Science.gov

Sample records for 100-hr-3 operable unit

  1. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Vukelich, S.E.

    1994-09-22

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River.

  2. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit is comprised of three subareas; the 100 D Area, the 100 H Area and those portions of the 600 Area between the two reactor areas. The operable unit is one of seven operable units associated with the 100 D and H Areas. Operable units 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, 100-DR-3, 100-HR-1, 100-HR-2 and 100-IU-4 address contaminant sources while 100-HR-3 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of field investigation used during this LFI was the installation and sampling of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils, and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all round one, two and three and a minimum of 10% of round four data associated with the LFI were validated. A screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration, constituents that were below background. Constituents which are considered non-toxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Data consistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were then evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). A human health QRA was performed using conservative (maximum equilibrated contaminant levels from the LFI) analyses.

  3. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

  4. Aquatic studies at the 100-HR-3 and 100-NR-1 operable units

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.

    1993-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a program to characterize selected aquatic biological populations to determine (1) existing levels of inorganic chemical and radionuclide contamination, and (2) the populations` suitability as indicators of chemical releases during cleanup activities at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Following work plans for the ground-water operable units, lower trophic levels in the aquatic habitat (periphyton and caddisfly larvae) were evaluated for contaminants at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit and 100-NR-1 Operable Unit. The results were evaluated to determine the need for further sampling. If the results showed no significant contamination compared to upriver levels, sampling would be discontinued. The periphyton community appears to be suitable for determining contamination levels. Baseline concentrations for stable chromium were established and will be useful for comparing samples collected when contaminant release is expected. Concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs in periphyton were essentially below detectable limits, which will also make this community useful in detecting potential releases of radionuclides during cleanup activities. Levels for both stable chromium and radionuclides were essentially below detection limits for caddisfly larvae. Thus, these organisms may be used to monitor suspected contaminant releases from cleanup activities; if concentrations exceed detection limits, they may be related to these activities. Two candidate threatened and endangered species of molluscs occur in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These are the shortface lanx (Fisherola nuttalli), which is a Washington State candidate species, and the Columbia pebblesnail (Fluminicola columbiana), which is both a state and federal candidate species. Specimens of the shortface lanx were observed in the vicinity of N Springs (100-NR-1 Operable Unit); they likely occur throughout this area.

  5. Aquatic studies at the 100-HR-3 and 100-NR-1 operable units

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.

    1993-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a program to characterize selected aquatic biological populations to determine (1) existing levels of inorganic chemical and radionuclide contamination, and (2) the populations' suitability as indicators of chemical releases during cleanup activities at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Following work plans for the ground-water operable units, lower trophic levels in the aquatic habitat (periphyton and caddisfly larvae) were evaluated for contaminants at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit and 100-NR-1 Operable Unit. The results were evaluated to determine the need for further sampling. If the results showed no significant contamination compared to upriver levels, sampling would be discontinued. The periphyton community appears to be suitable for determining contamination levels. Baseline concentrations for stable chromium were established and will be useful for comparing samples collected when contaminant release is expected. Concentrations of [sup 60]Co, [sup 90]Sr, and [sup 137]Cs in periphyton were essentially below detectable limits, which will also make this community useful in detecting potential releases of radionuclides during cleanup activities. Levels for both stable chromium and radionuclides were essentially below detection limits for caddisfly larvae. Thus, these organisms may be used to monitor suspected contaminant releases from cleanup activities; if concentrations exceed detection limits, they may be related to these activities. Two candidate threatened and endangered species of molluscs occur in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These are the shortface lanx (Fisherola nuttalli), which is a Washington State candidate species, and the Columbia pebblesnail (Fluminicola columbiana), which is both a state and federal candidate species. Specimens of the shortface lanx were observed in the vicinity of N Springs (100-NR-1 Operable Unit); they likely occur throughout this area.

  6. GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507

    SciTech Connect

    SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

    2011-01-12

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

  7. Annual Summary Report Calendar Year 2000 for the 100-HR-3, 100-KR-4, and 100-NR-2 Operable Units and Pump-and-Treat Operations

    SciTech Connect

    G. B. Mitchem

    2001-08-22

    This annual progress and performance evaluation report discusses the groundwater remedial actions in the 100 Area, including the interim actions at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units, and also discusses the expedited response action in the 100-NR-2 operable unit.

  8. Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

    2013-03-20

    This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

  9. Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7620, C7621, C7622, C7623, C7626, C7627, C7628, C7629, C7630, and C7866.

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2011-06-01

    This is a data report for sediment samples analyzed for CHPRC. Between November 4, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-HR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

  10. Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7620, C7621, C7622, C7623, C7626, C7627, C7628, C7629, C7630, and C7866. Revision 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2012-04-25

    This is a revision to a previously released report. This revision contains additional analytical results for the sample with HEIS number B2H4X7. Between November 4, 2010 and October 26, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-HR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL. Samples were received with a chain of custody (COC) and were analyzed according to the sample identification numbers supplied by the client. All Samples were refrigerated upon receipt until prepared for analysis. All samples were received with custody seals intact unless noted in the Case Narrative. Holding time is defined as the time from sample preparation to the time of analyses. The prescribed holding times were met for all analytes unless noted in the Case Narrative. All reported analytical results meet the requirements of the CAW or client specified SOW unless noted in the case narrative. Due to the requirements of the statement of work and sampling events in the field, the 28 day and the 48 hr requirements cannot be met. The statement of work requires samples to be selected at the completion of the borehole. It is not always possible to complete a borehole and have the samples shipped to the laboratory within the hold time requirements. Duplicate

  11. Precipitate Formation Potential of Resin Regeneration Effluent in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-10-09

    Calculations performed as part of this study indicate that injection of treated groundwater containing treated regenerant solution has a high potential for precipitate formation that could lead to plugging of formation porosity surrounding the injection well. In the worst case scenario, substantial plugging could occur within a year of the initiation of injection. Some uncertainty is associated with respect to this conclusion. The uncertainty results from the fact that equilibrium with the most stable mineral assemblage cannot always be assumed and that slow precipitation rates could occur and reliable estimates of precipitation kinetics under Hanford aquifer conditions are not available. It is recommended that the potential of calcium phosphate precipitation be investigated further using a combination of laboratory and field investigations.

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 10): Hanford 100 area (USDOE), operable units 100-hr-3 and 100-kr-4, Hanford Site, Benton County, WA, March 26, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This decision document presents the selected interim remedial actions for portions of the USDOE Hanford 100 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington. The selected remedy is an interim action that involves removing hexavalent chromium from groundwater that discharges into the Columbia River. To intercept the chromium plumes, groundwater will be pumped from approximately 30 wells located along and inland from the river shoreline. The water will then be treated using an ion exchange treatment technology to remove chromium. The treated effluent will then be returned to the aquifer using injection wells located upgradient of the existing chromium plumes. The interim action includes monitoring of the groundwater near the river and the effluent from the treatment system to determine system performance in meeting the remedial action objectives for protection of the Columbia River. The interim action also involves institutional controls to protect human health from groundwater contaminants.

  13. Treatment tests for ex situ removal of chromate, nitrate, and uranium (VI) from Hanford (100-HR-3) groundwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M.A.; Duncan, J.B.

    1993-11-15

    This report describes batch and anion exchange column laboratory-scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and uranium (present as uranyl (uranium [VI]) carbonato anionic species) from contaminated Hanford Site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium, and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium, and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1993). The goal of these tests was to determine the best method to remove selected contaminants to below the concentration of the project performance goals. The raw data and observations made during these tests can be found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratory notebooks (Beck 1992, Herting 1993). The method recommended for future study is anion exchange with Dowex 21K resin.

  14. Multi-unit operations considerations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Walter E.; Bennett, Thomas C.; Brannon, Nathan Gregory

    2005-09-01

    Several nuclear weapons programs have or are pursuing the implementation of multi-unit operations for tasks such as disassembly and inspection, and rebuild. A multi-unit operation is interpreted to mean the execution of nuclear explosive operating procedures in a single facility by two separate teams of technicians. The institution of a multi-unit operations program requires careful consideration of the tools, resources, and environment provided to the technicians carrying out the work. Therefore, a systematic approach is necessary to produce safe, secure, and reliable processes. In order to facilitate development of a more comprehensive multi-unit operations program, the current work details categorized issues that should be addressed prior to the implementation of multi-unit operations in a given weapons program. The issues have been organized into the following categories: local organizational conditions, work process flow/material handling/workplace configuration, ambient environmental conditions, documented safety analysis, and training.

  15. Small Unit Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Laboratory report UCRL-ID-119289, Jan. 15, 1995. [4] Ng, L. W. and T. J. Karr, "Performance Analysis of 3-Dimensional Estimation from an Angle-only Sensor...22102-3481 (703) 883-6997 IKIC QUALITY DJSFECTBD 1 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this...Information Operations and Reports . 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway Suite 1204 Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget

  16. Environmental Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John T., Ed.

    This manual was prepared for the purpose of stimulating the development of effective unit operations and unit processes laboratory courses in environmental engineering. Laboratory activities emphasizing physical operations, biological, and chemical processes are designed for various educational and equipment levels. An introductory section reviews…

  17. Environmental Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John T., Ed.

    This manual was prepared for the purpose of stimulating the development of effective unit operations and unit processes laboratory courses in environmental engineering. Laboratory activities emphasizing physical operations, biological, and chemical processes are designed for various educational and equipment levels. An introductory section reviews…

  18. The operational cost of a urology unit.

    PubMed

    Abeygunasekera, Anuruddha M; Duminda, M T; Chamintha, Thushara; Jayasingha, Ruwan

    2008-06-01

    To assess the operational cost of a urology unit, individual cost for certain index operations in urology, and to develop a framework to audit finances of a unit. A financial audit. Urology unit in a teaching hospital. Data of cost in providing urology services during one month were collected. It included three main areas: ward, operating theatre and outpatient clinic. Direct costs included staff wages, drugs, consumables, investigations and food. Indirect expenses such as administration, water, electricity and cleaning services were also calculated. For each type of operation a relative value was assigned depending on the nature of the operation. When direct expenses were not available, the hospital was divided into different cost centres and apportioning of the cost was done accordingly. The monthly operational cost of running a 19 bed urology unit with three operating sessions a week was Rs. 1 294 259. Staff wages constituted 61.2% of the cost. The cost of performing a pyelolithotomy was Rs. 18 669. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was done at a cost of Rs. 21 271. When the basic principles and the framework are understood, clinicians can perform financial audit and cost analysis of their units.

  19. Pressurized fluid bed demonstration units operate successfully

    SciTech Connect

    Smock, R.

    1993-03-01

    This article reviews the successful demonstration of 75 MW pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plants and the planning for 350 MW commercial scale plants. The topics of the article include progress in development, a review of operating units, the need for better sulfur capture, and large scale circulating PFBC design. A buyer's guide to PFBC system suppliers is provided.

  20. Unpacking Referent Units in Fraction Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipp, Randolph A.; Hawthorne, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Although fraction operations are procedurally straightforward, they are complex, because they require learners to conceptualize different units and view quantities in multiple ways. Prospective secondary school teachers sometimes provide an algebraic explanation for inverting and multiplying when dividing fractions. That authors of this article…

  1. Unpacking Referent Units in Fraction Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipp, Randolph A.; Hawthorne, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Although fraction operations are procedurally straightforward, they are complex, because they require learners to conceptualize different units and view quantities in multiple ways. Prospective secondary school teachers sometimes provide an algebraic explanation for inverting and multiplying when dividing fractions. That authors of this article…

  2. 30 CFR 77.301 - Dryer heating units; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dryer heating units; operation. 77.301 Section... MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.301 Dryer heating units; operation. (a) Dryer heating units shall be operated...) Dryer heating units which are fired by pulverized coal, shall be operated and maintained in...

  3. 30 CFR 77.301 - Dryer heating units; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dryer heating units; operation. 77.301 Section... MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.301 Dryer heating units; operation. (a) Dryer heating units shall be operated...) Dryer heating units which are fired by pulverized coal, shall be operated and maintained in...

  4. 30 CFR 77.301 - Dryer heating units; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dryer heating units; operation. 77.301 Section... MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.301 Dryer heating units; operation. (a) Dryer heating units shall be operated...) Dryer heating units which are fired by pulverized coal, shall be operated and maintained in...

  5. 30 CFR 77.301 - Dryer heating units; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dryer heating units; operation. 77.301 Section... MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.301 Dryer heating units; operation. (a) Dryer heating units shall be operated...) Dryer heating units which are fired by pulverized coal, shall be operated and maintained in...

  6. 30 CFR 77.301 - Dryer heating units; operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dryer heating units; operation. 77.301 Section... MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.301 Dryer heating units; operation. (a) Dryer heating units shall be operated...) Dryer heating units which are fired by pulverized coal, shall be operated and maintained in accordance...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dental operating light, an air or water syringe unit, and oral cavity evacuator, a suction operative unit... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872.6640... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dental operating light, an air or water syringe unit, and oral cavity evacuator, a suction operative unit... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872.6640... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dental operating light, an air or water syringe unit, and oral cavity evacuator, a suction operative unit... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872.6640... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and...

  10. NIC atomic operation unit with caching and bandwidth mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    A network interface controller atomic operation unit and a network interface control method comprising, in an atomic operation unit of a network interface controller, using a write-through cache and employing a rate-limiting functional unit.

  11. Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation Upgrades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trageser, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and fabrication associated with upgrades for the Medical Operations Workstation in the Habitat Demonstration Unit. The work spanned a ten week period. The upgrades will be used during the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field campaign. Upgrades include a deployable privacy curtain system, a deployable tray table, an easily accessible biological waste container, reorganization and labeling of the medical supplies, and installation of a retractable camera. All of the items were completed within the ten week period.

  12. Higher-Order Thinking in the Unit Operations Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ronald L.; Ely, James F.; Baldwin, Robert M.; Olds, Barbara M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the unit operations laboratory provides an ideal setting to help chemical engineering students become better engineering practitioners. Describes a summer program at the Colorado School of Mines that incorporates experience into a unit operations laboratory. (DDR)

  13. Higher-Order Thinking in the Unit Operations Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ronald L.; Ely, James F.; Baldwin, Robert M.; Olds, Barbara M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the unit operations laboratory provides an ideal setting to help chemical engineering students become better engineering practitioners. Describes a summer program at the Colorado School of Mines that incorporates experience into a unit operations laboratory. (DDR)

  14. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operations bond or unit... § 24.147 Operations bond or unit bond. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 24.146, each person... amended, give an operations bond or unit bond in accordance with the applicable provisions of 27 CFR part...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872.6640... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and accessories. (a) Identification. A dental operative unit and accessories is an AC-powered device that is...

  16. 200-BP-5 operable unit treatability test report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The 200-BP-5 Operable Unit was established in response to recommendations presented in the 200 East Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE-RL 1993a). Recognizing different approaches to remediation, the groundwater AAMSR recommended separating groundwater from source and vadose zone operable units and subdividing 200 East Area groundwater into two operable units. The division between the 200-BP-5 and 200-PO-1 Operable Units was based principally on source operable unit boundaries and distribution of groundwater plumes derived from either B Plant or Plutonium/Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant liquid waste disposal sites.

  17. 43 CFR 3284.2 - What are the principal operational responsibilities of the unit operator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What are the principal operational responsibilities of the unit operator? 3284.2 Section 3284.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Unit Operations § 3284.2 What are the principal operational...

  18. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigated the operational impacts of very high levels of variable generation penetration rates (up to 35% by energy) in the western United States. This work examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators. The cost impacts of maintaining hydro unit flexibility are assessed and compared for a number of different modes of system operation.

  19. 43 CFR 3281.8 - Must a unit operator provide working interests within the designated unit area the opportunity to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... interests within the designated unit area the opportunity to join the unit? 3281.8 Section 3281.8 Public... designated unit area the opportunity to join the unit? After BLM designates a unit area, the unit operator... operating rights) in the designated unit area to join the unit. The unit operator must provide the...

  20. 43 CFR 3281.8 - Must a unit operator provide working interests within the designated unit area the opportunity to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... interests within the designated unit area the opportunity to join the unit? 3281.8 Section 3281.8 Public... designated unit area the opportunity to join the unit? After BLM designates a unit area, the unit operator... operating rights) in the designated unit area to join the unit. The unit operator must provide the...

  1. 43 CFR 3281.8 - Must a unit operator provide working interests within the designated unit area the opportunity to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... interests within the designated unit area the opportunity to join the unit? 3281.8 Section 3281.8 Public... designated unit area the opportunity to join the unit? After BLM designates a unit area, the unit operator... operating rights) in the designated unit area to join the unit. The unit operator must provide the...

  2. 43 CFR 3281.8 - Must a unit operator provide working interests within the designated unit area the opportunity to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... interests within the designated unit area the opportunity to join the unit? 3281.8 Section 3281.8 Public... designated unit area the opportunity to join the unit? After BLM designates a unit area, the unit operator... operating rights) in the designated unit area to join the unit. The unit operator must provide the...

  3. Incorporating Safety into a Unit Operations Laboratory Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Julia A.

    1998-01-01

    Details the incorporation of safety procedures and issues into the curriculum of an undergraduate chemical engineering unit operations laboratory course. Includes checklists and sample reporting forms. (DDR)

  4. Nebraska biocontainment unit design and operations.

    PubMed

    Lenaghan, Patricia A; Schwedhelm, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Planning and design of a unique biocontainment unit specifically for care of patients with rare and highly infectious diseases presented an opportunity for nurse leaders to engage staff in crucial groundbreaking decisions. The Magnet® philosophy and framework were used to structure committees with key stakeholders and staff to ensure best and safe practices. Members of the biocontainment unit are engaged in active research and outreach training.

  5. 43 CFR 3104.4 - Unit operator's bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Unit operator's bond. 3104.4 Section 3104.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND GAS LEASING Bonds § 3104.4 Unit operator's bond...

  6. Operations: A Comparative Study of the United States and Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Cheng-Yao; Becker, Jerry; Byun, Mi-Ran; Yang, Der-Ching; Huang, Tsai-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This study examined (a) the differences in preservice teachers’ procedural knowledge in four areas of fraction operations in Taiwan and the United States, (b) the differences in preservice teachers’ conceptual knowledge in four areas of fraction operations in Taiwan and the United States, and (c) correlation in preservice teachers’ conceptual…

  7. 15 CFR 0.735-36 - Responsibilities of operating units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibilities of operating units. 0... RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Administration § 0.735-36 Responsibilities of operating units. The head of each... supervisor, and upon employees with whom the employee works, their responsibility as follows: (1)...

  8. Operations: A Comparative Study of the United States and Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Cheng-Yao; Becker, Jerry; Byun, Mi-Ran; Yang, Der-Ching; Huang, Tsai-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This study examined (a) the differences in preservice teachers’ procedural knowledge in four areas of fraction operations in Taiwan and the United States, (b) the differences in preservice teachers’ conceptual knowledge in four areas of fraction operations in Taiwan and the United States, and (c) correlation in preservice teachers’ conceptual…

  9. Sanitary Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Professors in Sanitary Engineering.

    This manual contains a compilation of experiments in Physical Operations, Biological and Chemical Processes for various education and equipment levels. The experiments are designed to be flexible so that they can be adapted to fit the needs of a particular program. The main emphasis is on hands-on student experiences to promote understanding.…

  10. Sanitary Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Professors in Sanitary Engineering.

    This manual contains a compilation of experiments in Physical Operations, Biological and Chemical Processes for various education and equipment levels. The experiments are designed to be flexible so that they can be adapted to fit the needs of a particular program. The main emphasis is on hands-on student experiences to promote understanding.…

  11. Infantry Small-Unit Mountain Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    winds often result in blowing snow, sand , or debris that further impairs visibility. On clear days, high elevations provide opportunities to see for...winches, sand bags, spill kits, shovels, and recovery capabilities for damaged vehicles should accompany all moving units if possible. 2-34. Dismounted...protections against erosion can become badly damaged with ruts becoming permanent fixtures as they dry. Mountain water runoff can wash away portions roads and

  12. Military Implications of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    maintenance of law and order, protecting the delivery of humanitarian assistance, the denial of an air space and the guarantee of rights of passage . In...involve the coordinated presence of warships and combat aircraft in the disputed region. Operations to guarantee rights of passage may be mounted to ensure

  13. The United States Military and Humanitarian Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    stated that, "The wave of the future will be putting together task forces that will be able to respond to crisis management or humanitarian...equipped for combat. "The skills needed to feed hungry people in Africa or build tent cities for hurricane victims are different from the skills needed...examine three options for the military’s role in humanitaria operations at home and abroad. Option 1: Virtually Eliminate Anv Military Role This is the

  14. Reliability and operational characteristics of VVER nuclear units

    SciTech Connect

    Kralovec, J.; Drab, F.

    1996-07-01

    Nuclear units VVER 440 of the Russian design have been constructed in counties of former USSR, East Germany, Hungary, Bulgaria, Czech and Slovak Republics and Finland. In the Czech Republic, four units VVER 440 are in operation at the NPP Dukovany, two units VVER 1000 are being constructed at the site Temelin. According to the data of the PRIS, NPP with units VVER 440 have high reliability and operational characteristics exceeding the average level of the pressurized water reactors family. SKODA PRAHA, as the main supplier of primary and secondary systems of NPPs in the Czech and Slovak Republics, made comparative analyses of all operating PWRs by using data of the PRIS and operational records of Czech and Slovak NPPS. Comparative criterions were: Load Factor, Planned Outage Factor, Forced Outage Factor (both for a unit as a whole and for its individual main components) etc. Results of the analyses are described in the paper.

  15. Study on safety operation for large hydroelectric generator unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z. G.; Cui, T.; Zhou, L. J.; Zhi, F. L.; Wang, Z. W.

    2012-11-01

    Hydroelectric generator unit is a complex mechanical system which is composed of hydraulic turbine and electric generator. Rotary system is supported by the bearing bracket and the reinforced concrete structures, and vibration problem can't be avoided in the process of operating. Many large-scale hydroelectric units have been damaged because of the vibration problem in recent years. As the increase of the hydraulic turbine unit capacity and water head, the safe operation of hydraulic turbine has become a focus research in many countries. The operating characteristics of the hydraulic turbine have obvious differences at different working conditions. Based on the combination of field measurement and theoretical calculation, this paper shows a deep research on the safe operation of a large-scale Francis turbine unit. Firstly, the measurements of vibration, swing, pressure fluctuation and noise were carried out at 4 different heads. And also the relationships between vibrations and pressure fluctuations at different heads and working conditions were analysed deeply. Then the scientific prediction of safe operation for the unit at high head were done based on the CFD numerical calculation. Finally, this paper shows the division of the operating zone for the hydroelectric unit. According to the experimental results (vibrations, swings, pressure fluctuations and noise) as well as the theoretical results, the operating zone of the unit has been divided into three sections: prohibited operating zone, transition operating zone and safe operating zone. After this research was applied in the hydropower station, the security and economic efficiency of unit increased greatly, and enormous economic benefits and social benefits have been obtained.

  16. Models of unit operations used for solid-waste processing

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, G.M.; Glaub, J.C.; Diaz, L.F.

    1984-09-01

    This report documents the unit operations models that have been developed for typical refuse-derived-fuel (RDF) processing systems. These models, which represent the mass balances, energy requirements, and economics of the unit operations, are derived, where possible, from basic principles. Empiricism has been invoked where a governing theory has yet to be developed. Field test data and manufacturers' information, where available, supplement the analytical development of the models. A literature review has also been included for the purpose of compiling and discussing in one document the available information pertaining to the modeling of front-end unit operations. Separate analytics have been done for each task.

  17. Unit costs of waste management operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

  18. Civil Military Cooperation for Counterterrorism Operations within the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    military, specifically Special Operations Forces, possesses a pool of talent in advanced counterterrorism operations that is not being utilized by...United States. The U.S. military, specifically Special Operations Forces, possesses a pool of talent in advanced counterterrorism operations that...examine and restructure the force allowing creativity to be applied to existing and older problems. The Army has created new and effective ideas when

  19. Security-constrained unit commitment with flexible operating modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo

    The electricity industry throughout the world, which has long been dominated by vertically integrated utilities, is facing enormous challenges. To enhance the competition in electricity industry, vertically integrated utilities are evolving into a distributed and competitive industry in which market forces drive the price of electricity and possibly reduce the net cost of supplying electrical loads through increased competition. To excel in the competition, generation companies (GENCOs) will acquire additional generating units with flexible operating capability which allows a timely response to the continuous changes in power system conditions. This dissertation considers the short-term scheduling of generating units with flexible modes of operation in security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC). Among the units considered in this study are combined cycle units, fuel switching/blending units, photovoltaic/battery system, pumped-storage units, and cascaded hydro units. The proposed security-constrained unit commitment solution will include a detailed model of transmission system which could impact the short-term scheduling of units with flexible operation modes.

  20. 53. OPERATOR WORKING GOVERNOR ON UNIT NO. 4. SCE negative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. OPERATOR WORKING GOVERNOR ON UNIT NO. 4. SCE negative no. 2685, no date. Photograph by G. Haven Bishop. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. Eielson Air Force Base Operable Unit 2 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.E.; Jarvis, T.T.; Jarvis, M.R.; Whelan, G.

    1994-10-01

    Operable Unit 2 at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, is one of several operable units characterized by petroleum, oil, and lubricant contamination, and by the presence of organic products floating at the water table, as a result of Air Force operations since the 1940s. The base is approximately 19,270 acres in size, and comprises the areas for military operations and a residential neighborhood for military dependents. Within Operable Unit 2, there are seven source areas. These source areas were grouped together primarily because of the contaminants released and hence are not necessarily in geographical proximity. Source area ST10 includes a surface water body (Hardfill Lake) next to a fuel spill area. The primary constituents of concern for human health include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Monitored data showed these volatile constituents to be present in groundwater wells. The data also showed an elevated level of trace metals in groundwater.

  2. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Bonds and Consents of Surety § 24.147 Operations bond or unit bond. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 24.146, each person intending to commence or to continue business as the proprietor of a bonded wine premises with an adjacent...

  3. Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This feasibility study examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred alternative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965--1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area, groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228, and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9{times}10{sup {minus}5}.

  4. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units Testing Plans and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.; Currin, Kelly M.; Orozco-Smith, Evelyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant loading operations with their associated flight and ground systems are some of the most complex, critical activities in launch operations. Consequently, these systems and operations account for a sizeable portion of the life cycle costs of any launch program. NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite advances in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. This project was developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancement in the current state of the art in these areas using two distinct integrated ground operations demonstration units (GODU): GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage (IRAS) and GODU Autonomous Control

  5. 200-UP-2 Operable Unit technical baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    Deford, D.H.

    1991-02-01

    This report is prepared in support of the development of a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit by EBASCO Environmental, Incorporated. It provides a technical baseline of the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit and results from an environmental investigation undertaken by the Technical Baseline Section of the Environmental Engineering Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Technical Baseline Report is based on review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, Hanford Site drawings and photographs and is supplemented with Hanford Site inspections and employee interviews. No field investigations or sampling were conducted. Each waste site in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is described separately. Close relationships between waste units, such as overflow from one to another, are also discussed. The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit consists of liquid-waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, U Plant operations in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The U Plant'' refers to the 221-U Process Canyon Building, a chemical separations facility constructed during World War 2. It also includes the Uranium Oxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which was constructed at the same time and, like the 221-U Process Canyon Building, was later converted for other missions. Waste sites in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit are associated with the U Plant Uranium Metal Recovery Program mission that occurred between 1952 and 1958 and the UO{sub 3} Plant's ongoing uranium oxide mission and include one or more cribs, reverse wells, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, waste vaults, and the lines and encasements that connect them. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Limited field investigation for the 200-UP-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit is located in the southern portion of the 200 West Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The operable unit is located adjacent to the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit and underlies a significant part of seven source operable units: 200-RO-1, 200-RO-2, 200-RO-3, 200-RO-4, 200-SS-2, 200-UP-2, and 200-UP-3. Remedial efforts in the 100-ZP-1 Operable Unit focus on addressing volatile organic contamination in the aquifer. The focus of the 200-UP-1 limited field investigation (LFI) is on contaminated aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, with the exception of uranium and technetium-99 plumes, which are addressed by an existing 200-UP-1 interim remedial measure (IRM). The LFI approach is driven by general and specific data needs required to refine the site conceptual model and conduct a risk assessment. Activities supporting the LFI include drilling, well construction, sampling and analysis, data validation, geologic and geophysical logging, aquifer testing, measuring depth to water, and evaluating geodetic survey and existing analytical data.

  7. Planning and Operational Considerations for Units Utilizing Military Working Dogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Planning and Operational Considerations for Units Utilizing Military Working Dogs 5 INTRODUCTION Military working dogs (MWDs) play an in- creasingly...certain conditions and sup- port elements to maintain maximal effectiveness. To gain the maximum benefit from canine units, teams that work with dogs must...take factors into consideration re- lating to canine health, handling, and safety. TRANSPORTATION AND HOUSING Transportation of dogs in the

  8. 3. Unit 4 Turbine Pit Shaft and Operating Ring, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Unit 4 Turbine Pit Shaft and Operating Ring, view to the northeast. One of the servo motor housings is visible in the right background of the photograph. Notice the wicket gate linkage greasing tubes along the top of the operating ring. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  9. 77 FR 62247 - Dynamic Positioning Operations Guidance for Vessels Other Than Mobile Offshore Drilling Units...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ...] Dynamic Positioning Operations Guidance for Vessels Other Than Mobile Offshore Drilling Units Operating on... voluntary guidance titled ``Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Dynamic Positioning Guidance''. The notice recommended owners and operators of Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs) follow Marine Technology...

  10. Biomass publications of the forest operations research unit: A synthesis

    Treesearch

    Dana Mitchell; Renee Ayala; [Compilers

    2005-01-01

    The Forest Operations Unit of the Southern Research Station has been studying biomass-related topics since 1977. This CD aids the reader by organizing these publications in one easy-to-use CD. This CD is comprised of an executive summary, two bibliographies, individual publications (in PDF format), and a keyword listing. The types of publications included on this CD...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872.6640 Section 872.6640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... intended to supply power to and serve as a base for other dental devices, such as a dental handpiece,...

  12. Adaptation of Professional Skills in the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rende, Deniz; Rende, Sevinc; Baysal, Nihat

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the design of three consecutive unit operations laboratory (UOL) courses that retain the academic rigor of the course while incorporating skills essential for professional careers, such as ability to propose ideas, develop practical solutions, participate in teamwork, meet deadlines, establish communication between technical support…

  13. Community-Based Presentations in the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Brian S.; Law, Victor J.

    2005-01-01

    A method for incorporating community­-based oral presentations into the undergraduate chemical engineering unit operations laboratory experience is described. Examples are given of appropriate topics and how these presentations can be incorporated into the experiment sequence. Course evaluations reflect the fact that these presentations are an…

  14. The Development and Deployment of a Virtual Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidyanath, Sreeram; Williams, Jason; Hilliard, Marcus; Wiesner, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Computer-simulated experiments offer many benefits to engineering curricula in the areas of safety, cost, and flexibility. We report our experience in developing and deploying a computer-simulated unit operations laboratory, driven by the guiding principle of maximum fidelity to the physical lab. We find that, while the up-front investment in…

  15. Implementation and Analysis of Hemodialysis in the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madihally, Sundararajan V.; Lewis, Randy S.

    2007-01-01

    To enhance bioengineering in the chemical engineering curriculum, a Unit Operations experiment simulating the hemodialysis of creatinine was implemented. The blood toxin creatinine was used for developing a more realistic dialysis experiment. A dialysis model is presented that allows students to assess the validity of model assumptions. This work…

  16. Adaptation of Professional Skills in the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rende, Deniz; Rende, Sevinc; Baysal, Nihat

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the design of three consecutive unit operations laboratory (UOL) courses that retain the academic rigor of the course while incorporating skills essential for professional careers, such as ability to propose ideas, develop practical solutions, participate in teamwork, meet deadlines, establish communication between technical support…

  17. 15 CFR 0.735-33 - Operating units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operating units. 0.735-33 Section 0.735-33 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND... Administration); (c) Certain provisions of the Defense Production Act of 1950, e.g., 50 U.S.C. App....

  18. Semiconductor Chemical Reactor Engineering and Photovoltaic Unit Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, T. W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the nature of semiconductor chemical reactor engineering, illustrating the application of this engineering with research in physical vapor deposition of cadmium sulfide at both the laboratory and unit operations scale and chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon at the laboratory scale. (JN)

  19. The Development and Deployment of a Virtual Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidyanath, Sreeram; Williams, Jason; Hilliard, Marcus; Wiesner, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Computer-simulated experiments offer many benefits to engineering curricula in the areas of safety, cost, and flexibility. We report our experience in developing and deploying a computer-simulated unit operations laboratory, driven by the guiding principle of maximum fidelity to the physical lab. We find that, while the up-front investment in…

  20. 7 CFR 636.19 - Access to operating unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to operating unit. 636.19 Section 636.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVES PROGRAM § 636.19 Access to...

  1. Unit Operation Experiment Linking Classroom with Industrial Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Tracy J.; Richmond, Peyton C.; LeBlanc, Weldon

    2013-01-01

    An industrial-type distillation column, including appropriate pumps, heat exchangers, and automation, was used as a unit operations experiment to provide a link between classroom teaching and real-world applications. Students were presented with an open-ended experiment where they defined the testing parameters to solve a generalized problem. The…

  2. An Automated Distillation Column for the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Douglas M.; Bruce, David A.; Gooding, Charles H.; Butler, Justin T.

    2005-01-01

    A batch distillation apparatus has been designed and built for use in the undergraduate unit operations laboratory course. The column is fully automated and is accompanied by data acquisition and control software. A mixture of 1­-propanol and 2-­propanol is separated in the column, using either a constant distillate rate or constant composition…

  3. Semiconductor Chemical Reactor Engineering and Photovoltaic Unit Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, T. W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the nature of semiconductor chemical reactor engineering, illustrating the application of this engineering with research in physical vapor deposition of cadmium sulfide at both the laboratory and unit operations scale and chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon at the laboratory scale. (JN)

  4. An Automated Distillation Column for the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Douglas M.; Bruce, David A.; Gooding, Charles H.; Butler, Justin T.

    2005-01-01

    A batch distillation apparatus has been designed and built for use in the undergraduate unit operations laboratory course. The column is fully automated and is accompanied by data acquisition and control software. A mixture of 1­-propanol and 2-­propanol is separated in the column, using either a constant distillate rate or constant composition…

  5. Unit Operation Experiment Linking Classroom with Industrial Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Tracy J.; Richmond, Peyton C.; LeBlanc, Weldon

    2013-01-01

    An industrial-type distillation column, including appropriate pumps, heat exchangers, and automation, was used as a unit operations experiment to provide a link between classroom teaching and real-world applications. Students were presented with an open-ended experiment where they defined the testing parameters to solve a generalized problem. The…

  6. Implementation and Analysis of Hemodialysis in the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madihally, Sundararajan V.; Lewis, Randy S.

    2007-01-01

    To enhance bioengineering in the chemical engineering curriculum, a Unit Operations experiment simulating the hemodialysis of creatinine was implemented. The blood toxin creatinine was used for developing a more realistic dialysis experiment. A dialysis model is presented that allows students to assess the validity of model assumptions. This work…

  7. 43 CFR 3140.4-1 - Approval of plan of operations (and unit and operating agreements).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) LEASING IN SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Conversion of Existing Oil and Gas Leases and Valid Claims Based on Mineral Locations § 3140.4-1 Approval of plan of operations (and unit and operating agreements). (a) The owner of an oil and gas lease, or the owner of a valid claim based on a mineral location shall have...

  8. Operational Research to Improve HIV Prevention in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Jeffrey H.; Glassman, Marlene; Carey, James W.; Painter, Thomas M.; Gelaude, Deborah J.; Fasula, Amy M.; Raiford, Jerris L.; Freeman, Arin E.; Harshbarger, Camilla; Viall, Abigail H.; Purcell, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States continues despite several recent noteworthy advances in HIV prevention. Contemporary approaches to HIV prevention involve implementing combinations of biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions in novel ways to achieve high levels of impact on the epidemic. Methods are needed to develop optimal combinations of approaches for improving efficiency, effectiveness, and scalability. This article argues that operational research offers promise as a valuable tool for addressing these issues. We define operational research relative to domestic HIV prevention, identify and illustrate how operational research can improve HIV prevention, and pose a series of questions to guide future operational research. Operational research can help achieve national HIV prevention goals of reducing new infections, improving access to care and optimization of health outcomes of people living with HIV, and reducing HIV-related health disparities. PMID:22217681

  9. Operational research to improve HIV prevention in the United States.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Jeffrey H; Glassman, Marlene; Carey, James W; Painter, Thomas M; Gelaude, Deborah J; Fasula, Amy M; Raiford, Jerris L; Freeman, Arin E; Harshbarger, Camilla; Viall, Abigail H; Purcell, David W

    2012-04-15

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States continues despite several recent noteworthy advances in HIV prevention. Contemporary approaches to HIV prevention involve implementing combinations of biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions in novel ways to achieve high levels of impact on the epidemic. Methods are needed to develop optimal combinations of approaches for improving efficiency, effectiveness, and scalability. This article argues that operational research offers promise as a valuable tool for addressing these issues. We define operational research relative to domestic HIV prevention, identify and illustrate how operational research can improve HIV prevention, and pose a series of questions to guide future operational research. Operational research can help achieve national HIV prevention goals of reducing new infections, improving access to care and optimization of health outcomes of people living with HIV, and reducing HIV-related health disparities.

  10. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    PubMed

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-07

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  11. Measures of coherence-generating power for quantum unital operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardi, Paolo; Styliaris, Georgios; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo

    2017-05-01

    Given an orthonormal basis B in a d -dimensional Hilbert space and a unital quantum operation E acting on it, one can define a nonlinear mapping that associates with E a d ×d real-valued matrix that we call the coherence matrix of E with respect to B . This is the Gram matrix of the coherent part of the basis projections of B under E . We show that one can use this coherence matrix to define vast families of measures of the coherence-generating power (CGP) of the operation. These measures have a natural geometrical interpretation as separation of E from the set of incoherent unital operations. The probabilistic approach to CGP discussed in P. Zanardi et al. [Phys. Rev. A 95, 052306 (2017)., 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.052306] can be reformulated and generalized, introducing, alongside the coherence matrix, another d ×d real-valued matrix, the simplex correlation matrix. This matrix describes the relevant statistical correlations in the input ensemble of incoherent states. Contracting these two matrices, one finds CGP measures associated with the process of preparing the given incoherent ensemble and processing it with the chosen unital operation. Finally, in the unitary case, we discuss how these concepts can be made compatible with an underlying tensor product structure by defining families of CGP measures that are additive.

  12. On Point: The United States Army in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    colleagues in the other services, and others may find useful or interesting. On Point will not be the last word or the definitive history of this operation...has, by definition , no secure areas. Every unit in the theater must be prepared to fight to accomplish its mission. OIF drove this idea home and...The Darkest Day By any definition , 23 March 2003 proved a dark day for the coalition forces fi ghting in Iraq. CFLCC’s maneuver units fought from As

  13. Operating experience of Pyroflow boilers in a 250 MWe unit

    SciTech Connect

    Chelian, P.K.; Hyvarinen, K.

    1995-12-31

    The Cedar Bay Cogeneration project is a 250 MWe unit owned and operated by US Generating Company. This plant has one turbine rated at 250 MWe net which is supplied by three Pyroflow CFB boilers that operate in parallel while supplying a paper mill with steam on an uninterruptible basis. Compared to similar size CFB boilers the Cedar Bay boilers have certain unique features. First, these are reheat boilers which must continue to supply process steam even when the steam turbine is down. Second, the SO{sub 2} control operates at a very low Ca/S molar ratio by optimizing the process conditions and flyash reinjection. Third, the NO{sub x} reduction process utilizes aqueous ammonia injection. This paper presents the operating data at full load in terms of boiler efficiency, and the ability to limit gaseous emissions with minimum limestone and ammonia usage. Unique features relating to the multiple boiler installation are also discussed.

  14. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  15. BOTUX: bayesian-like operational taxonomic unit examiner.

    PubMed

    Koparde, Vishal N; Adkins, Ricky S; Fettweis, Jennifer M; Serrano, Myrna G; Buck, Gregory A A; Reimers, Mark A; Sheth, Nihar U

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian-like operational taxonomic unit examiner (BOTUX) is a new tool for the classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that addresses the problem of overestimation caused by errors introduced during PCR amplification and DNA sequencing steps. BOTUX utilises a grammar-based assignment strategy, where Bayesian models are built from each word of a given length (e.g., 8-mers). de novo analysis is possible with BOTUX as it does not require a training set, and updates probabilistic models as new sequences are recruited to an OTU. In benchmarking tests performed with real and simulated datasets of 16S rDNA sequences, BOTUX accurately identifies OTUs with comparable or better clustering efficiency and lower execution times than other OTU algorithms tested. BOTUX is the only OTU classifier, which allows incremental analysis of large datasets, and is also adept in clustering both 454 and Illumina datasets in a reasonable timeframe.

  16. Computer simulation of on-orbit manned maneuvering unit operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, G. M.; Garcia, K. D.

    1986-01-01

    Simulation of spacecraft on-orbit operations is discussed in reference to Martin Marietta's Space Operations Simulation laboratory's use of computer software models to drive a six-degree-of-freedom moving base carriage and two target gimbal systems. In particular, key simulation issues and related computer software models associated with providing real-time, man-in-the-loop simulations of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) are addressed with special attention given to how effectively these models and motion systems simulate the MMU's actual on-orbit operations. The weightless effects of the space environment require the development of entirely new devices for locomotion. Since the access to space is very limited, it is necessary to design, build, and test these new devices within the physical constraints of earth using simulators. The simulation method that is discussed here is the technique of using computer software models to drive a Moving Base Carriage (MBC) that is capable of providing simultaneous six-degree-of-freedom motions. This method, utilized at Martin Marietta's Space Operations Simulation (SOS) laboratory, provides the ability to simulate the operation of manned spacecraft, provides the pilot with proper three-dimensional visual cues, and allows training of on-orbit operations. The purpose here is to discuss significant MMU simulation issues, the related models that were developed in response to these issues and how effectively these models simulate the MMU's actual on-orbiter operations.

  17. 101st Sustainment Brigade Supports Operation United Assistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    breaks down a biological safety level three glove box at the Ebola testing lab in Zwedru, Liberia. (Photo by Sta Sgt. Terrance D. Rhodes) 17...Army Sustainment July–August 2015 OU July–August 2015 Army Sustainment18 In early 2014, the Ebola virus dis-ease began to spread throughout West... Ebola . This mission, Operation United As- sistance (OUA), marked the first time U.S. military forces had deployed with a primary mission of force

  18. Operable Unit D Remedial Investigation Report. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-06

    Bert Ellsworth 8455 Jackson Road, Suite 120 Sacramento CA 95826 Sacramento County Environ.cjital Management Department Hazardous Materials Division...Remedial Investigation (RI) activities within Operable Unit D at MicClellan Air Force Base (McClellan AFB ) in California. This "I is a primary document, as...Moss-RI Report Graphics CH2M HILl. would like to acknowledge the cooperation .f the McClellai; AFB Office oe 1. • ,;oninentai Management for their

  19. Logistics Support Contracting for the United States Special Operations Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-28

    Development, Test, and Evaluation SOFSA Special Operations Forces Support Activity TAPO Technology Applications Program Office U.S.C United...Violation The Technology Applications Program Office ( TAPO ) did not comply with appropriations laws and regulations when funding task order USZA22-03...C-0056-2237 because TAPO funded $63.6 million of the task order with procurement funds rather than research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT

  20. SCOPING SUMMARY FOR THE P-AREA OPERABLE UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Kupar, J; Sadika Baladi, S; Mark Amidon, M

    2007-05-22

    This scoping summary supports development of the combined Remedial Investigation (RI)/Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA)/Feasibility Study (FS) for the P-Area Operable Unit (PAOU), or Combined document, which will be submitted on or before 09/28/2007. The objective of this Feasibility Study scoping summary meeting is to agree on the likely response actions to be evaluated and developed as alternatives in the combined document and agree on the uncertainties identified and whether they have been adequately managed.

  1. Analysis of viral clearance unit operations for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Miesegaes, George; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of viral clearance is a critical step in assuring the safety of biotechnology products. We generated a viral clearance database that contains product information, unit operation process parameters, and viral clearance data from monoclonal antibody and antibody-related regulatory submissions to FDA. Here we present a broad overview of the database and resulting analyses. We report that the diversity of model viruses tested expands as products transition to late-phase. We also present averages and ranges of viral clearance results by Protein A and ion exchange chromatography steps, low pH chemical inactivation, and virus filtration, focusing on retro- and parvoviruses. For most unit operations, an average log reduction value (LRV, a measure of clearance power) for retrovirus of >4 log(10) were measured. Cases where clearance data fell outside of the anticipated range (i.e., outliers) were rationally explained. Lastly, a historical analysis did not find evidence of any improvement trend in viral clearance over time. The data collectively suggest that many unit operations in general can reliably clear viruses.

  2. 43 CFR 3283.4 - When may the unit operator add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When may the unit operator add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement? 3283.4 Section 3283.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement? (a) The unit operator may request BLM to...

  3. 43 CFR 3283.4 - When may the unit operator add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When may the unit operator add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement? 3283.4 Section 3283.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement? (a) The unit operator may request BLM to...

  4. 43 CFR 3283.4 - When may the unit operator add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When may the unit operator add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement? 3283.4 Section 3283.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement? (a) The unit operator may request BLM to...

  5. 43 CFR 3283.4 - When may the unit operator add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When may the unit operator add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement? 3283.4 Section 3283.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to... add lands to or remove lands from a unit agreement? (a) The unit operator may request BLM to...

  6. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01

    This paper examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating unit patterns are examined for an aggregation of all hydro generators.

  7. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Glass Fabrication Unit Operation Testing Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. E.; Newell, J. D.; Johnson, F. C.; Edwards, T. B.

    2016-07-14

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed campaign prior to transfer from the Tank Operations Contractor to the feed receipt vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. The Waste Feed Qualification Program Plan describes the three components of waste feed qualification: 1. Demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criteria 2. Determine waste processability 3. Test unit operations at laboratory scale. The glass fabrication unit operation is the final step in the process demonstration portion of the waste feed qualification process. This unit operation generally consists of combining each of the waste feed streams (high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW)) with Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs), fabricating glass coupons, performing chemical composition analysis before and after glass fabrication, measuring hydrogen generation rate either before or after glass former addition, measuring rheological properties before and after glass former addition, and visual observation of the resulting glass coupons. Critical aspects of this unit operation are mixing and sampling of the waste and melter feeds to ensure representative samples are obtained as well as ensuring the fabrication process for the glass coupon is adequate. Testing was performed using a range of simulants (LAW and HLW simulants), and these simulants were mixed with high and low bounding amounts of GFCs to evaluate the mixing, sampling, and glass preparation steps in shielded cells using laboratory techniques. The tests were performed with off-the-shelf equipment at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is similar to equipment used in the SRNL work during qualification of waste feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other waste treatment facilities at the

  8. The United States national volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albersheim, Steven; Guffanti, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic-ash clouds are a known hazard to aviation, requiring that aircraft be warned away from ash-contaminated airspace. The exposure of aviation to potential hazards from volcanoes in the United States is significant. In support of existing interagency operations to detect and track volcanic-ash clouds, the United States has prepared a National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation to strengthen the warning process in its airspace. The US National Plan documents the responsibilities, communication protocols, and prescribed hazard messages of the Federal Aviation Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Geological Survey, and Air Force Weather Agency. The plan introduces a new message format, a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation, to provide clear, concise information about volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to air-traffic controllers (for use in Notices to Airmen) and other aviation users. The plan is online at http://www.ofcm.gov/p35-nvaopa/pdf/FCM-P35-2007-NVAOPA.pdf. While the plan provides general operational practices, it remains the responsibility of the federal agencies involved to implement the described procedures through orders, directives, etc. Since the plan mirrors global guidelines of the International Civil Aviation Organization, it also provides an example that could be adapted by other countries.

  9. Method and apparatus for operating an improved thermocline storage unit

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a thermocline storage unit in which an insulated barrier member is provided substantially at the interface region between the hot and cold liquids in the storage tank. The barrier member physically and thermally separates the hot and cold liquids substantially preventing any diffusing or mixing between them and substantially preventing any heat transfer therebetween. The barrier member follows the rise and fall of the interface region between the liquids as the tank is charged and discharged. Two methods of maintaining it in the interface region are disclosed. With the structure and operation of the present invention and in particular the significant reduction in diffusing or mixing between the hot and cold liquids as well as the significant reduction in the thermal heat transfer between them, the performance of the storage tank is improved. More specifically, the stability of the interface region or thermocline is enhanced and the thickness of the thermocline is reduced producing a corresponding increase in the steepness of the temperature gradient across the thermocline and a more efficiently operating thermocline storage unit.

  10. Method and apparatus for operating an improved thermocline storage unit

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, R.J.

    1982-09-30

    A method and apparatus for operating a thermocline storage unit in which an insulated barrier member is provided substantially at the interface region between the hot and cold liquids in the storage tank. The barrier member physically and thermally separates the hot and cold liquids substantially preventing any diffusing or mixing between them and substantially preventing any heat transfer there between. The barrier member follows the rise and fall of the interface region between the liquids as the tank is charged and discharged. Two methods of maintaining it in the interface region are disclosed. With the structure and operation of the present invention and in particular the significant reduction in diffusing or mixing between the hot and cold liquids as well as the significant reduction in the thermal heat transfer between them, the performance of the storage tank is improved. More specifically, the stability of the interface region or thermocline is enhanced and the thickness of the thermocline is reduced producing a corresponding increase in the steepness of the temperature gradient across the thermocline and a more efficiently operating thermocline storage unit.

  11. Feasibility Study for Operable Unit 7-13/14

    SciTech Connect

    K. Jean Holdren Thomas E. Bechtold Brian D. Preussner

    2007-05-29

    The Subsurface Disposal Area is a radioactive waste landfill located within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in southeastern Idaho. This Feasibility Study for Operable Unit 7-13/14 analyzes options for mitigating risks to human health and the environment associated with the landfill. Analysis is conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, using nine evaluation criteria to develop detailed and comparative analysis of five assembled alternatives. Assembled alternatives are composed of discrete modules. Ultimately, decision-makers will select, recombine, and sum various modules into an optimized preferred alternative and final remedial decision.

  12. Article separation apparatus and method for unit operations

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Mathews, Royce A.; Hockey, Ronald L.

    2010-06-22

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for separating articles from a group of articles. The apparatus includes a container for containing one or more articles coupled to a suitable fluidizer for suspending articles within the container and transporting articles to an induction tube. A portal in the induction tube introduces articles singly into the induction tube. A vacuum pulls articles through the induction tube separating the articles from the group of articles in the container. The apparatus and method can be combined with one or more unit operations or modules, e.g., for inspecting articles, assessing quality of articles, or ascertaining material properties and/or parameters of articles, including layers thereof.

  13. CTS (Hermes): United States experiments and operations summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, P. L.; Hunczak, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The Communications Technology Satellite, launched in January 1976 and embodying the highest power transmitter in a communications satellite, was considered. As a joint program between the U.S. and Canada, close coordination of the two countries was necessitated since the management and control of experiments were done in real time. Criteria used by NASA for acceptance of the United States experiments are noted and acceptance procedures are discussed. The category for each accepted experiment is given. The modus operandi employed for the U.S. experiments in the areas of management, coordination, liaison, and real time operation are described. Some of the highlights associated with satellite utilization are given.

  14. 43 CFR 3284.5 - How do unit operations affect lease extensions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How do unit operations affect lease extensions? 3284.5 Section 3284.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... UNIT AGREEMENTS Unit Operations § 3284.5 How do unit operations affect lease extensions? (a) Once the...

  15. 43 CFR 3284.8 - May a unit have multiple operators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false May a unit have multiple operators? 3284.8 Section 3284.8 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... Operations § 3284.8 May a unit have multiple operators? A unit may have only one operator....

  16. 43 CFR 3284.8 - May a unit have multiple operators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false May a unit have multiple operators? 3284.8 Section 3284.8 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... Operations § 3284.8 May a unit have multiple operators? A unit may have only one operator....

  17. 43 CFR 3284.8 - May a unit have multiple operators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false May a unit have multiple operators? 3284.8 Section 3284.8 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... Operations § 3284.8 May a unit have multiple operators? A unit may have only one operator....

  18. 43 CFR 3284.8 - May a unit have multiple operators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false May a unit have multiple operators? 3284.8 Section 3284.8 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... Operations § 3284.8 May a unit have multiple operators? A unit may have only one operator....

  19. Comparative effectiveness of primary bariatric operations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Ranjan; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Wilk, Amber R; Nguyen, Ninh T; Ponce, Jaime; Morton, John M

    2017-05-01

    Four current bariatric operations were compared after matching patients for differences at baseline. Operations with greater weight loss and resolution of co-morbidities also incurred more adverse events. Reflux was best treated by gastric bypass and type 2 diabetes with duodenal switch. These results can guide decision making regarding choice of bariatric operation. Relative outcomes of common primary bariatric operations have not been compared previously in a large multisite cohort from surgeons in multiple surgical centers. Compare outcomes of primary bariatric operations in a matched national sample. Bariatric Surgery Centers of Excellence in the United States of America METHODS: Data from Bariatric Surgery Center of Excellence Data File was queried from June 2007 to September 2011 for 30-day and 1-year adverse events, 1-year weight loss and comorbidity resolution. Inverse probability weighting accounted for covariate imbalances in multivariable linear/logistic regressions estimates of differences/odds ratios for each pairwise surgical procedure comparison. A Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple pairwise comparisons. Among 130,796 patients, 57,094 patients underwent AGB, 5942 patients underwent SG, 66,324 patients underwent RYGB and 1436 patients underwent BPD/DS. Compared with AGB, change in body mass index units at 1 year for BPD/DS was 10.6 (standard error [SE]: .15), RYGB 9.3 (SE: .03), and SG 5.7 (SE: .06). Resolution of GERD was best for RYGB (odds ratio [OD] = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.48-1.58) and lowest for SG (OR = 0.87, 95% CI: .79-.95). Hypertension and T2D resolution were better after the BPD/DS (OR = 3.82, 95% CI: 3.21-4.55, and OR = 5.62, 95% CI: 4.60-6.88, respectively) or after RYGB (OR = 3.08, 95% CI: 2.98-3.18 and OR = 3.5, 95% CI: 3.39-3.64, respectively). Odds of serious adverse events at 1 year were: SG, OR = 3.22, 95% CI: 2.64-3.92; RYGB, OR = 4.92, 95% CI: 4.38-5.54; BPD/DS, OR = 17.47, 95% CI: 14

  20. Toward a warfighter's associate: eliminating the operator control unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Hobart R.; Pacis, Estrellina B.; Kogut, Greg; Farrington, Nathan M.; Khurana, S.

    2004-12-01

    In addition to the challenges of equipping a mobile robot with the appropriate sensors, actuators, and processing electronics necessary to perform some useful function, there coexists the equally important challenge of effectively controlling the system"s desired actions. This need is particularly critical if the intent is to operate in conjunction with human forces in a military application, as any low-level distractions can seriously reduce a warfighter"s chances of survival in hostile environments. Historically there can be seen a definitive trend towards making the robot smarter in order to reduce the control burden on the operator, and while much progress has been made in laboratory prototypes, all equipment deployed in theatre to date has been strictly teleoperated. There exists a definite tradeoff between the value added by the robot, in terms of how it contributes to the performance of the mission, and the loss of effectiveness associated with the operator control unit. From a command-and-control perspective, the ultimate goal would be to eliminate the need for a separate robot controller altogether, since it represents an unwanted burden and potential liability from the operator"s perspective. This paper introduces the long-term concept of a supervised autonomous Warfighter"s Associate, which employs a natural-language interface for communication with (and oversight by) its human counterpart. More realistic near-term solutions to achieve intermediate success are then presented, along with actual results to date. The primary application discussed is military, but the concept also applies to law enforcement, space exploration, and search-and-rescue scenarios.

  1. Simplified programming and control of automated radiosynthesizers through unit operations.

    PubMed

    Claggett, Shane B; Quinn, Kevin M; Lazari, Mark; Moore, Melissa D; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-07-15

    Many automated radiosynthesizers for producing positron emission tomography (PET) probes provide a means for the operator to create custom synthesis programs. The programming interfaces are typically designed with the engineer rather than the radiochemist in mind, requiring lengthy programs to be created from sequences of low-level, non-intuitive hardware operations. In some cases, the user is even responsible for adding steps to update the graphical representation of the system. In light of these unnecessarily complex approaches, we have created software to perform radiochemistry on the ELIXYS radiosynthesizer with the goal of being intuitive and easy to use. Radiochemists were consulted, and a wide range of radiosyntheses were analyzed to determine a comprehensive set of basic chemistry unit operations. Based around these operations, we created a software control system with a client-server architecture. In an attempt to maximize flexibility, the client software was designed to run on a variety of portable multi-touch devices. The software was used to create programs for the synthesis of several 18F-labeled probes on the ELIXYS radiosynthesizer, with [18F]FDG detailed here. To gauge the user-friendliness of the software, program lengths were compared to those from other systems. A small sample group with no prior radiosynthesizer experience was tasked with creating and running a simple protocol. The software was successfully used to synthesize several 18F-labeled PET probes, including [18F]FDG, with synthesis times and yields comparable to literature reports. The resulting programs were significantly shorter and easier to debug than programs from other systems. The sample group of naive users created and ran a simple protocol within a couple of hours, revealing a very short learning curve. The client-server architecture provided reliability, enabling continuity of the synthesis run even if the computer running the client software failed. The architecture enabled

  2. Simplified programming and control of automated radiosynthesizers through unit operations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many automated radiosynthesizers for producing positron emission tomography (PET) probes provide a means for the operator to create custom synthesis programs. The programming interfaces are typically designed with the engineer rather than the radiochemist in mind, requiring lengthy programs to be created from sequences of low-level, non-intuitive hardware operations. In some cases, the user is even responsible for adding steps to update the graphical representation of the system. In light of these unnecessarily complex approaches, we have created software to perform radiochemistry on the ELIXYS radiosynthesizer with the goal of being intuitive and easy to use. Methods Radiochemists were consulted, and a wide range of radiosyntheses were analyzed to determine a comprehensive set of basic chemistry unit operations. Based around these operations, we created a software control system with a client–server architecture. In an attempt to maximize flexibility, the client software was designed to run on a variety of portable multi-touch devices. The software was used to create programs for the synthesis of several 18F-labeled probes on the ELIXYS radiosynthesizer, with [18F]FDG detailed here. To gauge the user-friendliness of the software, program lengths were compared to those from other systems. A small sample group with no prior radiosynthesizer experience was tasked with creating and running a simple protocol. Results The software was successfully used to synthesize several 18F-labeled PET probes, including [18F]FDG, with synthesis times and yields comparable to literature reports. The resulting programs were significantly shorter and easier to debug than programs from other systems. The sample group of naive users created and ran a simple protocol within a couple of hours, revealing a very short learning curve. The client–server architecture provided reliability, enabling continuity of the synthesis run even if the computer running the client software

  3. Post-operative pyrexia in an orthopaedic unit.

    PubMed

    Gakuu, L N

    1997-08-01

    The causes of post operative pyrexia in an orthopaedic unit was studied prospectively in 520 patients who underwent surgery. Two hundred patients (38.4%) developed postoperative pyrexia as defined by having recorded high temperatures of over 38 degrees C on two occasions within 24 hours (excluding the first 24 hours post-operatively). The commonest causes of post-operative pyrexia were wound infection in 70 (13.4%), respiratory tract infections in 40 (7.6%) and malaria in 30 (5.7%) patients, while other causes were urinary tract infection in 20 (3.8%), thrombophlebitis in 15 (2.8%) and deep vein thrombosis in 15 (2.8%) of the patients; while ten (1.9%) patients had pyrexia of undetermined cause despite exhaustive clinical and laboratory workup. The other associated conditions in patients who developed pyrexia were diabetes mellitus in 20 (3.8%), HIV seropositivity and malignancy in 30 (5.7%) and six (1.1%) patients, respectively.

  4. Impact of High Wind Power Penetration on Hydroelectric Unit Operations in the WWSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B.-M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2011-07-01

    This report examines the impact of this large amount of wind penetration on hydroelectric unit operations. Changes in hydroelectric unit operating patterns are examined both for an aggregation of all hydro generators and for select individual plants.

  5. Multimegabit Operation Multiplexer System. [PCM telemetry unit for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giri, R. R.; Maxwell, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Multimegabit Operation Multiplexer System (MOMS) is a high-data-rate PCM telemetry unit capable of sampling and encoding 60 scanning radiometer and four vidicon channels at 250 kilosamples/second and 5 megasamples/second, respectively. This sampling capacity plus the seven-bit quantization requires a total throughput rate of 40 megasamples/second and 280 megabits/second. To produce these rates efficiently, the system was divided into a pair of identical 140-megabit blocks. A low-power 20-MHz analog multiplexer and analog-to-digital converter were developed together with a video sample-and-hold that features an aperture time error of less than 50 psec. Breadboard testing of these basic building blocks confirmed the design prediction that the total system would consume 27 watts of power. Two 140-megabit output parts are suitable for quadriphase modulation.

  6. Multimegabit Operation Multiplexer System. [PCM telemetry unit for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giri, R. R.; Maxwell, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Multimegabit Operation Multiplexer System (MOMS) is a high-data-rate PCM telemetry unit capable of sampling and encoding 60 scanning radiometer and four vidicon channels at 250 kilosamples/second and 5 megasamples/second, respectively. This sampling capacity plus the seven-bit quantization requires a total throughput rate of 40 megasamples/second and 280 megabits/second. To produce these rates efficiently, the system was divided into a pair of identical 140-megabit blocks. A low-power 20-MHz analog multiplexer and analog-to-digital converter were developed together with a video sample-and-hold that features an aperture time error of less than 50 psec. Breadboard testing of these basic building blocks confirmed the design prediction that the total system would consume 27 watts of power. Two 140-megabit output parts are suitable for quadriphase modulation.

  7. Explanation of significant differences for the TNX groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.R.

    1997-09-22

    This Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) is being issued by the Department of Energy (DOE), the lead agency for the Savannah River Site (SRS), with concurrence by the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV (EPA) and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to announce changes in the interim remediation strategy selected for the TNX Groundwater Operable Unit. The TNX Area is located adjacent to the Savannah River in the southwestern portion of SRS. The remedy selected in the Interim Record of Decision (IROD) to achieve the interim action goals was the Hybrid Groundwater Corrective Action (HGCA). The HGCA consisted of a recirculation well system and an air stripper with a series of groundwater extraction wells. The original remediation strategy needs to be modified because the recirculation well system was determined to be ineffective in this area due to geological factors and the nature of the contamination.

  8. OTUbase: an R infrastructure package for operational taxonomic unit data

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Daniel; Settles, Matt; Foster, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: OTUbase is an R package designed to facilitate the analysis of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) data and sequence classification (taxonomic) data. Currently there are programs that will cluster sequence data into OTUs and/or classify sequence data into known taxonomies. However, there is a need for software that can take the summarized output of these programs and organize it into easily accessed and manipulated formats. OTUbase provides this structure and organization within R, to allow researchers to easily manipulate the data with the rich library of R packages currently available for additional analysis. Availability: OTUbase is an R package available through Bioconductor. It can be found at http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/OTUbase.html. Contact: msettles@uidaho.edu PMID:21498398

  9. LBL continuous bench-scale liquefaction unit, operation and results

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C.; Schaleger, L.L.; Davis, H.G.

    1981-12-01

    A bench-scale continuous liquefaction unit (CLU) is now fully operational. The CLU is a flexible system capable of examining feedstocks introduced in slurry form by various liquefying techniques. It is the only continuous biomass liquefaction unit currently in use. Emphasis has been on the liquefaction of aqueous slurries (about 20% organics) of prehydrolyzed Douglas fir wood, without recycle, under the following conditions: 330 to 360/sup 0/C; 3000 to 3400 psig; pH 6 to 9 (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, 5 to 10% of wood); CO-H/sub 2/ ratios in reactant gas 1:0, 1:1, 0:1; and experiment duration 10 to 24 hours. Results show about 30% of feed organics is converted to CO/sub 2/ plus H/sub 2/O, with crude wood oil yields 20 to 35% and water-soluble organic products 20 to 30%. Atom balances and difference calculations indicate that the estimates of oil yield are low. The ratio of water-solubles to oil is higher than in the oil recycle, or PERC process. Direct reduction by CO and usage of feed gas are less than in PERC. A variety of analytical techniques is used to characterize both wood-oil and water-solubles. The SESC technique, developed for coal liquefaction products, combined with size exclusion chromatography, is especially useful for showing effects of process variable changes on product oil.

  10. Enhanced Teaching and Student Learning through a Simulator-Based Course in Chemical Unit Operations Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghasem, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    This paper illustrates a teaching technique used in computer applications in chemical engineering employed for designing various unit operation processes, where the students learn about unit operations by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of unit operation processes…

  11. Enhanced Teaching and Student Learning through a Simulator-Based Course in Chemical Unit Operations Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghasem, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    This paper illustrates a teaching technique used in computer applications in chemical engineering employed for designing various unit operation processes, where the students learn about unit operations by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of unit operation processes…

  12. 77 FR 11585 - Notice of Availability of the Aspinall Unit Operations Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Notice of Availability of the Aspinall Unit Operations Final Environmental Impact... Reclamation (Reclamation), the Federal agency responsible for operation of the Aspinall Unit, announces the availability of the final environmental impact statement (FEIS) on proposed Aspinall Unit operations, Gunnison...

  13. 75 FR 61226 - Exemption; Entergy Operations, Inc.; Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 and 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... COMMISSION Exemption; Entergy Operations, Inc.; Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 and 2 1.0 Background Entergy..., which authorize operation of the Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 and 2 (ANO-1 and ANO-2), respectively... Release Report, covering the operation of each unit in the previous year, to be submitted prior to May 1...

  14. 27 CFR 19.231 - Filing of operations or unit bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 19.231 Filing of operations or unit bonds. Every person intending to establish a distilled spirits plant shall file an operations or unit bond as prescribed in this subpart, covering distilled spirits... require, in connection with any operations or unit bond, a statement, executed under the penalties of...

  15. 14 CFR 375.32 - Flights incidental to agricultural and industrial operations outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... industrial operations outside the United States. 375.32 Section 375.32 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... agricultural and industrial operations outside the United States. Foreign civil aircraft that are engaged in agricultural or industrial operations to be performed wholly outside the United States may be navigated into...

  16. Applied Meteorology Unit - Operational Contributions to Spaceport Canaveral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Roeder, William P.; Lafosse, Richard A.; Sharp, David W.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2004-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) provides technology development, evaluation and transition services to improve operational weather support to the Space Shuttle and the National Space Program. It is established under a Memorandum of Understanding among NASA, the Air Force and the National .Weather Service (NWS). The AMU is funded and managed by NASA and operated by ENSCO, Inc. through a competitively awarded NASA contract. The primary customers are the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), FL; the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, TX; and the NWS office in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB). This paper will briefly review the AMU's history and describe the three processes through which its work is assigned. Since its inception in 1991 the AMU has completed 72 projects, all of which are listed at the end of this paper. At least one project that highlights each of the three tasking processes will be briefly reviewed. Some of the projects that have been especially beneficial to the space program will also be discussed in more detail, as will projects that developed significant new techniques or science in applied meteorology.

  17. Operating requirements for and historical operations of arctic offshore drilling systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Regg, J.B.; Kuranel, R.Y.; Breitmeier, J.; Smith, R.; Walker, J.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Arctic offshore, with the exception of several nearshore shallow-water development projects northeast of Prudhoe Bay, is in an exploratory phase of hydrocarbon development. This is especially true for the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) area. The Arctic OCS comprises those submerged lands beyond 4.8 kilometers (3 mi) from the coastline subject to United States jurisdiction and control. Oil and gas activities on the OCS are conducted by privately owned oil companies under Federal laws administered by the Minerals Management Service (MMS), an agency within the US Department of the Interior. Exploration in the Arctic OCS relies on the use of several different types of conventional and unique technologies for drilling. These include both fixed and mobile bottom-founded and floating drilling units. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the mobile drilling units which could operate in the Russian Arctic-their capabilities, how they are regulated in the United States, and the experiences to date in the US Arctic.

  18. 75 FR 15749 - Entergy Operations, Inc., Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Operations, Inc., Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Exemption 1.0 Background Entergy Operations, Inc. (Entergy or the licensee), is the holder of Facility Operating License No. NPF-29 which authorizes operation of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (GGNS). The license provides, among other...

  19. 75 FR 15751 - Entergy Operations, Inc., Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 And 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Operations, Inc., Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 And 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Entergy Operations, Inc. (the licensee), is the holder of Facility Operating License Nos. DPR-51 and NPF-6, which authorize operation of the Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 and 2 (ANO-1 and 2). The licenses provide, among...

  20. 75 FR 15746 - Entergy Operations, Inc., Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Operations, Inc., Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3; Exemption 1.0 Background Entergy Operations, Inc. (the licensee), is the holder of Facility Operating License No. NPF-38 which authorizes operation of the Waterford Steam Electric Station, Unit 3 (Waterford 3). The license provides...

  1. Cesàro operators on Hardy spaces in the unit ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoqin; Ren, Guangbin

    2008-03-01

    This article establishes the boundedness of the generalized Cesàro operator on holomorphic Hardy spaces in the unit ball. The approach consists in writing the generalized Cesàro operator as a composition of certain integral operators.

  2. Fatality trends in United Nations Peacekeeping Operations, 1948-1998.

    PubMed

    Seet, B; Burnham, G M

    2000-08-02

    The rising number of deaths among United Nations (UN) peacekeeping forces after the Cold War has made some troop-contributing countries hesitant to participate in peacekeeping operations. While the number and scale of missions have increased, no data have demonstrated a parallel increase in risks to peacekeepers. To determine the association of characteristics of UN peacekeeping operations with risks and mortality rates among UN peacekeeping forces in both the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. Descriptive analysis of 1559 personnel deaths during 49 UN peacekeeping missions from 1948-1998 based on the casualty database maintained by Department of Peacekeeping Operations, UN Headquarters. Number and percentage of deaths by circumstance, total crude death rate, and crude death rate and relative risk of death by circumstance (hostile acts, unintentional violence, and illness or other causes) and time period (Cold War vs post-Cold War), geographic region, and nature of peacekeeping response; and regression analysis of mission variables (strength, duration, and humanitarian mandate) associated with total number of deaths. More deaths have occurred among UN peacekeeping forces in the past decade alone than in the previous 40 years of UN peacekeeping (807 vs 752), but crude death rates did not differ significantly by time period (Cold War vs post-Cold War, 21.8 vs 21. 2 deaths per 10,000 person-years; P =.58), level of peacekeeping response, or for geographic regions other than East Europe and Central America, where rates were lower (P<.001 for both regions). Unintentional violence accounted for 41.2% of deaths, followed by hostile acts (36.1%), and illness or other causes (22.7%). Deaths from hostile acts increased after the Cold War (relative risk [RR] 1. 51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-1.88), while rates for deaths caused by unintentional violence decreased (RR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67-0. 94) but remain high, particularly in the Middle East and Asia (RR, 1. 39; 95

  3. Manned maneuvering unit simulations on the Space Operations Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, C.; Cwynar, D.; Ray, L.

    1984-01-01

    Details of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) and its use is discussed. MMU simulations in the Space Operations Simulator (SOS) use two major devices. The first is a six-degree-of-freedom moving base carriage that allows the trainee freedom to fly the MMU in a large room and to match rates and dock with full scale targets. The second device is a large screen television display that provides the trainee with accurate views of tumbling targets from any point in a surrounding sphere up to 300 meters (1000 feet) in diameter. Astronauts used the SOS to train for the Solar Max repair mission and are now using it to train for a mission to recover the Palapa-B communications satellite. Subjective comparisons by astronauts of an orbit MMU performance to simulated MMU performance in the SOS indicate that the simulations are very realistic. Data from the Solar Max mission have resulted in two software upgrades that increase SOS fidelity for the next MMU mission: a model of contact dynamics between the MMU and a target spacecraft, and a model of MMU plume impingement forces during docking.

  4. Operations research in intensive care unit management: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jie; Fügener, Andreas; Schoenfelder, Jan; Brunner, Jens O

    2016-08-12

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is a crucial and expensive resource largely affected by uncertainty and variability. Insufficient ICU capacity causes many negative effects not only in the ICU itself, but also in other connected departments along the patient care path. Operations research/management science (OR/MS) plays an important role in identifying ways to manage ICU capacities efficiently and in ensuring desired levels of service quality. As a consequence, numerous papers on the topic exist. The goal of this paper is to provide the first structured literature review on how OR/MS may support ICU management. We start our review by illustrating the important role the ICU plays in the hospital patient flow. Then we focus on the ICU management problem (single department management problem) and classify the literature from multiple angles, including decision horizons, problem settings, and modeling and solution techniques. Based on the classification logic, research gaps and opportunities are highlighted, e.g., combining bed capacity planning and personnel scheduling, modeling uncertainty with non-homogenous distribution functions, and exploring more efficient solution approaches.

  5. Operative Management of Patellar Instability in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Arshi, Armin; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Hame, Sharon L.; McAllister, David R.; Jones, Kristofer J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of patellofemoral instability has evolved as our understanding of the relevant pathoanatomy has improved. In light of these developments, current practice patterns and management trends have likely changed to reflect these advancements; however, this has not been evaluated in a formal study. Purpose: To determine nationwide patient demographics, surgical trends, and postoperative complications associated with the operative management of patellar instability surgery. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: A large private-payer database (PearlDiver) comprising patients covered by Humana and United Healthcare insurance policies was retrospectively reviewed using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes to identify patients who underwent surgery for patellar instability. The study cohort was established by querying for patients billed under CPT codes 27420, 27422, or 27427 while satisfying the diagnostic requirement of patellar instability (International Classification of Diseases–9th Revision codes 718.36, 718.86, or 836.3). Patient demographics, surgical trends, concomitant procedures, and postoperative complications were determined. Results: A total of 6190 patients underwent surgical management for patellar instability. Adolescents (age range, 10-19 years) represented 51.5% of cases, and 59.6% were female. The number of patellar instability procedures increased annually over the study period in both the Humana (P = .004, R 2 = 0.76) and United Healthcare (P = .097, R 2 = 0.54) cohorts. The most common concomitant procedures were lateral retinacular release (43.7%), chondroplasty (31.1%), tibial tubercle osteotomy (13.1%), removal of loose bodies (10.5%), osteochondral grafting (9.5%), and microfracture surgery (9.5%). Manipulation under anesthesia was required in 4.6% of patients within 1 year. Patellar fracture within 1 year and infection within 30 days occurred in 2.1% and 1.2% of patients, respectively. Conclusion

  6. 43 CFR 3282.2 - When must the unit operator have a participating area approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When must the unit operator have a... RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Participating Area § 3282.2 When must the unit operator have a participating area approved? You must have an established BLM-approved participating area to allocate production and...

  7. 43 CFR 3282.2 - When must the unit operator have a participating area approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When must the unit operator have a... RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Participating Area § 3282.2 When must the unit operator have a participating area approved? You must have an established BLM-approved participating area to allocate production and...

  8. 43 CFR 3137.60 - As the unit operator, what are my obligations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... obligations? 3137.60 Section 3137.60 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued... Operating Requirements § 3137.60 As the unit operator, what are my obligations? As the unit operator— (a) You must comply with the terms and conditions of the unit agreement, Federal laws and...

  9. Hospital markup and operation outcomes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gani, Faiz; Ejaz, Aslam; Makary, Martin A; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-07-01

    Although the price hospitals charge for operations has broad financial implications, hospital pricing is not subject to regulation. We sought to characterize national variation in hospital price markup for major cardiothoracic and gastrointestinal operations and to evaluate perioperative outcomes of hospitals relative to hospital price markup. All hospitals in which a patient underwent a cardiothoracic or gastrointestinal procedure were identified using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2012. Markup ratios (ratio of charges to costs) for the total cost of hospitalization were compared across hospitals. Risk-adjusted morbidity, failure-to-rescue, and mortality were calculated using multivariable, hierarchical logistic regression. Among the 3,498 hospitals identified, markup ratios ranged from 0.5-12.2, with a median markup ratio of 2.8 (interquartile range 2.7-3.9). For the 888 hospitals with extreme markup (greatest markup ratio quartile: markup ratio >3.9), the median markup ratio was 4.9 (interquartile range 4.3-6.0), with 10% of these hospitals billing more than 7 times the Medicare-allowable costs (markup ratio ≥7.25). Extreme markup hospitals were more often large (46.3% vs 33.8%, P < .001), urban, nonteaching centers (57.0% vs 37.9%, P < .001), and located in the Southern (46.4% vs 32.8%, P < .001) or Western (27.8% vs 17.6%, P < .001) regions of the United States. Of the 639 investor-owned, for-profit hospitals, 401 hospitals (62.8%) had an extreme markup ratio compared with 19.3% (n = 452) and 6.8% (n = 35) of nonprofit and government hospitals, respectively. Perioperative morbidity (32.7% vs 26.4%, P < .001) was greater at extreme markup hospitals. There is wide variation in hospital markup for cardiothoracic and gastrointestinal procedures, with approximately a quarter of hospital charges being 4 times greater than the actual cost of hospitalization. Hospitals with an extreme markup had greater perioperative morbidity. Copyright © 2016

  10. Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units: An Analysis of Operations.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Alan D; Sibrizzi, Christopher; Kirkland, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    In 1998 the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) secured the first federal funding to develop an innovative network of public health-oriented entities: Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs). PEHSU goals were to provide pediatric and environmental health education to health care providers and health profession students, to offer consultation to health care professionals, parents, and others regarding environmental health exposures, and to provide referrals to specialized medical resources when necessary. This report analyzes the productivity of US PEHSUs from 1999 to 2014. This was a retrospective analysis of federally mandated quarterly reports filed by each PEHSU. These reports document specific goal-related deliverables outlined under cooperative agreements awarded to the Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics (AOEC) with funding from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and ATSDR. Costs were obtained from grant budget information available from the administrator of the grants, AOEC. Total EPA/ATSDR funding for PEHSUs paid to AOEC during 1999-2014 was $23,847,452. The average cost to the EPA/ATSDR of running each PEHSU in 2014 was $169,256. Through over 8000 consultations and educational activities, PEHSUs reached 702,506 people: 298,936 health professionals, 61,947 health professional trainees, 323,817 members of the public, and 17,806 public health officials and others. PEHSUs have grown into an established, productive network of clinical and educational centers whose expertise and activities have benefited both the public and health care professionals alike. The federal contributions to the cost of operating these centers have been more than offset by the benefits PEHSUs have conferred on the communities they serve. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. FOCU:S--future operator control unit: soldier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Barry J.; Karan, Cem; Young, Stuart H.

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory's (ARL) Computational and Information Sciences Directorate (CISD) has long been involved in autonomous asset control, specifically as it relates to small robots. Over the past year, CISD has been making strides in the implementation of three areas of small robot autonomy, namely platform autonomy, Soldier-robot interface, and tactical behaviors. It is CISD's belief that these three areas must be considered as a whole in order to provide Soldiers with useful capabilities. In addressing the Soldier-robot interface aspect, CISD has begun development on a unique dismounted controller called the Future Operator Control Unit: Soldier (FOCU:S) that is based on an Apple iPod Touch. The iPod Touch's small form factor, unique touch-screen input device, and the presence of general purpose computing applications such as a web browser combine to give this device the potential to be a disruptive technology. Setting CISD's implementation apart from other similar iPod or iPhone-based devices is the ARL software that allows multiple robotic platforms to be controlled from a single OCU. The FOCU:S uses the same Agile Computing Infrastructure (ACI) that all other assets in the ARL robotic control system use, enabling automated asset discovery on any type of network. Further, a custom ad hoc routing implementation allows the FOCU:S to communicate with the ARL ad hoc communications system and enables it to extend the range of the network. This paper will briefly describe the current robotic control architecture employed by ARL and provide short descriptions of existing capabilities. Further, the paper will discuss FOCU:S specific software developed for the iPod Touch, including unique capabilities enabled by the device's unique hardware.

  12. Varying duty operation of air-cooled condenser units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milman, O. O.; Kondratev, A. V.; Ptakhin, A. V.; Dunaev, S. N.; Kirjukhin, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Results of experimental investigations of operation modes of air-cooled condensers (ACC) under design and varying duty conditions are presented. ACCs with varying cooling airflow rates under constant heat load and with constant cooling airflow under varying heat load are examined. Diagrams of heat transfer coefficients and condensation pressures on the heat load and cooling airflow are obtained. It is found that, if the relative heat load is in the range from 0.6 to 1.0 of the nominal value, the ACC heat transfer coefficient varies insignificantly, unlike that of the water-cooled surface condensers. The results of the determination of "zero points" are given, i.e., the attainable pressure in air-cooled condensing units (ACCU), if there is no heat load for several values of working water temperature at the input of water-jet ejectors and liquid ring vacuum pump. The results of the experimental determination of atmospheric air suction into the ACC vacuum system. The effect of additional air suctions in the steam pipe on ACCU characteristics is analyzed. The thermal mapping of ACC heat exchange surfaces from the cooling air inlet is carried out. The dependence of the inefficient heat exchange zone on the additional air suction into the ACC vacuum system is given. It is shown that, if there is no additional air suction into the ACC vacuum system, the inefficient heat exchange zone is not located at the bottom of the first pass tubes, and their portion adjacent to the bottom steam pipe works efficiently. Design procedures for the ACC varying duty of capacitors are presented, and their adequacy for the ACCU varying duty estimation is analyzed.

  13. 43 CFR 3284.10 - What must a unit operator do to prevent or compensate for drainage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What must a unit operator do to prevent or... RESOURCES UNIT AGREEMENTS Unit Operations § 3284.10 What must a unit operator do to prevent or compensate for drainage? The unit operator must take all necessary measures to prevent or compensate for drainage...

  14. 78 FR 50454 - Entergy Operations, Inc., River Bend Station, Unit 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Operations, Inc., River Bend Station, Unit 1 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION...-47, issued to Entergy Operations, Inc. (the licensee), for operation of the River Bend Station, Unit...

  15. 14 CFR 375.41 - Agricultural and industrial operations within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agricultural and industrial operations... Agricultural and industrial operations within the United States. Foreign civil aircraft shall not be used for..., banner towing, skywriting or similar agricultural or industrial operations within the United States...

  16. 14 CFR 375.41 - Agricultural and industrial operations within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agricultural and industrial operations... Agricultural and industrial operations within the United States. Foreign civil aircraft shall not be used for..., banner towing, skywriting or similar agricultural or industrial operations within the United States...

  17. United States Peacekeeping Operations: The Need for Policy and Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-31

    not routinely trained its forces tc fill the role of peace- keepers . The United States’ forces have traditionally been t.ained as warfighters, a task for...conducted and the psyche of the American soldier. Warfighters are indoctrinated in how to respond under fire, to have instinctive and reflex reactions...conditions to which the United States will respond as peace- keepers , peace-makers or peace- enforcers. Whether the United States embarks on a policy

  18. Evolution of United States Army Deployment Operations: The Santiago Campaign

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-03

    The army’s entire allocated logistics strength was a mere twenty-two commissary officers, 179 medical officers, and fifty- seven quartermaster...unity of command, synchronization, and balance. No one was in charge to synchronize unit arrivals with land allocation , supplies, or leadership...maintain unit integrity of equipment as they matched units with vessels. With limited berths , the ships continuously rotated within the narrow port to match

  19. United States Military in Central Asia: Beyond Operation Enduring Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-23

    Malinowski , advocacy director for Human Rights Watch, stated, “the United States is most effective in promoting liberty around the world when people...26 U.S. President, The National Security Strategy of the United States of America, page? 27 Thomas Malinowski , “Testimony

  20. Operational air quality forecast guidance for the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Lee, Pius; Tong, Daniel; Pan, Li; McQueen, Jeff; Huang, Jinaping; Djalalova, Irina; Wilczak, James; Huang, Ho-Chun; Wang, Jun; Stein, Ariel; Upadhayay, Sikchya

    2016-04-01

    NOAA provides operational air quality predictions for ozone and wildfire smoke over the United States (U.S.) and predictions of airborne dust over the contiguous 48 states at http://airquality.weather.gov. These predictions are produced using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Model for Air Quality (CMAQ) and NOAA's HYSPLIT model (Stein et al., 2015) with meteorological inputs from the North American Mesoscale Forecast System (NAM). The current efforts focus on improving test predictions of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) from CMAQ. Emission inputs for ozone and PM2.5 predictions include inventory information from the U.S. EPA and recently added contributions of particulate matter from intermittent wildfires and windblown dust that rely on near real-time information. Current testing includes refinement of the vertical grid structure in CMAQ and inclusion of contributions of dust transport from global sources into the U.S. domain using the NEMS Global Aerosol Capability (NGAC). The addition of wildfire smoke and dust contributions in CMAQ reduced model underestimation of PM2.5 in summertime. Wintertime overestimation of PM2.5 was reduced by suppressing emissions of soil particles when the terrain is covered by snow or ice. Nevertheless, seasonal biases and biases in the diurnal cycle of PM2.5 are still substantial. Therefore, a new bias correction procedure based on an analog ensemble approach was introduced (Djalalova et al., 2015). It virtually eliminates biases in monthly means or in the diurnal cycle, but it also reduces day-to-day variability in PM2.5 predictions. Refinements to the bias correction procedure are being developed. Upgrades for the representation of wildfire smoke emissions within the domain and from global sources are in testing. Another area of active development includes approaches to scale emission inventories for nitrogen oxides in order to reproduce recent changes observed by the AirNow surface monitoring network and by

  1. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-KR-1 source operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.M.

    1994-09-01

    The 100-KR-1 operable unit is located within the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area of the Hanford Site was included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This report provides the qualitative risk assessments for the high priority waste sites associated with this operable unit. The application of the HPPS at the 100-KR-1 operable unit is discussed in detail in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 100-KR-1 Operable Unit (DOE-RL 1992).

  2. 14 CFR 91.857 - Stage 2 operations outside of the 48 contiguous United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.857 Stage 2 operations outside of the 48 contiguous United States. An... airplane may not be used to provide air transportation to or from any airport in the contiguous...

  3. 14 CFR 91.857 - Stage 2 operations outside of the 48 contiguous United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.857 Stage 2 operations outside of the 48 contiguous United States. An... airplane may not be used to provide air transportation to or from any airport in the contiguous...

  4. Planning and operational considerations for units utilizing military working dogs.

    PubMed

    Royal, Joseph; Taylor, Charles L

    2009-01-01

    Military working dogs are rapidly becoming integral to military operations. While they bring many valuable capabilities to the battlefield, it is important that Special Operations leaders consider canine team capabilities and requirements when planning missions. Careful logistical and operational planning can optimize the health, performance, and readiness of the working dog while protecting the safety and well-being of the team members working with them. We also offer recommendations for medical treatment of dog bites.

  5. Analysis of alky unit DIB exposes design, operating considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D.F.; Musumeci, J.; Chavez, R.

    1996-09-30

    A recent examination of an alkylation plant deisobutanizer (DIB) illustrates design and operating considerations that should be addressed when capacity increases and efficiency improvements are desired. This sulfuric acid alkylation plant had excess feed and reaction zone capacity. The DIB was the limiting factor; specifically, the DIB reboiler duty was at its maximum and the reboiler steam-supply valves were wide open. A new alkylate Rvp specification of 5.0 psia also was constraining operation. An engineering review suggested minor design modifications and maintenance items which, when implemented, increased alkylate production capacity by more than 25%. The paper discusses DIB operation, reboiler review, superheated steam supply, fouling, improvements, and revised operation.

  6. Analyzing Resources of United States Marine Corps for Humanitarian Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-26

    the United States Marine Corps (USMC) response to Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR), the capabilities of the USMC will need to be...matched to the demand created by future disasters . In this research, we study the USMC resources that are primarily responsible for the response, the...effectiveness of the United States Marine Corps (USMC) response to Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR), the capabilities of the USMC

  7. Phase I remedial investigation report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    The focus of this remedial investigation (RI) is the 300-FF-5 operable unit, one of five operable units associated with the 300 Area aggregate of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. The 300-FF-5 operable unit is a groundwater operable unit beneath the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 source operable units. This operable unit was designated to include all contamination detected in the groundwater and sediments below the water table that emanates from the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 operable units (DOE-RL 1990a). In November 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 300 Area on the National Priorities List (NPL) contained within Appendix B of the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP, 53 FR 51391 et seq.). The EPA took this action pursuant to their authority under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA, 42 USC 9601 et seq.). The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), the EPA and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), in May 1989 (Ecology et al. 1992, Rev. 2). This agreement, among other matters, governs all CERCLA efforts at the Hanford Site. In June 1990, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) workplan for the 300-FF-5 operable unit was issued pursuant to the Tri-Party Agreement.

  8. 77 FR 29701 - Impact of Construction (Under a Combined License) of New Nuclear Power Plant Units on Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... a Combined License) of New Nuclear Power Plant Units on Operating Units at Multi-Unit Sites AGENCY... a COL intending to construct and operate new nuclear power plants (NPPs) on multi-unit sites to... Impacts of Construction (under a Combined License) of New Nuclear Power Plants on Operating Units at...

  9. 42 CFR 447.206 - Cost limit for providers operated by units of government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... section applies to payments made to health care providers that are operated by units of government as...) of the Act. (a) General rules. (1) All health care providers that are operated by units of government are limited to reimbursement not in excess of the individual health care provider's cost of...

  10. Compatibility of pressure sensitive adhesives with recycling unit operations

    Treesearch

    David. Bormett; Carl. Houtman; Said. Abubakr; Joseph. Peng

    1999-01-01

    Removal of pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) from recovered paper is a major problem facing the paper recycling industry. As a result of a United States Postal Service (USPS) initiative, which currently purchases about 12% of domestic PSA production, a team was formed consisting of representatives from the USPS, the Forest Products Laboratory, Springborn Testing and...

  11. Microchannel apparatus comprising plural microchannels and methods of conducting unit operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wegeng, Robert S; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E; Whyatt, Greg A

    2009-03-10

    Microchannel apparatus comprising a header and plural flow microchannels is described in which orifices connect the header and the flow microchannels. The orifices constrict flow. The ratio of the cross-sectional area of each of the orifices to the cross-sectional area of the flow microchannels connected to the orifices is between 0.0005 and 0.1. Also described is microchannel apparatus for conducting unit operations in which a device comprises two arrays of microchannels, and a unit operation is conducted on a fluid as it passes through the first set of microchannels and into a header where a second unit operation is performed, and then the fluid stream passes into the second array of microchannels where the first unit operation is again performed. Methods of conducting unit operations in the apparatuses are also described.

  12. An Innovative Method for Dynamic Characterization of Fan FilterUnit Operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2006-12-21

    Fan filter units (FFU) are widely used to deliver re-circulated air while providing filtration control of particle concentration in controlled environments such as cleanrooms, minienvironments, and operating rooms in hospitals. The objective of this paper is to document an innovative method for characterizing operation and control of an individual fan filter unit within its operable conditions. Built upon the draft laboratory method previously published [1] , this paper presents an updated method including a testing procedure to characterize dynamic operation of fan filter units, i.e., steady-state operation conditions determined by varied control schemes, airflow rates, and pressure differential across the units. The parameters for dynamic characterization include total electric power demand, total pressure efficiency, airflow rate, pressure differential across fan filter units, and airflow uniformity.

  13. Evaluation of the Contract Management Process in the United Nations for Acquiring Peacekeeping Operations/Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT Evaluation of the Contract Management Process in the United...blank) 2. REPORT DATE June 2007 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED MBA Professional Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of the Contract...of Peacekeeping Operations UNTSO United Nations Truce Supervision Organization UNDP United Nations Development Programme USG Under-Secretary

  14. Non-Operating Room Anesthesia in the Endoscopy Unit.

    PubMed

    Bhavani, Sekar

    2016-07-01

    The term, non-operating room anesthesia, describes a location remote from the main operating suites and closer to the patient, including areas that offer specialized procedures, like endoscopy suites, cardiac catheterization laboratories, bronchoscopy suites, and invasive radiology suites. There has been an exponential growth in such procedures and they present challenges in both organizational aspects and administration of anesthesia. This article explores the requirements for the location, preoperative evaluation and patient selection, monitoring, anesthesia technique, and postoperative management at these sites. There is a need to better define the role of the anesthesia personnel at these remote sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. United States Special Operations Command History, 15th Anniversary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    Anniversary 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6 . AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER... 6 Evolution of the Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9...Representative Dan Daniel (D-VA), the – 3 – Senator William Cohen (R-ME) Rep. Dan Daniel (D-VA) Senator Sam Nunn (D-GA) chairman of the Readiness

  16. FOLLOW ME! Assisting United States Government Organizations Supporting Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-26

    Briem, Christopher, Joint is dead, what is next?, Proceedings of the United States Naval Institute, January 2004, Volume 130. Bronson , Rachel...20021101faessay99997/rachel- bronson /when- soldiers-become-cops.html. Building Security, Interagency Security Committee Has Had Limited Success in Fulfilling Its...Russell, Richard L. Tug of war: the CIA’s uneasy relationship with the military, SAIS Review, Summer/Fall 20023, volume 22. 72 Shapiro, Shlomo

  17. United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM): Construction Management Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-11

    The projects can’t be split up in phases to stay within funding limits and must reviewed by JAG and coordinated with the local contracting unit. 4...on the government (except for latent defects or fraud). 13. Cleaning up (FAR 52.236-12) Requires contractor to keep working area clean at all times...comply with international laws regarding transit /exit/entry procedures and the requirements for work visas. Contractors shall follow all Host

  18. United States Air Force Role in Mass Atrocity Response Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-17

    through the lens of their own perspective. They cannot view the world objectively because of their own preconceptions : history, prejudices, ideology...initial stages of the genocide. Similarly, the RC-135’s ability to detect and locate those stations would provide the perfect target for strikes having...all levels. Air Force unit exercises would integrate air power, focusing on those specific tasks required in a MARO. These training exercises , in

  19. Operations Research and the US (United States) Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-07

    COMPLETING FORM REPRT UMBR2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TTLE and ubtilo)S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Operations Research Arnd...cost analysts are considered a part of the financial management arena and are not included in Figure 1 nor in this discussion. Also excluded were

  20. Operational Encirclements: Can the United States Military Decisively Follow Through?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-21

    Office, 1991. Heller, Charles E. and Stofft, William A. America’s First Battles, 1776-1965. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1986. Hooker ...is the secret of successful war.”12 Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson ...operation was planned and designed by General William Westmoreland as a spoiling attack against three NVA regiments in order to prevent a planned

  1. Optimizing Resources of United States Navy for Humanitarian Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-26

    6  A Notional Scenario ...Humanitarian Operations The vessels that the USN deployed for HADR in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami were the entire Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike...officers. We studied every ship that was deployed to respond to certain disasters. Apte et al. (2013) studied the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami , the 2005

  2. The United States Army Operating Concept, 2016-2028

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-19

    such as urbanization, youth bulges, and migration are creating overpopulated megacities in which a growing pool of youth is willing to engage in...exercise observations in discussions from operational panel members in Central Command and Africa Command regional panels, 26-30 April 2010. TRADOC Pam

  3. Operational experiences with Bt in the Eastern United States

    Treesearch

    Henry, Jr. Trial

    1985-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (B. t.) has been used operationally in the eastern U. S. since 1978 with most applications occurring in Maine. Changes in B. t. dosage rates, volume, cost, spray aircraft, and use patterns will be discussed. Evaluation of B. t. dosage in the east has consisted of variable results with 8 B.I.U. treatments in 1978 through 1980,...

  4. Electric vehicle fleet operations in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.; O`Hara, D.

    1998-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively supporting the development and commercialization of advanced electric vehicles, batteries, and propulsion systems. As part of this effort, the DOE Field Operations Program is performing commercial validation testing of electric vehicles and supporting the development of an electric vehicle infrastructure. These efforts include the evaluation of electric vehicles in baseline performance, accelerated reliability, and fleet operations testing. The baseline performance testing focuses on parameters such as range, acceleration, and battery charging. This testing, performed in conjunction with EV America, has included the baseline performance testing of 16 electric vehicle models from 1994 through 1997. During 1997, the Chevrolet S10 and Ford Ranger electric vehicles were tested. During 1998, several additional electric vehicles from original equipment manufacturers will also be baseline performance tested. This and additional information is made available to the public via the Program`s web page (http://ev.inel.gov/sop). In conjunction with industry and other groups, the Program also supports the Infrastructure Working Council in its development of electric vehicle communications, charging, health and safety, and power quality standards. The Field Operations Program continues to support the development of electric vehicles and infrastructure in conjunction with its qualified vehicle test partners: Electric Transportation Applications, and Southern California Edison. The Field Operations Program is managed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

  5. United Nations Operations: Who Should be in Charge?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Cold War; Panama, Iraq, and the New World Order, in RIGHT V. MIGHT, supra note 16, at 109, 128; and HANS KELSON, THE LAW OF THE UNITED NATIONS 928...interpretation would also appear to resolve Kelsen’s dilemma (see KELSEN , supra note 35, at 935) with respect to the Korean conflict. Kelsen argues the Security...and Scheffer, supra note 35, at 131. 45. See D. J. HARRIS, CASES AND MATERIAL ON INTERNATIONAL LAW 681 (4th ed. 1991); KELSEN , supra note 35, at 756

  6. Tactical Unit Data and Decision Requirements for Urban Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    decision requirements useful in urban operations. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising , publication, or...Building Function Verify mosque and identify possi- ble schools or meeting places Identify types of cinema (stage/theatre) or other similar nearby...Determine mosque and residen- tial floor plans Interior layout of cinema and high-rises Layout of power control facilities Improved Dismounted & Mounted

  7. Evaluating Operational Readiness For Fixed-Wing Tactical Aviation Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    3LtCol R. Scott Pomarico, MCAS, Cherry Point, NC, numerous interviews by author, telephone conversations...FDP&E in Support of MAGTF Operations (Coordinating Draft). Quantico, VA: MSTP, January 2002. Philips, Gary, E. Damm, T. Bowditch , A Jareb, and R...to April 2003. Pomarico, R. Scott , Lieutenant Colonel, MAG-14 Executive Officer, former AV-8B squadron commander, and former Air Force exchange pilot

  8. United States Special Operations Command Professional Military Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Force Management and Development Division; Gap Analysis; Formal Documents; Command and Staff College ; Admiral William H. McRaven; Senior Officers...ACSC Air Command and Staff College ARSOF Army Special Operations Forces CAC Combined Arms Center CGSC Command and General Staff College CJCS...Corps Command and Staff College MCU Marine Corps University MCWAR Marine Corps War College MMS Master’s of Military Science NCR National Capital

  9. Biota of the 300-FF-1 operable unit. [Westinghouse Hanford Company

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Fitzner, R.E.; Brandt, C.A.

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes Task 5a-2 of the Phase I Remedial Investigation -- Operable Unit Characterization of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. The ultimate goal of Phase I is to determine the nature and extent of the threat to public health and the environment from releases of hazardous substances from the operable unit. The purpose of Task 5a-2 was to determine what species inhabit the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit and how they use the unit. The focus is on those species listed as endangered or threatened, those that are economically important, or those that constitute significant components of the human food chain. 39 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Surgeon specialization and operative mortality in United States: retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Nikhil R; Dalton, Maurice; Cutler, David M; Birkmeyer, John D; Chandra, Amitabh

    2016-07-21

     To measure the association between a surgeon's degree of specialization in a specific procedure and patient mortality.  Retrospective analysis of Medicare data.  US patients aged 66 or older enrolled in traditional fee for service Medicare.  25 152 US surgeons who performed one of eight procedures (carotid endarterectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, lung resection, cystectomy, pancreatic resection, or esophagectomy) on 695 987 patients in 2008-13.  Relative risk reduction in risk adjusted and volume adjusted 30 day operative mortality between surgeons in the bottom quarter and top quarter of surgeon specialization (defined as the number of times the surgeon performed the specific procedure divided by his/her total operative volume across all procedures).  For all four cardiovascular procedures and two out of four cancer resections, a surgeon's degree of specialization was a significant predictor of operative mortality independent of the number of times he or she performed that procedure: carotid endarterectomy (relative risk reduction between bottom and top quarter of surgeons 28%, 95% confidence interval 0% to 48%); coronary artery bypass grafting (15%, 4% to 25%); valve replacement (46%, 37% to 53%); abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (42%, 29% to 53%); lung resection (28%, 5% to 46%); and cystectomy (41%, 8% to 63%). In five procedures (carotid endarterectomy, valve replacement, lung resection, cystectomy, and esophagectomy), the relative risk reduction from surgeon specialization was greater than that from surgeon volume for that specific procedure. Furthermore, surgeon specialization accounted for 9% (coronary artery bypass grafting) to 100% (cystectomy) of the relative risk reduction otherwise attributable to volume in that specific procedure.  For several common procedures, surgeon specialization was an important predictor of operative mortality independent of volume in that specific

  11. Surgeon specialization and operative mortality in United States: retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Maurice; Cutler, David M; Birkmeyer, John D; Chandra, Amitabh

    2016-01-01

    Objective To measure the association between a surgeon’s degree of specialization in a specific procedure and patient mortality. Design Retrospective analysis of Medicare data. Setting US patients aged 66 or older enrolled in traditional fee for service Medicare. Participants 25 152 US surgeons who performed one of eight procedures (carotid endarterectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, lung resection, cystectomy, pancreatic resection, or esophagectomy) on 695 987 patients in 2008-13. Main outcome measure Relative risk reduction in risk adjusted and volume adjusted 30 day operative mortality between surgeons in the bottom quarter and top quarter of surgeon specialization (defined as the number of times the surgeon performed the specific procedure divided by his/her total operative volume across all procedures). Results For all four cardiovascular procedures and two out of four cancer resections, a surgeon’s degree of specialization was a significant predictor of operative mortality independent of the number of times he or she performed that procedure: carotid endarterectomy (relative risk reduction between bottom and top quarter of surgeons 28%, 95% confidence interval 0% to 48%); coronary artery bypass grafting (15%, 4% to 25%); valve replacement (46%, 37% to 53%); abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (42%, 29% to 53%); lung resection (28%, 5% to 46%); and cystectomy (41%, 8% to 63%). In five procedures (carotid endarterectomy, valve replacement, lung resection, cystectomy, and esophagectomy), the relative risk reduction from surgeon specialization was greater than that from surgeon volume for that specific procedure. Furthermore, surgeon specialization accounted for 9% (coronary artery bypass grafting) to 100% (cystectomy) of the relative risk reduction otherwise attributable to volume in that specific procedure. Conclusion For several common procedures, surgeon specialization was an important predictor

  12. 47 CFR 90.421 - Operation of mobile station units not under the control of the licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of mobile station units not under the....421 Operation of mobile station units not under the control of the licensee. Mobile stations, as... unauthorized operation of such units not under its control. (a) Public Safety Pool. (1) Mobile units licensed...

  13. Operation United Assistance: infectious disease threats to deployed military personnel.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K; Yun, Heather C; Markelz, Ana Elizabeth; Okulicz, Jason F; Vento, Todd J; Burgess, Timothy H; Cardile, Anthony P; Miller, R Scott

    2015-06-01

    As part of the international response to control the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Department of Defense has deployed military personnel to train Liberians to manage the disease and build treatment units and a hospital for health care volunteers. These steps have assisted in providing a robust medical system and augment Ebola diagnostic capability within the affected nations. In order to prepare for the deployment of U.S. military personnel, the infectious disease risks of the regions must be determined. This evaluation allows for the establishment of appropriate force health protection posture for personnel while deployed, as well as management plans for illnesses presenting after redeployment. Our objective was to detail the epidemiology and infectious disease risks for military personnel in West Africa, particularly for Liberia, along with lessons learned from prior deployments. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Handbook of operation and maintenance instructions for Model 5208A bit synchronizer unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Electrical/mechanical characteristics, operation, theory of operation, parts list, and electrical diagrams for the model 5208A bit synchronizer unit are provided. The unit is capable of performing the functions of bit synchronization and signal conditioning on demodulated wave trains containing amplitude, frequency, and phase distortions, as well as additive noise. Operating frequencies in the 1 to 27 MHz bit rate range are accommodated through the use of discrete frequency plug-in subunits. The unit provides 0 and 180 degree clocks and either a single signal hard decision, or a three bit quantized soft decision data output.

  15. Operational optimization of large-scale parallel-unit SWRO desalination plant using differential evolution algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Aipeng; Jiangzhou, Shu; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale parallel-unit seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant contains many reverse osmosis (RO) units. If the operating conditions change, these RO units will not work at the optimal design points which are computed before the plant is built. The operational optimization problem (OOP) of the plant is to find out a scheduling of operation to minimize the total running cost when the change happens. In this paper, the OOP is modelled as a mixed-integer nonlinear programming problem. A two-stage differential evolution algorithm is proposed to solve this OOP. Experimental results show that the proposed method is satisfactory in solution quality.

  16. Operational Optimization of Large-Scale Parallel-Unit SWRO Desalination Plant Using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Aipeng; Jiangzhou, Shu; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale parallel-unit seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant contains many reverse osmosis (RO) units. If the operating conditions change, these RO units will not work at the optimal design points which are computed before the plant is built. The operational optimization problem (OOP) of the plant is to find out a scheduling of operation to minimize the total running cost when the change happens. In this paper, the OOP is modelled as a mixed-integer nonlinear programming problem. A two-stage differential evolution algorithm is proposed to solve this OOP. Experimental results show that the proposed method is satisfactory in solution quality. PMID:24701180

  17. Standard formatted data units-control authority operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to illustrate a Control Authority's (CA) possible operation. The document is an interpretation and expansion of the concept found in the CA Procedures Recommendation. The CA is described in terms of the functions it performs for the management and control of data descriptions (metadata). Functions pertaining to the organization of Member Agency Control Authority Offices (MACAOs) (e.g., creating and disbanding) are not discussed. The document also provides an illustrative operational view of a CA through scenarios describing interaction between those roles involved in collecting, controlling, and accessing registered metadata. The roles interacting with the CA are identified by their actions in requesting and responding to requests for metadata, and by the type of information exchanged. The scenarios and examples presented in this document are illustrative only. They represent possible interactions supported by either a manual or automated system. These scenarios identify requirements for an automated system. These requirements are expressed by identifying the information to be exchanged and the services that may be provided by a CA for that exchange.

  18. Ground operations demonstration unit for liquid hydrogen initial test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.; Tomsik, T.

    2015-12-01

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project has designed, assembled, and started testing of a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The system is unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. This paper will present and discuss the results of the initial phase of testing of the GODU LH2 system.

  19. Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen Initial Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.; Tomsik, T.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project has designed, assembled, and started testing of a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The system is unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. This paper will present and discuss the results of the initial phase of testing of the GODU LH2 system.

  20. Nurse managers' decision-making in daily unit operation in peri-operative settings: a cross-sectional descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Siirala, Eriikka; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Lundgrén-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna; Junttila, Kristiina

    2016-09-01

    To describe the tactical and the operational decisions made by nurse managers when managing the daily unit operation in peri-operative settings. Management is challenging as situations change rapidly and decisions are constantly made. Understanding decision-making in this complex environment helps to develop decision support systems to support nurse managers' operative and tactical decision-making. Descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were collected from 20 nurse managers with the think-aloud method during the busiest working hours and analysed using thematic content analysis. Nurse managers made over 700 decisions; either ad hoc (n = 289), near future (n = 268) or long-term (n = 187) by nature. Decisions were often made simultaneously with many interruptions. Ad hoc decisions covered staff allocation, ensuring adequate staff, rescheduling surgical procedures, confirmation tangible resources and following-up the daily unit operation. Decisions in the near future were: planning of surgical procedures and tangible resources, and planning staff allocation. Long-term decisions were: human recourses, nursing development, supplies and equipment, and finances in the unit. Decision-making was vulnerable to interruptions, which sometimes complicated the managing tasks. The results can be used when planning decision support systems and when defining the nurse managers' tasks in peri-operative settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. 43 CFR 3284.2 - What are the principal operational responsibilities of the unit operator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... is authorized to conduct: (1) Any phase of drilling authorized under subpart 3260 of this chapter... resource produced from the unit. (b) Providing written notification to BLM within 30 days after any changes...

  2. ISS Plasma Contactor Units Operations During Strong Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, J.; Mikatarian, R.; Barsamian, H.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2003-12-01

    The large structure and high voltage arrays of the ISS represent a complex system that interacts with the Earth's ionosphere. To mitigate spacecraft charging problems on the ISS, two Plasma Contactor Units discharge ionized xenon gas to "clamp" the potential of the ISS with respect to the low Earth orbit plasma. The Plasma Interaction Model, a model of ISS plasma interaction developed from the basic physics of the interaction phenomena, includes magnetic induction effects, plasma temperature and density effects, interaction of the high voltage solar arrays with ionospheric plasma, and accounts for other conductive areas on the ISS. To augment this model, the PCU discharge current has been monitored for the ISS in a variety of flight attitudes as well as during the annual seasons. A review of the PCU discharge currents shows a correlation to the geomagnetic activity. The variation in the PCU discharge current during strong geomagnetic activity will be presented. Also, the PCU discharge currents during periods of low geomagnetic activity will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of satellite plasma measurements during different stages of geomagnetic activity.

  3. Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2012-01-17

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

  4. 78 FR 20144 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear... for public comment. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is reconsidering...

  5. 78 FR 52987 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear.... SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has concluded that existing exemptions from...

  6. 78 FR 39018 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit Nos. 2 and 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit Nos. 2 and 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Supplement to Final Supplement 38 to the Generic...

  7. Innovations in Site Characterization Case Study: Hanscom Air Force Base, Operable Unit 1

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a condensation of the information provided in the much more detailed Hanscom AFB Report entitled A Dynamic Site Investigation: Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Program for Operable Unit 1 at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts.

  8. The Design, Testing and Operation of the IUE Data Processing Unit Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The design and operation is reported of the power supply for the IUE data processing unit. Design specifications are presented along with performance data and parts selection. Illustrations show the completed circuit with and without its covers.

  9. Description of work for 100-DR-2 Operable Unit Vadose Drilling/test pits

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the scope of work for the boreholes/test pits of the 100-DR-2 Operable Unit. Sampling and field activities include: Soil screening; geologic sampling; soil sampling (physical property); analytical sampling and depths; and geophysical logging.

  10. Optimization Review: Lockwood Operable Unit 1 - Beall Source Area, Billings, Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Lockwood Solvent Groundwater Plume Site (LSGPS) consists of two operable units (OUs) and is located on the outskirts of Billings, Montana in EPA Region 8. OU1 consists of contaminated soils and a chlorinated solvent groundwater plume associated with...

  11. Technology used to operate the 300-MW power unit topped with a GTE-110 gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinets, P. A.; Doverman, G. I.

    2010-09-01

    Results obtained from mathematical simulation of operations for starting the 300-MW power unit topped with a GTE-110 gas turbine installed at the GRES-24 district power station of OAO OGK-6 wholesale power-generating company are described. It is shown that operations on speeding up the steam turbine from a cold state to its idle running mode can be carried out solely by using the heat of exhaust gases from the gas turbine unit without supplying fuel to the boiler.

  12. The Implications of Network-Centric Warfare for United States and Multinational Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    impact of network-centric warfare on United States naval operations will be without conducting much more research and many more experiments. Until...recognizable as the same species it is today? Perhaps, but progress will be slow. As a result, the impact of NCW on the Navy between now and 2010...force deployments in the future will be associated with multinational operations.1 This paper will focus initially on the impact of NCW on United

  13. 2006 Annual Operations Report for INTEC Operable Unit 3-13, Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shanklin

    2007-02-14

    This annual operations report describes the requirements followed and activities conducted to inspect, monitor, and maintain the items installed during performance of the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action, at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This report covers the time period from January 1 through December 31, 2006, and describes inspection and monitoring activities for the surface-sealed areas within the tank farm, concrete-lined ditches and culverts in and around the tank farm, the lift station, and the lined evaporation pond. These activities are intended to assure that the interim action is functioning adequately to meet the objectives stated in the Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision for the Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action (DOE/ID-10660) as described in the Group 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan (DOE/ID-10772).

  14. 2005 Annual Operations Report for INTEC Operable Unit 3-13, Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action

    SciTech Connect

    D. Shanklin

    2006-07-19

    This annual operations report describes the requirements followed and activities conducted to inspect, monitor, and maintain the items installed during performance of the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action, at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This report describes inspection and monitoring activities fro the surface-sealed areas within the tank farm, concrete-lined ditches and culverts in and around the tank farm, the lift station, and the lined evaporation pond. These activities are intended to assure that the interim action is functioning adequately to meet the objectives stated in the Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision for the Group 1, Tank Farm Interim Action, (DOE/ID-10660) and as amended by the agreement to resolve dispute, which was effective in February 2003.

  15. United States Special Operations Command Strategic Issues for the Long War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    for USSOCOM’s campaign plan. UNITED STATES SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND STRATEGIC ISSUES FOR THE LONG WAR World order is more fundamental and primordial ... Soup to Nuts: Understanding the Elements of the Strategy The United States is a big, lumbering, pluralistic, affluent, liberal, democratic

  16. 76 FR 66051 - Availability of the Fiscal Year 2010 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Inventory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... of the Secretary Availability of the Fiscal Year 2010 United States Special Operations Command... 2330a of Title 10 United States Code as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal..., Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy, Office of Strategic Sourcing (DPAP/SS) will make available to...

  17. 77 FR 38274 - Availability of the Fiscal Year 2011 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Inventory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... of the Secretary Availability of the Fiscal Year 2011 United States Special Operations Command... 2330a of Title 10, United States Code as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal... Acquisition Policy, Office of Strategic Sourcing (DPAP/SS) will make available to the public the first...

  18. Record of Decision for the Ford Building Waste Unit (643-11G) Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Fraley, S.

    2002-06-13

    This decision document presents the selected remedial for the Ford Building Waste Unit (FBWU), in Aiken, South Carolina, which was chosen in accordance with CERCLA, as amended by SARA, and, to the extent practical, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA site.

  19. The United Nations and the United States: Overcoming Obstacles for a Synergistic Future of Peace Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-27

    order to defend the homeland. 34 The US 32 Pappalardo . Bosnia Commanders Point Out Peacekeeping...from Bosnia.” United States Institute of Peace. (29 October 1999) www.usip.org (accessed 17 April 2010) Pappalardo , Joe. “Bosnia

  20. 76 FR 67425 - Availability of the Fiscal Year 2010 United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Inventory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Inventory List of Contracts for Services. A web site in this... (USSOCOM) Inventory List of Contracts for Services; Correction AGENCY: United States Special Operations... INFORMATION: Subsequent to the publication of the notice described in the SUMMARY, DoD discovered that the web...

  1. Soils and groundwater cleanup at Fernald: A status update on Operable Unit No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Yerace, P.J.; Bomberger, A.K.; Brettschneider, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses a status update on the cleanup operations at FERNALD. Discussed is the regulatory framework for FERNALD cleanup; overview of the FERNALD site; description of operable unit 5;remedial investigation; pattern of contamination; feasibility studies; and tangible progress to date.

  2. Value recovery from two mechanized bucking operations in the southeastern United States

    Treesearch

    Kevin Boston; Glen. Murphy

    2003-01-01

    The value recovered from two mechanized bucking operations in the southeastern United States was compared with the optimal value computed using an individual-stem log optimization program, AVIS. The first operation recovered 94% of the optimal value. The main cause for the value loss was a failure to capture potential sawlog volume; logs were bucked to a larger average...

  3. Feasibility study report for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This feasibility study (FS) examines a range of alternatives and provides recommendations for selecting a preferred altemative for remediating contamination at the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The 200-BP-1 operable unit is located in the center of the Hanford Site along the northern boundary of the 200 East Area. The 241-BY Tank Farm is located immediately to the south of the operable unit. 200-BP-1 is a source operable unit with contaminated soils associated primarily with nine inactive cribs (known as the 216-B cribs). These cribs were used for disposal of low-level radioactive liquid waste from U Plant uranium recovery operations, and waste storage tank condensate from the adjacent 241-BY Tank Farm. The cribs used for disposal of U Plant waste were in operation from 1955--1965, and the cribs used for disposal of tank condensate were in operation from 1965-1975. In addition to the cribs, four unplanned releases of radioactive materials have occurred within the operable unit. Contaminated surface soils associated with the unplanned releases have been consolidated over the cribs and covered with clean soil to reduce contaminant migration and exposure. Discharge of wastes to the cribs has resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. The groundwater is being addressed as part of the 200 East Aggregate Area groundwater operable unit. Contaminated soils at the site can be categorized by the types of contaminants, their distribution in the soil column, and the risk posed by the various potential exposure pathways. Below the clean soil cover, the near surface soils contain low-:levels of contamination with cesium-137, radium-226, strontium-90, thorium-228 and uranium. The lifetime incremental cancer risk associated with these soils if they were exposed at the surface is 9 {times} 10{sup 5}.

  4. Operating unit time use is associated with anaesthesia type in below-knee surgery in adults.

    PubMed

    Lohela, T J; Chase, R P; Hiekkanen, T A; Kontinen, V K; Hynynen, M J

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral nerve blocks could reduce the operating unit and theatre time spent on high-risk patients who are particularly vulnerable to complications of general anaesthesia or have medications that prevent application of central neuraxial blocks. Medical record data of 617 and 254 elderly adults undergoing below-knee surgery in Jorvi and Meilahti hospitals (Helsinki University Hospital) between January 2010 and December 2012 were used to investigate the influence of anaesthetic technique on operating theatre times and on operating unit times using flexible parametric survival models. We report operating theatre and unit exit ratios (i.e. hazard ratios but using ratios of exit rates) for different types of anaesthesia. Adjusted analyses: In Jorvi Hospital, anaesthesia type was associated with large initial differentials in operating theatre times. The theatre exit ratios remained lower for general anaesthesia and central neuraxial blocks compared to peripheral nerve blocks until 30 min. In Meilahti Hospital, anaesthesia type did not influence theatre time, but was the best predictor of operating unit times. Compared to peripheral nerve blocks, the exit ratio remained lower for general anaesthesia until five operating unit hours in both hospitals and for central neuraxial blocks until 1 h in Meilahti Hospital and until 3 h in Jorvi Hospital. Holding area was used more in Jorvi Hospital compared to Meilahti Hospital. Peripheral nerve block anaesthesia reduces time spent in the operating unit and can reduce time spent in the operating theatre if induced in holding area outside of theatre. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Operating requirements for and historical operations of Arctic offshore drilling systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Regg, J.; Breitmeier, J.; Walker, J.

    1995-12-31

    Many of the floating and bottom-founded drilling structures used for oil and gas exploration in the US Arctic have recently been proposed for use in the Russian Arctic offshore. This paper describes the US Arctic environmental conditions in terms of operation capabilities for the various types of drilling systems. A brief description of the various types of drilling systems used to date in the US Arctic is provided as background information. Also presented are the special regulatory requirements and contingency plans which have been developed for offshore Arctic drilling-system operations. The paper will summarize information on the operating experiences of the various drilling systems used in the US Arctic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) to date.

  6. Development and Use of a Web Site with Multimedia Contents as a Complement to Traditional Unit Operations Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Cristian; Muller, Mauricio; Sapag-Hagar, Jaime; Valenzuela, Fernando; Basualto, Carlos; Abugoch, Lilian

    2005-01-01

    The Unit Operations Laboratory offers 2 courses in unit operations. One is a 2-semester course for chemistry and food engineering students that is more demanding because it considers more unit operations and places more emphasis on solving exercises. The other is a 1-semester course for chemistry and pharmacy students that considers fewer unit…

  7. 43 CFR 3284.7 - May BLM authorize operations on uncommitted Federal leases located within a unit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... uncommitted Federal leases located within a unit? 3284.7 Section 3284.7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... on uncommitted Federal leases located within a unit? BLM may authorize a lessee/operator to conduct operations on an uncommitted Federal lease located within a unit if the lessee/operator demonstrates to...

  8. Development and Use of a Web Site with Multimedia Contents as a Complement to Traditional Unit Operations Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Cristian; Muller, Mauricio; Sapag-Hagar, Jaime; Valenzuela, Fernando; Basualto, Carlos; Abugoch, Lilian

    2005-01-01

    The Unit Operations Laboratory offers 2 courses in unit operations. One is a 2-semester course for chemistry and food engineering students that is more demanding because it considers more unit operations and places more emphasis on solving exercises. The other is a 1-semester course for chemistry and pharmacy students that considers fewer unit…

  9. Results of toxicity tests and chemical analyses conducted on sediments collected from the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit, July 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-02-11

    In order to provide unit specific toxicity data that will be used to address critical uncertainty in the ecological risk assessment (ERA) for the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit (TNXOD OU), sediments were collected from eight locations in the Inner Swamp portion of the operable unit and two unit specific background locations. These samples were analyzed for total mercury, total uranium, and sediment toxicity.

  10. Analysis of long-time operation of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsch, Marek; Čaja, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Micro-cogeneration is cogeneration with small performance, with maximal electric power up to 50 kWe. On the present, there are available small micro-cogeneration units with small electric performance, about 1 kWe, which are usable also in single family houses or flats. These micro-cogeneration units operate on principle of conventional combustion engine, Stirling engine, steam engine or fuel cell. Micro-cogeneration units with fuel cells are new progressive developing type of units for single family houses. Fuel cell is electrochemical device which by oxidation-reduction reaction turn directly chemical energy of fuel to electric power, secondary products are pure water and thermal energy. The aim of paper is measuring and evaluation of operation parameters of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell which uses natural gas as a fuel.

  11. United States Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, completion report Operation KLAXON, Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Completion Report provides a summary of activities conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) between October 1, 1992, and September 30, 1993, associated with Operation KLAXON. (In the past, each annual Completion Report dealt with a series of underground nuclear detonations; however, because no nuclear tests were conducted during FY 1993, this Report summarizes continuing nonnuclear and nuclear test readiness activities at the NTS sponsored by DOE/NV.) The report serves as a reference for those involved with the planning and execution of Operation KLAXON and also serves as a planning guide for future operations. Information in the report covers the logistics and management of activities. Scientific information and data associated with NTS activities are presented in technical documents published by participating agencies. In September 1992, Congress legislated a nine-month moratorium on the testing of nuclear weapons. The bill also provided for a resumption of testing (with no more than five tests per year, or a total of 15 during the next three years) in July 1993, and mandated an end to nuclear testing, entirely, by 1996. President Bush signed the bill into law in October 1992.

  12. Operational Interdiction: An Appraisal of United States Interdiction Doctrine for the Operational Level of War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    44 FM 6-20 46 Summary 48 CHAPTER 5 CURRENT AIR FORCE INTERDICTION DOCTRINE General 52 AFN 1-1 53 TACM 2-1 55 Summary 57 iv CHAPTER 6 ANALYSIS General...64 CHAPTER 7 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMENDATIONS Conclusions 66 Recommendat ions 69 APPENDIX ONE: VIEWS ON FOFA 76 APPENDIX TWO: GLOSSARY 83 BIBLIOGRAPHY 89...senior commanders go to great lengths to fully integrate interdiction with other operations. (See Appendix One: FOFA Arguments) The increased stature

  13. The Applied Meteorology Unit: Nineteen Years Successfully Transitioning Research Into Operations for America's Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, John T.; Bauman, William H., III; Merceret, Francis J.; Roeder, William P.; Brody, Frank C.; Hagemeyer, Bartlett C.

    2011-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) provides technology development and transition services to improve operational weather support to America's space program . The AMU was founded in 1991 and operates under a triagency Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the United States Air Force (USAF) and the National Weather Service (NWS) (Ernst and Merceret, 1995). It is colocated with the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) and funded by the Space Shuttle Program . Its primary customers are the 45WS, the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) operated for NASA by the NWS at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, TX, and the NWS forecast office in Melbourne, FL (MLB). The gap between research and operations is well known. All too frequently, the process of transitioning research to operations fails for various reasons. The mission of the AMU is in essence to bridge this gap for America's space program.

  14. 78 FR 37591 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point Unit 2, LLC, Issuance of Director...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point Unit 2, LLC, Issuance of Director's... (ADAMS) Accession No. ML12108A052), concerns the operation of Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit No. 2 (Indian Point 2), owned by Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, and operated by Entergy Nuclear Operations...

  15. Intensive Care Unit Admission Parameters Improve the Accuracy of Operative Mortality Predictive Models in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Marco; Ballotta, Andrea; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina; Brozzi, Simonetta; Boncilli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Background Operative mortality risk in cardiac surgery is usually assessed using preoperative risk models. However, intraoperative factors may change the risk profile of the patients, and parameters at the admission in the intensive care unit may be relevant in determining the operative mortality. This study investigates the association between a number of parameters at the admission in the intensive care unit and the operative mortality, and verifies the hypothesis that including these parameters into the preoperative risk models may increase the accuracy of prediction of the operative mortality. Methodology 929 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery were admitted to the study. The preoperative risk profile was assessed using the logistic EuroSCORE and the ACEF score. A number of parameters recorded at the admission in the intensive care unit were explored for univariate and multivariable association with the operative mortality. Principal Findings A heart rate higher than 120 beats per minute and a blood lactate value higher than 4 mmol/L at the admission in the intensive care unit were independent predictors of operative mortality, with odds ratio of 6.7 and 13.4 respectively. Including these parameters into the logistic EuroSCORE and the ACEF score increased their accuracy (area under the curve 0.85 to 0.88 for the logistic EuroSCORE and 0.81 to 0.86 for the ACEF score). Conclusions A double-stage assessment of operative mortality risk provides a higher accuracy of the prediction. Elevated blood lactates and tachycardia reflect a condition of inadequate cardiac output. Their inclusion in the assessment of the severity of the clinical conditions after cardiac surgery may offer a useful tool to introduce more sophisticated hemodynamic monitoring techniques. Comparison between the predicted operative mortality risk before and after the operation may offer an assessment of the operative performance. PMID:21042411

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the...

  17. Proposed plan for remedial action at the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This proposed plan addresses the management of contamination present in various components of the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) of the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri. The QROU consists of (1) residual waste at the quarry proper; (2) the Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of the slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of the evaluations for this operable unit. Remedial activities for the QROU will be conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process required for the QROU under CERCLA, three major evaluation documents have been prepared to support cleanup decisions for this operable unit.

  18. Reservoir release patterns for hydropower operations at the Aspinall Unit on the Gunnison River, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, S.C.L.; McCoy, J.J.; Sedlacek, J.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the development of reservoir release patterns for the Aspinall Unit, which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal Reservoirs on the Gunnison River in Colorado. Release patterns were assessed for two hydropower operational scenarios--seasonally adjusted steady flows and seasonally adjusted high fluctuating flows--and three representative hydrologic years--moderate (1987), dry (1989), and wet (1983). The release patterns for the operational scenarios were developed with the aid of monthly, daily, and hourly reservoir operational models, which simulate the linked operation of the three Aspinall Unit reservoirs. Also presented are reservoir fluctuations and downstream water surface elevations corresponding to the reservoir release patterns. Both of the hydropower operational scenarios evaluated are based on the ecological research flows proposed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service for the Aspinall Unit. The first operational scenario allows only seasonally adjusted steady flows (no hourly fluctuations at any dam within one day), whereas the second scenario permits high fluctuating flows from Blue Mesa and Morrow Point Reservoirs during certain times of the year. Crystal Reservoir would release a steady flow within each day under both operational scenarios.

  19. A Perspective on the USAFE (United States Air Forces in Europe) Collocated Operating Base System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    Containerized Maintenance Building CONUS Continental United States DOC Designed Operational Capability EDS European Distribution System EIFEL ...Table 1. IMPLEMENTATION By the early seventies, when the principle of co -use of the bases had been agreed to by the NATO countries, the United...NATO channels and (in Germany) be received over the EIFEL network. One deployed squadron had direct telephone communications to its home base by

  20. Interim action record of decision remedial alternative selection: TNX area groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.R.

    1994-10-01

    This document presents the selected interim remedial action for the TNX Area Groundwater Operable Unit at the Savannah River Site (SRS), which was developed in accordance with CERCLA of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution contingency Plan (NCP). This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific CERCLA unit.

  1. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  2. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request

    SciTech Connect

    L. Davison

    2009-06-30

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

  3. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Davison

    2009-06-30

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

  4. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase I) Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect

    L. Davison

    2007-07-31

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase I sites at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The 10 sites addressed in this report were defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for these 10 sites have been accomplished and are hereafter considered No Action or No Further Action sites.

  5. Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08

    SciTech Connect

    M. S. Roddy

    2007-05-01

    This plan describes the groundwater sampling and water level monitoring that will be conducted to evaluate contaminations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer entering and leaving the Idaho National Laboratory. The sampling and monitoring locations were selected to meet the data quality objectives detailed in this plan. Data for the Snake River Plain Aquifer obtained under this plan will be evaluated in the Operable Unit 10-08 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study report and will be used to support the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide groundwater model.

  6. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Biggerstaff, R.L.

    1994-06-30

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment (QRA) for the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The extent of the groundwater beneath the 100 K Area is defined in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit (DOE-RL 1992a). The QRA is an evaluation or risk using a limited amount of data and a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios and is not intended to replace or be a substitute for a baseline risk assessment.

  7. Phase 1 remedial investigation report for 200-BP-1 operable unit. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989 included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priority List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Inclusion on the NPL initiated the remedial investigation (RD process for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. These efforts are being addressed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989) which was negotiated and approved by the DOE, the EPA, and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) in May 1989. This agreement, known as the Tri-Party Agreement, governs all CERCLA efforts at Hanford. In March of 1990, the Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) issued a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan (DOE-RL 1990a) for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The work plan initiated the first phase of site characterization activities associated with the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The purpose of the 200-BP-1 operable unit RI is to gather and develop the necessary information to adequately understand the risks to human health and the environment posed by the site and to support the development and analysis of remedial alternatives during the FS. The RI analysis will, in turn, be used by Tri-Party Agreement signatories to make a risk-management-based selection of remedies for the releases of hazardous substances that have occurred from the 200-BP-1 operable unit.

  8. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-02

    The primary focus of this Process Development Unit operating program was to prepare for a confident move to the next scale of operation with a simplified and optimized process. The main purpose of these runs was the evaluation of the alternate commercial catalyst (F21/0E75-43) that had been identified in the laboratory under a different subtask of the program. If the catalyst proved superior to the previous catalyst, then the evaluation run would be continued into a 120-day life run. Also, minor changes were made to the Process Development Unit system to improve operations and reliability. The damaged reactor demister from a previous run was replaced, and a new demister was installed in the intermediate V/L separator. The internal heat exchanger was equipped with an expansion loop to relieve thermal stresses so operation at higher catalyst loadings and gas velocities would be possible. These aggressive conditions are important for improving process economics. (VC)

  9. Post-Conflicts Stability Operations and the 1989 United States Invasion of Panama

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    institutionalizing the interagency process in a similar way the Gol dwater-Nichols Act of 112 1986 created an environment for the United States Armed Forces...Administrative/Operational Use. Protection of information restricted to official use or for administrative or operational purposes. 8. Software ...Documentation. Protection of software documentation - release only in accordance with the provisions of DoD Instruction 7930.2. 9. Specific Authority

  10. Nonorthogonal projective positive-operator-value measurement of photon polarization states with unit probability of success

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnert, S.E.; Payne, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe a scheme for performing a nonorthogonal projective positive-operator-value measurement of any arbitrary single-photon polarization input state with unit probability of success. While this probability is reached in the limit of infinite cycles of states through the apparatus, only one actual physical setup is required for a feasible implementation. Specifically, our setup implements a set of three nonorthogonal measurement operators at angles of 120 deg. to each other.

  11. Determinants of early discharge from the intensive care unit after cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Ranucci, Marco; Bellucci, Carmen; Conti, Daniela; Cazzaniga, Anna; Maugeri, Bruno

    2007-03-01

    The length of stay in the intensive care unit is one of the factors limiting operating room utilization in cardiac surgery. We investigated the impact of a goal-oriented program aimed at discharging the patients from the intensive care unit the morning after the operation within a comprehensive model including other explanatory variables. A multivariable predictive model for early discharge from the intensive care unit was established using a stepwise forward logistic regression. The analysis was retrospectively conducted on 9120 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures at our institution. A total of 1874 patients were discharged early from the intensive care unit. Factors associated with early discharge were ejection fraction, lowest hematocrit on cardiopulmonary bypass, lowest temperature on cardiopulmonary bypass, and the presence of the goal-oriented strategy (odds ratio, 5.5; 95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 6.3). Factors associated with late discharge were age, preoperative serum creatinine value, unstable angina, congestive heart failure, redo operation, combined operation, and cardiopulmonary bypass duration. An extubation time of 4 hours after the arrival in the intensive care unit was associated with the peak rate of early discharge. Patients being early discharged according to the goal-oriented strategy did not demonstrate a different complication rate compared with patients treated with a standard strategy. Early discharge from the intensive care unit depends on a combination of preoperative and intraoperative factors, but most of all on the presence of a goal-oriented strategy. A very early extubation is not required for an early discharge from the intensive care unit.

  12. 40 CFR 73.18 - Submittal procedures for units commencing commercial operation during the period from January 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Eligibility. To be eligible for allowances under this section, a unit shall commence commercial operation... construction of the unit. (c) Commencement of commercial operation. The Administrator will use EIA information... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submittal procedures for units...

  13. Denver Radium Site -- Operable Unit I closeout report for the US Environmental Protection Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Denver Radium Site consists of properties in the Denver, Colorado, area having radioactive contamination left from radium processing in the early 1900s. The properties are divided into 11 gaps or operable units to facilitate remedial action of the Site. Operable Unit I is an 8-acre block bounded by Quivas Street to the east, Shoshone Street to the west, West 12th Avenue to the south, and West 13th Avenue to the north. The primary focus of interest concerning investigations of radiological contamination was a radium, vanadium, and uranium processing facility at 1201 Quivas Street owned by the Pittsburgh Radium Company (PRC) from 1925 until 1926. The Radium Ores Company, which was associated with PRC, operated the facility until 1927. A Remedial investigation (RI) of Operable Unit I was prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group and CH[sub 2]M Hill on behalf of EPA in April 1986. The draft Feasibility Study (FS), prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group and CH[sub 2]M Hill, was issued in July 1987 (the final FS is the Community Relations Responsiveness Summary with an errata to the draft, issued September 1987). The RI focused on radium uranium processing residues discarded in the early 1900s. These residues contained uranium, radium, and thorium. EPA s Community Relations Plan involved the community in the decision-making process relating to the remedy to be implemented at Operable Unit X, and promoted communications among interested parties throughout the course of the project. The remedial action alternative preferred by EPA for Operable Unit I was Off-Site Permanent Disposal. Because a permanent disposal facility was not available at the time the Record of Decision was issued in September 1987, EPA selected the On-Site Temporary Containment (capping) with the Off-Site Permanent Disposal alternative.

  14. Remedial investigation Phase 2 supplemental work plan for the Hanford Site 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The 1100 Area, the central warehousing, vehicle maintenance, and transportation operations center for the Hanford Site, was designated an (NPL) National Priorities List site in July 1989. This NPL site was divided into four operable units, and the first equipment maintenance operable unit, 1100-EM-1, was assigned the highest priority. The following summary focuses on the major issues related to contaminant sources, meteorology, surface hydrology, geology, pedology, hydrogeology, and ecology. The 110-EM-1 Phase 1 R1 report recommended further investigation at six waste management units assigned to or within the operable unit. 1100-1 (Battery Acid Pit)--an unlined dry sump, or french drain, used for the disposal of waste acid from vehicle batteries; 1100-2 (Paint and solvent Pit)--a former sand and gravel pit subsequently used for the disposal of construction debris and, reportedly, waste paints, thinner, and solvents; 1100-4 (Antifreeze Tank Site)--The site of a former underground storage tank used for the disposal of waste vehicle antifreeze; UN-1100-6 (Discolored Soil Site)--the location of an apparent disposal event onto the ground surface involving a container of organic waste liquids; Horn Rapids Landfill--a solid waste facility used primarily for the disposal of office and construction waste and the burning of classified documents; asbestos, sewage sludge, fly ash, and, potentially, drums of unidentified organic liquids alleged to be disposed at this location; and Ephemeral Pool--the location of 1100 Area parking lot runoff accumulation during infrequent, high-intensity precipitation events. This remedial investigation supplemental work plan details the efforts for final characterization of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit that will provide data to be used for the evaluation of remedial operations in the Phase 3 1100-EM-1 feasibility study. 19 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-02

    This report consists of Detailed Data Acquisition Sheets for Runs E-6 and E-7 for Task 2.2 of the Modification, Operation, and Support Studies of the Liquid Phase Methanol Laporte Process Development Unit. (Task 2.2: Alternate Catalyst Run E-6 and Catalyst Activity Maintenance Run E-7).

  16. Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

  17. Program Unit Funding: A Handbook for ECS Operators in the 2002/2003 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Special Education Branch.

    This handbook is written specifically for Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta, Canada, applying for Program Unit Funding for students with severe disabilities. It is also designed to enhance the understanding of how assistance is provided to ECS children with severe disabilities by teachers, special needs assistants, parents, and…

  18. ECS Program Unit Funding: A Handbook for ECS Operators. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Special Educational Services Branch.

    This handbook is written specifically for Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta (Canada) to apply for Program Unit Funding. It is also designed to enhance the understanding of how assistance is provided to ECS children with severe disabilities by teachers, special needs assistants, parents, and supporting agency personnel. ECS…

  19. ECS Program Unit Funding: A Handbook of ECS Operators, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Special Education Branch.

    This handbook is written specifically for Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta, Canada, applying for Program Unit Funding. It is also designed to enhance the understanding of how assistance is provided to ECS children with severe disabilities by teachers, special needs assistants, parents, and supporting agency personnel. ECS…

  20. ECS Program Unit Funding: A Handbook for ECS Operators, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Special Education Branch.

    This handbook discusses the Program Unit Funding that is provided to approved Early Childhood Services (ECS) operators in Alberta (Canada) for children with severe disabilities who require additional support above that offered in a regular ECS program. Funding is available for a maximum of 3 years for each eligible child who is two and a half…

  1. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  2. Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. F., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

  3. 77 FR 40091 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating, Units 2 and 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating, Units 2 and 3 AGENCY: Nuclear... statement for license renewal of nuclear plants; availability. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear...

  4. Limited field investigation report for the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to optimize the use of interim remedial measures (IRM) for expediting clean up while maintaining a technically sound and cost-effective program. The 100-KR-4 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 K Area. Operable units KR-1, KR-2 and KR-3 address contaminant sources while 100-KR-4 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The IRM decision process for groundwater operable units is based on three aspects: (1) Is the concentration greater than Hanford background? (2) Does the concentration present a medium or high human-health risk? (3) Does the concentration exceed an ecologically based applicable, relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR) or present an environmental hazard quotient > I? The primary methods of investigation used during this LFI were the installation of monitoring wells and sampling of groundwater. The samples collected from the groundwater and soils were submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the location and degree of contamination. All soil samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all first round and a minimum of 10% of subsequent round data were validated.

  5. Ambiguity in Units and the Referents: Two Cases in Rational Number Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathouz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    I explore the impact of ambiguous referral to the unit on understanding of decimal and fraction operations during episodes in two different mathematics courses for pre-service teachers (PSTs). In one classroom, the instructor introduces a rectangular area diagram to help the PSTs visualize decimal multiplication. A transcript from this classroom…

  6. A Moveable Feast--A Progressive Approach to the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Wm. Curtis, Jr.; Hammond, Karl D.; Laurence, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe an alternative format for the senior laboratory in which students are allowed--indeed, expected--to communicate with previous groups and build on their results. The effect is a unit operations laboratory in which students are empowered to propose the experiments they wish to do and in which the cumulative experience of the…

  7. Interim Action Proposed Plan for the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.

    2002-06-18

    The purpose of this Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) is to describe the preferred interim remedial action for addressing the Chemicals, Metals, and Pesticides (CMP) Pits Operable Unit and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process.

  8. Limited field investigation report for the 100-BC-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-BC-5 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-BC-5 Operable Unit is one of three operable units associated with the 100 B/C Area. Operable units 1 and 2 address contaminant sources while 100-BC-5 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of investigation used during this LFI was the installation of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all first round and 10% of the subsequent rounds of data associated with the LFI were validated. The screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration constituents that were below background. Constituents considered nontoxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Inconsistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). Tritium and strontium-90 were identified as contaminants of concern at 100-BC-5 because the concentrations exceeded potential applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. The QRA determined that the risk is low for all of the site contaminants.

  9. Orchard Business Management. Unit II. Management and Analysis of the Orchard Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullinix, Shauna K.

    This guide is intended for use in providing in-depth formal classroom and on-site instruction in the principles of business and financial management as they apply to operating and managing orchards. Designed to be used with an accompanying Orchard Business Management Record Book, this unit is devoted to management and analysis of an orchard…

  10. Extended Cesaro operators between Bloch-type spaces in the unit ball of Cn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaomin

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we characterize those holomorphic symbols [phi] in the unit ball of Cn for which the induced extended Cesaro operator (respectively, ) is bounded or compact, where [omega] and [mu] are normal functions on [0,1). In addition, we obtain some properties of those spaces and .

  11. Interprofessional Rhetoric and Operational Realities: An Ethnographic Study of Rounds in Four Intensive Care Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Morning interprofessional rounds (MIRs) are used in critical care medicine to improve team-based care and patient outcomes. Given existing evidence of conflict between and dissatisfaction among rounds participants, this study sought to better understand how the operational realities of care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU) impact the…

  12. Use of the LITEE Lorn Manufacturing Case Study in a Senior Chemical Engineering Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Abulencia, James Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the effectiveness of incorporating the Laboratory for Innovative Technology and Engineering Education (LITEE) Lorn Manufacturing case into a senior level chemical engineering unit operations course at Manhattan College. The purpose of using the case study is to demonstrate the relevance of ethics to chemical engineering…

  13. Use of the LITEE Lorn Manufacturing Case Study in a Senior Chemical Engineering Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Abulencia, James Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the effectiveness of incorporating the Laboratory for Innovative Technology and Engineering Education (LITEE) Lorn Manufacturing case into a senior level chemical engineering unit operations course at Manhattan College. The purpose of using the case study is to demonstrate the relevance of ethics to chemical engineering…

  14. Title V Operating Permit: XTO Energy, Inc. - Little Canyon Unit Compressor Station

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Initial Title V Operating Permit (Permit Number: V-UO-000016-2006.00), Response to Public Comments and the Administrative Permit Record for the XTO Energy, Inc., Little Canyon Unit Compressor Station, located on the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation.

  15. Interprofessional Rhetoric and Operational Realities: An Ethnographic Study of Rounds in Four Intensive Care Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Morning interprofessional rounds (MIRs) are used in critical care medicine to improve team-based care and patient outcomes. Given existing evidence of conflict between and dissatisfaction among rounds participants, this study sought to better understand how the operational realities of care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU) impact the…

  16. Ambiguity in Units and the Referents: Two Cases in Rational Number Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathouz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    I explore the impact of ambiguous referral to the unit on understanding of decimal and fraction operations during episodes in two different mathematics courses for pre-service teachers (PSTs). In one classroom, the instructor introduces a rectangular area diagram to help the PSTs visualize decimal multiplication. A transcript from this classroom…

  17. 75 FR 3943 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc.; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... workers and members of the public. Therefore, no changes or different types of radiological impacts are..., no changes to or different types of non-radiological environmental impacts are expected as a result... COMMISSION Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc.; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2...

  18. 75 FR 61219 - Entergy Operations, Inc.; River Bend Station, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Operations, Inc.; River Bend Station, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...-47, issued Entergy Operations, Inc. (Entergy, the licensee), for operation of the River Bend Station, Unit 1 (RBS), located in West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. In accordance with 10 CFR 51.21, the NRC...

  19. 76 FR 16012 - STP Nuclear Operating Company, et al. South Texas Project, Units 1 and 2 Notice of Consideration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... COMMISSION STP Nuclear Operating Company, et al. South Texas Project, Units 1 and 2 Notice of Consideration... issued to STP Nuclear Operating Company, et al. (the licensee) for operation of the South Texas Project (STP), Units 1 and 2, located in Matagorda County, Texas. The notice is being reissued in its...

  20. The building blocks for JWST I&T to operations: from simulator to flight units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiak, Francis; Ochs, William; Johns, Alan; Seaton, Bonita; Adams, Cynthia; Fatig, Curtis; Jones, Ronald; Jackson, Wallace

    2012-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project has an extended integration and test (I&T) phase due to long procurement and development times of various components as well as recent launch delays. The JWST Ground Segment and Operations group has developed a roadmap of the various ground and flight elements and their use in the various JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project's building block approach to the eventual operational systems, while not new, is complex and challenging; a large-scale mission like JWST involves international partners, many vendors across the United States, and competing needs for the same systems. One of the challenges is resource balancing so simulators and flight products for various elements congeal into integrated systems used for I&T and flight operations activities. This building block approach to an incremental buildup provides for early problem identification with simulators and exercises the flight operations systems, products, and interfaces during the JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project has completed some early I&T with the simulators, engineering models and some components of the operational ground system. The JWST Project is testing the various flight units as they are delivered and will continue to do so for the entire flight and operational system. The JWST Project has already and will continue to reap the value of the building block approach on the road to launch and flight operations.

  1. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Wittreich, C.D.

    1994-05-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

  2. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(c)(1), you shall meet... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  3. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(c)(1), you shall meet... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  4. Soil washing physical separations test procedure - 300-FF-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Belden, R.D.

    1993-10-08

    This procedure provides the operations approach, a field sampling plan, and laboratory procedures for a soil washing test to be conducted by Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) in the 300-FF-1 area at the Hanford site. The {open_quotes}Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Soil Washing Physical Separations Test, 300-FF-1 Operable Unit,{close_quotes} Hanford, Washington, Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc., February 1994 (QAPP) is provided in a separate document that presents the procedural and organizational guidelines for this test. This document describes specifications, responsibilities, and general procedures to be followed to conduct physical separation soil treatability tests in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. These procedures are based on the {open_quotes}300-FF-1 Physical Separations CERCLA Treatability Test Plan, DOE/RL 92-2l,{close_quotes} (DOE-RL 1993).

  5. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

  6. Finding of No Significant Impact: Construction and Operation of an Emergency Services Center United States Air Force Academy, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-08

    FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP ACT Construction and Operation of an Emergency Services Center United States Air Force Academy, Colorado An...Operation of an Emergency Services Center United States Air Force Academy, Colorado 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Operation of an Emergency Services Center U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado USAFA 10 CES/CECP 8120 Edgerton Drive United

  7. External Peer Review Report on the United States Special Operations Command Office of Inspector General Audit Division

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-15

    Review Report on the United States Special Operations Command Office of Inspector General Audit Division ( Report No. DODIG-2016-122) Attached is the...External Peer Review Report and the Letter of Comments on the United States Special Operations Command Office of Inspector General that we conducted in...2016 MEMORANDUM FOR UNITED STATES SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND, INSPECTOR GENERAL SUBJECT: System Review Report ( Report No. DODIG-2016-122) We have

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): T, H, Agriculture and Nutrition Site, Operable Unit 1, Albany, GA, May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-21

    This decision document (Record of Decision), presents the selected remedial action for Operable Unit One for the T H Agriculture and Nutrition (THAN) Site, Albany, Georgia. This operable unit is the first of two that are planned for the Site. The first operable unit addresses the source of the contamination on the western parcel of the Site as well as the principle threat of groundwater contamination across the entire Site. While this remedy does address the principal threats at the Site, the second operable unit will involve continued study and remediation of a second source of contamination on the eastern parcel of the Site.

  9. SACROC Unit CO{sub 2} flood: Multidisciplinary team improves reservoir management and decreases operating costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, J.T.; Benvegnu, A.J.; Wingate, T.P.; McKamie, J.D.; Pickard, C.D.; Altum, J.T.

    1996-08-01

    The SACROC Unit of the Kelly-Snyder field is located in the Midland basin. The Midland basin is the eastern most of the Permian Basins of west Texas. This field is the largest of the many prolific, Late Pennsylvanian age carbonate buildups that comprise the Horseshoe Atoll. The field, discovered in 1948, encompasses 50,000 acres and contained an estimated original oil in place of 2.8 billion bbl. Waterflooding operations began in 1954 and CO{sub 2} flooding began in 1972. Cumulative recovery has been more than 1.2 billion bbl. The field contains approximately 1,600 wells with about 400 active producers and 240 active injectors. Recent changes implemented by the team have significantly improved operational efficiency at the unit. In addition, recent geologic investigations have finally began to unravel the complex stratigraphy of the reservoir. In 1992, the economic viability of the SACROC Unit was somewhat uncertain. At that time, a multidisciplinary team was formed to improve operational efficiencies and reservoir performance. Better understanding of reservoir geology from detailed biostratigraphic analysis provided the framework to make effective changes. This paper discusses operational efficiency and reservoir exploitation projects implemented by the team.

  10. 78 FR 19535 - In the Matter of Entergy Operations, Inc. (Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 1); Confirmatory Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of Entergy Operations, Inc. (Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 1); Confirmatory Order Modifying License I Entergy Operations, Inc. (Entergy, licensee), is the holder of Renewed...

  11. An Automatic Uav Mapping System for Supporting un (united Nations) Field Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K.; Cheon, J. W.; Kim, H. Y.; Lee, I.

    2016-06-01

    The United Nations (UN) has performed field operations worldwide such as peacekeeping or rescue missions. When such an operation is needed, the UN dispatches an operation team usually with a GIS (Geographic Information System) customized to a specific operation. The base maps for the GIS are generated mostly with satellite images which may not retain a high resolution and the current situation. To build an up-to-date high resolution map, we propose a UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) based automatic mapping system, which can operate in a fully automatic way from the data acquisition of sensory data to the data processing for the generation of the geospatial products such as a mosaicked orthoimage of a target area. In this study, we analyse the requirements for UN field operations, suggest a UAV mapping system with an operation scenario, and investigate the applicability of the system. With the proposed system, we can construct a tailored GIS with up-to-date and high resolution base maps for a specific operation efficiently.

  12. An analysis of post-traumatic stress symptoms in United States Air Force drone operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne; Goodman, Tanya; Reardon, Laura; Thompson, William

    2014-06-01

    Remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), commonly referred to as "drones," have emerged over the past decade as an innovative warfighting tool. Given there is a paucity of empirical research assessing drone operators, the purpose of this study was to assess for the prevalence of PTSD symptoms among this cohort. Of the 1084 United States Air Force (USAF) drone operators that participated, a total of 4.3% endorsed a pattern of symptoms of moderate to extreme level of severity meeting criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition. The incidence of PTSD among USAF drone operators in this study was lower than rates of PTSD (10-18%) among military personnel returning from deployment but higher than incidence rates (less than 1%) of USAF drone operators reported in electronic medical records. Although low PTSD rates may be promising, limitations to this study are discussed.

  13. Automated processing of whole blood units: operational value and in vitro quality of final blood components

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Marisa; Algora, Manuel; Garcia-Sanchez, Félix; Vico, Santiago; Rodriguez, Eva; Perez, Sonia; Barbolla, Luz

    2012-01-01

    Background The Community Transfusion Centre in Madrid currently processes whole blood using a conventional procedure (Compomat, Fresenius) followed by automated processing of buffy coats with the OrbiSac system (CaridianBCT). The Atreus 3C system (CaridianBCT) automates the production of red blood cells, plasma and an interim platelet unit from a whole blood unit. Interim platelet unit are pooled to produce a transfusable platelet unit. In this study the Atreus 3C system was evaluated and compared to the routine method with regards to product quality and operational value. Materials and methods Over a 5-week period 810 whole blood units were processed using the Atreus 3C system. The attributes of the automated process were compared to those of the routine method by assessing productivity, space, equipment and staffing requirements. The data obtained were evaluated in order to estimate the impact of implementing the Atreus 3C system in the routine setting of the blood centre. Yield and in vitro quality of the final blood components processed with the two systems were evaluated and compared. Results The Atreus 3C system enabled higher throughput while requiring less space and employee time by decreasing the amount of equipment and processing time per unit of whole blood processed. Whole blood units processed on the Atreus 3C system gave a higher platelet yield, a similar amount of red blood cells and a smaller volume of plasma. Discussion These results support the conclusion that the Atreus 3C system produces blood components meeting quality requirements while providing a high operational efficiency. Implementation of the Atreus 3C system could result in a large organisational improvement. PMID:22044958

  14. Automated processing of whole blood units: operational value and in vitro quality of final blood components.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Marisa; Algora, Manuel; Garcia-Sanchez, Félix; Vico, Santiago; Rodriguez, Eva; Perez, Sonia; Barbolla, Luz

    2012-01-01

    The Community Transfusion Centre in Madrid currently processes whole blood using a conventional procedure (Compomat, Fresenius) followed by automated processing of buffy coats with the OrbiSac system (CaridianBCT). The Atreus 3C system (CaridianBCT) automates the production of red blood cells, plasma and an interim platelet unit from a whole blood unit. Interim platelet unit are pooled to produce a transfusable platelet unit. In this study the Atreus 3C system was evaluated and compared to the routine method with regards to product quality and operational value. Over a 5-week period 810 whole blood units were processed using the Atreus 3C system. The attributes of the automated process were compared to those of the routine method by assessing productivity, space, equipment and staffing requirements. The data obtained were evaluated in order to estimate the impact of implementing the Atreus 3C system in the routine setting of the blood centre. Yield and in vitro quality of the final blood components processed with the two systems were evaluated and compared. The Atreus 3C system enabled higher throughput while requiring less space and employee time by decreasing the amount of equipment and processing time per unit of whole blood processed. Whole blood units processed on the Atreus 3C system gave a higher platelet yield, a similar amount of red blood cells and a smaller volume of plasma. These results support the conclusion that the Atreus 3C system produces blood components meeting quality requirements while providing a high operational efficiency. Implementation of the Atreus 3C system could result in a large organisational improvement.

  15. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

  16. Summary of remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3), 300-FF-2 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Hulstrom, L.C.

    1994-06-30

    Remedial investigations at the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches (316-3) in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site were conducted as part of the 300-FF-1 operable unit Phase 1 remedial investigation (RI) in accordance with the approved RI work plan. During the RI, the southwestern boundary of the 300-FF-1 operable unit was modified by all signatories to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, which shifted the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches to the 300-FF-3 operable unit. As a consequence, the RI results from these waste management units were not included in the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation Report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. As a results of recent Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the 300-FF-2 operable unit now consists of the remaining 300 Area operable units within the 300 Area National Priorities List (NPL), which includes the former 300-FF-3 operable unit. Therefore, this document summarizes the RI results from the 307 retention basins and 307 trenches in the 300-FF-2 operable unit. Analysis and evaluation of these results well be included in the 300-FF-2 RI report.

  17. Dose rate evaluation of workers on the operation floor in Fukushima-Daiichi Unit 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Kaoru; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Shirai, Keisuke; Matsuoka, Ippei; Mukaida, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    At Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3, installation of a fuel handling machine is planned to support the removal of spent fuel. The dose rates at the workplace were calculated based on the source distribution measured using a collimator in order to confirm that the dose rates on the operation floor were within a manageable range. It was confirmed that the accuracy of the source distribution was C/M = 1.0-2.4. These dose rates were then used to plan the work on the operation floor.

  18. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Reactor Technology Complex Operable Unit 2-13

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Wells

    2007-03-23

    This Groundwater Monitoring Plan describes the objectives, activities, and assessments that will be performed to support the on-going groundwater monitoring requirements at the Reactor Technology Complex, formerly the Test Reactor Area (TRA). The requirements for groundwater monitoring were stipulated in the Final Record of Decision for Test Reactor Area, Operable Unit 2-13, signed in December 1997. The monitoring requirements were modified by the First Five-Year Review Report for the Test Reactor Area, Operable Unit 2-13, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to focus on those contaminants of concern that warrant continued surveillance, including chromium, tritium, strontium-90, and cobalt-60. Based upon recommendations provided in the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Status Report for 2006, the groundwater monitoring frequency was reduced to annually from twice a year.

  19. Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Dresel, P. EVAN; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2006-09-21

    A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final (EPA 1988). The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers) identified in the groundwater sampling and analysis plan for the operable unit (DOE/RL-2001-49, Rev. 1) with additions.

  20. Baseline groundwater model update for p-area groundwater operable unit, NBN

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.; Amidon, M.

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the development of a numerical groundwater flow and transport model of the hydrogeologic system of the P-Area Reactor Groundwater Operable Unit at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). The P-Area model provides a tool to aid in understanding the hydrologic and geochemical processes that control the development and migration of the current tritium, tetrachloroethene (PCE), and trichloroethene (TCE) plumes in this region.

  1. Discrete Sampling Test Plan for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Mark D.

    2010-02-04

    The Discrete Groundwater Sampling Project is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on behalf of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company. The project is focused on delivering groundwater samples from proscribed horizons within select groundwater wells residing in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit (200-BP-5 OU) on the Hanford Site. This document provides the scope, schedule, methodology, and other details of the PNNL discrete sampling effort.

  2. A Study of Learning in the Operations of a Viscous Damped Traversing Unit.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    used dampers mechanically coupled to the traversing unit. Most of the high-frequency manual tracking errors (oscillations) which occur at frequencies...greater than one hertz were filtered out by these dampers . The damper consisted of rotating disks and stationary disks. A high viscosity fluid lies...and the stationary members increased. A torque was applied to the rotating member of the damper in order for the operator to optically track a moving

  3. Data validation report for the 100-KR-4 operable unit first quarter, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, A.D.

    1994-07-01

    Samples were obtained from the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit first Quarter 1994 Groundwater Sampling event. The data from the chemical analysis of fifty-eight samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported samples results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. Information fro the sampling event and the information validation processes are presented in this document.

  4. The reliability analysis of a separated, dual fail operational redundant strapdown IMU. [inertial measurement unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motyka, P.

    1983-01-01

    A methodology for quantitatively analyzing the reliability of redundant avionics systems, in general, and the dual, separated Redundant Strapdown Inertial Measurement Unit (RSDIMU), in particular, is presented. The RSDIMU is described and a candidate failure detection and isolation system presented. A Markov reliability model is employed. The operational states of the system are defined and the single-step state transition diagrams discussed. Graphical results, showing the impact of major system parameters on the reliability of the RSDIMU system, are presented and discussed.

  5. Factors That Influence Human Behavior And Negatively Affect Energy Consumption In USMC Ground Units During Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    without an adverse impact on performance . 46 3. What benefits can be realized by changing human behavior to avoid unnecessary energy expenditures...INFLUENCE HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND NEGATIVELY AFFECT ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN USMC GROUND UNITS DURING OPERATIONS by John A. Peters September 2016...REPORT DATE September 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND

  6. Enhanced teaching and student learning through a simulator-based course in chemical unit operations design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasem, Nayef

    2016-07-01

    This paper illustrates a teaching technique used in computer applications in chemical engineering employed for designing various unit operation processes, where the students learn about unit operations by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of unit operation processes through simulators. A case study presenting the teaching method was evaluated using student surveys and faculty assessments, which were designed to measure the quality and effectiveness of the teaching method. The results of the questionnaire conclusively demonstrate that this method is an extremely efficient way of teaching a simulator-based course. In addition to that, this teaching method can easily be generalised and used in other courses. A student's final mark is determined by a combination of in-class assessments conducted based on cooperative and peer learning, progress tests and a final exam. Results revealed that peer learning can improve the overall quality of student learning and enhance student understanding.

  7. Vapor phase deposition of functional polymers onto paper-based microfluidic devices for advanced unit operations.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Philip; Gupta, Malancha

    2012-11-20

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have recently received significant attention as a potential platform for low-cost diagnostic assays. However, the number of advanced unit operations, such as separation of analytes and fluid manipulation, that can be applied to these devices has been limited. Here, we use a vapor phase polymerization process to sequentially deposit functional polymer coatings onto paper-based microfluidic devices to integrate multiple advanced unit operations while retaining the fibrous morphology necessary to generate capillary-driven flow. A hybrid grafting process was used to apply hydrophilic polymer coatings with a high surface concentration of ionizable groups onto the surface of the paper fibers in order to passively separate analytes, which allowed a multicomponent mixture to be separated into its anionic and cationic components. Additionally, a UV-responsive polymer was sequentially deposited to act as a responsive switch to control the path of fluid within the devices. This work extends the advanced unit operations available for paper-based microfluidics and allows for more complex diagnostics. In addition, the vapor phase polymerization process is substrate independent, and therefore, these functional coatings can be applied to other textured materials such as membranes, filters, and fabrics.

  8. Initial closed operation of the CELSS Test Facility Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliss, M.; Blackwell, C.; Zografos, A.; Drews, M.; MacElroy, R.; McKenna, R.; Heyenga, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the NASA Advanced Life Support Flight Program, a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Test Facility Engineering Development Unit has been constructed and is undergoing initial operational testing at NASA Ames Research Center. The Engineering Development Unit (EDU) is a tightly closed, stringently controlled, ground-based testbed which provides a broad range of environmental conditions under which a variety of CELSS higher plant crops can be grown. Although the EDU was developed primarily to provide near-term engineering data and a realistic determination of the subsystem and system requirements necessary for the fabrication of a comparable flight unit, the EDU has also provided a means to evaluate plant crop productivity and physiology under controlled conditions. This paper describes the initial closed operational testing of the EDU, with emphasis on the hardware performance capabilities. Measured performance data during a 28-day closed operation period are compared with the specified functional requirements, and an example of inferring crop growth parameters from the test data is presented. Plans for future science and technology testing are also discussed. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  9. Initial closed operation of the CELSS Test Facility Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliss, M.; Blackwell, C.; Zografos, A.; Drews, M.; MacElroy, R.; McKenna, R.; Heyenga, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the NASA Advanced Life Support Flight Program, a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Test Facility Engineering Development Unit has been constructed and is undergoing initial operational testing at NASA Ames Research Center. The Engineering Development Unit (EDU) is a tightly closed, stringently controlled, ground-based testbed which provides a broad range of environmental conditions under which a variety of CELSS higher plant crops can be grown. Although the EDU was developed primarily to provide near-term engineering data and a realistic determination of the subsystem and system requirements necessary for the fabrication of a comparable flight unit, the EDU has also provided a means to evaluate plant crop productivity and physiology under controlled conditions. This paper describes the initial closed operational testing of the EDU, with emphasis on the hardware performance capabilities. Measured performance data during a 28-day closed operation period are compared with the specified functional requirements, and an example of inferring crop growth parameters from the test data is presented. Plans for future science and technology testing are also discussed. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  10. Operation and results of the prototype KM3NeT detection unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, Simone

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT will be a km3-scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The detector will consist of blocks of about one hundred detection units. Each detection unit will host 18 digital optical modules, connected along a 700 m-long vertical structure. Electro-optical cables allow for data transmission and power supply to the optical modules. The optical module comprises 31 photomultiplier tubes of 3'', instruments to monitor environmental variables and electronic boards to communicate onshore and operate the photomultipliers. A prototype detection unit has been deployed in May 2014 at the KM3NeT-It installation site 80 km SE offshore of Capo Passero, Sicily. This prototype allowed to test the deployment procedures, the mechanics and the electronic of the apparatus, the data taking and analysis procedures. A general description of the detector and some results of the prototype are presented. The first detection unit of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be deployed and become operative by the end of 2015.

  11. [Air conditioning units and warm air blankets in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Piechowiak, Karolin; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays almost all operating rooms are equipped with air conditioning (AC units). Their main purpose is climatization, like ventilation, moisturizing, cooling and also the warming of the room in large buildings. In operating rooms they have an additional function in the prevention of infections, especially the avoidance of postoperative wound infections. This is achieved by special filtration systems and by the creation of specific air currents. Since hypothermia is known to be an unambiguous factor for the development of postoperative wound infections, patients are often actively warmed intraoperatively using warm air blankets (forced-air warming units). In such cases it is frequently discussed whether such warm air blankets affect the performance of AC units by changing the air currents or whether, in contrast, have exactly the opposite effect. However, it has been demonstrated in numerous studies that warm air blankets do not have any relevant effect on the functioning of AC units. Also there are no indications that their use increases the rate of postoperative wound infections. By preventing the patient from experiencing hypothermia, the rate of postoperative wound infections can even be decreased thereby. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  12. 40 CFR 60.1545 - Does this subpart directly affect municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? 60.1545 Section 60.1545 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? (a) No, this subpart does not...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1545 - Does this subpart directly affect municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? 60.1545 Section 60.1545 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? (a) No, this subpart does not...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1200 - What are the operating practice requirements for my municipal waste combustion unit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for my municipal waste combustion unit? 60.1200 Section 60.1200 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units for Which Construction is... Good Combustion Practices: Operating Requirements § 60.1200 What are the operating...

  15. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  16. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  17. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  18. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  19. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  20. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 16 Table 16 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic...

  1. 40 CFR 60.1545 - Does this subpart directly affect municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? 60.1545 Section 60.1545 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? (a) No, this subpart does not directly...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1545 - Does this subpart directly affect municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? 60.1545 Section 60.1545 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? (a) No, this subpart does not directly...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1545 - Does this subpart directly affect municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? 60.1545 Section 60.1545 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion... municipal waste combustion unit owners and operators in my State? (a) No, this subpart does not directly...

  4. 77 FR 11173 - Renewal of Facility Operating License No. NPF-30, Union Electric Company, Callaway Plant, Unit 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... COMMISSION Renewal of Facility Operating License No. NPF-30, Union Electric Company, Callaway Plant, Unit 1... Electric Company to operate the Callaway Plant, Unit 1 (Callaway), at 3565 megawatts thermal. The renewed... specified in the current license. Callaway is located in Callaway County, Missouri and its current...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Metal...

  6. Operational Evaluation of VEGGIE Food Production System in the Habitat Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Newsham, Gerard; Morrow, Robert M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) of the VEGGIE Food Production System in the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) was the first operational evaluation of salad crop production technology in a NASA analog test. A systematic evaluation of rooting media and nutrient delivery systems were evaluated for three lettuce cultivars that have shown promise as candidates for a surface based food production system. The VEGGIE nutrient delivery system worked well, was able to be maintained by multiple operators with a minimum of training, and supported excellent lettuce growth for the duration of the test. A Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) evaluation was performed using ProSan(tm) as sanitation agent prior to consumption was approved, and the crew was allowed to consume the lettuce grown using the VEGGIE light cap and gravity based nutrient delivery system at the completion of the 14-day DRAT field test. The DRAT field test validated the crew operations; Growth of all lettuce cultivars was excellent. The operational DRAT field testing in the HDU identified light quality issues related to morphology and pigment development that will need to be addressed through additional testing. Feedback from the crew, ground support personnel, and human factors leads was uniformly positive on the psychological value of having the crop production system in the excursion module. A number of areas have been identified for future work, to minimize the "footprint" of the Food Production system through creative use of unused wall and floor space in the unit.

  7. Operation Evaluation of the VEGGIE Food Production System in the Habitat Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Newsham, Gerard; Morrow, Robert M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) of the VEGGIE Food Production System in the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) was the first operational evaluation of salad crop production technology in a NASA analog test. A systematic evaluation of rooting media and nutrient delivery systems were evaluated for three lettuce cultivars that have shown promise as candidates for a surface based food production system. The VEGGIE nutrient delivery system worked well, was able to be maintained by multiple operators with a minimum of training, and supported excellent lettuce growth for the duration of the test. A Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) evaluation was performed using ProSantm as sanitation agent prior to consumption was approved, and the crew was allowed to consume the lettuce grown using the VEGGIE light cap and gravity based nutrient delivery system at the completion of the 14-day DRAT field test. The DRAT field test validated the crew operations; Growth of all lettuce cultivars was excellent. The operational DRAT field testing in the HDU identified light quality issues related to morphology and pigment development that will need to be addressed through additional testing. Feedback from the crew, ground support personnel, and human factors leads was uniformly positive on the psychological value of having the crop production system in the excursion module. A number of areas have been identified for future work, to minimize the "footprint" of the Food Production system through creative use of unused wall and floor space in the unit.

  8. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-BP-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994) and a recent 200 NPL Agreement Change Control Form (Appendix A). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-BP-5 Operable Unit Interim Remedial Measure (IRM) Proposed Plan be developed for use in preparing an Interim Action Record of Decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-BP-5 Operable Unit activities (e.g., development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the Interim Action ROD will specify the interim action(s) for groundwater contamination at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. The treatability test approach is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for each of the two contaminant plumes associated with the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are {sup 99}Tc and {sup 60}Co for underwater affected by past discharges to the 216-BY Cribs, and {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239/240}Pu, and Cs for groundwater affected by past discharges to the 216-B-5 Reverse Well. The purpose of the pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this testplan is to provide the data basis for preparing an IRM Proposed Plan. To achieve this objective, treatability testing must: Assess the performance of groundwater pumping with respect to the ability to extract a significant amount of the primary contaminant mass present in the two contaminant plumes.

  9. International Space Station United States Orbital Segment Oxygen Generation System On-Orbit Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Howe, John, Jr.; Kulp, Galen W.; VanKeuren, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours, In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to SS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  10. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, R.; Snyder, B.

    1982-02-01

    This NRC Plan, which defines NRC's functional role in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 and outlines NRC's regulatory responsibilities in fulfilling this role, is the first revision to the initial plan issued in July 1980 (NUREG-0698). Since 1980, a number of policy developments have occurred which will have an impact on the course of cleanup operations. This revision reflects these developments in the area of NRC's review and approval process with regard to cleanup operations as well as NRC's interface with the Department of Energy's involvement in the cleanup and waste disposal. This revision is also intended to update the cleanup schedule by presenting the cleanup progress that has taken place and NRC's role in ongoing and future cleanup activities.

  11. 33 CFR 125.53 - Requirements for credentials; certain vessels operating on navigable waters of the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; certain vessels operating on navigable waters of the United States (including the Great Lakes and Western... navigable waters of the United States (including the Great Lakes and Western Rivers). (a) Every person... in the navigable waters of the continental United States other than the Great Lakes and Western...

  12. 33 CFR 125.53 - Requirements for credentials; certain vessels operating on navigable waters of the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; certain vessels operating on navigable waters of the United States (including the Great Lakes and Western... navigable waters of the United States (including the Great Lakes and Western Rivers). (a) Every person... in the navigable waters of the continental United States other than the Great Lakes and Western...

  13. 33 CFR 125.53 - Requirements for credentials; certain vessels operating on navigable waters of the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; certain vessels operating on navigable waters of the United States (including the Great Lakes and Western... navigable waters of the United States (including the Great Lakes and Western Rivers). (a) Every person... in the navigable waters of the continental United States other than the Great Lakes and Western...

  14. 33 CFR 125.53 - Requirements for credentials; certain vessels operating on navigable waters of the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; certain vessels operating on navigable waters of the United States (including the Great Lakes and Western... navigable waters of the United States (including the Great Lakes and Western Rivers). (a) Every person... in the navigable waters of the continental United States other than the Great Lakes and Western...

  15. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in §...

  16. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in §...

  17. 14 CFR 91.703 - Operations of civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... registry outside of the United States. 91.703 Section 91.703 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States. (a) Each person operating a civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States shall— (1) When over the high seas, comply with annex...

  18. 14 CFR 91.703 - Operations of civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... registry outside of the United States. 91.703 Section 91.703 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States. (a) Each person operating a civil aircraft of U.S. registry outside of the United States shall— (1) When over the high seas, comply with annex...

  19. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in §...

  20. Development of in situ product removal strategies in biocatalysis applying scaled-down unit operations.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Søren; Börner, Tim; Ringborg, Rolf H; Rehn, Gustav; Grey, Carl; Nordblad, Mathias; Krühne, Ulrich; Gernaey, Krist V; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Woodley, John M

    2017-03-01

    An experimental platform based on scaled-down unit operations combined in a plug-and-play manner enables easy and highly flexible testing of advanced biocatalytic process options such as in situ product removal (ISPR) process strategies. In such a platform, it is possible to compartmentalize different process steps while operating it as a combined system, giving the possibility to test and characterize the performance of novel process concepts and biocatalysts with minimal influence of inhibitory products. Here the capabilities of performing process development by applying scaled-down unit operations are highlighted through a case study investigating the asymmetric synthesis of 1-methyl-3-phenylpropylamine (MPPA) using ω-transaminase, an enzyme in the sub-family of amino transferases (ATAs). An on-line HPLC system was applied to avoid manual sample handling and to semi-automatically characterize ω-transaminases in a scaled-down packed-bed reactor (PBR) module, showing MPPA as a strong inhibitor. To overcome the inhibition, a two-step liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) ISPR concept was tested using scaled-down unit operations combined in a plug-and-play manner. Through the tested ISPR concept, it was possible to continuously feed the main substrate benzylacetone (BA) and extract the main product MPPA throughout the reaction, thereby overcoming the challenges of low substrate solubility and product inhibition. The tested ISPR concept achieved a product concentration of 26.5 gMPPA  · L(-1) , a purity up to 70% gMPPA  · gtot(-1) and a recovery in the range of 80% mol · mol(-1) of MPPA in 20 h, with the possibility to increase the concentration, purity, and recovery further. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 600-609. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Affecting Reform: Explaining the Kingdom of Cambodia’s Contributions to United Nations Peacekeeping Operations in Comparative Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Forces personnel to United Nations-led peacekeeping operations in Africa , and the Middle East. This thesis draws on systemic, regional, and domestic...Cambodia has recently begun to provide Royal Cambodian Armed Forces personnel to United Nations-led peacekeeping operations in Africa , and the...peacekeeping operations in Africa , and the Middle East. This thesis draws on systemic, regional, and domestic level theories for why states

  2. Discrete phase model representation of particulate matter (PM) for simulating PM separation by hydrodynamic unit operations.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Joshua A; Sansalone, John J

    2009-11-01

    Modeling the separation of dilute particulate matter (PM) has been a topic of interest since the introduction of unit operations for clarification of rainfall-runoff. One consistent yet controversial issue is the representation of PM and PM separation mechanisms for treatment. While Newton's Law and surface overflow rate were utilized, many historical models represented PM as a lumped gravimetric index largely out of economy and lack of particle analysis methods. As a result such models did not provide information about particle fate in or through a unit operation. In this study, PM discrete phase modeling (DPM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are applied to model PM fate as a function of particle size and flow rate in two common types of hydrodynamic separator (HS) units. The study examines the discretization requirements (as a discretization number, DN) and errors for particle size distributions (PSDs) that range from the common heterodisperse to a monodisperse PSD. PSDs are categorized based on granulometric indices. Results focus on ensuring modeling accuracy while examining the role of size dispersivity and overall PM fineness on DN requirements. The fate of common heterodisperse PSDs is accurately predicted for a DN of 16, whereas a single particle size index, commonly the d(50m), is limited to monodisperse PSDs in order to achieve similar accuracy.

  3. Microbiological and aflatoxin evaluation of Brazil nut pods and the effects of unit processing operations.

    PubMed

    Arrus, Katia; Blank, Greg; Clear, Randall; Holley, Richard A; Abramson, David

    2005-05-01

    Harvesting of Brazil nuts not only helps to preserve the Amazon rainforest but also provides income to individuals who would otherwise have little means of making a livelihood. Recently, the European Community has tightened the quality requirements for Brazil nuts, particularly with regard to aflatoxin levels and microbiological contamination. The objectives of this research were to gain a better understanding of the origin of aflatoxins on Brazil nuts and to microbiologically evaluate some of the operations involved in processing. In this regard, five Brazil nut pods were aseptically picked from trees located in each of three concessions of the Peruvian Amazon rainforest (Madre de Dios province). The exteriors of the pods and the nuts were examined for yeast and molds, including Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, and for bacteria, including Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Brazil nuts obtained from various commercial process operations located in Peru were similarly evaluated. Exteriors of all Brazil nut pods did not contain A. parasiticus, and only pods from one concession yielded A. flavus isolates. All isolates tested were aflatoxigenic (630 to 915 ppb total aflatoxin). Coliforms, E. coli, and salmonellae were not recovered from any of the pods. Whole, in-shell nuts obtained after opening the pods yielded no A. flavus or A. parasiticus. Aflatoxins were not detected (detection limit 1.75 ppb) in any of the nuts. Whole, in-shell and shelled nuts from various process operations were all positive for A. flavus but negative for E. coli and salmonellae. Soaking of whole, in-shell nuts before cracking or shelling increased coliform numbers, whereas levels of A. flavus decreased. In order to gain a better understanding of the sanitary performance of the unit process operations, additional evaluations should be conducted on product lots processed on different days. Also, the microbiology of product processed from common lots should be followed through the

  4. Array Flattening Trenasformations via Superoperators on Difference, Unit and Shift Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiralp, Emre; Demiralp, Metin

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach for array flattening. We first establish a relationship between the general array element and a specifically chosen reference element by using unit, shift, forward and backward difference operators. Then, we define an array function by multiplying the forward and backward difference operators with a single scalar variable t. This variable is a perturbating agent since the produced array is equivalent to the original array when t is 1. We define the discrete counterparts of the Taylor series and Taylor formula with remainder in the form of expansion in t powers. We also define array flatness as this array function's flatness with respect to t. Then the use of an affine transformation via a superoperator (first degree polynomial in the array function on the function operator and the variable operator) to create a new array function makes the flattening possible. This is done by appropriately choosing the super operator's coefficient functions. The Taylor polynomial's reciprocal is taken as the first degree term coefficient. The flattened array is obtained by setting t=1 after the flattening in t becomes complete.

  5. Unit operations used to treat process and/or waste streams at nuclear power plants. [R

    SciTech Connect

    Godbee, H.W.; Kibbey, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates are given of the annual amounts of each generic type of LLW (i.e., Government and commerical (fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle)) that is generated at LWR plants. Many different chemical engineering unit operations used to treat process and/or waste streams at LWR plants include adsorption, evaporation, calcination, centrifugation, compaction, crystallization, drying, filtration, incineration, reverse osmosis, and solidification of waste residues. The treatment of these various streams and the secondary wet solid wastes thus generated is described. The various treatment options for concentrates or solid wet wastes, and for dry wastes are discussed. Among the dry waste treatment methods are compaction, baling, and incineration, as well as chopping, cutting and shredding. Organic materials (liquids (e.g., oils or solvents) and/or solids), could be incinerated in most cases. The filter sludges, spent resins, and concentrated liquids (e.g., evaporator concentrates) are usually solidified in cement, or urea-formaldehyde or unsaturated polyester resins prior to burial. Incinerator ashes can also be incorporated in these binding agents. Asphalt has not yet been used. This paper presents a brief survey of operational experience at LWRs with various unit operations, including a short discussion of problems and some observations on recent trends.

  6. The Applied Meteorology Unit: Nineteen Years Successfully Transitioning Research into Operations for America's Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, John T.; Bauman, William H.; Merceret, Francis J.; Roeder, William P.; Brody, Frank C.; Hagemeyer, Bartlett C.

    2010-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) provides technology transition and technique development to improve operational weather support to the Space Shuttle and the entire American space program. The AMU is funded and managed by NASA and operated by a contractor that provides five meteorologists with a diverse mix of advanced degrees, operational experience, and associated skills including data processing, statistics, and the development of graphical user interfaces. The AMU's primary customers are the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron at Patrick Air Force Base, the National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group at NASA Johnson Space Center, and the National Weather Service Melbourne FL Forecast Office. The AMU has transitioned research into operations for nineteen years and worked on a wide range of topics, including new forecasting techniques for lightning probability, synoptic peak winds,.convective winds, and summer severe weather; satellite tools to predict anvil cloud trajectories and evaluate camera line of sight for Space Shuttle launch; optimized radar scan strategies; evaluated and implemented local numerical models; evaluated weather sensors; and many more. The AMU has completed 113 projects with 5 more scheduled to be completed by the end of 2010. During this rich history, the AMU and its customers have learned many lessons on how to effectively transition research into operations. Some of these lessons learned include collocating with the operational customer and periodically visiting geographically separated customers, operator submitted projects, consensus tasking process, use of operator primary advocates for each project, customer AMU liaisons with experience in both operations and research, flexibility in adapting the project plan based on lessons learned during the project, and incorporating training and other transition assistance into the project plans. Operator involvement has been critical to the AMU's remarkable success and many awards

  7. The Applied Meteorology Unit: Nineteen Years Successfully Transitioning Research into Operations for America's Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, John T.; Bauman, William H.; Merceret, Francis J.; Roeder, William P.; Brody, Frank C.; Hagemeyer, Bartlett C.

    2010-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) provides technology transition and technique development to improve operational weather support to the Space Shuttle and the entire American space program. The AMU is funded and managed by NASA and operated by a contractor that provides five meteorologists with a diverse mix of advanced degrees, operational experience, and associated skills including data processing, statistics, and the development of graphical user interfaces. The AMU's primary customers are the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron at Patrick Air Force Base, the National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group at NASA Johnson Space Center, and the National Weather Service Melbourne FL Forecast Office. The AMU has transitioned research into operations for nineteen years and worked on a wide range of topics, including new forecasting techniques for lightning probability, synoptic peak winds,.convective winds, and summer severe weather; satellite tools to predict anvil cloud trajectories and evaluate camera line of sight for Space Shuttle launch; optimized radar scan strategies; evaluated and implemented local numerical models; evaluated weather sensors; and many more. The AMU has completed 113 projects with 5 more scheduled to be completed by the end of 2010. During this rich history, the AMU and its customers have learned many lessons on how to effectively transition research into operations. Some of these lessons learned include collocating with the operational customer and periodically visiting geographically separated customers, operator submitted projects, consensus tasking process, use of operator primary advocates for each project, customer AMU liaisons with experience in both operations and research, flexibility in adapting the project plan based on lessons learned during the project, and incorporating training and other transition assistance into the project plans. Operator involvement has been critical to the AMU's remarkable success and many awards

  8. Surface soil sampling plan for the 200-UP-2 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.M.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Description of Work (DOW) is to provide detailed guidance for implementation of the field activities outlined in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. This work plan provides the basis for conducting a limited field investigation (LFI) in the unit, with the DOW outlining the protocols and procedures to be utilized in performing the surface soil sampling. As outlined in the Work Plan, the data to be collected in the LFI will be utilized to determine the need for, and possible selection of, an Interim Remedial Measure (IRM). In order to do that, detailed information on the current nature and extent of contamination in surface soils at selected management units is required for assessment in conjunction with the existing areas of highest concentration for each unit. Field screening efforts using surface radiation surveys will allow for surface soil samples to be collected from those points that represent the highest contaminant concentrations. Analysis of these samples will provide data on the types and concentrations of the contaminants of concern.

  9. 12 CFR 7.4003 - Establishment and operation of a remote service unit by a national bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment and operation of a remote service unit by a national bank. 7.4003 Section 7.4003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Preemption § 7.4003 Establishment and operation of...

  10. Application of total care time and payment per unit time model for physician reimbursement for common general surgery operations.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Holubar, Stefan D; Figy, Sean; Chen, Lilian; Montagne, Shirley A; Rosen, Joseph M; Desimone, Joseph P

    2012-06-01

    The relative value unit system relies on subjective measures of physician input in the care of patients. A payment per unit time model incorporates surgeon reimbursement to the total care time spent in the operating room, postoperative in-house, and clinic time to define payment per unit time. We aimed to compare common general surgery operations by using the total care time and payment per unit time method in order to demonstrate a more objective measurement for physician reimbursement. Average total physician payment per case was obtained for 5 outpatient operations and 4 inpatient operations in general surgery. Total care time was defined as the sum of operative time, 30 minutes per hospital day, and 30 minutes per office visit for each operation. Payment per unit time was calculated by dividing the physician reimbursement per case by the total care time. Total care time, physician payment per case, and payment per unit time for each type of operation demonstrated that an average payment per time spent for inpatient operations was $455.73 and slightly more at $467.51 for outpatient operations. Partial colectomy with primary anastomosis had the longest total care time (8.98 hours) and the least payment per unit time ($188.52). Laparoscopic gastric bypass had the highest payment per time ($707.30). The total care time and payment per unit time method can be used as an adjunct to compare reimbursement among different operations on an institutional level as well as on a national level. Although many operations have similar payment trends based on time spent by the surgeon, payment differences using this methodology are seen and may be in need of further review. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrated Operational Taxonomic Units (IOTUs) in Echolocating Bats: A Bridge between Molecular and Traditional Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Galimberti, Andrea; Spada, Martina; Russo, Danilo; Mucedda, Mauro; Agnelli, Paolo; Crottini, Angelica; Ferri, Emanuele; Martinoli, Adriano; Casiraghi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Background Nowadays, molecular techniques are widespread tools for the identification of biological entities. However, until very few years ago, their application to taxonomy provoked intense debates between traditional and molecular taxonomists. To prevent every kind of disagreement, it is essential to standardize taxonomic definitions. Along these lines, we introduced the concept of Integrated Operational Taxonomic Unit (IOTU). IOTUs come from the concept of Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) and paralleled the Molecular Operational Taxonomic Unit (MOTU). The latter is largely used as a standard in many molecular-based works (even if not always explicitly formalized). However, while MOTUs are assigned solely on molecular variation criteria, IOTUs are identified from patterns of molecular variation that are supported by at least one more taxonomic characteristic. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the use of IOTUs on the widest DNA barcoding dataset of Italian echolocating bats species ever assembled (i.e. 31 species, 209 samples). We identified 31 molecular entities, 26 of which corresponded to the morphologically assigned species, two MOTUs and three IOTUs. Interestingly, we found three IOTUs in Myotis nattereri, one of which is a newly described lineage found only in central and southern Italy. In addition, we found a level of molecular variability within four vespertilionid species deserving further analyses. According to our scheme two of them (i.e. M. bechsteinii and Plecotus auritus) should be ranked as unconfirmed candidate species (UCS). Conclusions/Significance From a systematic point of view, IOTUs are more informative than the general concept of OTUs and the more recent MOTUs. According to information content, IOTUs are closer to species, although it is important to underline that IOTUs are not species. Overall, the use of a more precise panel of taxonomic entities increases the clarity in the systematic field and has the potential to fill the gaps

  12. Cooling unit for the AmpaCity project - One year successful operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Friedhelm; Kutz, Thomas; Stemmle, Mark; Kugel, Torsten

    2016-12-01

    High temperature super conductors (HTS) can efficiently be cooled with liquid nitrogen down to a temperature of 64 K (-209 °C). Lower temperatures are not practical, because at 63 K (-210 °C) nitrogen becomes solid. To achieve this temperature level the coolant has to be vaporized below atmospheric pressure. Messer has developed a cooling unit with an adequate vacuum subcooler, a liquid nitrogen circulation system, and a storage vessel for cooling an HTS-power cable. Liquid nitrogen is circulated through the superconducting cable to take out the heat, and afterward it is pumped through the subcooler to be recooled. In the circulation system liquid nitrogen is used as a dielectric fluid and as a heat transfer medium. It stays always liquid (subcooled) and does not vaporize. On the secondary side of the subcooler liquid nitrogen from the storage vessel is used as refrigerant. It is vaporized under a pressure of 150 mbar to achieve the desired low temperatures. The cooling unit was delivered in 2013 for the German AmpaCity project of RWE Deutschland AG, Nexans and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Within this project RWE and Nexans installed the worldwide longest superconducting power cable in the city of Essen, Germany. The cooling unit cools a 10 kV concentric HTS cable (40 MV A) with a length of 1000 m. The cable is in operation since March 10th, 2014. After more than one year of practical operation many important figures from cable and cooling unit are available. These figures are discussed and a total energy balance is shown to compare liquid nitrogen cooling with alternative mechanical cooling systems.

  13. Quality and productivity drive innovation and improvement at United Technologies Aerospace Operations, Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamar, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    Quality and innovation are the hallmarks of the national space program. In programs that preceded the Shuttle Program the emphasis was on meeting the risks and technical challenges of space with safety, quality, reliability, and success. At United Technologies Aerospace Operations, Inc. (UTAO), the battle has developed along four primary fronts. These fronts include programs to motivate and reward people, development and construction of optimized processes and facilities, implementation of specifically tailored management systems, and the application of appropriate measurement and control systems. Each of these initiatives is described. However, to put this quality and productivity program in perspective, UTAO and its role in the Shuttle Program are described first.

  14. Operational performance of MOSFIRE with its cryogenic configurable slitmask unit at the W. M. Keck Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassis, Marc; McLean, Ian S.; Steidel, Charles C.; Matthews, Keith; Lyke, James E.; Rizzi, Luca; Chan, Dwight; Weiss, Jason; Adkins, Sean; Spanoudakis, Peter; Schwab, Philippe; Onillon, Emmanuel; Lisowski, Leszek; Theurillat, Patrick; Chételat, Olivier; Meier, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The Multi-Object Spectrograph for Infrared Exploration (MOSFIRE) achieved first light on the W. M. Keck Observatory's Keck I telescope on 4 April 2012 and quickly became the most popular Keck I instrument. One of the primary reasons for the instrument's popularity is that it uses a configurable slitmask unit developed by the Centre Suisse d'Electronique et Microtechnique (CSEM SA) to isolate the light from up to 46 objects simultaneously. In collaboration with the instrument development team and CSEM engineers, the Keck observatory staff present how MOSFIRE is successfully used, and we identify what contributed to routine and trouble free nighttime operations.

  15. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

  16. Investigation on Main Radiation Source at Operation Floor of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Hideo; Kondo, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Seishiro; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Iwanaga, Kohei

    2017-09-01

    Pulse height distributions were measured using a LaBr3 detector set in a 1 cm lead collimator to investigate main radiation source at the operation floor of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 4. It was confirmed that main radiation source above the reactor well was Co-60 from the activated steam dryer in the DS pool (Dryer-Separator pool) and that at the standby area was Cs-134 and Cs-137 from contaminated buildings and debris at the lower floor. Full energy peak count rate of Co-60 was reduced about 1/3 by 12mm lead sheet placed on the floor of the fuel handling machine.

  17. An Autopilot Design for the United States Marine Corps’ Airborne Remotely Operated Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    remotely piloted vehicle, RPV , optimal control, Riccati, control systems 𔄃 ABSTRACT (Contonve On ’eweame of hft#Ua#V adI sdenfta oy bW )0k nMWOber An...rapidly. Even the best of control designers is not apt to hit a bullseye on his first shot. Control system design theory does not guarantee success on...endeavor is an airborne remotely piloted vehicle ( RPV ) called AROD. The acronym stands for Airborne Remotely Operated Device. The United States

  18. MTG process in a fluidized bed with catalyst circulation: Operation and simulation of an experimental unit

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J.M.; Gayubo, A.G.; Aguayo, A.T.; Olazar, M.; Bilbao, J.

    1998-11-01

    The simulation of the MTG process has been studied in a fluidized bed with circulation of the catalyst (prepared based on a HZSM-5 zeolite). The simulation has been carried out by taking into account the activity distribution of the catalyst particles in the bed and by using experimentally determined kinetic models for the reaction at zero time on stream and for the catalyst deactivation. The results of the simulation have been proven in an experimental laboratory unit by operating in the range between 380 and 420 C, with different values of space time and of average residence time of the catalyst.

  19. Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE`s preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public`s role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy.

  20. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

  1. 40 CFR 62.14535 - When must I comply with this subpart if I plan to continue operation of my CISWI unit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I plan to continue operation of my CISWI unit? 62.14535 Section 62.14535 Protection of Environment... operation of my CISWI unit? If you plan to continue operation of your CISWI unit, then you must follow the... Waste Incineration Units That Commenced Construction On or Before November 30, 1999 Compliance Schedule...

  2. Factors Prolonging Length of Stay in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Following the Arterial Switch Operation

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Derek S.; Dent, Catherine L.; Manning, Peter B.; Nelson, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The arterial switch operation has become the preferred procedure for surgical management of transposition of the great arteries. We conducted a retrospective evaluation of our experience in sixty-one infants with transposition from January, 1997 to July, 2003 in order to determine the factors that are associated with a prolonged postoperative course following the arterial switch operation. Factors independently associated with a prolonged postoperative stay in the cardiac intensive care unit included prematurity, difficulty feeding, capillary leak, need for preoperative inotropic support, and postoperative infectious complications. Future research designed to minimize the impact of capillary leak and postoperative infectious complications is warranted. In addition, based on these results, our practice has evolved to initiate enteral feedings in the preoperative period if feasible and to resume enteral feedings as soon as possible following surgery. PMID:18093360

  3. Logistics measurement and performance for United States-Mexican operations under NAFTA

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, S.E.; Smith, S.R.

    1995-12-01

    An empirical study utilizing a survey methodology was undertaken to explore the issues surrounding logistics performance under the recently enacted North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The study surveyed 524 senior level managers directly responsible for their strategic business units` operations involving Mexican production sharing. The study focused on what role Mexican production facilities take in the production process, relative technology level, planning activities, final destination of products, and what level of logistics performance was required to successfully operate. Some of the findings suggest a need to reevaluate current strategies to incorporate logistics support systems. Many benefits of true integration may have been overlooked since logistics was given a secondary position when strategies were formulated. Excessive tranportation and distribution costs may be lowered if logistics is given a higher emphasis in corporate decision making.

  4. Survey of glaucoma surgical preferences and post-operative care in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Una, Ignacio; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto; King, Anthony J

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of glaucoma surgery and the post-operative follow-up regimes undertaken among glaucoma specialists in the United Kingdom. National survey. Seventy-five glaucoma specialists (consultants and fellows). An eight-question survey was emailed to all glaucoma subspecialists members of the United Kingdom and Eire Glaucoma Society. Surgery undertaken, post-operative management, awareness of intervention tariff and handling of the follow-up burden generated through surgery. Almost all the participants (74/75: 99%) routinely performed trabeculectomy, 54 responders (72%) undertook tube surgery and Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS) was more frequently undertaken (33.0%) than non-penetrating surgery (23%). In general, for patients with advanced glaucoma requiring a low target intraocular pressure (IOP), the most frequent primary intervention was trabeculectomy (99%), followed by tubes (64%). Similarly, in patients with less advanced glaucoma requiring moderate target IOP, participants preferred trabeculectomy (99%), followed by MIGS (60%). By the first 6 months after the procedure, trabeculectomy and Baerveldt tube implant required a larger number of postoperative visits (9 and 7, respectively), than iStent® and non-penetrating deep sclerectomy (3 and 5, respectively). The majority of participants were not aware of the costs of their interventions. A wide variety of glaucoma surgery techniques are undertaken. Post-operative follow-up regimes are variable between techniques and for surgeons using the same technique. Trabeculectomy requires more follow-up than any other intervention. For patients requiring low IOP, trabeculectomy is the operation of choice for most surgeons. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  5. Particle emissions from district heating units operating on three commonly used biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicka, A.; Lillieblad, L.; Pagels, J.; Strand, M.; Gudmundsson, A.; Gharibi, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Sanati, M.; Bohgard, M.

    The aim of this study was to characterise particle emissions from district heating units operating on three commonly used biofuels: forest residues, pellets and sawdust. Boilers used in the three district heating units were of moving grate type, with the maximum thermal output between 1 and 1.5 MW. The measurements were done after multicyclones, the only particle removal devices installed, therefore the direct emissions to ambient air were characterised. Number and mass size distributions were determined. Elemental composition of the particles was determined by particle induced X-ray emissions analysis (PIXE) and thermal-optical analysis. Particles' morphology was assessed on the basis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total number concentration of emitted particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 5 μm (PM5) at medium operation load ranged from 6.3 to 7.7×10 7 particles/cm n3, with the slightly higher values from combustion of forest residues. PM5 mass concentration at medium load from low pressure impactor measurements ranged between 51 and 120 mg/m n3, with the highest values from unit operating on forest residues. Both PM5 mass and total number concentrations were dominated by fine mode contributions i.e. particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1 μm (PM1). Elements determined by PIXE ( Z>12) contributed to 21-34% of PM1 mass, of which K, S, Cl and Ca contributed to 18-33% of PM1 mass, and Zn, Mn, Fe, Cr, Pb and Cd to 1-3%. Emitted concentrations of heavy metals depended on type of the fuel and operating load. Particulate organic (OC) and elemental (EC) carbon contribution to PM1 ranged from 1-19% and 0-56%, respectively. Particulate OC concentrations strongly depended on the operation load regardless the type of the fuel, while EC concentrations seemed to depend both on load and the type of the fuel. Considering the potential public health implications of the obtained results, further research is needed to carefully assess the impact

  6. Overview of the Habitat Demonstration Unit Power System Integration and Operation at Desert RATS 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; George, Pat; Gambrell, Ronnie; Chapman, Chris

    2013-01-01

    A habitat demonstration unit (HDU) was constructed at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and designed by a multicenter NASA team led out of NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The HDU was subsequently utilized at the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) program held at the Black Point Lava Flow in Arizona. This report describes the power system design, installation and operation for the HDU. The requirements for the power system were to provide 120 VAC, 28 VDC, and 120 VDC power to the various loads within the HDU. It also needed to be capable of providing power control and real-time operational data on the load's power consumption. The power system had to be capable of operating off of a 3 phase 480 VAC generator as well as 2 solar photovoltaic (PV) power systems. The system operated well during the 2 week Desert RATS campaign and met all of the main goals of the system. The power system is being further developed to meet the future needs of the HDU and options for this further development are discussed.

  7. Steering quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty under unital and nonunital noises via filtering operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ai-Jun; Shi, Jia-Dong; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamic features of the entropic uncertainty for two incompatible measurements under local unital and nonunital channels. Herein, we choose Pauli operators σ _x and σ _z as a pair of observables of interest measuring on particle A, and the uncertainty can be predicted when particle A is entangled with quantum memory B. We explore the dynamics of the uncertainty for the measurement under local unitary (phase-damping) and nonunitary (amplitude-damping) channels, respectively. Remarkably, we derive the entropic uncertainty relation under three different kinds of measurements of Pauli-observable pair under various realistic noisy environments; it has been found that the entropic uncertainty has the same tendency of its evolution during the AD and PD channel when we choose σ _x and σ _y measurement. Besides, we find out that the entropic uncertainty will have an optimal value if one chooses σ _x and σ _z as the measurement incompatibility, comparing with others. Furthermore, in order to reduce the entropic uncertainty in noisy environment, we propose an effective strategy to steer the amount by means of implementing a filtering operation on the particle under the two types of channels, respectively. It turns out that this operation can greatly reduce the entropic uncertainty by modulation of the operation strength. Thus, our investigations might offer an insight into the dynamics and steering of the entropic uncertainty in an open system.

  8. Solving optimum operation of single pump unit problem with ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Liu, C.

    2012-11-01

    For pumping stations, the effective scheduling of daily pump operations from solutions to the optimum design operation problem is one of the greatest potential areas for energy cost-savings, there are some difficulties in solving this problem with traditional optimization methods due to the multimodality of the solution region. In this case, an ACO model for optimum operation of pumping unit is proposed and the solution method by ants searching is presented by rationally setting the object function and constrained conditions. A weighted directed graph was constructed and feasible solutions may be found by iteratively searching of artificial ants, and then the optimal solution can be obtained by applying the rule of state transition and the pheromone updating. An example calculation was conducted and the minimum cost was found as 4.9979. The result of ant colony algorithm was compared with the result from dynamic programming or evolutionary solving method in commercial software under the same discrete condition. The result of ACO is better and the computing time is shorter which indicates that ACO algorithm can provide a high application value to the field of optimal operation of pumping stations and related fields.

  9. Operational Experience with Long Duration Wildfire Mapping: UAS Missions Over the Western United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip; Cobleigh, Brent; Buoni, Greg; Howell, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, United States Forest Service, and National Interagency Fire Center have developed a partnership to develop and demonstrate technology to improve airborne wildfire imaging and data dissemination. In the summer of 2007, a multi-spectral infrared scanner was integrated into NASA's Ikhana Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) (a General Atomics Predator-B) and launched on four long duration wildfire mapping demonstration missions covering eight western states. Extensive safety analysis, contingency planning, and mission coordination were key to securing an FAA certificate of authorization (COA) to operate in the national airspace. Infrared images were autonomously geo-rectified, transmitted to the ground station by satellite communications, and networked to fire incident commanders within 15 minutes of acquisition. Close coordination with air traffic control ensured a safe operation, and allowed real-time redirection around inclement weather and other minor changes to the flight plan. All objectives of the mission demonstrations were achieved. In late October, wind-driven wildfires erupted in five southern California counties. State and national emergency operations agencies requested Ikhana to help assess and manage the wildfires. Four additional missions were launched over a 5-day period, with near realtime images delivered to multiple emergency operations centers and fire incident commands managing 10 fires.

  10. Light weight portable operator control unit using an Android-enabled mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Nicholas

    2011-05-01

    There have been large gains in the field of robotics, both in hardware sophistication and technical capabilities. However, as more capable robots have been developed and introduced to battlefield environments, the problem of interfacing with human controllers has proven to be challenging. Particularly in the field of military applications, controller requirements can be stringent and can range from size and power consumption, to durability and cost. Traditional operator control units (OCUs) tend to resemble laptop personal computers (PCs), as these devices are mobile and have ample computing power. However, laptop PCs are bulky and have greater power requirements. To approach this problem, a light weight, inexpensive controller was created based on a mobile phone running the Android operating system. It was designed to control an iRobot Packbot through the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in-house Agile Computing Infrastructure (ACI). The hardware capabilities of the mobile phone, such as Wi- Fi communications, touch screen interface, and the flexibility of the Android operating system, made it a compelling platform. The Android based OCU offers a more portable package and can be easily carried by a soldier along with normal gear requirements. In addition, the one hand operation of the Android OCU allows for the Soldier to keep an unoccupied hand for greater flexibility. To validate the Android OCU as a capable controller, experimental data was collected evaluating use of the controller and a traditional, tablet PC based OCU. Initial analysis suggests that the Android OCU performed positively in qualitative data collected from participants.

  11. The Provence 250 MWe unit: The largest CFB boiler ready for operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jaud, P.; Jacquet, L.; Piedfer, O.; Jestin, L.

    1995-12-31

    Today, the largest Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) project approaching operation is the 250 MWe Provence CFB boiler, located in the south of France. At such a size, the CFB technique has now reached a capacity corresponding to thermal power plants operated by utilities. This new unit, with a pant leg design, is also a very important step towards larger size i.e. 400 MWe and greater. The purpose of the Provence project was to replace the existing pulverized coal boiler unit 4, commissioned in 1967, of the Provence/Gardanne power plant, with a new CFB boiler while reusing most of the existing equipment. The 250 MWe boiler is of the superheat-reheat type, 1,050 F--1,050 F, firing local high-sulfur subbituminous coal with the possibility of co-firing high viscosity fuel oil (with a high sulfur content) up to a 50%--50% energy ratio. The first firing of the boiler is due in May 1995. This paper describes the progress in the construction of the plant and provides technical details of the new boiler and auxiliaries. Also presented is the associated R and D program designed to give a thorough evaluation of this boiler with a view to the design of larger CFBs in the future.

  12. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  13. 76 FR 79678 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling parties: Pick-Your-Part Auto Wrecking; Hayward Associates, LLC; and PNM Properties, LLC. The settlement requires the settling parties to pay a total of $102,161 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling parties pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  14. 77 FR 123 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling party: Waste Management Recycling & Disposal Services of California, Inc., dba Bradley Landfill & Recycling Center. The settlement requires the settling party to pay a total of $185,734 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling party pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  15. 76 FR 77528 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California, with the following settling parties: Pick-Your-Part Auto Wrecking; Hayward Associates, LLC; and PNM Properties, LLC. The settlement requires the settling parties to pay a total of $102,161 to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund. The settlement also includes a covenant not to sue the settling parties pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following the date of publication of this notice, the Agency will receive written comments relating to the settlement. The Agency will consider all comments received and may modify or withdraw its consent to the settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement is inappropriate, improper, or inadequate. The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the City of Los Angeles Central Library, Science and Technology Department, 630 West 5th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90071 and at the EPA Region 9 Superfund Records Center, Mail Stop SFD-7C, 95 Hawthorne Street, Room 403, San Francisco, CA 94105.

  16. Explicit isospectral flows associated to the AKNS operator on the unit interval. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amour, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Explicit flows associated to any tangent vector fields on any isospectral manifold for the AKNS operator acting in L2 × L2 on the unit interval are written down. The manifolds are of infinite dimension (and infinite codimension). The flows are called isospectral and also are Hamiltonian flows. It is proven that they may be explicitly expressed in terms of regularized determinants of infinite matrix-valued functions with entries depending only on the spectral data at the starting point of the flow. The tangent vector fields are decomposed as ∑ξkTk where ξ ∈ ℓ2 and the Tk ∈ L2 × L2 form a particular basis of the tangent vector spaces of the infinite dimensional manifold. The paper here is a continuation of Amour ["Explicit isospectral flows for the AKNS operator on the unit interval," Inverse Probl. 25, 095008 (2009)], 10.1088/0266-5611/25/9/095008 where, except for a finite number, all the components of the sequence ξ are zero in order to obtain an explicit expression for the isospectral flows. The regularized determinants induce counter-terms allowing for the consideration of finite quantities when the sequences ξ run all over ℓ2.

  17. Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.; Dresel, P EVAN.; Murray, Christopher J.

    2006-08-07

    A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final. The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers). COC with similar properties were grouped for the screening evaluation. The screening evaluation was conducted in two primary steps. The initial screening step evaluated potential remediation methods based on whether they can be effectively applied within the environmental setting of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit for the specified contaminants. In the second step, potential remediation methods were screened using scoping calculations to estimate the scale of infrastructure, overall quantities of reagents, and conceptual approach for applying the method for each defined grouping of COC. Based on these estimates, each method was screened with respect to effectiveness, implementability, and relative cost categories of the CERCLA feasibility study screening process defined in EPA guidance.

  18. Report on geological surveys in the 300-FF-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Sandness, G.A.

    1991-03-01

    This report describes a set of geophysical surveys performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at selected locations within the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit at Hanford. Field work and preliminary data processing activities were initiated in September 1989. These actions were terminated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company before completion in December 1989. Work was reinitiated in October 1990, to complete the processing of the data that had already been collected and to report the results. Because the field work was only partially completed, the task objectives, as presented in the Statement of Work, could not be fully met. This report is, therefore, a progress report covering the work performed through December 11, 1989. This task involved (1) ground-penetrating radar surveys of the 618-4 and 618-5 Burial Grounds, and (2) ground-penetrating radar and electromagnetic induction surveys along the assumed routes of the abandoned process sewers and radioactive liquid waste sewers in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The surveys in the burial grounds were intended to identify burial trenches and pits, to determine the depth of fill, and to locate waste materials, including any that might be outside the perimeter fences. The surveys along the sewer routes were intended, first, to confirm the locations of the sewers as shown on existing maps or to otherwise accurately determine their locations, and second, to attempt to identify locations of possible leaks. 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Current Conditions Risk Assessment for the 300-FF-5 Groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Terri B.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Napier, Bruce A.; Peterson, Robert E.; Becker, James M.

    2007-11-01

    This report updates a baseline risk assessment for the 300 Area prepared in 1994. The update includes consideration of changes in contaminants of interest and in the environment that have occurred during the period of interim remedial action, i.e., 1996 to the present, as well as the sub-regions, for which no initial risk assessments have been conducted. In 1996, a record of decision (ROD) stipulated interim remedial action for groundwater affected by releases from 300 Area sources, as follows: (a) continued monitoring of groundwater that is contaminated above health-based levels to ensure that concentrations continue to decrease, and (b) institutional controls to ensure that groundwater use is restricted to prevent unacceptable exposure to groundwater contamination. In 2000, the groundwater beneath the two outlying sub-regions was added to the operable unit. In 2001, the first 5-year review of the ROD found that the interim remedy and remedial action objectives were still appropriate, although the review called for additional characterization activities. This report includes a current conditions baseline ecological and human health risk assessment using maximum concentrations in the environmental media of the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and downstream conditions at the City of Richland, Washington. The scope for this assessment includes only current measured environmental concentrations and current use scenarios. Future environmental concentrations and future land uses are not considered in this assessment.

  20. Combined Operation of AC and DC Distribution System with Distributed Generation Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozian, Reza; Abedi, Mehrdad; Gharehpetian, Gevorg

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a DC distribution system which has been supplied by external AC systems as well as local DG units in order to demonstrate an overall solution to power quality issue. In this paper, the proposed operation method is demonstrated by simulation of power transfer between external AC systems, DG units, AC and DC loads. The power flow control in DC distribution system has been achieved by network converters and DG converters. Also, the mathematical model of the network, DG and load converters are obtained by using the average technique, which allows converter systems accurately simulated and control strategies for this converters is achieved. A suitable control strategy for network converters has been proposed that involves DC voltage droop regulator and novel instantaneous power regulation scheme. Also, a novel control technique has been proposed for DG converters. In this paper, a novel control system based on stationary and synchronously rotating reference frame has been proposed for load converters for supplying AC loads connected to the DC bus by balanced voltages. The several case studies have been studied based on proposed methods. The simulation results show that DC distribution systems including DG units can improve the power quality at the point of common coupling (PCC) in the power distribution system or industrial power system.

  1. Surprisingly extensive mixed phylogenetic and ecological signals among bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units

    PubMed Central

    Koeppel, Alexander F.; Wu, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The lack of a consensus bacterial species concept greatly hampers our ability to understand and organize bacterial diversity. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs), which are clustered on the basis of DNA sequence identity alone, are the most commonly used microbial diversity unit. Although it is understood that OTUs can be phylogenetically incoherent, the degree and the extent of the phylogenetic inconsistency have not been explicitly studied. Here, we tested the phylogenetic signal of OTUs in a broad range of bacterial genera from various phyla. Strikingly, we found that very few OTUs were monophyletic, and many showed evidence of multiple independent origins. Using previously established bacterial habitats as benchmarks, we showed that OTUs frequently spanned multiple ecological habitats. We demonstrated that ecological heterogeneity within OTUs is caused by their phylogenetic inconsistency, and not merely due to ‘lumping’ of taxa resulting from using relaxed identity cut-offs. We argue that ecotypes, as described by the Stable Ecotype Model, are phylogenetically and ecologically more consistent than OTUs and therefore could serve as an alternative unit for bacterial diversity studies. In addition, we introduce QuickES, a new wrapper program for the Ecotype Simulation algorithm, which is capable of demarcating ecotypes in data sets with tens of thousands of sequences. PMID:23571758

  2. Embedding damage detection algorithms in a wireless sensing unit for operational power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Jerome Peter; Sundararajan, Arvind; Law, Kincho H.; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Carryer, Ed

    2004-08-01

    A low-cost wireless sensing unit is designed and fabricated for deployment as the building block of wireless structural health monitoring systems. Finite operational lives of portable power supplies, such as batteries, necessitate optimization of the wireless sensing unit design to attain overall energy efficiency. This is in conflict with the need for wireless radios that have far-reaching communication ranges that require significant amounts of power. As a result, a penalty is incurred by transmitting raw time-history records using scarce system resources such as battery power and bandwidth. Alternatively, a computational core that can accommodate local processing of data is designed and implemented in the wireless sensing unit. The role of the computational core is to perform interrogation tasks of collected raw time-history data and to transmit via the wireless channel the analysis results rather than time-history records. To illustrate the ability of the computational core to execute such embedded engineering analyses, a two-tiered time-series damage detection algorithm is implemented as an example. Using a lumped-mass laboratory structure, local execution of the embedded damage detection method is shown to save energy by avoiding utilization of the wireless channel to transmit raw time-history data.

  3. Interprofessional rhetoric and operational realities: an ethnographic study of rounds in four intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Morning interprofessional rounds (MIRs) are used in critical care medicine to improve team-based care and patient outcomes. Given existing evidence of conflict between and dissatisfaction among rounds participants, this study sought to better understand how the operational realities of care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU) impact the success of MIRs. We conducted a year-long comparative ethnographic study of interprofessional collaboration and patient and family involvement in four ICUs in tertiary academic hospitals in two American cities. The study included 576 h of observation of team interactions, 47 shadowing sessions and 40 clinician interviews. In line with best practices in ethnographic research, data collection and analysis were done iteratively using the constant comparative method. Member check was conducted regularly throughout the project. MIRs were implemented on all units with the explicit goals of improving team-based and patient-centered care. Operational conditions on the units, despite interprofessional commitment and engagement, appeared to thwart ICU teams from achieving these goals. Specifically, time constraints, struggles over space, and conflicts between MIRs' educational and care-plan-development functions all prevented teams from achieving collaboration and patient-involvement. Moreover, physicians' de facto control of rounds often meant that they resembled medical rounds (their historical predecessors), and sidelined other providers' contributions. This study suggests that the MIRs model, as presently practiced, might not be well suited to the provision of team-based, patient-centered care. In the interest of interprofessional collaboration, of the optimization of clinicians' time, of high-quality medical education and of patient-centered care, further research on interprofessional rounds models is needed.

  4. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-02

    Liquid-entrained operations at the LaPorte Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Process Development Unit (PDU) continued during June and July 1988 under Tasks 2.1 and 2.2 of Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC90005 for the US Department of Energy. The primary focus of this PDU operating program was to prepare for a confident move to the next scale of operation with an optimized and simplified process. Several new design options had been identified and thoroughly evaluated in a detailed process engineering study completed under the LPMEOH Part-2 contract (DE-AC22-85PC80007), which then became the basis for the current PDU modification/operating program. The focus of the Process Engineering Design was to optimize and simplifications focused on the slurry loop, which consists of the reactor, vapor/liquid separator, slurry heat exchanger, and slurry circulation pump. Two-Phase Gas Holdup tests began at LaPorte in June 1988 with nitrogen/oil and CO- rich gas/oil systems. The purpose of these tests was to study the hydrodynamics of the reactor, detect metal carbonyl catalyst poisons, and train operating personnel. Any effect of the new gas sparger and the internal heat exchanger would be revealed by comparing the hydrodynamic data with previous PDU hydrodynamic data. The Equipment Evaluation'' Run E-5 was conducted at the LaPorte LPMEOH PDU in July 1988. The objective of Run E-5 was to systematically evaluate each new piece of equipment (sparger, internal heat exchanger, V/L disengagement zone, demister, and cyclone) which had been added to the system, and attempt to run the reactor in an internal-only mode. In addition, a successful catalyst activation with a concentrated (45 wt % oxide) slurry was sought. 9 refs., 26 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Letter from Galo Jackson Final Comments on November 2012 Draft ofthe Remedial Investigation Report fpr Operable Unit 3-Upland Soils

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter from Galo Jackson contains the Final Comments on November 2012 Draft ofthe Remedial Investigation Report for Operable Unit 3-Upland Soils: LCP Chemical National Priorities List Site, Brunswick, Glynn County, GA.

  6. Long-Term Monitoring Network Optimization Evaluation for Operable Unit 2, Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex Superfund Site, Idaho

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report presents a description and evaluation of the ground water and surface water monitoring program associated with the Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex Superfund Site (Bunker Hill) Operable Unit (OU) 2.

  7. A descriptive survey of management and operations at selected sports medicine centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Olsen, D

    1996-11-01

    No uniform guidelines for operations or accreditation standards for sports medicine center were available and, at the time of this study, little information on the management and operation of sports medicine centers was available in the literature. The purpose of the study was to determine the management structure and function of selected sports medicine centers in the United States. Questionnaires were mailed to 200 randomly selected centers throughout the United State from a directory of sports medicine centers published in Physician and Sportsmedicine (1992) to gather descriptive information on eight areas, including 1) general background, 2) staffing, 3) services, facilities, and equipment, 4) billing, collections, and revenue, 5) clientele, caseloads, and referrals, 6) ownership and financing, 7) school and club outreach contracts, and 8) marketing strategies and future trends. A total of 71 surveys (35.5%) were returned in the allotted time frame. Data were analyzed using ranges, means, medians, modes, and percentages. Results yielded several conclusions about sports medicine centers. Nearly all (93%) of the centers employed physical therapists; physical therapists were clinical directors at 70.2% of centers; orthopaedists were most often medical directors; rehabilitation was the most frequently offered service (93%); physical therapy produced the highest revenue; sports injuries accounted for a mean 34.5% of patients, who were mostly recreational or high school athletes between 13-60 years of age; primary shareholders were most often physical therapists or physicians; most were involved in outreach services for schools; marketing strategies primarily involved communication with referral sources; and managed care was identified most frequently as a trend affecting the future of sports medicine centers. Findings identified common aspects of sports medicine centers and may assist in establishing guidelines for operations or accreditation of sports medicine

  8. The Introduction of Standard Operating Procedures to Improve Burn Care in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Nikolaos Spyros; Jeevan, Ranjeet; Godwin, Lindsey; Wilkinson, Donnas; Shokrollahi, Kayvan; James, Malcolm Ian

    2015-01-01

    United Kingdom (UK) burn units face substantial new obstacles in delivering high quality care because of the advent of full-shift working patterns, cross-specialty cover arrangements, and increased trainee turnover. Junior trainees rely heavily on senior colleagues, who may not be readily accessible. The authors therefore proposed the introduction of standard operating procedures (SOPs), detailed written instructions used to achieve uniformity in performance and to improve outcomes. After undertaking a preliminary strength, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis of their use locally and nationally, the authors set out to systematically develop burn-specific SOPs. The authors first mapped our existing local SOPs to the newly introduced UK national burn care pathway to specify gaps in coverage. The authors then administered a questionnaire to other UK burn units to identify SOPs already used elsewhere. Finally, the authors developed and piloted a robust pathway for the development, introduction, and auditing of new SOPs. The strength, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis identified significant benefits and minimal risks. The mapping exercise identified specific deficiencies in our coverage of the national pathway. All 26 UK burn units responded to our questionnaire; only 12 had one or more SOPs (mean, 2.1). These covered initial assessment, inhalational injuries, drug prescribing, wound care, and gastric protection; none were audited. Locally, the authors have begun to develop the additional SOPs required. SOPs have not been instituted widely in the UK, despite the shift toward a standardized national care pathway and their association with improved outcomes. The authors hope that the systematic approach to their development and implementation demonstrates the feasibility of their wider use within UK regional burn centers and beyond.

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Chemform, Inc. , Site, Operable Unit Two, Pompano Beach, FL, September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Chemform, Inc. Site in Pompano Beach, Florida. This remedy applies to Operable Unit Two at the site which pertains to the site-related soil contamination. Due to an extensive cleanup of the site related contaminant sources, and a significant reduction in soil contaminant levels, no further Superfund action is necessary to address Operable Unit Two at the site.

  10. Operational Ensemble River Forecasting in the United States and Australia: Practices and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, T. C.

    2012-04-01

    Operational river forecasts have been long produced to support water resources management in the United States and Australia. These forecasts cover a range of timescales from flash flooding (e.g. minutes to hours ahead) to seasonal (e.g. months ahead) and are generated by a range of statistical (e.g. regression-based) and dynamical (e.g. rainfall-runoff) model based techniques. Forecast uncertainty is commonly estimated operationally by using an ensemble of future precipitation scenarios and/or a measure of historical model error. Retrospective ensemble forecasting and the use of reforecasts for bias-adjustment and post-processing have become popular research topics and a few successful demonstration projects exist in both countries. Practical methods of post-processing, such as ensemble dressing, have been used to improve the probabilistic reliability of forecasts. The translation of predictions of probability distributions of streamflow into temporally and spatially consistent ensemble hydrographs remains an area for further development. However, probabilistic forecast communication and use remains a stumbling block for many. Furthermore, ensemble generation and post-processing typically require completely automated systems, making it difficult for humans to contribute their expertise to the forecasting process. This talk draws on ten years of experience as an operational forecaster with the US Department of Agriculture and as a developer of short-term flood forecasting systems to support the Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

  11. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2. Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Masnik, M.T.; Snyder, B.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report updates a plan that defines NRC's role in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) and outlines NRC's regulatory responsibilities in fulfilling this role. These responsibilities include reviewing and approving General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation (the licensee) proposals for cleanup actions, overseeing the licensee's implementation of approved activities, coordinating wih other federal and state governmental agencies on their activities in the cleanup, and informing local officials and the public about the status of the cleanup. Since the initial issuance of this NRC Plan in July 1980, this office has issued the Final NRC Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) related to the entire TMI-2 cleanup and a draft Supplement to the PEIS related to occupational radiation exposure. Additionally, a number of developments have occurred which will have an impact on the course of cleanup operations. This revision provides a discussion of these developments, specifically in the areas of the functinal role of the NRC in cleanup operations, the cleanup schedule, and the current status of the cleanup. The plan also discusses NRC's perceived role in future cleanup activities.

  12. Borehole completion and seal testing for upper confined aquifier-monitoring wells in the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Schalla, R.; Spane, F.A.; Raymond, J.R.

    1991-03-01

    The remedial investigation of the 300-FF-5 operable unit was initiated in fiscal year 1991. A major part of the investigation involves the construction of eight new groundwater-monitoring wells in the upper confined aquifer beneath the operable unit. The upper confined aquifer has a head gradient significantly higher (approximately 30 ft) than the unconfined aquifer. Because of this, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the State of Washington Department of Ecology requested, through review comments associated with the operable unit work plan (DOE 1990), the US Department of Energy to prepare a description of borehole seal emplacement and testing for this specific operable unit. They further requested that the resulting documentation be approved by the regulatory agencies prior to constructing the first confined aquifer-monitoring well. The description of seal emplacement and testing in new groundwater-monitoring wells completed in the upper confined aquifer in the 300-FF-5 operable unit is presented in this report. This work applies only to wells drilled for the 300-FF-5 operable unit. The area under consideration is located on the Hanford Reservation. 19 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  13. 12 CFR 7.4003 - Establishment and operation of a remote service unit by a national bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... a remote service unit by a national bank. A remote service unit (RSU) is an automated facility... withdrawals, or lending money. A national bank may establish and operate an RSU pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 24(Seventh). An RSU includes an automated teller machine, automated loan machine, and automated device for...

  14. 40 CFR 60.5407 - What are the requirements for monitoring of emissions and operations from my sweetening unit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... monitoring of emissions and operations from my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural gas... Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5407 What are the... natural gas processing plants? (a) If your sweetening unit affected facility is located at an onshore...

  15. 40 CFR 60.5407 - What are the requirements for monitoring of emissions and operations from my sweetening unit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... monitoring of emissions and operations from my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural gas... Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5407 What are the... natural gas processing plants? (a) If your sweetening unit affected facility is located at an onshore...

  16. A Formula for the Units to Satisfy an Operation's Desired Rate of Return in CVP Analysis--A Conceptual Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Johann A.; Leese, Wallace R.

    2016-01-01

    A common formula presented in many managerial- and cost-accounting textbooks makes possible the determination of the quantity of units which must be produced and sold to generate a desired dollar-amount of operating income. This article addresses the question "What formula can be used to determine the quantity of units needed to yield a…

  17. 47 CFR 101.209 - Operation of stations at temporary fixed locations for communication between the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... locations for communication between the United States and Canada or Mexico. 101.209 Section 101.209... communication between the United States and Canada or Mexico. Stations authorized to operate at temporary fixed... Mexico, without prior specific notification to, and authorization from, the Commission. Notification of...

  18. 47 CFR 101.209 - Operation of stations at temporary fixed locations for communication between the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... locations for communication between the United States and Canada or Mexico. 101.209 Section 101.209... communication between the United States and Canada or Mexico. Stations authorized to operate at temporary fixed... Mexico, without prior specific notification to, and authorization from, the Commission. Notification of...

  19. 47 CFR 101.209 - Operation of stations at temporary fixed locations for communication between the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... locations for communication between the United States and Canada or Mexico. 101.209 Section 101.209... communication between the United States and Canada or Mexico. Stations authorized to operate at temporary fixed... Mexico, without prior specific notification to, and authorization from, the Commission. Notification of...

  20. 43 CFR 3282.5 - What technical information must the unit operator submit with a proposed participating area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... injection wells necessary for unit operations; (2) Unit wells that are capable of being produced or utilized in commercial quantities; and (3) The area each well drains or supplies pressure communication. (b) Data, including logs, from production and injection well testing, if not previously submitted under...

  1. 43 CFR 3282.5 - What technical information must the unit operator submit with a proposed participating area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... injection wells necessary for unit operations; (2) Unit wells that are capable of being produced or utilized in commercial quantities; and (3) The area each well drains or supplies pressure communication. (b) Data, including logs, from production and injection well testing, if not previously submitted under...

  2. 43 CFR 3282.5 - What technical information must the unit operator submit with a proposed participating area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... injection wells necessary for unit operations; (2) Unit wells that are capable of being produced or utilized in commercial quantities; and (3) The area each well drains or supplies pressure communication. (b) Data, including logs, from production and injection well testing, if not previously submitted under...

  3. 43 CFR 3282.5 - What technical information must the unit operator submit with a proposed participating area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... injection wells necessary for unit operations; (2) Unit wells that are capable of being produced or utilized in commercial quantities; and (3) The area each well drains or supplies pressure communication. (b) Data, including logs, from production and injection well testing, if not previously submitted under...

  4. 77 FR 30509 - Notice To Extend Public Comment Period for United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Department of the Air Force Notice To Extend Public Comment Period for United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Notification of Extension of Public Comment Period. SUMMARY: The U.S. Air Force is issuing this notice...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1690 - What are the operating practice requirements for my municipal waste combustion unit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for my municipal waste combustion unit? 60.1690 Section 60.1690 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Good Combustion Practices: Operating Requirements § 60.1690...

  6. Emissions from oil and gas operations in the United States and their air quality implications.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T

    2016-06-01

    The energy supply infrastructure in the United States has been changing dramatically over the past decade. Increased production of oil and natural gas, particularly from shale resources using horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, made the United States the world's largest producer of oil and natural gas in 2014. This review examines air quality impacts, specifically, changes in greenhouse gas, criteria air pollutant, and air toxics emissions from oil and gas production activities that are a result of these changes in energy supplies and use. National emission inventories indicate that volatile organic compound (VOC) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from oil and gas supply chains in the United States have been increasing significantly, whereas emission inventories for greenhouse gases have seen slight declines over the past decade. These emission inventories are based on counts of equipment and operational activities (activity factors), multiplied by average emission factors, and therefore are subject to uncertainties in these factors. Although uncertainties associated with activity data and missing emission source types can be significant, multiple recent measurement studies indicate that the greatest uncertainties are associated with emission factors. In many source categories, small groups of devices or sites, referred to as super-emitters, contribute a large fraction of emissions. When super-emitters are accounted for, multiple measurement approaches, at multiple scales, produce similar results for estimated emissions. Challenges moving forward include identifying super-emitters and reducing their emission magnitudes. Work done to date suggests that both equipment malfunction and operational practices can be important. Finally, although most of this review focuses on emissions from energy supply infrastructures, the regional air quality implications of some coupled energy production and use scenarios are examined. These case studies suggest that both

  7. Readmission To Intensive Care Unit After Coronary Bypass Operations in the Short Term.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Funda; Polat, Adil; Yektaş, Abdülkadir; Erentuğ, Vedat; Alagöl, Ayşin

    2014-08-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) readmissions after coronary bypass (CABG) operations occur in a significant number of patients, and the prognosis is poor. We analyzed the risk factors for ICU readmissions after CABG operations. We retrospectively analyzed the prospectively collected data of 679 coronary bypass patients operated in a single institution in order to evaluate the risk factors for readmittance to the ICU with logistic regression analysis. The outcome results of patients readmitted to the ICU (Group R) and others (Group N) were compared. Thirty-six (5.3%) patients were readmitted to the ICU. Postoperative in-hospital mortality and pulmonary and neurologic morbidity occurred in 43 (6.3%), 135 (19.9%), and 46 (6.8%) patients, respectively. The comparison of groups showed that mortality and morbidity were significantly higher in Group R compared to Group N (mortality 16.7% vs. 5.9, p=0.029; pulmonary morbidity 66.7% vs. 17.3%, p=0.0001; neurologic morbidity 38.9% vs. 5.0%, p=0.0001). Features associated with readmission included presence of left ventricular dysfunction preoperatively[odds ratio (OR)=4.1; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.4-12.5; p=0.013], advanced NYHA Class (OR=5.3; 95% CI=1.3-21.7; p=0.022), pulmonary complications (OR=7.3; 95% CI=2.1-25.5; p=0.002), and neurologic complications (OR=4.6; 95% CI=1.3-16.7; p=0.021). Patients readmitted to the ICU postoperatively have higher rates of mortality and pulmonary and neurologic morbidity after coronary bypass operations. Left ventricular dysfunction, advanced NYHA class, and postoperative pulmonary and neurologic complications are significant risk factors for readmission to the ICU.

  8. A manned maneuvering unit proximity operations planning and flight guidance display and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershzohn, Gary R.; Sirko, Robert J.; Zimmerman, K.; Jones, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    This task concerns the design, development, testing, and evaluation of a new proximity operations planning and flight guidance display and control system for manned space operations. A forecast, derivative manned maneuvering unit (MMU) was identified as a candidate for the application of a color, highway-in-the-sky display format for the presentation of flight guidance information. A silicon graphics 4D/20-based simulation is being developed to design and test display formats and operations concepts. The simulation includes the following: (1) real-time color graphics generation to provide realistic, dynamic flight guidance displays and control characteristics; (2) real-time graphics generation of spacecraft trajectories; (3) MMU flight dynamics and control characteristics; (4) control algorithms for rotational and translational hand controllers; (5) orbital mechanics effects for rendezvous and chase spacecraft; (6) inclusion of appropriate navigation aids; and (7) measurement of subject performance. The flight planning system under development provides for: (1) selection of appropriate operational modes, including minimum cost, optimum cost, minimum time, and specified ETA; (2) automatic calculation of rendezvous trajectories, en route times, and fuel requirements; (3) and provisions for manual override. Man/machine function allocations in planning and en route flight segments are being evaluated. Planning and en route data are presented on one screen composed of two windows: (1) a map display presenting a view perpendicular to the orbital plane, depicting flight planning trajectory and time data attitude display presenting attitude and course data for use en route; and (2) an attitude display presenting local vertical-local horizontal attitude data superimposed on a highway-in-the-sky or flight channel representation of the flight planned course. Both display formats are presented while the MMU is en route. In addition to these displays, several original display

  9. Operator Training and TEMS Support: A Survey of Unit Leaders in Northern and Central California.

    PubMed

    Young, Jason B; Galante, Joseph M; Sena, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Members of Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams routinely work in high-risk tactical situations. Awareness of the benefit of Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) is increasing but not uniformly emphasized. To characterize the current regional state of tactical medicine and identify potential barriers to more widespread implementation. A multiple-choice survey was administered to SWAT team leaders of 22 regional agencies in northern and central California. Questions focused on individual officer self-aid and buddy care training, the use and content of individual first aid kits (IFAKs), and the operational inclusion of a dedicated TEMS provider. Respondents included city police (54%), local county sheriff (36%), state law enforcement (5%), and federal law enforcement (5%). RESULTS showed that 100% of respondents thought it was ?Very Important? for SWAT officers to understand the basics of self-aid and buddy care and to carry an IFAK, while only 71% of respondents indicated that team members actually carried an IFAK. In addition, 67% indicated that tourniquets were part of the IFAK, and 91% of surveyed team leaders thought it was ?Very Important? for teams to have a trained medic available onsite at callouts or high-risk warrant searches. Also, 59% of teams used an organic TEMS element. The majority of SWAT team leaders recognize the benefit of basic Operator medical training and the importance of a TEMS program. Despite near 100% endorsement by unit-level leadership, a significant proportion of teams are lacking one of the key components including Operator IFAKs and/or tourniquets. Tactical team leaders, administrators, and providers should continue to promote adequate Operator training and equipment as well as formal TEMS support. 2013.

  10. Maintaining reduced noise levels in a resource-constrained neonatal intensive care unit by operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, A; Denzil, S B; Linda, R; Josephine, P K; Nagapoornima, M; Suman Rao, P N; Swarna Rekha, A

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of operant conditioning in sustaining reduced noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Quasi-experimental study on quality of care. Level III NICU of a teaching hospital in south India. 26 staff employed in the NICU. (7 Doctors, 13 Nursing staff and 6 Nursing assistants). Operant conditioning of staff activity for 6 months. This method involves positive and negative reinforcement to condition the staff to modify noise generating activities. Comparing noise levels in decibel: A weighted [dB (A)] before conditioning with levels at 18 and 24 months after conditioning. Decibel: A weighted accounts for noise that is audible to human ears. Operant conditioning for 6 months sustains the reduced noise levels to within 62 dB in ventilator room 95% CI: 60.4 - 62.2 and isolation room (95% CI: 55.8 - 61.5). In the preterm room, noise can be maintained within 52 dB (95% CI: 50.8 - 52.6). This effect is statistically significant in all the rooms at 18 months (P = 0.001). At 24 months post conditioning there is a significant rebound of noise levels by 8.6, 6.7 and 9.9 dB in the ventilator, isolation and preterm room, respectively (P =0.001). Operant conditioning for 6 months was effective in sustaining reduced noise levels. At 18 months post conditioning, the noise levels were maintained within 62 dB (A), 60 dB (A) and 52 dB (A) in the ventilator, isolation and pre-term room, respectively. Conditioning needs to be repeated at 12 months in the ventilator room and at 18 months in the other rooms.

  11. 300-FF-1 operable unit remedial investigation phase II report: Physical separation of soils treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the approach and results of physical separations treatability tests conducted at the Hanford Site in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Physical separation of soils was identified as a remediation alternative due to the potential to significantly reduce the amount of contaminated soils prior to disposal. Tests were conducted using a system developed at Hanford consisting of modified EPA equipment integrated with screens, hoppers, conveyors, tanks, and pumps from the Hanford Site. The treatability tests discussed in this report consisted of four parts, in which an estimated 84 tons of soil was processed: (1) a pre-test run to set up the system and adjust system parameters for soils to be processed; (2) a baseline run to establish the performance of the system - Test No. 1; (3) a final run in which the system was modified as a result of findings from the baseline run - Test No. 2; and (4) water treatment.

  12. Thermo-physical performance prediction of the KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit for liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, J. H.; Notardonato, W. U.; Karng, S. W.; Oh, I.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) researchers have been working on enhanced and modernized cryogenic liquid propellant handling techniques to reduce life cycle costs of propellant management system for the unique KSC application. The KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit (GODU) for liquid hydrogen (LH2) plans to demonstrate integrated refrigeration, zero-loss flexible term storage of LH2, and densified hydrogen handling techniques. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has partnered with the KSC researchers to develop thermal performance prediction model of the GODU for LH2. The model includes integrated refrigeration cooling performance, thermal losses in the tank and distribution lines, transient system characteristics during chilling and loading, and long term steady-state propellant storage. This paper will discuss recent experimental data of the GODU for LH2 system and modeling results.

  13. Technical work plan for Surface Impoundments Operable Unit engineering support studies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a comprehensive work plan which, when utilized as a data collection guide for field activities, will provide the necessary information required to complete a report on geotechnical properties of the sediments contained in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Detailed guidance is provided for the following activities: collection of samples from the impoundments; compressive strength testing of the raw sediments; compressive strength testing of the structurally modified (lime and cement additives) sediments; testing for sediment physical properties and settling rates; testing for sediment dewatering characteristics; testing for radiation activity during the field work; testing for polymer additions that may enhance settling. The work plan additionally provides guidance and examples for the preparation of documents necessary to establish readiness for safe and satisfactory performance of the field activities. An outline for the format requested for a report of these data is also provided.

  14. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of endophytic bacteria isolated from banana cultivars in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Souza, Á; Nogueira, V B; Cruz, J C; Sousa, N R; Procópio, A R L; Silva, G F

    2015-08-19

    Endophytic microorganisms colonize plants, inhibit the growth of pathogens (by competing for nutrients and/or space), or produce antagonistic substances. Fifty-five endophytic bacteria were isolated from the leaf tissue of the FHIA 18 banana cultivar. Genetic diversity analyses were performed using the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence polymerase chain reaction method and BOX molecular markers. These analyses resulted in 33 and 21 polymorphic bands, respectively. The similarity data, obtained using the Dice coefficient based on the polyphasic analysis method, ranged from 22 to 100%. This indicated a high genetic diversity among the analyzed isolates. Sixty percent similarity was utilized as the cut-off criterion for the formation of operational taxonomic units (OTUs); this resulted in the identification of 32 possible OTUs, indicating a high number of potential species.

  15. Eielson Air Force Base operable unit 2 and other areas record of decision

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.E.; Smith, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial actions and no action decisions for Operable Unit 2 (OU2) at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska, chosen in accordance with state and federal regulations. This document also presents the decision that no further action is required for 21 other source areas at Eielson AFB. This decision is based on the administrative record file for this site. OU2 addresses sites contaminated by leaks and spills of fuels. Soils contaminated with petroleum products occur at or near the source of contamination. Contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater occur in plumes on the top of a shallow groundwater table that fluctuates seasonally. These sites pose a risk to human health and the environment because of ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact with contaminated groundwater. The purpose of this response is to prevent current or future exposure to the contaminated groundwater, to reduce further contaminant migration into the groundwater, and to remediate groundwater.

  16. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-07-01

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  17. Development and Evaluation of the Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation and Opportunities for Future Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Robert L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA develops missions to leave Earth orbit and explore distant destinations (Mars, Moon, Asteroids) it is necessary to rethink human spaceflight paradigms in the life sciences. Standards developed for low earth orbit human spaceflight may not be fully applicable and in-space research may be required to develop new standards. Preventative and emergency medical care may require new capabilities never before used in space. Due to spacecraft volume limitations, this work area may also be shared with various animal and plant life science research. This paper explores the prototype Medical Operations Workstation within the NASA Habitat Demonstration Unit and discusses some of the lessons learned from field analogue missions involving the workstation. Keywords: Exploration, medical, health, crew, injury emergency, biology, animal, plant, science, preventative, emergency.

  18. Variation in Operating Characteristics of Adult Day Services Centers, by Center Ownership: United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Rome, Vincent; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D; Park-Lee, Eunice

    2015-12-01

    More than one-quarter of a million participants were enrolled in 4,800 adult day services centers in the United States in 2014. Unlike other long-term care providers, such as nursing homes, home health agencies, hospices, and residential care communities, the majority of adult day services centers are nonprofit. However, for-profit ownership of adult day services centers has increased, from 27% in 2010 to 40% in 2012, and more recently to 44% in 2014. This report presents the most current national estimates of selected adult day services center operating characteristics, and compares these characteristics by center ownership. State estimates for the characteristics presented in this data brief are available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm.

  19. Designing User Interfaces for Smart-Applications for Operating Rooms and Intensive Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindsmüller, Martin Christof; Haar, Maral; Schulz, Hannes; Herczeg, Michael

    Today’s physicians and nurses working in operating rooms and intensive care units have to deal with an ever increasing amount of data. More and more medical devices are delivering information, which has to be perceived and interpreted in regard to patient status and the necessity to adjust therapy. The combination of high information load and insufficient usability creates a severe challenge for the health personnel with respect to proper monitoring of these devices respective to acknowledging alarms and timely reaction to critical incidents. Smart Applications are a new kind of decision support systems that incorporate medical expertise in order to help health personnel in regard to diagnosis and therapy. By means of a User Centered Design process of two Smart Applications (anaesthesia monitor display, diagnosis display), we illustrate which approach should be followed and which processes and methods have been successfully applied in fostering the design of usable medical devices.

  20. Remedial action report for Monticello, Utah, Vicinity Properties National Priority List Site, Operable Unit A

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    Uranium and vanadium milling activities were conducted by and for the US Atomic Energy Commission in Monticello, Utah, between 1942 and 1959, which resulted in the production of mill tailings containing radioactive materials. The tailings were wind blown and used to a limited extent for construction purposes in the Monticello area. In 1984, the US Department of Energy Grand Junction Office implemented the Monticello Vicinity Properties Project to isolate tailings-related sources from the environment and thereby prevent them from causing harm to human health or the environment. Remedial action is complete at Operable Unit A of the Monticello Vicinity Properties Project, which consists of 104 properties within the city limits of Monticello, Utah. These properties have been reconstructed and, pending the outcome of possible postconstruction activities on six properties, can be recommended for certification of conformance to project guidelines.

  1. 78 FR 37584 - U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Employment and Training Administration U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation, Mckeesport, Pennsylvania; Notice of Amended... workers of U.S. Steel Tubular Products, McKeesport Tubular Operations Division, a subsidiary of...

  2. 78 FR 13384 - In the Matter of FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Co. (Beaver Valley Units 1 and 2); Confirmatory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Matter of FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Co. (Beaver Valley Units 1 and 2); Confirmatory Order Modifying License I FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company (FENOC, the licensee) is the holder of Renewed Facility... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY...

  3. 78 FR 45987 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to the Primary Sampling System AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Exemption and combined... COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe...

  4. 78 FR 45989 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to the Primary Sampling System AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Exemption and combined... COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe...

  5. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions...

  6. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment..., Subpt. UUU, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions...

  7. 75 FR 9620 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc.; Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc.; Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc. (SNC, the licensee), is the holder of Renewed...

  8. Defining DNA-based operational taxonomic units for microbial-eukaryote ecology.

    PubMed

    Caron, David A; Countway, Peter D; Savai, Pratik; Gast, Rebecca J; Schnetzer, Astrid; Moorthi, Stefanie D; Dennett, Mark R; Moran, Dawn M; Jones, Adriane C

    2009-09-01

    DNA sequence information has increasingly been used in ecological research on microbial eukaryotes. Sequence-based approaches have included studies of the total diversity of selected ecosystems, studies of the autecology of ecologically relevant species, and identification and enumeration of species of interest for human health. It is still uncommon, however, to delineate protistan species based on their genetic signatures. The reluctance to assign species-level designations based on DNA sequences is in part a consequence of the limited amount of sequence information presently available for many free-living microbial eukaryotes and in part a consequence of the problematic nature of and debate surrounding the microbial species concept. Despite the difficulties inherent in assigning species names to DNA sequences, there is a growing need to attach meaning to the burgeoning amount of sequence information entering the literature, and there is a growing desire to apply this information in ecological studies. We describe a computer-based tool that assigns DNA sequences from environmental databases to operational taxonomic units at approximately species-level distinctions. This approach provides a practical method for ecological studies of microbial eukaryotes (primarily protists) by enabling semiautomated analysis of large numbers of samples spanning great taxonomic breadth. Derivation of the algorithm was based on an analysis of complete small-subunit (18S) rRNA gene sequences and partial gene sequences obtained from the GenBank database for morphologically described protistan species. The program was tested using environmental 18S rRNA data sets for two oceanic ecosystems. A total of 388 operational taxonomic units were observed for 2,207 sequences obtained from samples collected in the western North Atlantic and eastern North Pacific oceans.

  9. Transportable enhanced simulation technologies for pre-implementation limited operations testing: neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jesse; Shields, Robin; Kennally, Karen

    2011-08-01

    Transition of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) to a new physical plant incurs many challenges. These are amplified when the culture of care is changing from traditional cohort-based care to the single-family room model. Altered healthcare delivery systems can be tested in situ with TESTPILOT: Transportable Enhanced Simulation Technologies for Pre-Implementation Limited Operations Testing. The aims of the study included promoting translation of existing processes and identifying staff orientation material. We hypothesized that (1) numerous process gaps would be discovered and resolved, and (2) participants would feel better prepared. A functional neonatal intensive care unit was modeled before its opening. Scenarios were developed, volunteers recruited, and rooms supplied with equipment. Participants performed usual duties in two 30-minute in situ simulations followed by facilitated debriefings. As latent safety hazards were identified, they were corrected and retested in subsequent simulations. Staff was surveyed for perceived preparedness. Ninety-six multidisciplinary participants identified 164 latent safety hazards in verbal and written communication, facilities, supplies, staffing, and training, 93% of which were resolved at transition. Staff preparedness varied but showed improving communication, workflow patterns, and awareness of equipment and supply locations. The majority stated that this simulation experience changed their practice. Simulation is very effective for identifying process gaps before major institutional change. TESTPILOT generated iterative workflow enhancements and staff orientation toward improving patient care at transition and beyond. The extensive coordination required to implement such large-scale simulations is well worth the benefit for systems refinement and patient safety.

  10. SEOM recommendations on the structure and operation of hereditary cancer genetic counseling units (HCGCUs).

    PubMed

    Lastra-Aras, Enrique; Robles-Díaz, Luis; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Alba, Emilio; Cruz, Juan-Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 5 % of all cancer cases are hereditary. Cancer genetic counseling assesses individual and family risks of cancer, conducts genetic studies, interprets results, and advises patients regarding strategies for prevention and risk reduction. Currently, many networks of hereditary cancer genetic counseling units (HCGCUs) are integrated in the medical oncology services of most Spanish hospitals, which are comprised of multidisciplinary teams and offer high-quality care for the treatment of hereditary cancer. The Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) analyzed key issues involving the integration of HCGCUs into the National Health Service. These included basic compliance issues by these units regarding their operation and organization, as well as prerequisites in quality control thereof. This document describes the specific roles and clinical processes performed in HCGCUs in addition to basic services provided by molecular diagnostic laboratories. It also provides a summary on the coordination of care across different levels for patients and families with hereditary cancers. Finally, this document describes the human and material resources needed for the organization of HCGCUs. SEOM has been a pioneer in the creation and development of HCGCUs. This paper seeks to ensure high-quality care to individuals and families with inherited susceptibility to cancer in Spain.

  11. Managing waste from confined animal feeding operations in the United States: the need for sanitary reform.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jay P; Nachman, Keeve E

    2010-12-01

    Confined food-animal operations in the United States produce more than 40 times the amount of waste than human biosolids generated from US wastewater treatment plants. Unlike biosolids, which must meet regulatory standards for pathogen levels, vector attraction reduction and metal content, no treatment is required of waste from animal agriculture. This omission is of concern based on dramatic changes in livestock production over the past 50 years, which have resulted in large increases in animal waste and a high degree of geographic concentration of waste associated with the regional growth of industrial food-animal production. Regulatory measures have not kept pace with these changes. The purpose of this paper is to: 1) review trends that affect food-animal waste production in the United States, 2) assess risks associated with food-animal wastes, 3) contrast food-animal waste management practices to management practices for biosolids and 4) make recommendations based on existing and potential policy options to improve management of food-animal waste.

  12. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-1 Source Operable Unit LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA) (WHC 1993a), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. A LFI Report is required, in accordance with the HPPS, when waste sites are to be considered for IRMs. The LFI is an integral part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) and process and functions as a focused RI or RFI for selection of IRMs. The purpose of the report is to identify those sites that are recommended to remain as candidates for IRMs, provide a preliminary summary of site characterization studies, refine the conceptual model as needed, identify contaminant- and location-specific applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARA), and provide a qualitative assessment of the risks associated with the sites. This assessment includes consideration of whether contaminant concentrations pose an unacceptable risk that warrants action through IRMs. The 100-HR-1 unit encompasses approximately 100 acres adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. It contains waste units associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support the H Reactor. The area also contains evaporation basins which received liquid process wastes and nonroutine deposits of chemical wastes from the 300 Area, where fuel elements for the N Reactor were produced.

  13. Can a stepwise steady flow computational fluid dynamics model reproduce unsteady particulate matter separation for common unit operations?

    PubMed

    Pathapati, Subbu-Srikanth; Sansalone, John J

    2011-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is emerging as a model for resolving the fate of particulate matter (PM) by unit operations subject to rainfall-runoff loadings. However, compared to steady flow CFD models, there are greater computational requirements for unsteady hydrodynamics and PM loading models. Therefore this study examines if integrating a stepwise steady flow CFD model can reproduce PM separation by common unit operations loaded by unsteady flow and PM loadings, thereby reducing computational effort. Utilizing monitored unit operation data from unsteady events as a metric, this study compares the two CFD modeling approaches for a hydrodynamic separator (HS), a primary clarifier (PC) tank, and a volumetric clarifying filtration system (VCF). Results indicate that while unsteady CFD models reproduce PM separation of each unit operation, stepwise steady CFD models result in significant deviation for HS and PC models as compared to monitored data; overestimating the physical size requirements of each unit required to reproduce monitored PM separation results. In contrast, the stepwise steady flow approach reproduces PM separation by the VCF, a combined gravitational sedimentation and media filtration unit operation that provides attenuation of turbulent energy and flow velocity.

  14. Initial Closed Operation of the CELSS Test Facility Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliss, Mark

    1995-01-01

    As part of the NASA Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program, a CELSS Test Facility (CTF) is being planned for installation on the Space Station. The CTF will be used to provide data on the productivity and efficiency of a variety of CELSS higher plant crops grown sequentially from seed to harvest in the microgravity environment of the Space Station. Stringent environmental control will be maintained while fundamental crop productivity issues, such as carbon dioxide uptake and oxygen production rates, water transpiration rates, and biomass accumulation rates are obtained for comparison with ground-based data. In order to obtain an early realistic determination of the subsystem and system requirements necessary to provide the appropriate environmental conditions specified for CTF crop productivity experiments, an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) has been constructed and is undergoing initial operational testing at NASA Ames Research Center. The EDU is a ground-based testbed which will be used to characterize the integrated performance of major subsystem technologies, to evaluate hardware candidates and control strategies required for the CTF, and to further define the ability to meet CTF requirements within present Space Station constraints. This paper describes the initial closed operational testing of the EDU. Measured performance data are compared with the specified functional requirements and results from initial closed testing are presented. Plans for future science and technology testing are discussed.

  15. Operable Unit 1 remedial investigation report, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.J.; Fruland, R.M.; Liikala, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    This remedial investigation report for operable Unit 1 (OU-1) at Eielson Air Force Base presents data, calculations, and conclusions as to the nature and extent of surface and subsurface contamination at the eight source areas that make up OU-1. The information is based on the 1993 field investigation result and previous investigations. This report is the first in a set of three for OU-1. The other reports are the baseline risk assessment and feasibility study. The information in these reports will lead to a Record of Decision that will guide and conclude the environmental restoration effort for OU-1 at Eielson Air Force Base. The primary contaminants of concern include fuels and fuel-related contaminants (diesel; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene; total petroleum hydrocarbon; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), maintenance-related solvents and cleaners (volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroothylene), polychlorinated biphenyls, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The origins of contaminants of concern include leaks from storage tanks, drums and piping, and spills. Ongoing operations and past sitewide practices also contribute to contaminants of concern at OU-1 source areas. These include spraying mixed oil and solvent wastes on unpaved roads and aerial spraying of DDT.

  16. Some assembly required: constructing the elementary units of store-operated Ca2+ entry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Minnie M.; Luik, Riina M.; Lewis, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The means by which Ca2+ store depletion evokes the opening of store-operated Ca2+ channels (SOCs) in the plasma membrane of excitable and non-excitable cells has been a longstanding mystery. Indirect evidence has supported local interactions between the ER and SOCs as well as long-range interactions mediated through a diffusible activator. The recent molecular identification of the ER Ca2+ sensor (STIM1) and a subunit of the CRAC channel (Orai1), a prototypic SOC, has now made it possible to visualize directly the sequence of events that links store depletion to CRAC channel opening. Following store depletion, STIM1 moves from locations throughout the ER to accumulate in ER subregions positioned within 10-25 nm of the plasma membrane. Simultaneously, Orai1 gathers at discrete sites in the plasma membrane directly opposite STIM1, resulting in local CRAC channel activation. These new studies define the elementary units of store-operated Ca2+ entry, and reveal an unprecedented mechanism for channel activation in which the stimulus brings a channel and its activator/sensor together for interaction across apposed membrane compartments. We discuss the implications of this choreographic mechanism with regard to Ca2+ dynamics, specificity of Ca2+ signaling, and the existence of a specialized ER subset dedicated to the control of the CRAC channel. PMID:17499354

  17. Some assembly required: constructing the elementary units of store-operated Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minnie M; Luik, Riina M; Lewis, Richard S

    2007-08-01

    The means by which Ca(2+) store depletion evokes the opening of store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCs) in the plasma membrane of excitable and non-excitable cells has been a longstanding mystery. Indirect evidence has supported local interactions between the ER and SOCs as well as long-range interactions mediated through a diffusible activator. The recent molecular identification of the ER Ca(2+) sensor (STIM1) and a subunit of the CRAC channel (Orai1), a prototypic SOC, has now made it possible to visualize directly the sequence of events that links store depletion to CRAC channel opening. Following store depletion, STIM1 moves from locations throughout the ER to accumulate in ER subregions positioned within 10-25nm of the plasma membrane. Simultaneously, Orai1 gathers at discrete sites in the plasma membrane directly opposite STIM1, resulting in local CRAC channel activation. These new studies define the elementary units of store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and reveal an unprecedented mechanism for channel activation in which the stimulus brings a channel and its activator/sensor together for interaction across apposed membrane compartments. We discuss the implications of this choreographic mechanism with regard to Ca(2+) dynamics, specificity of Ca(2+) signaling, and the existence of a specialized ER subset dedicated to the control of the CRAC channel.

  18. Initial Closed Operation of the CELSS Test Facility Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliss, Mark

    1995-01-01

    As part of the NASA Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program, a CELSS Test Facility (CTF) is being planned for installation on the Space Station. The CTF will be used to provide data on the productivity and efficiency of a variety of CELSS higher plant crops grown sequentially from seed to harvest in the microgravity environment of the Space Station. Stringent environmental control will be maintained while fundamental crop productivity issues, such as carbon dioxide uptake and oxygen production rates, water transpiration rates, and biomass accumulation rates are obtained for comparison with ground-based data. In order to obtain an early realistic determination of the subsystem and system requirements necessary to provide the appropriate environmental conditions specified for CTF crop productivity experiments, an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) has been constructed and is undergoing initial operational testing at NASA Ames Research Center. The EDU is a ground-based testbed which will be used to characterize the integrated performance of major subsystem technologies, to evaluate hardware candidates and control strategies required for the CTF, and to further define the ability to meet CTF requirements within present Space Station constraints. This paper describes the initial closed operational testing of the EDU. Measured performance data are compared with the specified functional requirements and results from initial closed testing are presented. Plans for future science and technology testing are discussed.

  19. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

  20. Production of wheat gluten hydrolysates with reduced antigenicity employing enzymatic hydrolysis combined with downstream unit operations.

    PubMed

    Merz, Michael; Kettner, Lucas; Langolf, Emma; Appel, Daniel; Blank, Imre; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Due to allergies or other health disorders a certain segment of the population is not able to safely consume some plant proteins, which are the main protein support in human nutrition. Coeliac disease is a prominent autoimmune disorder and requires a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. The aim of this study was to identify suitable combinations of enzymatic hydrolysis and common unit operations in food processing (centrifugation, ultra-filtration) to produce gluten-free wheat gluten hydrolysates for food application. To analyse the hydrolysates, a simple and cheap competitive ELISA protocol was designed and validated in this study as well. The competitive ELISA was validated using gliadin spiked skim milk protein hydrolysates, due to the latter application of the assay. The limit of quantification was 4.19 mg kg(-1) , which allowed the identification of gluten-free (<20 mg kg(-1) ) hydrolysates. Enzymatic hydrolysis, including the type of peptidase, and the downstream processing greatly affected the antigenicity of the hydrolysates. Enzymatic hydrolysis and downstream processing operations, such as centrifugation and ultra-filtration, reduced the antigenicity of wheat gluten hydrolysates. Gluten-free hydrolysates were obtained with Flavourzyme after centrifugation (25 g L(-1) substrate) and after 1 kDa ultra-filtration (100 g L(-1) substrate). A multiple peptidase complex, such as Flavourzyme, seems to be required for the production of gluten-free hydrolysates. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Example of cost calculations for an operating room and a post-anaesthesia care unit.

    PubMed

    Raft, J; Millet, F; Meistelman, C

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost of an operating room using data from our hospital. Using an accounting-based method helped us. Over the year 2012, the sum of direct and indirect expenses with cost sharing expenses allowed us to calculate the cost of the operating room (OR) and of the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU). The cost of the OR and PACU was €10.8 per minute of time offered. Two thirds of the direct expenses were allocated to surgery and one third to anaesthesia. Indirect expenses were 25% of the direct expenses. The cost of medications and single use medical devises was €111.45 per anaesthesia. The total cost of anaesthesia (taking into account wages and indirect expenses) was €753.14 per anaesthesia as compared to the total cost of the anaesthesia. The part of medications and single use devices for anaesthesia was 14.8% of the total cost. Despite the difficulties facing cost evaluation, this model of calculation, assisted by the cost accounting controller, helped us to have a concrete financial vision. It also shows that a global reflexion is necessary during financial decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Large-Scale Pumping Test Recommendations for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, Frank A.

    2010-09-08

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently assessing aquifer characterization needs to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies (e.g., extraction well pumping rates, pumping schedule/design) in the 200-ZP-1 operable unit (OU), and in particular for the immediate area of the 241 TX-TY Tank Farm. Specifically, CHPRC is focusing on hydrologic characterization opportunities that may be available for newly constructed and planned ZP-1 extraction wells. These new extraction wells will be used to further refine the 3-dimensional subsurface contaminant distribution within this area and will be used in concert with other existing pump-and-treat wells to remediate the existing carbon tetrachloride contaminant plume. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system for the purpose of remediating the existing carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater within this general area. As many as 20 new extraction wells and 17 injection wells may be installed to support final pump-and-treat operations within the OU area. It should be noted that although the report specifically refers to the 200-ZP-1 OU, the large-scale test recommendations are also applicable to the adjacent 200-UP-1 OU area. This is because of the similar hydrogeologic conditions exhibited within these two adjoining OU locations.

  3. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Pilot Study: XRF Evaluation of Select Pre-Hanford Orchards

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gorton, Alicia M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Pino, Christian; Martinez, Dominique M.; Rana, Komal; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-20

    Prior to the acquisition of land by the U.S. Department of War in February 1943 and the creation of the Hanford Site, the land along the Columbia River was home to over 1000 people. Farming and orchard operations by both homesteaders and commercial organizations were prevalent. Orchard activities and the associated application of lead arsenate pesticide ceased in 1943, when residents were moved from the Hanford Site at the beginning of the Manhattan Project. Today, the residues from historical application of lead arsenate pesticide persist in some locations on the Hanford Site. In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology established the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The pre-Hanford orchard lands identified as the 100-OL-1 OU are located south of the Columbia River and east of the present-day Vernita Bridge, and extend southeast to the former Hanford townsite. The discontinuous orchard lands within 100-OL-1 OU are approximately 20 km2 (5000 ac). A pilot study was conducted to support the approval of the remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 OU. This pilot study evaluated the use of a field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of lead arsenate pesticide residues in the OU. The objectives of the pilot study included evaluating a field portable XRF analyzer as the analytical method for decision making, estimating the nature and extent of lead and arsenic in surface soils in four decision units, evaluating the results for the purpose of optimizing the sampling approach implemented in the remedial investigation, and collecting information to improve the cost estimate and planning the cultural resources review for sampling activities in the remedial investigation. Based on

  4. The United Nations Standing Force a Qualitative Analysis of Strategic and Operational Options for the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    the Charter of the United Nations sets forth that the number one purpose of the United Nations is: To maintain international peace and security, and...the consensus of world opinion. * War should be a last resort. Another set of criteria was suggested by LtGen Trainor:32 * Start by examining the...an example, when its mission was over, the U.N. Transition Assistance Group, set up in Namibia to keep the peace, obs:4erve a cease fire, and

  5. Impact of selection of cord blood units from the United States and swiss registries on the cost of banking operations.

    PubMed

    Bart, Thomas; Boo, Michael; Balabanova, Snejana; Fischer, Yvonne; Nicoloso, Grazia; Foeken, Lydia; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Passweg, Jakob; Tichelli, Andre; Kindler, Vincent; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Price, Thomas; Regan, Donna; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Schwabe, Rudolf

    2013-02-01

    Over the last 2 decades, cord blood (CB) has become an important source of blood stem cells. Clinical experience has shown that CB is a viable source for blood stem cells in the field of unrelated hematopoietic blood stem cell transplantation. Studies of CB units (CBUs) stored and ordered from the US (National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) and Swiss (Swiss Blood Stem Cells (SBSQ)) CB registries were conducted to assess whether these CBUs met the needs of transplantation patients, as evidenced by units being selected for transplantation. These data were compared to international banking and selection data (Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide (BMDW), World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA)). Further analysis was conducted on whether current CB banking practices were economically viable given the units being selected from the registries for transplant. It should be mentioned that our analysis focused on usage, deliberately omitting any information about clinical outcomes of CB transplantation. A disproportionate number of units with high total nucleated cell (TNC) counts are selected, compared to the distribution of units by TNC available. Therefore, the decision to use a low threshold for banking purposes cannot be supported by economic analysis and may limit the economic viability of future public CB banking. We suggest significantly raising the TNC level used to determine a bankable unit. A level of 125 × 10(7) TNCs, maybe even 150 × 10(7) TNCs, might be a viable banking threshold. This would improve the return on inventory investments while meeting transplantation needs based on current selection criteria.

  6. Impact of Selection of Cord Blood Units from the United States and Swiss Registries on the Cost of Banking Operations

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Thomas; Boo, Michael; Balabanova, Snejana; Fischer, Yvonne; Nicoloso, Grazia; Foeken, Lydia; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Passweg, Jakob; Tichelli, Andre; Kindler, Vincent; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Price, Thomas; Regan, Donna; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Schwabe, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last 2 decades, cord blood (CB) has become an important source of blood stem cells. Clinical experience has shown that CB is a viable source for blood stem cells in the field of unrelated hematopoietic blood stem cell transplantation. Methods Studies of CB units (CBUs) stored and ordered from the US (National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) and Swiss (Swiss Blood Stem Cells (SBSQ)) CB registries were conducted to assess whether these CBUs met the needs of transplantation patients, as evidenced by units being selected for transplantation. These data were compared to international banking and selection data (Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide (BMDW), World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA)). Further analysis was conducted on whether current CB banking practices were economically viable given the units being selected from the registries for transplant. It should be mentioned that our analysis focused on usage, deliberately omitting any information about clinical outcomes of CB transplantation. Results A disproportionate number of units with high total nucleated cell (TNC) counts are selected, compared to the distribution of units by TNC available. Therefore, the decision to use a low threshold for banking purposes cannot be supported by economic analysis and may limit the economic viability of future public CB banking. Conclusions We suggest significantly raising the TNC level used to determine a bankable unit. A level of 125 × 107 TNCs, maybe even 150 × 107 TNCs, might be a viable banking threshold. This would improve the return on inventory investments while meeting transplantation needs based on current selection criteria. PMID:23637645

  7. 78 FR 3030 - Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division, East Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit..., NJ and Off-Site Workers of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales... Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division, East Hanover, New Jersey. The Department...

  8. Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit lll, Annual Groundwater Report, May 2015 Through April 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Jason; Smith, Fred

    2016-10-01

    This report provides the annual analysis of water quality restoration progress, cumulative through April 2016, for Operable Unit (OU) III, surface water and groundwater, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). The MMTS is a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act National Priorities List site located in and near the city of Monticello, San Juan County, Utah. MMTS comprises the 110-acre site of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill (mill site) and 1700 acres of surrounding private and municipal property. Milling operations generated 2.5 million cubic yards of waste (tailings) from 1942 to 1960. The tailings were impounded at four locations on the mill site. Inorganic constituents in the tailings drained from the impoundments to contaminate local surface water (Montezuma Creek) and groundwater in the underlying alluvial aquifer. Mill tailings dispersed by wind and water also contaminated properties surrounding and downstream of the mill site. Remedial actions to remove and isolate radiologically contaminated soil, sediment, and debris from the former mill site, Operable Unit I (OU I), and surrounding properties (OU II) were completed in 1999 with the encapsulation of the wastes in an engineered repository located on DOE property 1 mile south of the former mill site. This effectively removed the primary source of groundwater contamination; however, contamination of groundwater and surface water remains within OU III at levels that exceed water quality protection standards. Uranium is the primary contaminant of concern (COC). LM implemented monitored natural attenuation with institutional controls as the OU III remedy in 2004. Because groundwater restoration proceeded more slowly than expected and did not meet performance criteria established in the OU III Record of Decision (June 2004), LM implemented a contingency action in 2009 by an Explanation of

  9. Climate change impact on operation of dams and hydroelectricity generation in the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsani, N.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Fekete, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    We are using a large-scale, high-resolution, fully integrated hydrological/reservoir/hydroelectricity model to investigate the impact of climate change on the operation of 11037 dams and generation of electricity from 375 hydroelectric power plants in the Northeastern United States. Moreover, we estimate the hydropower potential of the region by energizing the existing non-powered dams and then studying the impact of climate change on the hydropower potential. We show that climate change increases the impact of dams on the hydrology of the region. Warmer temperatures produce shorter frozen periods, earlier snowmelt and elevated evapotranspiration rates, which when combined with changes in precipitation, are projected to increase water availability in winter but reduce it during summer. As a result, the water that is stored by dams will be more than ever a necessary part of the routine water systems operations to compensate for these seasonal imbalances. The function of dams as emergency water storage for creating drought resiliency will mostly diminish in the future. Building more dams to cope with the local impacts of climate change on water resources and to offset the increased drought vulnerability may thus be inevitable. Annual hydroelectricity generation in the region is 41 Twh. Our estimate of the annual hydropower potential of non-powered dams adds up to 350 Twh. Climate change may reduce hydropower potential from non-powered dams by up to 13% and reduce current hydroelectricity generation by up to 8% annually. Hydroelectricity generation and hydropower potential may increase in winter months and decline in months of summer and fall. These changes call for recalibration of dam operations and may raise conflict of interests in multipurpose dams.

  10. Typhoid perforation: Post-operative Intensive Care Unit care and outcome.

    PubMed

    Akinwale, Mukaila Oyegbade; Sanusi, Arinola A; Adebayo, Oluwaseun K

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid perforation ileitis is a serious complication of typhoid fever, a common and unfortunate health problem in a resource-poor country like Nigeria. Following bowel perforation, treatment is usually by simple closure or bowel resection and anastomosis after adequate aggressive fluid resuscitation and electrolyte correction. Postoperatively, some of these patients do require management in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on account of sepsis or septic shock and to improve survival. This is a prospective observational study in which 67 consecutive patients who had exploratory laparotomy for typhoid perforation between August 2009 and October 2012 in the main operating theatre of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, were studied. The attending anaesthetists had the freedom of choosing the appropriate anaesthetic drugs depending on the patients' clinical condition. The reason for admission into the ICU, the types of organ support required and outcomes were recorded. Twenty-five patients (37.3%) out of 67 required critical care. Reasons for admission among others included poor respiratory effort, hypotension, septic shock and delayed recovery from anaesthesia. Twenty-one patients (84%) required mechanical ventilation with a mean duration of 2.14 days (range 1-5 days). Fourteen patients required ionotropic support and the length of ICU stay ranged from 1 to 15 days (mean 4.32 days). Nineteen patients (76%) were successfully managed and discharged to the ward while 24% (6 patients) mortality rate was recorded. This study showed high rate of post-operative ICU admission in patients with typhoid perforation with a high demand for critical care involving mechanical ventilation and ionotropic support. In centres that manage patients presenting with typhoid ileitis and perforation, post-operative critical care should be available.

  11. Species of Cryptosporidium detected in weaned cattle on cow-calf operations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santín, Monica; Dargatz, David

    2010-06-24

    To determine the species and distribution of Cryptosporidium in weaned beef calves in the United States, fecal specimens were collected from 819 cattle between 6 and 18 months of age from 49 operations in 20 states (Alabama, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wyoming). Fresh feces, collected either from the ground or directly from the rectum of each animal, were sieved and subjected to density gradient centrifugation to remove fecal debris and to concentrate oocysts. DNA extracted from each specimen was subjected to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers for the SSU rRNA gene. All PCR positive specimens were subjected to sequence analysis. Cryptosporidium was detected in 20.5% of the fecal samples. Cryptosporidium ryanae, C. bovis and C. andersoni were detected in 1.8, 4.8, and 14.0% of the 819 samples, respectively. California (number operations [n]=2), Iowa (n=3), and Nebraska (n=7) had the highest prevalence of infected weaned cattle with 44.4, 41.0 and 40.2% infected, respectively. Cryptosporidium was not detected in any weaned cattle from Alabama (number operations [n]=1), Georgia (n=2), New Mexico (n=1), South Dakota (n=1), Tennessee (n=1), or Texas (n=1). The zoonotic species, C. parvum, was not detected in any samples from 6- to 18-month-old cattle, a finding that parallels reports for dairy cattle of similar age in which less than 1% were found to harbor this species.

  12. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 1. PDU operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit. In this process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of sodium carbonate, removal of sulfur, and disposal of the ash. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner during one of the runs. The principal problem encountered during the five test runs was maintaining a continuous flow of melt from the gasifier to the quench tank. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined-cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  13. Typhoid perforation: Post-operative Intensive Care Unit care and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Akinwale, Mukaila Oyegbade; Sanusi, Arinola A.; Adebayo, Oluwaseun K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Typhoid perforation ileitis is a serious complication of typhoid fever, a common and unfortunate health problem in a resource-poor country like Nigeria. Following bowel perforation, treatment is usually by simple closure or bowel resection and anastomosis after adequate aggressive fluid resuscitation and electrolyte correction. Postoperatively, some of these patients do require management in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on account of sepsis or septic shock and to improve survival. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective observational study in which 67 consecutive patients who had exploratory laparotomy for typhoid perforation between August 2009 and October 2012 in the main operating theatre of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, were studied. The attending anaesthetists had the freedom of choosing the appropriate anaesthetic drugs depending on the patients’ clinical condition. The reason for admission into the ICU, the types of organ support required and outcomes were recorded. Results: Twenty-five patients (37.3%) out of 67 required critical care. Reasons for admission among others included poor respiratory effort, hypotension, septic shock and delayed recovery from anaesthesia. Twenty-one patients (84%) required mechanical ventilation with a mean duration of 2.14 days (range 1–5 days). Fourteen patients required ionotropic support and the length of ICU stay ranged from 1 to 15 days (mean 4.32 days). Nineteen patients (76%) were successfully managed and discharged to the ward while 24% (6 patients) mortality rate was recorded. Conclusion: This study showed high rate of post-operative ICU admission in patients with typhoid perforation with a high demand for critical care involving mechanical ventilation and ionotropic support. In centres that manage patients presenting with typhoid ileitis and perforation, post-operative critical care should be available. PMID:28051046

  14. FEASIBILITY STUDY REPORT FOR THE 200-ZP-1 GROUNDWATER OPERABLE UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2008-07-18

    The Hanford Site, managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), encompasses approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) in the Columbia Basin of south-central Washington State. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas of the Hanford Site on the 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300, 'National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan' National Contingency Plan [NCPD], Appendix B, 'National Priorities List' (NPL), pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The 200 Areas NPL sites consist of the 200 West and 200 East Areas (Figure 1-1). The 200 Areas contain waste management facilities, inactive irradiated fuel reprocessing facilities, and the 200 North Area (formerly used for interim storage and staging of irradiated fuel). Several waste sites in the 600 Area, located near the 200 Areas, also are included in the 200 Areas NPL site. The 200 Areas NPL site is in a region referred to as the 'Central Plateau' and consists of approximately 700 waste sites, excluding sites assigned to the tank farm waste management areas (WMAs). The 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) consists of the groundwater located under the northern portion of the 200 West Area. Waste sources that contributed to the 200-ZP-1 OU included cribs and trenches that received liquid and/or solid waste in the past from the Z Plant and T Plant aggregate areas, WMA-T, WMA-TX/TY, and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). This feasibility study (FS) for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater OU was prepared in accordance with the requirements of CERCLA decision documents. These decision documents are part of the Administrative Record for the selection of remedial actions for each waste site and present the selected remedial actions that are chosen in accordance with CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and to the extent practicable

  15. Adsorption of Carbon Tetrachloride to Sediments from the UP-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Riley, Robert G.; Parker, Kent E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.

    2006-09-01

    In 2004, Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FHI) drilled several groundwater wells within the 200-UP-1 operable unit to monitor plumes that have been the focus of past remediation activities. Thirteen cores taken from three wells (C4298, C4299, and C4300) were sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for characterization and quantification of contaminant retardation. These cores were 4-inches in diameter by 6-inches in length and were taken from depths near the unconfined aquifer surface (water table) to locations approximately 150 to 180 ft below the water table. Prior to this work, no 200-UP-1 site-specific adsorption data (i.e., values of distribution coefficient [Kd ]) were available for the sediments or key contaminants present in the 200-UP-1 operable unit groundwater plume. Site-specific sorption data for carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) was obtained with the <2 mm size fractions of uncontaminated 200-UP-1 sediments taken from two of these boreholes (C4299 and C4300) and distribution coefficients determined. Each fraction exhibited bimodal CCl4 adsorption isotherms over the concentration range (15 – 2500 μg L-1) for total CCl4 in solution. Sorption of CCl4 was linear over the concentration ranges of 15 to 400 μg L-1 and 400 to 2500 μg L-1. The Kd values measured for the three 200-UP-1 sediments exhibited bimodal sorption with initial Kd values ranging from 0.0002 to 0.0005, and phase 2 values approximately 0.003 for all sediments. The measure Kd values are lower than the range calculated for CCl4 in a Hanford soil (0.016 to 0.83 L/Kg) containing an average organic carbon content of 0.2% (Truex et al., 2001). The best estimate value of Truex et al. (2001) is 0.06 L/Kg based on a 0.1% sediment organic carbon content. However, this estimate is based on an organic carbon content up to an order of magnitude greater than the organic carbon content of the sediments tested herein. Prolonged contact may increase

  16. Developing a Comprehensive Model of Intensive Care Unit Processes: Concept of Operations.

    PubMed

    Romig, Mark; Tropello, Steven P; Dwyer, Cindy; Wyskiel, Rhonda M; Ravitz, Alan; Benson, John; Gropper, Michael A; Pronovost, Peter J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2015-04-23

    This study aimed to use a systems engineering approach to improve performance and stakeholder engagement in the intensive care unit to reduce several different patient harms. We developed a conceptual framework or concept of operations (ConOps) to analyze different types of harm that included 4 steps as follows: risk assessment, appropriate therapies, monitoring and feedback, as well as patient and family communications. This framework used a transdisciplinary approach to inventory the tasks and work flows required to eliminate 7 common types of harm experienced by patients in the intensive care unit. The inventory gathered both implicit and explicit information about how the system works or should work and converted the information into a detailed specification that clinicians could understand and use. Using the ConOps document, we created highly detailed work flow models to reduce harm and offer an example of its application to deep venous thrombosis. In the deep venous thrombosis model, we identified tasks that were synergistic across different types of harm. We will use a system of systems approach to integrate the variety of subsystems and coordinate processes across multiple types of harm to reduce the duplication of tasks. Through this process, we expect to improve efficiency and demonstrate synergistic interactions that ultimately can be applied across the spectrum of potential patient harms and patient locations. Engineering health care to be highly reliable will first require an understanding of the processes and work flows that comprise patient care. The ConOps strategy provided a framework for building complex systems to reduce patient harm.

  17. Specialized operating room for cesarean section in the perinatal care unit: a review of the opening process and operating room management.

    PubMed

    Kasagi, Yoshihiro; Okutani, Ryu; Oda, Yutaka

    2015-02-01

    We have opened an operating room in the perinatal care unit (PNCU), separate from our existing central operating rooms, to be used exclusively for cesarean sections. The purpose is to meet the increasing need for both emergency cesarean sections and non-obstetric surgeries. It is equipped with the same surgical instruments, anesthesia machine, monitoring system, rapid infusion system and airway devices as the central operating rooms. An anesthesiologist and a nurse from the central operating rooms trained the nurses working in the new operating room, and discussed solutions to numerous problems that arose before and after its opening. Currently most of the elective and emergency cesarean sections carried out during the daytime on weekdays are performed in the PNCU operating room. A total of 328 and 347 cesarean sections were performed in our hospital during 2011 and 2012, respectively, of which 192 (55.5 %) and 254 (73.2 %) were performed in the PNCU operating room. The mean occupancy rate of the central operating rooms also increased from 81 % in 2011 to 90 % in 2012. The PNCU operating room was built with the support of motivated personnel and multidisciplinary teamwork, and has been found to be beneficial for both surgeons and anesthesiologists, while it also contributes to hospital revenue.

  18. Porting ONETEP to graphical processing unit-based coprocessors. 1. FFT box operations.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Karl; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2013-10-30

    We present the first graphical processing unit (GPU) coprocessor-enabled version of the Order-N Electronic Total Energy Package (ONETEP) code for linear-scaling first principles quantum mechanical calculations on materials. This work focuses on porting to the GPU the parts of the code that involve atom-localized fast Fourier transform (FFT) operations. These are among the most computationally intensive parts of the code and are used in core algorithms such as the calculation of the charge density, the local potential integrals, the kinetic energy integrals, and the nonorthogonal generalized Wannier function gradient. We have found that direct porting of the isolated FFT operations did not provide any benefit. Instead, it was necessary to tailor the port to each of the aforementioned algorithms to optimize data transfer to and from the GPU. A detailed discussion of the methods used and tests of the resulting performance are presented, which show that individual steps in the relevant algorithms are accelerated by a significant amount. However, the transfer of data between the GPU and host machine is a significant bottleneck in the reported version of the code. In addition, an initial investigation into a dynamic precision scheme for the ONETEP energy calculation has been performed to take advantage of the enhanced single precision capabilities of GPUs. The methods used here result in no disruption to the existing code base. Furthermore, as the developments reported here concern the core algorithms, they will benefit the full range of ONETEP functionality. Our use of a directive-based programming model ensures portability to other forms of coprocessors and will allow this work to form the basis of future developments to the code designed to support emerging high-performance computing platforms. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Very prolonged stay in the intensive care unit after cardiac operations: early results and late survival.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Shuli; Bitran, Daniel; Fink, Daniel; Tauber, Rachel; Merin, Ofer

    2013-07-01

    Prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay is a surrogate for advanced morbidity or perioperative complications, and resource utilization may become an issue. It is our policy to continue full life support in the ICU, even for patients with a seemingly grim outlook. We examined the effect of duration of ICU stay on early outcomes and late survival. Between 1993 and 2011, 6,385 patients were admitted to the ICU after cardiac surgery. Patients were grouped according to length of stay in the ICU: group 1, 2 days or less (n = 4,631; 73%); group 2, 3 to 14 days (n = 1,423; 22%); group 3, more than 14 days (n = 331; 5%). Length of stay in ICU for group 3 patients was 38 ± 24 days (range, 15 to 160; median 31). Clinical profile and outcomes were compared between groups. Patients requiring prolonged ICU stay were older, underwent more complex surgery, had greater comorbidity, and a higher predicted operative mortality (p < 0.0001). They had a higher incidence of adverse events and increased mortality (p < 0.0001). Of the 331 group 3 patients, 60% were discharged: survival of these patients at 1, 3, and 5 years was 78%, 65%, and 52%, respectively. Operative mortality as well as late survival of discharged patients was proportional to duration of ICU stay. Current technology enables keeping sick patients alive for extended periods of time. Nearly two thirds of patients requiring prolonged ICU leave hospital, and of these, 50% attain 5-year survival. These data support offering full and continued support even for patients requiring very prolonged ICU stay. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Operating room fire prevention: creating an electrosurgical unit fire safety device.

    PubMed

    Culp, William C; Kimbrough, Bradly A; Luna, Sarah; Maguddayao, Aris J

    2014-08-01

    To reduce the incidence of surgical fires. Operating room fires represent a potentially life-threatening hazard and are triggered by the electrosurgical unit (ESU) pencil. Carbon dioxide is a fire suppressant and is a routinely used medical gas. We hypothesize that a shroud of protective carbon dioxide covering the tip of the ESU pencil displaces oxygen, thereby preventing fire ignition. Using 3-dimensional modeling techniques, a polymer sleeve was created and attached to an ESU pencil. This sleeve was connected to a carbon dioxide source and directed the gas through multiple precisely angled ports, generating a cone of fire-suppressive carbon dioxide surrounding the active pencil tip. This device was evaluated in a flammability test chamber containing 21%, 50%, and 100% oxygen with sustained ESU activation. The sleeve was tested with and without carbon dioxide (control) until a fuel was ignited or 30 seconds elapsed. Time to ignition was measured by high-speed videography. Fires were ignited with each control trial (15/15 trials). The control group median ± SD ignition time in 21% oxygen was 3.0 ± 2.4 seconds, in 50% oxygen was 0.1 ± 1.8 seconds, and in 100% oxygen was 0.03 ± 0.1 seconds. No fire was observed when the fire safety device was used in all concentrations of oxygen (0/15 trials; P < 0.0001). The exact 95% confidence interval for absolute risk reduction of fire ignition was 76% to 100%. A sleeve creating a cone of protective carbon dioxide gas enshrouding the sparks from an ESU pencil effectively prevents fire in a high-flammability model. Clinical application of this device may reduce the incidence of operating room fires.

  1. 5-year operation experience with the 1.8 K refrigeration units of the LHC cryogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlin, G.; Tavian, L.; Claudet, S.; Pezzetti, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2009, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is in operation at CERN. The LHC superconducting magnets distributed over eight sectors of 3.3-km long are cooled at 1.9 K in pressurized superfluid helium. The nominal operating temperature of 1.9 K is produced by eight 1.8-K refrigeration units based on centrifugal cold compressors (3 or 4 stages depending to the vendor) combined with warm volumetric screw compressors with sub-atmospheric suction. After about 5 years of continuous operation, we will present the results concerning the availability for the final user of these refrigeration units and the impact of the design choice on the recovery time after a system trip. We will also present the individual results for each rotating machinery in terms of failure origin and of Mean Time between Failure (MTBF), as well as the consolidations and upgrades applied to these refrigeration units.

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Spickler Landfill, Operable Unit 2, Spencer, WI, September 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This decision document represents the selected remedial action for Operable Unit (OU) No. 2 at the Spickler Landfill Superfund Site (the Site) in Specer, Wisconsin. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has found that no further action is appropriate due to the effectiveness of the remedial action for the first operable unit. Proper closure of the landfills and mercury brine pit, installation of a landfill gas collection and flare and leachate collection systems and continued operation have eliminated the primary human health risk posed by direct contact with contaminated soils, eliminated the threat to the environment, and mitigated the primary human health risk posed by contaminated Site groundwater and landfill gas. The remedy established by this ROD is the final Remedial Action for this Site.

  3. Operation of the counter-rotating type pump-turbine unit installed in the power stabilizing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemoto, T.; Honda, H.; Kasahara, R.; Miyaji, T.

    2014-03-01

    This serial research intends to put a unique power stabilization system with a pumped storage into practical use. The pumped storage is equipped with a counter-rotating type pump-turbine unit whose operating mode can be shifted instantaneously in response to the fluctuation of power from renewable resources. This paper verifies that the system is reasonably effective to stabilize the fluctuating power. It is necessary to quickly increase the rotational speed when the operation is shifted from the turbine to the pumping modes, because the unit cannot pump-up water from a lower reservoir at a slow rotational speed while keeping gross/geodetic head constant. The maximum hydraulic efficiency at the turbine mode is close to the efficiency of the counter-rotating type hydroelectric unit designed exclusively for the turbine mode. The system is also provided for a pilot plant to be operated in the field.

  4. A Present Value-Unit Cost Methodology for Evaluating Wastewater Reclamation and Direct Reuse at a Military Base of Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    KEY WORDS (Conllnut on rtvtrt^ tldt II ntctttmry mnd Idtntlly by block numbtr) Waslewater reciainalion Wat(;r renovation Water reuse Present...applied to a water supply problem typical for a military operation. A relevant unit cost figure, called the "present value-unit cost" (PVUC), is...determined and applied to alternative methods for meeting a projected need for water . The concepls of reclamation am! dual supply systems are

  5. Impact of Obesity on Intensive Care Unit Resource Utilization After Cardiac Operations.

    PubMed

    Rosvall, Brandon R; Forgie, Keir; MacLeod, Jeffrey B; Yip, Alexandra M; Aguiar, Christie; Lutchmedial, Sohrab; Brown, Craig; Forgie, Rand; Légaré, Jean Francois; Hassan, Ansar

    2017-07-24

    Much has been published about the effect of obesity on adverse outcomes after cardiac operations, yet little is known regarding the effect of obesity on intensive care unit (ICU) resource utilization. This study examined the effect of obesity on ICU resource utilization after cardiac operations. All patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 18.5 kg/m(2) or higher who underwent a cardiac surgical procedure between 2006 and 2013 were stratified into the following weight categories: normal (BMI 18.5 to 24.99 kg/m(2)), preobese (BMI 25 to 29.99 kg/m(2)), obese class I (BMI 30 to 34.99 kg/m(2)), obese class II (BMI 35 to 39.99 kg/m(2)), and obese class III (BMI ≥40 kg/m(2)). Comparisons between weight categories were done, and the risk-adjusted effect of weight category on prolonged ICU stay, prolonged ventilation, and ICU readmission was determined. Of the 5,365 included patients, 1,948 were obese. Patients with greater obesity experienced longer ICU time, longer ventilation time, and increased ICU readmission. After adjustment, increasing obesity remained independently associated with greater likelihood of prolonged ICU stay (obese class II: odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.55 to 3.61; obese class III: OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 2.38 to 7.05), prolonged ventilation (obese class III: OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.57 to 7.22), and ICU readmission (obese class II: OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.70 to 5.31; obese class III: OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.32 to 6.36). Increasing obesity was associated with a significant increase in ICU resource utilization after cardiac operations. Further study is needed to determine the mechanisms underlying this association and how the adverse effects of obesity may be mitigated. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ALTERNATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT AT 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    DADO MA

    2008-07-31

    This study focuses on the remediation methods and technologies applicable for use at 200-PO-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. The 200-PO-I Groundwater au requires groundwater remediation because of the existence of contaminants of potential concern (COPC). A screening was conducted on alternative technologies and methods of remediation to determine which show the most potential for remediation of groundwater contaminants. The possible technologies were screened to determine which would be suggested for further study and which were not applicable for groundwater remediation. COPCs determined by the Hanford Site groundwater monitoring were grouped into categories based on properties linking them by remediation methods applicable to each COPC group. The screening considered the following criteria. (1) Determine if the suggested method or technology can be used for the specific contaminants found in groundwater and if the technology can be applied at the 200-PO-I Groundwater au, based on physical characteristics such as geology and depth to groundwater. (2) Evaluate screened technologies based on testing and development stages, effectiveness, implementability, cost, and time. This report documents the results of an intern research project conducted by Mathew Dado for Central Plateau Remediation in the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The study was conducted under the technical supervision of Gloria Cummins and management supervision of Theresa Bergman and Becky Austin.

  7. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Methods Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). Results The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. Conclusions We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials. PMID:23433341

  8. Niche differentiation in nitrogen metabolism among methanotrophs within an operational taxonomic unit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The currently accepted thesis on nitrogenous fertilizer additions on methane oxidation activity assumes niche partitioning among methanotrophic species, with activity responses to changes in nitrogen content being dependent on the in situ methanotrophic community structure Unfortunately, widely applied tools for microbial community assessment only have a limited phylogenetic resolution mostly restricted to genus level diversity, and not to species level as often mistakenly assumed. As a consequence, intragenus or intraspecies metabolic versatility in nitrogen metabolism was never evaluated nor considered among methanotrophic bacteria as a source of differential responses of methane oxidation to nitrogen amendments. Results We demonstrated that fourteen genotypically different Methylomonas strains, thus distinct below the level at which most techniques assign operational taxonomic units (OTU), show a versatile physiology in their nitrogen metabolism. Differential responses, even among strains with identical 16S rRNA or pmoA gene sequences, were observed for production of nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate or ammonium, nitrogen fixation and tolerance to high levels of ammonium, nitrate, and hydroxylamine. Overall, reduction of nitrate to nitrite, nitrogen fixation, higher tolerance to ammonium than nitrate and tolerance and assimilation of nitrite were general features. Conclusions Differential responses among closely related methanotrophic strains to overcome inhibition and toxicity from high nitrogen loads and assimilation of various nitrogen sources yield competitive fitness advantages to individual methane-oxidizing bacteria. Our observations proved that community structure at the deepest phylogenetic resolution potentially influences in situ functioning. PMID:24708438

  9. jMOTU and Taxonerator: Turning DNA Barcode Sequences into Annotated Operational Taxonomic Units

    PubMed Central

    Blaxter, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding and other DNA sequence-based techniques for investigating and estimating biodiversity require explicit methods for associating individual sequences with taxa, as it is at the taxon level that biodiversity is assessed. For many projects, the bioinformatic analyses required pose problems for laboratories whose prime expertise is not in bioinformatics. User-friendly tools are required for both clustering sequences into molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTU) and for associating these MOTU with known organismal taxonomies. Results Here we present jMOTU, a Java program for the analysis of DNA barcode datasets that uses an explicit, determinate algorithm to define MOTU. We demonstrate its usefulness for both individual specimen-based Sanger sequencing surveys and bulk-environment metagenetic surveys using long-read next-generation sequencing data. jMOTU is driven through a graphical user interface, and can analyse tens of thousands of sequences in a short time on a desktop computer. A companion program, Taxonerator, that adds traditional taxonomic annotation to MOTU, is also presented. Clustering and taxonomic annotation data are stored in a relational database, and are thus amenable to subsequent data mining and web presentation. Conclusions jMOTU efficiently and robustly identifies the molecular taxa present in survey datasets, and Taxonerator decorates the MOTU with putative identifications. jMOTU and Taxonerator are freely available from http://www.nematodes.org/. PMID:21541350

  10. Species identification in the genus Saprolegnia (Oomycetes): defining DNA-based molecular operational taxonomic units.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Sierra, Jose Vladimir; Martín, María P; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2014-07-01

    The lack of a robust taxonomy in the genus Saprolegnia is leading to the presence of incorrectly named isolates in culture collections and of an increasing number of misassigned sequences in DNA databases. Accurate species delimitation is critical for most biological disciplines. A recently proposed approach to solve species delimitation (taxonomic diagnosis system) of difficult organisms is the definition of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). We have used 961 sequences of nrDNA ITS from culture collections (461 sequences) and GenBank (500 sequences), to perform phylogenetic and clustering optimization analyses. As result, we have identified 29 DNA-based MOTUs in agreement with phylogenetic studies. The resulting molecular clusters support the validity of 18 species of Saprolegnia and identify 11 potential new ones. We have also listed a number of incorrectly named isolates in culture collections, misassigned species names to GenBank sequences, and reference sequences for the species. We conclude that GenBank represents the main source of errors for identifying Saprolegnia species since it possesses sequences with misassigned names and also sequencing errors. The presented taxonomic diagnosis system might help setting the basis for a suitable identification of species in this economically important genus.

  11. Adherence to standard operating procedures is crucial for intensive care unit survival of elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, I; Deja, M; Tafelski, S; Tamarkin, A; Schaller, K; Halle, E; Gastmeier, P; Wernecke, K D; Bauer, T; Kastrup, M; Spies, C

    2008-01-01

    Elderly patients account for 42-52% of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and for almost 60% of all ICU days in the USA and up to 50% receive inappropriate antibiotic treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adherence to Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) reduced ICU mortality in an elderly population. The study included consecutive patients (n = 228) aged > or = 60 years with an ICU stay of > 72 h. SOPs were based on evidence-based medicine guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of infections, and on local resistance rates. According to preset indicators of quality management standards and assessment of different degrees of adherence, an implementation rate > 70% was considered adherent (high adherence group [HAG]) and < or = 70% was considered non-adherent (low adherence group [LAG]). Patients in the HAG (n = 137) had significantly reduced mortality compared with LAG patients (n = 91): 5.8% versus 19.8%, respectively. It was concluded that adherence to SOPs based on evidence-based medicine that consider local resistance rates for antibiotic treatment in elderly ICU patients is associated with a lower mortality rate.

  12. Health risks associated with ingesting venison from a uranium enrichment facility with multiple operable units

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.; Welsh, C.

    1995-12-31

    Ingestion of game, including venison, may be a significant exposure pathway in human health risk assessments at hazardous waste sites. The difficulty associated with modeling contaminant tissue concentrations in a wide-ranging herbivorous mammal is compounded when the home range of the mammal extends over multiple operable units (OUs) of varying size and media contaminant concentration. Using biotransfer factors extracted from the literature and species-specific parameter information (e.g., home range size, diet, forage and water ingestion rates) the authors estimate contaminant concentrations in venison based on soil and surface water contaminant concentrations and determine the contribution of individual OUs to modeled venison tissue concentrations. Estimated tissue concentrations are calculated through the use of site foraging factors (SFFS) that adjust exposure contributions from individual OUs to account for the size of the OU in relation to the animals home range. The authors then use the venison tissue concentrations to estimate human health risk associated with ingesting venison under both a current and future exposure scenario.

  13. Next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite: GOES-R, the United States' advanced weather sentinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Hal J.

    2009-08-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series (GOES-R) is the follow-on to the existing GOES system, completing a transition from 1980's technology to state-of-the-art. The product of a collaborative development effort between NOAA, NASA, DOC and industry, the first GOES-R satellite is planned to be launched in April 2015 with readiness to fully replace the heritage GOES constellation in 2017. This next-generation system will continue as the United States' weather sentinel for forecasting hurricanes, severe storms, and flash floods while providing information about air quality, winds, sea surface temperature, and space weather. It will provide advanced capabilities by providing five times more spectral information, temporal coverage six times faster than the current system, and 50% higher spatial resolution. The heart of the GOES-R system is the ABI instrument, a sixteen-channel imager with six visible channels and 10 infrared channels. The GLM instrument will be the first geostationary sensor to detect and monitor lightning strikes. GOES-R also includes several space environment sensors that will increase the capability to monitor and predict solar flare activity. Additionally, GOES-R will continue to provide heritage search and rescue capabilities, a data collection system, and other direct readout capabilities.

  14. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit.

    PubMed

    Rapport, Frances; Storey, Mel; Porter, Alison; Snooks, Helen; Jones, Kerina; Peconi, Julie; Sánchez, Antonio; Siebert, Stefan; Thorne, Kym; Clement, Clare; Russell, Ian

    2013-02-21

    Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials.

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Robins Air Force Base, operable unit 2, Houston County, GA, March 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The Decision Document presents the interim selected remedial action for Operable Unit 2 of the Zone 1 Robins Air Force Base (AFB) Site, Houston County, Georgia. The wetlands associated with Zone 1, OU2 provide an important habitat for a variety of wetlands plant and animal species, and protection of the wetlands should be given a relatively high priority. Operable Unit 2 (OU2) is a phase to determine the degree of impact that has occurred in the downgradient wetlands area (east and southeast of Landfill No. 4).

  16. Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Eaton

    2007-01-18

    This Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) applies to the remedial actions performed under the Final Record of Decision for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-1 0, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (DOE-ID 1999) as amended by the Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10 (DOE-ID 2003), the Record of Decision Amendment for the V-Tanks (TSF-09 and TSF-18) and Explanation of Significant Differences for the PM-2A Tanks (TSF-26) and TSF-06, Area IO, at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-1 0 (DOE-ID 2004a), and the Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10 (DOE-ID 2005). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10; and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare-now identified as the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)-signed the Record of Decision (ROD) in December 1999, the 2003 ESD in April 2003, the ROD Amendment/ESD in February 2004, and the 2005 ESD in January 2005. The EPA and DEQ support the need for this ESD.

  17. Description of a dual fail-operational redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit for integrated avionics systems research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. H.; Morrell, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit for integrated avionics. The system consists of four two-degree-of-freedom turned rotor gyros and four two-degree-of-freedom accelerometers in a skewed and separable semi-octahedral array. The unit is coupled through instrument electronics to two flight computers which compensate sensor errors. The flight computers are interfaced to the microprocessors and process failure detection, isolation, redundancy management and flight control/navigation algorithms. The unit provides dual fail-operational performance and has data processing frequencies consistent with integrated avionics concepts presently planned.

  18. Description of a dual fail-operational redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit for integrated avionics systems research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. H.; Morrell, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit for integrated avionics. The system consists of four two-degree-of-freedom turned rotor gyros and four two-degree-of-freedom accelerometers in a skewed and separable semi-octahedral array. The unit is coupled through instrument electronics to two flight computers which compensate sensor errors. The flight computers are interfaced to the microprocessors and process failure detection, isolation, redundancy management and flight control/navigation algorithms. The unit provides dual fail-operational performance and has data processing frequencies consistent with integrated avionics concepts presently planned.

  19. United States Army Special Operations Forces and Building Enduring Partner Enabler Capacity in Operation Enduring Freedom-Philippines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    medical , facility engineering, and sustainment to help others understand the importance of building a self-sustaining partner force to produce... Medical Officer, and a JSOTF-P Special Forces Operations Officer. In the end of the study, three conclusions are offered. First, despite its vast... Medical ................................................................................................................................. 23

  20. 77 FR 65581 - Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division, East Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit... Healthcare, and Pro Unlimited, East Hanover, NJ and Off-Site Workers of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation..., applicable to workers of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Primary Care Business Unit (Sales) Division...

  1. Micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine for heating and their real operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čierny, Jaroslav; Patsch, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This article was deal with micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine. We watched problematic of real working Stirling engine. The article also contain hookup of unit constructed at University of Zilina.

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Ship Operational Test and Evaluation in the United States Navy and the Royal Australian Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Author ken’neth 6dli~vn Joseph Approved By: 01- . . 66 Thomas H. Hoivik, Thesis Advisor Charles N. Calva ~mo, Second Reader David k. Whipple, Jr., Ch...Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E), of the new combatants. The United States Navy (USN) is the world leader in the development of high technology weapons...large, risky, developmental programs which push the state of the art in weapons technology . To minimise technical and operational risk, the outputs of

  3. Survey of small-enterprise chicken operations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Garber, L; Forde-Folle, K; Beam, A; Hill, G

    2009-08-01

    The National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) Small-Enterprise Chicken study was conducted to better understand bird movement and biosecurity practices of commercial poultry operations having fewer than 20,000 chickens. A stratified random sample of 2511 operations having 1000-19,999 chickens was selected from a list maintained by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), based primarily upon data from the 2002 Census of Agriculture; 1789 (72.1%) operations participated in the study. Over one-half of operations were contract operations with breeding birds, and one-fourth were contract operations without breeding birds. Only 17% of operations were independent (noncontract) operations. Independent operations were primarily table-egg producers and to a lesser extent, growers. Independent operations were more likely to have birds other than chickens, to allow outdoor access to birds, and had less stringent biosecurity requirements compared to contract operations.

  4. Special Operations Forces Language Transformation Strategy Needs Assessment Project: Unit Leadership Survey Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    policy issues (e.g., Foreign Language Proficiency Pay, FLPP ) from SOF personnel, SOF unit leaders, and other personnel involved in SOF language...leaders had low opinions of FLPP . • Unit leaders reported that FLPP was not an effective motivator for SOF personnel. • The majority of unit leaders...somewhat agreed that the procedures for assigning FLPP upheld the intent of motivating proficiency, although CLPMs disagreed. • Unit leaders who

  5. Container Lift Adapter-Helicopter (CLAH) Operational Prototype (Preproduction) Militarized Units for Flight Evaluation and Operational Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    or commercial ANSI/- ISO container without the assistance of ground crew. SYSTEM OPERATION The control box, umbilical cord, and the walk-around power...each side of the CLAH structure) 210- 10218 -1 retraction gearbox assemblies, eaci driven by a motor actuator, to rotate the guide tubes from a downward...490A1000001-001 was designed to replace the 210- 10218 -1 re- traction drive assembly and associated actuator. This fixture (Figure 25) is physically

  6. Operating Room to Intensive Care Unit Handoffs and the Risks of Patient Harm

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Lisa M.; Collins, Kelly M.; Koller, Felicitas L.; Khorzad, Rebeca; Abecassis, Michael M.; Holl, Jane L.; Ladner, Daniela P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to assess systems and processes involved in the operating room (OR) to intensive care unit (ICU) handoff in an attempt to understand the criticality of specific steps of the handoff. Methods We performed a failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) of the OR to ICU handoff of deceased donor liver transplant recipients using in-person observations and descriptions of the handoff process from a multidisciplinary group of clinicians. For each step in the process, failures were identified along with frequency of occurrence, causes, potential effects and safeguards. A risk priority number (RPN) was calculated for each failure (Frequency x Potential effect x Safeguard; range 1-least risk to 1000-most risk). Results The FMECA identified 37 individual steps in the OR to ICU handoff process. In total, 81 process failures were identified, 22 of which were determined to be critical and 36 of which relied on weak safeguards such as informal human verification. Process failures with the highest risk of harm were lack of preliminary OR to ICU communication (RPN 504), team member absence during handoff communication (RPN 480) and transport equipment malfunction (RPN 448). Conclusions Based on the analysis, recommendations were made to reduce potential for patient harm during OR to ICU handoffs. These included automated transfer of OR data to ICU clinicians, enhanced ICU team member notification processes and revision of the postoperative order sets. The FMECA revealed steps in the OR to ICU handoff that are high risk for patient harm and are currently being targeted for process improvement. PMID:26067459

  7. Prolonged stay in intensive care unit is a powerful predictor of adverse outcomes after cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Choong, Cliff K; Goldsmith, Kimberley; Gerrard, Caroline; Nashef, Samer A M; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay on in-hospital mortality and long-term survival. Prospectively collected data from 6,101 consecutive patients who underwent surgery between 2003 and 2007 were analyzed. Prolonged ICU stay was defined as a total duration of ICU stay of 3 days or more postoperatively, including readmissions; patients with an ICU stay less than 3 days were identified as controls. Univariate and multiple variable analyses were performed to identify risk factors associated with prolonged ICU stay. Of 6,101 patients, 1,139 (18.7%) patients had a prolonged ICU stay. These patients had a higher ICU mortality (10%) compared with controls (0.6%; p < 0.001). On discharge from the ICU, their hospital mortality was still 6-fold higher (1.2%) compared with controls (0.2%; p < 0.001). Finally, the patients who had prolonged ICU stays had lower survival after discharge from the ICU-89.2% and 81.2% at 1 year and 3 years, respectively, compared with 97.8% and 93.6%, respectively, for controls (p < 0.001). Multiple variable analysis revealed prolonged ICU stay to be an independent predictor of prolonged hospital stay, higher hospital mortality, and poorer long-term survival (all p < 0.001). Prolonged ICU stay is an important predictor of adverse immediate, short-term, and long-term outcomes after cardiac operations. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Distribution-based clustering: using ecology to refine the operational taxonomic unit.

    PubMed

    Preheim, Sarah P; Perrotta, Allison R; Martin-Platero, Antonio M; Gupta, Anika; Alm, Eric J

    2013-11-01

    16S rRNA sequencing, commonly used to survey microbial communities, begins by grouping individual reads into operational taxonomic units (OTUs). There are two major challenges in calling OTUs: identifying bacterial population boundaries and differentiating true diversity from sequencing errors. Current approaches to identifying taxonomic groups or eliminating sequencing errors rely on sequence data alone, but both of these activities could be informed by the distribution of sequences across samples. Here, we show that using the distribution of sequences across samples can help identify population boundaries even in noisy sequence data. The logic underlying our approach is that bacteria in different populations will often be highly correlated in their abundance across different samples. Conversely, 16S rRNA sequences derived from the same population, whether slightly different copies in the same organism, variation of the 16S rRNA gene within a population, or sequences generated randomly in error, will have the same underlying distribution across sampled environments. We present a simple OTU-calling algorithm (distribution-based clustering) that uses both genetic distance and the distribution of sequences across samples and demonstrate that it is more accurate than other methods at grouping reads into OTUs in a mock community. Distribution-based clustering also performs well on environmental samples: it is sensitive enough to differentiate between OTUs that differ by a single base pair yet predicts fewer overall OTUs than most other methods. The program can decrease the total number of OTUs with redundant information and improve the power of many downstream analyses to describe biologically relevant trends.

  9. Phase 1 and 2 feasibility study report for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit (OU) feasibility study (FS) presented in this document completes the FS process only through the first two study phases: Phase I, Remedial Alternatives Development, and Phase II, Remedial Alternatives Screening in accordance with CERCIA guidance for performing Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) (EPA 1988a). This Phase I/II study provides a generalized view of workable remedial technologies as applied to the site contamination problems as a whole. Phase III, Detailed Analysis of Alternatives, will be performed at a later date to further evaluate screened alternatives based on the nine criteria in the CERCLA RI/FS guidance. The purpose of this Phase I/II FS is to develop and screen a range of alternatives for remediation of contamination present in the vadose zone of the 300-FF-1 OU. The scope of work for this Phase I/II FS includes five primary tasks: 1. Review existing documents and their associated data from relevant investigations and studies; 2. Establish remedial action objectives (RAO) and general response actions (GRA); 3. Identify applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARS) pertinent to all general response actions (including waste disposal); 4. Develop remedial alternatives (Phase I) applicable to the 300-FF-1 OU including identification and screening of technologies and process options, and assembly of remedial alternatives from representative technology types; 5. Screen alternatives (Phase II) developed in Phase I for implementability, effectiveness, and cost to identify those alternatives which warrant advancement to the detailed analysis phase (Phase III) of the FS.

  10. 300-FF-1 Operable Unit physical separation of soils pilot plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-01-15

    Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) was selected in a competitive selection process to conduct a pilot study for the physical separation of soils in the North Process Pond of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. In January 1994, ART mobilized its 15 tons-per-hour pilot plant to the site. The plant was initially staged in a commercial area to allow for pretest inspections and minor modifications. The plant was specifically designed for use as a physical separations unit and consisted of a feed hopper, wet screens, hydrocyclones, as well as settling and dewatering equipment. The plant was supported in the field with prescreening equipment, mobile generators, air compressors, and water storage tanks. The plant was moved into the surface contamination area on March 24, 1994. The testing was conducted during the period March 23, 1994 through April 13, 1994. Two soil types were treated during the testing: a natural soil contaminated with low levels of uranium, cesium, cobalt, and heavy metals, and a natural soil contaminated with a uranium carbonate material that was visually recognizable by the presence of a green sludge material in the soil matrix. The ``green`` material contained significantly higher levels of the same contaminants. Both source materials were treated by the plant in a manner that fed the material, produced clean gravel and sand fractions, and concentrated the contaminants in a sludge cake. Process water was recycled during the operations. The testing was extremely successful in that for both source waste streams, it was demonstrated that volume reductions of greater than 90% could be achieved while also meeting the test performance criteria. The volume reduction for the natural soils averaged a 93.8%, while the ``green`` soils showed a 91.4% volume reduction.

  11. Operating characteristics of residential care communities, by community bed size: United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Christine; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren; Rome, Vincent; Sengupta, Manisha

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, the majority of residential care communities had 4–25 beds, yet 71% of residents lived in communities with more than 50 beds. A lower percentage of communities with 4–25 beds were chain-affiliated, nonprofit, and in operation 10 years or more, compared with communities with 26–50 and more than 50 beds. Dementia-exclusive care or dementia care units were more common as community size increased. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for cognitive impairment and offered dementia-specific programming compared with communities with 4–25 and 26–50 beds. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for depression compared with communities with 4–25 beds. Compared with communities with 4–25 beds, a higher percentage of communities with 26–50 beds and more than 50 beds provided therapeutic, hospice, mental health, and dental services; but a lower percentage of communities with more than 50 beds provided skilled nursing services than did smaller communities. This report presents national estimates of residential care communities, using data from the first wave of NSLTCP. This brief profile of residential care communities provides useful information to policymakers, providers, researchers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. The findings also highlight the diversity of residential care communities across different sizes. Corresponding state estimates and their standard errors for the national figures in this data brief can be found on the NSLTCP website at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/ nsltcp_products.htm. These national and state estimates establish a baseline for monitoring trends among residents living in residential care.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Operable Unit 4, Silverdale, WA, July 19, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected action for Operable Unit 4 (OU 4) at the Naval Submarine Base (SUBASE), Bangor in Silverdale, Washington. No remedial action is necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment. No further monitoring or investigative studies will be conducted. A 5-year review is not required.

  13. 40 CFR Table 30 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  14. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  15. 75 FR 67784 - STP Nuclear Operating Company South Texas Project Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Water Act Section 402(p) Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (TPDES) general permit for... surface water quality. BMPs would be ] described in a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) that... COMMISSION STP Nuclear Operating Company South Texas Project Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and...

  16. 78 FR 14361 - U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Employment and Training Administration U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation, Mckeesport, PA; Notice of Initiation of...) filed on December 20, 2012 on behalf of workers of U.S. Steel Tubular Products, McKeesport...

  17. 75 FR 69137 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company Inc. Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Unit No. 2 Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    .... There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect radiation exposures to plant workers and... permit are needed. No effects on the aquatic or terrestrial habitat in the vicinity of the plant, or to... COMMISSION Southern Nuclear Operating Company Inc. Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Unit No. 2 Environmental...

  18. 77 FR 22361 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., (Indian Point Nuclear Generating Units 2 and 3); Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., (Indian Point Nuclear Generating Units 2 and 3); Notice of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Reconstitution Pursuant to 10 CFR 2.313(c) and 2.321(b), the Atomic...

  19. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Batch Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Process Vents From Batch Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 5 Table 5 to Subpart PPP of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS...

  20. Prevalence of Giardia duodenalis assemblages in weaned cattle on cow-calf operations in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine the prevalence of Giardia duodenalis in weaned beef calves in cow-calf operations in the United States, fecal specimens were collected from 819 calves (6 to18 months of age) in 20 states from 49 locations. After cleaning and concentration procedures to maximize the potential recovery of...