,10-dihydro-benzo[a]pyrene, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol, aflatoxin B1, naphthalene, and styrene, with high turnover. Most substrates tested were converted to detoxification products, except in the case of benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol, which was converted into the very potent carcinogenic metabolite 7,8-dihydrodiol-trans-9,10-epoxide at a relatively efficient rate (Km = 12.4 ± 2 μM, turnover = 2.3 min−1). This metabolite formation was also supported both in vitro and in vivo by fatty acid hydroperoxides described in the accompanying report (p. 1044). Together, these data indicate that CYP2S1 contributes to the metabolism of environmental carcinogens via an NADPH independent activity. PMID:19713358

  14. [Modulation of S-1 conformation and inhibition of the skeletal muscle S-1-ATPase by calponin of the mussel].

    PubMed

    Sirenko, V V; Simonian, A O; Dobrzhanskaia, A V; Shelud'ko, N S; Borovikov, Iu S

    2014-01-01

    A novel 40 kDa protein has been detected in native thin filaments from catch muscles of the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus. In this study, using skeletal muscle actin and S-1, we investigated the effects of the mussel 40-kDa actin-binding protein on the acto · S-1 ATPase activity. On increasing the 40-kDa actin-binding protein (CaP-40) concentration, the actin-activated ATPase activity decreased, and was inhibited 80% at a CaP-40 to actin ratio of 0.5. Polarized fluorimetry technique and glycerinated muscle fibers were used to study effects of CaP-40 on the orientation and mobility of fluorescent label 1.5-IAEDANS specifically bound to CyS-707 of myosin subfragment-1 in the absence of nucleotide, and in the presence of MgADP or MgATP. We have concluded that CaP-40 binding to actin affects the strong binding of myosin to actin but has no effect on the weak binding. Thus, the influence of the CaP-40 on the formation of strong actomyosin binding forms A · M and A · M · ADP manifests itself by a decrease in the relative content of myosin cross-bridges strongly bound with actin, which probably results in a decrease in the relative content of "switch on" actin monomers in thin filaments. This suggests that, as calponin CaP-40 selects its target the phase of strong actomyosin binding binding which preceded by a phase generating power stroke.

  15. PERFORMANCE TRENDS IN LARGE 10-KM ROAD RUNNING RACES IN THE UNITED STATES

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, Dan M.; Markert, Matthew; Rho, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Our study examines the current trends of runners participating in 10-km road races in the United States. Finish times and ages of all runners participating in 10 of the largest 10-km running races in the United States between 2002–2005 and 2011 were recorded. Linear regression analysis was performed to examine the trends for age, sex, and finishing time for all participants completing the course in <1 hour. A total of 408,296 runners were analyzed. There was a significant annual decrease in the ratio of men to women finishers (p < 0.001, r2 = 0.976). The average finishing time of the top 10 (men, p ≤ 0.05), 100 (men and women, p ≤ 0.05), and 1,000 (men and women, p < 0.01) significantly decreased annually. The total number of subhour finishers increased annually across all races (194 men per year, r2 = 0.584, p = 0.045; 161 women per year, r2 = 0.779, p = 0.008), whereas the percentage of overall finishers completing the course in less than an hour significantly declined for men and women (p ≤ 0.003). There was a significant trend toward younger men in all top groups except for the single fastest runner (p ≤ 0.017). Our study demonstrates that for large 10-km U.S. races: the top men and women seem to be getting faster; there are more subhour finishers, with increasingly more women accomplishing this feat compared with men; an increasingly lower percentage of overall finishers is finishing in <1 hour; and the fastest men are also increasingly younger. PMID:24077377

  16. Thermodynamic linkage between the S1 site, the Na+ site, and the Ca2+ site in the protease domain of human activated protein C (APC). Sodium ion in the APC crystal structure is coordinated to four carbonyl groups from two separate loops.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Padmanabhan, Kaillathe; Underwood, Matthew C; Bode, Wolfram; Mather, Timothy; Bajaj, S Paul

    2002-08-01

    The serine protease domain of activated protein C (APC) contains a Na+ and a Ca2+ site. However, the number and identity of the APC residues that coordinate to Na+ is not precisely known. Further, the functional link between the Na+ and the Ca2+ site is insufficiently defined, and their linkage to the substrate S1 site has not been studied. Here, we systematically investigate the functional significance of these two cation sites and their thermodynamic links to the S1 site. Kinetic data reveal that Na+ binds to the substrate-occupied APC with K(d) values of approximately 24 mm in the absence and approximately 6 mm in the presence of Ca2+. Sodium-occupied APC has approximately 100-fold increased catalytic efficiency ( approximately 4-fold decrease in K(m) and approximately 25-fold increase in k(cat)) in hydrolyzing S-2288 (H-d-Ile-Pro-Arg-p-nitroanilide) and Ca2+ further increases this k(cat) slightly ( approximately 1.2-fold). Ca2+ binds to the protease domain of APC with K(d) values of approximately 438 microm in the absence and approximately 105 microm in the presence of Na+. Ca2+ binding to the protease domain of APC does not affect K(m) but increases the k(cat) approximately 10-fold, and Na+ further increases this k(cat) approximately 3-fold and decreases the K(m) value approximately 3.7-fold. In agreement with the K(m) data, sodium-occupied APC has approximately 4-fold increased affinity in binding to p-aminobenzamidine (S1 probe). Crystallographically, the Ca2+ site in APC is similar to that in trypsin, and the Na+ site is similar to that in factor Xa but not thrombin. Collectively, the Na+ site is thermodynamically linked to the S1 site as well as to the protease domain Ca2+ site, whereas the Ca2+ site is only linked to the Na+ site. The significance of these findings is that under physiologic conditions, most of the APC will exist in Na2+-APC-Ca2+ form, which has 110-fold increased proteolytic activity. PMID:12029084

  17. Possible Dust Models for C/2012 S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) provided a great opportunity to study a dynamically new Oort-cloud comet on its initial and only passage through the inner solar system. Contrary to expectations, the comet's activity fluctuated from high through a quiescent phase, and a major outburst days before its perihelion passage, ending in a dramatic race to complete disintegration on perihelion day, 28 November 2013. Amateur observations to professional ground-based, sub-orbital telescopes indicate the various changes of visible factors such as Afrho, a proxy for dust activity, and the measured production rates for water, consistent with the disintegration of the nucleus. Hines et al. (2013; ApJ Lett. 780) detected positive polarization in the inner coma and negative polarization in the outer coma, indicative of a jet, independently confirmed by Li et al. (2013, ApJ Lett., 779). Thermal emission observations of the comet pre-perihelion from NAOJ/Subaru/COMICS, a mid-infrared spectrometer, indicated a body with an equivalent brightness temperature of 265K (Ootsubo et al., 2013, ACM, Helsinki,FI); thermal observations acquired at the NASA/Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) with The Aerospace Corporation spectrometer (BASS, PI. R. Russell), before and after the November 12, 2013 outburst observed by the CIOC_ISON amateur network, indicates a brightness temperature of 330K and the presence, albeit weak, of the 11.3-micron crystalline silicate feature (Sitko et al., 2014, LPI abstract 1537). A Monte Carlo comet dust tail model, applied to extract the dust environment parameters of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) from both Earth-based and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) calibrated observations, performed from about 6 AU (inbound), to right after perihelion passage, when just a small portion of the original comet nucleus survived in the form of a cloud of tiny particles, indicates that particles underwent disintegration and fragmentation (Moreno et al., 2014, ApJ Lett., 791). Ongoing work

  18. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3–4 compared to those with 0–2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  19. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target. PMID:27562371

  20. Nighttime ionization by energetic particles at Wallops Island in the altitude region 120 to 200 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, H. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    Five Nike Apache rockets, each including an energetic particle spectrometer and an electron density-electron temperature experiment, have been launched from Wallops Island (L = 2.6) near midnight under varying geomagnetic conditions. On the most recent of these (5 January 1978) an additional spectrometer with a broom magnet, and a 391.4 nm photometer were flown. The data from this flight indicate that the energetic particle flux consists predominantly of protons, neutral hydrogen and possibly other energetic nuclei. The energy spectrum becomes much softer and the flux more intense with increasing Kp for 10-100 keV. The pitch angle distribution at 180 km is asymmetrical with a peak at 90 deg indicating that the majority of particles are near their mirroring altitude. Ionization rates are calculated based on the measured energy spectrum and mirror height distribution. The resulting ionization rate profile is found to be nearly constant with altitude in the region 120 to 200 km. The measured energetic particle flux and calculated ionization rate from the five flights are found to vary with magnetic activity (based on the Kp and Dst indexes) in the same way as the independently derived ionization rates deduced from the electron density profile.

  1. Using Deception to Establish a Reproducible Improvement in 4-Km Cycling Time Trial Performance.

    PubMed

    Shei, R-J; Thompson, K; Chapman, R; Raglin, J; Mickleborough, T

    2016-05-01

    We investigated whether performance gains achieved with deception persisted after the deception was revealed, and whether pacing strategy changed. 14 trained cyclists completed 4 simulated 4-km time trials (TT) on a cycle ergometer comprising familiarization and baseline trials (BAS), followed by "unaware" (of deception, UAW) and "aware" (of deception, AW) trials on separate days. In the UAW trial, participants competed against an on-screen avatar set at 102% of their baseline trial mean power output (Pmean) believing it was set at 100% of BAS Pmean. 24 h prior to the AW trial, participants were informed of the deception in the UAW trial. 4 participants did not improve in the UAW trial compared to BAS. 10 participants improved time to completion (TTC) and Pmean in the UAW and AW trials compared to BAS (p<0.03) with no significant differences between UAW and AW (p=1.0). Pacing strategy (at 0.5-km intervals) and RPE responses were unchanged (p>0.05) for these participants. In summary, deception did not improve performance in all participants. However, participants whose time trial performance improved following deception could retain their performance gains once the deception was revealed, demonstrating a similar pacing strategy and RPE response.

  2. The Effect of Cycling Cadence on Subsequent 10km Running Performance in Well-Trained Triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Tew, Garry

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of different pedalling cadences on the performance of a subsequent 10km treadmill run. Eight male triathletes (age 38.9 ± 15.4 years, body mass 72.2 ± 5.2 kg, and stature 176 ± 6 cm; mean ± SD) completed a maximal cycling test, one isolated run (10km), and then three randomly ordered cycle-run sessions (65 minutes cycling + 10km run). During the cycling bout of the cycle-run sessions, subjects cycled at an intensity corresponding to 70% Pmax while maintaining one of three cadences, corresponding to preferred cadence (PC), PC+15% (fast cadence) and PC-15% (slow cadence). Slow, preferred and fast cadences were 71.8 ± 3.0, 84.5 ± 3.6, and 97.3 ± 4.3 rpm, respectively (mean ± SD). Physiological variables measured during the cycle-run and isolated run sessions were VO2, VE, RER, HR, RPE, and blood lactate. Biomechanical variables measured during the cycle-run and isolated run sessions were running velocity, stride length, stride frequency, and hip and knee angles at foot-strike and toe-off. Running performance times were also recorded. A significant effect of prior cycling exercise was found on 10km running time (p = 0.001) without any cadence effect (p = 0.801, ω2 = 0.006) (49:58 ± 8:20, 49:09 ± 8:26, 49:28 ± 8:09, and 44:45 ± 6:27 min·s-1 for the slow, preferred, fast, and isolated run conditions, respectively; mean ± SD). However, during the first 500 m of the run, running velocity was significantly higher after cycling at the preferred and fast cadences than after the slow cadence (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the slow cadence condition was associated with a significantly lower HR (p = 0.012) and VE (p = 0.026) during cycling than in the fast cadence condition. The results confirm the deterioration in running performance completed after the cycling event compared with the isolated run. However, no significant effect of cycling cadence on running performance was observed within the cadence ranges usually used

  3. A BOTDA with break interrogation function over 72 km sensing length.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junhui; Zhang, Xuping; Yao, Yuguo; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2013-01-14

    A BOTDA with the capacity of break interrogation is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. In our configuration, coherent detection and double sideband probe method are employed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to effectively reduce nonlocal effects, respectively. Without amplification, a 72 km sensing range with 5-meter resolution and an estimated temperature uncertainty of 1.8 °C are obtained. Benefiting from the flexible optical configuration, this sensor system has the capacity of break interrogation as a coherent optical time domain reflectometry (COTDR) if there is a break in the fiber under test (FUT). The sensor achieves a dynamic range of 36 dB with a 100 m spatial resolution, which offers an excellent solution for the requisite of two-end-access in BOTDA, and significantly enhances the robustness of the sensing system.

  4. 100G Deployment@(DE-KIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, Bruno; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has been involved fairly early in 100GE network technology. Initiated by DFN1 (the German NREN), a first 100GE wide area network testbed over a distance of approx. 450 km was deployed between the national research organizations KIT and FZ-Jülich in 2010. Three years later in 2013. KIT joined the Caltech SuperComputing 2013 (SC132) 100GE "show floor" initiative using the transatlantic ANA-100GE link to transfer LHC data from a storage at DE-KIT (GridKa) in Europe to hard disks at the show floor of SC13 in Denver (USA). The network infrastructure of KIT as well as of the German Tier-1 installation DE-KIT (GridKa). however. is still based on 10Gbps. As highlighted in the contribution "Status and Trends in Networking at LHC Tier1 Facilities" to CHEP 2012. proactive investment is required at the Tier-1 sites. Bandwidth requirements will grow beyond current capacity and the required upgrades are expected in 2015. In close cooperation with DFN. KIT drives the upgrade from 10GE to 100GE. The process is divided into several phases. due to upgrade costs and differing requirements in different parts of the network infrastructure. The requirements of the different phases as well as the planned topology will be described. Some of the obstacles we discovered during the deployment will be discussed and solutions or workarounds presented.

  5. File Specification for the 7-km GEOS-5 Nature Run, Ganymed Release Non-Hydrostatic 7-km Global Mesoscale Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    da Silva, Arlindo M.; Putman, William; Nattala, J.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the gridded output files produced by a two-year global, non-hydrostatic mesoscale simulation for the period 2005-2006 produced with the non-hydrostatic version of GEOS-5 Atmospheric Global Climate Model (AGCM). In addition to standard meteorological parameters (wind, temperature, moisture, surface pressure), this simulation includes 15 aerosol tracers (dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black and organic carbon), O3, CO and CO2. This model simulation is driven by prescribed sea-surface temperature and sea-ice, daily volcanic and biomass burning emissions, as well as high-resolution inventories of anthropogenic sources. A description of the GEOS-5 model configuration used for this simulation can be found in Putman et al. (2014). The simulation is performed at a horizontal resolution of 7 km using a cubed-sphere horizontal grid with 72 vertical levels, extending up to to 0.01 hPa (approximately 80 km). For user convenience, all data products are generated on two logically rectangular longitude-latitude grids: a full-resolution 0.0625 deg grid that approximately matches the native cubed-sphere resolution, and another 0.5 deg reduced-resolution grid. The majority of the full-resolution data products are instantaneous with some fields being time-averaged. The reduced-resolution datasets are mostly time-averaged, with some fields being instantaneous. Hourly data intervals are used for the reduced-resolution datasets, while 30-minute intervals are used for the full-resolution products. All full-resolution output is on the model's native 72-layer hybrid sigma-pressure vertical grid, while the reduced-resolution output is given on native vertical levels and on 48 pressure surfaces extending up to 0.02 hPa. Section 4 presents additional details on horizontal and vertical grids. Information of the model surface representation can be found in Appendix B. The GEOS-5 product is organized into file collections that are described in detail in Appendix C. Additional

  6. Kinematics of the New Zealand plate boundary: Relative motion by GPS across networks of 1000 km and 50 km spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meertens, Charles M.; Rocken, Christian; Perin, Barbara; Walcott, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/DOSE 'Kinematics of the New Zealand Plate Boundary' experiment is a four-year cooperative Global Positioning System (GPS) experiment involving 6 universities and institutions in New Zealand and the United States. The investigation covers two scales, the first on the scale of plates (approximately 1000 km) and the second is on the scale of the plate boundary zone (approximately 50 km). In the first portion of the experiment, phase A, the objective is to make direct measurements of tectonic plate motion between the Australian and Pacific plates using GPS in order to determine the Euler vector of this plate pair. The phase A portion of this experiment was initiated in December 1992 with the first-epoch baseline measurements on the large scale network. The network will be resurveyed two years later to obtain velocities. The stations which were observed for phase A are shown and listed. Additional regional stations which will be used for this study are listed and are part of either CIGNET or other global tracking networks. The phase A portion of the experiment is primarily the responsibility of the UNAVCO investigators. Therefore, this report concentrates on phase A. The first year of NASA funding for phase A included only support for the field work. Processing and analysis will take place with the second year of funding. The second part of the experiemnt measured relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates across the pate boundary zone between Hokitika and Christchurch on the South Island of New Zealand. The extent and rate of deformation will be determined by comparisons with historical, conventional surveys and by repeated GPS measurements to be made in two years. This activity was the emphasis of the LDGO portion of the study. An ancillary experiment, phase C, concentrated on plate boundary deformation in the vicinity of Wellington and was done as part of training during the early portion of the field campaign. Details of the objectives of the

  7. Gravitational dynamics in s+1+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, László Á.; Kovács, Zoltán

    2005-09-01

    We present the concomitant decomposition of an (s+2)-dimensional space-time both with respect to a timelike and a spacelike direction. The formalism we develop is suited for the study of the initial value problem and for canonical gravitational dynamics in braneworld scenarios. The bulk metric is replaced by two sets of variables. The first set consists of one tensorial (the induced metric gij), one vectorial (Mi) and one scalar (M) dynamical quantity, all defined on the s space. Their time evolutions are related to the second fundamental form (the extrinsic curvature Kij), the normal fundamental form (Ki) and normal fundamental scalar (K), respectively. The nondynamical set of variables is given by the lapse function and the shift vector, which however has one component less. The missing component is due to the externally imposed constraint, which states that physical trajectories are confined to the (s+1)-dimensional brane. The pair of dynamical variables (gij, Kij), well known from the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner decomposition is supplemented by the pairs (Mi, Ki) and (M, K) due to the bulk curvature. We give all projections of the junction condition across the brane and prove that for a perfect fluid brane neither of the dynamical variables has jump across the brane. Finally we complete the set of equations needed for gravitational dynamics by deriving the evolution equations of Kij, Ki and K on a brane with arbitrary matter.

  8. Outgassing and chemical evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Vervack, Ronald J.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Cochran, Anita; McKay, Adam J.; Harris, Walter M.; Weaver, Harold A.; Lisse, Carey M.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Biver, Nicolas; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Crovisier, Jacques; Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (λ/Δλ ~ 25,000) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on UT 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC at the W. M. Keck Observatory, and UT 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL at the NASA IRTF. H2O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing by about a factor of 40 between October 26 (Rh = 1.12 AU) and November 20 (Rh = 0.43 AU). Short-term variability of H2O was also seen as the production rate increased by nearly a factor of two during observations obtained over a period of about six hours on November 19. C2H6, CH3OH and CH4 abundances were slightly depleted relative to H2O in ISON compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C2H2, HCN and OCS abundances relative to H2O appear to be close to the range of mean values, whereas H2CO and NH3 were significantly enhanced. We will compare derived chemical abundances in ISON to other comets measured with infrared spectroscopy.

  9. Will Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) Survive Perihelion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2013-10-01

    On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ~200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm-3 are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm-3, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

  10. Observing Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) With the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Bauer, J. M.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Kelley, M. S.; Knight, M. M.; Li, J.; Hines, D. C.; Reach, W. T.; Sitko, M.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Meech, K. J.; Rayner, J.

    2013-12-01

    In this talk we discuss the design, implementation, and reduction of observations of Comet ISON from space using the Spitzer Space Telescope on 13.00 - 23.12 Jun UT and from the ground at Lowell Observatory on Jun 11.16 UT and from APO on 14.13 Jun UT. The comet was at distance r_h = 3.34 AU from the Sun, distance Δ_Spitzer = 3.29 AU and 17.4 deg phase from SST, and distance Δ_Earth = 4.25 AU and 6.8 - 7.3 deg phase at the time of observation. Preliminary analyses show ISON's Spitzer coma morphology was relatively compact and simple, with a linear anti-solar dust tail > 3x10**5 km in length and a 1/p profile gas coma extending > 10**5 km from the nucleus. Afp values in an 18,200 km radius aperture of 840, 890, and 840 × 80 cm were found at VRI, and 650 × 100 cm were found at 3.6 micron. Together, the ground-based and Spitzer photometry imply near-neutral dust scattering from the visual through the infrared. An excess at 4.5 μm due to emission from a neutral gas coma is clearly found both morphologically and photometrically. The gas coma total flux and spatial profile and ISON's discovery distance imply a coma dominated by the stronger CO_2 line emission at 4.67 μm, but we cannot rule out a preponderance of CO emission at 4.26 μm. No variability in our Spitzer photometry at the 0.03 mag level over 24 hrs was seen. We present our imagery, spectrophotometry, and lightcurves, and discuss the physical implications of these observations of the comet made well outside the water ice line.

  11. A high resolution (1 km) groundwater model for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Verkaik, Jarno; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Rens; Erkens, Gilles; Bierkens, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater is important in many parts of Indonesia. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and industrial activities. During times of drought, it sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus support ecosystem habitat and biodiversity as well as preventing hazardous forest fire. Besides its importance, groundwater is known as a vulnerable resource as unsustainable groundwater exploitation and management occurs in many areas of the country. Therefore, in order to ensure sustainable management of groundwater resources, monitoring and predicting groundwater changes in Indonesia are imperative. However, large extent groundwater models to assess these changes on a regional scale are almost non-existent and are hampered by the strong topographical and lithological transitions that characterize Indonesia. In this study, we built an 1 km resolution groundwater model for the entire Indonesian archipelago (total inland area: about 2 million km2). We adopted the approaches of Sutanudjaja et al. (2011, 2014a) and de Graaf et al. (2014) in order to make a MODFLOW (Harbaugh et al., 2000) groundwater model by using only global datasets. Aquifer schematization and properties of the groundwater model were developed from available global lithological maps (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2011; Hartmann & Moorsdorf, 2012; Gleeson et al., 2014). We forced the groundwater model with the recent output of global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB version 2.0 (Sutanudjaja et al., 2014b; van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term average of groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from channel discharge. Simulation results were promising. The MODFLOW model converged with realistic aquifer properties (i.e. transmissivities) and produced reasonable groundwater head spatial distribution reflecting the positions of major groundwater bodies and surface water bodies in the country. In Vienna, we aim to show and demonstrate these

  12. Processing techniques for global land 1-km AVHRR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Steinwand, Daniel R.; Wivell, Charles E.; Hollaren, Douglas M.; Meyer, David

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center (EDC) in cooperation with several international science organizations has developed techniques for processing daily Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) 1-km data of the entire global land surface. These techniques include orbital stitching, geometric rectification, radiometric calibration, and atmospheric correction. An orbital stitching algorithm was developed to combine consecutive observations acquired along an orbit by ground receiving stations into contiguous half-orbital segments. The geometric rectification process uses an AVHRR satellite model that contains modules for forward mapping, forward terrain correction, and inverse mapping with terrain correction. The correction is accomplished by using the hydrologic features coastlines and lakes from the Digital Chart of the World. These features are rasterized into the satellite projection and are matched to the AVHRR imagery using binary edge correlation techniques. The resulting coefficients are related to six attitude correction parameters: roll, roll rate, pitch, pitch rate, yaw, and altitude. The image can then be precision corrected to a variety of map projections and user-selected image frames. Because the AVHRR lacks onboard calibration for the optical wavelengths, a series of time-variant calibration coefficients derived from vicarious calibration methods and are used to model the degradation profile of the instruments. Reducing atmospheric effects on AVHRR data is important. A method has been develop that will remove the effects of molecular scattering and absorption from clear sky observations, using climatological measurements of ozone. Other methods to remove the effects of water vapor and aerosols are being investigated.

  13. Gastrointestinal distress is common during a 161-km ultramarathon.

    PubMed

    Stuempfle, Kristin Jean; Hoffman, Martin Dean

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the incidence, severity, and timing of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in finishers and non-finishers of the 161-km Western States Endurance Run. A total of 272 runners (71.0% of starters) completed a post-race questionnaire that assessed the incidence and severity (none = 0, mild = 1, moderate = 2, severe = 3, very severe = 4) of 12 upper (reflux/heartburn, belching, stomach bloating, stomach cramps/pain, nausea, vomiting) and lower (intestinal cramps/pain, flatulence, side ache/stitch, urge to defecate, loose stool/diarrhoea, intestinal bleeding/bloody faeces) GI symptoms experienced during each of four race segments. GI symptoms were experienced by most runners (96.0%). Flatulence (65.9% frequency, mean value 1.0, s = 0.6 severity), belching (61.3% frequency, mean value 1.0, s = 0.6 severity), and nausea (60.3% frequency, mean value 1.0, s = 0.7 severity) were the most common symptoms. Among race finishers, 43.9% reported that GI symptoms affected their race performance, with nausea being the most common symptom (86.0%). Among race non-finishers, 35.6% reported that GI symptoms were a reason for dropping out of the race, with nausea being the most common symptom (90.5%). For both finishers and non-finishers, nausea was greatest during the most challenging and hottest part of the race. GI symptoms are very common during ultramarathon running, and in particular, nausea is the most common complaint for finishers and non-finishers. PMID:25716739

  14. Estimation of Land Surface Temperature from 1-km AVHRR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    In order to re-process DLRs 1km AVHRR data archive to different geophysical and descriptive parameters of the land surface and the atmosphere, a series of scientific data processors are being developed in the framework of the TIMELINE project. The archive of DLR ranges back to the 80ies. One of the data processors is SurfTemp, which processes L2 LST and emissivity datasets from AVHRR L1b data. The development of the data processor included the selection of statistical procedures suitable for time series processing, including four mono-window and six split window algorithms. For almost all of these algorithms, new constants were generated, which better account for different atmospheric and geometric acquisition situations. The selection of optimal algorithms for SurfTemp is based on a round robin approach, in which the selected mono-window and split window algorithms are tested on the basis of a large number of TOA radiance/LST pairs, which were generated using a radiative transfer model and the SeeBorV5 profile database. The original LSTs are thereby compared to the LSTs derived from the TOA radiances using the mono- and split window algorithms. The algorithm comparison includes measures of precision, as well as the sensitivity of a method to the accuracy of its input data. The results of the round robin are presented, as well as the implementation of selected algorithms into SurfTemp. Further, first cross-validation results between the AVHRR LST and MODIS LST are shown.

  15. Genome sequence of Oceanobacillus picturae strain S1, an halophilic bacterium first isolated in human gut.

    PubMed

    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Khelaifia, Saber; Azhar, Esam Ibraheem; Croce, Olivier; Bibi, Fehmida; Jiman-Fatani, Asif Ahmad; Yasir, Muhammad; Helaby, Huda Ben; Robert, Catherine; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Oceanobacillus picturae is a strain of a moderately halophilic bacterium, first isolated from a mural painting. We demonstrate, for the first time, the culture of human Oceanobacillus picturae, strain S1(T), whose genome is described here, from a stool sample collected from a 25-year-old Saoudian healthy individual. We used a slightly modified standard culture medium adding 100 g/L of NaCl. We provide a short description of this strain including its MALDI-TOF spectrum, the main identification tool currently used in clinical microbiology. The 3,675,175 bp long genome exhibits a G + C content of 39.15 % and contains 3666 protein-coding and 157 RNA genes. The draft genome sequence of Oceanobacillus picturae has a similar size to the Oceanobacillus kimchii (respectively 3.67 Mb versus 3.83 Mb). The G + C content was higher compared with Oceanobacillus kimchii (respectively 39.15 % and 35.2 %). Oceanobacillus picturae shared almost identical number of genes (3823 genes versus 3879 genes), with a similar ratio of genes per Mb (1041 genes/Mb versus 1012 genes/Mb). The genome sequencing of Oceanobacillus picturae strain S1 isolated for the first time in a human, will be added to the 778 genome projects from the gastrointestinal tract listed by the international consortium Human Microbiome Project.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and N-acetylation metabolism of S-methyl-l-cysteine and trans-S-1-propenyl-l-cysteine in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hirotaka; Kazamori, Daichi; Itoh, Kenji

    2016-11-01

    1. Pharmacokinetics and N-acetylation metabolism of S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMC) and trans-S-1-propenyl-L-cysteine (S1PC) were examined in rats and dogs. SMC and S1PC (2-5 mg/kg) were well absorbed in both species with high bioavailability (88-100%). 2. SMC and S1PC were excreted only to a small extent in the urine of rats and dogs. The small renal clearance values (<0.03 l/h/kg) indicated the extensive renal reabsorption of SMC and S1PC, which potentially contributed to their long elimination half-lives (>5 h) in dogs. 3. S1PC, but not SMC, underwent N-acetylation extensively in vivo, which can be explained by the relative activities of N-acetylation of S1PC/SMC and deacetylation of their N-acetylated forms, N-acetyl-S1PC/N-acetyl-SMC, in the liver and kidney in vitro. The activities for S1PC N-acetylation were similar to or higher than those for N-acetyl-S1PC deacetylation in liver S9 fractions of rat and dog, whereas liver and kidney S9 fractions of rat and dog had little activity for SMC N-acetylation or considerably higher activities for N-acetyl-SMC deacetylation. 4. Our study demonstrated that the pharmacokinetics of SMC and S1PC in rats and dogs was characterized by high bioavailability and extensive renal reabsorption; however, the extent of undergoing the N-acetylation metabolism was extremely different between SMC and S1PC. PMID:26887651

  17. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Receptor Agonists Mediate Pro-fibrotic Responses in Normal Human Lung Fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 Receptors and Smad-independent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-β1. In contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-β1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-β1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-β1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways. PMID:23589284

  18. Phase 1 study on S-1 and oxaliplatin therapy as an adjuvant after hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Michiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Oba, Masaru; Saiura, Akio; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Shinozaki, Eiji; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-08-01

    of Background Data The effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer has been confirmed in various studies. However, no adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastasis (CLM) classified to stage IV has been established. Objectives We conducted a phase 1 study of S-1 and oxaliplatin to determine the recommended dose (RD) in patients with CLM as adjuvant therapy in two institutes. Methods S-1 and oxaliplatin were administered from day 1 to day 14 of a 3-week cycle as a 2-h infusion every 3 weeks, respectively. The initial doses of S-1 and oxaliplatin were fixed to 80 mg/m(2) and 100 mg/m(2), respectively (level 1). We scheduled in the protocol a dose change of S-1 and oxaliplatin to level 2 (S-1: 80 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 130 mg/m(2)) or level 0 (S-1: 65 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin: 100 mg/m(2)) depending on the incidence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at level 1 in six patients. Results Because DLT occurred in one among the initial six patients at level 1, the doses were increased to level 2 in the next six patients. At level 2, grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia occurred in one (16.7 %) and two (33.3 %) patients, respectively, in the absence of non-hematological event. Because no DLT occurred at level 2, we suggest that the RD can be set to the level 2 dose. The median number of cycles delivered at RD was 8. The mean relative dose intensity of S-1 and oxaliplatin at RD was 0.90 and 0.63, respectively. Conclusion In a patient undergoing hepatectomy for CLM, 80 mg/m(2) of S-1 and 130 mg/m(2) of oxaliplatin are recommended as adjuvant therapy. A further study is required to confirm the efficacy and safety of this regimen on a larger scale.

  19. The modelled surface mass balance of the Antarctic Peninsula at 5.5 km horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wessem, J. M.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; Reijmer, C. H.; van de Berg, W. J.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Barrand, N. E.; Thomas, E. R.; Turner, J.; Wuite, J.; Scambos, T. A.; van Meijgaard, E.

    2015-09-01

    This study presents a high-resolution (~ 5.5 km) estimate of Surface Mass Balance (SMB) over the period 1979-2014 for the Antarctic Peninsula (AP), generated by the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2.3 and a Firn Densification Model (FDM). RACMO2.3 is used to force the FDM, which calculates processes in the snowpack, such as meltwater percolation, refreezing and runoff. We evaluate model output with 132 in-situ SMB observations and discharge rates from 6 glacier drainage basins, and find that the model realistically simulates the strong spatial variability in precipitation, but that significant biases remain as a result of the highly complex topography of the AP. It is also clear that the observations significantly underrepresent the high-accumulation regimes. The SMB map reveals large accumulation gradients, with precipitation values above 3000 mm we yr-1 over the western AP (WAP) and below 500 mm we yr-1 on the eastern AP (EAP), not resolved by coarser data-sets such as ERA-Interim. The other SMB components are one order of magnitude smaller, with drifting snow sublimation the largest ablation term removing up to 100 mm we yr-1 of mass. Snowmelt is widespread over the AP, reaching 500 mm we yr-1 towards the northern ice shelves, but the meltwater mostly refreezes. As a result runoff fluxes are low, but still considerable (200 mm we yr-1) over the Larsen (B/C), Wilkins and George VI ice shelves. The average AP ice sheet integrated SMB, including ice shelves (an area of 4.1 × 105 km2), is estimated at 351 Gt yr-1 with an interannual variability of 58 Gt yr-1, which is dominated by precipitation (PR) (365 ± 57 Gt yr-1). The WAP (2.4 × 105 km2) SMB (276 ± 47 Gt yr-1), where PR is large (276 ± 47 Gt yr-1), dominates over the EAP (1.7 × 105 km2) SMB (75 ± 11 Gt yr-1) and PR (84 ± 11 Gt yr-1). Total sublimation is 11 ± 2 Gt yr-1 and meltwater runoff into the ocean is 4 ± 4 Gt yr-1. There are no significant trends in any of the AP SMB components, except

  20. The turbomachine blading design using S2-S1 approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, T. S.; Bencherif, L.; Viney, B.; Duc, J. M. Nguyen

    1991-01-01

    The boundary conditions corresponding to the design problem when the blades being simulated by the bound vorticity distribution are presented. The 3D flow is analyzed by the two steps S2 - S1 approach. In the first step, the number of blades is supposed to be infinite, the vortex distribution is transformed into an axisymmetric one, so that the flow field can be analyzed in a meridional plane. The thickness distribution of the blade producing the flow channel striction is taken into account by the modification of metric tensor in the continuity equation. Using the meridional stream function to define the flow field, the mass conservation is satisfied automatically. The governing equation is deduced from the relation between the azimuthal component of the vorticity and the meridional velocity. The value of the azimuthal component of the vorticity is provided by the hub to shroud equilibrium condition. This step leads to the determination of the axisymmetric stream sheets as well as the approximate camber surface of the blade. In the second step, the finite number of blades is taken into account, the inverse problem corresponding to the blade to blade flow confined in each stream sheet is analyzed. The momentum equation implies that the free vortex of the absolute velocity must be tangential to the stream sheet. The governing equation for the blade to blade flow stream function is deduced from this condition. At the beginning, the upper and the lower surfaces of the blades are created from the camber surface obtained from the first step with the assigned thickness distribution. The bound vorticity distribution and the penetrating flux conservation applied on the presumed blade surface constitute the boundary conditions of the inverse problem. The detection of this flux leads to the rectification of the geometry of the blades.

  1. Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ΛN spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the Σ+p(3S1,T = 3/2)- and ΣN(1S0,T = 1/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

  2. Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2010-10-01

    We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ΛN spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the Σ+p(3S1, T = 3/2)- and ΣN(1S0,T = l/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

  3. WILL COMET ISON (C/2012 S1) SURVIVE PERIHELION?

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Matthew M.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2013-10-10

    On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ∼200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm{sup –3} are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm{sup –3}, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

  4. Electron-impact excitation of the Rb 7 2S1/2, 8 2S1/2, 5 2D3/2, and 6 2D3/2 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zuyi; Flynn, Connor; Redd, Aaron; Stumpf, Bernhard

    1993-03-01

    Electron-impact cross sections for excitation of the 7 2S1/2, 8 2S1/2, 5 2D3/2, and 6 2D3/2 states of rubidium have been measured from threshold to 1000 eV. The optical-excitation-function method has been employed in a crossed atom- and electron-beam apparatus. Relative, total (cascade including) experimental cross sections are made absolute by comparison with the known total cross section of the Rb D1 line. Total excitation cross sections are compared with theoretical calculations employing first Born approximation and theoretical branching ratios. Born cross sections for the 7 2S1/2 and 8 2S1/2 states are obtained from the literature, while Born cross sections for the 5 2D3/2, 6 2D3/2, and all cascading states are calculated in this paper. At high energies, the measured total 2D3/2 state cross sections show 1/E behavior and converge to first Born theory; for E>100 eV, experiment and theory agree within 6.7% for 5 2D3/2 and within 3.7% for 6 2D3/2. The total cross sections for the 2S1/2 states do not converge to Born theory even at 1000 eV, and it is shown that this cannot be attributed to cascading. At low energies, 2S1/2 and 2D3/2 state total excitation cross sections have similar shapes with sharply peaked maxima at about 0.9 eV above threshold. After cascading is corrected using first Born theory, estimated experimental cross sections for direct excitation of higher fine-structure states of rubidium are given.

  5. The isolated ˜680 km deep 30 May 2015 MW 7.9 Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lingling; Lay, Thorne; Zhan, Zhongwen; Kanamori, Hiroo; Hao, Jin-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Deep-focus earthquakes, located in very high-pressure conditions 300 to 700 km below the Earth's surface within sinking slabs of relatively cold oceanic lithosphere, are mysterious phenomena. The largest recorded deep-focus earthquake (MW 7.9) in the Izu-Bonin slab struck on 30 May 2015 beneath the Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, isolated from prior seismicity by over 100 km in depth, and followed by only a few small aftershocks. Globally, this is the deepest (680 km centroid depth) event with MW ≥ 7.8 in the seismological record. Seismicity indicates along-strike contortion of the Izu-Bonin slab, with horizontal flattening near a depth of 550 km in the Izu region and rapid steepening to near-vertical toward the south above the location of the 2015 event. This event was exceptionally well-recorded by seismic stations around the world, allowing detailed constraints to be placed on the source process. Analyses of a large global data set of P, SH and pP seismic phases using short-period back-projection, subevent directivity, and broadband finite-fault inversion indicate that the mainshock ruptured a shallowly-dipping fault plane with patchy slip that spread over a distance of ˜40 km with a multi-stage expansion rate (˜ 5 + km /s down-dip initially, ˜3 km/s up-dip later). During the 17 s total rupture duration the radiated energy was ˜ 3.3 ×1016 J and the stress drop was ˜38 MPa. The radiation efficiency is moderate (0.34), intermediate to that of the 1994 Bolivia and 2013 Sea of Okhotsk MW 8.3 deep earthquakes, indicating that source processes of very large deep earthquakes sample a wide range of behavior from dissipative, more viscous failure to very brittle failure. The isolated occurrence of the event, much deeper than the apparently thermally-bounded distribution of Bonin-slab seismicity above 600 km depth, suggests that localized stress concentration associated with the pronounced deformation of the Izu-Bonin slab and proximity to the 660-km phase transition

  6. Multiple broadly synchronous km-scale exhumation episodes on different continents: implications for controlling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul; Duddy, Ian; Japsen, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Numerous low temperature thermochronology studies have defined regional cooling episodes which imply removal of several km of section over areas of several 104 km2. The origin of such events has long been the subject of debate, while their reality has sometimes been questioned because of the lack of a viable mechanism. Kilometre-scale denudation at rifted margins has traditionally been interpreted as related to rifting and breakup, magnified by the flexural response to denudation of the uplifted rift flanks. But it is now clear that at many margins the post-breakup history is more complex, with km-scale uplift and erosion commonly post-dating breakup by 10s of Myr and often affecting regions many 100s of kilometres inland of the margins (Green et al., 2013; Brown et al., 2014). Numerous examples around the world of km-scale exhumation affecting regions distant from continental margins, including cratonic regions traditionally regarded as stable over Phanerozoic time (e.g. Ault et al., 2009; Flowers & Kelley, 2011), cannot be explained by margin-related mechanisms. It has also become clear that periods of exhumation are separated by episodes of burial, defining a series of positive and negative vertical movements. Previous studies have defined a broad synchroneity of Early, Middle and Late Cenozoic exhumation events in regions from Alaska to Greenland, Norway and Svalbard (Green and Duddy, 2010). New results from SE Australia define a series of exhumation episodes ranging in time from Carboniferous to Cenozoic which are broadly synchronous with similar events previously defined in Brazil and South Africa (Green et al. 2013). While estimates of the timing of exhumation in different areas are subject to some uncertainty, data across three southern hemisphere continents show a broad synchronicity in similar fashion to the northern hemisphere examples cited above. Dynamic topography has been invoked as a possible mechanism for producing uplift, the effects of which

  7. 112 Gb/s PM-QPSK transmission up to 6000 km with 200 km amplifier spacing and a hybrid fiber span configuration.

    PubMed

    Downie, John D; Hurley, Jason; Cartledge, John; Bickham, Scott; Mishra, Snigdharaj

    2011-12-12

    We demonstrate transmission of 112 Gb/s PM-QPSK signals over a system with 200 km span lengths. Amplification is provided by hybrid backward-pumped Raman/EDFA amplifiers and reach lengths up to 6000 km for an 8 channel system and 5400 km for a 32 channel system are shown. As a means of maximizing OSNR, a simple hybrid fiber span configuration is used that combines two ultra-low loss fibers, one having very large effective area.

  8. Development of Activity in Comet C/2012 S1 ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, K. J.; Yang, B.; Keane, J.; Ansdell, M.; Riesen, T.; Kleyna, J.; Hsieh, H.; Mottola, S.; Kuhrt, E.; Chiang, H.; Reipurth, B.; Michaud, P.; Rector, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 ISON obtained immediately after discovery (22 Sep. 2012; r = 6.28 AU) until moving into solar conjunction in mid-June 2013 using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, and the VYSOS-5 and VYSOS-20 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawai'i. An additional pre-discovery data point from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 28 Jan. 2012 (r = 8.4 AU). The images showed similar tail morphology throughout this period, largely because of projection effects. Additional observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 9 March (r = 4.52 AU) and 16 June 2013 (r = 3.35 AU) were used to search for CO J(3-2), CO J(2-1), HCN J(4-3), and HCN J(3-2) rotation lines. No gas was detected, with preliminary upper limits for CO during 14-15 June (r = 3.3 AU) of Q < 6.4 x 10^27 molec/s based on the observations of the CO J(2-1) line. Using these production rates, the Q(H2O) published by Schleicher (2013; IAUC 9254), and the preliminary radius from the HST measurements (J.-Y. Li et al., 2013; STScI-2013-14) we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO or CO2; at these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. Without more sensitive limits on CO, we cannot yet constrain which of these volatiles is controlling the activity. It is clear from the photometric light curve that the fractional active area of the nucleus increased linearly by about a factor of 2 from Jan. 2012 until mid Jan. 2013 (r ~ 5 AU) at which point the activity decreased by 30% by early May 2013. We will discuss these models and data obtained from Mauna Kea after the comet comes out of solar conjunction in late August 2013. Our team has a comprehensive plan of observation to look at the evolution of activity as the comet goes

  9. Development of Activity in Comet C/2012 S1 ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, Karen J.; Yang, B.; Keane, J. V.; Ansdell, M.; Riesen, T. E.; Kleyna, J.; Hsieh, H.; Mottola, S.; Kuehrt, E.; Chiang, H.; Reipurth, B.; Milani, G.; Bryssinck, E.; Michaud, P.; Rector, T.

    2013-10-01

    We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 ISON obtained immediately after discovery (22 Sep. 2012; r = 6.28 AU) until moving into solar conjunction in mid-June 2013 using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, and the VYSOS-5 and VYSOS-20 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawai’i. An additional pre-discovery data point from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 28 Jan. 2012 (r = 8.4 AU). The images showed similar tail morphology throughout this period, largely because of projection effects. Additional observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 9 March (r = 4.52 AU) and 16 June 2013 (r = 3.35 AU) were used to search for CO J(3-2), CO J(2-1), HCN J(4-3), and HCN J(3-2) rotation lines. No gas was detected, with preliminary upper limits for CO during 14-15 June (r = 3.3 AU) of Q < 6.4 x 10^27 molec/s based on the observations of the CO J(2-1) line. Using these production rates, the Q(H2O) published by Schleicher (2013; IAUC 9254), and the preliminary radius from the HST measurements (J.-Y. Li et al., 2013; STScI-2013-14) we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO or CO2; at these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. Without more sensitive limits on CO, we cannot yet constrain which of these volatiles is controlling the activity. It is clear from the photometric light curve that the fractional active area of the nucleus increased linearly by about a factor of 2 from Jan. 2012 until mid Jan. 2013 (r ~ 5 AU) at which point the activity decreased by 30% by early May 2013. This suggests that a limited supply of volatile material was driving the current activity.

  10. The influence of sex, age, and race experience on pacing profiles during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Magnus; Assarsson, Hannes; Carlsson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pacing-profile differences during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race related to the categories of sex, age, and race experience. Skiing times from eight sections (S1 to S8) were analyzed. For each of the three categories, 400 pairs of skiers were matched to have a finish time within 60 seconds, the same start group, and an assignment to the same group for the other two categories. Paired-samples Student's t-tests were used to investigate sectional pacing-profile differences between the subgroups. Results showed that males skied faster in S2 (P=0.0042), S3 (P=0.0049), S4 (P=0.010), and S1-S4 (P<0.001), whereas females skied faster in S6 (P<0.001), S7 (P<0.001), S8 (P=0.0088), and S5-S8 (P<0.001). For the age category, old subjects (40 to 59 years) skied faster than young subjects (19 to 39 years) in S3 (P=0.0029), and for the other sections, there were no differences. Experienced subjects (≥4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) skied faster in S1 (P<0.001) and S1-S4 (P=0.0054); inexperienced skiers (<4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) had a shorter mean skiing time in S5-S8 (P=0.0063). In conclusion, females had a more even pacing profile than that of males with the same finish time, start group, age, and race experience. No clear age-related pacing-profile difference was identified for the matched subgroups. Moreover, experienced skiers skied faster in the first half whereas inexperienced skiers had higher skiing speeds during the second half of the race.

  11. The influence of sex, age, and race experience on pacing profiles during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Magnus; Assarsson, Hannes; Carlsson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pacing-profile differences during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race related to the categories of sex, age, and race experience. Skiing times from eight sections (S1 to S8) were analyzed. For each of the three categories, 400 pairs of skiers were matched to have a finish time within 60 seconds, the same start group, and an assignment to the same group for the other two categories. Paired-samples Student’s t-tests were used to investigate sectional pacing-profile differences between the subgroups. Results showed that males skied faster in S2 (P=0.0042), S3 (P=0.0049), S4 (P=0.010), and S1–S4 (P<0.001), whereas females skied faster in S6 (P<0.001), S7 (P<0.001), S8 (P=0.0088), and S5–S8 (P<0.001). For the age category, old subjects (40 to 59 years) skied faster than young subjects (19 to 39 years) in S3 (P=0.0029), and for the other sections, there were no differences. Experienced subjects (≥4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) skied faster in S1 (P<0.001) and S1–S4 (P=0.0054); inexperienced skiers (<4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) had a shorter mean skiing time in S5–S8 (P=0.0063). In conclusion, females had a more even pacing profile than that of males with the same finish time, start group, age, and race experience. No clear age-related pacing-profile difference was identified for the matched subgroups. Moreover, experienced skiers skied faster in the first half whereas inexperienced skiers had higher skiing speeds during the second half of the race. PMID:26937207

  12. A practical process for the preparation of [32P]S1P and binding assay for S1P receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Adam J.; Liu, Hui; Tu, Zhude

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are important regulators of vascular permeability, inflammation, angiogenesis and vascular maturation. Identifying a specific S1PR PET radioligand is imperative, but it is hindered by the complexity and variability of current for binding affinity measurement procedures. Herein, we report a streamlined protocol for radiosynthesis of [32P]S1P with good radiochemical yield (36 – 50%) and high radiochemical purity (>99%). We also report a reproducible procedure for determining the binding affinity for compounds targeting S1PRs in vitro. PMID:25931137

  13. Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel S1P1 agonist that does not require S1P-like head-group interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of S1P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A S1P1 mutants neither bind S1P nor transduce S1P function. Because S1P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective S1P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating S1P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in S1P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for S1P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of S1P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of S1P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific S1P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for S1P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates S1P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of S1P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635

  14. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  15. Aberrant expression of the S1P regulating enzymes, SPHK1 and SGPL1, contributes to a migratory phenotype in OSCC mediated through S1PR2

    PubMed Central

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Johnson, Steven P.; Lai, Sook Ling; Panja Bernam, Suthashini; Lopes, Victor; Wei, Wenbin; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R.; Herr, Deron R.; Murray, Paul G.; Yap, Lee Fah; Paterson, Ian C.

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease with a 5-year mortality rate of around 50%. Molecular targeted therapies are not in routine use and novel therapeutic targets are required. Our previous microarray data indicated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signalling was deregulated in OSCC. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of S1P signalling to the pathogenesis of OSCC. We show that the expression of the two major enzymes that regulate S1P levels were altered in OSCC: SPHK1 was significantly upregulated in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa and low levels of SGPL1 mRNA correlated with a worse overall survival. In in vitro studies, S1P enhanced the migration/invasion of OSCC cells and attenuated cisplatin-induced death. We also demonstrate that S1P receptor expression is deregulated in primary OSCCs and that S1PR2 is over-expressed in a subset of tumours, which in part mediates S1P-induced migration of OSCC cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that FTY720 induced significantly more apoptosis in OSCC cells compared to non-malignant cells and that FTY720 acted synergistically with cisplatin to induce cell death. Taken together, our data show that S1P signalling promotes tumour aggressiveness in OSCC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27160553

  16. Near infrared rubidium 62P3/2,1/2→62S1/2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Paul J.; Richards, Ryan M.; Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2016-09-01

    An optically pumped near infrared rubidium (Rb) pulsed, mirrorless laser has been demonstrated in a heat pipe along both the 62P3/2-62S1/2 transition at 2.73 μm and the 62P1/2-62S1/2 transition at 2.79 μm. The bleached limit, slope efficiency, and maximum laser output energy of the near infrared Rb laser scale linearly with increasing Rb density, contrary to prior results. Previously, a maximum output energy of ~5 nJ had been observed before a rollover occurred in the scaling of output energy with rubidium concentration. In this experiment, the maximum laser output energy observed was ~100 nJ, with no indication of any scaling limitation. A maximum slope efficiency of 1.7×10-4 was observed. A small percentage of the pump photons were absorbed even at the maximum Rb density attainable in the heat pipe, indicating that laser efficiency could be scaled to near the quantum efficiency. Additionally, the hyperfine structure and absorption spectral profile of the 52S1/2-62P1/2 and 52S1/2-62P3/2 (blue) pump transitions were studied using a cw pump source.

  17. Short-time-scale variability in ventilation and export productivity during the formation of Mediterranean sapropel S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilbert, Tom; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Mason, Paul; de Lange, Gert J.

    High-resolution laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) scanning of laminated sediments from the Urania basin is used to investigate short-time-scale variability in export productivity and redox conditions during the formation of eastern Mediterranean sapropel S1. Sedimentary enrichments of molybdenum (Mo), vanadium (V), and uranium (U) reflect deep-water redox conditions, most likely those near to the seawater-brine interface, while enrichment of Ba is related to biogenic barite and hence to export productivity. The enrichments of all four elements show strong variability on multidecadal to multicentennial time scales throughout S1. A partial decoupling of export productivity from redox conditions at the height of sapropel formation suggests that hydrographic changes, i.e., a variable ventilation rate of the eastern Mediterranean, played an important role in determining deep-water redox conditions. A pronounced switch is observed in the enrichments of redox-sensitive trace metals, from dominantly 300-600 year variability during early S1 to dominantly 100-300 year variability during late S1, indicating a change in the mean frequency of variability in the ventilation rate. The presence of a similar shift in the frequency of tropical and extratropical climate records at this time suggests that ventilation of the eastern Mediterranean was coupled to global climate variability.

  18. Genetic characterization of three qnrS1-harbouring multidrug-resistance plasmids and qnrS1-containing transposons circulating in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Le, Vien; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Cerdeno-Tarraga, Ana; Campbell, James I.; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; Schultsz, Constance; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) refers to a family of closely related genes that confer decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMQR genes are generally associated with integrons and/or plasmids that carry additional antimicrobial resistance genes active against a range of antimicrobials. In Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam, we have previously shown a high frequency of PMQR genes within commensal Enterobacteriaceae. However, there are limited available sequence data detailing the genetic context in which the PMQR genes reside, and a lack of understanding of how these genes spread across the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we aimed to determine the genetic background facilitating the spread and maintenance of qnrS1, the dominant PMQR gene circulating in HCMC. We sequenced three qnrS1-carrying plasmids in their entirety to understand the genetic context of these qnrS1-embedded plasmids and also the association of qnrS1-mediated quinolone resistance with other antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Annotation of the three qnrS1-containing plasmids revealed a qnrS1-containing transposon with a closely related structure. We screened 112 qnrS1-positive commensal Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the community and in a hospital in HCMC to detect the common transposon structure. We found the same transposon structure to be present in 71.4 % (45/63) of qnrS1-positive hospital isolates and in 36.7 % (18/49) of qnrS1-positive isolates from the community. The resulting sequence analysis of the qnrS1 environment suggested that qnrS1 genes are widely distributed and are mobilized on elements with a common genetic background. Our data add additional insight into mechanisms that facilitate resistance to multiple antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria in Vietnam. PMID:26272054

  19. Genetic characterization of three qnrS1-harbouring multidrug-resistance plasmids and qnrS1-containing transposons circulating in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Vien; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Cerdeno-Tarraga, Ana; Campbell, James I; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; Schultsz, Constance; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R; Baker, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) refers to a family of closely related genes that confer decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMQR genes are generally associated with integrons and/or plasmids that carry additional antimicrobial resistance genes active against a range of antimicrobials. In Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam, we have previously shown a high frequency of PMQR genes within commensal Enterobacteriaceae. However, there are limited available sequence data detailing the genetic context in which the PMQR genes reside, and a lack of understanding of how these genes spread across the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we aimed to determine the genetic background facilitating the spread and maintenance of qnrS1, the dominant PMQR gene circulating in HCMC. We sequenced three qnrS1-carrying plasmids in their entirety to understand the genetic context of these qnrS1-embedded plasmids and also the association of qnrS1-mediated quinolone resistance with other antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Annotation of the three qnrS1-containing plasmids revealed a qnrS1-containing transposon with a closely related structure. We screened 112 qnrS1-positive commensal Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the community and in a hospital in HCMC to detect the common transposon structure. We found the same transposon structure to be present in 71.4 % (45/63) of qnrS1-positive hospital isolates and in 36.7 % (18/49) of qnrS1-positive isolates from the community. The resulting sequence analysis of the qnrS1 environment suggested that qnrS1 genes are widely distributed and are mobilized on elements with a common genetic background. Our data add additional insight into mechanisms that facilitate resistance to multiple antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria in Vietnam.

  20. A Prokaryotic S1P Lyase Degrades Extracellular S1P In Vitro and In Vivo: Implication for Treating Hyperproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Andrea; Bourquin, Florence; Kotelevets, Nataliya; Pastukhov, Oleksandr; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus G.; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a broad spectrum of fundamental cellular processes like proliferation, death, migration and cytokine production. Therefore, elevated levels of S1P may be causal to various pathologic conditions including cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and aberrant angiogenesis. Here we report that S1P lyase from the prokaryote Symbiobacterium thermophilum (StSPL) degrades extracellular S1P in vitro and in blood. Moreover, we investigated its effect on cellular responses typical of fibrosis, cancer and aberrant angiogenesis using renal mesangial cells, endothelial cells, breast (MCF-7) and colon (HCT 116) carcinoma cells as disease models. In all cell types, wild-type StSPL, but not an inactive mutant, disrupted MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by exogenous S1P. Functionally, disruption of S1P receptor signaling by S1P depletion inhibited proliferation and expression of connective tissue growth factor in mesangial cells, proliferation, migration and VEGF expression in carcinoma cells, and proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Upon intravenous injection of StSPL in mice, plasma S1P levels rapidly declined by 70% within 1 h and then recovered to normal 6 h after injection. Using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model we further demonstrate that also under in vivo conditions StSPL, but not the inactive mutant, inhibited tumor cell-induced angiogenesis as an S1P-dependent process. Our data demonstrate that recombinant StSPL is active under extracellular conditions and holds promise as a new enzyme therapeutic for diseases associated with increased levels of S1P and S1P receptor signaling. PMID:21829623

  1. 112 Gb/s transmission over 80 km SSMF using PDM-PAM4 and coherent detection without optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Kangping; Huo, Jiahao; Gao, Lei; Wang, Yiguang; Wang, Liang; Yang, Yanfu; Yuan, Jinhui; Long, Keping; Zeng, Li; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao

    2016-07-25

    Polarization-division-multiplexed (PDM) four-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM4) with coherent detection is a promising low cost solution for 80 km inter-datacenter transmissions at 100 Gb/s and beyond. In this paper, three modified adaptive equalization algorithms for the PDM-PAM4 optical coherent systems, i.e. signal-phase aid least-mean-square (SP-LMS) algorithm, training multi-modulus algorithm (TMMA) and cascaded four-modulus algorithm (CMMA-4), are proposed and compared. Based on the proposed algorithms, 112 Gb/s PDM-PAM4 transmission over 80 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) in C-band for a bit error rate (BER) below 3.8e-3 is successfully demonstrated without optical amplifier, chromatic dispersion (CD) pre-compensation and extra carrier recovery operations. PMID:27464183

  2. The S1P/S1PR2 axis regulates early airway T cell infiltration in murine mast cell-dependent acute allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Hait, Nitai C.; Wedman, Piper; Chumanevich, Alena; Kolawole, Elizabeth M.; Price, Megan M.; Falanga, Yves T.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Ryan, John J.; Milstien, Sheldon; Sabbadini, Roger; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid produced by mast cells (MC) upon cross-linking of their high affinity receptors for IgE by antigen (Ag) that can amplify MC responses by binding to its S1P receptors. Acute MC-dependent allergic reaction can lead to systemic shock but the early events of its development in lung tissues have not been investigated, and S1P functions in the onset of allergic processes remain to be examined. Objective We used a highly specific neutralizing anti-S1P antibody (mAb) and an S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) antagonist, JTE-013, to study S1P and S1PR2 signaling contributions to MC- and IgE-dependent airway allergic responses in mice within minutes after Ag challenge. Methods Allergic reaction was triggered by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of Ag in sensitized mice pre-treated i.p. with anti-S1P or isotype control mAb, or JTE-013 or vehicle prior to Ag challenge. Results Kinetics experiments revealed early pulmonary infiltration of mostly T cells around blood vessels of sensitized mice 20 minutes post-Ag exposure. Pre-treatment with anti-S1P mAb inhibited in vitro MC activation, as well as in vivo development of airway infiltration and MC activation, reducing serum levels of histamine, cytokines and the chemokines MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and RANTES/CCL5. S1PR2 antagonism or deficiency, or MC deficiency recapitulated these results. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated MC S1PR2 dependency for chemokine release and the necessity for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) activation. Conclusion Activation of S1PR2 by S1P and downstream Stat3 signaling in MC regulate early T cell recruitment to antigen-challenged lungs by chemokine production. PMID:25512083

  3. Benzyl butyl phthalate promotes breast cancer stem cell expansion via SPHK1/S1P/S1PR3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Chang, Yi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lee, Jau-Nan; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the regulatory mechanisms unique to breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) is required to control breast cancer metastasis. We found that phthalates promote BCSCs in human breast cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. A toxic phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor in breast cancer cells to stimulate sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1)/sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) signaling and enhance formation of metastasis-initiating BCSCs. BBP induced histone modifications in S1PR3 in side population (SP) cells, but not in non-SP cells. SPHK1 or S1PR3 knockdown in breast cancer cells effectively reduced tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest S1PR3 is a determinant of phthalate-driven breast cancer metastasis and a possible therapeutic target for regulating BCSC populations. Furthermore, the association between breast carcinogenesis and environmental pollutants has important implications for public health.

  4. Developing Knowledge Management (KM): Contributions by Organizational Learning and Total Quality Management (TQM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Richard Yu-Yuan; Lien, Bella Ya-Hui

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge management is an integral business function for many organizations to manage intellectual resources effectively. From a resource-based perspective, organizational learning and TQM are antecedents that are closely related to KM. The purposes of this study were to explain the contents of KM, and explore the relationship between KM-related…

  5. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction. PMID:26539121

  6. 100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

    1993-09-01

    This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

  7. Attenuation of the S+Lg+Surface Wave Group out to 600 km in Northeastern North America: A Baseline Study?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, J.; Seekins, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze the S+Lg+surface wave groups radiated out to 600 km by four moderate (4 ≤ M ≤ 5) earthquakes in Quebec, New York, and Maine: the 1997 Cap Rouge, 2002 Ausable Forks, 2005 Rivière du Loup, and 2006 Bar Harbor earthquakes. The raypaths predominately sample the Appalacian Province, and the crustal velocity structure is roughly homogeneous across the study area. We compute spectra using 20-60 s windows of the horizontal broadband components. We restrict our analysis to hard-rock (Vs > 1500 m/s) and soft-rock (Vs > 700 m/s) sites, avoiding resonant sedimentary sites; we model site amplification using average 1D impedance functions (Boore and Joyner, 1997). We use ro = 50 km instead of ro = 100 km for the crossover distance in the Street et al. (1975) function for geometrical spreading: this distance adjusts the corrected spectra at 10 s to the moment tensor estimates. This simple correction scheme allows us to regress for Q directly as a function of frequency: the source spectral shape is entirely unconstrained. Fitting a Qo f q function to the Q estimates from 0.2 to 25 Hz yields Q = 410 f 0.5 for a group velocity of 3.5 km/s. This attenuation is stronger than the Lg attenuation of 650 f 0.36 obtained by Erickson et al. (2004). The Q estimates are consistent for individual events. For f > 20 Hz, the Q estimates increase more rapidly than f 0.5: this deviation from the Qo f q form appears characteristic. To gauge how these Q estimates depend on the distance limit, we will rerun the analysis using broadband data out to 1000 km, adding 30% more recordings to the dataset.

  8. {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100>, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, {100}<100> or 45.degree.-rotated {100}<100> oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  9. 26 CFR 31.3121(s)-1 - Concurrent employment by related corporations with common paymaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with common paymaster. 31.3121(s)-1 Section 31.3121(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Revenue Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(s)-1 Concurrent employment by related corporations with... this section. Section 3121(s) and this section apply only to remuneration disbursed in the form...

  10. First measurement of horizontal wind and temperature in the lower thermosphere (105-140 km) with a Na Lidar at Andes Lidar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang; Vargas, Fabio; Swenson, Gary R.

    2016-03-01

    We report the first measurement of nighttime atmospheric temperature and horizontal wind profiles in the lower thermosphere up to 140 km with the Na lidar at Andes Lidar Observatory in Cerro Pachón, Chile (30.25°S, 70.74°W), when enhanced thermospheric Na was observed. Temperature and horizontal wind were derived up to 140 km using various resolutions, with the lowest resolution of about 2.7 hr and 15 km above 130 km. Thus, the measurements span 60 km in vertical, more than double the traditional 25 km. On the night of 17 April 2015, the horizontal wind magnitude in the thermosphere exceeds 150 ms-1, consistent with past rocket measurements. The meridional wind shows a clear transition from the diurnal-tide-dominant mesopause to the semidiurnal-tide-dominant lower thermosphere. A lidar with a 100 times the power aperture product will be able to measure wind and temperature above 160 km and cover longer time span, providing key measurements for the study of atmosphere-space interactions in this region.

  11. Horizontal wind and temperature in the lower thermosphere (80-140 km) measured by a Na Lidar at Andes Lidar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Vargas, F.; Guo, Yafang; Swenson, Gary

    2016-07-01

    We report the first measurement of nighttime atmospheric temperature and horizontal wind profiles in the lower thermosphere up to 140 km with the Na lidar at Andes Lidar Observatory in Cerro Pachón, Chile (30.3S, 70.7W), when enhanced thermospheric Na was observed. Temperature and horizontal wind were derived up to 140 km using various resolutions, with the lowest resolution of about 2.7 hr and 15 km above 130 km. Thus the measurements span 60 km in vertical, more than double the traditional 25 km. On the night of 17 April 2015, the horizontal wind magnitude in the thermosphere exceeds 150 m/s, consistent with past rocket measurements. The meridional wind shows a clear transition from the diurnal-tide-dominant mesopause to the semidiurnal-tide-dominant lower thermosphere. A lidar with a 100 times the power-aperture product will be able to measure wind and temperature above 160 km and cover longer time span, providing key measurements for the study of atmosphere-space interactions in this region.

  12. Underwater acoustic positioning system for the SMO and KM3NeT - Italia projects

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, S.; Barbagallo, G.; Cacopardo, G.; Calí, C.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amato, V.; D'Amico, A.; De Luca, V.; Del Tevere, F.; Distefano, C.; Ferrera, F.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Imbesi, M.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; and others

    2014-11-18

    In the underwater neutrino telescopes, the positions of the Cherenkov light sensors and their movements must be known with an accuracy of few tens of centimetres. In this work, the activities of the SMO and KM3NeT-Italia teams for the development of an acoustic positioning system for KM3NeT-Italia project are presented. The KM3NeT-Italia project foresees the construction, within two years, of 8 towers in the view of the several km{sup 3}-scale neutrino telescope KM3NeT.

  13. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  14. The Clinically-tested S1P Receptor Agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, Demonstrate Subtype-Specific Bradycardia (S1P1) and Hypertension (S1P3) in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C.; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E.; Dinallo, Roger M.; Horan, Joshua C.; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1PX receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2–3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P1,5 agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P1 mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P3 receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P1 receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P3 receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  15. The clinically-tested S1P receptor agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, demonstrate subtype-specific bradycardia (S1P₁) and hypertension (S1P₃) in rat.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Ryan M; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E; Dinallo, Roger M; Horan, Joshua C; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K; Reinhart, Glenn A

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1P(X) receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2-3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P₁,₅ agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P₁ mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P₃ receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P₁ receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P₃ receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  16. Continuous measurements of water surface height and width along a 6.5km river reach for discharge algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuozzolo, S.; Durand, M. T.; Pavelsky, T.; Pentecost, J.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite will provide measurements of river width and water surface elevation and slope along continuous swaths of world rivers. Understanding water surface slope and width dynamics in river reaches is important for both developing and validating discharge algorithms to be used on future SWOT data. We collected water surface elevation and river width data along a 6.5km stretch of the Olentangy River in Columbus, Ohio from October to December 2014. Continuous measurements of water surface height were supplemented with periodical river width measurements at twenty sites along the study reach. The water surface slope of the entire reach ranged from during 41.58 cm/km at baseflow to 45.31 cm/km after a storm event. The study reach was also broken into sub-reaches roughly 1km in length to study smaller scale slope dynamics. The furthest upstream sub-reaches are characterized by free-flowing riffle-pool sequences, while the furthest downstream sub-reaches were directly affected by two low-head dams. In the sub-reaches immediately upstream of each dam, baseflow slope is as low as 2 cm/km, while the furthest upstream free-flowing sub-reach has a baseflow slope of 100 cm/km. During high flow events the backwater effect of the dams was observed to propagate upstream: sub-reaches impounded by the dams had increased water surface slopes, while free flowing sub-reaches had decreased water surface slopes. During the largest observed flow event, a stage change of 0.40 m affected sub-reach slopes by as much as 30 cm/km. Further analysis will examine height-width relationships within the study reach and relate cross-sectional flow area to river stage. These relationships can be used in conjunction with slope data to estimate discharge using a modified Manning's equation, and are a core component of discharge algorithms being developed for the SWOT mission.

  17. A randomized phase II study of S-1 plus oral leucovorin versus S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, M.; Okusaka, T.; Omuro, Y.; Isayama, H.; Fukutomi, A.; Ikeda, M.; Mizuno, N.; Fukuzawa, K.; Furukawa, M.; Iguchi, H.; Sugimori, K.; Furuse, J.; Shimada, K.; Ioka, T.; Nakamori, S.; Baba, H.; Komatsu, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Hyodo, I.; Boku, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of adding oral leucovorin (LV) to S-1 when compared with S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). Patients and methods Gemcitabine-refractory PC patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 at 40, 50, or 60 mg according to body surface area plus LV 25 mg, both given orally twice daily for 1 week, repeated every 2 weeks (SL group), or S-1 monotherapy at the same dose as the SL group for 4 weeks, repeated every 6 weeks (S-1 group). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Among 142 patients enrolled, 140 were eligible for efficacy assessment (SL: n = 69 and S-1: n = 71). PFS was significantly longer in the SL group than in the S-1 group [median PFS, 3.8 versus 2.7 months; hazard ratio (HR), 0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37–0.85; P = 0.003]). The disease control rate was significantly higher in the SL group than in the S-1 group (91% versus 72%; P = 0.004). Overall survival (OS) was similar in both groups (median OS, 6.3 versus 6.1 months; HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.54–1.22; P = 0.463). After adjusting for patient background factors in a multivariate analysis, OS tended to be better in the SL group (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47–1.07; P = 0.099). Both treatments were well tolerated, although gastrointestinal toxicities were slightly more severe in the SL group. Conclusion The addition of LV to S-1 significantly improved PFS in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced PC, and a phase III trial has been initiated in a similar setting. Clinical trials number Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center: JapicCTI-111554. PMID:26681680

  18. Defect induced mobility enhancement: Gadolinium oxide (100) on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaputra, W.; Tsu, R.

    2012-11-26

    Growth of predominantly single crystal (100)-oriented gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on a p-type Si(100) and growth of a polycrystal with a predominant Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100) crystallite on a n-type Si(100) was performed using molecular beam epitaxy. Despite a poorer crystal structure than Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(110), an enhancement in carrier mobility can be found only from the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100)/n-type Si(100) interface. The mobility of 1715-1780 cm{sup 2}/V {center_dot} s was observed at room temperature, for carrier concentration >10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. This accumulation of the electrons and the mobility enhancement may arise from the two-dimensional confinement due to charge transfer across the interface similar to transfer doping.

  19. Experiments on 1,000 km/s flyer acceleration and collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Kehne, D. M.; Zalesak, S. T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Oh, J.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2012-10-01

    We will present results from follow-on experiments to the record-high velocities achieved using the ultra-uniform deep-uv drive of the Nike KrF laser [Karasik et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056317 (2010)], in which highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene were made to collide with a witness foil to produce ˜1 Gbar shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Such velocities may indicate a path to lower minimum energy required for central ignition. Still higher velocities and higher target densities are required for impact fast ignition. New results give velocity of >1,100 km/s achieved through improvements in pulseshaping. Variation of second foil parameters results in significant change in fusion neutron production on impact. In-flight target density is inferred from target heating upon collision via DD neutron time-of-flight ion temperature measurement. Availability of pressures generated by collisions of such highly accelerated flyers may provide an experimental platform for study of matter at extreme conditions. Work is supported by US DOE (NNSA).

  20. Observations of earthquake source parameters at 2 km depth in the Long Valley Caldera, eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, Stephanie G.; Ellsworth, William L.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate seismic source parameter scaling and seismic efficiency in the Long Valley caldera, California, we measured source parameters for 41 earthquakes (M 0.5 to M 5) recorded at 2 km depth in the Long Valley Exploratory Well. Borehole recordings provide a wide frequency bandwidth, typically 1 to 200–300 Hz, and greatly reduce seismic noise and path effects compared to surface recordings. We calculated source parameters in both the time and frequency domains for P and S waves. At frequencies above the corner frequency, spectra decay faster than ω3, indicating that attenuation plays an important role in shaping the spectra (path averaged Qp = 100–400, Qs = 200–800). Source parameters are corrected for attenuation and radiation pattern. Both static stress drops and apparent stresses range from approximately 0.01 to 30 MPa. Although static stress drops do not vary with seismic moment for these data, our analyses are consistent with apparent stress increasing with increasing moment. To estimate tectonic driving stress and seismic efficiencies in the region, we combined source parameter measurements with knowledge of the stress field and a Coulomb failure criterion to infer a driving stress of 40–70 MPa. Subsequent seismic efficiencies are consistent with McGarr's (1999) hypothesis of a maximum seismic efficiency of 6%.

  1. Pile driving zone of responsiveness extends beyond 20 km for harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena (L.)).

    PubMed

    Tougaard, Jakob; Carstensen, Jacob; Teilmann, Jonas; Skov, Henrik; Rasmussen, Per

    2009-07-01

    Behavioral reactions of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) to underwater noise from pile driving were studied. Steel monopile foundations (4 m diameter) for offshore wind turbines were driven into hard sand in shallow water at Horns Reef, the North Sea. The impulsive sounds generated had high sound pressures [source level 235 dB re 1 microPa(pp) at 1 m, transmission loss 18 log(distance)] with a strong low frequency emphasis but with significant energy up to 100 kHz. Reactions of porpoises were studied by passive acoustic loggers (T-PODs). Intervals between echolocation events (encounters) were analyzed, and a significant increase was found from average 5.9 h between encounters in the construction period as a whole to on average 7.5 h between first and second encounters after pile driving. The size of the zone of responsiveness could not be inferred as no grading in response was observed with distance from the pile driving site but must have exceeded 21 km (distance to most distant T-POD station). PMID:19603857

  2. Synchronization of clocks through 12 km of strongly turbulent air over a city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Laura C.; Swann, William C.; Bergeron, Hugo; Baumann, Esther; Cermak, Michael; Coddington, Ian; Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Juarez, Juan C.; Khader, Isaac; Petrillo, Keith G.; Souza, Katherine T.; Dennis, Michael L.; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate real-time, femtosecond-level clock synchronization across a low-lying, strongly turbulent, 12-km horizontal air path by optical two-way time transfer. For this long horizontal free-space path, the integrated turbulence extends well into the strong turbulence regime corresponding to multiple scattering with a Rytov variance up to 7 and with the number of signal interruptions exceeding 100 per second. Nevertheless, optical two-way time transfer is used to synchronize a remote clock to a master clock with femtosecond-level agreement and with a relative time deviation dropping as low as a few hundred attoseconds. Synchronization is shown for a remote clock based on either an optical or microwave oscillator and using either tip-tilt or adaptive-optics free-space optical terminals. The performance is unaltered from optical two-way time transfer in weak turbulence across short links. These results confirm that the two-way reciprocity of the free-space time-of-flight is maintained both under strong turbulence and with the use of adaptive optics. The demonstrated robustness of optical two-way time transfer against strong turbulence and its compatibility with adaptive optics is encouraging for future femtosecond clock synchronization over very long distance ground-to-air free-space paths.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR 1000 km s{sup -1} MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN THE LOCAL ULIRG POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Aeree; Yun, Min S.; Naraynan, Gopal; Heyer, Mark; Erickson, Neal R.

    2011-05-01

    The feedback from galactic outflows is thought to play an important role in shaping the gas content, star formation history, and ultimately the stellar mass function of galaxies. Here we present evidence for massive molecular outflows associated with ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) in the co-added Redshift Search Receiver {sup 12}CO (1-0) spectrum. Our stacked spectrum of 27 ULIRGs at z = 0.043-0.11 ({nu}{sub rest} = 110-120 GHz) shows broad wings around the CO line with {Delta}V(FWZI) {approx} 2000 km s{sup -1}. Its integrated line flux accounts for up to 25% {+-} 5% of the total CO line luminosity. When interpreted as a massive molecular outflow wind, the associated mechanical energy can be explained by a concentrated starburst with star formation rate (SFR) {>=}100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, which agrees well with their SFR derived from the FIR luminosity. Using the high signal-to-noise stacked composite spectrum, we also probe {sup 13}CO and {sup 12}CN emission in the sample and discuss how the chemical abundance of molecular gas may vary depending on the physical conditions of the nuclear region.

  4. Pile driving zone of responsiveness extends beyond 20 km for harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena (L.)).

    PubMed

    Tougaard, Jakob; Carstensen, Jacob; Teilmann, Jonas; Skov, Henrik; Rasmussen, Per

    2009-07-01

    Behavioral reactions of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) to underwater noise from pile driving were studied. Steel monopile foundations (4 m diameter) for offshore wind turbines were driven into hard sand in shallow water at Horns Reef, the North Sea. The impulsive sounds generated had high sound pressures [source level 235 dB re 1 microPa(pp) at 1 m, transmission loss 18 log(distance)] with a strong low frequency emphasis but with significant energy up to 100 kHz. Reactions of porpoises were studied by passive acoustic loggers (T-PODs). Intervals between echolocation events (encounters) were analyzed, and a significant increase was found from average 5.9 h between encounters in the construction period as a whole to on average 7.5 h between first and second encounters after pile driving. The size of the zone of responsiveness could not be inferred as no grading in response was observed with distance from the pile driving site but must have exceeded 21 km (distance to most distant T-POD station).

  5. Discovery of Tetrahydropyrazolopyridine as Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3 (S1P3)-Sparing S1P1 Agonists Active at Low Oral Doses.

    PubMed

    Demont, Emmanuel H; Bailey, James M; Bit, Rino A; Brown, Jack A; Campbell, Colin A; Deeks, Nigel; Dowell, Simon J; Eldred, Colin; Gaskin, Pam; Gray, James R J; Haynes, Andrea; Hirst, David J; Holmes, Duncan S; Kumar, Umesh; Morse, Mary A; Osborne, Greg J; Renaux, Jessica F; Seal, Gail A L; Smethurst, Chris A; Taylor, Simon; Watson, Robert; Willis, Robert; Witherington, Jason

    2016-02-11

    FTY720 is the first oral small molecule approved for the treatment of people suffering from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. It is a potent agonist of the S1P1 receptor, but its lack of selectivity against the S1P3 receptor has been linked to most of the cardiovascular side effects observed in the clinic. These findings have triggered intensive efforts toward the identification of a second generation of S1P3-sparing S1P1 agonists. We have recently disclosed a series of orally active tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) compounds matching these criteria. In this paper we describe how we defined and implemented a strategy aiming at the discovery of selective structurally distinct follow-up agonists. This effort culminated with the identification of a series of orally active tetrahydropyrazolopyridines. PMID:26751273

  6. Diel vertical migration of zooplankton at the S1 biogeochemical mooring revealed from acoustic backscattering strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Ryuichiro; Kitamura, Minoru; Fujiki, Tetsuichi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the diel vertical migration of zooplankton by using the backscatter strength obtained from moored acoustic Doppler current profilers at mooring site S1 in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. There was seasonal variability in the vertical distribution and migration of the high-backscatter layers in that they became deeper than the euphotic zone (<100 m) in winter and were confined above this depth in other seasons. Seasonal changes in daylight hours also affected the timing of the diel migration. We found that lunar cycles affected vertical distributions of zooplankton near the surface by changing the light intensity. Physical events, such as mixed-layer deepening and restratification and the passage of a mesoscale eddy, also affected zooplankton behavior possibly by changing food environment in the euphotic zone. Since the comparison with net samples indicated that the backscatter likely represents the bulk biomass, the accuracy of biomass estimates based on net samples could be influenced by the high temporal variability of zooplankton distributions.

  7. ND4FeBr3, a new one-dimensional S=1 antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, A.; Stager, C. V.; Visser, D.

    1991-04-01

    Compounds of chemical formula AFeX3 (A=Rb,Cs,Tl, and X=Cl, Br) provide an isomorphous series of one-dimensional induced-moment magnets with an effective spin S=1. They display a variety of ordered magnetic structures at low temperatures, depending on the sign and relative magnitudes of the intra- and interchain exchange and any magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. We report the first preparation of the salt NH4FeBr3. Powder neutron diffraction measurements on a perdeuterated sample showed that at room temperature the unit cell is hexagonal with cell parameters a=7.398(3) Å and c=6.331(2) Å. On cooling, structural phase transitions to cells of successively lower symmetry were observed. These are probably caused by cooperative reorientations of the ND+4 tetrahedra. At 4.8(2) K and 2.8(2) K additional Bragg peaks were observed. These additional reflections were attributed to magnetic long-range order with antiferromagnetic exchange both in the basal plane and along the c axis and could be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell of dimension 2a ×√ 3a × c. Magnetic susceptibility measurements taken with a SQUID magnetometer on a polycrystalline sample at 2-100 K with an applied magnetic field of 0.1 T showed very similar behavior to that for RbFeBr3, with a broad cusp at approximately 8 K and θ≂-43 K.

  8. Helicobacter pylori vacA s1a and s1b alleles from clinical isolates from different regions of Chile show a distinct geographic distribution

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, MI; Valdivia, A; Martínez, P; Palacios, JL; Harris, P; Novales, J; Garrido, E; Valderrama, D; Shilling, C; Kirberg, A; Hebel, E; Fierro, J; Bravo, R; Siegel, F; Leon, G; Klapp, G; Venegas, A

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish the most common vacA alleles in Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) strains isolated from Chilean patients and its relationship with gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcers. METHODS: Two hundred and forty five H pylori clinical isolates were obtained from 79 biopsies from Chilean infected patients suffering from gastrointestinal diseases. An average of 2-3 strains per patient was isolated and the vacA genotype was analyzed by PCR and 3% agarose electrophoresis. Some genotypes were checked by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: The most prevalent vacA genotype in Chilean patients was s1b m1 (76%), followed by s1a m1 (21%). In contrast, the s2 m2 genotype was scarcely represented (3%). The s1b m1 genotype was found most frequently linked to gastropathies (P<0.05) rather than ulcers. Ulcers were found more commonly in male and older patients. Curiously, patients living in cities located North and far South of Santiago, the capital and largest Chilean city, carried almost exclusively strains with the s1b m1 genotype. In contrast, patients from Santiago and cities located South of Santiago carried strains with either one or both s1a m1 and s1b m1 genotypes. Regarding the s2 m2 genotype, comparison with GenBank sequences revealed that Chilean s2 sequence was identical to those of Australian, American, and Colombian strains but quite different from those of Alaska and India. CONCLUSION: Differences in geographic distribution of the s and m vacA alleles in Chile and a relationship of s1b m1 genotype with gastritis were found. Sequence data in part support a hispanic origin for the vacA genotype. Asymmetric distribution of genotypes s1b m1 and s2 m2 recedes H Pylori strain distribution in Spain and Portugal. PMID:16419167

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of gemcitabine, S-1 and gemcitabine plus S-1 for treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Rongce; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Pengfei; Tang, Ruilei; Du, Zedong; He, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Qiu

    2015-04-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM) alone, S-1 alone and gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) have shown a marginal clinical benefit for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. However, there is no clearly defined optimal cost-effectiveness treatment. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of GEM alone, S-1 alone and GS for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study for public payers. A decision model compared GEM alone, S-1 alone and GS. Primary base case data were identified using the GEST study and the literatures. Costs were estimated from West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. Survival benefits were reported in quality-adjusted life-months (QALMs). Sensitive analyses were performed by varying potentially modifiable parameters of the model. The base case analysis showed that the GEM cost $21,912 and yielded survival of 6.93 QALMs, S-1 cost $19,371 and yielded survival of 7.90 QALMs and GS cost $22,943 and yielded survival of 7.46 QALMs in the entire treatment. The one-way sensitivity analyses showed that the ICER of S-1 was driven mostly by the S-1 group utility score of stable state compared with GEM, and the GEM group utility score of progressed state played a key role on the ICER of GS compared with GEM. S-1 represents an attractive cost-effective treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer, given the favorable cost per QALM and improvement in clinical efficacy, especially the limited available treatment options.

  10. Neutrophil activation induced by the lectin KM+ involves binding to CXCR2.

    PubMed

    Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Moreno, Andréa N; Marques, Fabiana; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2006-01-01

    The lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia, also known as artocarpin, induces neutrophil migration by haptotaxis. The interactions of KM+ with both neutrophils and the extracellular matrix depend on the lectin's ability to recognize mannose-containing glycans. In the present study, we characterized the binding of KM+ to human neutrophils and the responses stimulated by this binding. Exposure to KM+ results in cell polarization, formation of a lamellipodium, and induction of deep ruffles on the cell surface. By fluorescence microscopy, we observed that KM+ is distributed homogeneously over the cell surface. KM+/ligand complexes are rapidly internalized, reaching maximum intracellular concentrations at 120 min, and decreasing thereafter. Furthermore, KM+ binding to the surface of human neutrophils is inhibited by the specific sugars, d-mannose or mannotriose. KM+-induced neutrophil migration is inhibited by pertussis toxin as well as by inhibition of CXCR2 activity. These results suggest that the KM+ ligand on the neutrophil surface is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The results also suggest that neutrophil migration induced by KM+ involves binding to CXCR2.

  11. Numerical simulation of current experimental 100 Gbit s{sup -1} DWDM communication lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yushko, O V; Redyuk, A A; Fedoruk, M P; Nanii, O E; Treshchikov, V N

    2015-01-31

    We report the results of experimental and numerical studies of the maximum length of multi-span DP-QPSK DWDM communication lines (channel rate of 100 Gbit s{sup -1}) with 100-kmlong uniform and combined spans. The use of the combined spans (50 km of SSMF fibre and 50 km of NZDSF fibre) has allowed the maximum line length to be increased up to 6700 km, which is 60% higher than in the case of homogeneous SSMF- and NZDSF-based spans. (optical transmission of information)

  12. Quantum key distribution over 120 km using ultrahigh purity single-photon source and superconducting single-photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuya; Nambu, Yoshihiro; Miyazawa, Toshiyuki; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Yorozu, Shinichi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-25

    Advances in single-photon sources (SPSs) and single-photon detectors (SPDs) promise unique applications in the field of quantum information technology. In this paper, we report long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) by using state-of-the-art devices: a quantum-dot SPS (QD SPS) emitting a photon in the telecom band of 1.5 μm and a superconducting nanowire SPD (SNSPD). At the distance of 100 km, we obtained the maximal secure key rate of 27.6 bps without using decoy states, which is at least threefold larger than the rate obtained in the previously reported 50-km-long QKD experiment. We also succeeded in transmitting secure keys at the rate of 0.307 bps over 120 km. This is the longest QKD distance yet reported by using known true SPSs. The ultralow multiphoton emissions of our SPS and ultralow dark count of the SNSPD contributed to this result. The experimental results demonstrate the potential applicability of QD SPSs to practical telecom QKD networks.

  13. Detection potential of the KM3NeT detector for high-energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KM3NeT Collaboration; Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Aharonian, F.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Alexandri, M.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bakker, R.; Ball, A. E.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Baret, B.; de Bel, M.; Belias, A.; Bellou, N.; Berbee, E.; Berkien, A.; Bersani, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bigourdan, B.; Billault, M.; de Boer, R.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Bonori, M.; Borghini, M.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bradbury, S.; Brown, A.; Bruni, F.; Brunner, J.; Brunoldi, M.; Busto, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calvo Díaz-Aldagalán, D.; Calzas, A.; Canals, M.; Capone, A.; Carr, J.; Castorina, E.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Cereseto, R.; Chaleil, Th.; Chateau, F.; Chiarusi, T.; Choqueuse, D.; Christopoulou, P. E.; Chronis, G.; Ciaffoni, O.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Cohen, F.; Colijn, F.; Coniglione, R.; Cordelli, M.; Cosquer, A.; Costa, M.; Coyle, P.; Craig, J.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; D'Amico, A.; Damy, G.; De Asmundis, R.; De Bonis, G.; Decock, G.; Decowski, P.; Delagnes, E.; De Rosa, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drogou, J.; Drouhin, D.; Druillole, F.; Drury, L.; Durand, D.; Durand, G. A.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Espinosa, V.; Etiope, G.; Favali, P.; Felea, D.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fotiou, A.; Fritsch, U.; Gajanana, D.; Garaguso, R.; Gasparini, G. P.; Gasparoni, F.; Gautard, V.; Gensolen, F.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Gialas, I.; Giordano, V.; Giraud, J.; Gizani, N.; Gleixner, A.; Gojak, C.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Grasso, D.; Grimaldi, A.; Groenewegen, R.; Guédé, Z.; Guillard, G.; Guilloux, F.; Habel, R.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; van Heerwaarden, J.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hillebrand, T.; van de Hoek, M.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Imbesi, M.; Jamieson, A.; Jansweijer, P.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Karolak, M.; Katz, U. F.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Keller, P.; Kiskiras, Y.; Klein, R.; Kok, H.; Kontoyiannis, H.; Kooijman, P.; Koopstra, J.; Kopper, C.; Korporaal, A.; Koske, P.; Kouchner, A.; Koutsoukos, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Laan, M.; La Fratta, C.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leisos, A.; Lenis, D.; Leonora, E.; Le Provost, H.; Lim, G.; Llorens, C. D.; Lloret, J.; Löhner, H.; Lo Presti, D.; Lotrus, P.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lykousis, V.; Malyshev, D.; Mangano, S.; Marcoulaki, E. C.; Margiotta, A.; Marinaro, G.; Marinelli, A.; Mariş, O.; Markopoulos, E.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Marvaldi, J.; Masullo, R.; Maurin, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Minutoli, S.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Monmarthe, E.; Morganti, M.; Mos, S.; Motz, H.; Moudden, Y.; Mul, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann, Ch.; Neff, M.; Nicolaou, C.; Orlando, A.; Palioselitis, D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Papazoglou, I. A.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Peek, H. Z.; Perkin, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Priede, I. G.; Psallidas, A.; Rabouille, C.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Randazzo, N.; Rapidis, P. A.; Razis, P.; Real, D.; Reed, C.; Reito, S.; Resvanis, L. K.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rolin, J.; Rose, J.; Roux, J.; Rovelli, A.; Russo, A.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D.; Sapienza, P.; Schmelling, J.-W.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schroeder, K.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schussler, F.; Sciliberto, D.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Siotis, I.; Sipala, V.; Sollima, C.; Sparnocchia, S.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Staller, T.; Stavrakakis, S.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, A.; Thompson, L.; Timmer, P.; Tonoiu, D.; Toscano, S.; Touramanis, C.; Trasatti, L.; Traverso, P.; Trovato, A.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urbano, F.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Werneke, P.; White, R. J.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zhukov, V.; Zonca, E.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2013-02-01

    A recent analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data provided evidence for a high-intensity emission of high-energy gamma rays with a E-2 spectrum from two large areas, spanning 50° above and below the Galactic centre (the "Fermi bubbles"). A hadronic mechanism was proposed for this gamma-ray emission making the Fermi bubbles promising source candidates of high-energy neutrino emission. In this work Monte Carlo simulations regarding the detectability of high-energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles with the future multi-km3 neutrino telescope KM3NeT in the Mediterranean Sea are presented. Under the hypothesis that the gamma-ray emission is completely due to hadronic processes, the results indicate that neutrinos from the bubbles could be discovered in about one year of operation, for a neutrino spectrum with a cutoff at 100 TeV and a detector with about 6 km3 of instrumented volume. The effect of a possible lower cutoff is also considered.

  14. Seismic Shaking Removal of Craters 0.2-0.5 km in Diameter on Asteroid 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.; Robinson, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Impact cratering acts in a variety of ways to create a surprising range of scenery on small satellites and asteroids. The visible crater population is a self-modifying characteristic of these airless objects, and determining the various ways younger craters can add or subtract from the population is an important aspect of small body "geology." Asteroid 433 Eros, the most closely studied of any small body, has two aspects of its crater population that have attracted attention: a fall-off of crater densities below approx.100 m diameter relative to an expected equilibrium population [1] and regions of substantially lower large crater densities [2, 3, 4]. In this work we examine the global variation of the density of craters on Eros larger than 0.177 km, a size range above that involved in small crater depletion hypotheses [1, 5]. We counted all craters on Eros to a size range somewhat below 0.177 km diameter (and different from data used in [3]). The primary metric for this study is the number of craters between 0.177 and 1.0 km within a set radius of each grid point on the 2deg x 2deg shape model of Eros. This number can be expressed as an R-value [6], provided that it is remembered that the large bin size makes individual R values slightly different from those obtained in the usual root-2 bins.

  15. Factor Xa inhibitors: S1 binding interactions of a series of N-{(3S)-1-[(1S)-1-methyl-2-morpholin-4-yl-2-oxoethyl]-2-oxopyrrolidin-3-yl}sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chuen; Borthwick, Alan D; Brown, David; Burns-Kurtis, Cynthia L; Campbell, Matthew; Chaudry, Laiq; Chung, Chun-wa; Convery, Máire A; Hamblin, J Nicole; Johnstone, Lisa; Kelly, Henry A; Kleanthous, Savvas; Patikis, Angela; Patel, Champa; Pateman, Anthony J; Senger, Stefan; Shah, Gita P; Toomey, John R; Watson, Nigel S; Weston, Helen E; Whitworth, Caroline; Young, Robert J; Zhou, Ping

    2007-04-01

    Factor Xa inhibitory activities for a series of N-{(3S)-1-[(1S)-1-methyl-2-morpholin-4-yl-2-oxoethyl]-2-oxopyrrolidin-3-yl}sulfonamides with different P1 groups are described. These data provide insight into binding interactions within the S1 primary specificity pocket; rationales are presented for the derived SAR on the basis of electronic interactions through crystal structures of fXa-ligand complexes and molecular modeling studies. A good correlation between in vitro anticoagulant activities with lipophilicity and the extent of human serum albumin binding is observed within this series of potent fXa inhibitors. Pharmacokinetic profiles in rat and dog, together with selectivity over other trypsin-like serine proteases, identified 1f as a candidate for further evaluation.

  16. The "AS&U" 100

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article presents "American School & University's" 100 largest school districts in the U.S. The top 100 public school districts in the U.S. represent less than 1% of the more than 14,000 school districts, but in 2004-2005, they accounted for more than 20% of the nation's public school enrollment--10,795,068 students. The money spent by the 100

  17. An evaluation of acoustic seabed classification techniques for marine biotope monitoring over broad-scales (>1 km 2) and meso-scales (10 m 2-1 km 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rein, H.; Brown, C. J.; Quinn, R.; Breen, J.; Schoeman, D.

    2011-07-01

    Acoustic seabed classification is a useful tool for monitoring marine benthic habitats over broad-scales (>1 km 2) and meso-scales (10 m 2-1 km 2). Its utility in this context was evaluated using two approaches: by describing natural changes in the temporal distribution of marine biotopes across the broad-scale (4 km 2), and by attempting to detect specific experimentally-induced changes to kelp-dominated biotopes across the meso-scale (100 m 2). For the first approach, acoustic backscatter mosaics were constructed using sidescan sonar and multibeam echosounder data collected from Church Bay (Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland) in 1999, 2008 and 2009. The mosaics were manually segmented into acoustic facies, which were ground-truthed using a drop-video camera. Biotopes were classified from the video by multivariate exploratory analysis and cross-tabulated with the acoustic facies, showing a positive correlation. These results were integrated with bathymetric data to map the distribution of seven unique biotopes in Church Bay. Kappa analysis showed the biotope distribution was highly similar between the biotope maps, possibly due to the stability of bedforms shaped by the tidal regime around Rathlin Island. The greatest biotope change in this approach was represented by seasonal and annual changes in the growth of the seagrass, Zostera marina. In the second approach, sidescan sonar data were collected before and after the removal of 100 m 2 of kelp from three sites. Comparison of the data revealed no differences between the high-resolution backscatter imagery. It is concluded that acoustic seabed classification can be used to monitor change over broad- and meso-scales but not necessarily for all biotopes; its success depends on the type of acoustic system employed and the biological characteristics of the target biotope.

  18. History of 100-B Area

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlen, R.K.

    1989-10-01

    The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

  19. Removal of nitrogen by heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification of a novel metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus sp. S1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyi; Lv, Yongkang; Liu, Yuxiang; Ren, Ruipeng

    2016-11-01

    A novel heterotrophic nitrifying and metal resistant bacterium was isolated and identified as Cupriavidus sp. S1. The utilization of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite as well as the production of N2 proved the heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification ability of S1. The ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal efficiencies were 99.68%, 98.03% and 99.81%, with removal rates of 10.43, 8.64 and 8.36mg/L/h, respectively. A multiple regression equation well described the relationship between carbon source utilization, cell growth and nitrification. Keeping the shaking speed at 120rpm was beneficial for denitrification. Moreover, different forms of nitrogen source could be utilize in simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. Additionally, the efficient removal of ammonium occurred at 20.0mg/LZn(2+), or 10.0mg/LNi(2+) or 8.0mg/LCu(2+) or 5.0mg/LCr(6+), 33.35mmol/L sodium pyruvate, C/N 12-28. These findings demonstrate that S1 was effective for nitrogen removal in industrial wastewater containing heavy metal. PMID:27566522

  20. Estimation of Anomalous Single Scatter Events in XENON100 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kyungeun; Xenon100 Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous single scatter events in XENON100 are events that have only one scintillation pulse (S1) and one ionization pulse (S2), but are multiple scatters in nature. Only one scatter takes place inside the detector's charge and light sensitive volume, resulting in a S2/S1 ratio that is lower than that of true single scatter events and typical of that expected from a WIMP interaction. The identification and suppression of these anomalous events is therefore essential for a sensitive dark matter search. I present results from a Monte Carlo (MC) study that was carried out to estimate the expected number of anomalous single scatter events in the XENON100 WIMP search data. The MC was validated with a comparison with Co-60 gamma-calibration data. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF, DOE, SNF, the Volkswagen Foundation, FCT, and STCSM. We are grateful to the LNGS for hosting and supporting the XENON program.

  1. Cratering and penetration experiments in Teflon targets at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cintala, Mark J.; See, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    Approximately 20 sq m of protective thermal blankets, largely composed of Teflon, were retrieved from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) after the spacecraft had spent approximately 5.7 years in space. Examination of these blankets revealed that they contained thousands of hypervelocity impact features ranging from micron-sized craters to penetration holes several millimeters in diameter. We conducted impact experiments in an effort to reproduce such features and to -- hopefully -- understand the relationships between projectile size and the resulting crater or penetration-hole diameter over a wide range of impact velocity. Such relationships are needed to derive the size- and mass-frequency distribution and flux of natural and man-made particles in low-Earth orbit. Powder propellant and light-gas guns were used to launch soda-lime glass spheres of 3.175 mm (1/8 inch) nominal diameter (Dp) into pure Teflon FEP targets at velocities ranging from 1 to 7 km/s. Target thickness (T) was varied over more than three orders of magnitude from infinite halfspace targets (Dp/T less than 0.1) to very thin films (Dp/T greater than 100). Cratering and penetration of massive Teflon targets is dominated by brittle failure and the development of extensive spall zones at the target's front and, if penetrated, the target's rear side. Mass removal by spallation at the back side of Teflon targets may be so severe that the absolute penetration-hole diameter (Dh) can become larger than that of a standard crater (Dc) at relative target thicknesses of Dp/T = 0.6-0.9. The crater diameter is infinite halfspace Teflon targets increases -- at otherwise constant impact conditions -- with encounter velocity by a factor of V0.44. In contrast, the penetration-hole size is very thin foils (Dp/T greater than 50) is essentially unaffected by impact velocity. Penetrations at target thicknesses intermediate to these extremes will scale with variable exponents of V. Our experimental matrix is

  2. MODIS 3 Km Aerosol Product: Applications over Land in an Urban/suburban Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munchak, L. A.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Remer, L. A.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites have provided a rich dataset of aerosol information at a 10 km spatial scale. Although originally intended for climate applications, the air quality community quickly became interested in using the MODIS aerosol data. However, 10 km resolution is not sufficient to resolve local scale aerosol features. With this in mind, MODIS Collection 6 is including a global aerosol product with a 3 km resolution. Here, we evaluate the 3 km product over the Baltimore/Washington D.C., USA, corridor during the summer of 2011, by comparing with spatially dense data collected as part of the DISCOVER-AQ campaign these data were measured by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and a network of 44 sun photometers (SP) spaced approximately 10 km apart. The HSRL instrument shows that AOD can vary by up to 0.2 within a single 10 km MODIS pixel, meaning that higher resolution satellite retrievals may help to characterize aerosol spatial distributions in this region. Different techniques for validating a high-resolution aerosol product against SP measurements are considered. Although the 10 km product is more statistically reliable than the 3 km product, the 3 km product still performs acceptably, with more than two-thirds of MODIS/SP collocations falling within the expected error envelope with high correlation (R > 0.90). The 3 km product can better resolve aerosol gradients and retrieve closer to clouds and shorelines than the 10 km product, but tends to show more significant noise especially in urban areas. This urban degradation is quantified using ancillary land cover data. Overall, we show that the MODIS 3 km product adds new information to the existing set of satellite derived aerosol products and validates well over the region, but due to noise and problems in urban areas, should be treated with some degree of caution.

  3. CEH-GEAR: 1 km resolution daily and monthly areal rainfall estimates for the UK for hydrological use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. D. J.; Tanguy, M.; Prosdocimi, I.; Terry, J. A.; Hitt, O.; Cole, S. J.; Fry, M.; Morris, D. G.; Dixon, H.

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology - Gridded Estimates of Areal Rainfall (CEH-GEAR) dataset was developed to provide reliable 1 km gridded estimates of daily and monthly rainfall for Great Britain (GB) and Northern Ireland (NI) (together with approximately 3500 km2 of catchment in the Republic of Ireland) from 1890 onwards. The dataset was primarily required to support hydrological modelling. The rainfall estimates are derived from the Met Office collated historical weather observations for the UK which include a national database of raingauge observations. The natural neighbour interpolation methodology, including a normalisation step based on average annual rainfall, was used to generate the daily and monthly rainfall grids. To derive the monthly estimates, rainfall totals from monthly and daily (when complete month available) read raingauges were used in order to obtain maximum information from the raingauge network. The daily grids were adjusted so that the monthly grids are fully consistent with the daily grids. The CEH-GEAR dataset was developed according to the guidance provided by the British Standards Institution. The CEH-GEAR dataset contains 1 km grids of daily and monthly rainfall estimates for GB and NI for the period 1890-2012. For each day and month, CEH-GEAR includes a secondary grid of distance to the nearest operational raingauge. This may be used as an indicator of the quality of the estimates. When this distance is greater than 100 km, the estimates are not calculated due to high uncertainty. CEH-GEAR is available free of charge for commercial and non-commercial use subject to licensing terms and conditions. doi:10.5285/5dc179dc-f692-49ba-9326-a6893a503f6e

  4. CEH-GEAR: 1 km resolution daily and monthly areal rainfall estimates for the UK for hydrological and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. D. J.; Tanguy, M.; Prosdocimi, I.; Terry, J. A.; Hitt, O.; Cole, S. J.; Fry, M.; Morris, D. G.; Dixon, H.

    2015-06-01

    The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology - Gridded Estimates of Areal Rainfall (CEH-GEAR) data set was developed to provide reliable 1 km gridded estimates of daily and monthly rainfall for Great Britain (GB) and Northern Ireland (NI) (together with approximately 3500 km2 of catchment in the Republic of Ireland) from 1890 onwards. The data set was primarily required to support hydrological modelling. The rainfall estimates are derived from the Met Office collated historical weather observations for the UK which include a national database of rain gauge observations. The natural neighbour interpolation methodology, including a normalisation step based on average annual rainfall (AAR), was used to generate the daily and monthly rainfall grids. To derive the monthly estimates, rainfall totals from monthly and daily (when complete month available) rain gauges were used in order to obtain maximum information from the rain gauge network. The daily grids were adjusted so that the monthly grids are fully consistent with the daily grids. The CEH-GEAR data set was developed according to the guidance provided by the British Standards Institution. The CEH-GEAR data set contains 1 km grids of daily and monthly rainfall estimates for GB and NI for the period 1890-2012. For each day and month, CEH-GEAR includes a secondary grid of distance to the nearest operational rain gauge. This may be used as an indicator of the quality of the estimates. When this distance is greater than 100 km, the estimates are not calculated due to high uncertainty. CEH-GEAR is available from doi:10.5285/5dc179dc-f692-49ba-9326-a6893a503f6e and is free of charge for commercial and non-commercial use subject to licensing terms and conditions.

  5. Development of a surface display ELISA to detect anti-IgG antibodies against bovine αS1-casein in human sera.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Thorsten; Braukmann, Achim; Vordenbäumen, Stefan; Altendorfer, Irina; Bleck, Ellen; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Valenta, Rudolf; Schneider, Matthias; Jose, Joachim

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a surface display ELISA (SD-ELISA) for IgG-serum reaction against bovine casein αS1 (CSN1S1). In a SD-ELISA, the antigen is displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli using the autodisplay technology and whole cells of E. coli are used to coat the microplates for serum testing. After establishing the setup of the SD-ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antiserum against bovine CSN1S1, the SD-ELISA was validated with 20 human sera, of which 10 sera were proven to have an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1 and 10 sera were shown to be negative for this reaction. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis revealed sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% at a cut-off value of 0.133. Furthermore, human serum of 48 patients with known reactivity against human CSN1S1 (31 positive and 17 negative) was examined by the newly developed SD-ELISA to exclude cross-reactivity. Twenty human sera showed an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1. Eleven of these sera were positive for the reactivity against human CSN1S1, and nine were negative. In conclusion it was demonstrated that the performance of SD-ELISA is comparable to established ELISA without loss in sensitivity or specificity. Based on the advantages of this method - in particular no need for time-consuming and expensive antigen production and purification - the SD-ELISA is a potent alternative to convenient methods for identification and especially high-throughput screening of new antigens in the field of food allergies. PMID:24747146

  6. Development of a surface display ELISA to detect anti-IgG antibodies against bovine αS1-casein in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Saenger, Thorsten; Braukmann, Achim; Vordenbäumen, Stefan; Altendorfer, Irina; Bleck, Ellen; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Valenta, Rudolf; Schneider, Matthias; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a surface display ELISA (SD-ELISA) for IgG-serum reaction against bovine casein αS1 (CSN1S1). In a SD-ELISA, the antigen is displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli using the autodisplay technology and whole cells of E. coli are used to coat the microplates for serum testing. After establishing the setup of the SD-ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antiserum against bovine CSN1S1, the SD-ELISA was validated with 20 human sera, of which 10 sera were proven to have an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1 and 10 sera were shown to be negative for this reaction. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis revealed sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% at a cut-off value of 0.133. Furthermore, human serum of 48 patients with known reactivity against human CSN1S1 (31 positive and 17 negative) was examined by the newly developed SD-ELISA to exclude cross-reactivity. Twenty human sera showed an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1. Eleven of these sera were positive for the reactivity against human CSN1S1, and nine were negative. In conclusion it was demonstrated that the performance of SD-ELISA is comparable to established ELISA without loss in sensitivity or specificity. Based on the advantages of this method – in particular no need for time-consuming and expensive antigen production and purification – the SD-ELISA is a potent alternative to convenient methods for identification and especially high-throughput screening of new antigens in the field of food allergies. PMID:24747146

  7. Development of a surface display ELISA to detect anti-IgG antibodies against bovine αS1-casein in human sera.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Thorsten; Braukmann, Achim; Vordenbäumen, Stefan; Altendorfer, Irina; Bleck, Ellen; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Valenta, Rudolf; Schneider, Matthias; Jose, Joachim

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a surface display ELISA (SD-ELISA) for IgG-serum reaction against bovine casein αS1 (CSN1S1). In a SD-ELISA, the antigen is displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli using the autodisplay technology and whole cells of E. coli are used to coat the microplates for serum testing. After establishing the setup of the SD-ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antiserum against bovine CSN1S1, the SD-ELISA was validated with 20 human sera, of which 10 sera were proven to have an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1 and 10 sera were shown to be negative for this reaction. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis revealed sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% at a cut-off value of 0.133. Furthermore, human serum of 48 patients with known reactivity against human CSN1S1 (31 positive and 17 negative) was examined by the newly developed SD-ELISA to exclude cross-reactivity. Twenty human sera showed an IgG-mediated reaction against bovine CSN1S1. Eleven of these sera were positive for the reactivity against human CSN1S1, and nine were negative. In conclusion it was demonstrated that the performance of SD-ELISA is comparable to established ELISA without loss in sensitivity or specificity. Based on the advantages of this method - in particular no need for time-consuming and expensive antigen production and purification - the SD-ELISA is a potent alternative to convenient methods for identification and especially high-throughput screening of new antigens in the field of food allergies.

  8. MODIS aerosol product at 3 km spatial resolution for urban and air quality studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoo, S.; Remer, L. A.; Levy, R. C.; Holben, B. N.; Smirnov, A.

    2008-12-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites has been producing an aerosol product since early 2000. The original product reports aerosol optical depth and a variety of other aerosol parameters at a spatial resolution of 10 km over both land and ocean. The 10 km product is actually constructed from 500 m pixels, which permits a strict selection process to choose the "best" or "cleanest" pixels in each 10 km square for use in the aerosol retrieval. Thus, the original 10 km product provides a useful product, accurate in many applications. However, the 10 km product can miss narrow aerosol plumes and the spatial variability associated with urban air pollution. The MODIS aerosol team will be introducing a finer resolution aerosol product over land regions in the next release of the product (Collection 6). The new product will be produced at 3 km resolution. It is based on the same procedures as the original product and benefits from the same spatial variability criteria for finding and masking cloudy pixels. The 3 km product does capture the higher spatial variability associated with individual aerosol plumes. However, it is noisier than the 10 km product. Both products will be available operationally in Collection 6. The new 3km product offers new synergistic possibilities with PM2.5 monitoring networks, AERONET and various air quality models such as CMAQ.

  9. Potential of KM3NeT to observe galactic neutrino point-like sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trovato, Agata

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT (http://www.km3net.org">http://www.km3net.org) will be the next-generation cubic-kilometre-scale neutrino telescope to be installed in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea. This location will allow for surveying the Galactic Centre, most of the Galactic Plane as well as a large part of the sky. We report KM3NeT discovery potential for the SNR RXJ1713.7-3946 and the PWN Vela X and its sensitivity to point-like sources with an E-2 spectrum.

  10. Protective effect of kombucha mushroom (KM) tea on phenol-induced cytotoxicity in albino mice.

    PubMed

    Yapar, Kursad; Cavusoglu, Kultigin; Oruc, Ertan; Yalcin, Emine

    2010-09-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the protective role of kombucha mushroom (KM) tea on cytotoxicity induced by phenol (PHE) in mice. We used weight gain and micronucleus (MN) frequency as indicators of cytotoxicity and supported these parameters with pathological findings. The animals were randomly divided into seven groups: (Group I) only tap water (Group II) 1000 microl kg(-1) b. wt KM-tea, (Group III) 35 mg kg(-1) body wt. PHE (Group IV) 35 mg kg(-1) body wt. PHE + 250 microl kg(-1) b. wt KM-tea (Group V) 35 mg kg(-1) b. wt PHE + 500 microl kg(-1) b. wt KM-tea (Group VI) 35 mg kg(-1) b. wt PHE + 750 microl kg(-1) b. wt KM-tea, (Group VII) 35 mg kg(-1) b. wt PHE + 1000 microl kg(-1) b. wt KM-tea, for 20 consecutive days by oral gavage. The results indicated that all KM-tea supplemented mice showed a lower MN frequency than erythrocytes in only PHE-treated group. There was an observable regression on account of lesions in tissues of mice supplemented with different doses of KM-tea in histopathological observations. In conclusion, the KM-tea supplementation decreases cytotoxicity induced by PHE and its protective role is dose-dependent.

  11. NETL: The First 100 Years

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-21

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory celebrates 100 years of innovative energy technology development. NETL has been a leader in energy technology development. This video takes a look back at the many accomplishments over the past 100 years. These advances benefit the American people, enhance our nation's energy security and protect our natural resources.

  12. CV 100--Still Going Strong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    Describes results of a study that used CV 100, a fuel additive for use in oil-fired heating systems, on a trial basis in 12 Ontario schools. The test showed an average 12 percent reduction in fuel costs in the schools using CV 100. (JG)

  13. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  14. S1PR1-mediated IFNAR1 degradation modulates plasmacytoid dendritic cell interferon-α autoamplification

    PubMed Central

    Teijaro, John R.; Studer, Sean; Leaf, Nora; Kiosses, William B.; Nguyen, Nhan; Matsuki, Kosuke; Negishi, Hideo; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Oldstone, Michael B. A.; Rosen, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Blunting immunopathology without abolishing host defense is the foundation for safe and effective modulation of infectious and autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) agonists are effective in treating infectious and multiple autoimmune pathologies; however, mechanisms underlying their clinical efficacy are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we uncover an unexpected mechanism of convergence between S1PR1 and interferon alpha receptor 1 (IFNAR1) signaling pathways. Activation of S1PR1 signaling by pharmacological tools or endogenous ligand sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) inhibits type 1 IFN responses that exacerbate numerous pathogenic conditions. Mechanistically, S1PR1 selectively suppresses the type I IFN autoamplification loop in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), a specialized DC subset, for robust type I IFN release. S1PR1 agonist suppression is pertussis toxin-resistant, but inhibited by an S1PR1 C-terminal–derived transactivating transcriptional activator (Tat)-fusion peptide that blocks receptor internalization. S1PR1 agonist treatment accelerates turnover of IFNAR1, suppresses signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation, and down-modulates total STAT1 levels, thereby inactivating the autoamplification loop. Inhibition of S1P-S1PR1 signaling in vivo using the selective antagonist Ex26 significantly elevates IFN-α production in response to CpG-A. Thus, multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that S1PR1 signaling sets the sensitivity of pDC amplification of IFN responses, thereby blunting pathogenic immune responses. These data illustrate a lipid G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-IFNAR1 regulatory loop that balances effective and detrimental immune responses and elevated endogenous S1PR1 signaling. This mechanism will likely be advantageous in individuals subject to a range of inflammatory conditions. PMID:26787880

  15. Development of a second generation experiment to measure the 2(3)S(1) transition to 2(3)P(J) intervals in positronium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engbrecht, Jason John

    Positronium has proven to be a rich testing ground for Quantum Electrodynamics over the last half of the twentieth century. The 23S1 → 23PJ intervals in positronium have previously been measured and disagreements currently exist amongst various experiments and between some experiments and theoretical predictions. Furthermore, recent advances in theory have produced predictions with much higher precision than the current experiments. Therefore, work has been done to develop a 2 nd generation experiment to measure the 23S1 → 23PJ intervals in positronium. Previous experiments used the enhancement of the Lyman-a radiation from the 23P J states in order to observe the 23S1 → 23PJ resonance line. In the 2nd generation experiment the 23S1 positronium is observed by photo-ionizing the positronium and detecting the photo-positron. This signal is then depleted when microwave radiation is applied on resonance as compared to the signal off resonance. The ultimate goal of the 2nd generation experiment is to improve the precision of the measurement of the 2 3S1 → 23P2 interval from 1.5 MHz to 100 kHz. This dissertation describes the current status of the development of this 2nd generation experiment. This includes the development of all of the major subsystems necessary for detecting the 23S 1 → 23PJ transition, including the accumulated positron beam, the pulsed laser beam, the microwave delivery apparatus, and the interaction region. Results are presented showing the first photo-positron signal using an accumulated positron beam. The rate of this signal is approximately 100 mHz as compared to 15 mHz in the 1st generation experiments. This rate is sufficient to produce a 23S1 → 23P2 interval measurement with precision of 3 MHz with 8 hours of data acquisition and 600 kHz after 30 days. Potential improvements to the technique are suggested to allow for a 100 kHz measurement. Additionally, results are presented for Doppler broadening measurements of thermalization of

  16. Short communication: CSN1S1-CSN3 (α(S1)-κ-casein) composite genotypes affect detailed milk protein composition of Mediterranean water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Bonfatti, V; Giantin, M; Gervaso, M; Rostellato, R; Coletta, A; Dacasto, M; Carnier, P

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of composite CSN1S1-CSN3 [α(S1)-κ-casein (CN)] genotype on milk protein composition in Mediterranean water buffalo. Content of α(S1)-CN, α(S2)-CN, β-CN, γ-CN, κ-CN, glycosylated and unglycosylated κ-CN, α-lactalbumin, and β-lactoglobulin was measured by reversed-phase HPLC using 621 individual milk samples. Genotypes at CSN1S1 and CSN3 were also obtained by reversed-phase HPLC. Two alleles were detected at CSN1S1 (corresponding to the A and B variants, O62823: p.Leu193Ser,) and at CSN3 (corresponding to the X1 and X2 variants, CAP12622.1: p.Ile156Thr). Increased proportions of α(S1)-CN in total casein (TCN) were associated with genotypes carrying CSN1S1 A. Genotypes associated with a marked decrease of the proportion of α(S1)-CN in TCN (composite genotypes AB-X1X1 and BB-X1X2) were associated with marked increases in the proportion of α(S2)-CN. In addition, composite genotypes carrying the X1 allele at CSN3 were associated with a greater proportion of α(S2)-CN in TCN relative to those carrying CSN3 X2. Composite genotypes greatly affected also the variability of ratios of κ-CN to TCN, with genotypes carrying the X1 allele at CSN3 being associated with decreased ratios. The decreased content of glycosylated κ-CN associated with CSN3 X1 was responsible for the overall lower content of total κ-CN in milk of X1-carrying animals. Increasing the frequency of specific genotypes might be an effective way to alter milk protein composition, namely the proportion of α(S1)-CN, α(S2)-CN, and κ-CN in TCN, and the degree of glycosylation of κ-CN. PMID:22959943

  17. Short communication: CSN1S1-CSN3 (α(S1)-κ-casein) composite genotypes affect detailed milk protein composition of Mediterranean water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Bonfatti, V; Giantin, M; Gervaso, M; Rostellato, R; Coletta, A; Dacasto, M; Carnier, P

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of composite CSN1S1-CSN3 [α(S1)-κ-casein (CN)] genotype on milk protein composition in Mediterranean water buffalo. Content of α(S1)-CN, α(S2)-CN, β-CN, γ-CN, κ-CN, glycosylated and unglycosylated κ-CN, α-lactalbumin, and β-lactoglobulin was measured by reversed-phase HPLC using 621 individual milk samples. Genotypes at CSN1S1 and CSN3 were also obtained by reversed-phase HPLC. Two alleles were detected at CSN1S1 (corresponding to the A and B variants, O62823: p.Leu193Ser,) and at CSN3 (corresponding to the X1 and X2 variants, CAP12622.1: p.Ile156Thr). Increased proportions of α(S1)-CN in total casein (TCN) were associated with genotypes carrying CSN1S1 A. Genotypes associated with a marked decrease of the proportion of α(S1)-CN in TCN (composite genotypes AB-X1X1 and BB-X1X2) were associated with marked increases in the proportion of α(S2)-CN. In addition, composite genotypes carrying the X1 allele at CSN3 were associated with a greater proportion of α(S2)-CN in TCN relative to those carrying CSN3 X2. Composite genotypes greatly affected also the variability of ratios of κ-CN to TCN, with genotypes carrying the X1 allele at CSN3 being associated with decreased ratios. The decreased content of glycosylated κ-CN associated with CSN3 X1 was responsible for the overall lower content of total κ-CN in milk of X1-carrying animals. Increasing the frequency of specific genotypes might be an effective way to alter milk protein composition, namely the proportion of α(S1)-CN, α(S2)-CN, and κ-CN in TCN, and the degree of glycosylation of κ-CN.

  18. Pre-perihelion characterization of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Kelley, M. S.; Farnham, T. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Knight, M. M.; Weaver, H. A.; Mutchler, M.; Lamy, P. L.; Toth, I.

    2013-12-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a dynamically new comet on a sungrazing orbit. As such, C/ISON represents a unique opportunity to study both the cosmic-ray-irradiated surface, produced during the comet's long residence in the Oort cloud, and much deeper layers in the nucleus, exposed when the comet passes within 2 solar radii of the Sun at perihelion. During the first phase of our investigation, we collected broadband images of C/ISON on April 10, 2012 at a heliocentric distance of 4.15 AU, using the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS. We used the F606W and F438W filters in three HST orbits covering a total span of ~19 hrs. The comet shows a well delineated coma in the sunward direction extending about 2" from the nucleus, and a dust tail at least 25" long. The coma has an average red color of 5%/0.1 micron within 1.6" from the nucleus, becoming redder towards the tail. Both the color and the size of the coma in the sunward direction are consistent with outflow of micron sized dust. Broadband photometry yielded Afρ of 1376 cm at 589 nm, and 1281 cm at 433 nm, measured with a 1.6" radius aperture. The total brightness of the comet within a 0.12" radius aperture remained unchanged within 0.03 mag for the entire duration of the observations. A well defined sunward jet is visible after removing the 1/ρ brightness distribution. The jet is centered at position angle 290 deg (E of Celestial N), with a cone angle of 45 deg, a projected length of 1.6", and a slight curvature towards the north near the end. No temporal change in the morphology is observed, suggesting the jet is circumpolar. Under this assumption, the jet's apparent position constrains the rotational pole to lie within 30 deg of (RA, Dec) = (330, 0), and an obliquity of 50-80 deg. Preliminary analysis using a coma-nucleus separation technique suggests a nuclear radius less than 2 km. The survival of such a small nucleus during its perihelion at 2.7 solar radii is certainly questionable.

  19. The Anomalous Drift of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) due to Sublimating Volatiles near Perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, J. K.; Keane, J. V.; Milam, S.; Coulson, I.; Knight, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prior to perihelion passage on 28 November 2013, the observed right ascension (RA) and declination (Dec) coordinates of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) significantly lagged the predicted JPL (# 53) ephemeris. We show that this "braking effect" is due to a dynamic pressure exerted by sublimating gases on the sunward side of the nucleus [1]. Comet ISON was observed November 23 through November 28 using the SCUBA-2 sub-millimeter camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Imaging is achieved simultaneously at wavelengths of 850 μm and 450 μm, with RA and Dec determined from the central peak in the coma brightness [2]. When comet ISON was first detected at 850 μm, the 1-mm-sized dust particles were tightly bound to the comet nucleus until at least November 23. Three days later, the dust was less tightly bound, elongated and diffuse, spread out over as much as 120 arc seconds (80,000 km) in the anti-solar direction, suggesting a fragmentation event. We compute the average braking velocity of the nucleus of comet ISON by first measuring the distance between the central RA position and the predicted JPL ephemeris. We then calculate the change in this distance between subsequent observations, and divide this value by the elapsed time between the two observations to yield an average drift velocity of the nucleus over this time interval. We assume that comet ISON, like a number of Jupiter Family Comets visited by spacecraft [3], has low thermal inertia. Thus, the sublimating gases are emitted predominantly on the sunward side of the nucleus. Additionally, we assume that water ice dominates the sublimating gases [4]. We then calculate the pressure on the surface of the nucleus due to the emitted gases using the procedure described in [1]. We match the average drift velocity of the nucleus due to this sublimation pressure with the observed average drift velocity from the JCMT observations, which is sensitive to the size of the body, allowing us to estimate the size of the

  20. S1←S0 vibronic spectra and structure of cyclopropanecarboxaldehyde molecule in the S1 lowest excited singlet electronic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godunov, I. A.; Yakovlev, N. N.; Terentiev, R. V.; Maslov, D. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Abramenkov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The S1←S0 vibronic spectra of gas-phase absorption at room temperature and fluorescence excitation of jet-cooled cyclopropanecarboxaldehyde (CPCA, c-C3H5CHO)were obtained and analyzed. In addition, the quantum chemical calculation (CASPT2/cc-pVTZ)was carried out for CPCA in the ground (S0) and lowest excited singlet (S1) electronic states. As a result, it was proved that the S1←S0 electronic excitation of the CPCA conformers (syn and anti) causes (after geometrical relaxation) significant structural changes, namely, the carbonyl fragments become non-planar and the cyclopropyl groups rotate around the central C-C bond. As a consequence, the potential energy surface of CPCA in the S1 state has six minima, 1ab, 2ab, and 3ab, corresponding to three pairs of mirror symmetry conformers: a and b. It was shown that vibronic bands of experimental spectra can be assigned to the 2(S1)←syn(S0) electronic transition with the origin at 30,481 cm-1. A number of fundamental vibrational frequencies for the 2 conformer of CPCA were assigned. In addition, several inversional energy levels for the 2 conformer were found and the 2a↔2b potential function of inversion was determined. The experimental barrier to inversion and the equilibrium angle between the CH bond and the CCO plane were calculated as 570 cm-1 and 28°, respectively.

  1. Benzyl butyl phthalate promotes breast cancer stem cell expansion via SPHK1/S1P/S1PR3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Chang, Yi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lee, Jau-Nan; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the regulatory mechanisms unique to breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) is required to control breast cancer metastasis. We found that phthalates promote BCSCs in human breast cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. A toxic phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor in breast cancer cells to stimulate sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1)/sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) signaling and enhance formation of metastasis-initiating BCSCs. BBP induced histone modifications in S1PR3 in side population (SP) cells, but not in non-SP cells. SPHK1 or S1PR3 knockdown in breast cancer cells effectively reduced tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest S1PR3 is a determinant of phthalate-driven breast cancer metastasis and a possible therapeutic target for regulating BCSC populations. Furthermore, the association between breast carcinogenesis and environmental pollutants has important implications for public health. PMID:27129165

  2. Involvement of sphingosine-1-phosphate and S1P1 in angiogenesis: analyses using a new S1P1 antagonist of non-sphingosine-1-phosphate analog.

    PubMed

    Yonesu, Kiyoaki; Kawase, Yumi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Takagi, Nana; Tsuchida, Jun; Takuwa, Yoh; Kumakura, Seiichiro; Nara, Futoshi

    2009-03-15

    Chemical lead 2 (CL2) is the first non-sphingosine-1-phosphate (Sph-1-P) analog type antagonist of endothelial differentiation gene-1 (Edg-1/S1P(1)), which is a member of the Sph-1-P receptor family. CL2 inhibits [(3)H]Sph-1-P/S1P(1) binding and shows concentration-dependent inhibition activity against both intracellular cAMP concentration decrease and cell invasion induced by the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway. It also inhibits normal tube formation in an angiogenesis culture model, indicating that CL2 has anti-angiogenesis activity. This compound improved the disease conditions in two angiogenic models in vivo. It significantly inhibited angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit cornea model as well as the swelling of mouse feet in an anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis model. These results indicate that the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway would have an important role in disease-related angiogenesis, especially in the processes of migration/invasion and tube formation. In addition, CL2 would be a powerful tool for the pharmacological study of the mechanisms of the Sph-1-P/S1P(1) pathway in rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes retinopathy, and solid tumor growth processes. PMID:19150609

  3. Benzyl butyl phthalate promotes breast cancer stem cell expansion via SPHK1/S1P/S1PR3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Chang, Yi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lee, Jau-Nan; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory mechanisms unique to breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) is required to control breast cancer metastasis. We found that phthalates promote BCSCs in human breast cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. A toxic phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor in breast cancer cells to stimulate sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1)/sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) signaling and enhance formation of metastasis-initiating BCSCs. BBP induced histone modifications in S1PR3 in side population (SP) cells, but not in non-SP cells. SPHK1 or S1PR3 knockdown in breast cancer cells effectively reduced tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest S1PR3 is a determinant of phthalate-driven breast cancer metastasis and a possible therapeutic target for regulating BCSC populations. Furthermore, the association between breast carcinogenesis and environmental pollutants has important implications for public health. PMID:27129165

  4. BRIC-100VC Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC)-100VC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E.; Levine, Howard G. (Compiler); Romero, Vergel

    2016-01-01

    The Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) is an anodized-aluminum cylinder used to provide passive stowage for investigations of the effects of space flight on small specimens. The BRIC 100 mm petri dish vacuum containment unit (BRIC-100VC) has supported Dugesia japonica (flatworm) within spring under normal atmospheric conditions for 29 days in space and Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus L. (daylily) somatic embryo development within a 5% CO2 gaseous environment for 4.5 months in space. BRIC-100VC is a completely sealed, anodized-aluminum cylinder (Fig. 1) providing containment and structural support of the experimental specimens. The top and bottom lids of the canister include rapid disconnect valves for filling the canister with selected gases. These specialized valves allow for specific atmospheric containment within the canister, providing a gaseous environment defined by the investigator. Additionally, the top lid has been designed with a toggle latch and O-ring assembly allowing for prompt sealing and removal of the lid. The outside dimensions of the BRIC-100VC canisters are 16.0 cm (height) x 11.4 cm (outside diameter). The lower portion of the canister has been equipped with sufficient storage space for passive temperature and relative humidity data loggers. The BRIC- 100VC canister has been optimized to accommodate standard 100 mm laboratory petri dishes or 50 mL conical tubes. Depending on storage orientation, up to 6 or 9 canisters have been flown within an International Space Station (ISS) stowage locker.

  5. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  6. Leukocyte Subset Changes in Response to a 164-km Road Cycle Ride in a Hot Environment

    PubMed Central

    LUK, HUI-YING; MCKENZIE, AMY L.; DUPLANTY, ANTHONY A.; BUDNAR, RONALD G.; LEVITT, DANIELLE; FERNANDEZ, ALEX; LEE, ELAINE C.; ARMSTRONG, LAWRENCE E.; VINGREN, JAKOB L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this observational study was to determine the circulating leukocyte subset response to completing the 2013 Hotter’N Hell Hundred recreational 164-km road cycle event in a hot and humid environmental condition. Twenty-eight men and four women were included in this study. Whole blood samples were obtained 1–2 hours before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) the event. Electronic sizing/sorting and cytometry were used to determine complete blood counts (CBC) including neutrophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte subsets. The concentration of circulating total leukocytes (103·μL−1) increased 134% from PRE to POST with the greatest increase in neutrophils (319%, p<0.0001). Circulating monocytes (including macrophages) increased 24% (p=0.004) and circulating lymphocytes including B and T cells increased 53% (p<0.0001). No association was observed between rolling time or relative intensity and leukocyte subset. Completing the Hotter n′ Hell Hundred (HHH), a 100 mile recreational cycling race in extreme (hot and humid) environmental conditions, induces a substantial increase in total leukocytes in circulation. The contribution of increases in specific immune cell subsets is not equal, with neutrophils increasing to greater than 4-fold starting values from PRE to POST race. It is likely that exercise in stressful environmental conditions affects the complement of circulating immune cells, although activational state and characterization of specific leukocyte subsets remains unclear. The observed increase in circulating cell sub-populations suggests that the circulating immune surveillance system may be acutely affected by exercise in hot and humid conditions. PMID:27293505

  7. Heavy metal effects on the biodegradation of fluorene by Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 isolated from PAHs-contaminated mine soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I.; Chon, C.; Jung, K.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment and occur ubiquitously in fossil fuels as well as in products of incomplete combustion and are known to be strongly toxic, often with carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. Fluorene is one of the 16 PAHs included in the list of priority pollutants of the Environmental Protection Agency. The fluorene-degrading bacterial strain Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 was isolated from PAHs-contaminated soil near an abandoned mine impacted area by selective enrichment techniques. Fluorene added to the Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 culture as sole carbon and energy source was 78.4% removed within 120 h. A fluorene degradation pathway is tentatively proposed based on mass spectrometric identification of the metabolic intermediates 9-fluorenone, 4-hydroxy-9-fluorenone, and 8-hydroxy-3,4-benzocoumarin. Further the ability of Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 to bioremediate 100 mg/kg fluorene in mine soil was examined by composting under laboratory conditions. Treatment of microcosm soil with the strain KM-02 for 20 days resulted in a 65.6% reduction in total amounts. These results demonstrate that Sphingobacterium sp. KM-02 could potentially be used in the bioremediation of fluorene from contaminated soil. Mine impacted area comprises considerable amounts of heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic, and copper. Although some of these metals are necessary for biological life, excessive quantities often result in the inhibition of essential biological reactions via numerous pathways. A number of reports collectively show that various metals, such as Al, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Hg at a range of concentrations have adverse effects on the degradation of organic compounds. However, at present there is only limited information on the effect of individual heavy metals on the biological degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including fluorene. Moreover, heavy metal effects were not

  8. Changes in Body Mass, Hydration and Electrolytes Following a 161-km Endurance Race

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To examine electrolyte concentrations and changes in body mass and total body water (TBW) during a 161-km ultra-marathon, and relate these to finish time and incidence of hyponatremia. Methods: Subjects were recruited from the 161-km 2008 Rio Del Lago Endurance Race. Body mass, TBW, and s...

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bordetella bronchiseptica Swine Isolate KM22.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Shore, Sarah M; Bayles, Darrell O; Register, Karen B; Kingsley, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22 has been used in experimental infections of swine as a model of clinical B. bronchiseptica infections within swine herds and to study host-to-host transmission. Here we report the draft genome sequence of KM22. PMID:25013141

  10. Acute prior heavy strength exercise bouts improve the 20-km cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renato A S; Silva-Júnior, Fernando L; Pinheiro, Fabiano A; Souza, Patrícia F M; Boullosa, Daniel A; Pires, Flávio O

    2014-09-01

    This study verified if a prior 5 repetition maximum (5RM) strength exercise would improve the cycling performance during a 20-km cycling time trial (TT20km). After determination of the 5RM leg press exercise load, 11 trained cyclists performed a TT20km in a control condition and 10-minute after 4 sets of 5RM strength exercise bouts (potentiation condition). Oxygen uptake, blood lactate concentration, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and power output data were recorded during the TT20km. Cycling economy index was assessed before the TT20km, and pacing strategy was analyzed assuming a "J-shaped" power output distribution profile. Results were a 6.1% reduction (p ≤ 0.05) in the time to complete the TT20km, a greater cycling economy (p < 0.01), and power output in the first 10% of the TT20km (i.e., trend; p = 0.06) in the potentiation condition. However, no differences were observed in pacing strategy, physiological parameters, and RPE between the conditions. These results suggest that 5RM strength exercise bouts improve the performance in a subsequent TT20km.

  11. A Co-Creation Blended KM Model for Cultivating Critical-Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Yu-chu

    2012-01-01

    Both critical thinking (CT) and knowledge management (KM) skills are necessary elements for a university student's success. Therefore, this study developed a co-creation blended KM model to cultivate university students' CT skills and to explore the underlying mechanisms for achieving success. Thirty-one university students participated in this…

  12. Draft genome sequence of the Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22 has been used in experimental infections of swine as a model of clinical B. bronchiseptica infections within swine herds and to study host-to-host transmission. Here we report the draft genome sequence of KM22....

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bordetella bronchiseptica Swine Isolate KM22.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Shore, Sarah M; Bayles, Darrell O; Register, Karen B; Kingsley, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica swine isolate KM22 has been used in experimental infections of swine as a model of clinical B. bronchiseptica infections within swine herds and to study host-to-host transmission. Here we report the draft genome sequence of KM22.

  14. Isotope shift of the 32S 1/2 -22S 1/2 transition in lithium and the nuclear polarizability.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, M; Moro, A M; Pachucki, K

    2006-09-29

    High precision calculation of the isotope shift of the 3(2)S(1/2)-2(2)S(1/2) transition in lithium is presented. The wave function and matrix elements of relativistic operators are obtained by using recursion relations. Apart from the relativistic contribution, we obtain the nuclear polarizability correction for 11Li. The resulting difference of the squared charge radii 11Li-7Li based on the measurements of Sánchez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 033002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.033002] is deltar(ch)(2)=0.157(81) fm(2), which significantly differs from the previous evaluation.

  15. Design and mass production of the optical modules for KM3NeT-Italia project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonora, Emanuele; Aiello, Sebastiano; Giordano, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT European project aims at constructing a km3 underwater neutrino telescope in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea. The first phase that is under construction will comprise eight tower-like detection structures (KM3NeT-Italia), which will form the internal core of a km3-scale detector. The detection element of KM3NeT-Italia, the optical module, is made of a 13-inch pressure-resistant glass-vessel that contains a single 10-inch photomultiplier and the relative electronics. The design of the whole optical module, the main results obtained from the massive photomultipliers measurements, and the foremost phases of the mass production procedure performed at the production site of Catania are also presented.

  16. Cape Canaveral, Florida range reference atmosphere 0-70 km altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingle, A. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The RRA contains tabulations for monthly and annual means, standard deviations, skewness coefficients for wind speed, pressure temperature, density, water vapor pressure, virtual temperature, dew-point temperature, and the means and standard deviations for the zonal and meridional wind components and the linear (product moment) correlation coefficient between the wind components. These statistical parameters are tabulated at the station elevation and at 1 km intervals from sea level to 30 km and at 2 km intervals from 30 to 90 km altitude. The wind statistics are given at approximately 10 m above the station elevations and at altitudes with respect to mean sea level thereafter. For those range sites without rocketsonde measurements, the RRAs terminate at 30 km altitude or they are extended, if required, when rocketsonde data from a nearby launch site are available. There are four sets of tables for each of the 12 monthly reference periods and the annual reference period.

  17. 1-100 Rules Ok?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2003-01-01

    In a recent edition of "Mathematics Teaching" Midge Pasternack argued the case for the use of the 0-99 square with young children rather than the ubiquitous 1-100 square. In this article, the author would like to take the opportunity to mount a defence in favour of the much maligned 1-100 square. His main criticism of the 0-99 square (apart from…

  18. Nanoporosity of Si (100) bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S. N.; Timoshenkov, S. P.; Minaev, V. S.; Goryunova, E. P.; Gerasimenko, N. N.; Smirnov, D. I.

    2016-09-01

    Si(100) samples cut from a typical bar (100 mm in diameter) prepared using industrial technology are studied. Measurements of the electron work function (EWF) show that the size effects in these samples (a reduction in thickness along with a sample's area and the EWF) detected earlier were due to nanostructure porosity that was buried by the technological treatment of a bar's surface. This hidden nanoporosity is assumed to be a manifestation of the secondary crystal structure.

  19. Functions of S100 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donato, R.; Cannon, B.R.; Sorci, G.; Riuzzi, F.; Hsu, K.; Weber, D.J.; Geczy, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    The S100 protein family consists of 24 members functionally distributed into three main subgroups: those that only exert intracellular regulatory effects, those with intracellular and extracellular functions and those which mainly exert extracellular regulatory effects. S100 proteins are only expressed in vertebrates and show cell-specific expression patterns. In some instances, a particular S100 protein can be induced in pathological circumstances in a cell type that does not express it in normal physiological conditions. Within cells, S100 proteins are involved in aspects of regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis, energy metabolism, inflammation and migration/invasion through interactions with a variety of target proteins including enzymes, cytoskeletal subunits, receptors, transcription factors and nucleic acids. Some S100 proteins are secreted or released and regulate cell functions in an autocrine and paracrine manner via activation of surface receptors (e.g. the receptor for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptor 4), G-protein-coupled receptors, scavenger receptors, or heparan sulfate proteoglycans and N-glycans. Extracellular S100A4 and S100B also interact with epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor, respectively, thereby enhancing the activity of the corresponding receptors. Thus, extracellular S100 proteins exert regulatory activities on monocytes/macrophages/microglia, neutrophils, lymphocytes, mast cells, articular chondrocytes, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, neurons, astrocytes, Schwann cells, epithelial cells, myoblasts and cardiomyocytes, thereby participating in innate and adaptive immune responses, cell migration and chemotaxis, tissue development and repair, and leukocyte and tumor cell invasion. PMID:22834835

  20. Probable Disastrous Consequences of Collision Between Unknown Small (100 m) Asteroids with Known (Approximately 1 km) Near Earth Orbiting (NEO) Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry

    2003-01-01

    The long-term stability of the Solar System is not well understood. Ironically its stability is taken for granted even though our knowledge of all the constituents [comets, asteroids. (The Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter, Trojan Asteroids, Kuiper belt, Ort Cloud), planetoids, planets, moons, etc], and its long-term dynamics cannot be easily computed. At best one might say that the solar system is chaotic, but much of the time it seems to exists near a quasi-stationary state. An asteroid that passes near the Earth regularly returns with clock-like precision. Taking into account every known detail of its path through the solar system, its orbit is calculated forward thousands of years with no untoward calamity on the horizon. And then one day, this passive visitor slams into the Earth during a sunny afternoon picnic! Can this happen? Unfortunately, this is a real possibility in the ordinary history of the solar system. In fact our knowledge of the solar system in the small is sketchy, as will be pointed out. Events, which lie outside our awareness, can precipitate disasters that we may perceive when it's too late to launch effective counter measures. In this work, one such scenario is described and the direct consequences for the Earth are calculated.

  1. Recent Results of the Remote Sensing of the O/N2 Ratio in the 100 to 200 Km Altitude Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The O/N2 ratio is a sensitive indicator of dynamical changes in the composition of the lower Thermosphere. In the auroral zone the deposition of auroral energy (either through particle precipitation or Joule heating) can produce changes in vertical winds causing a decrease in the O/N2 ratio. Horizontal winds may transport O-depleted air away from the auroral zone causing composition changes in the latitude regions equatorward of the auroral zone. Large waves and tides may also affect composition. To measure such composition changes a number of complimentary remote sensing techniques exist. In the auroral zone ground-based photometers have been sued to monitor, at night, variations of the column O/N2 at a single location as a function of time. Satellite observations (most notably the GUVI instrument on TIMED) provide column O/N2 variations during the daytime as a function of latitude at a nearly fixed local time. Rockets have recently been shown to be able to measure vertical variations in an auroral arc providing altitude-based measurements. Here we review some of the most recent results with an emphasis on comparison with the model predictions of MSIS.

  2. Enhanced Raman scattering from cesium suboxides on silver particles and the structure of S-1 photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, C. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An explanation is given for the results of recent enhanced Raman scattering studies of photomultiplier tubes with S-1 photocathode surfaces which indicated the presence of Cs11O3 but not Cs2O. The reason for the discrepancy between the currently accepted model of the S-1 and this recent result is discussed.

  3. Mechanism of the S1 excited state internal conversion in vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Garabato, Brady D; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2014-09-21

    To explain the photostability of vitamin B12, internal conversion of the S1 state was investigated using TD-DFT. The active coordinates for radiationless deactivation were determined to be elongated axial bonds, overcoming a 5.0 kcal mol(-1) energy barrier between the relaxed ligand-to-metal charge transfer (S1), and the ground (S0) states.

  4. VIEW OF THE FROM SIDE OF WHARF S1 FROM WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE FROM SIDE OF WHARF S1 FROM WEST END OF QUARRY LOCK, FACING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Submarine Base, Berthing Wharf S1, South Waterfront Road along north side of Quarry Loch, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus S-1, an Efficient Isoeugenol-Utilizing Producer for Natural Vanillin

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Hua, Dongliang; Zhang, Zhaobin; Wang, Xiaoyu; Tang, Hongzhi; Tao, Fei; Tai, Cui; Wu, Qiulin; Wu, Geng; Xu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus S-1 is an efficient isoeugenol-utilizing producer of natural vanillin. The genome of B. pumilus S-1 contains the epoxide hydrolase and six candidate monooxygenases that make it possible to explore the mechanism involved in conversion of isoenguenol to vanillin in the B. pumilus strain. PMID:22038964

  6. European S1 guideline for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C; Desai, N; Emtestam, L; Hunger, R E; Ioannides, D; Juhász, I; Lapins, J; Matusiak, L; Prens, E P; Revuz, J; Schneider-Burrus, S; Szepietowski, J C; van der Zee, H H; Jemec, G B E

    2015-04-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa (HS) is a chronic, inflammatory, recurrent, debilitating skin disease of the hair follicle that usually presents after puberty with painful, deep-seated, inflamed lesions in the apocrine gland-bearing areas of the body, most commonly the axillae, inguinal and anogenital regions. A mean disease incidence of 6.0 per 100,000 person-years and an average prevalence of 1% has been reported in Europe. HS has the highest impact on patients' quality of life among all assessed dermatological diseases. HS is associated with a variety of concomitant and secondary diseases, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, e.g. Crohn's disease, spondyloarthropathy, follicular occlusion syndrome and other hyperergic diseases. The central pathogenic event in HS is believed to be the occlusion of the upper part of the hair follicle leading to a perifollicular lympho-histiocytic inflammation. A highly significant association between the prevalence of HS and current smoking (Odds ratio 12.55) and overweight (Odds ratio 1.1 for each body mass index unit) has been documented. The European S1 HS guideline suggests that the disease should be treated based on its individual subjective impact and objective severity. Locally recurring lesions can be treated by classical surgery or LASER techniques, whereas medical treatment either as monotherapy or in combination with radical surgery is more appropriate for widely spread lesions. Medical therapy may include antibiotics (clindamycin plus rifampicine, tetracyclines), acitretin and biologics (adalimumab, infliximab). A Hurley severity grade-relevant treatment of HS is recommended by the expert group following a treatment algorithm. Adjuvant measurements, such as pain management, treatment of superinfections, weight loss and tobacco abstinence have to be considered.

  7. Global Investigation of the Mg Atom and ion Layers using SCIAMACHY/Envisat Observations between 70 km and 150 km Altitude and WACCM-MG Model Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langowski, M.; vonSavigny, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.; Marsh, D. R.; Janches, Diego; Sinnhuber, M.; Aikin, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mg and Mg+ concentration fields in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere (UMLT) region are retrieved from SCIAMACHY/Envisat limb measurements of Mg and Mg+ dayglow emissions using a 2-D tomographic retrieval approach. The time series of monthly means of Mg and Mg+ for number density as well as vertical column density in different latitudinal regions are shown. Data from the limb mesosphere-thermosphere mode of SCIAMACHY/Envisat are used, which covers the 50 km to 150 km altitude region with a vertical sampling of 3.3 km and a highest latitude of 82 deg. The high latitudes are not covered in the winter months, because there is no dayglow emission during polar night. The measurements were performed every 14 days from mid-2008 until April 2012. Mg profiles show a peak at around 90 km altitude with a density between 750 cm(exp-3) and 2000 cm(exp-3). Mg does not show strong seasonal variation at mid-latitudes. The Mg+ peak occurs 5-15 km above the neutral Mg peak at 95-105 km. Furthermore, the ions show a significant seasonal cycle with a summer maximum in both hemispheres at mid- and high-latitudes. The strongest seasonal variations of the ions are observed at mid-latitudes between 20-40 deg and densities at the peak altitude range from 500 cm(exp-3) to 6000 cm(exp-3). The peak altitude of the ions shows a latitudinal dependence with a maximum at mid-latitudes that is up to 10 km higher than the peak altitude at the equator. The SCIAMACHY measurements are compared to other measurements and WACCM model results. In contrast to the SCIAMACHY results, the WACCM results show a strong seasonal variability for Mg with a winter maximum, which is not observable by SCIAMACHY, and globally higher peak densities. Although the peak densities do not agree the vertical column densities agree, since SCIAMACHY results show a wider vertical profile. The agreement of SCIAMACHY and WACCM results is much better for Mg+, showing the same seasonality and similar peak densities. However

  8. An anatomical update on the morphologic variations of S1 and S2.

    PubMed

    Karachalios, Theofilos; Zibis, Aristides H; Zintzaras, Elias; Bargiotas, Konstantinos; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2010-10-11

    Although percutaneous fixation with iliosacral screws has been shown to be a safe and reproducible method for sacroiliac dislocation and sacral fractures, it is a technically demanding technique, and one of its contraindications is sacral anatomical variations and dysmorphism. The incidence and pattern of S1 and S2 anatomical variations were evaluated in 61 patients (35 women and 26 men) using magnetic resonance imaging of the sacrum in an attempt to explore the possible existence of groups of individuals in whom percutaneous sacroiliac fixation is difficult due to local anatomy. S1 and S2 dimensions in both the transverse and coronal planes were recorded and evaluated. In each individual, S1 and S2 dimensions both in the coronal and transverse planes were proportional, with S2 dimensions being 80% of those of S1 on average. Patients were separated into 4 groups based on the S1 and S2 body size and the asymmetry of dimensions in the transverse and coronal planes. In 48 patients (78.6%), dimensions in both planes were symmetrical despite the varying size of the S1 and S2 body. In 2 patients (3.3%) there was a combination of large transverse plane and small coronal plane dimensions, with large S1 and S2 body size. In 9 patients (14.8%), coronal plane dimensions were disproportionately smaller compared to those of the transverse plane, with a varying size of S1 and S2 body making effective sacroiliac screw insertion a difficult task. Thus, a preoperative imaging study, preferably computed tomography scan, of S1 and S2 body size and coronal plane dimensions and an intraoperative fluoroscopic control of S1 and S2 dimensions on the coronal plane are suggested for safe sacroiliac screw fixation.

  9. Estimates of epistatic and pleiotropic effects of casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) and thyroglobulin (TG) genetic markers on beef heifer performance traits enhanced by selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC II) was subjected to marker assisted selection for two years to equalize CSN1S1 and TG genetic marker frequencies to evaluate the epista...

  10. Detection of anti-preS1 antibodies for recovery of hepatitis B patients by immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Wang, Yu-Qin; Lu, Zhi-Meng; Li, Guang-Di; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Zu-Chuan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To establish a convenient immunoassay method based on recombinant antigen preS1(21-119 aa) to detect anti-preS1 antibodies and evaluate the clinical significance of antibodies in hepatitis B. METHODS: The expression plasmid pET-28a-preS1 was constructed, and a large quantity of preS1(21-119 aa) fragment of the large HBsAg protein was obtained. The preS1 fragment purified by Ni2+-IDA affinity chromatography was used as coated antigen to establish the indirect ELISA based on streptavidin-biotin system for detection of the anti-preS1 antibodies in sera from HBV-infected patients. For follow-up study, serial sera were collected during the clinical course of 21 HBV-infected patients and anti-preS1 antibodies, preS1 antigen, HBV-DNA and other serological HBV markers were analyzed. RESULTS: preS1(21-119 aa) fragment was highly expressed from the plasmid pET-28a-preS1 in a soluble form in E. coli (30 mg•L⁻¹), and easily purified to high purity over 90% by one step of Ni2+-IDA-sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The purity and antigenicity of the purified preS1(21-119 aa) protein was determined by 150 g•L⁻¹ SDS-PAGE, Western blot and a direct ELISA. Recombinant preS1(21-119 aa) protein was successfully applied in the immunoassay which could sensitively detect the anti-preS1 antibodies in serum specimens of acute or chronic hepatitis B patients. Results showed that more than half of 19 acute hepatitis B patients produced anti-preS1 antibodies during recovery of the disease, however, the response was only found in a few of chronic patients. In the clinical follow-up study of 11 patients with anti-preS1 positive serological profile, HBsAg and HBV-DNA clearance occurred in 6 of 10 acute hepatitis B patients in 5-6 mo, and seroconversion of HBeAg and disappearance of HBV-DNA occurred in 1 chronic patients treated with lavumidine, a antiviral agent. CONCLUSION: The high-purity preS1(21-119 aa) coated antigen was successfully prepared by gene expression and

  11. The 130-km-long Green Valley Fault Zone of Northern California: Discontinuities Regulate Its Earthquake Recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienkaemper, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    comparable to the 6 mm/yr Holocene slip rate observed on the NCF (Kelson et al., 1996). Microearthquakes on the GVF reach a depth of ~14 km. Using methods of Savage and Lisowski (1993) for the GVF suggests that creep may on average extend to depths of ~7.5 km, leaving a width of ~6.5 km of locked fault zone below. Trenching on the SGVF indicates 400 (±50) years have elapsed since the most recent large earthquake (MRE) in 1610±50 yr CE. Previous earthquake recurrence intervals (RI) in the past millennium indicate a mean RI of 200±80 yr (μ±σ) for the SGVF, which is much shorter than the 400-yr open interval. Preliminary evidence from trenching on the BF gives a MRE of 1630±100 yr CE, which may thus coincide with of the MRE on the SGVF. If the MRE on the BF and SGVF sections is the same earthquake, then its expected larger size (M~6.9-7.0 vs 6.7) and greater fault complexity may have produced a large stress drop, which would possibly help explain the current long open interval. The SGVF paleoseismic recurrence model is consistent with a simple probabilistic rupture model (i.e., 50%-probable rupture across 1-4 km steps) and with a Brownian Passage Time recurrence model with a mean RI of 250 yr, CV (coefficient of variation, σ/μ) of 0.6, and a 30-yr rupture probability of 20-25%.

  12. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) Knowledge Management (KM) Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnedoe, Tom; Smith, Randy; McCarter, Mike; Wilson, Barry; Porter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities within the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center of Excellence (AISCE), lntergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KNI implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to suppoth e planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have beon pedormed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural1KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of the swine pathogen Bordetella bronchisepticastrain KM22.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Shore, Sarah M; Register, Karen B; Bayles, Darrell O; Kingsley, Robert A; Brunelle, Brain W

    2016-01-15

    The well-characterized Bordetella bronchiseptica strain KM22, originally isolated from a pig with atrophic rhinitis, has been used to develop a reproducible swine respiratory disease model. The goal of this study was to identify genetic features unique to KM22 by comparing the genome sequence of KM22 to the laboratory reference strain RB50. To gain a broader perspective of the genetic relationship of KM22 among other B. bronchiseptica strains, selected genes of KM22 were then compared to five other B. bronchiseptica strains isolated from different hosts. Overall, the KM22 genome sequence is more similar to the genome sequences of the strains isolated from animals than the strains isolated from humans. The majority of virulence gene expression in Bordetella is positively regulated by the two-component sensory transduction system BvgAS. bopN, bvgA, fimB, and fimC were the most highly conserved BvgAS-regulated genes present in all seven strains analyzed. In contrast, the BvgAS-regulated genes present in all seven strains with the highest sequence divergence werefimN, fim2, fhaL, andfhaS. A total of eight major fimbrial subunit genes were identified in KM22. Quantitative real-time PCR data demonstrated that seven of the eight fimbrial subunit genes identified in KM22 are expressed and regulated by BvgAS. The annotation of the KM22 genome sequence, coupled with the comparative genomic analyses reported in this study, can be used to facilitate the development of vaccines with improved efficacy towards B. bronchiseptica in swine to decrease the prevalence and disease burden caused by this pathogen. PMID:26711033

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of the swine pathogen Bordetella bronchisepticastrain KM22.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tracy L; Shore, Sarah M; Register, Karen B; Bayles, Darrell O; Kingsley, Robert A; Brunelle, Brain W

    2016-01-01

    The well-characterized Bordetella bronchiseptica strain KM22, originally isolated from a pig with atrophic rhinitis, has been used to develop a reproducible swine respiratory disease model. The goal of this study was to identify genetic features unique to KM22 by comparing the genome sequence of KM22 to the laboratory reference strain RB50. To gain a broader perspective of the genetic relationship of KM22 among other B. bronchiseptica strains, selected genes of KM22 were then compared to five other B. bronchiseptica strains isolated from different hosts. Overall, the KM22 genome sequence is more similar to the genome sequences of the strains isolated from animals than the strains isolated from humans. The majority of virulence gene expression in Bordetella is positively regulated by the two-component sensory transduction system BvgAS. bopN, bvgA, fimB, and fimC were the most highly conserved BvgAS-regulated genes present in all seven strains analyzed. In contrast, the BvgAS-regulated genes present in all seven strains with the highest sequence divergence werefimN, fim2, fhaL, andfhaS. A total of eight major fimbrial subunit genes were identified in KM22. Quantitative real-time PCR data demonstrated that seven of the eight fimbrial subunit genes identified in KM22 are expressed and regulated by BvgAS. The annotation of the KM22 genome sequence, coupled with the comparative genomic analyses reported in this study, can be used to facilitate the development of vaccines with improved efficacy towards B. bronchiseptica in swine to decrease the prevalence and disease burden caused by this pathogen.

  15. Dosimetry of secondary cosmic radiation up to an altitude of 30 km.

    PubMed

    Wissmann, F; Burda, O; Khurana, S; Klages, T; Langner, F

    2014-10-01

    Dosimetric measurements in the field of secondary cosmic radiation were extensively made during the last years. Since the majority of these measurements were performed on-board passenger aircraft at altitudes between 10 and 12 km, measurements at higher altitudes are desirable for the verification of the legal dose assessment procedures for aircrew. A simple solution is to use a high-altitude balloon that reaches altitudes as high as 30 km. In this work, it is shown that the dose rate profile up to 30 km can be measured with acceptable uncertainties using a Si-detector. PMID:24345463

  16. Dosimetry of secondary cosmic radiation up to an altitude of 30 km.

    PubMed

    Wissmann, F; Burda, O; Khurana, S; Klages, T; Langner, F

    2014-10-01

    Dosimetric measurements in the field of secondary cosmic radiation were extensively made during the last years. Since the majority of these measurements were performed on-board passenger aircraft at altitudes between 10 and 12 km, measurements at higher altitudes are desirable for the verification of the legal dose assessment procedures for aircrew. A simple solution is to use a high-altitude balloon that reaches altitudes as high as 30 km. In this work, it is shown that the dose rate profile up to 30 km can be measured with acceptable uncertainties using a Si-detector.

  17. Characterization of the KM3NeT photomultipliers in the Hellenic Open University

    SciTech Connect

    Bourlis, G.; Avgitas, T.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The KM3NeT neutrino research infrastructure will be a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory in the Mediterranean Sea hosting a neutrino telescope. The Physics Laboratory of the Hellenic Open University is involved in the characterization of the KM3NeT neutrino detector. The present work describes measurement techniques for the functional characteristics of the candidate KM3NeT photomultipliers. These characteristics include dark current, transit time spread, gain slope and single photoelectron characteristics, as well as delayed and after pulses.

  18. Phosphorylation of αS1-casein is regulated by different genes.

    PubMed

    Bijl, E; van Valenberg, H J F; Huppertz, T; van Hooijdonk, A C M; Bovenhuis, H

    2014-11-01

    Casein phosphorylation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by kinase enzymes that attach phosphate groups to specific AA in the protein sequence. This modification is one of the key factors responsible for the stabilization of calcium phosphate nanoclusters in casein micelles and for the internal structure of the casein micelles. α(S1)-Casein (α(s1)-CN) is of special interest because it constitutes up to 40% of the total casein fraction in milk, and it has 2 common phosphorylation states, with 8 (α(S1)-CN-8P) and 9 (α(S1)-CN-9P) phosphorylated serine residues. Factors affecting this variation in the degree of phosphorylation are not currently known. The objective of this research was to determine the genetic background of α(S1)-CN-8P and α(S1)-CN-9P. The genetic and phenotypic correlation between α(S1)-CN-8P and α(S1)-CN-9P was low (0.18 and 0.19, respectively). This low genetic correlation suggests a different genetic background. These differences were further investigated by means of a genome-wide association study, which showed that both α(S1)-CN-8P and α(S1)-CN-9P were affected by a region on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 6, but only α(S1)-CN-8P was affected by a region on BTA11 that contains the gene that encodes for β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), and only α(S1)-CN-9P was affected by a region on BTA14 that contains the diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) gene. Estimated effects of β-LG protein genotypes showed that only α(S1)-CN-8P was associated with the β-LG A/B polymorphism (g.1772G>A and g.3054C>T); the AA genotype of β-LG was associated with a lower concentration of α(S1)-CN-8P (-0.32% wt/wt) than the BB genotype (+0.41% wt/wt). Estimated effects of DGAT1 K232A genotypes showed that only α(S1)-CN-9P was associated with the DGAT1 gene polymorphism; DGAT1 AA genotype was associated with a higher α(S1)-CN-9P concentration (+0.53% wt/wt) than the DGAT1 KK genotype (-0.44% wt/wt). The results give insight in phosphorylation of α(S1

  19. [Combination therapy with S-1 and CDDP for head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masato

    2006-06-01

    The combination with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-FU is considered the first choice chemotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). S-1, a modulation of tegafur developed in Japan, is an active agent for HNSCC. Some clinical phase I/II studies about the combination with CDDP and S-1 have been reported. The combination showed a good response rate of 67.6% for advanced and recurrent HNSCC in our clinical phase I/II study. The regimens of S-1 combined with carboplatin or nedaplatin have also been reported. Regimens containing S-1 appear to have been effective for HNSCC. Multi-institutional phase II studies with a large sample size are needed in the future. The compliance for patients is better than a 5-FU injection because S-1 is orally administrated. The adverse effect, especially for bone mallow toxicity, is equal or upgraded compared with a 5-FU injection. The efficacy and adverse effects of CDDP plus S-1 should be studied in carefully designed phase II/III trials. S-1 will be one of the key drugs for HNSCC in the future. PMID:16897992

  20. One-stage surgery through posterior approach-for L5-S1 spondyloptosis

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Hikmet Turan; Celikoglu, Erhan; Borekcı, Ali; Hıcdonmez, Tufan; Suslu, Hüsnü

    2011-01-01

    Grade 5 spondylolisthesis or spondyloptosis is a rare condition. Generally, the surgical management of spondyloptosis includes multi-staged procedures instead of one-staged procedures. One-stage treatment for spondyloptosis is very rare. A 15-year-old girl with L5-S1 spondyloptosis was admitted with severe low back pain. There was no history of trauma. The patient underwent L5 laminectomy, L5-S1 discectomy, resection of sacral dome, reduction, L3-L4-L5-S1 pedicular screw fixation, and interbody-posterolateral fusion through the posterior approach. The reduction was maintained with bilateral L5-S1 discectomy, resection of the sacral dome, and transpedicular instrumentation from L3 to S1. In this particular case, one-staged approach was adequate for the treatment of L5-S1 spondyloptosis. One-staged surgery using the posterior approach may be adequate for the treatment of L5-S1 spondyloptosis while avoiding the risks inherent in anterior approaches. PMID:23125496

  1. Molecular insights into replication initiation by Qβ replicase using ribosomal protein S1

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Daijiro; Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1, consisting of six contiguous OB-folds, is the largest ribosomal protein and is essential for translation initiation in Escherichia coli. S1 is also one of the three essential host-derived subunits of Qβ replicase, together with EF-Tu and EF-Ts, for Qβ RNA replication in E. coli. We analyzed the crystal structure of Qβ replicase, consisting of the virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (β-subunit), EF-Tu, EF-Ts and the N-terminal half of S1, which is capable of initiating Qβ RNA replication. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that the two N-terminal OB-folds of S1 anchor S1 onto the β-subunit, and the third OB-fold is mobile and protrudes beyond the surface of the β-subunit. The third OB-fold mainly interacts with a specific RNA fragment derived from the internal region of Qβ RNA, and its RNA-binding ability is required for replication initiation of Qβ RNA. Thus, the third mobile OB-fold of S1, which is spatially anchored near the surface of the β-subunit, primarily recruits the Qβ RNA toward the β-subunit, leading to the specific and efficient replication initiation of Qβ RNA, and S1 functions as a replication initiation factor, beyond its established function in protein synthesis. PMID:25122749

  2. THE SPIRAL GALAXY M100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An image of the grand design of spiral galaxy M100 obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope resolves individual stars within the majestic spiral arms. (These stars typically appeared blurred together when viewed with ground-based telescopes.) Hubble has the ability to resolve individual stars in other galaxies and measure accurately the light from very faint stars. This makes space telescope invaluable for identifying a rare class of pulsating stars, called Cepheid Variable stars embedded within M100's spiral arms. Cepheids are reliable cosmic distance mileposts. The interval it takes for the Cepheid to complete one pulsation is a direct indication of the stars's intrinsic brightness. This value can be used to make a precise measurement of the galaxy's distance, which turns out to be 56 million light-years. M100 (100th object in the Messier catalog of non-stellar objects) is a majestic face-on spiral galaxy. It is a rotating system of gas and stars, similar to our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Hubble routinely can view M100 with a level of clarity and sensitivity previously possible only for the very few nearby galaxies that compose our 'Local Group.'' M100 is a member of the huge Virgo cluster of an estimated 2,500 galaxies. The galaxy can be seen by amateur astronomers as a faint, pinwheel-shaped object in the spring constellation Coma Berenices. Technical Information: The Hubble Space Telescope image was taken on December 31, 1993 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2). This color picture is a composite of several images taken in different colors of light. Blue corresponds to regions containing hot newborn stars. The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science. Credit: J. Trauger, JPL and NASA

  3. Safety, compliance, and predictive parameters for dosage modification in adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Keun-Wook

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the compliance, safety, dosage modifications (dose reduction and/or schedule change [including permanent S-1 withdrawal]), and clinical parameters that predict S-1 dosage modification in gastric cancer patients receiving adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy. One hundred and forty-nine patients who underwent curative D2 surgery and received adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy were enrolled. S-1 was administered orally (40 mg/m(2) twice daily on days 1-28 every 6 weeks) for 1 year. For patients unable to tolerate S-1, the dosage was reduced or the schedule was changed to a 3-weekly schedule of 2 weeks on treatment followed by 1 week off treatment. The planned 1-year treatment was completed in 73.8% of patients; 69 patients required dosage modification because of toxicity. The most frequent cause of dosage modification was enterocolitis (37 patients; defined as ≥ grade 2 abdominal pain and/or ≥ grade 2 diarrhea). Most dosage modification occurred during the early cycles of treatment (within the first 3 months). Severe toxicities (≥ grade 3) included neutropenia (13.4%), abdominal pain (8.1%) and diarrhea (8.1%). In multivariate analyses, decreased relative dose intensity was related to poor disease-free survival independent of stage, and only low creatinine clearance predicted S-1 dosage modification. In conclusion, although adjuvant S-1 therapy has a high compliance rate, meticulous monitoring of adverse events is required in the early period of treatment. Decreased creatinine clearance was the only factor that predicted dosage modification. In patients with creatinine clearance <50 mL/min, dosage reduction should be considered from the initiation of S-1 treatment.

  4. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J.; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Smith, Joshua D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2−/− mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2−/− mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  5. Decorin in human oral cancer: A promising predictive biomarker of S-1 neoadjuvant chemosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Ishige, Shunsaku; Kasama, Hiroki; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • DCN is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. • DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. • DCN predicts the clinical responses to S-1 NAC for patients with oral cancer. - Abstract: We reported previously that decorin (DCN) is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. DCN is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan that exists and functions in stromal and epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that DCN affects the biology of several types of cancer by directly/indirectly targeting the signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis, however, the molecular mechanisms of DCN in chemoresistance and its clinical relevance are still unknown. Here we assumed that DCN silencing cells increase chemosusceptibility to S-1, consisted of tegafur, prodrug of 5-fluorouracil. We first established DCN knockdown transfectants derived from oral cancer cells for following experiments including chemosusceptibility assay to S-1. In addition to the in vitro data, DCN knockdown zenografting tumors in nude mice demonstrate decreasing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis with dephosphorylation of AKT after S-1 chemotherapy. We also investigated whether DCN expression predicts the clinical responses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using S-1 (S-1 NAC) for oral cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry data in the preoperative biopsy samples was analyzed to determine the cut-off point for status of DCN expression by receiver operating curve analysis. Interestingly, low DCN expression was observed in five (83%) of six cases with complete responses to S-1 NAC, and in one (10%) case of 10 cases with stable/progressive disease, indicating that S-1 chemosensitivity is dramatically effective in oral cancer patients with low DCN expression compared with high DCN expression. Our findings suggest that DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms, and

  6. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2.

    PubMed

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-E-Huma; Smith, Joshua D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-02-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2(-/-) mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2(-/-) mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  7. THE 300 km s{sup -1} STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Frebel, Anna; Casey, Andrew R.; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Norris, John E.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2013-07-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s{sup -1} stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.46 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.23 (random and systematic uncertainties) for star 300S-1, and find an abundance pattern similar to typical halo stars at this metallicity. Comparing our stellar parameters to theoretical isochrones, we estimate a distance of 18 {+-} 7 kpc. Both the metallicity and distance estimates are in good agreement with what can be inferred from comparing the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data of the stream stars to globular cluster sequences. While several other structures overlap with the stream in this part of the sky, the combination of kinematic, chemical, and distance information makes it unlikely that these stars are associated with either the Segue 1 galaxy, the Sagittarius Stream, or the Orphan Stream. Streams with halo-like abundance signatures, such as the 300 km s{sup -1} stream, present another observational piece for understanding the accretion history of the Galactic halo.

  8. S = 1 Excitations in Heat Capacity of the Haldane Compound TMNIN Doped with a Nonmagnetic Impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawae, Tatsuya; Ito, Masakazu; Mito, Masaki; Takeda, Kazuyoshi

    1999-03-01

    We have studied the field dependence of the heat capacity of a typicalHaldane antiferromagnet (CH3)4NNi(NO)3 (TMNIN) doped with thenonmagnetic impurity Zn2+, as well as of a pure TMNIN. The overallfeatures of the magnetic heat capacity, including the characteristic broadmaximum, are almost reproduced by the theoretical curve with J/k B =-12 K for both systems in zero field. The field dependence in the impuresystems is described well by assuming the Schottky heat capacity with S =1, not S = 1/2 expected from the VBS model. A possible reason why the S= 1 model is suitable is discussed.

  9. Test and evaluation of the chloride Spegel S1P108/30 electric vehicle battery charger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driggans, R. L.; Keller, A. S.

    1985-09-01

    The Chloride Spegel Model S1P108/30 electric vehicle battery charger was tested by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as an account of work sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Charger input/output voltage, current, and power characteristics and input waveform distortion were measured; and induced electromagnetic interference was evaluated as the charger recharged a lead-acid battery pack. Electrical quantities were measured with precision volt-ampere-watt meters, frequency counters, a digital-storage oscilloscope, and a spectrum analyzer. THe Chloride charger required 8.5 hours to recharge a 216V tubular plate lead-acid battery from 100 percent depth of discharge (DOD). Energy efficiency was 83 percent, specific power was 37.4 W/kg (17.0 W/lb), input current distortion varied from 22.4 to 34.1 percent, and electromagnetic interference was observed on AM radio. Tests were conducted with the battery at initial DOD of 100, 75, 50, and 25 percent. Charge factor was 1.14 from 100-percent DOD, increasing to 1.39 from 25-percent DOD.

  10. 2-pyridone: The role of out-of-plane vibrations on the S1<-->S0 spectra and S1 state reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Jann A.; Leist, Roman; Tanner, Christian; Frey, Hans-Martin; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2006-09-01

    The S1↔S0 vibronic spectra of supersonic jet-cooled 2-pyridone [pyridin-2-one (2PY)] and its N-H deuterated isotopomer (d-2PY) have been recorded by two-color resonant two-photon ionization, laser-induced fluorescence and emission, and fluorescence depletion spectroscopies. By combining these methods, the B origin of 2PY at 000+98cm-1 and the bands at +218 and +252cm-1 are identified as overtones of the S1 state out-of-plane vibrations ν1' and ν2', as are the analogous bands of d-2PY. Anharmonic double-minimum potentials are derived for the respective out-of-plane coordinates that predict further ν1' and ν2' overtones and combinations, reproducing ˜80% of the vibronic bands up to 600cm-1 above the 000 band. The fluorescence spectra excited at the electronic origins and the ν1' and ν2' out-of-plane overtone levels confirm these assignments. The S1 nonplanar minima and S1←S0 out-of-plane progressions are in agreement with the determination of nonplanar vibrationally averaged geometries for the 000 and 000+98cm-1 upper states by Held et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 95, 8732 (1991)]. The fluorescence lifetimes of the S1 state vibrations show strong mode dependence: Those of the out-of-plane levels decrease rapidly above 200cm-1 excess vibrational energy, while the in-plane vibrations ν5', ν8', and ν9' have longer lifetimes, although they are above or interspersed with the "dark" out-of-plane states. This is interpreted in terms of an S1' state reaction with a low barrier towards a conical intersection with a prefulvenic geometry. Out-of-plane vibrational states can directly surmount this barrier, whereas in-plane vibrations are much less efficient in this respect. Analysis of the fluorescence spectra allows to identify nine in-plane S0' state fundamentals, overtones of the S0 state ν1″ and ν2″ out-of-plane vibrations, and >30 other overtones and combination bands. The B3LYP /6-311++G(d,p) calculated anharmonic wave numbers are in very good agreement with the

  11. The palaeosol model of arsenic pollution of groundwater tested along a 32 km traverse across West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M A; McArthur, J M; Sikdar, P K

    2012-08-01

    The distribution of As-pollution in groundwater of the deltaic aquifers of south-eastern Asia may be controlled by the subsurface distribution of palaeo-channel sediments (As-polluted groundwaters) and palaeo-interfluvial sediments (As-free groundwaters). To test this idea, termed the palaeosol model of As-pollution, we drilled 10 sites, analysed groundwater from 249 shallow wells (screened <107 mbgl), field-tested another 149 for As, and used colour as a guide to the presence or absence of As-pollution in a further 531 wells. Our work was conducted along a 32-km traverse running W to E across southern West Bengal, India. At seven drill sites we logged a palaeo-interfluvial sequence, which occurs as three distinct units that together occupy 20 km of the traverse. These palaeo-interfluvial sequences yield As-free groundwaters from brown sands at depth<100 m. The palaeo-interfluvial sequences are separated by two deep palaeo-channels, which were logged at 3 sites. The palaeo-channel deposits host As-polluted groundwater in grey sands. Our findings confirm the predictions of the palaeosol model of As-pollution. We show again that well-colour can be used both to successfully predict the degree of As-pollution in groundwater, and to locate regions of buried palaeo-interfluve that will yield As-free groundwater for the foreseeable future.

  12. Investigation on Prototype Superconducting Linear Synchronous Motor (LSM) for 600-km/h Wheel-Type Railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Beomyong; Lee, Changhyeong; Kim, Seokho; Lee, Changyoung; Yun, Sangwon

    The existing wheel-type high-speed railway with a rotatable motor has a limit of 600 km/h speed. The normal conducting electromagnet has several disadvantages to realize 600 km/h speed. Several disadvantages are the increased space and weight, and the decreased electric efficiency to generate the required high magnetic field. In order to reduce the volume and weight, superconducting electromagnets can be considered for LSM (Linear Synchronous Motor). Prior to the fabrication of the real system, a prototype demo-coil is designed and fabricated using 2G high temperature superconducting wire. The prototype HTS coil is cooled by the conduction using a GM cryocooler. To reduce the heat penetration, thermal design was performed for the current leads, supporting structure and radiation shield considering the thermal stress. The operating temperature and current are 30∼40 K and 100 A. The coil consists of two double pancake coils (N, S pole, respectively) and it is driven on a test rail, which is installed for the test car. This paper describes the design and test results of the prototype HTS LSM system. Thermal characteristics are investigated with additional dummy thermal mass on the coil after turning off the cryocooler.

  13. Photoelectron-induced waves: A likely source of 150 km radar echoes and enhanced electron modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Meers M.; Dimant, Yakov S.

    2016-04-01

    VHF radars near the geomagnetic equator receive coherent reflections from plasma density irregularities between 130 and 160 km in altitude during the daytime. Though researchers first discovered these 150 km echoes over 50 years ago and use them to monitor vertical plasma drifts, the underlying mechanism that creates them remains a mystery. This paper uses large-scale kinetic simulations to show that photoelectrons can drive electron waves, which then enhance ion density irregularities that radars could observe as 150 km echoes. This model explains why 150 km echoes exist only during the day and why they appear at their lowest altitudes near noon. It predicts the spectral structure observed by Chau (2004) and suggests observations that can further evaluate this mechanism. It also shows the types and strength of electron modes that photoelectron-wave interactions generate in a magnetized plasma.

  14. Making sense of KM through users: Information gaps and intellectual property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, Roberto de Miguel; Casado, Esther Monterroso

    2014-10-01

    Despite its lack of definition, in a general sense, knowledge management (KM) is consubstantial to contemporary innovation-driven social systems (IDSSs), allowing individuals, organizations, and entire societies, to cope with their intrinsic technical uncertainties more effectively. Before the advent of IDSSs, most of the results of KM were considered naturally inappropriable as well as fractions of the public domain. In such context, patents litigation was almost anecdotic. This paper summarizes various social scientific and humanistic approaches that nourish the emergence of a new KM model in which innovation will be anchored in the claim for universality. Patentability of ICT and services is also considered on the realm of a commons-based KM.

  15. 26 km of offset on the Lake Clark fault since late Eocene time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    Aeromagnetic data over the Lake Clark Fault reveal a north-trending band of magnetic anomalies that are right-laterally offset about 26 km across the fault. The magnetic anomalies correlate spatially with a belt of dated 34-39-Ma granitic plutons. Thus, the Lake Clark Fault has had ~26 km of right-lateral offset in the past 34-39 Ma. The Castle Mountain Fault, which lies along the strike of the Lake Clark Fault to the east-northeast, must have had a similar or, possibly, greater amount of offset. We infer the presence of an additional right-lateral strike-slip fault about 35 km northwest of the Lake Clark Fault, herein named the 'Telequana Fault,' on the basis of 11 km of right-lateral offset of a north-trending band of magnetic anomalies.

  16. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W.S.; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient's survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient's survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells. In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation. PMID:26887055

  17. Role of the transition zone and 660 km discontinuity in mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringwood, A. E.

    1994-10-01

    Recent seismic evidence suggests that subducted slabs experience resistance to further descent when they encounter the 660 km seismic discontinuity. Several possible causes of this resistance are evaluated. It is concluded that the chemical composition of the lower mantle is similar to that of the upper mantle, and that compositional change is therefore unlikely to be the cause of resistance to slab penetration. The proposal that a large increase of viscosity at the 660 km discontinuity impedes descending slabs is also rejected. However, three other factors are identified, each of which is capable of causing substantial resistance to descending slabs: (1) the negative slope of the transformation of silicate spinel to Mg-perovskite+magnesiowuestite; (2) differentiation of oceanic lithosphere into basaltic and depleted peridotitic layers, causing the slab to be buoyant compared with surrounding mantle pyrolite between depths of 660-800 km; (3) the accumulation of former oceanic crust to produce a gravitationally stable layer of garnetite (about 50 km thick) on top of the 660 km discontinuity. The combined effects of these sources of resistance provide a filter for subducted slabs. Those slabs with seismic zones extending below 600 km may possess sufficient negative buoyancy and strength to overcome the barriers and penetrate into the lower mantle. However, the resistance causes strong buckling and plastic thickening of these slabs, which accumulate to form huge blobs or 'megaliths' underneath the 660 km discontinuity. In contrast, slabs with seismic zones extending no deeper than 300 km possess much smaller degrees of negative buoyancy and strength and hence are unable to penetrate the 660 km discontinuity. Slabs of this type are recycled within the transition zone and upper mantle. Mixing and petrological homogenization processes are less efficient in the transition zone than in the upper mantle (above 400 km). The transition zone is composed mainly of ancient slabs

  18. SLA at 100: Conference Preview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstein, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    When School Library Association (SLA) convenes its annual conference in Washington, DC, June 14-17, 2009, the association will be celebrating its 100th birthday. This occasion allows for grand gestures--the SLA Salutes! Awards and Leadership Reception will be held in the Library of Congress's Great Hall. The conference also draws upon Washington…

  19. At 100, NAACP Still Kicking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2009-01-01

    When leaders of the NAACP gather this month to formally begin a year-long recognition of 100 years of civil rights work, they'll be talking as much about the organization's future as they will be honoring its past. On dozens of college campuses across the nation, where plenty of groups have taken on justice issues that for decades only the NAACP…

  20. The Journey toward 100% Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mindish, Jan; Sullivan, Marianne; Stiklaitis, Angela; Baireuther, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The journey toward 100% proficiency is most successful when a whole school works as a team. School leaders must focus their school's energy and effort on schoolwide initiatives that will make the changes needed to increase student learning and improve students' scores on state tests. The structure of the school and the collaboration of the faculty…

  1. The AS&U 100

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2007-01-01

    In 1986, the Indianapolis and Gwinnett County (Georgia) school districts sat side by side on the list of the 100 largest school districts, each with slightly less than 51,000 students. But the districts were headed in opposite directions. By 2005, enrollment in Indianapolis declined by about 25 percent to 38,142, falling from the 63rd-largest to…

  2. The 2002 Training Top 100.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Identifies the top 100 companies in terms of the amount spent on training and development, the number of hours of training per employee, percentage of payroll spent on training, and tuition allotment per employee. Describes best practices in succession planning and leadership development, mentoring, and job shadowing and provides a detailed…

  3. The 2003 Training Top 100.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Tammy

    2003-01-01

    Identifies the top 100 U.S. companies in terms of the amount spent on training and development, the number of hours of training per employee, percentage of payroll spent on training, and tuition allotment per employee. Describes best practices in succession planning and leadership development, mentoring, and job shadowing and provides a detailed…

  4. The Top 100: Associate Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmon, Olivia

    2009-01-01

    This year, Diverse has added a new addition to its annual Top 100 degree producers series--recognizing, with this edition, the institutions that award the most associate degrees to students of color. More than half of minority undergraduate students start their degree quest at a community college with 55 percent of all Hispanic and Native American…

  5. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  6. Hydraulic fracturing in situ stress measurements to 2.1 km depth at Cajon Pass, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Zoback, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Stress measurements to 2.1 km reveal stress changes with depth that cannot be explained by an elastic response to uniform crustal strain. The data at about 1 km depth suggest that the stress is limited by the frictional strength of rock and is perturbed at greater depths by faults which intersect the borehole. The stress data indicate that there is little or no right-lateral shear stress acting on planes parallel to the San Andreas Fault. -Authors

  7. Nitric acid emission from the F100 jet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. M.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Hunton, D. E.; Viggiano, A. A.; Wey, C. C.; Anderson, B. E.

    2003-01-01

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) from the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hanscom AFB was used to measure levels of HNO3 in the exhaust stream of the F100 jet engine both in a test cell at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) at simulated altitudes 3-17 km and in flight behind F-16 aircraft at 9-11 km altitude. The HNO3 concentrations have been expressed as emission indices (EI) by normalizing to engine-produced CO2 measured by GRC instruments in the test cell and NASA-Langley Research Center instruments in flight. The test cell data showed that EI(HNO3) is independent of fuel sulfur level, and is highly dependent upon altitude for altitudes at which most commercial aircraft fly (below 12 km), mainly because the emission is a strong function of combustor inlet temperature, which is lower at high altitudes. EI(HNO3) at military power was 0.003 g NO2 kg-1 fuel at low altitude (˜3 km), and increased to 0.02 g kg-1 for altitudes above 11 km. Operating the engine at 85% maximum turbine speed increased the figures above by a factor of about 2.5. At engine idle, EI(HNO3) was typically 0.14 g kg-1. The decrease in EI(HNO3) with combustor inlet temperature is attributed to the temperature dependence of the NO2 + OH reaction producing HNO3. Comparing HNO3 emission indices with those measured at GRC for NO and NOx allowed us to determine the fraction of NO2 which is converted into HNO3 in the combustion process as a function of inlet temperature. Conversion of NO2 to HNO3 is 0.9% at military power for altitudes ≥11 km, and twice that at 85% maximum turbine speed. The conversion fraction changes dramatically in the 8-11 km altitude range, and is only 0.02% at 3 km altitude, for military power, or 0.2% at 85% maximum turbine speed. At engine idle, this fraction was about 8% at all altitudes. The accuracy of the (average) figures quoted above is ±25%. The in situ data, obtained on 10 flights during the NASA Subsonic Near-Interaction Field (SNIF) experiment, are

  8. Components-dependent optical nonlinearity in a series of CdSexS1-x and CdSexS1-x/ZnS QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shunlong; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Siwen; Wang, Qian; Li, Songtao; Cheng, Xiaoman

    2016-08-01

    The different compositions of the ternary alloyed CdSexS1-x and CdSexS1-x/ZnS core/shell quantum dots(CSQDs) have been synthesized by the chemical routes. The nonlinear optical properties of these QDs were investigated using Z-scan technique under the excitation of the 1064 nm picosecond laser pulse. The Z-scan results reveal that the nonlinear refractive indices of these QDs can be tuned by changing the ratio of Se and S components. Nonlinear optical (NLO) properties have been shown to be enhanced in CSQDs as compared to their core semiconductor counterparts. These QDs exhibit the components-tuned nonlinear refraction indices, which lead to a wide application in the photonic field.

  9. Emissions from an international airport increase particle number concentrations 4-fold at 10 km downwind.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Gould, Tim; Hartin, Kris; Larson, Timothy V; Fruin, Scott A

    2014-06-17

    We measured the spatial pattern of particle number (PN) concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) with an instrumented vehicle that enabled us to cover larger areas than allowed by traditional stationary measurements. LAX emissions adversely impacted air quality much farther than reported in previous airport studies. We measured at least a 2-fold increase in PN concentrations over unimpacted baseline PN concentrations during most hours of the day in an area of about 60 km(2) that extended to 16 km (10 miles) downwind and a 4- to 5-fold increase to 8-10 km (5-6 miles) downwind. Locations of maximum PN concentrations were aligned to eastern, downwind jet trajectories during prevailing westerly winds and to 8 km downwind concentrations exceeded 75 000 particles/cm(3), more than the average freeway PN concentration in Los Angeles. During infrequent northerly winds, the impact area remained large but shifted to south of the airport. The freeway length that would cause an impact equivalent to that measured in this study (i.e., PN concentration increases weighted by the area impacted) was estimated to be 280-790 km. The total freeway length in Los Angeles is 1500 km. These results suggest that airport emissions are a major source of PN in Los Angeles that are of the same general magnitude as the entire urban freeway network. They also indicate that the air quality impact areas of major airports may have been seriously underestimated. PMID:24871496

  10. Emissions from an international airport increase particle number concentrations 4-fold at 10 km downwind.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Gould, Tim; Hartin, Kris; Larson, Timothy V; Fruin, Scott A

    2014-06-17

    We measured the spatial pattern of particle number (PN) concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) with an instrumented vehicle that enabled us to cover larger areas than allowed by traditional stationary measurements. LAX emissions adversely impacted air quality much farther than reported in previous airport studies. We measured at least a 2-fold increase in PN concentrations over unimpacted baseline PN concentrations during most hours of the day in an area of about 60 km(2) that extended to 16 km (10 miles) downwind and a 4- to 5-fold increase to 8-10 km (5-6 miles) downwind. Locations of maximum PN concentrations were aligned to eastern, downwind jet trajectories during prevailing westerly winds and to 8 km downwind concentrations exceeded 75 000 particles/cm(3), more than the average freeway PN concentration in Los Angeles. During infrequent northerly winds, the impact area remained large but shifted to south of the airport. The freeway length that would cause an impact equivalent to that measured in this study (i.e., PN concentration increases weighted by the area impacted) was estimated to be 280-790 km. The total freeway length in Los Angeles is 1500 km. These results suggest that airport emissions are a major source of PN in Los Angeles that are of the same general magnitude as the entire urban freeway network. They also indicate that the air quality impact areas of major airports may have been seriously underestimated.

  11. Mean winds of the mesosphere (60-80 km), as measured by MF radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.; Vincent, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1985-07-01

    Winds data obtained from medium frequency (MF) radars for heights of 60 to 80 km are discussed: locations are Saskatoon (52 N, 107 W), Christchurch (44 S, 173 W), Adelside (35 S, 183 E) and Townsville (20 S, 147 E). Whereas well defined summer easterly jets centered near 70 km develop in summer, no regular buildups and decays are observed in winter at midlatitudes. Part of this variability can be associated with stratospheric warmings, which develop into breakdown of the polar vortex in the Northern Hemisphere. Amplitude and phase profiles of the annual and semiannual oscillations are also presented. The radar winds from Saskatoon are compared and combined with rocket derived winds up to 60 km from Primrose Lake (54 N, 110 W) to give consistent cross sections from 20 to 110 km. The SH radar winds are compared with a model based on rocket winds which extends up to 80 km. The latter evidence considerable smoothing, as no winter variability is evident. The other consistent difference is that heights of the summer easterly maxima for the model are 5 to 10 km lower than the radar winds at all latitudes.

  12. Ribulose Diphosphate Carboxylase from Freshly Ruptured Spinach Chloroplasts Having an in Vivo Km[CO(2)].

    PubMed

    Bahr, J T; Jensen, R G

    1974-01-01

    The properties of a form of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase having a high affinity for CO(2) have been studied. Its apparent Km(HCO(3) (-)) of 0.5 to 0.8 mm (pH 7.8) and calculated Km(CO(2)) of 11 to 18 mum are comparable to the values exhibited by intact chloroplasts during photosynthesis. This form of the enzyme was released from chloroplasts in hypotonic media and was unstable, rapidly converting to a form having a high Km(HCO(3) (-)) of 20 to 25 mm similar to that for the purified enzyme. Incubation of the enzyme with MgCl(2) and HCO(3) (-) yielded a third form with an intermediate Km(HCO(3) (-)) of 2.5 to 3.0 mm.The low Km form had sufficient activity both at air levels of CO(2) and at saturating CO(2) to account for the rates of photosynthesis by intact chloroplasts. The low Km form could be stabilized in the presence of ribose 5-phosphate, adenosine triphosphate, and MgCl(2), at low temperatures for up to 2 hours.

  13. PMMA Cementoplasty in Symptomatic Metastatic Lesions of the S1 Vertebral Body

    SciTech Connect

    Dehdashti, Amir R.; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Jean, Beatrix; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2000-03-15

    We describe a lateral transiliac direct puncture approach to the S1 vertebral body for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cementoplasty of painful metastatic lesions. This approach was performed using a 15-cm-long trocar needle with 3-mm outer diameter, introduced under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic control. A lateral projection was used to center the needle just in front of the spinal canal and subjacent to the superior plate of the S1 vertebral body. Needle progression was controlled using anteroposterior and lateral fluoroscopic projections alternately with a needle course parallel to an axial plane, avoiding conflict with the S1 foramen. After needle tip placement in the center of the S1 vertebral body, diluted PMMA with a setting time of 8 min was delivered. Ipsilateral lesions of the lateral sacral compartment were filled with the same needle by stepwise withdrawal and continuous PMMA injection.

  14. Characterization of the sugar-O-methyltransferase LobS1 in lobophorin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ji; Zhang, Qingbo; Zhu, Yiguang; Li, Sumei; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhang, Haibo; Saurav, Kumar; Zhang, Changsheng

    2013-10-01

    Lobophorins A (1) and B (2) belong to a large group of spirotetronate natural products with potent antibacterial and antitumor activities. The cloning of the lobophorin biosynthesis gene cluster from the deep-sea-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSIO 01127 identified a sugar-O-methyltransferase-encoding gene lobS1. The lobS1 inactivation mutant accumulated two new lobophorin analogs 3 and 4, different from 1 and 2 by lacking the 4-methyl group at the terminal L-digitoxose, respectively. Biochemical experiments verified that LobS1 was a SAM-dependent sugar-O-methyltransferase that required divalent metal ions for better activity. Antibacterial assays revealed compounds 3 and 4 were generally less potent than compounds 1 and 2. These findings suggest that the methylation on the terminal digitoxose by LobS1 tailors lobophorin biosynthesis and highlights the importance of this methylation for antibacterial potence.

  15. 6S-1 RNA function leads to a delay in sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Amy T; Wassarman, Karen M

    2013-05-01

    We have discovered that 6S-1 RNA (encoded by bsrA) is important for appropriate timing of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis in that cells lacking 6S-1 RNA sporulate earlier than wild-type cells. The time to generate a mature spore once the decision to sporulate has been made is unaffected by 6S-1 RNA, and, therefore, we propose that it is the timing of onset of sporulation that is altered. Interestingly, the presence of cells lacking 6S-1 RNA in coculture leads to all cell types exhibiting an early-sporulation phenotype. We propose that cells lacking 6S-1 RNA modify their environment in a manner that promotes early sporulation. In support of this model, resuspension of wild-type cells in conditioned medium from ΔbsrA cultures also resulted in early sporulation. Use of Escherichia coli growth as a reporter of the nutritional status of conditioned media suggested that B. subtilis cells lacking 6S-1 RNA reduce the nutrient content of their environment earlier than wild-type cells. Several pathways known to impact the timing of sporulation, such as the skf- and sdp-dependent cannibalism pathways, were eliminated as potential targets of 6S-1 RNA-mediated changes, suggesting that 6S-1 RNA activity defines a novel mechanism for altering the timing of onset of sporulation. In addition, 6S-2 RNA does not influence the timing of sporulation, providing further evidence of the independent influences of these two related RNAs on cell physiology. PMID:23457253

  16. Characterization of the L4-L5-S1 motion segment using the stepwise reduction method.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Héctor Enrique; Puttlitz, Christian M; McGilvray, Kirk; García, José J

    2016-05-01

    The two aims of this study were to generate data for a more accurate calibration of finite element models including the L5-S1 segment, and to find mechanical differences between the L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments. Then, the range of motion (ROM) and facet forces for the L4-S1 segment were measured using the stepwise reduction method. This consists of sequentially testing and reducing each segment in nine stages by cutting the ligaments, facet capsules, and removing the nucleus. Five L4-S1 human segments (median: 65 years, range: 53-84 years, SD=11.0 years) were loaded under a maximum pure moment of 8Nm. The ROM was measured using stereo-photogrammetry via tracking of three markers and the facet contact forces (CF) were measured using a Tekscan system. The ROM for the L4-L5 segment and all stages showed good agreement with published data. The major differences in ROM between the L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments were found for lateral bending and all stages, for which the L4-L5 ROM was about 1.5-3 times higher than that of the L5-S1 segment, consistent with L5-S1 facet CF about 1.3 to 4 times higher than those measured for the L4-L5 segment. For the other movements and few stages, the L4-L5 ROM was significantly lower that of the L5-S1 segment. ROM and CF provide important baseline data for more accurate calibration of FE models and to understand the role that their structures play in lower lumbar spine mechanics.

  17. Characterization of the L4-L5-S1 motion segment using the stepwise reduction method.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Héctor Enrique; Puttlitz, Christian M; McGilvray, Kirk; García, José J

    2016-05-01

    The two aims of this study were to generate data for a more accurate calibration of finite element models including the L5-S1 segment, and to find mechanical differences between the L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments. Then, the range of motion (ROM) and facet forces for the L4-S1 segment were measured using the stepwise reduction method. This consists of sequentially testing and reducing each segment in nine stages by cutting the ligaments, facet capsules, and removing the nucleus. Five L4-S1 human segments (median: 65 years, range: 53-84 years, SD=11.0 years) were loaded under a maximum pure moment of 8Nm. The ROM was measured using stereo-photogrammetry via tracking of three markers and the facet contact forces (CF) were measured using a Tekscan system. The ROM for the L4-L5 segment and all stages showed good agreement with published data. The major differences in ROM between the L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments were found for lateral bending and all stages, for which the L4-L5 ROM was about 1.5-3 times higher than that of the L5-S1 segment, consistent with L5-S1 facet CF about 1.3 to 4 times higher than those measured for the L4-L5 segment. For the other movements and few stages, the L4-L5 ROM was significantly lower that of the L5-S1 segment. ROM and CF provide important baseline data for more accurate calibration of FE models and to understand the role that their structures play in lower lumbar spine mechanics. PMID:27017302

  18. CYP2S1 is negatively regulated by corticosteroids in human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bebenek, Ilona G; Solaimani, Parrisa; Bui, Peter; Hankinson, Oliver

    2012-02-25

    Cytochrome P450s are monooxygenase proteins involved in the metabolism of both exogenous and endogenous compounds. CYP2S1 can metabolize eicosanoids in the absence of both NADPH and NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase, and can also activate the anticancer agent 1 AQ4N [1,4-bis{[2-(dimethylamino-N-oxide)ethyl]amino}-5,8-dihydroxy anthracene-9,10-dione]. CYP2S1 is mainly expressed in extrahepatic tissues such as the trachea, lung, stomach, small intestine, spleen, skin, breast, kidney and placenta. Furthermore, increased expression of CYP2S1 occurs in several tumors of epithelial origin, making the characterization of CYP2S1 regulation relevant to the treatment of disease. We report that the synthetic glucocorticoid receptor ligand dexamethasone (DEX) represses CYP2S1 expression. The ED(50) is between 1 nM and 3 nM and maximal repression is reached by 48 h. Other corticosteroids are also effective at repressing CYP2S1. We show that repression by DEX is mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor and requires histone deacetylase activity.

  19. A novel role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 in mouse thrombopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Orban, Martin; Lorenz, Michael; Barocke, Verena; Braun, Daniel; Urtz, Nicole; Schulz, Christian; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Tirniceriu, Anca; Gaertner, Florian; Proia, Richard L.; Graf, Thomas; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Montanez, Eloi; Prinz, Marco; Müller, Alexandra; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Billich, Andreas; Sixt, Michael; Fässler, Reinhard; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Junt, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Millions of platelets are produced each hour by bone marrow (BM) megakaryocytes (MKs). MKs extend transendothelial proplatelet (PP) extensions into BM sinusoids and shed new platelets into the blood. The mechanisms that control platelet generation remain incompletely understood. Using conditional mutants and intravital multiphoton microscopy, we show here that the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) serves as a critical directional cue guiding the elongation of megakaryocytic PP extensions from the interstitium into BM sinusoids and triggering the subsequent shedding of PPs into the blood. Correspondingly, mice lacking the S1P receptor S1pr1 develop severe thrombocytopenia caused by both formation of aberrant extravascular PPs and defective intravascular PP shedding. In contrast, activation of S1pr1 signaling leads to the prompt release of new platelets into the circulating blood. Collectively, our findings uncover a novel function of the S1P–S1pr1 axis as master regulator of efficient thrombopoiesis and might raise new therapeutic options for patients with thrombocytopenia. PMID:23148237

  20. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Ganglioside Hp-s1 Analogues Varying at Glucosyl Moiety.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jung-Tung; Yeh, Chun-Hong; Yang, Shih-An; Lin, Chiu-Ya; Tai, Hung-Ju; Shelke, Ganesh B; Reddy, Daggula Mallikarjuna; Yu, Alice L; Luo, Shun-Yuan

    2016-08-17

    Ganglioside Hp-s1 is isolated from the ovary of sea urchin Diadema setosum. It exhibited better neuritogenic activity than GM1 in pheochromocytoma 12 cells. To explore the roles of glucosyl moiety of Hp-s1 in contributing to the neurogenic activity, we developed feasible procedures for synthesis of Hp-s1 analogues (2a-2f). The glucosyl moiety of Hp-s1 was replaced with α-glucose, α-galactose, β-galactose, α-mannose, and β-mannose, and their biological activities on SH-SY5Y cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells were evaluated. We found that the orientation of C-2 hydroxyl group at glucosyl moiety of Hp-s1 plays an important role to induce neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y cells. Surprisingly, compound 2d could activate NKT cells to produce interleukin 2, although it did not show great activity on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y cells. In general, the Hp-s1 might be considered as a lead compound for the development of novel drugs aimed at modulating the activity of neuronal cells. PMID:27276519

  1. Olivine-wadsleyite-pyroxene topotaxy: Evidence for coherent nucleation and diffusion-controlled growth at the 410-km discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Joseph R.; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Huss, Gary R.; Hellebrand, Eric; Rubie, David C.; Frost, Daniel J.

    2012-06-01

    We have synthesized a hydrous peridotite-composition sample at 13 GPa and 1400 °C with co-existing coarse grains (˜100 μm) of olivine, wadsleyite, clinoenstatite, plus melt in a multi-anvil press. Some of the olivine grains contain fine-scale (0.5-2 μm-wide) lamellae of wadsleyite and clinoenstatite that likely resulted from transformation caused by small temperature fluctuations during the four-hour experiment. Phase compositions were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The olivine ranges from Fo94 to Fo90 in composition and contains about 4000 ppm wt. H2O. The wadsleyite is Fo87±1 in composition and contains about 10,000 ppm wt. H2O. The clinoenstatite is En93±1 in composition and about 1400 ppm wt. H2O. Transmission electron microscopy of the wadsleyite lamellae and host olivine shows that the two phases share their close-packed oxygen planes so that the wadsleyite lamellae are nearly planar and perpendicular to the [1 0 0] of olivine. The wadsleyite lamellae thus have their {1 0 1} and {0 2 1} planes parallel to the (1 0 0) plane of olivine. Additionally, larger incoherent grains of wadsleyite in olivine are found. Dislocation microtexures in the olivine and iron concentration profiles across the lamella interface suggest heterogeneous nucleation and diffusion-controlled growth of coherent wadsleyite lamellae on defects in the olivine followed by the nucleation of faster-growing incoherent grains on the lamellae. The results show that, under hydrous conditions, the olivine-wadsleyite transformation occurs close to equilibrium at conditions of the 410-km discontinuity. Furthermore, inheritance of crystallographic preferred orientations (and therefore seismic anisotropy) across the 410-km discontinuity is unlikely to be significant. In addition, hydrogen distributions among the various phases indicate that dehydration by melt extraction at 410 km will be inefficient and that H contents greater than

  2. A comparative study of equatorial daytime vertical E × B drift in the Indian and Indonesian sectors based on 150 km echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A. K.; Chaitanya, P. Pavan; Mizutani, N.; Otsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we study for the first time the daytime vertical E × B drift velocities from Gadanki and Kototabang using the Doppler shifts of the 150-km echoes observed during 2008-2010, a period of low solar activity. Drift velocities are mostly positive and confined to 35 m s-1 at both the locations, except for Gadanki where on a few occasions negative drift velocities have been observed in the afternoon hours. Drift velocities generally show a decreasing trend with local time and the largest drift is generally observed in the forenoon hours consistent with extensively reported observations and models of E × B drift. Drift velocities from Gadanki and Kototabang compared exceeding well on some days and differed remarkably on many days despite the fact that they are longitudinally separated by only 20°. The day-to-day variation in the drift velocity could be as high as 15 m s-1 at Gadanki and 7 m s-1 at Kototabang. Seasonal mean drifts over Gadanki are found to be generally larger than those of Kototabang. The observations have been compared in detail with those reported earlier based on ground- and satellite- based observations and also with the Scherliess-Fejer model. The observed differences in the drifts at the two locations, including the downward drifts, have been discussed in the light of current understanding of the longitudinal variability of E × B drift.

  3. Wilson's disease, 100 years later….

    PubMed

    Trocello, J-M; Broussolle, E; Girardot-Tinant, N; Pelosse, M; Lachaux, A; Lloyd, C; Woimant, F

    2013-12-01

    Texts published, in 1912, 100 years ago, by Sir K. Wilson on his eponymous disease in Brain, The Lancet and La Revue Neurologique highlight the relevance of his descriptions in the light of the current knowledge. Wilson's invocation of an "unknown toxin" appears today as a prophetic intuition as the presence of excess copper in the liver was mentioned for the first time a year later whereas the role of copper in this disease was not described until 1929. Progress has been made to better understand the physiology of Wilson's disease (WD). The ATP7B gene implicated in WD is located on chromosome 13 and more than 500 mutations and 100 polymorphisms have been to date identified. The phenotypic expression is highly variable, even within a family. This can partly be explained by environmental factors as nutrition. Modulator genes are also involved in the phenotypic expression of the disease. Most of symptoms observed in WD have already been described in detail by Wilson in 1912, but subsequent progress was made over the following 100 years, helping the physician diagnose WD. Hepatic and neurological symptoms are the most frequent expressions of the disease. Other extrahepatic features include renal manifestations, osteoarticular disorders, myocardial abnormalities, endocrine disturbances, realizing a multisystemic disease. The diagnosis of the disease is based on a combination of clinical symptoms, biological, radiological and genetic data and new tools (Brain MRI, relative exchangeable copper…) allow reducing delay to diagnosis. Therapeutic findings have also changed the disease prognosis. Treatment is based on the use of copper chelators to promote copper excretion from the body (D-penicillamine and Triethylenetetramine) and zinc salts to reduce copper absorption. Tetratiomolybdate appears to be a promising treatment. While significant progress has been made during this century, many physiological aspects of this disease remain unknown and require further research to

  4. Science up to 100 tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.

    1995-05-01

    100 Tesla is the highest attainable field that can be held for milli-sec in a non-destructive magnet. The strongest steels turn soft under stresses of 4GPa, which is the magnetic pressure of 100 T. Until there is a breakthrough in materials, magnets having all the low temperature and high pressure trimmings will be limited to about 100 T. Within the field range 1-100 T far more resources are now devoted to producing the highest possible continuous fields (40+5 T) than to producing longer pulsed fields above 50 T. This illustrates that the utility of the field can be more important than the strength of the field to researchers in condensed matter. Discoveries are typically made in new territory, but this can be new combinations of pressure, temperature, and magnetic field, or new probes and new materials. If any activity has kept up with the proliferation of new experiments and new facilities in high magnetic field research it is the listing of experiments that could and should be done in high fields. Part of the reason for the vitality of high field research is that high fields provide a generic environment. Compared to particle accelerators and plasma machines a high field laboratory is a setting for generic science, like synchrotron light sources or neutron scattering centers. Although the latter two installations probes states, while a magnetic field creates a state. Because it is unrealistic to try to list all the science opportunities at high fields, the author list sources for lists in the public domain and gives a few examples.

  5. 100 Years of Reality Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpher, Nancy L.; Wright Ron, D.

    2006-01-01

    One may have heard of reality TV, but what about reality learning? The latter is probably a term one hasn't seen much, although it is in many ways a clearer and more concise name for a concept that in 2006 marks its 100th anniversary: cooperative education, or "co-op." Co-op, a break-through idea pioneered at the University of Cincinnati by Herman…

  6. Wilson's disease, 100 years later….

    PubMed

    Trocello, J-M; Broussolle, E; Girardot-Tinant, N; Pelosse, M; Lachaux, A; Lloyd, C; Woimant, F

    2013-12-01

    Texts published, in 1912, 100 years ago, by Sir K. Wilson on his eponymous disease in Brain, The Lancet and La Revue Neurologique highlight the relevance of his descriptions in the light of the current knowledge. Wilson's invocation of an "unknown toxin" appears today as a prophetic intuition as the presence of excess copper in the liver was mentioned for the first time a year later whereas the role of copper in this disease was not described until 1929. Progress has been made to better understand the physiology of Wilson's disease (WD). The ATP7B gene implicated in WD is located on chromosome 13 and more than 500 mutations and 100 polymorphisms have been to date identified. The phenotypic expression is highly variable, even within a family. This can partly be explained by environmental factors as nutrition. Modulator genes are also involved in the phenotypic expression of the disease. Most of symptoms observed in WD have already been described in detail by Wilson in 1912, but subsequent progress was made over the following 100 years, helping the physician diagnose WD. Hepatic and neurological symptoms are the most frequent expressions of the disease. Other extrahepatic features include renal manifestations, osteoarticular disorders, myocardial abnormalities, endocrine disturbances, realizing a multisystemic disease. The diagnosis of the disease is based on a combination of clinical symptoms, biological, radiological and genetic data and new tools (Brain MRI, relative exchangeable copper…) allow reducing delay to diagnosis. Therapeutic findings have also changed the disease prognosis. Treatment is based on the use of copper chelators to promote copper excretion from the body (D-penicillamine and Triethylenetetramine) and zinc salts to reduce copper absorption. Tetratiomolybdate appears to be a promising treatment. While significant progress has been made during this century, many physiological aspects of this disease remain unknown and require further research to

  7. The Trigger and Data Acquisition System for the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, Carmelo; Chiarusi, Tommaso

    2016-04-01

    KM3NeT is a large research infrastructure in the Mediterranean Sea that includes a network of deep-sea neutrino telescopes. The telescopes consist of vertical detection units carrying optical modules, whose separation is optimised according to the different ranges of neutrino energy that shall be explored. Two building blocks, each one made of 115 detection units, will be deployed at the KM3NeT-IT site, about 80 km from Capo Passero, Italy, to search for high-energy neutrino sources (ARCA); another building block will be installed at the KM3NeT-Fr site, about 40 km from Toulon, France, to study the hierarchy of neutrino masses (ORCA). The modular design of the KM3NeT allows for a progressive implementation and data taking even with an incomplete detector. The same scalable design is used for the Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (TriDAS). In order to reduce the complexity of the hardware inside the optical modules, the "all data to shore" concept is adopted. This implies that the throughput is dominated by the optical background due to the decay of 40K dissolved in the sea water and to the bursts of bioluminescence, about 3 orders of magnitude larger than the physics signal, ranging from 20 Gbps to several hundreds Gbps, according to the number of detection units. In addition, information from the acoustic positioning system of the detection units must be transmitted. As a consequence of the detector construction, the on-shore DAQ infrastructure must be expanded to handle an increasing data-rate and implement an efficient fast data filtering for both the optical and acoustic channels. In this contribution, the Trigger and Data Acquisition System designed for the Phase 1 of KM3NeT and its future expansion are presented. The network infrastructure, the shore computing resources and the developed applications for handling, filtering and monitoring the optical and acoustic data-streams are described.

  8. Making minor rural road networks safer: The effects of 60 km/h-zones.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Rinus; Louwerse, Robert; Dijkstra, Atze; de Vries, Jasper; Spaas, Jac-Paul

    2011-07-01

    For safety reasons a maximum speed limit of 60km/h has been applied to minor rural roads in the Netherlands since 1998. To support this structurally, a part of these roads have also received additional physical measures in a so-called "low cost design" that is expected to reduce the number of traffic casualties by 10-20%. This measure has been implemented as much as possible in an area oriented way. To measure the design's effectivity, road safety in 20 specific rural areas was studied for 5 years before changes were implemented and, on average, 3.5 years thereafter. The study examined 851km of roads, and a control study was done on 2105km of comparable roads with a speed limit of 80km/h. Both the study and the control roads are managed by water boards. Results show that the measures implemented on the roads in the 60km/h-zones had statistically significant effects (p<0.05) on casualty accidents (-24% overall), especially at intersections (-44%). This high reduction is probably caused by the concentration of technical interventions at intersections. Both outcomes are somewhat higher than previously expected and are comparable with the outcome of a meta-analysis of safety effects on area-wide urban traffic calming schemes. However, the cost-effectiveness ratio of the 60km/h zones measures (€33,000 per prevented KSI-casualty) is much more favourable than the ratio in urban 30km/h-zones (€86,000 per prevented KSI-casualty).

  9. The role of human cytochrome P450 enzymes in the formation of 2-hydroxymetronidazole: CYP2A6 is the high affinity (low Km) catalyst.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Robin E; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Sampson, Mario R; Kearns, Gregory L

    2013-09-01

    Despite metronidazole's widespread clinical use since the 1960s, the specific enzymes involved in its biotransformation have not been previously identified. Hence, in vitro studies were conducted to identify and characterize the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the formation of the major metabolite, 2-hydroxymetronidazole. Formation of 2-hydroxymetronidazole in human liver microsomes was consistent with biphasic, Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Although several cDNA-expressed P450 enzymes catalyzed 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation at a supratherapeutic concentration of metronidazole (2000 μM), at a "therapeutic concentration" of 100 μM only CYPs 2A6, 3A4, 3A5, and 3A7 catalyzed metronidazole 2-hydroxylation at rates substantially greater than control vector, and CYP2A6 catalyzed 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation at rates 6-fold higher than the next most active enzyme. Kinetic studies with these recombinant enzymes revealed that CYP2A6 has a Km = 289 μM which is comparable to the Km for the high-affinity (low-Km) enzyme in human liver microsomes, whereas the Km values for the CYP3A enzymes corresponded with the low-affinity (high-Km) component. The sample-to-sample variation in 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation correlated significantly with CYP2A6 activity (r ≥ 0.970, P < 0.001) at substrate concentrations of 100 and 300 μM. Selective chemical inhibitors of CYP2A6 inhibited metronidazole 2-hydroxylation in a concentration-dependent manner and inhibitory antibodies against CYP2A6 virtually eliminated metronidazole 2-hydroxylation (>99%). Chemical and antibody inhibitors of other P450 enzymes had little or no effect on metronidazole 2-hydroxylation. These results suggest that CYP2A6 is the primary catalyst responsible for the 2-hydroxylation of metronidazole, a reaction that may function as a marker of CYP2A6 activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Neutral and Plasma Distributions in the Coma of Comet C/2012 S1 ISON: Narrowband Imaging and Integral-Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.; Johnson, R. E.; Leblanc, F.; Baumgardner, J.; Mendillo, M.

    2015-10-01

    We present concurrent spectra and filtered imaging of the coma of C/2012 S1 ISON at .44 to 0.47 AU from the sun. C2, NH2, Na, and H2O+ distributions were elongated several thousand km along an axis perpendicular to the comet's motion and the sunward vector. The peak brightness of each species was collocated within 5,000 km of the dusty continuum concentration. ISON's water ion tail appeared distinctly broader than the neutral Na tail and we find no evidence for an extended source of Na by dissociative recombination of a molecular ion. Rather, an extended source of as much as 50% of Na may be attributed to dust, evidenced via Monte Carlo simulations of a distant sodium tail extending beyond 106 km. An increase of nearly a factor of four in the Na source rate was found within a 24 hour interval during an outburst, and the relative Na/O abundance is estimated at ~5 x 10-7, well below the ratio known in active comets of comparable geometry.

  11. Acute Impact of Inhaled Short Acting B2-Agonists on 5 Km Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, John; Hu, Jiu; Chester, Neil; Loosemore, Mike; Whyte, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Whilst there appears to be no ergogenic effect from inhaled salbutamol no study has investigated the impact of the acute inhalation of 1600 µg, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) daily upper limit, on endurance running performance. To investigate the ergogenic effect of an acute inhalation of short acting β2-agonists at doses up to 1600 µg on 5 km time trial performance and resultant urine concentration. Seven male non-asthmatic runners (mean ± SD; age 22.4 ± 4.3 years; height 1.80 ± 0.07 m; body mass 76.6 ± 8.6 kg) provided written informed consent. Participants completed six 5 km time-trials on separate days (three at 18 °C and three at 30 °C). Fifteen minutes prior to the initiation of each 5 km time-trial participants inhaled: placebo (PLA), 800 µg salbutamol (SAL800) or 1600 µg salbutamol (SAL1600). During each 5 km time-trial HR, VO2, VCO2, VE, RPE and blood lactate were measured. Urine samples (90 ml) were collected between 30-180 minutes post 5 km time-trial and analysed for salbutamol concentration. There was no significant difference in total 5 km time between treatments (PLA 1714.7 ± 186.2 s; SAL800 1683.3 ± 179.7 s; SAL1600 1683.6 ± 190.7 s). Post 5 km time-trial salbutamol urine concentration between SAL800 (122.96 ± 69.22 ug·ml-1) and SAL1600 (574.06 ± 448.17 ug·ml-1) were not significantly different. There was no improvement in 5 km time-trial performance following the inhalation of up to 1600 µg of salbutamol in non-asthmatic athletes. This would suggest that the current WADA guidelines, which allow athletes to inhale up to 1600 µg per day, is sufficient to avoid pharmaceutical induced performance enhancement. Key points Inhaling up to 1600 µg of Salbutamol does not result in improved 5 km time trial performance. The position of Salbutamol on the World Anti-Doping Agency list of prohibited appears justified. Athletes who use up to 1600 µg Salbutamol in one day need to review their therapy as it would suggest their respiratory

  12. The Effects of Spinopelvic Parameters and Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration on S1 Screw Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Bum; Lee, Young-Seok; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for S1 screw loosening after lumbosacral fusion, including spinopelvic parameters and paraspinal muscles. Methods We studied with 156 patients with degenerative lumbar disease who underwent lumbosacral interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation including the level of L5-S1 between 2005 and 2012. The patients were divided into loosening and non-loosening groups. Screw loosening was defined as a halo sign larger than 1 mm around a screw. We checked cross sectional area of paraspinal muscles, mean signal intensity of the muscles on T2 weight MRI as a degree of fatty degeneration, spinopelvic parameters, bone mineral density, number of fusion level, and the characteristic of S1 screw. Results Twenty seven patients showed S1 screw loosening, which is 24.4% of total. The mean duration for S1 screw loosening was 7.3±4.1 months after surgery. Statistically significant risk factors were increased age, poor BMD, 3 or more fusion levels (p<0.05). Among spinopelvic parameters, a high pelvic incidence (p<0.01), a greater difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordotic angle preoperatively (p<0.01) and postoperatively (p<0.05). Smaller cross-sectional area and high T2 signal intensity in both multifidus and erector spinae muscles were also significant muscular risk factors (p<0.05). Small converging angle (p<0.001) and short intraosseous length (p<0.05) of S1 screw were significant screw related risk factors (p<0.05). Conclusion In addition to well known risk factors, spinopelvic parameters and the degeneration of paraspinal muscles also showed significant effects on the S1 screw loosening. PMID:26587190

  13. Operation and results of the prototype KM3NeT detection unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, Simone

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT will be a km3-scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The detector will consist of blocks of about one hundred detection units. Each detection unit will host 18 digital optical modules, connected along a 700 m-long vertical structure. Electro-optical cables allow for data transmission and power supply to the optical modules. The optical module comprises 31 photomultiplier tubes of 3'', instruments to monitor environmental variables and electronic boards to communicate onshore and operate the photomultipliers. A prototype detection unit has been deployed in May 2